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Sample records for source revealed nanometer

  1. Short-Period RF Undulator for a SASE Nanometer source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis is described towards development of a RF undulator with a period < 1 cm, an undulator parameter K of the order of unity, and a gap greater than 2.25 mm. The application for the undulator is for a SASE source to produce 1 nm wavelength radiation using a low energy electron beam in the range 1-2 GeV. Particle orbit calculations in a conventional standing-wave resonator configuration show that the presence of a co-propagating component of RF field can cause deleterious motion for the undulating electrons that can seriously degrade their radiation spectrum. To obviate this problem, resonator designs were devised in which only the counter-propagating field components interact with the particles. Two resonator configurations with the same undulator parameter K = 0.4 have been devised and are described in this report.

  2. Mechanism of the superior mechanical strength of nanometer-sized metal single crystals revealed

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, N. D.; Salem, H. G.; Yavari, A.; El Sayed, Tamer S.

    2013-01-01

    Clear understanding of the superior mechanical strength of nanometer-sized metal single crystals is required to derive advanced mechanical components retaining such superiority. Although high quality studies have been reported on nano

  3. Nanopore Measurements of Filamentous Viruses Reveal a Sub-nanometer-Scale Stagnant Fluid Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Angus J; Tang, Jay X; Stein, Derek

    2017-11-28

    We report measurements and analyses of nanopore translocations by fd and M13, two related strains of filamentous virus that are identical except for their charge densities. The standard continuum theory of electrokinetics greatly overestimates the translocation speed and the conductance associated with counterions for both viruses. Furthermore, fd and M13 behave differently from one another, even translocating in opposite directions under certain conditions. This cannot be explained by Manning-condensed counterions or a number of other proposed models. Instead, we argue that these anomalous findings are consequences of the breakdown of the validity of continuum hydrodynamics at the scale of a few molecular layers. Next to a polyelectrolyte, there exists an extra-viscous, sub-nanometer-thin boundary layer that has a giant influence on the transport characteristics. We show that a stagnant boundary layer captures the essential hydrodynamics and extends the validity of the electrokinetic theory beyond the continuum limit. A stagnant layer with a thickness of about half a nanometer consistently improves predictions of the ionic current change induced by virus translocations and of the translocation velocity for both fd and M13 over a wide range of nanopore dimensions and salt concentrations.

  4. Mechanism of the superior mechanical strength of nanometer-sized metal single crystals revealed

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, N. D.

    2013-10-01

    Clear understanding of the superior mechanical strength of nanometer-sized metal single crystals is required to derive advanced mechanical components retaining such superiority. Although high quality studies have been reported on nano-crystalline metals, the superiority of small single crystals has neither been fundamentally explained nor quantified to this date. Here we present a molecular dynamics study of aluminum single crystals in the size range from 4.1 nm to 40.5 nm. We show that the ultimate mechanical strength deteriorates exponentially as the single crystal size increases. The small crystals superiority is explained by their ability to continuously form vacancies and to recover them. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Theoretical study and simulation for a nanometer laser based on Gauss–Hermite source expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been worldwide interest in constructing a new generation of continuously tunable nanometer lasers for a wide range of scientific applications, including femtosecond science, biological molecules, nanoscience research fields, etc. The high brightness electron beam required by a short wavelength self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL can be reached only with accurate control of the beam dynamics in the facility. Numerical simulation codes are basic tools for designing new nanometer laser devices. We have developed a MATLAB quasi-one-dimensional code based on a reduced model for the FEL. The model uses an envelope description of the transverse dynamics of the laser beam and full longitudinal particle motion. We have optimized the LCLS facility parameters, then given the characteristics of the nanometer laser. (letter)

  6. Theoretical study and simulation for a nanometer laser based on Gauss-Hermite source expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaowei

    2013-07-01

    Recently there has been worldwide interest in constructing a new generation of continuously tunable nanometer lasers for a wide range of scientific applications, including femtosecond science, biological molecules, nanoscience research fields, etc. The high brightness electron beam required by a short wavelength self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL can be reached only with accurate control of the beam dynamics in the facility. Numerical simulation codes are basic tools for designing new nanometer laser devices. We have developed a MATLAB quasi-one-dimensional code based on a reduced model for the FEL. The model uses an envelope description of the transverse dynamics of the laser beam and full longitudinal particle motion. We have optimized the LCLS facility parameters, then given the characteristics of the nanometer laser.

  7. Revealing source signatures in ambient BTEX concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalel, Amir; Yuval; Broday, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Management of ambient concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) is essential for maintaining low ozone levels in urban areas where its formation is under a VOC-limited regime. The significant decrease in traffic-induced VOC emissions in many developed countries resulted in relatively comparable shares of traffic and non-traffic VOC emissions in urban airsheds. A key step for urban air quality management is allocating ambient VOC concentrations to their pertinent sources. This study presents an approach that can aid in identifying sources that contribute to observed BTEX concentrations in areas characterized by low BTEX concentrations, where traditional source apportionment techniques are not useful. Analysis of seasonal and diurnal variations of ambient BTEX concentrations from two monitoring stations located in distinct areas reveal the possibility to identify source categories. Specifically, the varying oxidation rates of airborne BTEX compounds are used to allocate contributions of traffic emissions and evaporative sources to observed BTEX concentrations. - BTEX sources are identified from temporal variations of ambient concentration

  8. KINOFORM LENSES - TOWARD NANOMETER RESOLUTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STEIN, A.; EVANS-LUTTERODT, K.; TAYLOR, A.

    2004-10-23

    While hard x-rays have wavelengths in the nanometer and sub-nanometer range, the ability to focus them is limited by the quality of sources and optics, and not by the wavelength. A few options, including reflective (mirrors), diffractive (zone plates) and refractive (CRL's) are available, each with their own limitations. Here we present our work with kinoform lenses which are refractive lenses with all material causing redundant 2{pi} phase shifts removed to reduce the absorption problems inherently limiting the resolution of refractive lenses. By stacking kinoform lenses together, the effective numerical aperture, and thus the focusing resolution, can be increased. The present status of kinoform lens fabrication and testing at Brookhaven is presented as well as future plans toward achieving nanometer resolution.

  9. Nanometals - Status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faester, S.; Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Juul Jensen, D.; Ralph, B.

    2012-01-01

    Nanometals and nanotechnology have over the years been covered in papers, books and conferences - also in many Risoe International Symposia, where the 30th in 2009 dealt solely with nanostructured metals. Since then, rapid progress has been made in synthesis, characterization and modeling, and it is timely to discuss status and perspective also with a view on applications in an international forum such as the Risoe Symposium. Both keynote and contributed papers address important current problems illustrating global research and development in this field. Examples are the development of new synthesis techniques followed by characterization and modeling of microstructures both in 2D and 3D now starting to bridge the micrometer scales. The vital area of mechanical behavior is addressed by the development of new testing techniques and a broad effort to characterize and model mechanical properties of metals strengthened by dislocations and twins. This research has now led to new understanding of both strengthening mechanisms and strengh structure relationships based on experiments in combination with analytical and numerical modeling. The holistic approach to research on nanometals demonstrated by these proceedings can guide both scientists and technologists in their future work also with the aim of introducing into society this new group of advanced materials. Such an effort is important, as science and technology today is significantly affected by politics of governments and international institutions, and therefore a new initiative in the pressent is to include a discussion of research and development in the area of nanometals i USA, China and Japan. (Author)

  10. Nanometals - Status and perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faester, S.; Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Juul Jensen, D.; Ralph, B. (eds.)

    2012-11-01

    Nanometals and nanotechnology have over the years been covered in papers, books and conferences - also in many Risoe International Symposia, where the 30th in 2009 dealt solely with nanostructured metals. Since then, rapid progress has been made in synthesis, characterization and modeling, and it is timely to discuss status and perspective also with a view on applications in an international forum such as the Risoe Symposium. Both keynote and contributed papers address important current problems illustrating global research and development in this field. Examples are the development of new synthesis techniques followed by characterization and modeling of microstructures both in 2D and 3D now starting to bridge the micrometer scales. The vital area of mechanical behavior is addressed by the development of new testing techniques and a broad effort to characterize and model mechanical properties of metals strengthened by dislocations and twins. This research has now led to new understanding of both strengthening mechanisms and strengh structure relationships based on experiments in combination with analytical and numerical modeling. The holistic approach to research on nanometals demonstrated by these proceedings can guide both scientists and technologists in their future work also with the aim of introducing into society this new group of advanced materials. Such an effort is important, as science and technology today is significantly affected by politics of governments and international institutions, and therefore a new initiative in the pressent is to include a discussion of research and development in the area of nanometals i USA, China and Japan. (Author)

  11. Nanometer Characterization/Manipulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Characterizes the nanometer scale of biological, chemical, physical, electronic, and mechanical properties of surfaces and thin films using scanning probe...

  12. Nanometer sized structures grown by pulsed laser deposition

    KAUST Repository

    ElZein, Basma

    2015-10-01

    Nanometer sized materials can be produced by exposing a target to a laser source to remove material from the target and deposit the removed material onto a surface of a substrate to grow a thin film in a vacuum chamber

  13. Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography Using a High-Repetition-Rate Laser-Induced X-Ray Source for Sub-100 Nanometer Lithography Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Louis,; F. Bijkerk,; Shmaenok, L.; Voorma, H. J.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Schlatmann, R.; Verhoeven, J.; van der Drift, E. W. J. M.; Romijn, J.; Rousseeuw, B. A. C.; Voss, F.; Desor, R.; Nikolaus, B.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present the status of a joint development programme on soft x-ray projection lithography (SXPL) integrating work on high brightness laser plasma sources. fabrication of multilayer x-ray mirrors. and patterning of reflection masks. We are in the process of optimization of a

  14. Optical properties of (nanometer MCM-41)-(malachite green) composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaodong; Zhai Qingzhou; Zou Mingqiang

    2010-01-01

    Nanosized materials loaded with organic dyes are of interest with respect to novel optical applications. The optical properties of malachite green (MG) in MCM-41 are considerably influenced by the limited nanoporous channels of nanometer MCM-41. Nanometer MCM-41 was synthesized by tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as the source of silica and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) as the template. The liquid-phase grafting method has been employed for incorporation of the malachite green molecules into the channels of nanometer MCM-41. A comparative study has been carried out on the adsorption of the malachite green into modified MCM-41 and unmodified MCM-41. The modified MCM-41 was synthesized using a silylation reagent, trimethychlorosilane (TMSCl), which functionalized the surface of nanometer MCM-41 for proper host-guest interaction. The prepared (nanometer MCM-41)-MG samples have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption-desorption technique at 77 K, Raman spectra and luminescence studies. In the prepared (nanometer MCM-41)-MG composite materials, the frameworks of the host molecular sieve were kept intact and the MG located inside the pores of MCM-41. Compared with the MG, it is found that the prepared composite materials perform a considerable luminescence. The excitation and emission spectra of MG in both modified MCM-41 and unmodified MCM-41 were examined to explore the structural effects on the optical properties of MG. The results of luminescence spectra indicated that the MG molecules existed in monomer form within MCM-41. However, the luminescent intensity of MG incorporated in the modified MCM-41 are higher than that of MG encapsulated in unmodified MCM-41, which may be due to the anchored methyl groups on the channels of the nanometer MCM-41 and the strong host-guest interactions. The steric effect from the pore size of the host materials is significant. Raman

  15. Competing sound sources reveal spatial effects in cortical processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross K Maddox

    Full Text Available Why is spatial tuning in auditory cortex weak, even though location is important to object recognition in natural settings? This question continues to vex neuroscientists focused on linking physiological results to auditory perception. Here we show that the spatial locations of simultaneous, competing sound sources dramatically influence how well neural spike trains recorded from the zebra finch field L (an analog of mammalian primary auditory cortex encode source identity. We find that the location of a birdsong played in quiet has little effect on the fidelity of the neural encoding of the song. However, when the song is presented along with a masker, spatial effects are pronounced. For each spatial configuration, a subset of neurons encodes song identity more robustly than others. As a result, competing sources from different locations dominate responses of different neural subpopulations, helping to separate neural responses into independent representations. These results help elucidate how cortical processing exploits spatial information to provide a substrate for selective spatial auditory attention.

  16. Biosensor reveals multiple sources for mitochondrial NAD⁺.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambronne, Xiaolu A; Stewart, Melissa L; Kim, DongHo; Jones-Brunette, Amber M; Morgan, Rory K; Farrens, David L; Cohen, Michael S; Goodman, Richard H

    2016-06-17

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is an essential substrate for sirtuins and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), which are NAD(+)-consuming enzymes localized in the nucleus, cytosol, and mitochondria. Fluctuations in NAD(+) concentrations within these subcellular compartments are thought to regulate the activity of NAD(+)-consuming enzymes; however, the challenge in measuring compartmentalized NAD(+) in cells has precluded direct evidence for this type of regulation. We describe the development of a genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor for directly monitoring free NAD(+) concentrations in subcellular compartments. We found that the concentrations of free NAD(+) in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and mitochondria approximate the Michaelis constants for sirtuins and PARPs in their respective compartments. Systematic depletion of enzymes that catalyze the final step of NAD(+) biosynthesis revealed cell-specific mechanisms for maintaining mitochondrial NAD(+) concentrations. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Analog filters in nanometer CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Uhrmann, Heimo; Zimmermann, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the basics of analog filters and the poor transistor characteristics in nanometer CMOS 10 high-performance analog filters developed by the authors in 120 nm and 65 nm CMOS are described extensively. Among them are gm-C filters, current-mode filters, and active filters for system-on-chip realization for Bluetooth, WCDMA, UWB, DVB-H, and LTE applications. For the active filters several operational amplifier designs are described. The book, furthermore, contains a review of the newest state of research on low-voltage low-power analog filters. To cover the topic of the book comprehensively, linearization issues and measurement methods for the characterization of advanced analog filters are introduced in addition. Numerous elaborate illustrations promote an easy comprehension. This book will be of value to engineers and researchers in industry as well as scientists and Ph.D students at universities. The book is also recommendable to graduate students specializing on nanoelectronics, microelectronics ...

  18. Functional nanometer-scale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tsz On Mario

    Nanometer-scale structures have properties that are fundamentally different from their bulk counterparts. Much research effort has been devoted in the past decades to explore new fabrication techniques, model the physical properties of these structures, and construct functional devices. The ability to manipulate and control the structure of matter at the nanoscale has made many new classes of materials available for the study of fundamental physical processes and potential applications. The interplay between fabrication techniques and physical understanding of the nanostructures and processes has revolutionized the physical and material sciences, providing far superior properties in materials for novel applications that benefit society. This thesis consists of two major aspects of my graduate research in nano-scale materials. In the first part (Chapters 3--6), a comprehensive study on the nanostructures based on electrospinning and thermal treatment is presented. Electrospinning is a well-established method for producing high-aspect-ratio fibrous structures, with fiber diameter ranging from 1 nm--1 microm. A polymeric solution is typically used as a precursor in electrospinning. In our study, the functionality of the nanostructure relies on both the nanostructure and material constituents. Metallic ions containing precursors were added to the polymeric precursor following a sol-gel process to prepare the solution suitable for electrospinning. A typical electrospinning process produces as-spun fibers containing both polymer and metallic salt precursors. Subsequent thermal treatments of the as-spun fibers were carried out in various conditions to produce desired structures. In most cases, polymer in the solution and the as-spun fibers acted as a backbone for the structure formation during the subsequent heat treatment, and were thermally removed in the final stage. Polymers were also designed to react with the metallic ion precursors during heat treatment in some

  19. [Spinal instrumentation, source of progress, but also revealing pitfalls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubousset, Jean

    2003-01-01

    The second half of the XXo century and especially the last 30 years have been the source of a great improvement for surgical treatment of spinal pathology essentially in 3 directions:--First, for the patient himself and his comfort by suppression for most of the cases of any post operative external support thanks to the rigidity, security and strength of segmental fixation given by the hooks, screws and rods systems, as well for posterior as anterior instrumentation. In addition, these new techniques allow the patient to return quickly to standing and walking activity and subsequently the surgery for adult people increased dramatically especially for all kind of degenerative diseases and more and more extended spinal deformities.--The second major improvement came from the real and new understanding of the 3 dimensions for all the physiology and pathology of the spine leading to practical applications for the design and surgical strategies for correction. The exploding expansion of the era of computer technology brought a lot of help in such understanding as well as for the development of spinal instrumentation.--Finally the impressive development of medical imaging with CT scan and less and less invasive techniques like MRI allow a much better vision of spinal cord and roots (a major concern for the spinal surgeon). All this occurs also because simultaneous revolution occurred in the field of anesthesia and intensive care especially post operatively, but also because the big progress for monitoring of vital function as well as neurological monitoring during surgery. The consequence of that was an improvement for the results concerning the patient for functional quality of life as well as for cosmesis. The subsequent failures resulting of these improvements came from various fields even if we exclude infection or neurological complications more and more controlled now.--At the level of the indications because of these lack of post operative external immobilization

  20. Imaging and Patterning on Nanometer Scale Using Coherent EUV Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachulak, P.W.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Marconi, M.C.; Menoni, C.S.; Rocca, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) covers wavelength range from about 5 nm to 50 nm. That is why EUV is especially applicable for imaging and patterning on nanometer scale length. In the paper periodic nanopatterning realized by interference lithography and high resolution holographic nanoimaging performed in a Gabor in-line scheme are presented. In the experiments a compact table top EUV laser was used. Preliminary studies on using a laser plasma EUV source for nanoimaging are presented as well. (author)

  1. Optoelectronic circuits in nanometer CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Atef, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the newest implementations of integrated photodiodes fabricated in nanometer standard CMOS technologies. It also includes the required fundamentals, the state-of-the-art, and the design of high-performance laser drivers, transimpedance amplifiers, equalizers, and limiting amplifiers fabricated in nanometer CMOS technologies. This book shows the newest results for the performance of integrated optical receivers, laser drivers, modulator drivers and optical sensors in nanometer standard CMOS technologies. Nanometer CMOS technologies rapidly advanced, enabling the implementation of integrated optical receivers for high data rates of several Giga-bits per second and of high-pixel count optical imagers and sensors. In particular, low cost silicon CMOS optoelectronic integrated circuits became very attractive because they can be extensively applied to short-distance optical communications, such as local area network, chip-to-chip and board-to-board interconnects as well as to imaging and medical...

  2. Sound Photographs to reveal vehicle pass-by sources with a calibrated source-strength level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mast, A.; Dool, T.C. van den; Toorn, J.D. van der; Watts, G.

    2003-01-01

    In national and European discussions, it appears that the conventional sound measurement techniques are insufficient to answer some relevant questions with respect to source strength of road vehicles. An example of such a question is: What is the importance of tyre-road noise on the one hand and

  3. Nanometer scale thermometry in a living cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucsko, G.; Maurer, P. C.; Yao, N. Y.; Kubo, M.; Noh, H. J.; Lo, P. K.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive probing of temperature variations on nanometer scales represents an outstanding challenge in many areas of modern science and technology1. In particular, a thermometer capable of sub-degree temperature resolution over a large range of temperatures as well as integration within a living system could provide a powerful new tool for many areas of biological, physical and chemical research; possibilities range from the temperature-induced control of gene expression2–5 and tumor metabolism6 to the cell-selective treatment of disease7,8 and the study of heat dissipation in integrated circuits1. By combining local light-induced heat sources with sensitive nanoscale thermometry, it may also be possible to engineer biological processes at the sub-cellular level2–5. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to nanoscale thermometry that utilizes coherent manipulation of the electronic spin associated with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond. We show the ability to detect temperature variations down to 1.8 mK (sensitivity of 9mK/Hz) in an ultra-pure bulk diamond sample. Using NV centers in diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs), we directly measure the local thermal environment at length scales down to 200 nm. Finally, by introducing both nanodiamonds and gold nanoparticles into a single human embryonic fibroblast, we demonstrate temperature-gradient control and mapping at the sub-cellular level, enabling unique potential applications in life sciences. PMID:23903748

  4. Stochastic modelling in design of mechanical properties of nanometals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tengen, T.B.; Wejrzanowski, T.; Iwankiewicz, R.; Kurzydlowski, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline nanometals are being fabricated through different processing routes and conditions. The consequence is that nanometals having the same mean grain size may have different grain size dispersion and, hence, may have different material properties. This has often led to conflicting reports from both theoretical and experimental findings about the evolutions of the mechanical properties of nanomaterials. The present paper employs stochastic model to study the impact of microstructure evolution during grain growth on the mechanical properties of polycrystalline nanometals. The stochastic model for grain growth and the stochastic model for changes in mechanical properties of nanomaterials are proposed. The model for the mechanical properties developed is tested on aluminium samples.Many salient features of the mechanical properties of the aluminium samples are revealed. The results show that the different mechanisms of grain growth impart different nature of response to the material mechanical properties. The conventional, homologous and anomalous temperature dependences of the yield stress have also been revealed to be due to different nature of interactions of the microstructures during evolution.

  5. Analysis of nano-meter structure in Ti implanted polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Gu; Wu Yuguang; Zhang Tonghe; Zhao Xinrong

    2001-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is modified with Ti ion implantation to a dose of 1x10 17 to 2 x 10 17 cm -2 by using a metal vapor vacuum arc(MEVVA)source. Nano-meter structures in the implanted sample are observed by means of transmission electron microscope (TEM). The influence of ion dose on the structure is indicated. The results show that dense nano-meter phases are dispersed uniformly in the implanted layer. TEM cross section indicates that there is a three-layer structure in the implanted PET. It is found that a metallurgical surface is formed. Therefore the hardness, wear resistance and conductive properties of PET are improved after metal ion implantation. The mechanism of electrical conduction will be discussed

  6. Nanometer scale materials - characterization and fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murday, J.S.; Colton, R.J.; Rath, B.B.

    1993-01-01

    Materials and solid state scientists have made excellent progress in understanding material behavior in length scales from microns to meters. Below a micron, the lack of analytical prowess has been a deterrent. At the atomic scale, chemistry and atomic/molecular physics have also contributed significant understanding of matter. The maturity of these three communities, materials, solid state physics, atomic/molecular physics/chemistry, coupled with the development of analytical capability for nanometer-sized structures, promises to broaden our grasp of materials behavior into the last realm of unexplored size scales-nanometer. The motivation for this effort is driven both by the expectation of novel properties as well as by the potential solution to long standing technological issues. Critical scale lengths for many material properties fall in the nanometer range, examples include superconductor coherence lengths, electron inelastic mean free paths, electron wavelengths in solids, critical lengths for dislocation generation. Structures of nanometer size will undoubtedly show behavior unexpected from experience at the larger and smaller scales. Many technological problems such as adhesion, friction, corrosion, elasticity and fracture are believed to depend critically on nanometer scale phenomena. The millennia-old efforts to improve materials behavior have undoubtedly been slowed by our inability to 'observe' in this size range. (orig.)

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Some Nanometal Oxides Using Microwave Technique and Their Application to Cotton Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gouda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is the synthesis of some nanometal oxides via microwave irradiation technique and their application to augment multifunctional properties of cotton fabric. Cotton fabrics containing nanometal oxides were prepared via a thiol-modification of cotton fabric samples and then dipped into the metal salt solutions precursors and transferred to the microwave oven. The surface morphology and quantitative analysis of the obtained modified cotton fabrics containing nanometal oxides were studied by scanning electron microscopy coupled with high energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX. The shape and distribution of nanometal oxide inside the fabric samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy of cross-section fabric samples. The iron oxide nanoparticles had a nanosphere with particle size diameter 15–20 nm, copper oxide nanoparticles had a nanosphere with particle size diameter 25–30 nm, and cobalt oxide nanoparticles had a nanotube-like shape with a length of 100–150 nanometer and a diameter of ~58 nanometer, whereas the manganese oxide nanoparticles had a linear structure forming nanorods with a diameter of 50–55 nanometer and a length of 70–80 nanometers. Antibacterial activity was evaluated quantitatively against gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, UV-protection activity was analyzed using UV-DRS spectroscopy, and flame retardation of prepared fabric samples was evaluated according to the limiting oxygen index (LOI. Results revealed that the prepared fabric sample containing nanometal oxide possesses improved antibacterial, LOI, and UV-absorbing efficiency. Moreover, the metal oxide nanoparticles did not leach out the fabrics by washing even after 30 laundering washing cycles.

  8. Revealing the atomic structure and strontium distribution in nanometer-thick La0.8Sr0.2CoO3−δ grown on (001)-oriented SrTiO3

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Zhenxing; Yacoby, Yizhak; Hong, Wesley T.; Zhou, Hua; Biegalski, Michael D.; Christen, Hans M.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Surface segregation in metal oxides can greatly influence the oxygen transport and surface oxygen exchange kinetics critical to the performance of solid-state devices such as oxygen permeation membranes and solid oxide fuel/electrolytic cell electrodes. Unfortunately detecting elemental distributions at the atomic scale near the surface remains challenging, which hampers the understanding of underpinning mechanisms and control of surface segregation for the design of high-performance materials. Using the coherent Bragg rod analysis (COBRA) method, we report the first direct 3D atomic imaging of a 4 nm-thick "La0.8Sr0.2CoO 3-δ"/SrTiO3 epitaxial film. Of significance, energy differential COBRA revealed pronounced Sr segregation (La 1-xSrxCoO3-δ, x ∼ 0.4) in the four unit cells from the top surface while complete Sr depletion was detected in the five unit cells from the "La0.8Sr0.2CoO 3-δ"/SrTiO3 interface. The drastic strontium compositional changes in the film were associated with large changes in the atomic positions of apical oxygen sites in the perovskite structure. Such Sr segregation tendencies toward the surface were also found in nominal "La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-δ" thin films, which can greatly enhance the surface oxygen exchange properties of oxides. The results presented here show that COBRA and the differential COBRA methods can be used to investigate a variety of electrochemically active systems providing atomic scale structural and chemical information that can help understand the physical and chemical properties of these systems and serve as a basis for comparison with DFT calculations. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. [Electronic and structural properties of individual nanometer-size supported metallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifenberger, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under contract DOE-FCO2-84ER45162. During the past ten years, our study of electron emission from laser-illuminated field emission tips has taken on a broader scope by addressing problems of direct interest to those concerned with the unique physical and chemical properties of nanometer-size clusters. The work performed has demonstrated that much needed data can be obtained on individual nanometer-size clusters supported on a wide-variety of different substrates. The work was performed in collaboration with R.P. Andres in the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. The Multiple Expansion Cluster Source developed by Andres and his students was essential for producing the nanometer-size clusters studied. The following report features a discussion of these results. This report provides a motivation for studying the properties of nanometer-size clusters and summarizes the results obtained

  10. [Electronic and structural properties of individual nanometer-size supported metallic clusters]. Final performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifenberger, R.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under contract DOE-FCO2-84ER45162. During the past ten years, our study of electron emission from laser-illuminated field emission tips has taken on a broader scope by addressing problems of direct interest to those concerned with the unique physical and chemical properties of nanometer-size clusters. The work performed has demonstrated that much needed data can be obtained on individual nanometer-size clusters supported on a wide-variety of different substrates. The work was performed in collaboration with R.P. Andres in the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. The Multiple Expansion Cluster Source developed by Andres and his students was essential for producing the nanometer-size clusters studied. The following report features a discussion of these results. This report provides a motivation for studying the properties of nanometer-size clusters and summarizes the results obtained.

  11. Glass ceramic ZERODUR enabling nanometer precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Nieder, Johannes; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The IC Lithography roadmap foresees manufacturing of devices with critical dimension of digit nanometer asking for nanometer positioning accuracy requiring sub nanometer position measurement accuracy. The glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in critical components of microlithography wafer stepper and offered with an extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), the tightest tolerance available on market. SCHOTT is continuously improving manufacturing processes and it's method to measure and characterize the CTE behavior of ZERODUR® to full fill the ever tighter CTE specification for wafer stepper components. In this paper we present the ZERODUR® Lithography Roadmap on the CTE metrology and tolerance. Additionally, simulation calculations based on a physical model are presented predicting the long term CTE behavior of ZERODUR® components to optimize dimensional stability of precision positioning devices. CTE data of several low thermal expansion materials are compared regarding their temperature dependence between - 50°C and + 100°C. ZERODUR® TAILORED 22°C is full filling the tight CTE tolerance of +/- 10 ppb / K within the broadest temperature interval compared to all other materials of this investigation. The data presented in this paper explicitly demonstrates the capability of ZERODUR® to enable the nanometer precision required for future generation of lithography equipment and processes.

  12. RF Circuit Design in Nanometer CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Bram

    2007-01-01

    With CMOS technology entering the nanometer regime, the design of analog and RF circuits is complicated by low supply voltages, very non-linear (and nonquadratic) devices and large 1/f noise. At the same time, circuits are required to operate over increasingly wide bandwidths to implement modern

  13. Nonendothelial source of nitric oxide in arterioles but not in venules: alternative source revealed in vivo by diaminofluorescein microfluorography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Kajimura, Mayumi; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Suematsu, Makoto

    2002-12-13

    This study aimed to examine topographic distribution of microvascular NO generation in vivo. To this end, nitrosonium ion (NO+)-sensitive diaminofluorescein diacetate was superfused continuously on the rat mesentery and the fluorescence was visualized in the microvessels through laser confocal microfluorography. Two major sites exhibited a time-dependent elevation of the fluorescence: microvascular endothelia and mast cells. As judged by the fluorescence sensitivity to local application of different inhibitors of NO synthase (NOS), NO availability in arteriolar endothelium and mast cells appeared to be maintained mainly by NOS1, whereas that in venular endothelium greatly depends on NOS3. In venules, the magnitude of inhibitory responses elicited by the inhibitors was positively correlated with the density of leukocyte adhesion. NOS inhibitors significantly reduced, but did not eliminate, the NO+-associated fluorescence in arterioles, capillaries, and venules, suggesting alternative sources of NO in circulation for these microvessels. Immunohistochemistry for NOS isozymes revealed that NOS1 occurred not only in nerve fibers innervated to arterioles but also abundantly in mast cells. Laser flow cytometry of peritoneal cells in vitro revealed abundant expression of NOS1 in mast cells. Interestingly, NOS3 occurred in endothelia of capillaries and venules but not in those of distal arterioles with comparable diameters. These results suggest that the arterioles receive NO from nonendothelial origins involving NOS1 present in nerve terminals and mast cells, whereas venules depend on the endothelial NOS as a major source. Furthermore, nonenzymatic sources of NO from circulating reservoirs constitute a notable fraction throughout different classes of microvessels. The full text of this article is available at http://www.circresaha.org.

  14. Nanometer CMOS ICs from basics to ASICs

    CERN Document Server

    J M Veendrick, Harry

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides a comprehensive, fully-updated introduction to the essentials of nanometer CMOS integrated circuits. It includes aspects of scaling to even beyond 12nm CMOS technologies and designs. It clearly describes the fundamental CMOS operating principles and presents substantial insight into the various aspects of design implementation and application. Coverage includes all associated disciplines of nanometer CMOS ICs, including physics, lithography, technology, design, memories, VLSI, power consumption, variability, reliability and signal integrity, testing, yield, failure analysis, packaging, scaling trends and road blocks. The text is based upon in-house Philips, NXP Semiconductors, Applied Materials, ASML, IMEC, ST-Ericsson, TSMC, etc., courseware, which, to date, has been completed by more than 4500 engineers working in a large variety of related disciplines: architecture, design, test, fabrication process, packaging, failure analysis and software.

  15. Widespread Micropollutant Monitoring in the Hudson River Estuary Reveals Spatiotemporal Micropollutant Clusters and Their Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Corey M G; Helbling, Damian E

    2018-06-05

    The objective of this study was to identify sources of micropollutants in the Hudson River Estuary (HRE). We collected 127 grab samples at 17 sites along the HRE over 2 years and screened for up to 200 micropollutants. We quantified 168 of the micropollutants in at least one of the samples. Atrazine, gabapentin, metolachlor, and sucralose were measured in every sample. We used data-driven unsupervised methods to cluster the micropollutants on the basis of their spatiotemporal occurrence and normalized-concentration patterns. Three major clusters of micropollutants were identified: ubiquitous and mixed-use (core micropollutants), sourced from sewage treatment plant outfalls (STP micropollutants), and derived from diffuse upstream sources (diffuse micropollutants). Each of these clusters was further refined into subclusters that were linked to specific sources on the basis of relationships identified through geospatial analysis of watershed features. Evaluation of cumulative loadings of each subcluster revealed that the Mohawk River and Rondout Creek are major contributors of most core micropollutants and STP micropollutants and the upper HRE is a major contributor of diffuse micropollutants. These data provide the first comprehensive evaluation of micropollutants in the HRE and define distinct spatiotemporal micropollutant clusters that are linked to sources and conserved across surface water systems around the world.

  16. How Simbol-X Will Reveal the Most Obscured High Energy Sources of our Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaty, S.

    2009-05-01

    The INTEGRAL satellite has revealed a major population of supergiant High Mass X-ray Binaries in our Galaxy, revolutionizing our understanding of binary systems and their evolution. This population, constituted of a compact object orbiting around a supergiant star, have unusual properties, either being extremely absorbed, or exhibiting very short flares. I will first describe the characteristics of these sources, that only intensive multi-wavelength observations have led us to disentangle, before showing that Simbol-X, thanks to its energy range and sensitivity, will allow us to go further in the understanding of these supergiant HMXBs.

  17. Sources for sedimentary bacteriohopanepolyols as revealed by 16S rDNA stratigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Marco J L; Talbot, Helen M; Abbas, Ben A; Ward, Christopher; Schouten, Stefan; Volkman, John K; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe

    2008-07-01

    Bacteriohopanoids are widespread lipid biomarkers in the sedimentary record. Many aerobic and anaerobic bacteria are potential sources of these lipids which sometimes complicates the use of these biomarkers as proxies for ecological and environmental changes. Therefore, we applied preserved 16S ribosomal RNA genes to identify likely Holocene biological sources of bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) in the sulfidic sediments of the permanently stratified postglacial Ace Lake, Antarctica. A suite of intact BHPs were identified, which revealed a variety of structural forms whose composition differed through the sediment core reflecting changes in bacterial populations induced by large changes in lake salinity. Stable isotopic compositions of the hopanols formed from periodic acid-cleaved BHPs, showed that some were substantially depleted in (13)C, indicative of their methanotrophic origin. Using sensitive molecular tools, we found that Type I and II methanotrophic bacteria (respectively Methylomonas and Methylocystis) were unique to the oldest lacustrine sediments (> 9400 years BP), but quantification of fossil DNA revealed that the Type I methanotrophs, including methanotrophs related to methanotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea cold-seep mussels, were the main precursors of the 35-amino BHPs (i.e. aminopentol, -tetrol and -triols). After isolation of the lake approximately 3000 years ago, one Type I methanotroph of the 'methanotrophic gill symbionts cluster' remained the most obvious source of aminotetrol and -triol. We, furthermore, identified a Synechococcus phylotype related to pelagic freshwater strains in the oldest lacustrine sediments as a putative source of 2-methylbacteriohopanetetrol (2-Me BHT). This combined application of advanced geochemical and paleogenomical tools further refined our knowledge about Holocene biogeochemical processes in Ace Lake.

  18. Nanometer-scale features in dolomite from Pennsylvanian rocks, Paradox Basin, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gournay, Jonas P.; Kirkland, Brenda L.; Folk, Robert L.; Lynch, F. Leo

    1999-07-01

    Scanning electron microscopy reveals an association between early dolomite in the Pennsylvanian Desert Creek (Paradox Fm.) and small (approximately 0.1 μm) nanometer-scale textures, termed `nannobacteria'. Three diagenetically distinct dolomites are present: early dolomite, limpid dolomite, and baroque dolomite. In this study, only the early dolomite contained nanometer-scale features. These textures occur as discrete balls and rods, clumps of balls, and chains of balls. Precipitation experiments demonstrate that these textures may be the result of precipitation in an organic-rich micro-environment. The presence of these nanometer-scale textures in Pennsylvanian rocks suggests that these early dolomites precipitated in organic-rich, bacterial environments.

  19. The development of control processes supporting source memory discrimination as revealed by event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chastelaine, Marianne; Friedman, David; Cycowicz, Yael M

    2007-08-01

    Improvement in source memory performance throughout childhood is thought to be mediated by the development of executive control. As postretrieval control processes may be better time-locked to the recognition response rather than the retrieval cue, the development of processes underlying source memory was investigated with both stimulus- and response-locked event-related potentials (ERPs). These were recorded in children, adolescents, and adults during a recognition memory exclusion task. Green- and red-outlined pictures were studied, but were tested in black outline. The test requirement was to endorse old items shown in one study color ("targets") and to reject new items along with old items shown in the alternative study color ("nontargets"). Source memory improved with age. All age groups retrieved target and nontarget memories as reflected by reliable parietal episodic memory (EM) effects, a stimulus-locked ERP correlate of recollection. Response-locked ERPs to targets and nontargets diverged in all groups prior to the response, although this occurred at an increasingly earlier time point with age. We suggest these findings reflect the implementation of attentional control mechanisms to enhance target memories and facilitate response selection with the greatest and least success, respectively, in adults and children. In adults only, response-locked ERPs revealed an early-onsetting parietal negativity for nontargets, but not for targets. This was suggested to reflect adults' ability to consistently inhibit prepotent target responses for nontargets. The findings support the notion that the development of source memory relies on the maturation of control processes that serve to enhance accurate selection of task-relevant memories.

  20. Lead isotopes reveal different sources of lead in balsamic and other vinegars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndung'u, Kuria; Hibdon, Sharon; Veron, Alain; Flegal, A. Russell

    2011-01-01

    Fifty-eight brands of balsamic vinegars were analyzed for lead concentrations and isotopic compositions ( 204 Pb, 206 Pb, 207 Pb, and 208 Pb) to test the findings of a previous study indicating relatively high levels of lead contamination in some of those vinegars - more than two thirds (70%) of them exceeded California's State Maximum Level (34 μg/L) based on consumption rates ≥ 0.5 μg Pb per day. The Lead isotopic fingerprints of all those vinegars with high lead concentrations were then found to be primarily anthropogenic. This isotopic analysis unquestionably reveals multiple contamination sources including atmospheric pollutant Pb and an unidentified contamination source, likely occurring after grape harvest. Organically grown grape vinegars display the same Pb content and isotopic signatures as other vinegars. This implies that pesticides might not be a significant source of pollutant Pb in vinegars. A significant post-harvest contamination would be inherited from chemicals added during production and/or material used during transport, processing or storage of these vinegars. This is consistent with the highest Pb levels being found in aged vinegars (112 ± 112 μg/L) in contrast to other vinegars (41.6 ± 28.9 μg/L) suggesting contamination during storage. It is, therefore, projected that lead levels in most vinegars, especially aged balsamic and wine vinegars, will decrease with improvements in their manufacture and storage processes consequential to recent concerns of elevated levels of lead in some vinegars. - Highlights: → First extensive study on content and possible sources of lead in balsamic vinegars. → Half of the vinegars exceed California's State Maximum Level for human consumption. → Lead content in vinegars seems to be mainly post-harvest from industrial processes.

  1. Sub-nanometer periodic nonlinearity error in absolute distance interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongxing; Huang, Kaiqi; Hu, Pengcheng; Zhu, Pengfei; Tan, Jiubin; Fan, Zhigang

    2015-05-01

    Periodic nonlinearity which can result in error in nanometer scale has become a main problem limiting the absolute distance measurement accuracy. In order to eliminate this error, a new integrated interferometer with non-polarizing beam splitter is developed. This leads to disappearing of the frequency and/or polarization mixing. Furthermore, a strict requirement on the laser source polarization is highly reduced. By combining retro-reflector and angel prism, reference and measuring beams can be spatially separated, and therefore, their optical paths are not overlapped. So, the main cause of the periodic nonlinearity error, i.e., the frequency and/or polarization mixing and leakage of beam, is eliminated. Experimental results indicate that the periodic phase error is kept within 0.0018°.

  2. Preparation, characterization and optical properties of Lanthanum-(nanometer MCM-41) composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Q. Z.; Wang, P.

    2008-01-01

    Nanometer MCM-41 molecular sieve was prepared under a base condition by using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as template and tetraethyl orthosilicate as silica source by means of hydrothermal method. Lanthanum(III) was incorporated into the nanometer MCM-41 by a liquid phase grafting method. The prepared nano composite materials were characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction, spectrophotometric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, low temperature nitrogen adsorption-desorption technique, solid diffuse reflectance absorption spectra and luminescence. The powder X-ray diffraction studies show that the nanometer MCM-41 molecular sieve is successfully prepared. The highly ordered meso porous two-dimensional hexagonal channel structure and framework of the support MCM-41 is retained intact in the prepared composite material La-(nanometer MCM-41). The spectrophotometric analysis indicates that lanthanum exists in the prepared nano composite materials. The Fourier transform infrared spectra indicate that the framework of the MCM-41 molecular sieve still remains in the prepared nano composite materials and some framework vibration peaks show blue shifts relative to those of the MCM-41 molecular sieve. The low temperature nitrogen adsorption-desorption indicates that the guest locales in the channel of the molecular sieve. Compared with bulk lanthanum oxide, the guest in the channel of the molecular sieve has smaller particle size and shows a significant blue shift of optical absorption band in solid diffuse reflectance absorption spectra. The observed blue shift in the solid state diffuse reflectance absorption spectra of the lanthanum-(nanometer MCM-41) sample show the obvious stereoscopic confinement effect of the channel of the host on the guest, which further indicates the successful encapsulation of the guest in the host. The La-(nanometer MCM-41) sample shows luminescence

  3. Nanometer size field effect transistors for terahertz detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knap, W; Rumyantsev, S; Coquillat, D; Dyakonova, N; Teppe, F; Vitiello, M S; Tredicucci, A; Blin, S; Shur, M; Nagatsuma, T

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer size field effect transistors can operate as efficient resonant or broadband terahertz detectors, mixers, phase shifters and frequency multipliers at frequencies far beyond their fundamental cut-off frequency. This work is an overview of some recent results concerning the application of nanometer scale field effect transistors for the detection of terahertz radiation. (paper)

  4. Dispersion effect and auto-reconditioning performance of nanometer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reported on dispersion effect and dispersing techniques of nanometer WS2 particles in the green lubricant concocted by us. And it also researched on auto-reconditioning performance of nanometer WS2 particles to the abrasive surfaces of steel ball from four-ball tribology test and piston ring from engine ...

  5. Stable isotopes reveal sources of precipitation in the Qinghai Lake Basin of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Bu-Li; Li, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    on the TP. - Highlights: • Stable isotopes reveal sources of precipitation in the Qinghai Lake Basin. • Southwest Asian Monsoon could not reach the northeastern Tibetan Plateau. • Vapor contribution from lake evaporation to precipitation cannot be ignored

  6. Stable isotopes reveal sources of precipitation in the Qinghai Lake Basin of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Bu-Li, E-mail: cuibuli@ieecas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710061 (China); College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, Xiao-Yan [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2015-09-15

    fundamental to water cycling on the TP. - Highlights: • Stable isotopes reveal sources of precipitation in the Qinghai Lake Basin. • Southwest Asian Monsoon could not reach the northeastern Tibetan Plateau. • Vapor contribution from lake evaporation to precipitation cannot be ignored.

  7. EEG source reconstruction reveals frontal-parietal dynamics of spatial conflict processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael X Cohen

    Full Text Available Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (∼200 ms post-stimulus conflict modulation in stimulus-contralateral parietal gamma (30-50 Hz, followed by a later alpha-band (8-12 Hz conflict modulation, suggesting an early detection of spatial conflict and inhibition of spatial location processing. Inter-regional connectivity analyses assessed via cross-frequency coupling of theta (4-8 Hz, alpha, and gamma power revealed conflict-induced shifts in cortical network interactions: Congruent trials (relative to incongruent trials had stronger coupling between frontal theta and stimulus-contrahemifield parietal alpha/gamma power, whereas incongruent trials had increased theta coupling between medial frontal and lateral frontal regions. These findings shed new light into the large-scale network dynamics of spatial conflict processing, and how those networks are shaped by oscillatory interactions.

  8. Jatropha curcas leaves analysis, reveals it as mineral source for low sodium diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Lucero; Rojas, Janne; Izaguirre, César; Contreras, Billmary; Gómez, Rubén

    2014-12-15

    Jatropha curcas is a perennial herb, belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae, found in countries such as India, Mexico and Venezuela. In the present study, proximate composition and mineral content on the leaves of J. curcas was analysed and compared to spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) using a ICP-AES. The bromatologic test (dry material) results for ashes, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates revealed 23.4%, 28.0%, 3.2% and 45.4% for J. curcas; whereas for S. oleracea values were 28.9%, 20.8%, 0.5% and 49.9%. Furthermore, minerals found in both species ashes were: calcium, potassium, magnesium, iron and phosphorus, resulting that leaves of J. curcas are composed by three times the iron and calcium amount comparing to spinach; while sodium was absent from the former species. In this study Cu and Zn were found only in spinach, while Pb and As were not detected in any of the studied species. These results indicate that J. curcas leaves might be considered as mineral source suitable for animal and human consumption, especially for people who requires a low sodium diet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. EEG source reconstruction reveals frontal-parietal dynamics of spatial conflict processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael X; Ridderinkhof, K Richard

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (∼200 ms post-stimulus) conflict modulation in stimulus-contralateral parietal gamma (30-50 Hz), followed by a later alpha-band (8-12 Hz) conflict modulation, suggesting an early detection of spatial conflict and inhibition of spatial location processing. Inter-regional connectivity analyses assessed via cross-frequency coupling of theta (4-8 Hz), alpha, and gamma power revealed conflict-induced shifts in cortical network interactions: Congruent trials (relative to incongruent trials) had stronger coupling between frontal theta and stimulus-contrahemifield parietal alpha/gamma power, whereas incongruent trials had increased theta coupling between medial frontal and lateral frontal regions. These findings shed new light into the large-scale network dynamics of spatial conflict processing, and how those networks are shaped by oscillatory interactions.

  10. EEG Source Reconstruction Reveals Frontal-Parietal Dynamics of Spatial Conflict Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael X; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (∼200 ms post-stimulus) conflict modulation in stimulus-contralateral parietal gamma (30–50 Hz), followed by a later alpha-band (8–12 Hz) conflict modulation, suggesting an early detection of spatial conflict and inhibition of spatial location processing. Inter-regional connectivity analyses assessed via cross-frequency coupling of theta (4–8 Hz), alpha, and gamma power revealed conflict-induced shifts in cortical network interactions: Congruent trials (relative to incongruent trials) had stronger coupling between frontal theta and stimulus-contrahemifield parietal alpha/gamma power, whereas incongruent trials had increased theta coupling between medial frontal and lateral frontal regions. These findings shed new light into the large-scale network dynamics of spatial conflict processing, and how those networks are shaped by oscillatory interactions. PMID:23451201

  11. Orangutan Alu quiescence reveals possible source element: support for ancient backseat drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Jerilyn A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence analysis of the orangutan genome revealed that recent proliferative activity of Alu elements has been uncharacteristically quiescent in the Pongo (orangutan lineage, compared with all previously studied primate genomes. With relatively few young polymorphic insertions, the genomic landscape of the orangutan seemed like the ideal place to search for a driver, or source element, of Alu retrotransposition. Results Here we report the identification of a nearly pristine insertion possessing all the known putative hallmarks of a retrotranspositionally competent Alu element. It is located in an intronic sequence of the DGKB gene on chromosome 7 and is highly conserved in Hominidae (the great apes, but absent from Hylobatidae (gibbon and siamang. We provide evidence for the evolution of a lineage-specific subfamily of this shared Alu insertion in orangutans and possibly the lineage leading to humans. In the orangutan genome, this insertion contains three orangutan-specific diagnostic mutations which are characteristic of the youngest polymorphic Alu subfamily, AluYe5b5_Pongo. In the Homininae lineage (human, chimpanzee and gorilla, this insertion has acquired three different mutations which are also found in a single human-specific Alu insertion. Conclusions This seemingly stealth-like amplification, ongoing at a very low rate over millions of years of evolution, suggests that this shared insertion may represent an ancient backseat driver of Alu element expansion.

  12. Pre-2014 mudslides at Oso revealed by InSAR and multi-source DEM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. W.; Lu, Z.; QU, F.

    2014-12-01

    The landslide is a process that results in the downward and outward movement of slope-reshaping materials including rocks and soils and annually causes the loss of approximately $3.5 billion and tens of casualties in the United States. The 2014 Oso mudslide was an extreme event costing nearly 40 deaths and damaging civilian properties. Landslides are often unpredictable, but in many cases, catastrophic events are repetitive. Historic record in the Oso mudslide site indicates that there have been serial events in decades, though the extent of sliding events varied from time to time. In our study, the combination of multi-source DEMs, InSAR, and time-series InSAR analysis has enabled to characterize the Oso mudslide. InSAR results from ALOS PALSAR show that there was no significant deformation between mid-2006 and 2011. The combination of time-series InSAR analysis and old-dated DEM indicated revealed topographic changes associated the 2006 sliding event, which is confirmed by the difference of multiple LiDAR DEMs. Precipitation and discharge measurements before the 2006 and 2014 landslide events did not exhibit extremely anomalous records, suggesting the precipitation is not the controlling factor in determining the sliding events at Oso. The lack of surface deformation during 2006-2011 and weak correlation between the precipitation and the sliding event, suggest other factors (such as porosity) might play a critical role on the run-away events at this Oso and other similar landslides.

  13. Electromagnetic fields of Nanometer electromagnetic waves and X-ray. New frontiers of electromagnetic wave engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The investigating committee aimed at research on electromagnetic fields in functional devices and X-ray fibers for efficient coherent X-ray generation and their material science, high-precision manufacturing, X-ray microscope, application to medical and information communication technologies, such as interaction between material and nanometer electromagnetic waves of radiated light and X-ray, interaction between microwaves and particle beams, theory and design of high-frequency waveguides for resonator and accelerator, from January 2003 to December 2005. In this report, we describe our research results, in particular, on the topics of synchrotron radiation and Cherenkov radiation, Kyushu synchrotron light source and its technology, nanometer electromagnetic fields in optical region, process of interaction between evanescent waves and near-field light, orthogonal relation of electromagnetic fields including evanescent waves in dispersive dielectrics, optical amplification using electron beam, nanometer electromagnetic fields in focusing waveguide lens device with curved facets, electromagnetic fields in nanometer photonic crystal waveguide consisting of atoms, X-ray scattering and absorption I bio-material for image diagnosis. (author)

  14. A model based approach to reference-free straightness measurement at the Nanometer Comparator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, C.; Stavridis, M.; Walzel, M.; Elster, C.; Wiegmann, A.; Schulz, M.; Köning, R.; Flügge, J.; Tutsch, R.

    2009-06-01

    The Nanometer Comparator is the PTB reference length measuring machine for high precision calibrations of line scales and encoder systems. Up to now the Nanometer Comparator allows to measure the position of line structures in one dimension only. For high precision characterisations of masks, scales and incremental encoders, the measurement of the straightness of graduations is a requirement from emerging lithography techniques. Therefore the Nanometer Comparator will be equipped with an additional short range measurement system in the Y-direction, realized as a single path plane mirror interferometer and supposed to achieve sub-nm uncertainties. To compensate the topography of the Y-mirror, the Traceable Multi Sensor (TMS) method will be implemented to achieve a reference-free straightness measurement. Virtual experiments are used to estimate the lower accuracy limit and to determine the sensitive parameters. The virtual experiments contain the influence of the positioning devices, interferometer errors as well as non-perfect adjustment and fabrication of the machine geometry. The whole dynamic measurement process of the Nanometer Comparator including its influence on the TMS analysis, e.g. non-equally spaced measurement points, is simulated. We will present the results of these virtual experiments as well as the most relevant error sources for straightness measurement, incorporating the low uncertainties of the existing and planned measurement systems.

  15. NANOMETER PRECISION IN LARGE SURFACE PROFILOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TAKACS, P.Z.

    1999-01-01

    The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is in use at many synchrotron radiation (SR) laboratories throughout the world and by a number of manufacturers who specialize in fabricating grazing incidence mirrors for SR and x-ray telescope applications. Recent improvements in the design and operation of the LTP system have reduced the statistical error in slope profile measurement to the 1 standard deviation level of 0.3 microradian for 0.5 meter long mirrors. This corresponds to a height error on the order of 10-20 nanometers. This level of performance allows one to measure with confidence the absolute shape of large cylindrical aspheres and spheres that have kilometer radii of curvature in the axial direction. The LTP is versatile enough to make measurements of a mirror in the face up, sideways, and face down configurations. We will illustrate the versatility of the current version of the instrument, the LTP II, and present results from two new versions of the instrument: the in situ LTP (ISLTP) and the Vertical Scan LTP (VSLTP). Both of them are based on the penta prism LTP (ppLTP) principle that utilizes a stationary optical head and moving penta prism. The ISLTP is designed to measure the distortion of high heat load mirrors during actual operation in SR beam lines. The VSLTP is designed to measure the complete 3-dimensional shape of x-ray telescope cylinder mirrors and mandrels in a vertical configuration. Scans are done both in the axial direction and in the azimuthal direction

  16. Resting 12-lead electrocardiogram reveals high-risk sources of cardioembolism in young adult ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirinen, Jani; Putaala, Jukka; Aro, Aapo L; Surakka, Ida; Haapaniemi, Anita; Kaste, Markku; Haapaniemi, Elena; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Lehto, Mika

    2015-11-01

    The diagnostic work-up to reveal etiology in a young ischemic stroke (IS) patient includes evaluation for high-risk source of cardioembolism (HRCE), since this subtype associates with high early recurrence rate and mortality. We investigated the association of ECG findings with a final etiologic subgroup of HRCE in a cohort of young patients with first-ever IS. The Helsinki Young Stroke Registry includes IS patients aged 15 to 49 years admitted between 1994 and 2007. Blinded to other clinical data, we analyzed a 12-lead resting ECG obtained 1-14 days after the onset of stroke symptoms in 690 patients. We then compared the ECG findings between a final diagnosis of HRCE (n=78) and other/undetermined causes (n=612). We used multivariate logistic regression to study the association between ECG parameters and HRCE. Of our cohort (63% male), 35% showed ECG abnormality, the most common being T-wave inversion (16%), left ventricular hypertrophy (14%), prolonged P-wave (13%), and prolonged QTc (12%). 3% had atrial fibrillation (AF), and 4% P-terminal force (PTF). Of the continuous parameters, longer QRS-duration, QTc, and wider QRS-T-angle independently associated with HRCE. After AF, PTF had the strongest independent association with HRCE (odds ratio=44.32, 95% confidence interval=[10.51-186.83]), followed by a QRS-T angle >110° (8.29 [3.55-19.32]), T-wave inversion (5.06, 2.54-10.05), and prolonged QTc (3.02 [1.39-6.56]). Routine ECG provides useful information for directing the work-up of a young IS patient. In addition to AF, PTF in particular showed a strong association with etiology of HRCE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cascade of neural events leading from error commission to subsequent awareness revealed using EEG source imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Dhar

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to shed light on the respective contributions of three important action monitoring brain regions (i.e. cingulate cortex, insula, and orbitofrontal cortex during the conscious detection of response errors. To this end, fourteen healthy adults performed a speeded Go/Nogo task comprising Nogo trials of varying levels of difficulty, designed to elicit aware and unaware errors. Error awareness was indicated by participants with a second key press after the target key press. Meanwhile, electromyogram (EMG from the response hand was recorded in addition to high-density scalp electroencephalogram (EEG. In the EMG-locked grand averages, aware errors clearly elicited an error-related negativity (ERN reflecting error detection, and a later error positivity (Pe reflecting conscious error awareness. However, no Pe was recorded after unaware errors or hits. These results are in line with previous studies suggesting that error awareness is associated with generation of the Pe. Source localisation results confirmed that the posterior cingulate motor area was the main generator of the ERN. However, inverse solution results also point to the involvement of the left posterior insula during the time interval of the Pe, and hence error awareness. Moreover, consecutive to this insular activity, the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC was activated in response to aware and unaware errors but not in response to hits, consistent with the implication of this area in the evaluation of the value of an error. These results reveal a precise sequence of activations in these three non-overlapping brain regions following error commission, enabling a progressive differentiation between aware and unaware errors as a function of time elapsed, thanks to the involvement first of interoceptive or proprioceptive processes (left insula, later leading to the detection of a breach in the prepotent response mode (right OFC.

  18. Displacement laser interferometry with sub-nanometer uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cosijns, S.J.A.G.

    2004-01-01

    Development in industry is asking for improved resolution and higher accuracy in mechanical measurement. Together with miniaturization the demand for sub nanometer uncertainty on dimensional metrology is increasing rapidly. Displacement laser interferometers are used widely as precision displacement

  19. Carbon nanotube transistors scaled to a 40-nanometer footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Tersoff, Jerry; Farmer, Damon B; Zhu, Yu; Han, Shu-Jen

    2017-06-30

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors challenges the device research community to reduce the transistor footprint containing all components to 40 nanometers within the next decade. We report on a p-channel transistor scaled to such an extremely small dimension. Built on one semiconducting carbon nanotube, it occupies less than half the space of leading silicon technologies, while delivering a significantly higher pitch-normalized current density-above 0.9 milliampere per micrometer at a low supply voltage of 0.5 volts with a subthreshold swing of 85 millivolts per decade. Furthermore, we show transistors with the same small footprint built on actual high-density arrays of such nanotubes that deliver higher current than that of the best-competing silicon devices under the same overdrive, without any normalization. We achieve this using low-resistance end-bonded contacts, a high-purity semiconducting carbon nanotube source, and self-assembly to pack nanotubes into full surface-coverage aligned arrays. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  20. Longitudinal investigation of source memory reveals different developmental trajectories for item memory and binding

    OpenAIRE

    Riggins, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    The present study used a cohort-sequential design to examine developmental changes in children's ability to bind items in memory during early and middle childhood. Three cohorts of children (aged 4, 6, or 8 years) were followed longitudinally for three years. Each year, children completed a source memory paradigm assessing memory for items and binding. Results suggest linear increases in memory for individual items (facts or sources) between 4 and 10 years of age, but that memory for correct ...

  1. Revealing transboundary and local air pollutant sources affecting Metro Manila through receptor modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.; Bautista VII, Angel T.; Santos, Flora L.; Racho, Joseph Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM 2 .5) levels at the Metro Manila air sampling stations of the Philippine Nuclear Research Research Institute were found to be above the WHO guideline value of 10 μg m 3 indicating, in general, very poor air quality in the area. The elemental components of the fine particulate matter were obtained using the energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Positive matrix factorization, a receptor modelling tool, was used to identify and apportion air pollution sources. Location of probable transboundary air pollutants were evaluated using HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model) while location of probable local air pollutant sources were determined using the conditional probability function (CPF). Air pollutant sources can either be natural or anthropogenic. This study has shown natural air pollutant sources such as volcanic eruptions from Bulusan volcano in 2006 and from Anatahan volcano in 2005 to have impacted on the region. Fine soils was shown to have originated from China's Mu US Desert some time in 2004. Smoke in the fine fraction in 2006 show indications of coming from forest fires in Sumatra and Borneo. Fine particulate Pb in Valenzuela was shown to be coming from the surrounding area. Many more significant air pollution impacts can be evaluated with the identification of probable air pollutant sources with the use of elemental fingerprints and locating these sources with the use of HYSPLIT and CPF. (author)

  2. Sensitive SERS detection at the single-particle level based on nanometer-separated mushroom-shaped plasmonic dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Quan; Li, Zhiqin; Zheng, Mengjie; Liu, Qing; Chen, Yiqin; Yang, Lan; Jiang, Tian; Duan, Huigao

    2018-03-01

    Elevated metallic nanostructures with nanogaps (film deposition. By controlling the initial size of nanogaps in resist structures and the following deposited film thickness, metallic nanogaps could be tuned at the sub-10 nm scale with single-digit nanometer precision. Both experimental and simulated results revealed that gold dimer on mushroom-shaped pillars have the capability to achieve higher SERS enhancement factor comparing to those plasmonic dimers on cylindrical pillars or on a common SiO2/Si substrate, implying that the nanometer-gapped elevated dimer is an ideal platform to achieve the highest possible field enhancement for various plasmonic applications.

  3. Candidate high-z protoclusters among the Planck compact sources, as revealed by Herschel-SPIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, J.; Clements, D. L.; Cheng, T.; De Zotti, G.; Scott, D.; Valiante, E.; Eales, S.; Bremer, M. N.; Dannerbauer, H.; Birkinshaw, M.; Farrah, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Michałowski, M. J.; Valtchanov, I.; Oteo, I.; Baes, M.; Cooray, A.; Negrello, M.; Wang, L.; van der Werf, P.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.

    2018-05-01

    By determining the nature of all the Planck compact sources within 808.4 deg2 of large Herschel surveys, we have identified 27 candidate protoclusters of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) that are at least 3σ overdense in either 250, 350, or 500 μm sources. We find roughly half of all the Planck compact sources are resolved by Herschel into multiple discrete objects, with the other half remaining unresolved by Herschel. We find a significant difference between versions of the Planck catalogues, with earlier releases hosting a larger fraction of candidate protoclusters and Galactic cirrus than later releases, which we ascribe to a difference in the filters used in the creation of the three catalogues. We find a surface density of DSFG candidate protoclusters of (3.3 ± 0.7) × 10-2 sources deg-2, in good agreement with previous similar studies. We find that a Planck colour selection of S857/S545 1. Our candidate protoclusters are a factor of 5 times brighter at 353 GHz than expected from simulations, even in the most conservative estimates. Further observations are needed to confirm whether these candidate protoclusters are physical clusters, multiple protoclusters along the line of sight, or chance alignments of unassociated sources.

  4. Multiple Spectral Ratio Analyses Reveal Earthquake Source Spectra of Small Earthquakes and Moment Magnitudes of Microearthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchide, T.; Imanishi, K.

    2016-12-01

    Spectral studies for macroscopic earthquake source parameters are helpful for characterizing earthquake rupture process and hence understanding earthquake source physics and fault properties. Those studies require us mute wave propagation path and site effects in spectra of seismograms to accentuate source effect. We have recently developed the multiple spectral ratio method [Uchide and Imanishi, BSSA, 2016] employing many empirical Green's function (EGF) events to reduce errors from the choice of EGF events. This method helps us estimate source spectra more accurately as well as moment ratios among reference and EGF events, which are useful to constrain the seismic moment of microearthquakes. First, we focus on earthquake source spectra. The source spectra have generally been thought to obey the omega-square model with single corner-frequency. However recent studies imply the existence of another corner frequency for some earthquakes. We analyzed small shallow inland earthquakes (3.5 multiple spectral ratio analyses. For 20000 microearthquakes in Fukushima Hamadori and northern Ibaraki prefecture area, we found that the JMA magnitudes (Mj) based on displacement or velocity amplitude are systematically below Mw. The slope of the Mj-Mw relation is 0.5 for Mj 5. We propose a fitting curve for the obtained relationship as Mw = (1/2)Mj + (1/2)(Mjγ + Mcorγ)1/γ+ c, where Mcor is a corner magnitude, γ determines the sharpness of the corner, and c denotes an offset. We obtained Mcor = 4.1, γ = 5.6, and c = -0.47 to fit the observation. The parameters are useful for characterizing the Mj-Mw relationship. This non-linear relationship affects the b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law. Quantitative discussions on b-values are affected by the definition of magnitude to use.

  5. Meteorite Source Regions as Revealed by the Near-Earth Object Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzel, Richard P.; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Burt, Brian J.; Polishook, David; Burbine, Thomas H.; Bus, Schelte J.; Tokunaga, Alan; Birlan, Mirel

    2014-11-01

    Spectroscopic and taxonomic information is now available for 1000 near-Earth objects, having been obtained through both targeted surveys (e.g. [1], [2], [3]) or resulting from all-sky surveys (e.g. [4]). We determine their taxonomic types in the Bus-DeMeo system [5] [6] and subsequently examine meteorite correlations based on spectral analysis (e.g. [7],[8]). We correlate our spectral findings with the source region probabilities calculated using the methods of Bottke et al. [9]. In terms of taxonomy, very clear sources are indicated: Q-, Sq-, and S-types most strongly associated with ordinary chondrite meteorites show clear source signatures through the inner main-belt. V-types are relatively equally balanced between nu6 and 3:1 resonance sources, consistent with the orbital dispersion of the Vesta family. B- and C-types show distinct source region preferences for the outer belt and for Jupiter family comets. A Jupiter family comet source predominates for the D-type near-Earth objects, implying these "asteroidal" bodies may be extinct or dormant comets [10]. Similarly, near-Earth objects falling in the spectrally featureless "X-type" category also show a strong outer belt and Jupiter family comet source region preference. Finally the Xe-class near-Earth objects, which most closely match the spectral properties of enstatite achondrite (aubrite) meteorites seen in the Hungaria region[11], show a source region preference consistent with a Hungaria origin by entering near-Earth space through the Mars crossing and nu6 resonance pathways. This work supported by the National Science Foundation Grant 0907766 and NASA Grant NNX10AG27G.[1] Lazzarin, M. et al. (2004), Mem. S. A. It. Suppl. 5, 21. [2] Thomas, C. A. et al. (2014), Icarus 228, 217. [3] Tokunaga, A. et al. (2006) BAAS 38, 59.07. [4] Hasselmann, P. H., Carvano, J. M., Lazzaro, D. (2011) NASA PDS, EAR-A-I0035-5-SDSSTAX-V1.0. [5] Bus, S.J., Binzel, R.P. (2002). Icarus 158, 146. [6] DeMeo, F.E. et al. (2009), Icarus

  6. Longitudinal Investigation of Source Memory Reveals Different Developmental Trajectories for Item Memory and Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    The present study used a cohort-sequential design to examine developmental changes in children's ability to bind items in memory during early and middle childhood. Three cohorts of children (aged 4, 6, or 8 years) were followed longitudinally for 3 years. Each year, children completed a source memory paradigm assessing memory for items and…

  7. EEG source reconstruction reveals frontal-parietal dynamics of spatial conflict processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.X.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict

  8. EEG source reconstruction reveals frontal-parietal dynamics of spatial conflict processing

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, M.X.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (?200 ms post-stimulus) conflict modulation in ...

  9. Phylogenomics Reveals Three Sources of Adaptive Variation during a Rapid Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Pease

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Speciation events often occur in rapid bursts of diversification, but the ecological and genetic factors that promote these radiations are still much debated. Using whole transcriptomes from all 13 species in the ecologically and reproductively diverse wild tomato clade (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon, we infer the species phylogeny and patterns of genetic diversity in this group. Despite widespread phylogenetic discordance due to the sorting of ancestral variation, we date the origin of this radiation to approximately 2.5 million years ago and find evidence for at least three sources of adaptive genetic variation that fuel diversification. First, we detect introgression both historically between early-branching lineages and recently between individual populations, at specific loci whose functions indicate likely adaptive benefits. Second, we find evidence of lineage-specific de novo evolution for many genes, including loci involved in the production of red fruit color. Finally, using a "PhyloGWAS" approach, we detect environment-specific sorting of ancestral variation among populations that come from different species but share common environmental conditions. Estimated across the whole clade, small but substantial and approximately equal fractions of the euchromatic portion of the genome are inferred to contribute to each of these three sources of adaptive genetic variation. These results indicate that multiple genetic sources can promote rapid diversification and speciation in response to new ecological opportunity, in agreement with our emerging phylogenomic understanding of the complexity of both ancient and recent species radiations.

  10. Hadean silicate differentiation revealed by anomalous 142Nd in the Réunion hotspot source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, B. J.; Carlson, R.; Day, J. M.; Horan, M.

    2017-12-01

    Geochemical and geophysical data show that volcanic hotspots can tap ancient domains sequestered in Earth's deep mantle. Evidence from stable and long-lived radiogenic isotope systems has demonstrated that many of these domains result from tectonic and differentiation processes that occurred more than two billion years ago. Recent advances in the analysis of short-lived radiogenic isotopes have further shown that some hotspot sources preserve evidence for metal-silicate differentiation occurring within the first one percent of Earth's history. Despite these discoveries, efforts to detect variability in the lithophile 146Sm-142Nd (t1/2 = 103 Ma) system in Phanerozoic hotspot lavas have not yet detected significant global variation. We report 142Nd/144Nd ratios in Réunion Island basalts that are statistically distinct from the terrestrial Nd standard ranging to both higher and lower 142Nd/144Nd. Variations in 142Nd/144Nd, which total nearly 15 ppm on Réunion, are correlated with 3He/4He among both anomalous and non-anomalous samples. Such behavior implies that there were analogous changes in Sm/Nd and (U+Th)/3He that occurred during a Hadean silicate differentiation event and were not completely overprinted by the depleted mantle. Variations in the 142Nd-143Nd compositions of Réunion basalts can be explained by a single Hadean melting event producing enriched and depleted domains that partially re-mixed after 146Sm was no longer extant. Assuming differentiation occurred at pressures where perovskite is stable, anomalies of the magnitude observed in Réunion basalts require melting of at least 50% across a wide depth range, and up to 90% for melting at pressures near those of the deepest mantle. Models with best fits to Nd isotope data suggest this differentiation occurred around 4.40 Ga and mixing occurred after 4 Ga. This two-stage differentiation process nearly erased the ancient, anomalous 142Nd composition of the Réunion source and produced the relatively

  11. Strontium isotopes reveal distant sources of architectural timber in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, N B; Betancourt, J L; Dean, J S; Quade, J

    2001-10-09

    Between A.D. 900 and 1150, more than 200,000 conifer trees were used to build the prehistoric great houses of Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, in what is now a treeless landscape. More than one-fifth of these timbers were spruce (Picea) or fir (Abies) that were hand-carried from isolated mountaintops 75-100 km away. Because strontium from local dust, water, and underlying bedrock is incorporated by trees, specific logging sites can be identified by comparing (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios in construction beams from different ruins and building periods to ratios in living trees from the surrounding mountains. (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios show that the beams came from both the Chuska and San Mateo (Mount Taylor) mountains, but not from the San Pedro Mountains, which are equally close. Incorporation of logs from two sources in the same room, great house, and year suggest stockpiling and intercommunity collaboration at Chaco Canyon. The use of trees from both the Chuska and San Mateo mountains, but not from the San Pedro Mountains, as early as A.D. 974 suggests that selection of timber sources was driven more by regional socioeconomic ties than by a simple model of resource depletion with distance and time.

  12. SWEPT-SOURCE OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY REVEALS INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING ALTERS DEEP RETINAL VASCULATURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalewska, Zofia; Nawrocki, Jerzy

    2018-04-30

    To describe morphology of retinal and choroidal vessels in swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography before and after vitrectomy with the temporal inverted internal limiting membrane (ILM) flap technique for full-thickness macular holes. Prospective, observational study of 36 eyes of 33 patients with full-thickness macular holes swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography was performed in patients before and 1 month after vitrectomy. Vitrectomy with the temporal inverted ILM flap technique was performed. In this method, ILM is peeled only at one side of the fovea. An ILM flap is created to cover the macular hole. Comparison of retina vasculature in the areas of ILM peeling vs. no ILM peeling at 1 and 3 months after successful vitrectomy was performed. The study demonstrated lower density of vessels in the deep retinal plexus in the area where ILM was peeled as compared to the rest of the fovea. Visual acuity and central retinal thickness 1 month after surgery correlates with fovea avascular zone diameter in deep retinal layers at the same time point (P = 0.001). This study confirmed that ILM peeling might alter blood flow in deep retinal vessels below the peeling area in the early postoperative period. The area of the fovea avascular zone corresponds to functional results at the same time point.

  13. Detailed budget analysis of HONO in central London reveals a missing daytime source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of HONO were carried out at an urban background site near central London as part of the Clean air for London (ClearfLo project in summer 2012. Data were collected from 22 July to 18 August 2014, with peak values of up to 1.8 ppbV at night and non-zero values of between 0.2 and 0.6 ppbV seen during the day. A wide range of other gas phase, aerosol, radiation, and meteorological measurements were made concurrently at the same site, allowing a detailed analysis of the chemistry to be carried out. The peak HONO/NOx ratio of 0.04 is seen at  ∼  02:00 UTC, with the presence of a second, daytime, peak in HONO/NOx of similar magnitude to the night-time peak, suggesting a significant secondary daytime HONO source. A photostationary state calculation of HONO involving formation from the reaction of OH and NO and loss from photolysis, reaction with OH, and dry deposition shows a significant underestimation during the day, with calculated values being close to 0, compared to the measurement average of 0.4 ppbV at midday. The addition of further HONO sources from the literature, including dark conversion of NO2 on surfaces, direct emission, photolysis of ortho-substituted nitrophenols, the postulated formation from the reaction of HO2 ×  H2O with NO2, photolysis of adsorbed HNO3 on ground and aerosols, and HONO produced by photosensitized conversion of NO2 on the surface increases the daytime modelled HONO to 0.1 ppbV, still leaving a significant missing daytime source. The missing HONO is plotted against a series of parameters including NO2 and OH reactivity (used as a proxy for organic material, with little correlation seen. Much better correlation is observed with the product of these species with j(NO2, in particular NO2 and the product of NO2 with OH reactivity. This suggests the missing HONO source is in some way related to NO2 and also requires sunlight. Increasing the photosensitized surface conversion rate of NO2 by a

  14. Integrated analysis of multiple data sources reveals modular structure of biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Hongchao; Shi Baochen; Wu Gaowei; Zhang Yong; Zhu Xiaopeng; Zhang Zhihua; Liu Changning; Zhao, Yi; Wu Tao; Wang Jie; Chen Runsheng

    2006-01-01

    It has been a challenging task to integrate high-throughput data into investigations of the systematic and dynamic organization of biological networks. Here, we presented a simple hierarchical clustering algorithm that goes a long way to achieve this aim. Our method effectively reveals the modular structure of the yeast protein-protein interaction network and distinguishes protein complexes from functional modules by integrating high-throughput protein-protein interaction data with the added subcellular localization and expression profile data. Furthermore, we take advantage of the detected modules to provide a reliably functional context for the uncharacterized components within modules. On the other hand, the integration of various protein-protein association information makes our method robust to false-positives, especially for derived protein complexes. More importantly, this simple method can be extended naturally to other types of data fusion and provides a framework for the study of more comprehensive properties of the biological network and other forms of complex networks

  15. Magnetic Source Imaging of the Human Brain Reveals a Hierarchy of Memories and Their Lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Samuel

    1998-03-01

    The advent of large arrays of superconducting sensors makes it possible to properly characterize the evolution of the magnetic field pattern near the human scalp produced by the spatio-temporal evolution of electric currents flowing within the cerebral cortex. With this capability a variety of dynamic phenomena can be elucidated, including the relaxation phenomena following a sensory stimulus. For both visual and auditory stimuli, magnetic source imaging (MSI) provides evidence that the cortical activation traces decay exponentially and thereby establish well-defined lifetimes. These lifetimes range from about 200 ms in the primary visual cortex and 2 s in the primary auditory cortex. Moreover, higher processing stages as in the parietal and temporal areas exhibit lifetimes as long as 20 s, or more.

  16. Detection of interferon alpha protein reveals differential levels and cellular sources in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Decalf, Jérémie; Bondet, Vincent; Hunt, David; Rice, Gillian I; Werneke, Scott; McGlasson, Sarah L; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Barnerias, Christine; Bellon, Nathalia; Belot, Alexandre; Bodemer, Christine; Briggs, Tracy A; Desguerre, Isabelle; Frémond, Marie-Louise; Hully, Marie; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Melki, Isabelle; Meyts, Isabelle; Musset, Lucile; Pelzer, Nadine; Quartier, Pierre; Terwindt, Gisela M; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wiseman, Stewart; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Rose, Yoann; Neven, Bénédicte; Hertel, Christina; Hayday, Adrian; Albert, Matthew L; Rozenberg, Flore; Crow, Yanick J; Duffy, Darragh

    2017-05-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are essential mediators of antiviral responses. These cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), diabetes mellitus, and dermatomyositis, as well as monogenic type I interferonopathies. Despite a fundamental role in health and disease, the direct quantification of type I IFNs has been challenging. Using single-molecule array (Simoa) digital ELISA technology, we recorded attomolar concentrations of IFNα in healthy donors, viral infection, and complex and monogenic interferonopathies. IFNα protein correlated well with functional activity and IFN-stimulated gene expression. High circulating IFNα levels were associated with increased clinical severity in SLE patients, and a study of the cellular source of IFNα protein indicated disease-specific mechanisms. Measurement of IFNα attomolar concentrations by digital ELISA will enhance our understanding of IFN biology and potentially improve the diagnosis and stratification of pathologies associated with IFN dysregulation. © 2017 Rodero et al.

  17. Pre-Columbian mycobacterial genomes reveal seals as a source of New World human tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Kirsten I.; Harkins, Kelly M.; Herbig, Alexander; Coscolla, Mireia; Weber, Nico; Comas, Iñaki; Forrest, Stephen A.; Bryant, Josephine M.; Harris, Simon R.; Schuenemann, Verena J.; Campbell, Tessa J.; Majander, Kerrtu; Wilbur, Alicia K.; Guichon, Ricardo A.; Wolfe Steadman, Dawnie L.; Cook, Della Collins; Niemann, Stefan; Behr, Marcel A.; Zumarraga, Martin; Bastida, Ricardo; Huson, Daniel; Nieselt, Kay; Young, Douglas; Parkhill, Julian; Buikstra, Jane E.; Gagneux, Sebastien; Stone, Anne C.; Krause, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Modern strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Americas are closely related to those from Europe, supporting the assumption that human tuberculosis was introduced post-contact1. This notion, however, is incompatible with archaeological evidence of pre-contact tuberculosis in the New World2. Comparative genomics of modern isolates suggests that M. tuberculosis attained its worldwide distribution following human dispersals out of Africa during the Pleistocene epoch3, although this has yet to be confirmed with ancient calibration points. Here we present three 1,000-year-old mycobacterial genomes from Peruvian human skeletons, revealing that a member of the M. tuberculosis complex caused human disease before contact. The ancient strains are distinct from known human-adapted forms and are most closely related to those adapted to seals and sea lions. Two independent dating approaches suggest a most recent common ancestor for the M. tuberculosis complex less than 6,000 years ago, which supports a Holocene dispersal of the disease. Our results implicate sea mammals as having played a role in transmitting the disease to humans across the ocean. PMID:25141181

  18. Simultaneous attentional guidance by working-memory and selection history reveals two distinct sources of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwark, Jeremy D; Dolgov, Igor; Sandry, Joshua; Volkman, C Brooks

    2013-10-01

    Recent theories of attention have proposed that selection history is a separate, dissociable source of information that influences attention. The current study sought to investigate the simultaneous involvement of selection history and working-memory on attention during visual search. Experiments 1 and 2 used target feature probability to manipulate selection history and found significant effects of both working-memory and selection history, although working-memory dominated selection history when they cued different locations. Experiment 3 eliminated the contribution of voluntary refreshing of working-memory and replicated the main effects, although selection history became dominant. Using the same methodology, but with reduced probability cue validity, both effects were present in Experiment 4 and did not significantly differ in their contribution to attention. Effects of selection history and working-memory never interacted. These results suggest that selection history and working-memory are separate influences on attention and have little impact on each other. Theoretical implications for models of attention are discussed. © 2013.

  19. Shearing Nanometer-Thick Confined Hydrocarbon Films: Friction and Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, I. M.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) friction and adhesion calculations for nanometer-thick confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths 20, 100 and 1400 carbon atoms. We study the dependency of the frictional shear stress on the confining pressure and sliding speed. We present results...

  20. Upper mantle low velocity heterogeneities beneath NE China revealed by source- and receiver-side converted waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Z.; Niu, F.

    2017-12-01

    Common-conversion-point (CCP) stacking of receiver function is a powerful tool in mapping upper mantle heterogeneities. However, reverberations from shallow boundaries with large velocity contrast could contaminate the imaging profiles severely. Applying the refined Slowness Weighted CCP (SWCCP) stacking technique (Guan and Niu, 2017) on NECESSArray data, we eliminated the multiple effects and systematically imaged the upper mantle low velocity heterogeneities in NE China where there exist rich unconsolidated sediments. The SWCCP profiles reveal a 350 km low velocity heterogeneity which is possibly associated with the Changbai Mountain volcanism and interpreted as a negatively buoyant silicate melt lying atop of the 410 km discontinuity. Besides, the imaging results are also suggestive of a sporadic 580-620 km low velocity heterogeneity locating in the easternmost part of NE China with a velocity contrast comparable with the 660-km discontinuity. In addition, between 42º N and 45º N, we also found a double 660-km discontinuity at the two sides of the localized depression in the longitudinal range of 128º E to 131º E. On the other hand, we gathered USArray and Alaska regional array seismic data of deep earthquakes occurring beneath NE China and the surrounding areas and employed stacking technique to study the source side S-to-P conversions. The source-side stacking also showed a strong S-to-P conversion at 600 km deep, consistent with the SWCCP stacks. Meanwhile, we also confirmed the double 660-km discontinuity feature from the source-side conversions. The receiver- and source-side observations provide strong constraints on these low velocity anomalies that may offer insights on the subduction dynamics of the Pacific plate.

  1. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Holt, Jason [Berkeley, CA; Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Park, Hyung Gyu [Oakland, CA

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  2. Magnetic Properties of Nanometer-sized Crystalline and Amorphous Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    1997-01-01

    Amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloy particles can be prepared by chemical preparation techniques. We discuss the preparation of transition metal-boron and iron-carbon particles and their magnetic properties. Nanometer-sized particles of both crystalline and amorphous magnetic materials...... are superparamagnetic at finite temperatures. The temperature dependence of the superparamagnetic relaxation time and the influence of inter-particle interactions is discussed. Finally, some examples of studies of surface magnetization of alpha-Fe particles are presented....

  3. Historical Y. pestis Genomes Reveal the European Black Death as the Source of Ancient and Modern Plague Pandemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, Maria A; Tukhbatova, Rezeda I; Feldman, Michal; Drath, Joanna; Kacki, Sacha; Beltrán de Heredia, Julia; Arnold, Susanne; Sitdikov, Airat G; Castex, Dominique; Wahl, Joachim; Gazimzyanov, Ilgizar R; Nurgaliev, Danis K; Herbig, Alexander; Bos, Kirsten I; Krause, Johannes

    2016-06-08

    Ancient DNA analysis has revealed an involvement of the bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis in several historical pandemics, including the second plague pandemic (Europe, mid-14(th) century Black Death until the mid-18(th) century AD). Here we present reconstructed Y. pestis genomes from plague victims of the Black Death and two subsequent historical outbreaks spanning Europe and its vicinity, namely Barcelona, Spain (1300-1420 cal AD), Bolgar City, Russia (1362-1400 AD), and Ellwangen, Germany (1485-1627 cal AD). Our results provide support for (1) a single entry of Y. pestis in Europe during the Black Death, (2) a wave of plague that traveled toward Asia to later become the source population for contemporary worldwide epidemics, and (3) the presence of an historical European plague focus involved in post-Black Death outbreaks that is now likely extinct. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-source analysis reveals latitudinal and altitudinal shifts in range of Ixodes ricinus at its northern distribution limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffersen Anja B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence for a latitudinal and altitudinal shift in the distribution range of Ixodes ricinus. The reported incidence of tick-borne disease in humans is on the rise in many European countries and has raised political concern and attracted media attention. It is disputed which factors are responsible for these trends, though many ascribe shifts in distribution range to climate changes. Any possible climate effect would be most easily noticeable close to the tick's geographical distribution limits. In Norway- being the northern limit of this species in Europe- no documentation of changes in range has been published. The objectives of this study were to describe the distribution of I. ricinus in Norway and to evaluate if any range shifts have occurred relative to historical descriptions. Methods Multiple data sources - such as tick-sighting reports from veterinarians, hunters, and the general public - and surveillance of human and animal tick-borne diseases were compared to describe the present distribution of I. ricinus in Norway. Correlation between data sources and visual comparison of maps revealed spatial consistency. In order to identify the main spatial pattern of tick abundance, a principal component analysis (PCA was used to obtain a weighted mean of four data sources. The weighted mean explained 67% of the variation of the data sources covering Norway's 430 municipalities and was used to depict the present distribution of I. ricinus. To evaluate if any geographical range shift has occurred in recent decades, the present distribution was compared to historical data from 1943 and 1983. Results Tick-borne disease and/or observations of I. ricinus was reported in municipalities up to an altitude of 583 metres above sea level (MASL and is now present in coastal municipalities north to approximately 69°N. Conclusion I. ricinus is currently found further north and at higher altitudes than described in

  5. Shifting nitrous oxide source/sink behaviour in a subtropical estuary revealed by automated time series observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, Michael J.; Santos, Isaac R.; Maher, Damien T.; Jeffrey, Luke C.; Tait, Douglas R.

    2017-07-01

    The oceans are a major source of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. However, little information is available on how estuaries and the coastal ocean may contribute to N2O budgets, and on the drivers of N2O in aquatic environments. This study utilised five time series stations along the freshwater to marine continuum in a sub-tropical estuary in Australia (Coffs Creek, Australia). Each time series station captured N2O, radon (222Rn, a natural submarine groundwater discharge tracer), dissolved nitrogen, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations for a minimum of 25 h. The use of automated time series observations enabled spatial and tidal-scale variability of N2O to be captured. Groundwater was highly enriched in N2O (up to 306 nM) compared to the receiving surface water. Dissolved N2O supersaturation as high as 386% (27.4 nM) was observed in the upstream freshwater and brackish water areas which represented only a small (∼13%) proportion of the total estuary area. A large area of N2O undersaturation (as low as 53% or 3.9 nM) was observed in the mangrove-dominated lower estuary. This undersaturated area likely resulted from N2O consumption due to nitrate/nitrite (NOx) limitation in mangrove sediments subject to shallow porewater exchange. Overall, the estuary was a minor source of N2O to the atmosphere as the lower mangrove-dominated estuary sink of N2O counteracted groundwater-dominated source of N2O in the upper estuary. Average area-weighted N2O fluxes at the water-air interface approached zero (0.2-0.7 μmol m-2 d-1, depending on piston velocity model used), and were much lower than nitrogen-rich Northern Hemisphere estuaries that are considered large sources of N2O to the atmosphere. This study revealed a temporally and spatially diverse estuary, with areas of N2O production and consumption related to oxygen and total dissolved nitrogen availability, submarine groundwater discharge, and uptake within mangroves.

  6. Numerical simulations of the melting behavior of bulk and nanometer-sized Cu systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manai, G.; Delogu, F.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to investigate the melting mechanisms of four different Cu systems consisting of a surface-free crystalline bulk, a semi-crystal terminating with a free surface and two unsupported particles with a radius of about 4 and 8 nm, respectively. Starting from a relaxed configuration at 300 K, the systems were gradually heated up to the characteristic melting points. The surface-free bulk system underwent homogeneous melting at the limit of superheating, whereas the melting of the semi-crystal and of the nanometer-sized particles occurred with heterogeneous features. In these latter cases, the structural and energetic properties revealed a two-state character with a definite difference between disordered surface layers and bulk-like interiors. In addition, the melting point and the latent heat of fusion of the nanometer-sized particles were significantly depressed with respect to the ones of the semi-crystal, approximately corresponding to the equilibrium values. Pre-melting phenomena took place at the free surfaces at temperatures significantly below the melting point, determining the formation of a solid-liquid interface. Numerical findings indicate that in all the cases the onset of melting is connected with the proliferation and migration of lattice defects and that an intimate relationship exists between homogeneous and heterogeneous melting mechanisms

  7. Surface effects on ionic Coulomb blockade in nanometer-size pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroya; Iizuka, Hideo; Pershin, Yuriy V.; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2018-01-01

    Ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores is a phenomenon that shares some similarities but also differences with its electronic counterpart. Here, we investigate this phenomenon extensively using all-atom molecular dynamics of ionic transport through nanopores of about one nanometer in diameter and up to several nanometers in length. Our goal is to better understand the role of atomic roughness and structure of the pore walls in the ionic Coulomb blockade. Our numerical results reveal the following general trends. First, the nanopore selectivity changes with its diameter, and the nanopore position in the membrane influences the current strength. Second, the ionic transport through the nanopore takes place in a hopping-like fashion over a set of discretized states caused by local electric fields due to membrane atoms. In some cases, this creates a slow-varying ‘crystal-like’ structure of ions inside the nanopore. Third, while at a given voltage, the resistance of the nanopore depends on its length, the slope of this dependence appears to be independent of the molarity of ions. An effective kinetic model that captures the ionic Coulomb blockade behavior observed in MD simulations is formulated.

  8. Surface effects on ionic Coulomb blockade in nanometer-size pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroya; Iizuka, Hideo; Pershin, Yuriy V; Ventra, Massimiliano Di

    2018-01-12

    Ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores is a phenomenon that shares some similarities but also differences with its electronic counterpart. Here, we investigate this phenomenon extensively using all-atom molecular dynamics of ionic transport through nanopores of about one nanometer in diameter and up to several nanometers in length. Our goal is to better understand the role of atomic roughness and structure of the pore walls in the ionic Coulomb blockade. Our numerical results reveal the following general trends. First, the nanopore selectivity changes with its diameter, and the nanopore position in the membrane influences the current strength. Second, the ionic transport through the nanopore takes place in a hopping-like fashion over a set of discretized states caused by local electric fields due to membrane atoms. In some cases, this creates a slow-varying 'crystal-like' structure of ions inside the nanopore. Third, while at a given voltage, the resistance of the nanopore depends on its length, the slope of this dependence appears to be independent of the molarity of ions. An effective kinetic model that captures the ionic Coulomb blockade behavior observed in MD simulations is formulated.

  9. Nanometer-size surface modification produced by single, low energy, highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    Atomically flat surfaces of insulators have been bombarded with low energy, highly charged ions to search for nanometer-size surface modifications. It is expected that the high electron deficiency of highly charged ions will capture and/or remove many of the insulator's localized electrons when impacting on an insulating surface. The resulting local electron deficiency is expected to locally disintegrate the insulator through a open-quotes Coulomb explosionclose quotes forming nanometer-size craters. Xe ions with charge states between 10+ and 45+ and kinetic energies between 0 and 10 keV/q were obtained from the KSU-CRYEBIS, a CRYogenic Electron Beam Ion Source and directed onto various insulating materials. Mica was favored as target material as atomically flat surfaces can be obtained reliably through cleaving. However, the authors observations with an atomic force microscope have shown that mica tends to defoliate locally rather than disintegrate, most likely due to the small binding forces between adjacent layers. So far the authors measurements indicate that each ion produces one blister if the charge state is sufficiently high. The blistering does not seem to depend very much on the kinetic energy of the ions

  10. Non-exponential resistive switching in Ag2S memristors: a key to nanometer-scale non-volatile memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubicza, Agnes; Csontos, Miklós; Halbritter, András; Mihály, György

    2015-03-14

    The dynamics of resistive switchings in nanometer-scale metallic junctions formed between an inert metallic tip and an Ag film covered by a thin Ag2S layer are investigated. Our thorough experimental analysis and numerical simulations revealed that the resistance change upon a switching bias voltage pulse exhibits a strongly non-exponential behaviour yielding markedly different response times at different bias levels. Our results demonstrate the merits of Ag2S nanojunctions as nanometer-scale non-volatile memory cells with stable switching ratios, high endurance as well as fast response to write/erase, and an outstanding stability against read operations at technologically optimal bias and current levels.

  11. Dimensional crossover in fluids under nanometer-scale confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, J

    2012-05-01

    Several earlier studies have shown signatures of crossover in various static and dynamics properties of a confined fluid when the confining dimension decreases to about a nanometer. The density fluctuations govern the majority of such properties of a fluid. Here, we illustrate the crossover in density fluctuation in a confined fluid, to provide a generic understanding of confinement-induced crossover of fluid properties, using computer simulations. The crossover can be understood as a manifestation of changes in the long-wavelength behavior of fluctuation in density due to geometrical constraints. We further show that the confining potential significantly affects the crossover behavior.

  12. Possible Source Populations of the White-backed Planthopper in the Greater Mekong Subregion Revealed by Mitochondrial DNA Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yong; Chu, Dong; Yin, Yan-Qiong; Zhao, Xue-Qing; Chen, Ai-Dong; Khay, Sathya; Douangboupha, Bounneuang; Kyaw, Mu Mu; Kongchuensin, Manita; Ngo, Vien Vinh; Nguyen, Chung Huy

    2016-12-01

    The white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), is a serious pest of rice in Asia. However, little is known regarding the migration of this pest insect from the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) including Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, and Vietnam, into China’s Yunnan Province. To determine the migration patterns of S. furcifera in the GMS and putative secondary immigration inside China’s Yunnan Province, we investigated the population genetic diversity, genetic structure, and gene flow of 42 S. furcifera populations across the six countries in the GMS by intensive sampling using mitochondrial genes. Our study revealed the potential emigration of S. furcifera from the GMS consists primarily of three major sources: 1) the S. furcifera from Laos and Vietnam migrate into south and southeast Yunnan, where they proceed to further migrate into northeast and central Yunnan; 2) the S. furcifera from Myanmar migrate into west Yunnan, and/or central Yunnan, and/or northeast Yunnan; 3) the S. furcifera from Cambodia migrate into southwest Yunnan, where the populations can migrate further into central Yunnan. The new data will not only be helpful in predicting population dynamics of the planthopper, but will also aid in regional control programs for this economically important pest insect.

  13. Seismic tomography model reveals mantle magma sources of recent volcanic activity at El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Yeguas, Araceli; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Koulakov, Ivan; Jakovlev, Andrey; Romero-Ruiz, M. Carmen; Prudencio, Janire

    2014-12-01

    We present a 3-D model of P and S velocities beneath El Hierro Island, constructed using the traveltime data of more than 13 000 local earthquakes recorded by the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN, Spain) in the period from 2011 July to 2012 September. The velocity models were performed using the LOTOS code for iterative passive source tomography. The results of inversion were thoroughly verified using different resolution and robustness tests. The results reveal that the majority of the onshore area of El Hierro is associated with a high-velocity anomaly observed down to 10-12-km depth. This anomaly is interpreted as the accumulation of solid igneous rocks erupted during the last 1 Myr and intrusive magmatic bodies. Below this high-velocity pattern, we observe a low-velocity anomaly, interpreted as a batch of magma coming from the mantle located beneath El Hierro. The boundary between the low- and high-velocity anomalies is marked by a prominent seismicity cluster, thought to represent anomalous stresses due to the interaction of the batch of magma with crust material. The areas of recent eruptions, Orchilla and La Restinga, are associated with low-velocity anomalies surrounding the main high-velocity block. These eruptions took place around the island where the crust is much weaker than the onshore area and where the melted material cannot penetrate. These results put constraints on the geological model that could explain the origin of the volcanism in oceanic islands, such as in the Canaries, which is not yet clearly understood.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of nanometal-ordered mesoporous carbon composites as heterogeneous catalysts for electrooxidation of aniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Xiaoyue; Chen, Yawen; Liu, Xinyue; Chang, Limin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •NM-OMC catalysts were prepared for electrochemical oxidation of aniline. •The oxidation of aniline was studied with NM-OMC catalysts suspended in solution. •The Cu-OMC exhibited the highest catalytic activity for aniline degradation. •The mineralization current efficiency was improved by 2 times with Cu-OMC catalyst. •An electrochemical mineralization pathway of aniline was proposed. -- Abstract: The Cu, Co and Ni nanometal embedded ordered mesoporous carbons (NM-OMCs) were fabricated by a soft-template method using phenol/formaldehyde as carbon source and triblock copolymer F127 as template agent. The morphology, structure, surface physicochemical properties and pore structure of the NM-OMCs were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. Their potential application to the electrocatalytic degradation of aniline was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and ·OH radicals generation test. Furthermore, the electrochemical oxidation process of aniline was also investigated in the presence of the OMC-based catalyst particles suspended in a Na 2 SO 4 solution using a PbO 2 anode. Results revealed that the NM-OMCs inherited the ordered mesostructure of pristine OMC and the metal nanoparticles (Cu, Co or Ni) were embedded in the carbon framework. The Cu-OMC exhibited significantly higher catalytic activity than OMC and other NM-OMCs for the electrooxidation of aniline. In electrochemical oxidation process of aniline, nearly all of aniline could be degraded after 120 min of electrolysis with Cu-OMC particles as catalyst, while 89%, 92%, and 97% with OMC, Co-OMC and Ni-OMC catalysts, respectively, obviously higher than 76% of electrochemical oxidation without assistance of catalysts. After

  15. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  16. Nanometer CMOS Sigma-Delta Modulators for Software Defined Radio

    CERN Document Server

    Morgado, Alonso; Rosa, José M

    2012-01-01

    This book presents innovative solutions for the implementation of Sigma-Delta Modulation (SDM) based Analog-to-Digital Conversion (ADC), required for the next generation of wireless hand-held terminals. These devices will be based on the so-called multistandard transceiver chipsets, integrated in nanometer CMOS technologies. One of the most challenging and critical parts in such transceivers is the analog-digital interface, because of the assorted signal bandwidths and dynamic ranges that can be required to handle the A/D conversion for several operation modes.   This book describes new adaptive and reconfigurable SDM ADC topologies, circuit strategies and synthesis methods, specially suited for multi-standard wireless telecom systems and future Software-defined-radios (SDRs) integrated in nanoscale CMOS. It is a practical book, going from basic concepts to the frontiers of SDM architectures and circuit implementations, which are explained in a didactical and systematic way. It gives a comprehensive overview...

  17. Mixed Surfactant Template Method for Preparation of Nanometer Selenium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Lin Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium nanoparticles have been synthesized in an aqueous solution by using sodium dodecyl sulfate and polyvinyl alcohol as a soft template. The factors on synthesis, such as reaction time, concentration of reactants and ultrasonic irradiation were studied. The uniform stable selenium nanospheres were obstained in the conditions of 1.0 (mass fraction sodium dodecyl sulfate, 1.0 (mass fraction polyvinyl alcohol, n(Vc:n(H2SeO3=7:1 and 7 minutes after the initiation of the reaction at room temperature. The average particle size of selenium is about 30 nm. The product was characterized by UV and TEM. Finally the applications of the red element nanometer selenium in anti-older cosmetics are presented.

  18. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, John E.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains.

  19. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, J.E.; Kelly, T.F.

    1999-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains. 20 figs.

  20. Quantitative nanometer-scale mapping of dielectric tunability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselev, Alexander [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Klein, Andreas [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany); Gassmann, Juergen [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany); Jesse, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Li, Qian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wisinger, Nina Balke [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-21

    Two scanning probe microscopy techniques—near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM)—are used to characterize and image tunability in a thin (Ba,Sr)TiO3 film with nanometer scale spatial resolution. While sMIM allows direct probing of tunability by measurement of the change in the dielectric constant, in PFM, tunability can be extracted via electrostrictive response. The near-field microwave imaging and PFM provide similar information about dielectric tunability with PFM capable to deliver quantitative information on tunability with a higher spatial resolution close to 15 nm. This is the first time that information about the dielectric tunability is available on such length scales.

  1. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  2. Mapping the Diffusion Potential of a Reconstructed Au(111) Surface at Nanometer Scale with 2D Molecular Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Shi-Chao; Xie Nan; Gong Hui-Qi; Guo Yang; Shan Xin-Yan; Lu Xing-Hua; Sun Qian

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption and diffusion behaviors of benzene molecules on an Au(111) surface are investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. A herringbone surface reconstruction of the Au(111) surface is imaged with atomic resolution, and significantly different behaviors are observed for benzene molecules adsorbed on step edges and terraces. The electric field induced modification in the molecular diffusion potential is revealed with a 2D molecular gas model, and a new method is developed to map the diffusion potential over the reconstructed Au(111) surface at the nanometer scale. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  3. Catchment tracers reveal discharge, recharge and sources of groundwater-borne pollutants in a novel lake modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kristensen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater-borne contaminants such as nutrients, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM and pesticides can have an impact the biological quality of lakes. The sources of pollutants can, however, be difficult to identify due to high heterogeneity in groundwater flow patterns. This study presents a novel approach for fast hydrological surveys of small groundwater-fed lakes using multiple groundwater-borne tracers. Water samples were collected from the lake and temporary groundwater wells, installed every 50 m within a distance of 5–45 m to the shore, were analysed for tracer concentrations of CDOM, DOC, total dissolved nitrogen (TDN, groundwater only, total nitrogen (TN, lake only, total dissolved phosphorus (TDP, groundwater only, total phosphorus (TP, lake only, δ18O ∕ δ16O isotope ratios and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM components derived from parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC. The isolation of groundwater recharge areas was based on δ18O measurements and areas with a high groundwater recharge rate were identified using a microbially influenced FDOM component. Groundwater discharge sites and the fractions of water delivered from the individual sites were isolated with the Community Assembly via Trait Selection model (CATS. The CATS model utilized tracer measurements of TDP, TDN, DOC and CDOM from the groundwater samples and related these to the tracer measurements of TN, TP, DOC and CDOM in the lake. A direct comparison between the lake and the inflowing groundwater was possible as degradation rates of the tracers in the lake were taken into account and related to a range of water retention times (WRTs of the lake (0.25–3.5 years in 0.25-year increments. These estimations showed that WRTs above 2 years required a higher tracer concentration of inflowing water than found in any of the groundwater wells around the lake. From the estimations of inflowing tracer concentration

  4. Catchment tracers reveal discharge, recharge and sources of groundwater-borne pollutants in a novel lake modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Emil; Madsen-Østerbye, Mikkel; Massicotte, Philippe; Pedersen, Ole; Markager, Stiig; Kragh, Theis

    2018-02-01

    Groundwater-borne contaminants such as nutrients, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and pesticides can have an impact the biological quality of lakes. The sources of pollutants can, however, be difficult to identify due to high heterogeneity in groundwater flow patterns. This study presents a novel approach for fast hydrological surveys of small groundwater-fed lakes using multiple groundwater-borne tracers. Water samples were collected from the lake and temporary groundwater wells, installed every 50 m within a distance of 5-45 m to the shore, were analysed for tracer concentrations of CDOM, DOC, total dissolved nitrogen (TDN, groundwater only), total nitrogen (TN, lake only), total dissolved phosphorus (TDP, groundwater only), total phosphorus (TP, lake only), δ18O / δ16O isotope ratios and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) components derived from parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The isolation of groundwater recharge areas was based on δ18O measurements and areas with a high groundwater recharge rate were identified using a microbially influenced FDOM component. Groundwater discharge sites and the fractions of water delivered from the individual sites were isolated with the Community Assembly via Trait Selection model (CATS). The CATS model utilized tracer measurements of TDP, TDN, DOC and CDOM from the groundwater samples and related these to the tracer measurements of TN, TP, DOC and CDOM in the lake. A direct comparison between the lake and the inflowing groundwater was possible as degradation rates of the tracers in the lake were taken into account and related to a range of water retention times (WRTs) of the lake (0.25-3.5 years in 0.25-year increments). These estimations showed that WRTs above 2 years required a higher tracer concentration of inflowing water than found in any of the groundwater wells around the lake. From the estimations of inflowing tracer concentration, the CATS model isolated

  5. δ(15)N and δ(18)O Reveal the Sources of Nitrate-Nitrogen in Urban Residential Stormwater Runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Ya; Toor, Gurpal S

    2016-03-15

    Nitrogen (N) sources are widely distributed in the complex urban environment. High-resolution data elucidating N sources in the residential catchments are not available. We used stable isotopes of N and oxygen (O) of nitrate (δ(18)O-NO3(-) and δ(15)N-NO3(-)) along with δ(18)O and hydrogen (δD) of water (H2O) to understand the sources and transformations of N in residential stormwater runoff. Stormwater runoff samples were collected over 25 stormwater events at 5 min intervals using an autosampler installed at the residential catchment outlet pipe that drained 31 low-density homes with a total drainage area of 0.11 km(2). Bayesian mixing model results indicated that atmospheric deposition (range 43-71%) and chemical N fertilizers (range stormwater runoff and that there was a continuum of source changes during the stormwater events. Further, the NO3-N transport in the stormwater runoff from the residential catchment was driven by mixing of multiple sources and biotic (i.e., nitrification) processes. This work suggests that a better understanding of N transport and sources is needed to reduce N export and improve water quality in urban water systems.

  6. First Beam Test of Nanometer Spot Size Monitor Using Laser Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Walz, D

    2003-01-01

    The nanometer spot size monitor based on the laser interferometry (Laser-Compton Spot Size Monitor) has been tested in FFTB beam line at SLAC. A low emittance beam of 46 GeV electrons, provided by the two-mile linear accelerator, was focused into nanometer spot in the FFTB line, and its transverse dimensions were precisely measured by the spot size monitor.

  7. First Beam Test of Nanometer Spot Size Monitor Using Laser Interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, Dieter R

    2003-01-01

    The nanometer spot size monitor based on the laser interferometry (Laser-Compton Spot Size Monitor) has been tested in FFTB beam line at SLAC. A low emittance beam of 46 GeV electrons, provided by the two-mile linear accelerator, was focused into nanometer spot in the FFTB line, and its transverse dimensions were precisely measured by the spot size monitor

  8. Dynamic imaging of coherent sources reveals different network connectivity underlying the generation and perpetuation of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Elshoff

    Full Text Available The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS, an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis.

  9. Gaze strategies can reveal the impact of source code features on the cognitive load of novice programmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff-Jensen, Andreas; Ruder, Kevin Vignola; Triantafyllou, Evangelia

    2018-01-01

    As shown by several studies, programmers’ readability of source code is influenced by its structural and the textual features. In order to assess the importance of these features, we conducted an eye-tracking experiment with programming students. To assess the readability and comprehensibility of...

  10. Ground deformation source model at Kuchinoerabu-jima volcano during 2006-2014 as revealed by campaign GPS observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kohei; Iguchi, Masato

    2017-12-01

    We analyzed campaign Global Positioning System observation data in Kuchinoerabu-jima during 2006-2014. Most benchmarks located around Shin-dake crater showed crater-centered radial horizontal displacements. Horizontal displacements at western rim of the Shin-dake crater were tended to be larger compared to those at eastern rim. In addition, benchmark KUC14 which locates near the cliff at Furu-dake showed westward horizontal displacement rather than crater-centered radial (southward) one. Meanwhile, small displacements were detected at the benchmarks located at the foot of Kuchinoerabu-jima. We modeled the observed displacements applying a finite element method. We set entire FE domain as 100 × 100 × 50 km3. We set top of the domain as a free surface, and sides and bottom to be fixed boundaries. Topography was introduced in the area within Kuchinoerabu-jima using digital elevation model data provided by Kagoshima prefecture and elevation information from Google earth, and elevation of the outside area was assumed to be sea level. We assumed a stratified structure based on a one-dimensional P-wave velocity structure. We applied a vertical spheroid source model and searched optimal values of horizontal location, depth, equatorial and polar radiuses, and internal pressure change of the source using the forward modeling method. A spherical source with a radius of 50 m was obtained beneath the Shin-dake crater at a depth of 400 m above sea level. The internal pressure increase of 361 MPa yields its volume increase of 31,700 m3. Taking effects of topography and heterogeneity of ground into account allowed reproduction of overall deformation in Kuchinoerabu-jima. The location of deformation source coincides with hypocenters of shallow volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes and the aquifer estimated from a two-dimensional resistivity model by audio-frequency magnetotellurics method. The obtained deformation source may be corresponding to the pressurized aquifer, and shallow VT

  11. Secondary emission scintillation counter for microdosimetry at the nanometer level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhagen, P.

    1987-01-01

    The secondary emission scintillation (SES) counter is a device designed to count the positive ions of charged-particle tracks in gas volumes simulating sites in tissue with diameters of the order of 1 nanometer. Based on suggestions by H.H. Rossi and A.M. Kellerer, the basic idea of the device was developed by A. Kosiara, M. Biavati, and R.D. Colvett in the late 1970s. The device was substantially modified in 1982, but work on it was suspended before the new version could be tested, in order to devote full-time effort to rebuilding RARAF. Work resumed on the SES counter in 1986. A diagram of the prototype SES counter now being tested is shown. A weak electric field in the cylindrical collection region of the device drifts ions from a track to a small region (less than 1 mm) of high electric field where they are accelerated by several kilovolts onto a dynode, producing secondary electrons. The secondary electrons are then accelerated onto a plastic scintillator, and the resulting light is detected by a photomultiplier. The passage of a charged particle is established by a solid state detector, which triggers electronics detecting coincidences and measuring the timing and amplitude of pulses from the photomultiplier

  12. Research on long-range grating interferometry with nanometer resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Xingchun; Zhao, Shanghong; Lü, Haibao

    2008-01-01

    Grating interferometry that features long range and nanometer resolution is presented. The optical system was established based on a single long metrology grating. The large fringe multiplication was achieved by properly selecting two high-order diffraction beams to form a fringe pattern. The fringe pattern collected by a linear array was first tailored to a few multiples of fringes in order to suppress the effect of the energy leakage on phase-extracting precision when the fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm was used to calculate its phase. Thus, the phase-extracting precision of a tailored fringe pattern by FFT was greatly improved. Based on this, a novel subdividing method, which exploited the time-shift property of FFT, was developed to subdivide the fringe with large multiple and high accuracy. Numerical results show that the system resolution reaches 1 nm. The experimental results obtained against a capacitive sensor in the sub-mm range show that the measurement precision of the system is less than 10 nm. (technical design note)

  13. Sub-nanometer glass surface dynamics induced by illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Illumination is known to induce stress and morphology changes in opaque glasses. Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) has a smaller bandgap than the crystal. Thus, we were able to excite with 532 nm light a 1 μm amorphous surface layer on a SiC crystal while recording time-lapse movies of glass surface dynamics by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Photoexcitation of the a-SiC surface layer through the transparent crystal avoids heating the STM tip. Up to 6 × 10 4 s, long movies of surface dynamics with 40 s time resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution were obtained. Clusters of ca. 3-5 glass forming units diameter are seen to cooperatively hop between two states at the surface. Photoexcitation with green laser light recruits immobile clusters to hop, rather than increasing the rate at which already mobile clusters hop. No significant laser heating was observed. Thus, we favor an athermal mechanism whereby electronic excitation of a-SiC directly controls glassy surface dynamics. This mechanism is supported by an exciton migration-relaxation-thermal diffusion model. Individual clusters take ∼1 h to populate states differently after the light intensity has changed. We believe the surrounding matrix rearranges slowly when it is stressed by a change in laser intensity, and clusters serve as a diagnostic. Such cluster hopping and matrix rearrangement could underlie the microscopic mechanism of photoinduced aging of opaque glasses

  14. Sub-nanometer resolution XPS depth profiling: Sensing of atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szklarczyk, Marek, E-mail: szklarcz@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Macak, Karol; Roberts, Adam J. [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Takahashi, Kazuhiro [Kratos XPS Section, Shimadzu Corp., 380-1 Horiyamashita, Hadano, Kanagawa 259-1304 (Japan); Hutton, Simon [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Głaszczka, Rafał [Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Blomfield, Christopher [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Angle resolved photoelectron depth profiling of nano thin films. • Sensing atomic position in SAM films. • Detection of direction position of adsorbed molecules. - Abstract: The development of a method capable of distinguishing a single atom in a single molecule is important in many fields. The results reported herein demonstrate sub-nanometer resolution for angularly resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is made possible by the incorporation of a Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) model, which utilize density corrected electronic emission factors to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experimental results. In this paper we report on the comparison between experimental ARXPS results and reconstructed for both inorganic and organic thin film samples. Unexpected deviations between experimental data and calculated points are explained by the inaccuracy of the constants and standards used for the calculation, e.g. emission factors, scattering intensity and atomic density through the studied thickness. The positions of iron, nitrogen and fluorine atoms were determined in the molecules of the studied self-assembled monolayers. It has been shown that reconstruction of real spectroscopic data with 0.2 nm resolution is possible.

  15. Sub-Nanometer Channels Embedded in Two-Dimensional Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yimo

    2017-07-31

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials are among the most promising candidates for next-generation electronics due to their atomic thinness, allowing for flexible transparent electronics and ultimate length scaling1. Thus far, atomically-thin p-n junctions2-7, metal-semiconductor contacts8-10, and metal-insulator barriers11-13 have been demonstrated. While 2D materials achieve the thinnest possible devices, precise nanoscale control over the lateral dimensions are also necessary. Although external one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes14 can be used to locally gate 2D materials, this adds a non-trivial third dimension, complicating device integration and flexibility. Here, we report the direct synthesis of sub-nanometer 1D MoS2 channels embedded within WSe2 monolayers, using a dislocation-catalyzed approach. The 1D channels have edges free of misfit dislocations and dangling bonds, forming a coherent interface with the embedding 2D matrix. Periodic dislocation arrays produce 2D superlattices of coherent MoS2 1D channels in WSe2. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have identified other combinations of 2D materials that could form 1D channels. Density function theory (DFT) calculation predicts these 1D channels display type II band alignment needed for carrier confinement and charge separation to access the ultimate length scales necessary for future electronic applications.

  16. Depositing nanometer-sized particles of metals onto carbon allotropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Fallbach, Michael J. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for depositing nanometer-sized metal particles onto a substrate in the absence of aqueous solvents, organic solvents, and reducing agents, and without any required pre-treatment of the substrate, includes preparing an admixture of a metal compound and a substrate by dry mixing a chosen amount of the metal compound with a chosen amount of the substrate; and supplying energy to the admixture in an amount sufficient to deposit zero valance metal particles onto the substrate. This process gives rise to a number of deposited metallic particle sizes which may be controlled. The compositions prepared by this process are used to produce polymer composites by combining them with readily available commodity and engineering plastics. The polymer composites are used as coatings, or they are used to fabricate articles, such as free-standing films, fibers, fabrics, foams, molded and laminated articles, tubes, adhesives, and fiber reinforced articles. These articles are well-suited for many applications requiring thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, antibacterial activity, catalytic activity, and combinations thereof.

  17. VLT/SINFONI Observations of Spitzer /MIPSGAL 24 μ m Circumstellar Shells: Revealing the Natures of Their Central Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, K. M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Hawaii Hilo, 200 W Kawili Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Flagey, N. [Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope Corporation, 65-1238 Mamalahoa Highway, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Noriega-Crespo, A. [Space Telescope Science Institue, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Carey, S. [Infrared Processing Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ingallinera, A., E-mail: silvakm@hawaii.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2017-03-01

    We present Very Large Telescope/Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared H - and K -band spectra of potential central stars within the inner 8″-by-8″ regions of 55 MIPSGAL “bubbles” (MBs), sub-arcminute circumstellar shells discovered in the mid-IR survey of the Galactic plane with Spitzer /MIPS. At magnitudes brighter than 15, we detect a total of 230 stars in the K band and 179 stars in the H band. We spectrally identify 145 stars in all but three MBs, with average magnitudes of 13.8 and 12.7 respectively, using spectral libraries and previous studies of near-IR stellar spectra. We also use tabulated intrinsic stellar magnitudes and colors to derive distances and extinction values, and to better constrain the classifications of the stars. We reliably identify the central sources for 21 of the 55 MBs, which we classify as follows: one Wolf–Rayet, three luminous blue variable candidates, four early-type (O to F), and 15 late-type (G to M) stars. The 21 central sources are, on average, one magnitude fainter than these in the most recent study of MBs, and we notice a significant drop in the fraction of massive star candidates. For the 34 remaining MBs in our sample, we are unable to identify the central sources due to confusion, low spectroscopic signal-to-noise ratio, and/or lack of detections in the images near the centers of the bubbles. We discuss how our findings compare with previous studies and support the trend, for the most part, between the shells’ morphologies in the mid-IR and central sources spectral types.

  18. High frequency longitudinal profiling reveals hydrologic controls on solute sourcing, transport and processing in a karst river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, R. T.; Cohen, M. J.; Spangler, M.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2017-12-01

    The lower Santa Fe River is a large, karst river of north Florida, fed by numerous artesian springs and also containing multiple sink-rise systems. We performed repeated longitudinal profiles collecting very high frequency measurements of multiple stream parameters including temperature, dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, pH, dissolved organic matter, nitrate, ammonium, phosphate and turbidity. This high frequency dataset provided a spatially explicit understanding of solute sources and coupled biogeochemical processing rates along the 25 km study reach. We noted marked changes in river profiles as the river transitioned from low to high flow during the onset of the wet season. The role of lateral inflow from springs as the primary solute source was greatly reduced under high flow conditions. Effects of sink-rise systems, which under low flow conditions allow the majority of flow to bypass several kilometer long sections of the main channel, virtually disappeared under high flow conditions. Impeded light transmittance at high flow reduced primary production and by extension assimilatory nutrient uptake. This study demonstrates how high frequency longitudinal profiling can be used to observe how hydrologic conditions can alter groundwater-surface water interactions and modulate the sourcing, transport and biogeochemical processing of stream solutes.

  19. Fabrication of Micrometer- and Nanometer-Scale Polymer Structures by Visible Light Induced Dielectrophoresis (DEP Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen J. Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report in this paper a novel, inexpensive and flexible method for fabricating micrometer- and nanometer-scale three-dimensional (3D polymer structures using visible light sources instead of ultra-violet (UV light sources or lasers. This method also does not require the conventional micro-photolithographic technique (i.e., photolithographic masks for patterning and fabricating polymer structures such as hydrogels. The major materials and methods required for this novel fabrication technology are: (1 any cross-linked network of photoactive polymers (examples of fabricated poly(ethylene glycol (PEG-diacrylate hydrogel structures are shown in this paper; (2 an Optically-induced Dielectrophoresis (ODEP System which includes an “ODEP chip” (i.e., any chip that changes its surface conductivity when exposed to visible light, an optical microscope, a projector, and a computer; and (3 an animator software hosted on a computer that can generate virtual or dynamic patterns which can be projected onto the “ODEP chip” through the use of a projector and a condenser lens. Essentially, by placing a photosensitive polymer solution inside the microfluidic platform formed by the “ODEP chip” bonded to another substrate, and applying an alternating current (a.c. electrical potential across the polymer solution (typically ~20 Vp-p at 10 kHz, solid polymer micro/nano structures can then be formed on the “ODEP chip” surface when visible-light is projected onto the chip. The 2D lateral geometry (x and y dimensions and the thickness (height of the micro/nano structures are dictated by the image geometry of the visible light projected onto the “ODEP chip” and also the time duration of projection. Typically, after an image projection with intensity ranging from ~0.2 to 0.4 mW/cm2 for 10 s, ~200 nm high structures can be formed. In our current system, the thickness of these polymer structures can be controlled to form from ~200 nanometers to ~3

  20. Iodine budget in surface waters from Atacama: Natural and anthropogenic iodine sources revealed by halogen geochemistry and iodine-129 isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez, Fernanda; Reich, Martin; Snyder, Glen; Pérez-Fodich, Alida; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Daniele, Linda; Fehn, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Iodine enrichment in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile is widespread and varies significantly between reservoirs, including nitrate-rich “caliche” soils, supergene Cu deposits and marine sedimentary rocks. Recent studies have suggested that groundwater has played a key role in the remobilization, transport and deposition of iodine in Atacama over scales of millions-of-years. However, and considering that natural waters are also anomalously enriched in iodine in the region, the relative source contributions of iodine in the waters and its extent of mixing remain unconstrained. In this study we provide new halogen data and isotopic ratios of iodine ("1"2"9I/I) in shallow seawater, rivers, salt lakes, cold and thermal spring water, rainwater and groundwater that help to constrain the relative influence of meteoric, marine and crustal sources in the Atacama waters. Iodine concentrations in surface and ground waters range between 0.35 μM and 26 μM in the Tarapacá region and between 0.25 μM and 48 μM in the Antofagasta region, and show strong enrichment when compared with seawater concentrations (I = ∼0.4 μM). In contrast, no bromine enrichment is detected (1.3–45.7 μM for Tarapacá and 1.7–87.4 μM for Antofagasta) relative to seawater (Br = ∼600 μM). These data, coupled to the high I/Cl and low Br/Cl ratios are indicative of an organic-rich sedimentary source (related with an “initial” fluid) that interacted with meteoric water to produce a mixed fluid, and preclude an exclusively seawater origin for iodine in Atacama natural waters. Iodine isotopic ratios ("1"2"9I/I) are consistent with halogen chemistry and confirm that most of the iodine present in natural waters derives from a deep initial fluid source (i.e., groundwater which has interacted with Jurassic marine basement), with variable influence of at least one atmospheric or meteoric source. Samples with the lowest isotopic ratios ("1"2"9I/I from ∼215 to ∼1000 × 10"

  1. Wintering area DDE source to migratory white-faced ibis revealed by satellite telemetry and prey sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, M.A.; Fuller, M.R.; Henny, C.J.; Seegar, W.S.; Garcia, Jorge H.

    2010-01-01

    Locations of contaminant exposure for nesting migratory species are difficult to fully understand because of possible additional sources encountered during migration or on the wintering grounds. A portion of the migratory white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi) nesting at Carson Lake, Nevada continues to be exposed to dichloro-diphenyldichloro-ethylene (DDE) with no change, which is unusual, observed in egg concentrations between 1985 and 2000. About 45-63% of the earliest nesting segment shows reduced reproductive success correlated with elevated egg concentrations of >4 ??g/g wet weight (ww). Local prey (primarily earthworms) near nests contained little DDE so we tracked the migration and wintering movements of 20 adult males during 2000-2004 to determine the possible source. At various wintering sites, we found a correlation (r 2 = 0.518, P = 0.0125, N = 11) between DDE in earthworm composites and DDE in blood plasma of white-faced ibis wintering there, although the plasma was collected on their breeding grounds soon after arrival. The main source of DDE was wintering areas in the Mexicali Valley of Baja California Norte, Mexico, and probably the adjacent Imperial Valley, California, USA. This unusual continuing DDE problem for white-faced ibis is associated with: the long-term persistence in soil of DDE; the earthworms' ability to bioconcentrate DDE from soil; the proclivity of white-faced ibis to feed on earthworms in agricultural fields; the species's extreme sensitivity to DDE in their eggs; and perhaps its life history strategy of being a "capital breeder". We suggest surveying and sampling white-faced ibis eggs at nesting colonies, especially at Carson Lake, to monitor the continuing influence of DDE. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  2. Seasonal and Daily Variations of Subsurface Velocity Revealed by the Air-gun Source in Binchuan, Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Y.; Yang, H.; Wang, B.

    2017-12-01

    We derive temporal variations of subsurface structure using a large-volume air-gun source excited in Binchuan, Yunnan, southwest China, the first transmitting seismic station that can generate high-quality repeating waveforms. The data were collected between January 2013 and December 2015 that were recorded by 40 stations within 150 km, including permanent and newly deployed air-gun array stations. Firstly, we conduct cluster analysis using the waveforms at the nearest station and find the clustering result is not only governed by the water level of the reservoir, but also has seasonal variations. Furthermore, we use the records of the nearest station to approximate the source time functions and then retrieve empirical Green's functions (EGF) by deconvolution. Then we obtain travel time difference by comparing the EGF. The travel time difference exhibits clear seasonal variation, and the pattern correlates the best with surface air temperature. The increasing temperature coincides with increasing delay time i.e. decreasing seismic velocity. We interpret the observed seasonal variation of subsurface velocity is partly caused by thermo-elastic strain. However, our calculated thermo-elastic strain is only half in amplitude of the observed strain, indicating other factors such as precipitation and ground water level may play a role in the subsurface changes. Moreover, we derive the daily variation of subsurface velocity in December 2015 when air-gun shots were made in every hour. The delay time clearly correlates with the barometric pressure change and the tidal strain. Here we demonstrate that both long-term (seasonal) and short-term (daily) structural variations can be derived using the newly constructed active source, which is a powerful tool to advance our understanding of rheological properties of the crust as well as well processes associated with earthquakes and other natural hazards.

  3. Wintering area DDE source to migratory white-faced ibis revealed by satellite telemetry and prey sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Michael A; Fuller, Mark R; Henny, Charles J; Seegar, William S; Garcia, Jaqueline

    2010-01-01

    Locations of contaminant exposure for nesting migratory species are difficult to fully understand because of possible additional sources encountered during migration or on the wintering grounds. A portion of the migratory white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi) nesting at Carson Lake, Nevada continues to be exposed to dichloro-diphenyldichloro-ethylene (DDE) with no change, which is unusual, observed in egg concentrations between 1985 and 2000. About 45-63% of the earliest nesting segment shows reduced reproductive success correlated with elevated egg concentrations of >4 microg/g wet weight (ww). Local prey (primarily earthworms) near nests contained little DDE so we tracked the migration and wintering movements of 20 adult males during 2000-2004 to determine the possible source. At various wintering sites, we found a correlation (r (2) = 0.518, P = 0.0125, N = 11) between DDE in earthworm composites and DDE in blood plasma of white-faced ibis wintering there, although the plasma was collected on their breeding grounds soon after arrival. The main source of DDE was wintering areas in the Mexicali Valley of Baja California Norte, Mexico, and probably the adjacent Imperial Valley, California, USA. This unusual continuing DDE problem for white-faced ibis is associated with: the long-term persistence in soil of DDE; the earthworms' ability to bioconcentrate DDE from soil; the proclivity of white-faced ibis to feed on earthworms in agricultural fields; the species's extreme sensitivity to DDE in their eggs; and perhaps its life history strategy of being a "capital breeder". We suggest surveying and sampling white-faced ibis eggs at nesting colonies, especially at Carson Lake, to monitor the continuing influence of DDE.

  4. Towards nanometer-spaced silicon contacts to proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schukfeh, Muhammed I.; Sepunaru, Lior; Behr, Pascal; Li, Wenjie; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David; Tornow, Marc

    2016-03-01

    A vertical nanogap device (VND) structure comprising all-silicon contacts as electrodes for the investigation of electronic transport processes in bioelectronic systems is reported. Devices were fabricated from silicon-on-insulator substrates whose buried oxide (SiO2) layer of a few nanometers in thickness is embedded within two highly doped single crystalline silicon layers. Individual VNDs were fabricated by standard photolithography and a combination of anisotropic and selective wet etching techniques, resulting in p+ silicon contacts, vertically separated by 4 or 8 nm, depending on the chosen buried oxide thickness. The buried oxide was selectively recess-etched with buffered hydrofluoric acid, exposing a nanogap. For verification of the devices’ electrical functionality, gold nanoparticles were successfully trapped onto the nanogap electrodes’ edges using AC dielectrophoresis. Subsequently, the suitability of the VND structures for transport measurements on proteins was investigated by functionalizing the devices with cytochrome c protein from solution, thereby providing non-destructive, permanent semiconducting contacts to the proteins. Current-voltage measurements performed after protein deposition exhibited an increase in the junctions’ conductance of up to several orders of magnitude relative to that measured prior to cytochrome c immobilization. This increase in conductance was lost upon heating the functionalized device to above the protein’s denaturation temperature (80 °C). Thus, the VND junctions allow conductance measurements which reflect the averaged electronic transport through a large number of protein molecules, contacted in parallel with permanent contacts and, for the first time, in a symmetrical Si-protein-Si configuration.

  5. Towards nanometer-spaced silicon contacts to proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schukfeh, Muhammed I; Behr, Pascal; Tornow, Marc; Sepunaru, Lior; Li, Wenjie; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2016-01-01

    A vertical nanogap device (VND) structure comprising all-silicon contacts as electrodes for the investigation of electronic transport processes in bioelectronic systems is reported. Devices were fabricated from silicon-on-insulator substrates whose buried oxide (SiO_2) layer of a few nanometers in thickness is embedded within two highly doped single crystalline silicon layers. Individual VNDs were fabricated by standard photolithography and a combination of anisotropic and selective wet etching techniques, resulting in p"+ silicon contacts, vertically separated by 4 or 8 nm, depending on the chosen buried oxide thickness. The buried oxide was selectively recess-etched with buffered hydrofluoric acid, exposing a nanogap. For verification of the devices’ electrical functionality, gold nanoparticles were successfully trapped onto the nanogap electrodes’ edges using AC dielectrophoresis. Subsequently, the suitability of the VND structures for transport measurements on proteins was investigated by functionalizing the devices with cytochrome c protein from solution, thereby providing non-destructive, permanent semiconducting contacts to the proteins. Current–voltage measurements performed after protein deposition exhibited an increase in the junctions’ conductance of up to several orders of magnitude relative to that measured prior to cytochrome c immobilization. This increase in conductance was lost upon heating the functionalized device to above the protein’s denaturation temperature (80 °C). Thus, the VND junctions allow conductance measurements which reflect the averaged electronic transport through a large number of protein molecules, contacted in parallel with permanent contacts and, for the first time, in a symmetrical Si–protein–Si configuration. (paper)

  6. Local mechanical spectroscopy with nanometer-scale lateral resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulevey, F.; Gremaud, G.; Sémoroz, A.; Kulik, A. J.; Burnham, N. A.; Dupas, E.; Gourdon, D.

    1998-05-01

    A new technique has been developed to probe the viscoelastic and anelastic properties of submicron phases of inhomogeneous materials. The measurement gives information related to the internal friction and to the variations of the dynamic modulus of nanometer-sized volumes. It is then the nanoscale equivalent to mechanical spectroscopy, a well-known macroscopic technique for materials studies, also sometimes called dynamic mechanical (thermal) analysis. The technique is based on a scanning force microscope, using the principle of scanning local-acceleration microscopy (SLAM), and allows the sample temperature to be changed. It is called variable-temperature SLAM, abbreviated T-SLAM. According to a recent proposition to systematize names of scanning probe microscope based methods, this technique should be included in the family of "mechanothermal analysis with scanning microscopy." It is suited for studying defect dynamics in nanomaterials and composites by locating the dissipative mechanisms in submicron phases. The primary and secondary relaxations, as well as the viscoplasticity, were observed in bulk PVC. The wide range of phenomena demonstrate the versatility of the technique. A still unexplained increase of the stiffness with increasing temperature was observed just below the glass transition. All of these observations, although their interpretation in terms of physical events is still tentative, are in agreement with global studies. This technique also permits one to image the variations of the local elasticity or of the local damping at a fixed temperature. This enables the study of, for instance, the homogeneity of phase transitions in multiphased materials, or of the interface morphologies and properties. As an illustration, the homogeneity of the glass transition temperature of PVC in a 50/50 wt % PVC/PB polymer blend has been demonstrated. Due to the small size of the probed volume, T-SLAM gives information on the mechanical properties of the near

  7. Seasonal Trophic Shift of Littoral Consumers in Eutrophic Lake Taihu (China Revealed by a Two-Source Mixing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the seasonal variation in the contributions of planktonic and benthic resources to 11 littoral predators in eutrophic Lake Taihu (China from 2004 to 2005. Seasonal fluctuations in consumer σ13C and σ15N were attributed to the combined impacts of temporal variation in isotopic signatures of basal resources and the diet shift of fishes. Based on a two-end-member mixing model, all target consumers relied on energy sources from coupled benthic and planktonic pathways, but the predominant energy source for most species was highly variable across seasons, showing seasonal trophic shift of littoral consumers. Seasonality in energy mobilization of consumers focused on two aspects: (1 the species number of consumers that relied mainly on planktonic carbon showed the lowest values in the fall and the highest during spring/summer, and (2 most consumer species showed seasonal variation in the percentages of planktonic reliance. We concluded that seasonal trophic shifts of fishes and invertebrates were driven by phytoplankton production, but benthic resources were also important seasonally in supporting littoral consumers in Meiliang Bay. Energy mobilization of carnivorous fishes was more subject to the impact of resource availability than omnivorous species.

  8. The nature of the Galactic Center source IRS 13 revealed by high spatial resolution in the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, J. P.; Paumard, T.; Stolovy, S. R.; Rigaut, F.

    2004-08-01

    High spatial resolution observations in the 1 to 3.5 μm/ region of the Galactic Center source known historically as IRS 13 are presented. They include ground-based adaptive optics images in the H, Kp (2.12/0.4 μm) and L bands, HST-NICMOS data in filters between 1.1 and 2.2 μm, and integral field spectroscopic data from BEAR, an Imaging FTS, in the He I 2.06 μm/ and the Brγ line regions. Analysis of all these data provides a completely new picture of the main component, IRS 13E, which appears as a cluster of seven individual stars within a projected diameter of ˜0.5 arcsec (0.02 pc). The brightest sources, 13E1, 13E2, 13E3 which is detected as a binary, and 13E4, are all massive stars of different type. The star 13E1 is a luminous, blue object, with no detected emission line. 13E2 and 13E4 are two hot, high-mass emission line stars, 13E2 being at the WR stage and 13E4 a massive O-type star. In contrast, 13E3A and B are extremely red objects, proposed as other examples of dusty WR stars, like IRS 21 (Tanner et al. \\cite{tanner}). All these sources have a common westward proper motion (Ott et al. \\cite{ott2}) indicating they are bounded. Two other sources, detected after deconvolution of the AO images in the H and Kp bands, are also identified. One, that we call 13E5, is a red source similar to 13E3A and B, while the other one, 13E6, is probably a main sequence O star in front of the cluster. Considering this exceptional concentration of comoving massive hot stars, IRS 13E is proposed as the remaining core of a massive star cluster, which could harbor an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) (Portegies Zwart & McMillan \\cite{zwart2)} of ˜1300 M⊙. This detection plays in favor of a scenario, first suggested by Gerhard (\\cite{gerhard}), in which the helium stars and the other hot stars in the central parsec originate from the stripping of a massive cluster formed several tens of pc from the center. This cluster would have spiraled towards SgrA*, and IRS 13E

  9. Exposure to Glycolytic Carbon Sources Reveals a Novel Layer of Regulation for the MalT Regulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia A. Reimann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria adapt to changing environments by means of tightly coordinated regulatory circuits. The use of synthetic lethality, a genetic phenomenon in which the combination of two nonlethal mutations causes cell death, facilitates identification and study of such circuitry. In this study, we show that the E. coli ompR malTcon double mutant exhibits a synthetic lethal phenotype that is environmentally conditional. MalTcon, the constitutively active form of the maltose system regulator MalT, causes elevated expression of the outer membrane porin LamB, which leads to death in the absence of the osmoregulator OmpR. However, the presence and metabolism of glycolytic carbon sources, such as sorbitol, promotes viability and unveils a novel layer of regulation within the complex circuitry that controls maltose transport and metabolism.

  10. Variability of the 2014-present inflation source at Mauna Loa volcano revealed using time-dependent modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, I. A.; Miklius, A.; Okubo, P.; Montgomery-Brown, E. K.

    2017-12-01

    Mauna Loa volcano is the largest active volcano on earth and in the 20thcentury produced roughly one eruption every seven years. The 33-year quiescence since its last eruption 1984 has been punctuated by three inflation episodes where magma likely entered the shallow plumbing system, but was not erupted. The most recent began in 2014 and is ongoing. Unlike prior inflation episodes, the current one is accompanied by a significant increase in shallow seismicity, a pattern that is similar to earlier pre-eruptive periods. We apply the Kalman filter based Network Inversion Filter (NIF) to the 2014-present inflation episode using data from a 27 station continuous GPS network on Mauna Loa. The model geometry consists of a point volume source and tabular, dike-like body, which have previously been shown to provide a good fit to deformation data from a 2004-2009 inflation episode. The tabular body is discretized into 1km x 1km segments. For each day, the NIF solves for the rates of opening on the tabular body segments (subject to smoothing and positivity constraints), volume change rate in the point source, and slip rate on a deep décollement fault surface, which is constrained to a constant (no transient slip allowed). The Kalman filter in the NIF provides for smoothing both forwards and backwards in time. The model shows that the 2014-present inflation episode occurred as several sub-events, rather than steady inflation. It shows some spatial variability in the location of the inflation sub-events. In the model, opening in the tabular body is initially concentrated below the volcano's summit, in an area roughly outlined by shallow seismicity. In October, 2015 opening in the tabular body shifts to be centered beneath the southwest portion of the summit and seismicity becomes concentrated in this area. By late 2016, the opening rate on the tabular body decreases and is once again under the central part of summit. This modeling approach has allowed us to track these

  11. Fluorescent gel particles in the nanometer range for detection of metabolites in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, K.; Sun, H.; Poulsen, A.K.

    2006-01-01

    micelles in oil microemulsions. Typical sizes of the particles are tens of nanometers. Characterization methods for such particles based on size exclusion chromatography, photon correlation spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy have been developed. The stability...

  12. Genomic Analysis of Hepatitis B Virus Reveals Antigen State and Genotype as Sources of Evolutionary Rate Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Abby; Lemey, Philippe; Hurles, Matthew; Moyes, Chris; Horn, Susanne; Pryor, Jan; Malani, Joji; Supuri, Mathias; Masta, Andrew; Teriboriki, Burentau; Toatu, Tebuka; Penny, David; Rambaut, Andrew; Shapiro, Beth

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genomes are small, semi-double-stranded DNA circular genomes that contain alternating overlapping reading frames and replicate through an RNA intermediary phase. This complex biology has presented a challenge to estimating an evolutionary rate for HBV, leading to difficulties resolving the evolutionary and epidemiological history of the virus. Here, we re-examine rates of HBV evolution using a novel data set of 112 within-host, transmission history (pedigree) and among-host genomes isolated over 20 years from the indigenous peoples of the South Pacific, combined with 313 previously published HBV genomes. We employ Bayesian phylogenetic approaches to examine several potential causes and consequences of evolutionary rate variation in HBV. Our results reveal rate variation both between genotypes and across the genome, as well as strikingly slower rates when genomes are sampled in the Hepatitis B e antigen positive state, compared to the e antigen negative state. This Hepatitis B e antigen rate variation was found to be largely attributable to changes during the course of infection in the preCore and Core genes and their regulatory elements. PMID:21765983

  13. Myoanatomy of the velvet worm leg revealed by laboratory-based nanofocus X-ray source tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mark; de Sena Oliveira, Ivo; Allner, Sebastian; Ferstl, Simone; Bidola, Pidassa; Mechlem, Korbinian; Fehringer, Andreas; Hehn, Lorenz; Dierolf, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Gleich, Bernhard; Hammel, Jörg U; Jahn, Henry; Mayer, Georg; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2017-11-21

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a powerful noninvasive technique for investigating the inner structure of objects and organisms. However, the resolution of laboratory CT systems is typically limited to the micrometer range. In this paper, we present a table-top nanoCT system in conjunction with standard processing tools that is able to routinely reach resolutions down to 100 nm without using X-ray optics. We demonstrate its potential for biological investigations by imaging a walking appendage of Euperipatoides rowelli , a representative of Onychophora-an invertebrate group pivotal for understanding animal evolution. Comparative analyses proved that the nanoCT can depict the external morphology of the limb with an image quality similar to scanning electron microscopy, while simultaneously visualizing internal muscular structures at higher resolutions than confocal laser scanning microscopy. The obtained nanoCT data revealed hitherto unknown aspects of the onychophoran limb musculature, enabling the 3D reconstruction of individual muscle fibers, which was previously impossible using any laboratory-based imaging technique.

  14. Structural variation of the oceanic Moho in the Pacific plate revealed by active-source seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Akane; Kodaira, Shuichi; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Fujie, Gou; Arai, Ryuta; Miura, Seiichi

    2017-10-01

    The characteristics of the oceanic Moho are known to depend on various factors, such as seafloor spreading rate, crustal age, and accretionary processes at a ridge. However, the effect of local magmatic activities on the seismic signature of the Moho is poorly understood. Here an active-source reflection and refraction survey is used to investigate crustal structure and Moho characteristics along a >1000-km-long profile southeast of the Shatsky Rise in a Pacific Ocean basin formed from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous and spanning the onset of Shatsky Rise volcanism. Although the seismic velocity structure estimated from the refraction data showed typical characteristics of the oceanic crust of the old Pacific plate, the appearance of the Moho reflections was spatially variable. We observed clear Moho reflections such as those to be expected where the spreading rate is fast to intermediate only at the southwestern end of the profile, whereas Moho reflections were diffuse, weak, or absent along other parts of the profile. The poor Moho reflections can be explained by the presence of a thick crust-mantle transition layer, which is temporally coincident with the formation of the Shatsky Rise. We inferred that the crust-mantle transition layer was formed by changes in on-axis accretion process or modification of the primary Moho by off-axis magmatism, induced by magmatic activity of the Shatsky Rise.

  15. Pluripotent stem cells reveal the developmental biology of human megakaryocytes and provide a source of platelets for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Naoya; Eto, Koji

    2012-10-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells [PSCs; including human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)] can infinitely proliferate in vitro and are easily accessible for gene manipulation. Megakaryocytes (MKs) and platelets can be created from human ESCs and iPSCs in vitro and represent a potential source of blood cells for transfusion and a promising tool for studying the human thrombopoiesis. Moreover, disease-specific iPSCs are a powerful tool for elucidating the pathogenesis of hematological diseases and for drug screening. In that context, we and other groups have developed in vitro MK and platelet differentiation systems from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). Combining this co-culture system with a drug-inducible gene expression system enabled us to clarify the novel role played by c-MYC during human thrombopoiesis. In the next decade, technical advances (e.g., high-throughput genomic sequencing) will likely enable the identification of numerous gene mutations associated with abnormal thrombopoiesis. Combined with such technology, an in vitro system for differentiating human PSCs into MKs and platelets could provide a novel platform for studying human gene function associated with thrombopoiesis.

  16. Partitioning the sources of demographic variation reveals density-dependent nest predation in an island bird population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofaer, Helen R; Sillett, T Scott; Langin, Kathryn M; Morrison, Scott A; Ghalambor, Cameron K

    2014-07-01

    Ecological factors often shape demography through multiple mechanisms, making it difficult to identify the sources of demographic variation. In particular, conspecific density can influence both the strength of competition and the predation rate, but density-dependent competition has received more attention, particularly among terrestrial vertebrates and in island populations. A better understanding of how both competition and predation contribute to density-dependent variation in fecundity can be gained by partitioning the effects of density on offspring number from its effects on reproductive failure, while also evaluating how biotic and abiotic factors jointly shape demography. We examined the effects of population density and precipitation on fecundity, nest survival, and adult survival in an insular population of orange-crowned warblers (Oreothlypis celata) that breeds at high densities and exhibits a suite of traits suggesting strong intraspecific competition. Breeding density had a negative influence on fecundity, but it acted by increasing the probability of reproductive failure through nest predation, rather than through competition, which was predicted to reduce the number of offspring produced by successful individuals. Our results demonstrate that density-dependent nest predation can underlie the relationship between population density and fecundity even in a high-density, insular population where intraspecific competition should be strong.

  17. Nanometer-scale temperature measurements of phase change memory and carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Kyle Lane

    This work investigates nanometer-scale thermometry and thermal transport in new electronic devices to mitigate future electronic energy consumption. Nanometer-scale thermal transport is integral to electronic energy consumption and limits current electronic performance. New electronic devices are required to improve future electronic performance and energy consumption, but heat generation is not well understood in these new technologies. Thermal transport deviates significantly at the nanometer-scale from macroscopic systems as low dimensional materials, grain structure, interfaces, and thermoelectric effects can dominate electronic performance. This work develops and implements an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanometer-scale thermometry technique, known as scanning Joule expansion microscopy (SJEM), to measure nanometer-scale heat generation in new graphene and phase change memory (PCM) devices, which have potential to improve performance and energy consumption of future electronics. Nanometer-scale thermometry of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene measured the heat generation at graphene wrinkles and grain boundaries (GBs). Graphene is an atomically-thin, two dimensional (2D) carbon material with promising applications in new electronic devices. Comparing measurements and predictions of CVD graphene heating predicted the resistivity, voltage drop, and temperature rise across the one dimensional (1D) GB defects. This work measured the nanometer-scale temperature rise of thin film Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) based PCM due to Joule, thermoelectric, interface, and grain structure effects. PCM has potential to reduce energy consumption and improve performance of future electronic memory. A new nanometer-scale thermometry technique is developed for independent and direct observation of Joule and thermoelectric effects at the nanometer-scale, and the technique is demonstrated by SJEM measurements of GST devices. Uniform heating and GST properties are observed for

  18. Probing dynamics and pinning of single vortices in superconductors at nanometer scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embon, L.; Anahory, Y.; Suhov, A.; Halbertal, D.; Cuppens, J.; Yakovenko, A.; Uri, A.; Myasoedov, Y.; Rappaport, M. L.; Huber, M. E.; Gurevich, A.; Zeldov, E.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of quantized magnetic vortices and their pinning by materials defects determine electromagnetic properties of superconductors, particularly their ability to carry non-dissipative currents. Despite recent advances in the understanding of the complex physics of vortex matter, the behavior of vortices driven by current through a multi-scale potential of the actual materials defects is still not well understood, mostly due to the scarcity of appropriate experimental tools capable of tracing vortex trajectories on nanometer scales. Using a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference microscope we report here an investigation of controlled dynamics of vortices in lead films with sub-Angstrom spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity. We measured, for the first time, the fundamental dependence of the elementary pinning force of multiple defects on the vortex displacement, revealing a far more complex behavior than has previously been recognized, including striking spring softening and broken-spring depinning, as well as spontaneous hysteretic switching between cellular vortex trajectories. Our results indicate the importance of thermal fluctuations even at 4.2 K and of the vital role of ripples in the pinning potential, giving new insights into the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation and electromagnetic response of superconductors.

  19. Probing Local Ionic Dynamics in Functional Oxides: From Nanometer to Atomic Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Vacancy-mediated electrochemical reactions in oxides underpin multiple applications ranging from electroresistive memories, to chemical sensors to energy conversion systems such as fuel cells. Understanding the functionality in these systems requires probing reversible (oxygen reduction/evolution reaction) and irreversible (cathode degradation and activation, formation of conductive filaments) electrochemical processes. In this talk, I summarize recent advances in probing and controlling these transformations locally on nanometer level using scanning probe microscopy. The localized tip concentrates the electric field in the nanometer scale volume of material, inducing local transition. Measured simultaneously electromechanical response (piezoresponse) or current (conductive AFM) provides the information on the bias-induced changes in material. Here, I illustrate how these methods can be extended to study local electrochemical transformations, including vacancy dynamics in oxides such as titanates, LaxSr1-xCoO3, BiFeO3, and YxZr1-xO2. The formation of electromechanical hysteresis loops and their bias-, temperature- and environment dependences provide insight into local electrochemical mechanisms. In materials such as lanthanum-strontium cobaltite, mapping both reversible vacancy motion and vacancy ordering and static deformation is possible, and can be corroborated by post mortem STEM/EELS studies. In ceria, a broad gamut of electrochemical behaviors is observed as a function of temperature and humidity. The possible strategies for elucidation ionic motion at the electroactive interfaces in oxides using high-resolution electron microscopy and combined ex-situ and in-situ STEM-SPM studies are discussed. In the second part of the talk, probing electrochemical phenomena on in-situ grown surfaces with atomic resolution is illustrated. I present an approach based on the multivariate statistical analysis of the coordination spheres of individual atoms to reveal

  20. Cortical processing of tactile stimuli applied in quick succession across the fingertips: temporal evolution of dipole sources revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgiou, Elissaios; Koutlas, Ioannis G; Alonso, Aurelio A; Leuthold, Arthur C; Lewis, Scott M; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2008-08-01

    We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) in 10 healthy human subjects to study cortical responses to tactile stimuli applied to the fingertips of digits 2-5 of the right hand. Each stimulus lasted 50 ms and was produced by air-driven elastic membranes. Four-hundred stimuli were delivered on each finger in three temporal patterns (conditions). In the "Discrete" condition, stimuli were applied to each finger repetitively with an interstimulus interval (ISI) of 1-2 s. In the "Continuous" condition, stimuli were applied to the fingers sequentially as four-stimulus trains with zero ISI and 1-2 s intervening between trains. Finally, in the "Gap" condition, stimuli were applied as in the Continuous condition but with an ISI of 50 ms. A sensation of tactile motion across fingers (digit 2 --> digit 5) was reported by all subjects in the Continuous and Gap conditions. Cortical responses were extracted as single equivalent current dipoles over a period of 1 s following stimulus onset. In all three conditions, initial responses in left primary somatosensory cortex (SI) were observed ~20 to 50 ms after stimulus onset and were followed by additional left SI responses and bilateral responses in the secondary somatosensory cortex (SII). In addition, in the Continuous and Gap conditions, there was an activation of the precentral gyrus, the temporal aspects of which depended on the temporal relation of the administered stimuli, as follows. An ISI of 0 ms led to activation of the precentral gyrus shortly after the second stimulation, whereas an ISI of 50 ms led to activation of the precentral gyrus after the third stimulation. The current findings support results from previous studies on temporal activity patterns in SI and SII, verify the participation of the precentral gyrus during tactile motion perception and, in addition, reveal aspects of integration of sequential sensory stimulations over nonadjacent areas as well as temporal activity patterns in the postcentral and precentral

  1. Screening of the Open Source Malaria Box Reveals an Early Lead Compound for the Treatment of Alveolar Echinococcosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Stadelmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The metacestode (larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis causes alveolar echinococcosis (AE, a very severe and in many cases incurable disease. To date, benzimidazoles such as albendazole and mebendazole are the only approved chemotherapeutical treatment options. Benzimidazoles inhibit metacestode proliferation, but do not act parasiticidal. Thus, benzimidazoles have to be taken a lifelong, can cause adverse side effects such as hepatotoxicity, and are ineffective in some patients. We here describe a newly developed screening cascade for the evaluation of the in vitro efficacy of new compounds that includes assessment of parasiticidal activity. The Malaria Box from Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV, comprised of 400 commercially available chemicals that show in vitro activity against Plasmodium falciparum, was repurposed. Primary screening was carried out at 10 μM by employing the previously described PGI assay, and resulted in the identification of 24 compounds that caused physical damage in metacestodes. Seven out of these 24 drugs were also active at 1 μM. Dose-response assays revealed that only 2 compounds, namely MMV665807 and MMV665794, exhibited an EC50 value below 5 μM. Assessments using human foreskin fibroblasts and Reuber rat hepatoma cells showed that the salicylanilide MMV665807 was less toxic for these two mammalian cell lines than for metacestodes. The parasiticidal activity of MMV665807 was then confirmed using isolated germinal layer cell cultures as well as metacestode vesicles by employing viability assays, and its effect on metacestodes was morphologically evaluated by electron microscopy. However, both oral and intraperitoneal application of MMV665807 to mice experimentally infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes did not result in any reduction of the parasite load.

  2. Quantification of human-associated fecal indicators reveal sewage from urban watersheds as a source of pollution to Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Hayley T.; Dila, Deborah K.; Bootsma, Melinda J.; Corsi, Steven; McLellan, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Sewage contamination of urban waterways from sewer overflows and failing infrastructure is a major environmental and public health concern. Fecal coliforms (FC) are commonly employed as fecal indicator bacteria, but do not distinguish between human and non-human sources of fecal contamination. Human Bacteroides and humanLachnospiraceae, two genetic markers for human-associated indicator bacteria, were used to identify sewage signals in two urban rivers and the estuary that drains to Lake Michigan. Grab samples were collected from the rivers throughout 2012 and 2013 and hourly samples were collected in the estuary across the hydrograph during summer 2013. Human Bacteroides and human Lachnospiraceae were highly correlated with each other in river samples (Pearson’s r = 0.86), with average concentrations at most sites elevated during wet weather. These human indicators were found during baseflow, indicating that sewage contamination is chronic in these waterways. FC are used for determining total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) in management plans; however, FC concentrations alone failed to prioritize river reaches with potential health risks. While 84% of samples with >1000 CFU/100 ml FC had sewage contamination, 52% of samples with moderate (200–1000 CFU/100 ml) and 46% of samples with low (events and was highest during an event with a short duration of intense rain. This work demonstrates urban areas have unrecognized sewage inputs that may not be adequately prioritized for remediation by the TMDL process. Further analysis using these approaches could determine relationships between land use, storm characteristics, and other factors that drive sewage contamination in urban waterways.

  3. Temporal Evolution of Surface Deformation and Magma Sources at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala Revealed by InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnuk, K.; Wauthier, C.

    2016-12-01

    Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala is a persistently active volcano whose western flank is unstable. Despite continuous activity since 1961, a lack of high temporal resolution geodetic surveying has prevented detailed modeling of Pacaya's underlying magmatic plumbing system. A new, temporally dense dataset of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) RADARSAT-2 images, spanning December 2012 to March 2014, shows magmatic deformation before and during major eruptions in January and March 2014. Inverse modeling of InSAR surface displacements suggest that three magma bodies are responsible for observed deformation: (1) a 3.7 km deep spherical reservoir located northwest of the summit, (2) a 0.4 km deep spherical source located directly west of the summit, and (3) a shallow dike below the summit that provides the primary transport pathway for erupted materials. Periods of heightened activity are brought on by magma pulses at depth, which result in rapid inflation of the edifice. We observe an intrusion cycle at Pacaya that consists of deflation of one or both magma reservoirs followed by dike intrusion. Intrusion volumes are proportional to reservoir volume loss, and do not always result in an eruption. Periods of increased activity culminate with larger dike fed eruptions. Large eruptions are followed by inter eruptive periods marked by a decrease in crater explosions and a lack of deformation. A full understanding of magmatic processes at Pacaya is required to assess potential impacts on other aspects of the volcano such as the unstable western flank. Co-eruptive flank motion appears to have initiated a new stage of volcanic rifting at Pacaya defined by repeated NW-SE dike intrusions. This creates a positive feedback relationship whereby magmatic forcing from eruptive dike intrusions induces flank motion

  4. Sub-nanometer emittance monitor for high brightness synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, K.

    1991-01-01

    Method of measuring a very small beam emittance in electron storage rings is presented. The monitor can sense an intrinsic emittance of beam particles by detecting the angular distribution of Compton scatterings of laser photons on beam electrons. It is possible to achieve measurement resolution smaller than 10 -9 m-rad without difficulty. (author)

  5. Genetic analysis and CRISPR typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from different sources revealed potential transmission from poultry and pig to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuchun; Wang, Xin; Yin, Kequan; Hu, Yachen; Xu, Haiyan; Xie, Xiaolei; Xu, Lijuan; Fei, Xiao; Chen, Xiang; Jiao, Xinan

    2018-02-02

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the most prevalent serotypes in Salmonella isolated from poultry and the most commonly reported cause of human salmonellosis. In this study, we aimed to assess the genetic diversity of 329 S. Enteritidis strains isolated from different sources from 2009 to 2016 in China. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) typing was used to characterize these 262 chicken clinical isolates, 38 human isolates, 18 pig isolates, six duck isolates, three goose isolates and two isolates of unknown source. A total of 18 Enteritidis CRISPR types (ECTs) were identified, with ECT2, ECT8 and ECT4 as the top three ECTs. CRISPR typing identified ECT2 as the most prevalent ECT, which accounted for 41% of S. Enteritidis strains from all the sources except duck. ECT9 and ECT13 were identified in both pig and human isolates and revealed potential transmission from pig to human. A cluster analysis distributed 18 ECTs, including the top three ECTs, into four lineages with LI as the predominant lineage. Forty-eight out of 329 isolates were subjected to whole genome sequence typing, which divided them into four clusters, with Cluster I as the predominant cluster. Cluster I included 92% (34/37) of strains located in LI identified from the CRISPR typing, confirming the good correspondence between both typing methods. In addition, the CRISPR typing also revealed the close relationship between ECTs and isolated areas, confirming that CRISPR spacers might be obtained by bacteria from the unique phage or plasmid pools in the environment. However, further analysis is needed to determine the function of CRISPR-Cas systems in Salmonella and the relationship between spacers and the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of Lactococcus lactis Isolates from Nondairy Sources with Potential Dairy Applications Reveals Extensive Phenotype-Genotype Disparity and Implications for a Revised Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Daniel; Casey, Aidan; Altermann, Eric; Cotter, Paul D; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2015-06-15

    Lactococcus lactis is predominantly associated with dairy fermentations, but evidence suggests that the domesticated organism originated from a plant niche. L. lactis possesses an unusual taxonomic structure whereby strain phenotypes and genotypes often do not correlate, which in turn has led to confusion in L. lactis classification. A bank of L. lactis strains was isolated from various nondairy niches (grass, vegetables, and bovine rumen) and was further characterized on the basis of key technological traits, including growth in milk and key enzyme activities. Phenotypic analysis revealed all strains from nondairy sources to possess an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype (lactis phenotype); however, seven of these strains possessed an L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotype (cremoris genotype), determined by two separate PCR assays. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that strains with lactis and cremoris genotypes clustered together regardless of habitat, but it highlighted the increased diversity that exists among "wild" strains. Calculation of average nucleotide identity (ANI) and tetranucleotide frequency correlation coefficients (TETRA), using the JSpecies software tool, revealed that L. lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subsp. lactis differ in ANI values by ∼14%, below the threshold set for species circumscription. Further analysis of strain TIFN3 and strains from nonindustrial backgrounds revealed TETRA values of lactis taxonomy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Source-reconstruction of event-related fields reveals hyperfunction and hypofunction of cortical circuits in antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients during Mooney face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivolta, Davide; Castellanos, Nazareth P; Stawowsky, Cerisa; Helbling, Saskia; Wibral, Michael; Grützner, Christine; Koethe, Dagmar; Birkner, Katharina; Kranaster, Laura; Enning, Frank; Singer, Wolf; Leweke, F Markus; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2014-04-23

    Schizophrenia is characterized by dysfunctions in neural circuits that can be investigated with electrophysiological methods, such as EEG and MEG. In the present human study, we examined event-related fields (ERFs), in a sample of medication-naive, first-episode schizophrenia (FE-ScZ) patients (n = 14) and healthy control participants (n = 17) during perception of Mooney faces to investigate the integrity of neuromagnetic responses and their experience-dependent modification. ERF responses were analyzed for M100, M170, and M250 components at the sensor and source levels. In addition, we analyzed peak latency and adaptation effects due to stimulus repetition. FE-ScZ patients were characterized by significantly impaired sensory processing, as indicated by a reduced discrimination index (A'). At the sensor level, M100 and M170 responses in FE-ScZ were within the normal range, whereas the M250 response was impaired. However, source localization revealed widespread elevated activity for M100 and M170 in FE-ScZ and delayed peak latencies for the M100 and M250 responses. In addition, M170 source activity in FE-ScZ was not modulated by stimulus repetitions. The present findings suggest that neural circuits in FE-ScZ may be characterized by a disturbed balance between excitation and inhibition that could lead to a failure to gate information flow and abnormal spreading of activity, which is compatible with dysfunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  8. Atomistic Insight on the Charging Energetics in Sub-nanometer Pore Supercacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Rui [ORNL; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Feng, Guang [Clemson University

    2010-01-01

    Electrodes featuring sub-nanometer pores can significantly enhance the capacitance and energy density of supercapacitors. However, ions must pay an energy penalty to enter sub-nanometer pores as they have to shed part of their solvation shell. The magnitude of such energy penalty plays a key role in determining the accessibility and charging/discharging of these sub-nanometer pores. Here we report on the atomistic simulation of Na+ and Cl ions entering a polarizable slit pore with a width of 0.82 nm. We show that the free energy penalty for these ions to enter the pore is less than 14 kJ/mol for both Na+ and Cl ions. The surprisingly small energy penalty is caused by the van der Waals attractions between ion and pore walls, the image charge effects, the moderate (19-26%) de-hydration of the ions inside the pore, and the strengthened interactions between ions and their hydration water molecules in the sub-nanometer pore. The results provide strong impetus for further developing nanoporous electrodes featuring sub- nanometer pores.

  9. Demonstrating a New Census of Infrared Galaxies with ALMA (DANCING-ALMA). I. FIR Size and Luminosity Relation at z = 0-6 Revealed with 1034 ALMA Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Seiji; Ouchi, Masami; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2017-11-01

    We present the large statistics of the galaxy effective radius R e in the rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) wavelength {R}{{e}({FIR})} obtained from 1627 Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 1 mm band maps that become public by 2017 July. Our ALMA sample consists of 1034 sources with the star formation rate ˜ 100{--}1000 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1 and the stellar mass ˜ {10}10{--}{10}11.5 {M}⊙ at z = 0-6. We homogeneously derive {R}{{e}({FIR})} and FIR luminosity L FIR of our ALMA sources via the uv-visibility method with the exponential disk model, carefully evaluating selection and measurement incompletenesses by realistic Monte-Carlo simulations. We find that there is a positive correlation between {R}{{e}({FIR})} and L FIR at the >99% significance level. The best-fit power-law function, {R}{{e}({FIR})}\\propto {L}{FIR}α , provides α =0.28+/- 0.07, and shows that {R}{{e}({FIR})} at a fixed L FIR decreases toward high redshifts. The best-fit α and the redshift evolution of {R}{{e}({FIR})} are similar to those of R e in the rest-frame UV (optical) wavelength {R}{{e}({UV})} ({R}{{e}({Opt}.)}) revealed by Hubble Space Telescope (HST) studies. We identify that our ALMA sources have significant trends of {R}{{e}({FIR})}≲ {R}{{e}({UV})} and {R}{{e}({Opt}.)}, which suggests that the dusty starbursts take place in compact regions. Moreover, {R}{{e}({FIR})} of our ALMA sources is comparable to {R}{{e}({Opt}.)} of quiescent galaxies at z ˜ 1-3 as a function of stellar mass, supporting the evolutionary connection between these two galaxy populations. We also investigate rest-frame UV and optical morphologies of our ALMA sources with deep HST images, and find that ˜30%-40% of our ALMA sources are classified as major mergers. This indicates that dusty starbursts are triggered by not only the major mergers but also the other mechanism(s).

  10. Molecular Chemical Structure of Barley Proteins Revealed by Ultra-Spatially Resolved Synchrotron Light Sourced FTIR Microspectroscopy: Comparison of Barley Varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.

    2007-01-01

    Barley protein structure affects the barley quality, fermentation, and degradation behavior in both humans and animals among other factors such as protein matrix. Publications show various biological differences among barley varieties such as Valier and Harrington, which have significantly different degradation behaviors. The objectives of this study were to reveal the molecular structure of barley protein, comparing various varieties (Dolly, Valier, Harrington, LP955, AC Metcalfe, and Sisler), and quantify protein structure profiles using Gaussian and Lorentzian methods of multi-component peak modeling by using the ultra-spatially resolved synchrotron light sourced Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (SFTIRM). The items of the protein molecular structure revealed included protein structure α-helices, β-sheets, and others such as β-turns and random coils. The experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, US Department of Energy, NY). The results showed that with the SFTIRM, the molecular structure of barley protein could be revealed. Barley protein structures exhibited significant differences among the varieties in terms of proportion and ratio of model-fitted α-helices, β-sheets, and others. By using multi-component peaks modeling at protein amide I region of 1710-1576 cm -1 , the results show that barley protein consisted of approximately 18-34% of α-helices, 14-25% of β-sheets, and 44-69% others. AC Metcalfe, Sisler, and LP955 consisted of higher (P 0.05). The ratio of α-helices to others (0.3 to 1.0, P < 0.05) and that of β-sheets to others (0.2 to 0.8, P < 0.05) were different among the barley varieties. It needs to be pointed out that using a multi-peak modeling for protein structure analysis is only for making relative estimates and not exact determinations and only for the comparison purpose between varieties. The principal component analysis showed that protein amide I Fourier

  11. Flip-flop design in nanometer CMOS from high speed to low energy

    CERN Document Server

    Alioto, Massimo; Palumbo, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a unified treatment of Flip-Flop design and selection in nanometer CMOS VLSI systems. The design aspects related to the energy-delay tradeoff in Flip-Flops are discussed, including their energy-optimal selection according to the targeted application, and the detailed circuit design in nanometer CMOS VLSI systems. Design strategies are derived in a coherent framework that includes explicitly nanometer effects, including leakage, layout parasitics and process/voltage/temperature variations, as main advances over the existing body of work in the field. The related design tradeoffs are explored in a wide range of applications and the related energy-performance targets. A wide range of existing and recently proposed Flip-Flop topologies are discussed. Theoretical foundations are provided to set the stage for the derivation of design guidelines, and emphasis is given on practical aspects and consequences of the presented results. Analytical models and derivations are introduced when needed to gai...

  12. Imaging Action Potential in Single Mammalian Neurons by Tracking the Accompanying Sub-Nanometer Mechanical Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunze; Liu, Xian-Wei; Wang, Hui; Yu, Hui; Guan, Yan; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2018-03-28

    Action potentials in neurons have been studied traditionally by intracellular electrophysiological recordings and more recently by the fluorescence detection methods. Here we describe a label-free optical imaging method that can measure mechanical motion in single cells with a sub-nanometer detection limit. Using the method, we have observed sub-nanometer mechanical motion accompanying the action potential in single mammalian neurons by averaging the repeated action potential spikes. The shape and width of the transient displacement are similar to those of the electrically recorded action potential, but the amplitude varies from neuron to neuron, and from one region of a neuron to another, ranging from 0.2-0.4 nm. The work indicates that action potentials may be studied noninvasively in single mammalian neurons by label-free imaging of the accompanying sub-nanometer mechanical motion.

  13. Experiments of Nanometer Spot Size Monitor at FETB Using Laser Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Walz, D

    2003-01-01

    The nanometer spot size monitor based on the laser interferometry has been developed and installed in the final focus test beam (FFTB) line at SLAC. The beam experiments started in September 1993, the first fringe pattern from the monitor was observed in the beginning of April 1994, then the small vertical spot around 70 nm was observed in May 1994. The spot size monitor has been routinely used for tuning the beam optics in FFTB. Basic principle of this monitor has been well proved, and its high performance as a precise beam monitor in nanometer range has been demonstrated.

  14. Accounting for nanometer-thick adventitious carbon contamination in X-ray absorption spectra of carbon-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangolini, Filippo; McClimon, J Brandon; Rose, Franck; Carpick, Robert W

    2014-12-16

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for characterizing the composition and bonding state of nanoscale materials and the top few nanometers of bulk and thin film specimens. When coupled with imaging methods like photoemission electron microscopy, it enables chemical imaging of materials with nanometer-scale lateral spatial resolution. However, analysis of NEXAFS spectra is often performed under the assumption of structural and compositional homogeneity within the nanometer-scale depth probed by this technique. This assumption can introduce large errors when analyzing the vast majority of solid surfaces due to the presence of complex surface and near-surface structures such as oxides and contamination layers. An analytical methodology is presented for removing the contribution of these nanoscale overlayers from NEXAFS spectra of two-layered systems to provide a corrected photoabsorption spectrum of the substrate. This method relies on the subtraction of the NEXAFS spectrum of the overlayer adsorbed on a reference surface from the spectrum of the two-layer system under investigation, where the thickness of the overlayer is independently determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This approach is applied to NEXAFS data acquired for one of the most challenging cases: air-exposed hard carbon-based materials with adventitious carbon contamination from ambient exposure. The contribution of the adventitious carbon was removed from the as-acquired spectra of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) to determine the intrinsic photoabsorption NEXAFS spectra of these materials. The method alters the calculated fraction of sp(2)-hybridized carbon from 5 to 20% and reveals that the adventitious contamination can be described as a layer containing carbon and oxygen ([O]/[C] = 0.11 ± 0.02) with a thickness of 0.6 ± 0.2 nm and a fraction of sp(2)-bonded carbon of 0.19 ± 0.03. This

  15. Three-dimensional nanometer scale analyses of precipitate structures and local compositions in titanium aluminide engineering alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstl, Stephan S. A.

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) alloys are among the fastest developing class of materials for use in high temperature structural applications. Their low density and high strength make them excellent candidates for both engine and airframe applications. Creep properties of TiAl alloys, however, have been a limiting factor in applying the material to a larger commercial market. In this research, nanometer scale compositional and structural analyses of several TiAl alloys, ranging from model Ti-Al-C ternary alloys to putative commercial alloys with 10 components are investigated utilizing three dimensional atom probe (3DAP) and transmission electron microscopies. Nanometer sized borides, silicides, and carbide precipitates are involved in strengthening TiAl alloys, however, chemical partitioning measurements reveal oxygen concentrations up to 14 at. % within the precipitate phases, resulting in the realization of oxycarbide formation contributing to the precipitation strengthening of TiAl alloys. The local compositions of lamellar microstructures and a variety of precipitates in the TiAl system, including boride, silicide, binary carbides, and intermetallic carbides are investigated. Chemical partitioning of the microalloying elements between the alpha2/gamma lamellar phases, and the precipitate/gamma-matrix phases are determined. Both W and Hf have been shown to exhibit a near interfacial excess of 0.26 and 0.35 atoms nm-2 respectively within ca. 7 nm of lamellar interfaces in a complex TiAl alloy. In the case of needle-shaped perovskite Ti3AlC carbide precipitates, periodic domain boundaries are observed 5.3+/-0.8 nm apart along their growth axis parallel to the TiAl[001] crystallographic direction with concomitant composition variations after 24 hrs. at 800°C.

  16. Undulators to FELs: Nanometers, Femtoseconds, Coherence and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attwood, David [University of California Berkeley

    2011-11-30

    For scientists in many fields, from material science to the life sciences and archeology, synchrotron radiation, and in particular undulator radiation, has provide an intense source of x-rays which are tunable to the absorption edges of particular elements of interest, often permitting studies at high spatial and spectral resolution. Now a close cousin to the undulator, the x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) has emerged with improved spatial coherence and, perhaps more importantly, femtosecond pulse durations which permit dynamical studies. In the future attosecond x-ray capabilities are anticipated. In this colloqium we will describe some state of the art undulator studies, how undulators work, the evolution to FELs, their pulse and coherence properties, and the types of experiments envisioned.

  17. Carbon sources in suspended particles and surface sediments from the Beaufort Sea revealed by molecular lipid biomarkers and compound-specific isotope analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tolosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular lipid biomarkers (hydrocarbons, alcohols, sterols and fatty acids and compound-specific isotope analysis of suspended particulate organic matter (SPM and surface sediments of the Mackenzie Shelf and slope (southeast Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean were studied in summer 2009. The concentrations of the molecular lipid markers, characteristic of known organic matter sources, were grouped and used as proxies to evaluate the relative importance of fresh algal, detrital algal, fossil, C3 terrestrial plants, bacterial and zooplankton material in the organic matter (OM of this area. Fossil and detrital algal contributions were the major fractions of the freshwater SPM from the Mackenzie River with ~34% each of the total molecular biomarkers. Fresh algal, C3 terrestrial, bacterial and zooplanktonic components represented much lower percentages, 17, 10, 4 and 80%, with a minor contribution of fossil and C3 terrestrial biomarkers. Characterization of the sediments revealed a major sink of refractory algal material mixed with some fresh algal material, fossil hydrocarbons and a small input of C3 terrestrial sources. In particular, the sediments from the shelf and at the mouth of the Amundsen Gulf presented the highest contribution of detrital algal material (60–75%, whereas those from the slope contained the highest proportion of fossil (40% and C3 terrestrial plant material (10%. Overall, considering that the detrital algal material is marine derived, autochthonous sources contributed more than allochthonous sources to the OM lipid pool. Using the ratio of an allochthonous biomarker (normalized to total organic carbon, TOC found in the sediments to those measured at the river mouth water, we estimated that the fraction of terrestrial material preserved in the sediments accounted for 30–40% of the total carbon in the inner shelf sediments, 17% in the outer shelf and Amundsen Gulf and up to 25% in the slope sediments. These estimates are low

  18. Green synthesis of noble nanometals (Au, Pt, Pd) using glycerol under microwave irradiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A newer application of glycerol in the field of nanomaterials synthesis has been developed from both the economic and environmental points of view. Glycerol can act as a reducing agent for the fabrication of noble nanometals, such as Au, Pt, and Pd, under microwave irradiation. T...

  19. Nanometer size wear debris generated from ultra high molecular weight polyethylene in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lapčíková, Monika; Šlouf, Miroslav; Dybal, Jiří; Zolotarevova, E.; Entlicher, G.; Pokorný, D.; Gallo, J.; Sosna, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 266, 1-2 (2009), s. 349-355 ISSN 0043-1648 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06096 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : ultra high molecular weight polyethylene * nanometer size wear debris * morphology of wear particles Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.771, year: 2009

  20. Nanometer range closed-loop control of a stepper micro-motor for data storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patrascu, M.; Stramigioli, Stefano; de Boer, Meint J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a nanometer range, closed-loop control study for MEMS stepper actuators. Although generically applicable to other types of stepper motors, the control design presented here was particularly intended for one dimensional shuffle actuators fabricated by surface micromachining technology. The

  1. Micrometer and nanometer-scale parallel patterning of ceramic and organic-inorganic hybrid materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Elshof, Johan E.; Khan, Sajid; Göbel, Ole

    2010-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the progress made in recent years in the development of low-cost parallel patterning techniques for ceramic materials, silica, and organic–inorganic silsesquioxane-based hybrids from wet-chemical solutions and suspensions on the micrometer and nanometer-scale. The

  2. Using Carbon Nanotubes for Nanometer-Scale Energy Transfer Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jessica; Shafran, Eyal; Mangum, Ben; Mu, Chun; Gerton, Jordan

    2009-10-01

    We investigate optical energy transfer between fluorophores and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). CNTs are grown on Si-oxide wafers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), lifted off substrates by atomic force microscope (AFM) tips via Van der Waals forces, then shortened by electrical pulses. The tip-attached CNTs are scanned over fluorescent CdSe-ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with sub-nm precision while recording the fluorescence rate. A novel photon counting technique enables us to produce 3D maps of the QD-CNT coupling, revealing nanoscale lateral and vertical features. All CNTs tested (>50) strongly quenched the QD fluorescence, apparently independent of chirality. In some data, a delay in the recovery of QD fluorescence following CNT-QD contact was observed, suggesting possible charge transfer in this system. In the future, we will perform time-resolved studies to quantify the rate of energy and charge transfer processes and study the possible differences in fluorescence quenching and nanotube-QD energy transfer when comparing single-walled (SW) versus multi-walled (MW) CNTs, attempting to grow substrates consisting primarily of SW or MWCNTs and characterizing the structure of tip-attached CNTs using optical spectroscopy.

  3. Sources and physical processes responsible for OH/H2O in the lunar soil as revealed by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, T.B.; Taylor, L.A.; Combe, J.-P.; Kramer, G.; Pieters, C.M.; Sunshine, J.M.; Clark, R.N.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of two absorption features near 3 m in the lunar reflectance spectrum, observed by the orbiting M3 spectrometer and interpreted as being due to OH and H2O, is presented, and the results are used to discuss the processes producing these molecules. This analysis focuses on the dependence of the absorptions on lunar physical properties, including composition, illumination, latitude, and temperature. Solar wind proton-induced hydroxylation is proposed as the creation process, and its products could be a source for other reported types of hydrogen-rich material and water. The irregular and damaged fine-grained lunar soil seems especially adapted for trapping solar wind protons and forming OH owing to abundant dangling oxygen bonds. The M3 data reveal that the strengths of the two absorptions are correlated and widespread, and both are correlated with lunar composition but in different ways. Feldspathic material seems richer in OH. These results seem to rule out water from the lunar interior and cometary infall as major sources. There appear to be correlations of apparent band strengths with time of day and lighting conditions. However, thermal emission from the Moon reduces the apparent strengths of the M3 absorptions, and its removal is not yet completely successful. Further, many of the lunar physical properties are themselves intercorrelated, and so separating these dependencies on the absorptions is difficult, due to the incomplete M3 data set. This process should also operate on other airless silicate surfaces, such as Mercury and Vesta, which will be visited by the Dawn spacecraft in mid-2011. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Sources and physical processes responsible for OH/H2O in the lunarsoil as revealed by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, T.B.; Taylor, L.A.; Combe, J.-P.; Kramer, G.; C.M. Pieters,; Sunshine, J.M.; Clark, R.N.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of two absorption features near 3 μm in the lunar reflectance spectrum, observed by the orbiting M3 spectrometer and interpreted as being due to OH and H2O, is presented, and the results are used to discuss the processes producing these molecules. This analysis focuses on the dependence of the absorptions on lunar physical properties, including composition, illumination, latitude, and temperature. Solar wind proton-induced hydroxylation is proposed as the creation process, and its products could be a source for other reported types of hydrogen-rich material and water. The irregular and damaged fine-grained lunar soil seems especially adapted for trapping solar wind protons and forming OH owing to abundant dangling oxygen bonds. The M3data reveal that the strengths of the two absorptions are correlated and widespread, and both are correlated with lunar composition but in different ways. Feldspathic material seems richer in OH. These results seem to rule out water from the lunar interior and cometary infall as major sources. There appear to be correlations of apparent band strengths with time of day and lighting conditions. However, thermal emission from the Moon reduces the apparent strengths of the M3absorptions, and its removal is not yet completely successful. Further, many of the lunar physical properties are themselves intercorrelated, and so separating these dependencies on the absorptions is difficult, due to the incomplete M3 data set. This process should also operate on other airless silicate surfaces, such as Mercury and Vesta, which will be visited by the Dawn spacecraft in mid-2011.

  5. Nano-metal oxides: Exposure and engineering control assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alberto; Eastlake, Adrienne; Topmiller, Jennifer L; Sparks, Christopher; Martinez, Kenneth; Geraci, Charles L

    2017-09-01

    In January 2007, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a field study to evaluate process specific emissions during the production of ENMs. This study was performed using the nanoparticle emission assessment technique (NEAT). During this study, it was determined that ENMs were released during production and cleaning of the process reactor. Airborne concentrations of silver, nickel, and iron were found both in the employee's personal breathing zone and area samples during reactor cleaning. At the completion of this initial survey, it was suggested that a flanged attachment be added to the local exhaust ventilation system.  NIOSH re-evaluated the facility in December 2011 to assess worker exposures following an increase in production rates. This study included a fully comprehensive emissions, exposure, and engineering control evaluation of the entire process. This study made use of the nanoparticle exposure assessment technique (NEAT 2.0). Data obtained from filter-based samples and direct reading instruments indicate that reactor cleanout increased the overall particle concentration in the immediate area. However, it does not appear that these concentrations affect areas outside of the production floor. As the distance between the reactor and the sample location increased, the observed particle number concentration decreased, creating a concentration gradient with respect to the reactor. The results of this study confirm that the flanged attachment on the local exhaust ventilation system served to decrease exposure potential.  Given the available toxicological data of the metals evaluated, caution is warranted. One should always keep in mind that occupational exposure levels were not developed specifically for nanoscale particles. With data suggesting that certain nanoparticles may be more toxic than the larger counterparts of the same material; employers should attempt to control emissions of these particles at the source

  6. A compact, all-optical, THz wave generator based on self-modulation in a slab photonic crystal waveguide with a single sub-nanometer graphene layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, R; Ouyang, Z; Mohammd, M M

    2015-07-14

    We design a compact, all-optical THz wave generator based on self-modulation in a 1-D slab photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide with a single sub-nanometer graphene layer by using enhanced nonlinearity of graphene. It has been shown that at the bandgap edge of higher bands of a 1-D slab PhC, through only one sub-nanometer graphene layer we can obtain a compact, high modulation factor (about 0.98 percent), self-intensity modulator at a high frequency (about 0.6 THz) and low threshold intensity (about 15 MW per square centimeter), and further a compact, all-optical THz wave generator by integrating the self-modulator with a THz photodiode or photonic mixer. Such a THz source is expected to have a relatively high efficiency compared with conventional sources based on optical methods. The proposed THz source can find wide applications in THz science and technology, e.g., in THz imaging, THz sensors and detectors, THz communication systems, and THz optical integrated logic circuits.

  7. Microbes make average 2 nanometer diameter crystalline UO2 particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Banfield, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    It is well known that phylogenetically diverse groups of microorganisms are capable of catalyzing the reduction of highly soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV), which rapidly precipitates as uraninite (UO2). Because biological uraninite is highly insoluble, microbial uranyl reduction is being intensively studied as the basis for a cost-effective in-situ bioremediation strategy. Previous studies have described UO2 biomineralization products as amorphous or poorly crystalline. The objective of this study is to characterize the nanocrystalline uraninite in detail in order to determine the particle size, crystallinity, and size-related structural characteristics, and to examine the implications of these for reoxidation and transport. In this study, we obtained U-contaminated sediment and water from an inactive U mine and incubated them anaerobically with nutrients to stimulate reductive precipitation of UO2 by indigenous anaerobic bacteria, mainly Gram-positive spore-forming Desulfosporosinus and Clostridium spp. as revealed by RNA-based phylogenetic analysis. Desulfosporosinus sp. was isolated from the sediment and UO2 was precipitated by this isolate from a simple solution that contains only U and electron donors. We characterized UO2 formed in both of the experiments by high resolution-TEM (HRTEM) and X-ray absorption fine structure analysis (XAFS). The results from HRTEM showed that both the pure and the mixed cultures of microorganisms precipitated around 1.5 - 3 nm crystalline UO2 particles. Some particles as small as around 1 nm could be imaged. Rare particles around 10 nm in diameter were also present. Particles adhere to cells and form colloidal aggregates with low fractal dimension. In some cases, coarsening by oriented attachment on \\{111\\} is evident. Our preliminary results from XAFS for the incubated U-contaminated sample also indicated an average diameter of UO2 of 2 nm. In nanoparticles, the U-U distance obtained by XAFS was 0.373 nm, 0.012 nm

  8. Toad radiation reveals into-India dispersal as a source of endemism in the Western Ghats-Sri Lanka biodiversity hotspot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossuyt Franky

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High taxonomic level endemism in the Western Ghats-Sri Lanka biodiversity hotspot has been typically attributed to the subcontinent's geological history of long-term isolation. Subsequent out of – and into India dispersal of species after accretion to the Eurasian mainland is therefore often seen as a biogeographic factor that 'diluted' the composition of previously isolated Indian biota. However, few molecular studies have focussed on into-India dispersal as a possible source of endemism on the subcontinent. Using c. 6000 base pairs of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, we investigated the evolutionary history and biogeography of true toads (Bufonidae, a group that colonized the Indian Subcontinent after the Indo-Asia collision. Results Contrary to previous studies, Old World toads were recovered as a nested clade within New World Bufonidae, indicating a single colonization event. Species currently classified as Ansonia and Pedostibes were both recovered as being non-monophyletic, providing evidence for the independent origin of torrential and arboreal ecomorphs on the Indian subcontinent and in South-East Asia. Our analyses also revealed a previously unrecognized adaptive radiation of toads containing a variety of larval and adult ecomorphs. Molecular dating estimates and biogeographic analyses indicate that the early diversification of this clade happened in the Western Ghats and Sri Lanka during the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene. Conclusion Paleoclimate reconstructions have shown that the Early Neogene of India was marked by major environmental changes, with the transition from a zonal- to the current monsoon-dominated climate. After arrival in the Western Ghats-Sri Lanka hotspot, toads diversified in situ, with only one lineage able to successfully disperse out of these mountains. Consequently, higher taxonomic level endemism on the Indian Subcontinent is not only the result of Cretaceous isolation, but also of invasion

  9. A scanning tunneling microscope with a scanning range from hundreds of micrometers down to nanometer resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Fatih; Zaum, Christopher; Morgenstern, Karina

    2012-10-01

    A beetle type stage and a flexure scanning stage are combined to form a two stages scanning tunneling microscope (STM). It operates at room temperature in ultrahigh vacuum and is capable of scanning areas up to 300 μm × 450 μm down to resolution on the nanometer scale. This multi-scale STM has been designed and constructed in order to investigate prestructured metallic or semiconducting micro- and nano-structures in real space from atomic-sized structures up to the large-scale environment. The principle of the instrument is demonstrated on two different systems. Gallium nitride based micropillars demonstrate scan areas up to hundreds of micrometers; a Au(111) surface demonstrates nanometer resolution.

  10. Applied Study on Magnetic Nanometer Beads in Preparation of Genechip Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈慧; 高华方; 谢欣; 马雪梅; 杨渝珍

    2004-01-01

    Summary: A protocol for enrichment and adsorption of karyocyte from whole blood by using magnetic nanometer beads as solid-phase absorbents was presented. The PCR amplification could be accomplished by using the nanobeads with karyocyte as template directly and the PCR products were applied on an oligonucleotide array to do gene typing. The HLA-A PCR amplification system and a small HLA-A oligonucleotide microarray were applied as the platform and an experiment protocol of separating karyocyte from whole blood using the magnetic nanometer beads (Fe2O3) were set up.The experimental conditions were also discussed. It showed that pH level of PBS eluent, Taq enzyme quantity and fragment length of products could influent the amplification results, and the magnetic nano-beads could succeed in sample preparation in microarray to provide a promising way in automatic detection and lab-on-a-chip.

  11. Effect of nanometer scale surface roughness of titanium for osteoblast function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Migita

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness is an important property for metallic materials used in medical implants or other devices. The present study investigated the effects of surface roughness on cellular function, namely cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation potential. Titanium (Ti discs, with a hundred nanometer- or nanometer-scale surface roughness (rough and smooth Ti surface, respectively were prepared by polishing with silicon carbide paper. MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblast-like cells were cultured on the discs, and their attachment, spreading area, proliferation, and calcification were analyzed. Cells cultured on rough Ti discs showed reduced attachment, proliferation, and calcification ability suggesting that the surface inhibited osteoblast function. The findings can provide a basis for improving the biocompatibility of medical devices.

  12. Tracing temperature in a nanometer size region in a picosecond time period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Kitayama, Takumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuda, Makoto; Sataka, Masao; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Toulemonde, Marcel; Bouffard, Serge; Kimura, Kenji

    2015-08-21

    Irradiation of materials with either swift heavy ions or slow highly charged ions leads to ultrafast heating on a timescale of several picosecond in a region of several nanometer. This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies. These nanostructures are believed to be formed when the local temperature rises beyond the melting or boiling point of the material. Conventional techniques, however, are not applicable to measure temperature in such a localized region in a short time period. Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position. The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model.

  13. Nanometer-scale patterning of high-Tc superconductors for Josephson junction-based digital circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Corless, R.F.; Martens, J.S.; Berkowitz, S.; Char, K.; Johansson, M.; Hou, S.Y.; Phillips, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    A straightforward method for nanometer-scale patterning of high-T c superconductor thin films is discussed. The technique combines direct-write electron beam lithography with well-controlled aqueous etches and is applied to the fabrication of Josephson junction nanobridges in high-quality, epitaxial thin-film YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 . We present the results of our studies of the dimensions, yield, uniformity, and mechanism of the junctions along with the performance of a representative digital circuit based on these junctions. Direct current junction parameter statistics measured at 77 K show critical currents of 27.5 μA±13% for a sample set of 220 junctions. The Josephson behavior of the nanobridge is believed to arise from the aggregation of oxygen vacancies in the nanometer-scale bridge

  14. A differential Michelson interferometer with orthogonal single frequency laser for nanometer displacement measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Wang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    A novel differential Michelson laser interferometer is proposed to eliminate the influence of environmental fluctuations for nanometer displacement measurement. This differential interferometer consists of two homodyne interferometers in which two orthogonal single frequency beams share common reference arm and partial measurement arm. By modulating the displacement of the common reference arm with a piezoelectric transducer, the common-mode displacement drift resulting from the environmental disturbances can be well suppressed and the measured displacement as differential-mode displacement signal is achieved. In addition, a phase difference compensation method is proposed for accurately determining the phase difference between interference signals by correcting the time interval according to the average speed in one cycle of interference signal. The nanometer displacement measurement experiments were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed interferometer and show that precision displacement measurement with standard deviation less than 1 nm has been achieved. (paper)

  15. Study of vibrations and stabilization of linear collider final doublets at the sub-nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzon, B.

    2007-11-01

    CLIC is one of the current projects of high energy linear colliders. Vertical beam sizes of 0.7 nm at the time of the collision and fast ground motion of a few nanometers impose an active stabilization of the final doublets at a fifth of nanometer above 4 Hz. The majority of my work concerned vibrations and active stabilization study of cantilever and slim beams in order to be representative of the final doublets of CLIC. In a first part, measured performances of different types of vibration sensors associated to an appropriate instrumentation showed that accurate measurements of ground motion are possible from 0.1 Hz up to 2000 Hz on a quiet site. Also, electrochemical sensors answering a priori the specifications of CLIC can be incorporated in the active stabilization at a fifth of nanometer. In a second part, an experimental and numerical study of beam vibrations enabled to validate the efficiency of the numerical prediction incorporated then in the simulation of the active stabilization. Also, a study of the impact of ground motion and of acoustic noise on beam vibrations showed that an active stabilization is necessary at least up to 1000 Hz. In a third part, results on the active stabilization of a beam at its two first resonances are shown down to amplitudes of a tenth of nanometer above 4 Hz by using in parallel a commercial system performing passive and active stabilization of the clamping. The last part is related to a study of a support for the final doublets of a linear collider prototype in phase of finalization, the ATF2 prototype. This work showed that relative motion between this support and the ground is below imposed tolerances (6 nm above 0.1 Hz) with appropriate boundary conditions. (author)

  16. Obtaining of iron particles of nanometer size in a natural zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xingu C, E. G.

    2013-01-01

    The zeolites are aluminosilicates with cavities that can act as molecular sieve. Their crystalline structure is formed by tetrahedrons that get together giving place to a three-dimensional net, in which each oxygen is shared by two silicon atoms, being this way part of the tecto silicate minerals, its external and internal areas reach the hundred square meters for gram, they are located in a natural way in a large part of earth crust and also exist in a synthetic way. In Mexico there are different locations of zeolitic material whose important component is the clinoptilolite. In this work the results of three zeolitic materials coming from San Luis Potosi are shown, the samples were milled and sieved for its initial characterization, to know its chemical composition, crystalline phases, morphology, topology and thermal behavior before and after its homo-ionization with sodium chloride, its use as support of iron particles of nanometer size. The description of the synthesis of iron particles of nanometer size is also presented, as well as the comparison with the particles of nanometer size synthesized without support after its characterization. The characterization techniques used during the experimental work were: Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Infrared spectroscopy, specific area by means of BET and thermogravimetry analysis. (Author)

  17. Nanometer-sized emissions from municipal waste incinerators: A qualitative risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, David R., E-mail: david.r.johnson@ghd.com

    2016-12-15

    Municipal waste incinerators (MWI) are beneficial alternatives to landfills for waste management. A recent constituent of concern in emissions from these facilities is incidental nanometer-sized particles (INP{sub MWI}), i.e., particles smaller than 1 micrometer in size that may deposit in the deepest parts of the lungs, cross into the bloodstream, and affect different regions of the body. With limited data, the public may fear INP{sub MWI} due to uncertainty, which may affect public acceptance, regulatory permitting, and the increased lowering of air quality standards. Despite limited data, a qualitative risk assessment paradigm can be applied to determine the relative risk due to INP{sub MWI} emissions. This review compiles existing data on nanometer-sized particle generation by MWIs, emissions control technologies used at MWIs, emission releases into the atmosphere, human population exposure, and adverse health effects of nanometer-sized particles to generate a qualitative risk assessment and identify data gaps. The qualitative risk assessment conservatively concludes that INP{sub MWI} pose a low to moderate risk to individuals, primarily due to the lack of relevant toxicological data on INP{sub MWI} mixtures in ambient particulate matter.

  18. In situ deposition of poly(1,8-diaminonaphthalene): from thin films to nanometer-sized structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagowska, Magdalena; PaIys, Barbara; Mazur, Maciej; Skompska, Magdalena; Jackowska, Krystyna

    2005-01-01

    Chemical in situ deposition of poly(1,8-diaminonaphthalene) (p(1,8-DAN)) on conductive supports in aqueous and acetonitrile solutions was investigated using electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The resulting deposits were examined by the means of cyclic voltammetry (CV), FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. P(1,8-DAN) was also deposited via chemical polymerization onto a porous polycarbonate membrane (PC) which served as a template for synthesis of nanometer-sized structures. The deposits of p(1,8-DAN) on PC substrate were imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the nanostructures obtained by dissolution of the template were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The EQCM and UV-vis studies indicated that the polymer is formed both on the surface of the substrate and in the bulk of the polymerization solution. However, polymerization of 1,8-DAN in solution is delayed in comparison with deposition on the substrate. Electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of p(1,8-DAN) formed chemically closely resemble the properties of the electrosynthesized polymer. Furthermore, SEM images of p(1,8-DAN) nanostructures revealed that the polymer nanowires are formed in aqueous solutions, whereas two types of structures: nanowires and round shaped structures, not fitting to the pore size, can be obtained by chemical polymerization in the acetonitrile medium

  19. EEG in Silent Small Vessel Disease : sLORETA Mapping Reveals Cortical Sources of Vascular Cognitive Impairment No Dementia in the Default Mode Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheorajpanday, Rishi V. A.; Marien, Peter; Weeren, Arie J. T. M.; Nagels, Guy; Saerens, Jos; van Putten, Michel J. A. M.; De Deyn, Peter P.

    Introduction: Vascular cognitive impairment, no dementia (vCIND) is a prevalent and potentially preventable disorder. Clinical presof the small vessel subcortical subtype may be insidious and difficult to diagnose in the initial stage. We investigated electroencephalographic sources of subcortical

  20. The voltammetric responses of nanometer-sized electrodes in weakly supported electrolyte: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuwen; Zhang Qianfan; Chen Shengli

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the supporting electrolyte concentration on the interfacial profiles and voltammetric responses of nanometer-sized disk electrodes have been investigated theoretically by combining the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) theory and Butler-Volmer (BV) equation. The PNP-theory is used to treat the nonlinear couplings of electric field, concentration field and dielectric field at electrochemical interface without the electroneutrality assumption that has been long adopted in various voltammetric theories for macro/microelectrodes. The BV equation is modified by using the Frumkin correction to account for the effect of the diffuse double layer potential on interfacial electron-transfer (ET) rate and by including a distance-dependent ET probability in the expression of rate constant to describe the radial heterogeneity of the ET rate constant at nanometer-sized disk electrodes. The computed voltammetric responses for disk electrodes larger than 200 nm in radii in the absence of the excess of the supporting electrolyte using the present theoretical scheme show reasonable agreements with the predications of the conventional microelectrode voltammetric theory which uses the combined Nernst-Planck equation and electroneutrality equation to describe the mixed electromigration-diffusion mass transport without including the possible effects of the diffuse double layer (Amatore et al. ). For electrodes smaller than 200 nm, however, the voltammetric responses predicated by the present theory exhibit significant deviation from the microelectrode theory. It is shown that the deviations are mainly resulted from the overlap between the diffuse double layer and the concentration depletion layer (CDL) at nanoscale electrochemical interfaces in weakly supported media, which will result in the invalidation of the electroneutrality condition in CDL, and from the radial inhomogeneity of ET probability at nanometer-sized disk electrodes.

  1. The voltammetric responses of nanometer-sized electrodes in weakly supported electrolyte: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yuwen; Zhang Qianfan [Hubei Electrochemical Power Sources Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen Shengli, E-mail: slchen@whu.edu.c [Hubei Electrochemical Power Sources Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2010-11-30

    The effect of the supporting electrolyte concentration on the interfacial profiles and voltammetric responses of nanometer-sized disk electrodes have been investigated theoretically by combining the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) theory and Butler-Volmer (BV) equation. The PNP-theory is used to treat the nonlinear couplings of electric field, concentration field and dielectric field at electrochemical interface without the electroneutrality assumption that has been long adopted in various voltammetric theories for macro/microelectrodes. The BV equation is modified by using the Frumkin correction to account for the effect of the diffuse double layer potential on interfacial electron-transfer (ET) rate and by including a distance-dependent ET probability in the expression of rate constant to describe the radial heterogeneity of the ET rate constant at nanometer-sized disk electrodes. The computed voltammetric responses for disk electrodes larger than 200 nm in radii in the absence of the excess of the supporting electrolyte using the present theoretical scheme show reasonable agreements with the predications of the conventional microelectrode voltammetric theory which uses the combined Nernst-Planck equation and electroneutrality equation to describe the mixed electromigration-diffusion mass transport without including the possible effects of the diffuse double layer (Amatore et al. ). For electrodes smaller than 200 nm, however, the voltammetric responses predicated by the present theory exhibit significant deviation from the microelectrode theory. It is shown that the deviations are mainly resulted from the overlap between the diffuse double layer and the concentration depletion layer (CDL) at nanoscale electrochemical interfaces in weakly supported media, which will result in the invalidation of the electroneutrality condition in CDL, and from the radial inhomogeneity of ET probability at nanometer-sized disk electrodes.

  2. Simulation of Electrical Discharge Initiated by a Nanometer-Sized Probe in Atmospheric Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ran; Chen Chilai; Liu Youjiang; Wang Huanqin; Kong Deyi; Ma Yuan; Cada Michael; Brugger Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional nanometer scale tip-plate discharge model has been employed to study nanoscale electrical discharge in atmospheric conditions. The field strength distributions in a nanometer scale tip-to-plate electrode arrangement were calculated using the finite element analysis (FEA) method, and the influences of applied voltage amplitude and frequency as well as gas gap distance on the variation of effective discharge range (EDR) on the plate were also investigated and discussed. The simulation results show that the probe with a wide tip will cause a larger effective discharge range on the plate; the field strength in the gap is notably higher than that induced by the sharp tip probe; the effective discharge range will increase linearly with the rise of excitation voltage, and decrease nonlinearly with the rise of gap length. In addition, probe dimension, especially the width/height ratio, affects the effective discharge range in different manners. With the width/height ratio rising from 1:1 to 1:10, the effective discharge range will maintain stable when the excitation voltage is around 50 V. This will increase when the excitation voltage gets higher and decrease as the excitation voltage gets lower. Furthermore, when the gap length is 5 nm and the excitation voltage is below 20 V, the diameter of EDR in our simulation is about 150 nm, which is consistent with the experiment results reported by other research groups. Our work provides a preliminary understanding of nanometer scale discharges and establishes a predictive structure-behavior relationship

  3. Grinding model and material removal mechanism of medical nanometer zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongkun; Li, Changhe; Jia, Dongzhou; Wang, Sheng; Li, Runze; Qi, Xiaoxiao

    2014-01-01

    Many patents have been devoted to developing medical nanometer zirconia ceramic grinding techniques that can significantly improve both workpiece surface integrity and grinding quality. Among these patents is a process for preparing ceramic dental implants with a surface for improving osseo-integration by sand abrasive finishing under a jet pressure of 1.5 bar to 8.0 bar and with a grain size of 30 µm to 250 µm. Compared with other materials, nano-zirconia ceramics exhibit unmatched biomedical performance and excellent mechanical properties as medical bone tissue and dentures. The removal mechanism of nano-zirconia materials includes brittle fracture and plastic removal. Brittle fracture involves crack formation, extension, peeling, and chipping to completely remove debris. Plastic removal is similar to chip formation in metal grinding, including rubbing, ploughing, and the formation of grinding debris. The materials are removed in shearing and chipping. During brittle fracture, the grinding-led transverse and radial extension of cracks further generate local peeling of blocks of the material. In material peeling and removal, the mechanical strength and surface quality of the workpiece are also greatly reduced because of crack extension. When grinding occurs in the plastic region, plastic removal is performed, and surface grinding does not generate grinding fissures and surface fracture, producing clinically satisfactory grinding quality. With certain grinding conditions, medical nanometer zirconia ceramics can be removed through plastic flow in ductile regime. In this study, we analyzed the critical conditions for the transfer of brittle and plastic removal in nano-zirconia ceramic grinding as well as the high-quality surface grinding of medical nanometer zirconia ceramics by ELID grinding.

  4. Self-assembled metallic nanoparticle template — a new approach of surface nanostructuring at nanometer scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Taleb

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the formation of silver and copper nanostructures on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG modified with self-assembled gold nanoparticles (Au NPs is demonstrated. Surface patterning with nanometer resolution was achieved. Different methods such as field emission scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM, energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were used to illustrate a selective deposition of silver and copper on Au NPs. The mechanism of silver and copper ions reduction on Au NP with n-dodecanethiol coating is discussed.

  5. Hybrid approaches to nanometer-scale patterning: Exploiting tailored intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, Thomas J.; Srinivasan, Charan; Shuster, Mitchell J.; Horn, Mark W.; Andrews, Anne M.; Weiss, Paul S.

    2008-01-01

    In this perspective, we explore hybrid approaches to nanometer-scale patterning, where the precision of molecular self-assembly is combined with the sophistication and fidelity of lithography. Two areas - improving existing lithographic techniques through self-assembly and fabricating chemically patterned surfaces - will be discussed in terms of their advantages, limitations, applications, and future outlook. The creation of such chemical patterns enables new capabilities, including the assembly of biospecific surfaces to be recognized by, and to capture analytes from, complex mixtures. Finally, we speculate on the potential impact and upcoming challenges of these hybrid strategies.

  6. The nature of the Fe-graphene interface at the nanometer level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattelan, Mattia, E-mail: mattia.cattelan.1@studenti.unipd.it; Artiglia, Luca; Favaro, Marco; Agnoli, Stefano, E-mail: mattia.cattelan.1@studenti.unipd.it; Granozzi, Gaetano [Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, via Marzolo 1, 35135, Padova (Italy); Peng, Guowen; Roling, Luke T.; Mavrikakis, Manos [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cavaliere, Emanuele; Gavioli, Luca [Interdisciplinary Laboratories for Advanced Materials Physics (i-LAMP) and Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica, via dei Musei 41, I-25121 Brescia (Italy); Barinov, Alexey [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park-Basovizza, Strada Statale 14 Km 163.5, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Píš, Igor [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park-Basovizza, Strada Statale 14 Km 163.5, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM)-CNR, Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park-Basovizza, Strada Statale 14 Km 163.5, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Nappini, Silvia; Magnano, Elena; Bondino, Federica [Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM)-CNR, Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park-Basovizza, Strada Statale 14 Km 163.5, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-07-27

    The emerging fields of graphene-based magnetic and spintronic devices require a deep understanding of the interface between graphene and ferromagnetic metals. This work reports a detailed investigation at the nanometer level of the Fe–graphene interface carried out by angle-resolved photoemission, high-resolution photoemission from core levels, and scanning tunnelling microscopy. Quasi-freestanding graphene was grown on Pt(111), and the iron film was either deposited atop or intercalated beneath graphene. Calculations and experimental results show that iron strongly modifies the graphene band structure and lifts its π band spin degeneracy.

  7. A New Nonlinear Model of Body Resistance in Nanometer PD SOI MOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Daghighi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nonlinear model for the body resistance of a 45nm PD SOI MOSFET is developed. This model verified on the base of the small signal three-dimensional simulation results. In this paper by using the three-dimensional simulation of ISE-TCAD software, the indicating factors of body resistance in nanometer transistors and then are shown, using the surface potential model. A mathematical relation to calculat the body resistance incorporating device width and body potential was derived. Excellent agreement was obtained by comparing the model outputs and three-dimensional simulation results.

  8. The nature of the Fe-graphene interface at the nanometer level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattelan, Mattia; Artiglia, Luca; Favaro, Marco; Agnoli, Stefano; Granozzi, Gaetano; Peng, Guowen; Roling, Luke T.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Cavaliere, Emanuele; Gavioli, Luca; Barinov, Alexey; Píš, Igor; Nappini, Silvia; Magnano, Elena; Bondino, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The emerging fields of graphene-based magnetic and spintronic devices require a deep understanding of the interface between graphene and ferromagnetic metals. This work reports a detailed investigation at the nanometer level of the Fe–graphene interface carried out by angle-resolved photoemission, high-resolution photoemission from core levels, and scanning tunnelling microscopy. Quasi-freestanding graphene was grown on Pt(111), and the iron film was either deposited atop or intercalated beneath graphene. Calculations and experimental results show that iron strongly modifies the graphene band structure and lifts its π band spin degeneracy.

  9. Nanometer-Scale Dissection of Chromosomes by Atomic Force Microscopy Combined with Heat-Denaturing Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Kazumi; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shichiri, Motoharu; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Toshio; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a method for dissecting chromosome fragments with a size of a few hundred nanometers by atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using this method, we demonstrated reproducible dissections of silkworm chromosomes in the pachytene phase. The dissected fragments were successfully recovered on the cantilever tips, as confirmed by fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent stained chromosomes. To recover dissected chromosome fragments from a larger chromosome, such as the human metaphase chromosome of a somatic cell, heat denaturation was found to be effective. Further improvements in this method may lead to a novel tool for isolating valuable genes and/or investigating local genome structures in the near future.

  10. A direct and at nanometer scale study of electrical charge distribution on membranes of alive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlière Christian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented an innovative method to map in-vivo and at nanometer scale the electrical charge distribution on membranes of alive cells. It relies on a new atomic force microscopy (AFM mode based on an electro-mechanical coupling effect. Furthermore, an additional electrical signal detected by both the deflection of the AFM cantilever and simultaneous direct current measurements was detected at low scanning rates. It was attributed to the detection of the current stemming from ionic channels. It opens a new way to directly investigate in situ biological electrical surface processes involved in bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, microbial fuel cells, etc.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy studies on nanometer-sized ω phase produced in Gum Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Takaaki; Murakami, Yasukazu; Shindo, Daisuke; Hayasaka, Yuichiro; Kuramoto, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    The morphology, numerical density and average spacing of the ω phase formed in Gum Metal, a Ti-based alloy showing unique mechanical properties, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Based on dark-field image observations and precise thickness measurements using a thin-foil specimen, the average spacing of the nanometer-sized ω phase was determined to be 6 nm. This spacing appeared to be sufficiently small for trapping dislocations. The results are discussed in conjunction with the dislocation-free deformation mechanism proposed for Gum Metal.

  12. Electron transport in nanometer GaAs structure under radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Demarina, N V

    2002-01-01

    One investigates into effect of neutron and proton irradiation on electron transport in nanometer GaAs structures. Mathematical model takes account of radiation defects via introduction of additional mechanisms od scattering of carriers at point defects and disordered regions. To investigate experimentally into volt-ampere and volt-farad characteristics one used a structure based on a field-effect transistor with the Schottky gate and a built-in channel. Calculation results of electron mobility, drift rate of electrons, time of energy relaxation and electron pulse are compared with the experimental data

  13. Fiscal 2000 achievement report on the research and development of nanometer controlled optical disk system; 2000 nendo nanometer seigyo hikari disk system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Development proceeded of nanometer controlled optical memory technologies as part of systematic research and development aiming at the reinforcement of industrial technology power in the field of data recording. Activities were conducted in the four fields of (1) high density signal processing technology, (2) high performance disk materials technology, (3) disk substrate fabrication technology, and (4) signal detection technology. Discussed in field (1) were multivalue ROM (read only memory) disk signal regeneration, SIL-LBR (solid immersion lens-laser beam recorder), dry etching process using RIE (reactive ion etching), SHG (second harmonic generation) blue laser, and a multivalue ROM disk evaluation system. Studied in field (2) were the evaluation of ROM disk performance dependent on recording materials, development of high density recording materials, and the evaluation of crystallization induction time using a static tester. Studied in the development of high density recording materials was the formation of microscopic recording marks in a phase shift/surface recording type disk comprising a 4-element (Ag-In-Sb-Te) recording layer and an Ag reflection layer. In fiscal 2000, an attempt was made at the 0.07 {mu}m level. (NEDO)

  14. Cleanability evaluation of ceramic glazes with nanometer far-infrared materials using contact angle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Liang, Jinsheng; Di, Xingfu; Tang, Qingguo

    2014-05-01

    The cleanability of easy-to-clean ceramic glazes doped with nanometer far-infrared materials was compared with that of some high-quality household ceramic glazes from the market. The cleanability was evaluated by the contact angle measurement using a sessile drop method with a Dataphysics OCA-30 contact angle analyzer. The results showed that the difference of contact angles of water on the glazes before soiling and after cleaning could be used as a parameter for evaluating the cleanability of the glazes. The relationship between cleanability and surface properties, such as surface free energy and surface topography, was investigated. The surface free energy of the samples and their components were calculated using van Oss acid-base approach. By measuring advancing and receding contact angles, the contact angle hysteresis of the ceramic glazes due to the surface topography was investigated. It was shown that the cleanability of ceramic glazes containing nanometer far-infrared materials (NFIM) is better than that of household ceramic glazes from market, due to a higher ratio of electron-acceptor parameter to electron-donor parameter, which led to the effect of water hydration as well as better hydrophilic property and increased smoothness. The contact angle measurement not only accurately evaluates the cleanability of the ceramic glazes, but also has a contribution to the study of cleanability theory. Moreover, this method is simple, convenient and less sample-consumption.

  15. Generating Sub-nanometer Displacement Using Reduction Mechanism Consisting of Torsional Leaf Spring Hinges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuda Makoto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent demand on the measurement resolution of precise positioning comes up to tens of picometers. Some distinguished researches have been performed to measure the displacement in picometer order, however, few of them can verify the measurement performance as available tools in industry. This is not only because the picometer displacement is not yet required for industrial use, but also due to the lack of standard tools to verify such precise displacement. We proposed a displacement reduction mechanism for generating precise displacement using torsional leaf spring hinges (TLSHs that consist of four leaf springs arranged radially. It has been demonstrated that a prototype of the reduction mechanism was able to provide one-nanometer displacement with 1/1000 reduction rate by a piezoelectric actuator. In order to clarify the potential of the reduction mechanism, a displacement reduction table that can be mounted on AFM stage was newly developed using TLSHs. This paper describes the design of the reduction mechanism and the sub-nanometer displacement performance of the table obtained from its dynamic and static characteristics measured by displacement sensors and from the AFM images

  16. [Clinical observation on nanometer acupoint mounting method for alleviation of myospasm complicated by spinal injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su-Jie; Si, Tong; Li, Zhi

    2008-11-01

    To observe clinical effect of nanometer acupoint mounting method for alleviation of myospasm complicated by spinal injury. Sixty cases were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 30 cases in each group. The observation group were treated by nanometer mounting at 4 Jiaji (EX-B 2) points each on both sides of the affected spine and Shenshu (BL 23), Shangliao (BL 31), Ciliao (BL 32), Yang-lingquan (GB 34), Xuanzhong (GB 39); and the control group by mounting zinc oxide sticking tablets at the above acupoints. The mounting was replaced once each two days, 7 times constituting one course. One week and one month after the end of 3 courses, their results were recorded, respectively. Before treatment, there was no significant difference between the two groups in grades of the myospasm degree (P > 0.05). One week after the end of treatment, 15 cases were grade I of myospasm, 9 cases were grade II, 5 cases were grade III and 1 case was grade IV in the observation group, and 1 cases grade I, 7 cases grade II, 14 cases grade III, 8 cases grade IV in the control group. Ridit analysis on the data indicated that there were significant differences before and after treatment in the myospasm degree (P mounting method is a new one for alleviation of myospasm complicated by spinal injury, with convenience, safety and no side effect.

  17. Mapping Thermal Expansion Coefficients in Freestanding 2D Materials at the Nanometer Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuan; Yasaei, Poya; Jokisaari, Jacob; Öǧüt, Serdar; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Klie, Robert F.

    2018-02-01

    Two-dimensional materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and their heterostructures, exhibit great potential for a variety of applications, such as transistors, spintronics, and photovoltaics. While the miniaturization offers remarkable improvements in electrical performance, heat dissipation and thermal mismatch can be a problem in designing electronic devices based on two-dimensional materials. Quantifying the thermal expansion coefficient of 2D materials requires temperature measurements at nanometer scale. Here, we introduce a novel nanometer-scale thermometry approach to measure temperature and quantify the thermal expansion coefficients in 2D materials based on scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy to determine the energy shift of the plasmon resonance peak of 2D materials as a function of sample temperature. By combining these measurements with first-principles modeling, the thermal expansion coefficients (TECs) of single-layer and freestanding graphene and bulk, as well as monolayer MoS2 , MoSe2 , WS2 , or WSe2 , are directly determined and mapped.

  18. Nanometal Skin of Plasmonic Heterostructures for Highly Efficient Near-Field Scattering Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Vecchione, Antonio; Pesce, Giuseppe; di Girolamo, Rocco; Malafronte, Anna; Sasso, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    In this work, atomic force microscopy probes are functionalized by virtue of self-assembling monolayers of block copolymer (BCP) micelles loaded either with clusters of silver nanoparticles or bimetallic heterostructures consisting of mixed species of silver and gold nanoparticles. The resulting self-organized patterns allow coating the tips with a sort of nanometal skin made of geometrically confined nanoislands. This approach favors the reproducible engineering and tuning of the plasmonic properties of the resulting structured tip by varying the nanometal loading of the micelles. The newly conceived tips are applied for experiments of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) spectroscopy and scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). TERS and s-SNOM probe characterizations on several standard Raman analytes and patterned nanostructures demonstrate excellent enhancement factor with the possibility of fast scanning and spatial resolution <12 nm. In fact, each metal nanoisland consists of a multiscale heterostructure that favors large scattering and near-field amplification. Then, we verify the tips to allow challenging nongap-TER spectroscopy on thick biosamples. Our approach introduces a synergistic chemical functionalization of the tips for versatile inclusion and delivery of plasmonic nanoparticles at the tip apex, which may promote the tuning of the plasmonic properties, a large enhancement, and the possibility of adding new degrees of freedom for tip functionalization.

  19. Transmission electron microscopical study of teenage crown dentin on the nanometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panfilov, Peter, E-mail: peter.panfilov@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kabanova, Anna [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Guo, Jinming; Zhang, Zaoli [Erich Schmid Institute for Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Leoben (Austria)

    2017-02-01

    Statement of significance: This is the first transmission electron microscopic study of teenage crown dentin on the nanometer scale. Samples for TEM were prepared by mechanical thinning and chemical polishing that allowed obtaining the electron transparent foils. It was firstly shown that human dentin possesses the layered morphology: the layers are oriented normally to the main axis of a tooth and have the thickness of ~ 50 nm. HA inorganic phase of teenage crown dentin is in the amorphous state. The cellular structure, which was formed from collagen fibers (diameter is ~ 5 nm), are observed near DEJ region in teenage dentin, whereas bioorganic phase of teenage crown dentin near the pulp camera does not contain the collagen fibers. Cracks in dentin thin foils have sharp tips, but big angles of opening (~ 30{sup °}) with plastic zone ahead crack tip. It means that young crown human dentin exhibits ductile or viscous-elastic fracture behavior on the nanometer scale. - Highlights: • Dentin has layered morphology. • Mineral component of dentin is in amorphous state. • Collagen fibers form cellular structure in dentin. • Cracks in dentin behave by elastic-plastic manner.

  20. Sub-nanometer-resolution imaging of peptide nanotubes in water using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, Tomoki; Hayashi, Itsuho; Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kimura, Kenjiro, E-mail: kimura@gold.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tamura, Atsuo [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Peptide nanotubes were aligned on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface. ► We visualized sub-nanometer-scale structure on peptide nanotube surface in water. ► We observed hydration structure at a peptide nanotube/water interface. - Abstract: Peptide nanotubes are self-assembled fibrous materials composed of cyclic polypeptides. Recently, various aspects of peptide nanotubes have been studied, in particular the utility of different methods for making peptide nanotubes with diverse designed functions. In order to investigate the relationship between formation, function and stability, it is essential to analyze the precise structure of peptide nanotubes. Atomic-scale surface imaging in liquids was recently achieved using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy with improved force sensing. Here we provide a precise surface structural analysis of peptide nanotubes in water without crystallizing them obtained by imaging the nanotubes at the sub-nanometer scale in water. In addition, the local hydration structure around the peptide nanotubes was observed at the nanotube/water interface.

  1. Spinel Li2CoTi3O8 nanometer obtained for application as pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa de Camara, M. S.; Alves Pimentel, L.; Longo, E.; Nobrega Azevedo, L. da; Araujo Melo, D. M. de

    2016-01-01

    Pigments are used in ceramics, cosmetics, inks, and other applications widely materials. To this must be single and easily reproducible. Moreover, the pigments obtained in the nanoscale are more stable, reproducible and highlight color in small amounts compared with those obtained in micrometer scale. The mixed oxides with spinel structures AB 2 O 4 have important applications, including: pigments, refractories, catalytic and electronic ceramics. In this context, the aim of this work was the preparation of powder Li 2 CoTi 3 O 8 spinel phase with nanometer particle size of the polymeric precursor method (Pechini) and characterization by means of thermal analysis (TG/DTA) X-ray diffraction (XRD), refined by the Rietveld method, BET, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman and colorimetric coordinates. The pigment was obtained by heat treatment of 400 degree centigrade to 1000 degree centigrade after pyrolysis at 300 degree centigrade/1 h for removing the organic material. Li 2 CoTi 3 O 8 desired spinel phase was obtained from 500 degree centigrade, and presenting stability nanometer to about 1.300 degree centigrade. Spinel green phase introduced at temperatures in the range of 400 degree centigrade and 500 degree centigrade, and 600 degree centigrade at temperatures between blue and 1000 degree centigrade. (Author)

  2. Transmission electron microscopical study of teenage crown dentin on the nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panfilov, Peter; Kabanova, Anna; Guo, Jinming; Zhang, Zaoli

    2017-01-01

    Statement of significance: This is the first transmission electron microscopic study of teenage crown dentin on the nanometer scale. Samples for TEM were prepared by mechanical thinning and chemical polishing that allowed obtaining the electron transparent foils. It was firstly shown that human dentin possesses the layered morphology: the layers are oriented normally to the main axis of a tooth and have the thickness of ~ 50 nm. HA inorganic phase of teenage crown dentin is in the amorphous state. The cellular structure, which was formed from collagen fibers (diameter is ~ 5 nm), are observed near DEJ region in teenage dentin, whereas bioorganic phase of teenage crown dentin near the pulp camera does not contain the collagen fibers. Cracks in dentin thin foils have sharp tips, but big angles of opening (~ 30 ° ) with plastic zone ahead crack tip. It means that young crown human dentin exhibits ductile or viscous-elastic fracture behavior on the nanometer scale. - Highlights: • Dentin has layered morphology. • Mineral component of dentin is in amorphous state. • Collagen fibers form cellular structure in dentin. • Cracks in dentin behave by elastic-plastic manner.

  3. Chemical-state-selective mapping at nanometer scale using synchrotron radiation and photoelectron emission microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Norie; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Honda, Mitsunori

    2010-01-01

    For surface analyses of semiconductor devices and various functional materials, it has become indispensable to analyze valence states at nanometer scale due to the rapid developments of nanotechnology. Since a method for microscopic mapping dependent on the chemical bond states has not been established so far, we have developed a photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) system combined with synchrotron soft X-ray excitation. The samples investigated were Si/SiO x micro-patterns prepared by O 2 + ion implantation in Si(001) wafer using a mask. PEEM images excited by various photon energies around the Si K-edge were observed. The lateral spatial resolution of the system was about 41 nm. The brightness of each spot in PEEM images changed depending on the photon energy, due to the X-ray absorption intensity of the respective chemical state. Since the surface of this sample was topographically flat, it has been demonstrated that the present method can be applied to observations of the microscopic pattern, depending not on the morphology, but only on the valence states of silicon. We have also in-situ measured the changes of the PEEM images upon annealing, and elucidated the mechanism of the lateral diffusion of oxygen and valence states of silicon at the nanometer scale. (author)

  4. Chemical-state-selective mapping at nanometer scale using synchrotron radiation and photoelectron emission microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Norie; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Honda, Mitsunori

    2008-01-01

    For surface analyses of semiconductor devices and various functional materials, it has become indispensable to analyze the valence states at the nanometer scale due to the rapid developments of nanotechnology. Since a method for microscopic mapping dependent on the chemical bond states has not been established so far, we have developed a photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) system combined with synchrotron soft X-ray excitation. The samples investigated were Si/SiO x micro-patterns prepared by O 2 + ion implantation in a Si(001) wafer using a mask. PEEM images excited by various photon energies around the Si K-edge were observed. The lateral spatial resolution of the system was about 41 nm. The brightness of each spot in PEEM images changed depending on the photon energy, due to the X-ray absorption intensity of the respective chemical state. Since the surface of this sample is topographically flat, it has been demonstrated that the present method can be applied to observations of the microscopic pattern, depending not on the morphology, but only on the valence states of silicon. We have also in-situ measured the changes of PEEM images upon annealing, and elucidated the mechanism of the lateral diffusion of oxygen and valence states of silicon at the nanometer scale. (author)

  5. In Depth Characterization of Repetitive DNA in 23 Plant Genomes Reveals Sources of Genome Size Variation in the Legume Tribe Fabeae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Pellicer, J.; Čížková, Jana; Koblížková, Andrea; Neumann, Pavel; Vrbová, Iva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Kelly, L.J.; Leitch, I.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 11 (2015), e0143424 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : Generation sequencing reveals * transposable elements * satellite repeats * retrotransposons Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  6. Medio-Frontal and Anterior Temporal abnormalities in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD during an acoustic antisaccade task as revealed by electro-cortical source reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rockstroh Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is one of the most prevalent disorders in children and adolescence. Impulsivity is one of three core symptoms and likely associated with inhibition difficulties. To date the neural correlate of the antisaccade task, a test of response inhibition, has not been studied in children with (or without ADHD. Methods Antisaccade responses to visual and acoustic cues were examined in nine unmedicated boys with ADHD (mean age 122.44 ± 20.81 months and 14 healthy control children (mean age 115.64 ± 22.87 months, three girls while an electroencephalogram (EEG was recorded. Brain activity before saccade onset was reconstructed using a 23-source-montage. Results When cues were acoustic, children with ADHD had a higher source activity than control children in Medio-Frontal Cortex (MFC between -230 and -120 ms and in the left-hemispheric Temporal Anterior Cortex (TAC between -112 and 0 ms before saccade onset, despite both groups performing similarly behaviourally (antisaccades errors and saccade latency. When visual cues were used EEG-activity preceding antisaccades did not differ between groups. Conclusion Children with ADHD exhibit altered functioning of the TAC and MFC during an antisaccade task elicited by acoustic cues. Children with ADHD need more source activation to reach the same behavioural level as control children.

  7. Surface functionalization by fine ultraviolet-patterning of nanometer-thick liquid lubricant films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Renguo; Zhang, Hedong; Komada, Suguru; Mitsuya, Yasunaga; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Itoh, Shintaro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present fine UV-patterning of nm-thick liquid films for surface functionalization. • The patterned films exhibit both a morphological pattern and a functional pattern of different surface properties. • The finest pattern linewidth was 0.5 μm. • Fine patterning is crucial for improving surface and tribological properties. - Abstract: For micro/nanoscale devices, surface functionalization is essential to achieve function and performance superior to those that originate from the inherent bulk material properties. As a method of surface functionalization, we dip-coated nanometer-thick liquid lubricant films onto solid surfaces and then patterned the lubricant films with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation through a photomask. Surface topography, adhesion, and friction measurements demonstrated that the patterned films feature a concave–convex thickness distribution with thicker lubricant in the irradiated regions and a functional distribution with lower adhesion and friction in the irradiated convex regions. The pattern linewidth ranged from 100 to as fine as 0.5 μm. The surface functionalization effect of UV-patterning was investigated by measuring the water contact angles, surface energies, friction forces, and depletion of the patterned, as-dipped, and full UV-irradiated lubricant films. The full UV-irradiated lubricant film was hydrophobic with a water contact angle of 102.1°, and had lower surface energy, friction, and depletion than the as-dipped film, which was hydrophilic with a water contact angle of 80.7°. This demonstrates that UV irradiation substantially improves the surface and tribological properties of the nanometer-thick liquid lubricant films. The UV-patterned lubricant films exhibited superior surface and tribological properties than the as-dipped film. The water contact angle increased and the surface energy, friction, and depletion decreased as the pattern linewidth decreased. In particular, the 0.5-μm patterned lubricant

  8. Report on achievements in fiscal 1999. Research and development of nanometer controlled optical disk system; 1999 nendo nanometer seigyo hikari disk system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Organizational strengthening is urged in industrial technological power in information recording area which is comparable with information communications being the main pillar of the innovation in the information technology in Japan. Extremely large expectations and heavy responsibilities are placed on the next generation optical memory technology, which is one of the strong points of Japan who plays a part in the above information recording area. The present project has been performing organizational research and development to achieve creation of new industries, with the following research themes as the main subjects: (1) nanometer controlled optical memory technology, (2) magnetic section responsive and three-dimensional optical memory, (3) ultra precision pit depicting technology, and (4) ultra precision pit measuring technology. The project is two years old this year, in which it was aimed to 'develop an optical memory technology with recording density of 100 Gb/in{sup 2} or more, transfer velocity of 100 Mbps or higher, and access time of 10 ms or less'. In order to achieve and establish the interim target set for fiscal 2000 among the above aims, intending 'trial fabrication of a disk having recording density of 40 to 50 Gb/in{sup 2}, the technical problem extraction and the specifications to realize a 100 Gb/in{sup 2} system', fiscal 1999 has performed researches on 'density and accuracy improvement on the prototype disk by improving the existing devices and introducing new devices'. This paper reports the developmental research theme No. 1. (NEDO)

  9. Split Bull's eye shaped aluminum antenna for plasmon-enhanced nanometer scale germanium photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fang-Fang; Ang, Kah-Wee; Ye, Jiandong; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee

    2011-03-09

    Bull's eye antennas are capable of efficiently collecting and concentrating optical signals into an ultrasmall area, offering an excellent solution to break the bottleneck between speed and photoresponse in subwavelength photodetectors. Here, we exploit the idea of split bull's eye antenna for a nanometer germanium photodetector operating at a standard communication wavelength of 1310 nm. The nontraditional plasmonic metal aluminum has been implemented in the resonant antenna structure fabricated by standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processing. A significant enhancement in photoresponse could be achieved over the conventional bull's eye scheme due to an increased optical near-field in the active region. Moreover, with this novel antenna design the effective grating area could be significantly reduced without sacrificing device performance. This work paves the way for the future development of low-cost, high-density, and high-speed CMOS-compatible germanium-based optoelectronic devices.

  10. Nanometer-Scale Chemistry of a Calcite Biomineralization Template: Implications for Skeletal Composition and Nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branson, Oscar; Bonnin, Elisa A.; Perea, Daniel E.; Spero, Howard J.; Zhu, Zihua; Winters, Maria; Hönisch, Bärbel; Russell, Ann D.; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer S.; Gagnon, Alexander C.

    2016-10-28

    Biomineralizing organisms exhibit exquisite control over skeletal morphology and composition. The promise of understanding and harnessing this feat of natural engineering has motivated an intense search for the mechanisms that direct in vivo mineral self-assembly. We used atom probe tomography, a sub-nanometer 3D chemical mapping technique, to examine the chemistry of a buried organic-mineral interface in biomineral calcite from a marine foraminifer. The chemical patterns at this interface capture the processes of early biomineralization, when the shape, mineralogy, and orientation of skeletal growth are initially established. Sodium is enriched by a factor of nine on the organic side of the interface. Based on this pattern, we suggest that sodium plays an integral role in early biomineralization, potentially altering interfacial energy to promote crystal nucleation, and that interactions between organic surfaces and electrolytes other than calcium or carbonate could be a crucial aspect of CaCO3 biomineralization.

  11. Nanometer Linear Focusing of Hard X Rays by a Multilayer Laue Lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H.C.; Stephenson, G.B.; Maser, J.; Liu, C.; Conley, R.; Macrander, A.T.; Vogt, S.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a type of linear zone plate for nanometer-scale focusing of hard x rays, a multilayer Laue lens (MLL), produced by sectioning a multilayer and illuminating it in Laue diffraction geometry. Because of its large optical depth, a MLL spans the diffraction regimes applicable to a thin Fresnel zone plate and a crystal. Coupled wave theory calculations indicate that focusing to 5 nm or smaller with high efficiency should be possible. Partial MLL structures with outermost zone widths as small as 10 nm have been fabricated and tested with 19.5 keV synchrotron radiation. Focal sizes as small as 30 nm with efficiencies up to 44% are measured

  12. Preparation of poly (methyl methacrylate)/nanometer calcium carbonate composite by in-situ emulsion polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史建明; 包永忠; 黄志明; 翁志学

    2004-01-01

    Methyl methacrylate (MMA) emulsion polymerization in the presence of nanometer calcium carbonate (nano-CaCO3) surface modified with (-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) was carried out to prepare poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/nano-CaCO3 composite. The reaction between nano-CaCO3 and MPTMS, and the grafting of PMMA onto nano-CaCO3 were confirmed by infrared spectrum. The grafting ratio and grafting efficiency of PMMA on nano-CaCO3 modified with MPTMS were much higher than that on nano-CaCO3 modified with stearic acid. The grafting ratio of PMMA increased as the weight ratio between MMA and nano-CaCO3 increased, while the grafting efficiency of PMMA decreased. Transmission electron micrograph showed that nano-CaCO3 covered with PMMA was formed by in-situ emulsion polymerization.

  13. Bimetallic Ag-Pt Sub-nanometer Supported Clusters as Highly Efficient and Robust Oxidation Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negreiros, Fabio R. [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Halder, Avik [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Yin, Chunrong [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Singh, Akansha [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, HBNI, Chhatnag Road Jhunsi Allahabad 211019 India; Barcaro, Giovanni [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Sementa, Luca [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Tyo, Eric C. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Bartling, Stephan [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, Rostock Germany; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, Rostock Germany; Seifert, Sönke [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Sen, Prasenjit [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, HBNI, Chhatnag Road Jhunsi Allahabad 211019 India; Nigam, Sandeep [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay Mumbai- 400 085 India; Majumder, Chiranjib [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay Mumbai- 400 085 India; Fukui, Nobuyuki [East Tokyo Laboratory, Genesis Research Institute, Inc., Ichikawa Chiba 272-0001 Japan; Yasumatsu, Hisato [Cluster Research Laboratory, Toyota Technological Institute: in, East Tokyo Laboratory, Genesis Research Institute, Inc. Ichikawa, Chiba 272-0001 Japan; Vajda, Stefan [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL USA; Fortunelli, Alessandro [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA USA

    2017-12-29

    A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of Ag-Pt sub-nanometer clusters as heterogeneous catalysts in the CO -> CO2 reaction (COox) is presented. Ag9Pt2 and Ag9Pt3 clusters are size-selected in the gas phase, deposited on an ultrathin amorphous alumina support, and tested as catalysts experimentally under realistic conditions and by first-principles simulations at realistic coverage. Insitu GISAXS/TPRx demonstrates that the clusters do not sinter or deactivate even after prolonged exposure to reactants at high temperature, and present comparable, extremely high COox catalytic efficiency. Such high activity and stability are ascribed to a synergic role of Ag and Pt in ultranano-aggregates, in which Pt anchors the clusters to the support and binds and activates two CO molecules, while Ag binds and activates O-2, and Ag/Pt surface proximity disfavors poisoning by CO or oxidized species.

  14. Consolidation of nanometer-sized aluminum single crystals: Microstructure and defects evolutions

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, N. D.

    2014-04-01

    Deriving bulk materials with ultra-high mechanical strength from nanometer-sized single metalic crystals depends on the consolidation procedure. We present an accurate molecular dynamics study to quantify microstructure responses to consolidation. Aluminum single crystals with an average size up to 10.7 nm were hydrostatically compressed at temperatures up to 900 K and pressures up to 5 GPa. The consolidated material developed an average grain size that grew exponentially with the consolidation temperature, with a growth rate dependent on the starting average grain size and the consolidation pressure. The evolution of the microstructure was accompanied by a significant reduction in the concentration of defects. The ratio of vacancies to dislocation cores decreased with the average grain size and then increased after reaching a critical average grain size. The deformation mechanisms of poly-crystalline metals can be better understood in the light of the current findings. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanical design of ultraprecision weak-link stages for nanometer-scale x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, D [APS Engineering Support Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Maser, J, E-mail: shu@aps.anl.go [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-09-01

    A nanopositioning diagnostic setup has been built to support the Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) nanoprobe instrument commissioning process at the APS. Its laser Doppler interferometer system provides subnanometer positioning diagnostic resolution with large dynamic range. A set of original APS designed ultraprecision PZT-driven weak-link stages with high-stiffness motor-driven stages has been tested with this diagnostic setup. In this paper we present a preliminary test result of the ultraprecision weak-link stage system developed for the CNM hard x-ray nanoprobe instrument at APS sector 26. A test result for a novel laminar weak-link mechanism with sub-centimeter travel range and sub-nanometer positioning resolution is also introduced in this paper as a future work.

  16. Consolidation of nanometer-sized aluminum single crystals: Microstructure and defects evolutions

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, N. D.; Salem, H. G.; Yavari, A.; El Sayed, Tamer S.

    2014-01-01

    Deriving bulk materials with ultra-high mechanical strength from nanometer-sized single metalic crystals depends on the consolidation procedure. We present an accurate molecular dynamics study to quantify microstructure responses to consolidation. Aluminum single crystals with an average size up to 10.7 nm were hydrostatically compressed at temperatures up to 900 K and pressures up to 5 GPa. The consolidated material developed an average grain size that grew exponentially with the consolidation temperature, with a growth rate dependent on the starting average grain size and the consolidation pressure. The evolution of the microstructure was accompanied by a significant reduction in the concentration of defects. The ratio of vacancies to dislocation cores decreased with the average grain size and then increased after reaching a critical average grain size. The deformation mechanisms of poly-crystalline metals can be better understood in the light of the current findings. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Real-time detection of antibiotic activity by measuring nanometer-scale bacterial deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriya, Rafael; Syal, Karan; Jing, Wenwen; Mo, Manni; Yu, Hui; Haydel, Shelley E.; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-12-01

    Diagnosing antibiotic-resistant bacteria currently requires sensitive detection of phenotypic changes associated with antibiotic action on bacteria. Here, we present an optical imaging-based approach to quantify bacterial membrane deformation as a phenotypic feature in real-time with a nanometer scale (˜9 nm) detection limit. Using this approach, we found two types of antibiotic-induced membrane deformations in different bacterial strains: polymyxin B induced relatively uniform spatial deformation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells leading to change in cellular volume and ampicillin-induced localized spatial deformation leading to the formation of bulges or protrusions on uropathogenic E. coli CFT073 cells. We anticipate that the approach will contribute to understanding of antibiotic phenotypic effects on bacteria with a potential for applications in rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  18. The microstructural evolution of nanometer ruthenium films in Ru/C multilayers with thermal treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Gronsky, R.; Kortright, J.B.

    1991-04-01

    The evolution of nanometer Ru films sandwiched between various C layer thickness with thermal treatments was studied by plan-view and cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy. Plan-view observation provides information on the Ru grain size, while cross- sectional studies allow examination of the multilayer morphology. After annealing at 800 degrees C for 30 minutes, the grain size in the 2 and 4 nm Ru layers show little difference from each other, while that in the 1 nm Ru layers depends strongly on the thickness of the C layers in the multilayers. It increases with decreasing C layer thickness. Agglomeration of the Ru layers is observed in 1nm Ru/1nm C multilayers after annealing at 600 degrees C for 30 minutes. The evolution of the microstructures and layered structure stability of the Ru/C system is compared to that of W/C and Ru/B 4 C systems. 10 refs., 2 figs

  19. Some applications of nanometer scale structures for current and future X-ray space research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Abdali, S; Frederiksen, P K

    1994-01-01

    Nanometer scale structures such as multilayers, gratings and natural crystals are playing an increasing role in spectroscopic applications for X-ray astrophysics. A few examples are briefly described as an introduction to current and planned applications pursued at the Danish Space Research...... Institute in collaboration with the FOM Institute for Plasma Physics, Nieuwegein, the Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Aussenstelle Berlin, the Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Ovonics Synthetic Materials Company and Lawrence...... Livermore National Laboratory. These examples include : 1. the application of multilayered Si crystals for simultaneous spectroscopy in two energy bands one centred around the SK-emission near 2.45 keV and the other below the CK absorption edge at 0.284 keV; 2. the use of in-depth graded period multilayer...

  20. Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM) for the imaging of biological samples at sub-nanometer resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joens, Matthew S.; Huynh, Chuong; Kasuboski, James M.; Ferranti, David; Sigal, Yury J.; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Obst, Martin; Burkhardt, Claus J.; Curran, Kevin P.; Chalasani, Sreekanth H.; Stern, Lewis A.; Goetze, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) has long been the standard in imaging the sub-micrometer surface ultrastructure of both hard and soft materials. In the case of biological samples, it has provided great insights into their physical architecture. However, three of the fundamental challenges in the SEM imaging of soft materials are that of limited imaging resolution at high magnification, charging caused by the insulating properties of most biological samples and the loss of subtle surface features by heavy metal coating. These challenges have recently been overcome with the development of the Helium Ion Microscope (HIM), which boasts advances in charge reduction, minimized sample damage, high surface contrast without the need for metal coating, increased depth of field, and 5 angstrom imaging resolution. We demonstrate the advantages of HIM for imaging biological surfaces as well as compare and contrast the effects of sample preparation techniques and their consequences on sub-nanometer ultrastructure.

  1. Non-equilibrium Green function method: theory and application in simulation of nanometer electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Van-Nam

    2014-01-01

    We review fundamental aspects of the non-equilibrium Green function method in the simulation of nanometer electronic devices. The method is implemented into our recently developed computer package OPEDEVS to investigate transport properties of electrons in nano-scale devices and low-dimensional materials. Concretely, we present the definition of the four real-time Green functions, the retarded, advanced, lesser and greater functions. Basic relations among these functions and their equations of motion are also presented in detail as the basis for the performance of analytical and numerical calculations. In particular, we review in detail two recursive algorithms, which are implemented in OPEDEVS to solve the Green functions defined in finite-size opened systems and in the surface layer of semi-infinite homogeneous ones. Operation of the package is then illustrated through the simulation of the transport characteristics of a typical semiconductor device structure, the resonant tunneling diodes. (review)

  2. Quantum decrease of capacitance in a nanometer-sized tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiedt, C.; Saenz, G.; Olivera, B.; Corso, M.; Sabater, C.; Pascual, J. I.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the capacitance of the tunnel junction defined by the tip and sample of a Scanning Tunnelling Microscope through the measurement of the electrostatic forces and impedance of the junction. A decrease of the capacitance when a tunnel current is present has shown to be a more general phenomenon as previously reported in other systems. On another hand, an unexpected reduction of the capacitance is also observed when increasing the applied voltage above the work function energy of the electrodes to the Field Emission (FE) regime, and the decrease of capacitance due to a single FE-Resonance has been characterized. All these effects should be considered when doing measurements of the electronic characteristics of nanometer-sized electronic devices and have been neglected up to date. Spanish government (FIS2010-21883-C02-01, CONSOLIDER CSD2007-0010), Comunidad Valenciana (ACOMP/2012/127 and PROMETEO/2012/011)

  3. Bio-functions and molecular carbohydrate structure association study in forage with different source origins revealed using non-destructive vibrational molecular spectroscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Mostafizar Rahman, M; Prates, Luciana L; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-08-05

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate forage carbohydrate molecular structure profiles; 2) bio-functions in terms of CHO rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio of N to OM (HED N/OM ), and 3) quantify interactive association between molecular structures, bio-functions and nutrient availability. The vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to investigate the structure feature on a molecular basis. Two sourced-origin alfalfa forages were used as modeled forages. The results showed that the carbohydrate molecular structure profiles were highly linked to the bio-functions in terms of rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio. The molecular spectroscopic technique can be used to detect forage carbohydrate structure features on a molecular basis and can be used to study interactive association between forage molecular structure and bio-functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. In Depth Characterization of Repetitive DNA in 23 Plant Genomes Reveals Sources of Genome Size Variation in the Legume Tribe Fabeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Pellicer, Jaume; Čížková, Jana; Koblížková, Andrea; Neumann, Pavel; Fuková, Iva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Ilia J

    2015-01-01

    The differential accumulation and elimination of repetitive DNA are key drivers of genome size variation in flowering plants, yet there have been few studies which have analysed how different types of repeats in related species contribute to genome size evolution within a phylogenetic context. This question is addressed here by conducting large-scale comparative analysis of repeats in 23 species from four genera of the monophyletic legume tribe Fabeae, representing a 7.6-fold variation in genome size. Phylogenetic analysis and genome size reconstruction revealed that this diversity arose from genome size expansions and contractions in different lineages during the evolution of Fabeae. Employing a combination of low-pass genome sequencing with novel bioinformatic approaches resulted in identification and quantification of repeats making up 55-83% of the investigated genomes. In turn, this enabled an analysis of how each major repeat type contributed to the genome size variation encountered. Differential accumulation of repetitive DNA was found to account for 85% of the genome size differences between the species, and most (57%) of this variation was found to be driven by a single lineage of Ty3/gypsy LTR-retrotransposons, the Ogre elements. Although the amounts of several other lineages of LTR-retrotransposons and the total amount of satellite DNA were also positively correlated with genome size, their contributions to genome size variation were much smaller (up to 6%). Repeat analysis within a phylogenetic framework also revealed profound differences in the extent of sequence conservation between different repeat types across Fabeae. In addition to these findings, the study has provided a proof of concept for the approach combining recent developments in sequencing and bioinformatics to perform comparative analyses of repetitive DNAs in a large number of non-model species without the need to assemble their genomes.

  5. In Depth Characterization of Repetitive DNA in 23 Plant Genomes Reveals Sources of Genome Size Variation in the Legume Tribe Fabeae.

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    Jiří Macas

    Full Text Available The differential accumulation and elimination of repetitive DNA are key drivers of genome size variation in flowering plants, yet there have been few studies which have analysed how different types of repeats in related species contribute to genome size evolution within a phylogenetic context. This question is addressed here by conducting large-scale comparative analysis of repeats in 23 species from four genera of the monophyletic legume tribe Fabeae, representing a 7.6-fold variation in genome size. Phylogenetic analysis and genome size reconstruction revealed that this diversity arose from genome size expansions and contractions in different lineages during the evolution of Fabeae. Employing a combination of low-pass genome sequencing with novel bioinformatic approaches resulted in identification and quantification of repeats making up 55-83% of the investigated genomes. In turn, this enabled an analysis of how each major repeat type contributed to the genome size variation encountered. Differential accumulation of repetitive DNA was found to account for 85% of the genome size differences between the species, and most (57% of this variation was found to be driven by a single lineage of Ty3/gypsy LTR-retrotransposons, the Ogre elements. Although the amounts of several other lineages of LTR-retrotransposons and the total amount of satellite DNA were also positively correlated with genome size, their contributions to genome size variation were much smaller (up to 6%. Repeat analysis within a phylogenetic framework also revealed profound differences in the extent of sequence conservation between different repeat types across Fabeae. In addition to these findings, the study has provided a proof of concept for the approach combining recent developments in sequencing and bioinformatics to perform comparative analyses of repetitive DNAs in a large number of non-model species without the need to assemble their genomes.

  6. Differential soil water sourcing of managed Loblolly Pine and Sweet Gum revealed by stable isotopes in the Upper Coastal Plain, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, L. E.; Younger, S. E.; Jackson, C. R.; McDonnell, J.; Janzen, K. F.

    2017-12-01

    Stable isotope signatures of stem water can illuminate where in the soil profile different types of trees are accessing soil water and thereby contribute to our understanding of water movement through the soil plant atmosphere continuum. The objective of this study was to use 2H and 18O isotopes to characterize water sources of fourteen-year-old intensively managed Loblolly Pine and Sweet Gum stands in replicated (n=3) paired plots. In order to differentiate the isotopic signatures of tree and soil water, both species and five soil depths were sampled monthly for one year. Tree sap and soil water were extracted cryogenically and their isotopic signatures were determined. Although plant water uptake is generally considered a non-fractionating process, our dataset suggests a source of fractionation in 2H signatures in both species and during most of the thirteen sampling events. As a result, only the 18O isotopic data were used to determine the vertical distribution of soil water contributions to stem water. Statistically, we grouped the five soil sampling depths into three isotopic horizons. Shallow, intermediate and deep soil represent sampling depths of 0-10cm, 30-70cm and 100-125cm, respectively. These isotopic horizons were used in a direct inference approach and Bayesian mixing model analysis to determine the origin of stem water. In this study, Loblolly Pine used more water from intermediate and deep soil while Sweet Gum used more water from shallow and intermediate soil. In the winter months, January through March, Loblolly Pine transpired primarily deep soil where as Sweet Gum mainly utilized shallow soil for transpiration. These results indicate that both species have opportunistic water use patterns with seasonal variation.

  7. GPS tracking of non-breeding ravens reveals the importance of anthropogenic food sources during their dispersal in the Eastern Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loretto, Matthias-Claudio; Schuster, Richard; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    In many songbirds, the space use of breeders is well studied but poorly understood for non-breeders. In common ravens, some studies of non-breeders indicate high vagrancy with large individual differences in home range size, whereas others show that up to 40% of marked non-breeders can be regularly observed at the same anthropogenic food source over months to years. The aim of this study was to provide new insights on ravens' behavior during dispersal in the Eastern Alps. We deployed Global Positioning System (GPS) loggers on 10 individuals to gather accurate spatial and temporal information on their movements to quantify: 1) the dimension of the birds' space use (home range size with seasonal effects and daily/long-term travel distances), 2) how long they stayed in a dispersal stage of wandering as opposed to settling temporarily, and 3) their destination of movements. We recorded movements of up to 40 km per hour, more than 160 km within 1 day and more than 11,000 km within 20 months, indicating high vagrancy. Switching frequently between temporarily settling and travelling large distances in short time intervals leads to extensive home ranges, which also explains and combines the different findings in the literature. The destinations are rich anthropogenic food sources, where the birds spent on average 75% of their time. We discuss how ravens may find these "feeding hot spots" and which factors may influence their decision to stay/leave a site. The strong dependence on anthropogenic resources found in this population may have implications for site management and conservation issues.

  8. Mesoporous TiO2 Micro-Nanometer Composite Structure: Synthesis, Optoelectric Properties, and Photocatalytic Selectivity

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    Kun Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous anatase TiO2 micro-nanometer composite structure was synthesized by solvothermal method at 180°C, followed by calcination at 400°C for 2 h. The as-prepared TiO2 was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR. The specific surface area and pore size distribution were obtained from N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, and the optoelectric property of the mesoporous TiO2 was studied by UV-Vis absorption spectrum and surface photovoltage spectra (SPS. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photodegradation of sole rhodamine B (RhB and sole phenol aqueous solutions under simulated sunlight irradiation and compared with that of Degussa P-25 (P25 under the same conditions. The photodegradation preference of this mesoporous TiO2 was also investigated for an RhB-phenol mixed solution. The results show that the TiO2 composite structure consists of microspheres (∼0.5–2 μm in diameter and irregular aggregates (several hundred nanometers with rough surfaces and the average primary particle size is 10.2 nm. The photodegradation activities of this mesoporous TiO2 on both RhB and phenol solutions are higher than those of P25. Moreover, this as-prepared TiO2 exhibits photodegradation preference on RhB in the RhB-phenol mixture solution.

  9. Graphene nanoribbon field effect transistor for nanometer-size on-chip temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banadaki, Yaser M.; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharifi, Safura

    2016-04-01

    Graphene has been extensively investigated as a promising material for various types of high performance sensors due to its large surface-to-volume ratio, remarkably high carrier mobility, high carrier density, high thermal conductivity, extremely high mechanical strength and high signal-to-noise ratio. The power density and the corresponding die temperature can be tremendously high in scaled emerging technology designs, urging the on-chip sensing and controlling of the generated heat in nanometer dimensions. In this paper, we have explored the feasibility of a thin oxide graphene nanoribbon (GNR) as nanometer-size temperature sensor for detecting local on-chip temperature at scaled bias voltages of emerging technology. We have introduced an analytical model for GNR FET for 22nm technology node, which incorporates both thermionic emission of high-energy carriers and band-to-band-tunneling (BTBT) of carriers from drain to channel regions together with different scattering mechanisms due to intrinsic acoustic phonons and optical phonons and line-edge roughness in narrow GNRs. The temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) of GNR FET-based temperature sensor shows approximately an order of magnitude higher TCR than large-area graphene FET temperature sensor by accurately choosing of GNR width and bias condition for a temperature set point. At gate bias VGS = 0.55 V, TCR maximizes at room temperature to 2.1×10-2 /K, which is also independent of GNR width, allowing the design of width-free GNR FET for room temperature sensing applications.

  10. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China.

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    Min Wang

    Full Text Available In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state, amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1 Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2 There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3 Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable.

  11. Helium Ion Microscope: A New Tool for Sub-nanometer Imaging of Soft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutthanandan, V.; Arey, B.; Smallwood, C. R.; Evans, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution inspection of surface details is needed in many biological and environmental researches to understand the Soil organic material (SOM)-mineral interactions along with identifying microbial communities and their interactions. SOM shares many imaging characteristics with biological samples and getting true surface details from these materials are challenging since they consist of low atomic number materials. FE-SEM imaging is the main imagining technique used to image these materials in the past. These SEM images often show loss of resolution and increase noise due to beam damage and charging issues. Newly developed Helium Ion Microscope (HIM), on the other hand can overcome these difficulties and give very fine details. HIM is very similar to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) but instead of using electrons as a probe beam, HIM uses helium ions with energy ranges from 5 to 40 keV. HIM offers a series of advantages compared to SEM such as nanometer and sub-nanometer image resolutions (about 0.35 nm), detailed surface topography, high surface sensitivity, low Z material imaging (especially for polymers and biological samples), high image contrast, and large depth of field. In addition, HIM also has the ability to image insulating materials without any conductive coatings so that surface details are not modified. In this presentation, several scientific applications across biology and geochemistry will be presented to highlight the effectiveness of this powerful microscope. Acknowledgements: Research was performed using the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL. Work was supported by DOE-BER Mesoscale to Molecules Bioimaging Project FWP# 66382.

  12. Transcriptional Profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reveals the Impact of Variation of a Single Transcription Factor on Differential Gene Expression in 4NQO, Fermentable, and Nonfermentable Carbon Sources

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    Xiaoqing Rong-Mullins

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular metabolism can change the potency of a chemical’s tumorigenicity. 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO is a tumorigenic drug widely used on animal models for cancer research. Polymorphisms of the transcription factor Yrr1 confer different levels of resistance to 4NQO in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To study how different Yrr1 alleles regulate gene expression leading to resistance, transcriptomes of three isogenic S. cerevisiae strains carrying different Yrr1 alleles were profiled via RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with sequencing (ChIP-Seq in the presence and absence of 4NQO. In response to 4NQO, all alleles of Yrr1 drove the expression of SNQ2 (a multidrug transporter, which was highest in the presence of 4NQO resistance-conferring alleles, and overexpression of SNQ2 alone was sufficient to overcome 4NQO-sensitive growth. Using shape metrics to refine the ChIP-Seq peaks, Yrr1 strongly associated with three loci including SNQ2. In addition to a known Yrr1 target SNG1, Yrr1 also bound upstream of RPL35B; however, overexpression of these genes did not confer 4NQO resistance. RNA-Seq data also implicated nucleotide synthesis pathways including the de novo purine pathway, and the ribonuclease reductase pathways were downregulated in response to 4NQO. Conversion of a 4NQO-sensitive allele to a 4NQO-resistant allele by a single point mutation mimicked the 4NQO-resistant allele in phenotype, and while the 4NQO resistant allele increased the expression of the ADE genes in the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway, the mutant Yrr1 increased expression of ADE genes even in the absence of 4NQO. These same ADE genes were only increased in the wild-type alleles in the presence of 4NQO, indicating that the point mutation activated Yrr1 to upregulate a pathway normally only activated in response to stress. The various Yrr1 alleles also influenced growth on different carbon sources by altering the function of the mitochondria

  13. Epidemiological Characteristics and Clinical Treatment Outcome of Typhoid Fever in Ningbo, China, 2005-2014: Pulsed-Field Gel Electorophoresis Results Revealing Great Proportion of Common Transmission Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qifa; Yang, Yuanbin; Lin, Wenping; Yi, Bo; Xu, Guozhang

    2017-09-25

    We aimed to describe the molecular epidemiological characteristics and clinical treatment outcome of typhoid fever in Ningbo, China during 2005-2014. Eighty-eight Salmonella Typhi isolates were obtained from 307 hospitalized patients. Three prevalent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of 54 isolates from 3 outbreaks were identified. Overall, there were 64 (72.7%) isolates from clustered cases and 24 (27.3%) isolates from sporadic cases. Resistance to nalidixic acid (NAL) (n = 47; 53.4%) and ampicillin (AMP) (n = 40; 45.4%) and rare resistance to tetracycline (TET) (n = 2; 2.3%) and gentamicin (GEN) (n = 2; 2.3%) were observed. No isolates resistant to cefotaxime (CTX), chloramphenicol (CL), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) were found. The occurrence of reduced sensitivity to CIP was 52.3% (n = 46). The medians of fever clearance time in cases with and without complications were 7 (interquartile range (IQR): 4-10) and 5 (IQR: 3-7) days (P = 0.001), respectively, when patients were treated with CIP or levofloxacin (LEV) and/or third-generation cephalosporins (CEP). Rates of serious complications were at low levels: peritonitis (2.3%), intestinal hemorrhage (6.8%), and intestinal perforation (1.1%). The present study revealed a long-term clustering trend with respect to PFGE patterns, occasional outbreaks, and the rapid spread of AMP resistance and decreased CIP susceptibility among S. Typhi isolates in recent years.

  14. A systematic analysis of TCA Escherichia coli mutants reveals suitable genetic backgrounds for enhanced hydrogen and ethanol production using glycerol as main carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Antonio; Cabrera, Gema; Muhamadali, Howbeer; Trivedi, Drupad K; Ratray, Nicholas J W; Goodacre, Royston; Cantero, Domingo; Bolivar, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Biodiesel has emerged as an environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels; however, the low price of glycerol feed-stocks generated from the biodiesel industry has become a burden to this industry. A feasible alternative is the microbial biotransformation of waste glycerol to hydrogen and ethanol. Escherichia coli, a microorganism commonly used for metabolic engineering, is able to biotransform glycerol into these products. Nevertheless, the wild type strain yields can be improved by rewiring the carbon flux to the desired products by genetic engineering. Due to the importance of the central carbon metabolism in hydrogen and ethanol synthesis, E. coli single null mutant strains for enzymes of the TCA cycle and other related reactions were studied in this work. These strains were grown anaerobically in a glycerol-based medium and the concentrations of ethanol, glycerol, succinate and hydrogen were analysed by HPLC and GC. It was found that the reductive branch is the more relevant pathway for the aim of this work, with malate playing a central role. It was also found that the putative C4-transporter dcuD mutant improved the target product yields. These results will contribute to reveal novel metabolic engineering strategies for improving hydrogen and ethanol production by E. coli. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Simultaneous recordings from the primary visual cortex and lateral geniculate nucleus reveal rhythmic interactions and a cortical source for γ-band oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Andre M; Briggs, Farran; Alitto, Henry J; Mangun, George R; Usrey, W Martin

    2014-05-28

    Oscillatory synchronization of neuronal activity has been proposed as a mechanism to modulate effective connectivity between interacting neuronal populations. In the visual system, oscillations in the gamma-frequency range (30-100 Hz) are thought to subserve corticocortical communication. To test whether a similar mechanism might influence subcortical-cortical communication, we recorded local field potential activity from retinotopically aligned regions in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1) of alert macaque monkeys viewing stimuli known to produce strong cortical gamma-band oscillations. As predicted, we found robust gamma-band power in V1. In contrast, visual stimulation did not evoke gamma-band activity in the LGN. Interestingly, an analysis of oscillatory phase synchronization of LGN and V1 activity identified synchronization in the alpha (8-14 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) frequency bands. Further analysis of directed connectivity revealed that alpha-band interactions mediated corticogeniculate feedback processing, whereas beta-band interactions mediated geniculocortical feedforward processing. These results demonstrate that although the LGN and V1 display functional interactions in the lower frequency bands, gamma-band activity in the alert monkey is largely an emergent property of cortex. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/347639-06$15.00/0.

  16. Use of the Stable Nitrogen Isotope to Reveal the Source-Sink Regulation of Nitrogen Uptake and Remobilization during Grain Filling Phase in Maize.

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    Lan Yang

    Full Text Available Although the remobilization of vegetative nitrogen (N and post-silking N both contribute to grain N in maize (Zea mays L., their regulation by grain sink strength is poorly understood. Here we use 15N labeling to analyze the dynamic behaviors of both pre- and post-silking N in relation to source and sink manipulation in maize plants. The results showed that the remobilization of pre-silking N started immediately after silking and the remobilized pre-silking N had a greater contribution to grain N during early grain filling, with post-silking N importance increasing during the later filling stage. The amount of post-silking N uptake was largely driven by post-silking dry matter accumulation in both grain as well as vegetative organs. Prevention of pollination during silking had less effect on post-silking N uptake, as a consequence of compensatory growth of stems, husk + cob and roots. Also, leaves continuously export N even though grain sink was removed. The remobilization efficiency of N in the leaf and stem increased with increasing grain yield (hence N requirement. It is suggested that the remobilization of N in the leaf is controlled by sink strength but not the leaf per se. Enhancing post-silking N uptake rather than N remobilization is more likely to increase grain N accumulation.

  17. Invasive mussels alter the littoral food web of a large lake: stable isotopes reveal drastic shifts in sources and flow of energy.

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    Ted Ozersky

    Full Text Available We investigated how establishment of invasive dreissenid mussels impacted the structure and energy sources of the littoral benthic food web of a large temperate lake. We combined information about pre- and postdreissenid abundance, biomass, and secondary production of the littoral benthos with results of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of archival (predreissenid and recent (postdreissenid samples of all common benthic taxa. This approach enabled us to determine the importance of benthic and sestonic carbon to the littoral food web before, and more than a decade after dreissenid establishment. Long term dreissenid presence was associated with a 32-fold increase in abundance, 6-fold increase in biomass, and 14-fold increase in secondary production of the littoral benthos. Dreissenids comprised a large portion of the post-invasion benthos, making up 13, 38, and 56% of total abundance, biomass, and secondary production, respectively. The predreissenid food web was supported primarily by benthic primary production, while sestonic material was relatively more important to the postdreissenid food web. The absolute importance of both sestonic material and benthic primary production to the littoral benthos increased considerably following dreissenid establishment. Our results show drastic alterations to food web structure and suggest that dreissenid mussels redirect energy and material from the water column to the littoral benthos both through biodeposition of sestonic material as well as stimulation of benthic primary production.

  18. Patterns of species range evolution in Indo-Pacific reef assemblages reveal the Coral Triangle as a net source of transoceanic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sean M; McKenna, Caroline; Simpson, Stephen D; Tournois, Jennifer; Genner, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    The Coral Triangle in the Indo-Pacific is a region renowned for exceptional marine biodiversity. The area could have acted as a 'centre of origin' where speciation has been prolific or a 'centre of survival' by providing refuge during major environmental shifts such as sea-level changes. The region could also have acted as a 'centre of accumulation' for species with origins outside of the Coral Triangle, owing to it being at a central position between the Indian and Pacific oceans. Here, we investigated support for these hypotheses using population-level DNA sequence-based reconstructions of the range evolution of 45 species (314 populations) of Indo-Pacific reef-associated organisms. Our results show that populations undergoing the most ancient establishment were significantly more likely to be closer to the centre of the Coral Triangle than to peripheral locations. The data are consistent with the Coral Triangle being a net source of coral-reef biodiversity for the Indo-Pacific region, suggesting that the region has acted primarily as a centre of survival, a centre of origin or both. These results provide evidence of how a key location can influence the large-scale distributions of biodiversity over evolutionary timescales. © 2016 The Authors.

  19. Theta band activity in response to emotional expressions and its relationship with gamma band activity as revealed by MEG and advanced beamformer source imaging

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    Qian eLuo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal oscillations in the theta and gamma bands have been shown to be important for cognition. Here we examined the temporal and spatial relationship between the two frequency bands in emotional processing using Magnetoencephalography and an advanced dynamic beamformer source imaging method called Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry. We found that areas including the amygdala, visual and frontal cortex showed significant event-related synchronization (ERS in both bands, suggesting a functional association of neuronal oscillations in the same areas in the two bands. However, while the temporal profile in both bands was similar in the amygdala, the peak in gamma band power was much earlier within both visual and frontal areas. Our results do not support a traditional view that the localizations of lower and higher frequencies are spatially distinct. Instead, they suggest that in emotional processing, neuronal oscillations in the gamma and theta bands may reflect, at least in visual and frontal cortex either different but related functional processes or, perhaps more probably, different computational components of the same functional process.

  20. Characterization of Missouri surface waters near point sources of pollution reveals potential novel atmospheric route of exposure for bisphenol A and wastewater hormonal activity pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Alvarez, David A.; Taylor, Julia A.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Nagel, Susan C.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Surface water contamination by chemical pollutants increasingly threatens water quality around the world. Among the many contaminants found in surface water, there is growing concern regarding endocrine disrupting chemicals, based on their ability to interfere with some aspect of hormone action in exposed organisms, including humans. This study assessed water quality at several sites across Missouri (near wastewater treatment plants and airborne release sites of bisphenol A) based on hormone receptor activation potencies and chemical concentrationspresent in the surface water. We hypothesized that bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol would be greater in water near permitted airborne release sites and wastewater treatment plant inputs, respectively, and that these two compounds would be responsible for the majority of activities in receptor-based assays conducted with water collected near these sites. Concentrations of bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol were compared to observed receptor activities using authentic standards to assess contribution to total activities, and quantitation of a comprehensive set of wastewater compounds was performed to better characterize each site. Bisphenol A concentrations were found to be elevated in surface water near permitted airborne release sites, raising questions that airborne releases of BPA may influence nearby surface water contamination and may represent a previously underestimated source to the environment and potential for human exposure. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of surface water samples were predictive of wastewater input, although the lower sensitivity of the ethinylestradiol ELISA relative to the very high sensitivity of the bioassay approaches did not allow a direct comparison. Wastewater-influenced sites also had elevated anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic equivalence, while sites without wastewater discharges exhibited no antagonist activities.

  1. The Tectonic Boundary Between Eastern Subbaisin and South-West Subbasin of the South China Sea Revealed from the Normalized Magnetic Source Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Meng, X.

    2014-12-01

    The South China Sea (SCS), surrounded by the Eurasia, Pacific and India-Australia plates, is one of the largest marginal seas in the Western Pacific. It was formed by the interaction of the three plates and the seafloor spreading during Late Oligocene time to Early Miocene time. The boundary between Eastern Subbaisin and South-west Subbasin of the SCS has long been debated in the literature. Refining the boundary is one of the crucial tasks for correctly understanding the seafloor spreading model of the SCS. Due to few drills on the deep ocean basin of the SCS, magnetic data become important information for refining the boundary. However, the interpretation of magnetic data in the SCS suffers from the remanent magnetization of ocean crust as well as igneous rock and seamounts. The conventional reduction-to-pole anomalies at low latitudes usually neglect the remanent magnetization, making the interpretation incorrect. Here, we assembled high-resolution total magnetic intensity (TMI) data around the ocean basin of the SCS, and then did a special transformation of the TMI anomalies with a varying magnetic inclinations algorithm to obtain the normalized source strength (NSS). The NSS has advantage of insensitivity to remanent magnetization, benefitting correct interpretation. The NSS presents discriminative features from east to west in the ocean basin. The boundary of the discriminative features is clear and just ranges from the northeastern edge of the Zhongsha Islands running in the southeast direction to the northeastern edge of the Reed Bank. These imply that magnetic structure and tectonic features in the crust are discriminative between both sides of this boundary. It can be deduced that this boundary is the tectonic boundary between Eastern Subbaisin and South-west Subbasin. We acknowledge the financial support of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41374093) and the SinoProbe-01-05 project.

  2. Characterization of Missouri surface waters near point sources of pollution reveals potential novel atmospheric route of exposure for bisphenol A and wastewater hormonal activity pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D; Alvarez, David A; Taylor, Julia A; vom Saal, Frederick S; Nagel, Susan C; Tillitt, Donald E

    2015-08-15

    Surface water contamination by chemical pollutants increasingly threatens water quality around the world. Among the many contaminants found in surface water, there is growing concern regarding endocrine disrupting chemicals, based on their ability to interfere with some aspect of hormone action in exposed organisms, including humans. This study assessed water quality at several sites across Missouri (near wastewater treatment plants and airborne release sites of bisphenol A) based on hormone receptor activation potencies and chemical concentrations present in the surface water. We hypothesized that bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol would be greater in water near permitted airborne release sites and wastewater treatment plant inputs, respectively, and that these two compounds would be responsible for the majority of activities in receptor-based assays conducted with water collected near these sites. Concentrations of bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol were compared to observed receptor activities using authentic standards to assess contribution to total activities, and quantitation of a comprehensive set of wastewater compounds was performed to better characterize each site. Bisphenol A concentrations were found to be elevated in surface water near permitted airborne release sites, raising questions that airborne releases of BPA may influence nearby surface water contamination and may represent a previously underestimated source to the environment and potential for human exposure. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of surface water samples were predictive of wastewater input, although the lower sensitivity of the ethinylestradiol ELISA relative to the very high sensitivity of the bioassay approaches did not allow a direct comparison. Wastewater-influenced sites also had elevated anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic equivalence, while sites without wastewater discharges exhibited no antagonist activities. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Lower Brioverian formations (Upper Proterozoic) of the Armorican Massif (France): geodynamic evolution of source areas revealed by sandstone petrography and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabard, Marie Pierre

    1990-11-01

    Formations with interbedded cherts constitute an important part of the Lower Brioverian succession (Upper Proterozoic age) in the Armorican Massif (northwest France). These formations are composed of shale-sandstone alternations with interbedded siliceous carbonaceous members. Petrographic and geochemical study of the detrital facies shows that these rocks are compositionally immature. The wackes are rich in lithic fragments (volcanic fragments: 3-20% modal; sedimentary and metamorphic fragments: 0-7% modal) and in feldspar (5-16%). From the geochemical point of view, they are relatively enriched in Fe 2+MgO (about 5.5%) and in alkalis with {Na 2O }/{K 2O } ratios greater than 1. The CaO contents are low (about 0.3%). Slightly negative Eu anomalies are observed ( {Eu}/{Eu ∗} = 0.8 ). Their chemical compositions are in agreement with a dominantly acidic source area with deposition in a continental active margin setting. Compared with other Upper Proterozoic deposits of the Armorican Massif, the interbedded-chert formations appear rather similar to other deposits in North Brittany which accumulated in an intra-arc or back-arc basin environment. The formations with interbedded cherts are interpreted as having been deposited during an early stage of magmatic arc activity (around 640-630 Ma ago) in an immature marginal basin. The clastic supply to these formations is derived in part from early volcanic products (acidic to intermediate) which are linked to subduction beneath the North Armorican Domain. Another component is inherited from the reworking of 2000 Ma old basement relics. The opening of the back-arc domain, with associated basaltic volcanism, would bring about a progressive displacement of the interbedded-chert depositional basin towards the continental margin.

  4. Highly crystallized nanometer-sized zeolite a with large Cs adsorption capability for the decontamination of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torad, Nagy L; Naito, Masanobu; Tatami, Junichi; Endo, Akira; Leo, Sin-Yen; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Wu, Kevin C-W; Wakihara, Toru; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-03-01

    Nanometer-sized zeolite A with a large cesium (Cs) uptake capability is prepared through a simple post-milling recrystallization method. This method is suitable for producing nanometer-sized zeolite in large scale, as additional organic compounds are not needed to control zeolite nucleation and crystal growth. Herein, we perform a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) study to evaluate the uptake ability of Cs ions by zeolite, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. In comparison to micrometer-sized zeolite A, nanometer-sized zeolite A can rapidly accommodate a larger amount of Cs ions into the zeolite crystal structure, owing to its high external surface area. Nanometer-sized zeolite is a promising candidate for the removal of radioactive Cs ions from polluted water. Our QCM study on Cs adsorption uptake behavior provides the information of adsorption kinetics (e.g., adsorption amounts and rates). This technique is applicable to other zeolites, which will be highly valuable for further consideration of radioactive Cs removal in the future. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of gold nanoparticles supported on copper foil with graphene as a nanometer gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Quan; Zhu, Xupeng; Chen, Yiqin; Duan, Huigao

    2016-01-01

    Gaps with single-nanometer dimensions (<10 nm) between metallic nanostructures enable giant local field enhancements for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Monolayer graphene is an ideal candidate to obtain a sub-nanometer gap between plasmonic nanostructures. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to achieve a sub-nanometer gap by dewetting a gold film supported on monolayer graphene grown on copper foil. The Cu foil can serve as a low-loss plasmonically active metallic film that supports the imaginary charge oscillations, while the graphene can not only create a stable sub-nanometer gap for massive plasmonic field enhancements but also serve as a chemical enhancer. We obtained higher SERS enhancements in this graphene-gapped configuration compared to those in Au nanoparticles on Cu film or on graphene–SiO 2 –Si. Also, the Raman signals measured maintained their fine features and intensities over a long time period, indicating the stability of this Au–graphene–Cu hybrid configuration as an SERS substrate. (paper)

  6. Comparison between XAS, AWAXS and DAFS applied to nanometer scale supported metallic clusters. Pt.1; monometallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazin, D.C.; Sayers, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The structural information found using three techniques related to synchrotron radiation are compared. XAS (X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy), AWAXS (Anomalous Wide Angle X-ray Scattering) and DAFS (Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure) are applied to nanometer scale metallic clusters. (author)

  7. Comparison between XAS, AWAXS and DAFS applied to nanometer scale supported metallic clusters. Pt.2; bimetallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazin, D.; Sayers, D.

    1993-01-01

    The structural information obtained using three techniques related to synchrotron radiation are compared. XAS (X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy), AWAXS (Anomalous Wide Angle X-ray Scattering) and DAFS (Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure) are applied to the study of nanometer scale bimetallic clusters. (author)

  8. Nature of the Jurassic Magnetic Quiet Zone revealed by the sea-surface, mid-water, and near-source magnetic sensor data in the western Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, M.; Tivey, M.; Sager, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    The nature of the Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) has been a long-standing debate in understanding Earth's geomagnetic field history and behavior. We present a coherent and likely globally significant marine magnetic reversal record for the JQZ by constructing a correlation of new and previously acquired magnetic anomaly profiles in the western Pacific. We obtained a high-resolution marine magnetic anomaly record using sea surface, mid-water (3-km level deep-towed), and near-bottom (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV)) profiles that targeted a spreading corridor in the Hawaiian lineation in 2011 (TN272 on R/V Thompson) and 2014 (SKQ2014S2 on R/V Sikuliaq). To extract crustal magnetic signals, the sea surface and mid-water magnetic data were corrected for ship-to-sensor offset, the diurnal effect, and the present-day ambient geomagnetic field. Mid-water data were upward continued to a constant 3 km level plane and to the sea surface. Near-bottom data were calibrated to remove the induced magnetic field by AUV Sentry, then corrected for IGRF and diurnal variations. We used these near-source data as an anchor for correlations with the sea surface and mid-water level data because of the AUV's superb inertial navigation and hydrodynamically stable, quiet platform environment. Our sea surface anomaly correlation with the previously established Japanese lineation sequence shows (i) an excellent correlation of anomaly shapes from M29 to M42; (ii) a remarkable similarity in anomaly amplitude envelope, which decreases back in time from M19 to M38, with a minimum at M41, then increases back in time from M42; and (iii) refined locations of pre-M25 lineations in the Hawaiian lineation set. Moreover, short-wavelength anomalies from the mid-water and near-bottom profiles show a strong similarity in the M37/M38 polarity attributes found both in the magnetostratigraphic and marine magnetic records, implying that rapid magnetic reversals were occurring at that time. The average reversal

  9. Real-Time Imaging of Plant Cell Wall Structure at Nanometer Scale, with Respect to Cellulase Accessibility and Degradation Kinetics (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2012-05-01

    Presentation on real-time imaging of plant cell wall structure at nanometer scale. Objectives are to develop tools to measure biomass at the nanometer scale; elucidate the molecular bases of biomass deconstruction; and identify factors that affect the conversion efficiency of biomass-to-biofuels.

  10. Construction of nanometer cisplatin core-ferritin (NCC-F) and proteomic analysis of gastric cancer cell apoptosis induced with cisplatin released from the NCC-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xue-Tao; Huang, Lin; Huang, He-Qing

    2012-06-18

    Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescence spectrometry were used to reveal the characteristics of both subunit disassociation and recombination in apo-pig pancreas ferritin (apoPPF) in an alkaline medium ranging reversibly from pH 7.0 to 13.0. The experimental results indicated that apoPPF could be completely disassociated into 24 free subunits at pH 13.0, and then these subunits could be quickly reassembled into the original apoPPF once the pH of the reactive medium was returned to pH7.0. This novel and simple method could be used to effectively construct a novel nanometer cisplatin core-PPF (NCC-PPF). The major characteristics of NCC-PPF were investigated using various analytical methods such as ultraviolet-spectrometry, circular dichroism spectrometry and TEM, which indicated that its molecular structure was still similar to that of the original apoPPF. Results from the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) method showed that 11.26 cisplatin (CDDP) molecules were successfully packaged within the NCC-PPF shell, indicating that each molecule of apoPPF had the ability to enwrap 11.26 CDDP molecules for constructing the NCC-PPF. Flow cytometry showed that NCC-PPF also had the ability to release CDDP for inducing the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells BGC823 (GCC), but this phenomenon could scarcely be observed using apoPPF. A differential proteomic technique using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels selected and identified the differential proteins from cell apoptosis in order to reveal the molecular pathway of GCC apoptosis by both NCC-PPF and free CDDP, giving 13 differential expression proteins. These differential proteins could be further classified into six groups, which were described as being involved in the regulation of apoptosis, RNA transcription, oxidative stress response, signal transduction, cell metabolism, and cytoskeleton changes. In addition, a real-time PCR method was used to prove the expression level of

  11. Structure and electrochemical properties of nanometer Cu substituted α-nickel hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Jie [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, WaiHuan Xi Road, No. 100, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong Province (China); Zhu, Yanjuan, E-mail: YanJuanZhu007@126.com [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, WaiHuan Xi Road, No. 100, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong Province (China); Zhang, Zhongju [Guangzhou Tiger Head Battery Group Co., Ltd., 568 Huangpu Road, Guangzhou 510655, Guangdong Province (China); Xu, Qingsheng; Zhao, Weiren [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, WaiHuan Xi Road, No. 100, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong Province (China); Chen, Jian [Instrumentation Analysis and Research Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, Guangdong Province (China); Zhang, Wei; Han, Quanyong [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, WaiHuan Xi Road, No. 100, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong Province (China)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Cu substituted α-nickel hydroxide was prepared by ultrasonic assisted precipitation. ► The XRD peaks are anisotropic broadening. ► The electrode for 0.9 wt.% Cu has the highest capacity of 310 mAh/g at 0.2 C. -- Abstract: Nanometer Cu-substituted α-nickel hydroxide was synthesized by means of ultrasonic-assisted precipitation. Particle size distribution (PSD) measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) were used to characterize the physical properties of the synthesized samples. The results indicate that the average particle size of the samples is about 96–110 nm and the XRD diffraction peaks are anisotropic broadening. The crystal grains are mainly polycrystal structure with columnar or needle-like morphology, containing many defects. With increase of Cu content, the shape of primary particles transform from columnar to needle-like. The influences of doping amounts of Cu on the electrochemical performance were investigated through constant current charge/discharge and cyclic voltammetric measurements. The specific capacity increases initially and then decreases with increasing Cu-doping ratio, the electrode C containing 0.9 wt.% Cu shows the maximum discharge capacity of 310 mAh/g at 0.2 C, and it has the lowest charging voltage, higher discharge voltage plateau, better cycle performance and larger proton diffusion coefficient than the other electrodes.

  12. Virtual rough samples to test 3D nanometer-scale scanning electron microscopy stereo photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarrubia, J S; Tondare, V N; Vladár, A E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of scanning electron microscopy for high spatial resolution, images from multiple angles to provide 3D information, and commercially available stereo photogrammetry software for 3D reconstruction offers promise for nanometer-scale dimensional metrology in 3D. A method is described to test 3D photogrammetry software by the use of virtual samples-mathematical samples from which simulated images are made for use as inputs to the software under test. The virtual sample is constructed by wrapping a rough skin with any desired power spectral density around a smooth near-trapezoidal line with rounded top corners. Reconstruction is performed with images simulated from different angular viewpoints. The software's reconstructed 3D model is then compared to the known geometry of the virtual sample. Three commercial photogrammetry software packages were tested. Two of them produced results for line height and width that were within close to 1 nm of the correct values. All of the packages exhibited some difficulty in reconstructing details of the surface roughness.

  13. Engineering polyelectrolyte multilayer structure at the nanometer length scale by tuning polymer solution conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddohi, Soheil; Killingsworth, Christopher; Kipper, Matt

    2008-03-01

    Chitosan (a weak polycation) and heparin (a strong polyanion) are used to make polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM). PEM thickness and composition are determined as a function of solution pH (4.6 to 5.8) and ionic strength (0.1 to 0.5 M). Over this range, increasing pH increases the PEM thickness; however, the sensitivity to changes in pH is a strong function of ionic strength. The PEM thickness data are correlated to the polymer conformation in solution. Polyelectrolyte conformation in solution is characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The highest sensitivity of PEM structure to pH is obtained at intermediate ionic strength. Different interactions govern the conformation and adsorption phenomena at low and high ionic strength, leading to reduced sensitivity to solution pH at extreme ionic strengths. The correspondence between PEM thickness and polymer solution conformation offers opportunities to tune polymer thin film structure at the nanometer length scale by controlling simple, reproducible processing conditions.

  14. Drift-insensitive distributed calibration of probe microscope scanner in nanometer range: Virtual mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, Rostislav V.

    2016-08-01

    A method of distributed calibration of a probe microscope scanner is suggested. The main idea consists in a search for a net of local calibration coefficients (LCCs) in the process of automatic measurement of a standard surface, whereby each point of the movement space of the scanner can be characterized by a unique set of scale factors. Feature-oriented scanning (FOS) methodology is used as a basis for implementation of the distributed calibration permitting to exclude in situ the negative influence of thermal drift, creep and hysteresis on the obtained results. Possessing the calibration database enables correcting in one procedure all the spatial systematic distortions caused by nonlinearity, nonorthogonality and spurious crosstalk couplings of the microscope scanner piezomanipulators. To provide high precision of spatial measurements in nanometer range, the calibration is carried out using natural standards - constants of crystal lattice. One of the useful modes of the developed calibration method is a virtual mode. In the virtual mode, instead of measurement of a real surface of the standard, the calibration program makes a surface image ;measurement; of the standard, which was obtained earlier using conventional raster scanning. The application of the virtual mode permits simulation of the calibration process and detail analysis of raster distortions occurring in both conventional and counter surface scanning. Moreover, the mode allows to estimate the thermal drift and the creep velocities acting while surface scanning. Virtual calibration makes possible automatic characterization of a surface by the method of scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  15. Ultra-High Density Single Nanometer-Scale Anodic Alumina Nanofibers Fabricated by Pyrophosphoric Acid Anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Nishinaga, Osamu; Nakajima, Daiki; Kawashima, Jun; Natsui, Shungo; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-12-01

    Anodic oxide fabricated by anodizing has been widely used for nanostructural engineering, but the nanomorphology is limited to only two oxides: anodic barrier and porous oxides. Therefore, the discovery of an additional anodic oxide with a unique nanofeature would expand the applicability of anodizing. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a third-generation anodic oxide, specifically, anodic alumina nanofibers, by anodizing in a new electrolyte, pyrophosphoric acid. Ultra-high density single nanometer-scale anodic alumina nanofibers (1010 nanofibers/cm2) consisting of an amorphous, pure aluminum oxide were successfully fabricated via pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The nanomorphologies of the anodic nanofibers can be controlled by the electrochemical conditions. Anodic tungsten oxide nanofibers can also be fabricated by pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The aluminum surface covered by the anodic alumina nanofibers exhibited ultra-fast superhydrophilic behavior, with a contact angle of less than 1°, within 1 second. Such ultra-narrow nanofibers can be used for various nanoapplications including catalysts, wettability control, and electronic devices.

  16. Thermal and ultrasonic influence in the formation of nanometer scale hydroxyapatite bio-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinern, GJE; Brundavanam, R; Le, X Thi; Djordjevic, S; Prokic, M; Fawcett, D

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is a widely used biocompatible ceramic in many biomedical applications and devices. Currently nanometer-scale forms of HAP are being intensely investigated due to their close similarity to the inorganic mineral component of the natural bone matrix. In this study nano-HAP was prepared via a wet precipitation method using Ca(NO3)2 and KH2PO4 as the main reactants and NH4OH as the precipitator under ultrasonic irradiation. The Ca/P ratio was set at 1.67 and the pH was maintained at 9 during the synthesis process. The influence of the thermal treatment was investigated by using two thermal treatment processes to produce ultrafine nano-HAP powders. In the first heat treatment, a conventional radiant tube furnace was used to produce nano-particles with an average size of approximately 30 nm in diameter, while the second thermal treatment used a microwave-based technique to produce particles with an average diameter of 36 nm. The crystalline structure and morphology of all nanoparticle powders produced were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Both thermal techniques effectively produced ultrafine powders with similar crystalline structure, morphology and particle sizes. PMID:22114473

  17. Multilayer Laue Lens: A Path Toward One Nanometer X-Ray Focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, H.; Stephenson, G.B.; Maser, J.; Yan, H.; Conley, R.; Kang, H.C.; Stephenson, G.B.; Kang, H.C.; Maser, J.; Conley, R.; Liu, Ch.; Macrander, A.T.

    2010-01-01

    The multilayer Laue lens (MLL) is a novel diffractive optic for hard X-ray nano focusing, which is fabricated by thin film deposition techniques and takes advantage of the dynamical diffraction effect to achieve a high numerical aperture and efficiency. It overcomes two difficulties encountered in diffractive optics fabrication for focusing hard X-rays: (1) small outmost zone width and (2) high aspect ratio. Here, we will give a review on types, modeling approaches, properties, fabrication, and characterization methods of MLL optics. We show that a full-wave dynamical diffraction theory has been developed to describe the dynamical diffraction property of the MLL and has been employed to design the optimal shapes for nano focusing. We also show a 16 nm line focus obtained by a partial MLL and several characterization methods. Experimental results show a good agreement with the theoretical calculations. With the continuing development of MLL optics, we believe that an MLL-based hard x-ray microscope with true nanometer resolution is on the horizon

  18. Fabrication of 200 nanometer period centimeter area hard x-ray absorption gratings by multilayer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, S K; Liu, C; Morgan, N Y; Xiao, X; Gomella, A A; Mazilu, D; Bennett, E E; Assoufid, L; de Carlo, F; Wen, H

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and fabrication trials of x-ray absorption gratings of 200 nm period and up to 100:1 depth-to-period ratios for full-field hard x-ray imaging applications. Hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging relies on gratings of ultra-small periods and sufficient depth to achieve high sensitivity. Current grating designs utilize lithographic processes to produce periodic vertical structures, where grating periods below 2.0 μm are difficult due to the extreme aspect ratios of the structures. In our design, multiple bilayers of x-ray transparent and opaque materials are deposited on a staircase substrate, and mostly on the floor surfaces of the steps only. When illuminated by an x-ray beam horizontally, the multilayer stack on each step functions as a micro-grating whose grating period is the thickness of a bilayer. The array of micro-gratings over the length of the staircase works as a single grating over a large area when continuity conditions are met. Since the layers can be nanometers thick and many microns wide, this design allows sub-micron grating periods and sufficient grating depth to modulate hard x-rays. We present the details of the fabrication process and diffraction profiles and contact radiography images showing successful intensity modulation of a 25 keV x-ray beam. PMID:23066175

  19. Probing Rubber Cross-Linking Generation of Industrial Polymer Networks at Nanometer Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielle, Brice; Gomez, Emmanuel; Korb, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-23

    We present improved analyses of rheometric torque measurements as well as (1)H double-quantum (DQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) buildup data on polymer networks of industrial compounds. This latter DQ NMR analysis allows finding the distribution of an orientation order parameter (Dres) resulting from the noncomplete averaging of proton dipole-dipole couplings within the cross-linked polymer chains. We investigate the influence of the formulation (filler and vulcanization systems) as well as the process (curing temperature) ending to the final polymer network. We show that DQ NMR follows the generation of the polymer network during the vulcanization process from a heterogeneous network to a very homogeneous one. The time variations of microscopic Dres and macroscopic rheometric torques present power-law behaviors above a threshold time scale with characteristic exponents of the percolation theory. We observe also a very good linear correlation between the kinetics of Dres and rheometric data routinely performed in industry. All these observations confirm the description of the polymer network generation as a critical phenomenon. On the basis of all these results, we believe that DQ NMR could become a valuable tool for investigating in situ the cross-linking of industrial polymer networks at the nanometer scale.

  20. Size-dependent elastic/inelastic behavior of enamel over millimeter and nanometer length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Siang Fung; Bortel, Emely L; Swain, Michael V; Klocke, Arndt; Schneider, Gerold A

    2010-03-01

    The microstructure of enamel like most biological tissues has a hierarchical structure which determines their mechanical behavior. However, current studies of the mechanical behavior of enamel lack a systematic investigation of these hierarchical length scales. In this study, we performed macroscopic uni-axial compression tests and the spherical indentation with different indenter radii to probe enamel's elastic/inelastic transition over four hierarchical length scales, namely: 'bulk enamel' (mm), 'multiple-rod' (10's microm), 'intra-rod' (100's nm with multiple crystallites) and finally 'single-crystallite' (10's nm with an area of approximately one hydroxyapatite crystallite). The enamel's elastic/inelastic transitions were observed at 0.4-17 GPa depending on the length scale and were compared with the values of synthetic hydroxyapatite crystallites. The elastic limit of a material is important as it provides insights into the deformability of the material before fracture. At the smallest investigated length scale (contact radius approximately 20 nm), elastic limit is followed by plastic deformation. At the largest investigated length scale (contact size approximately 2 mm), only elastic then micro-crack induced response was observed. A map of elastic/inelastic regions of enamel from millimeter to nanometer length scale is presented. Possible underlying mechanisms are also discussed. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Toxicological effects of nanometer titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lanzhou; Zhou, Lina; Liu, Yongding; Deng, Songqiang; Wu, Hao; Wang, Gaohong

    2012-10-01

    The toxicological effects of nanometer titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) on a unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were assessed by investigating the changes of the physiology and cyto-ultrastructure of this species under treatment. We found that nano-TiO2 inhibited photosynthetic efficiency and cell growth, but the content of chlorophyll a content in algae did not change, while carotenoid and chlorophyll b contents increased. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content reached maximum values after 8h exposure and then decreased to a moderately low level at 72 h. Electron microscopy images indicated that as concentrations of nano-TiO2 increased, a large number of C. reinhardtii cells were noted to be damaged: the number of chloroplasts declined, various other organelles were degraded, plasmolysis occurred, and TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be located inside cell wall and membrane. It was also noted that cell surface was surrounded by TiO2 particles, which could present an obstacle to the exchange of substances between the cell and its surrounding environment. To sum up, the effect of nano-TiO2 on C. reinhardtii included cell surface aggregation, photosynthesis inhibition, lipid peroxidation and new protein synthesis, while the response of C. reinhardtii to nano-TiO2 was a rapid process which occurs during 24 h after exposing and may relate to physiological stress system to mitigate damage. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis of nanometer-sized fayalite and magnesium-iron(II) mixture olivines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Bowden, Mark E.; Kovarik, Libor; Zhang, Xin; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, Bernard Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Loring, John S.

    2018-04-01

    Olivines are divalent orthosilicates with important geologic, biological, and industrial significance and are typically comprised of mixtures of Mg2+ and Fe2+ ranging from forsterite (Mg2SiO4) to fayalite (Fe2SiO4). Investigating the role of Fe(II) in olivine reactivity requires the ability to synthesize olivines that are nanometer-sized, have different percentages of Mg2+ and Fe2+, and have good bulk and surface purity. This article demonstrates a new method for synthesizing nanosized fayalite and Mg-Fe mixture olivines. First, carbonaceous precursors are generated from sucrose, PVA, colloidal silica, Mg2+, and Fe3+. Second, these precursors are calcined in air to burn carbon and create mixtures of Fe(III)-oxides, forsterite, and SiO2. Finally, calcination in reducing CO-CO2 gas buffer leads to Fe(II)-rich olivines. XRD, Mössbauer, and IR analyses verify good bulk purity and composition. XPS indicates that surface iron is in its reduced Fe(II) form, and surface Si is consistent with olivine. SEM shows particle sizes predominately between 50 and 450 nm, and BET surface areas are 2.8-4.2 m2/g. STEM HAADF analysis demonstrates even distributions of Mg and Fe among the available M1 and M2 sites of the olivine crystals. These nanosized Fe(II)-rich olivines are suitable for laboratory studies with in situ probes that require mineral samples with high reactivity at short timescales.

  3. Significant enhancement of magnetoresistance with the reduction of particle size in nanometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kalipada; Dasgupta, P.; Poddar, A.; Das, I.

    2016-01-01

    The Physics of materials with large magnetoresistance (MR), defined as the percentage change of electrical resistance with the application of external magnetic field, has been an active field of research for quite some times. In addition to the fundamental interest, large MR has widespread application that includes the field of magnetic field sensor technology. New materials with large MR is interesting. However it is more appealing to vast scientific community if a method describe to achieve many fold enhancement of MR of already known materials. Our study on several manganite samples [La1−xCaxMnO3 (x = 0.52, 0.54, 0.55)] illustrates the method of significant enhancement of MR with the reduction of the particle size in nanometer scale. Our experimentally observed results are explained by considering model consisted of a charge ordered antiferromagnetic core and a shell having short range ferromagnetic correlation between the uncompensated surface spins in nanoscale regime. The ferromagnetic fractions obtained theoretically in the nanoparticles has been shown to be in the good agreement with the experimental results. The method of several orders of magnitude improvement of the magnetoresistive property will have enormous potential for magnetic field sensor technology. PMID:26837285

  4. Control of the interaction strength of photonic molecules by nanometer precise 3D fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Colin D; Zientek, Michal; Spieser, Martin; Urbonas, Darius; Stöferle, Thilo; Mahrt, Rainer F; Lisunova, Yuliya; Brugger, Juergen; Duerig, Urs; Knoll, Armin W

    2017-11-28

    Applications for high resolution 3D profiles, so-called grayscale lithography, exist in diverse fields such as optics, nanofluidics and tribology. All of them require the fabrication of patterns with reliable absolute patterning depth independent of the substrate location and target materials. Here we present a complete patterning and pattern-transfer solution based on thermal scanning probe lithography (t-SPL) and dry etching. We demonstrate the fabrication of 3D profiles in silicon and silicon oxide with nanometer scale accuracy of absolute depth levels. An accuracy of less than 1nm standard deviation in t-SPL is achieved by providing an accurate physical model of the writing process to a model-based implementation of a closed-loop lithography process. For transfering the pattern to a target substrate we optimized the etch process and demonstrate linear amplification of grayscale patterns into silicon and silicon oxide with amplification ratios of ∼6 and ∼1, respectively. The performance of the entire process is demonstrated by manufacturing photonic molecules of desired interaction strength. Excellent agreement of fabricated and simulated structures has been achieved.

  5. Free-Space Quantum Key Distribution with a High Generation Rate Potassium Titanyl Phosphate Waveguide Photon-Pair Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Chaffee, Dalton W.; Wilson, Nathaniel C.; Lekki, John D.; Tokars, Roger P.; Pouch, John J.; Roberts, Tony D.; Battle, Philip; Floyd, Bertram M.; Lind, Alexander J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    A high generation rate photon-pair source using a dual element periodically-poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PP KTP) waveguide is described. The fully integrated photon-pair source consists of a 1064-nanometer pump diode laser, fiber-coupled to a dual element waveguide within which a pair of 1064-nanometer photons are up-converted to a single 532-nanometer photon in the first stage. In the second stage, the 532-nanometer photon is down-converted to an entangled photon-pair at 800 nanometer and 1600 nanometer which are fiber-coupled at the waveguide output. The photon-pair source features a high pair generation rate, a compact power-efficient package, and continuous wave (CW) or pulsed operation. This is a significant step towards the long term goal of developing sources for high-rate Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) to enable Earth-space secure communications. Characterization and test results are presented. Details and preliminary results of a laboratory free-space QKD experiment with the B92 protocol are also presented.

  6. Nonmonotonic behaviour of superconducting critical temperature of Nb/CuNi bilayers with a nanometer range of layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morari, R.; Antropov, E.; Socrovisciuc, A.; Prepelitsa, A.; Zdravkov, V.I.; Tagirov, L.R.; Kupriyanov, M.Yu.; Sidorenko, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Present work reports the result of the proximity effect investigation for superconducting Nb/CuNi-bilayers with the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer (Cu x Ni 1-x ) being in the sub-nanometer range. It was found a non-monotonic behavior of the critical temperature T c , i.e. its growth with the increasing of the ferromagnetic layer thickness dF, for the series of the samples with constant thickness of Nb layer, (d Nb = const). (authors)

  7. Nanometer-scale displacement measurement with high resolution using dual cavity Fabry-Pérot interferometer for biomimetic robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    A sensor of a biomimetic robot has to measure very small environmental changes such as, nanometer scale strains or displacements. Fiber optic sensor can be also one of candidates for the biomimetic sensor because the sensor is like thread and the shape of the sensor is similar to muscle fiber. A fiber optic interferometer, which is an optical-based sensor, can measure displacement precisely, so such device has been widely studied for the measurement of displacement on a nanometer-scale. Especially, a Quadrature Phase-Shifted Fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer (QPS-FFPI) uses phase-information for this measurement, allowing it to provide a precision result with high resolution. In theory, the QPS-FFPI generates two sinusoidal signals of which the phase difference should be 90 degrees for the exact measurement of the displacement. In order to guarantee the condition of the phase difference, the relative adjustment of the cavities of the optical fibers is required. However, with such precise adjustment it is very hard to fix the proper difference of the two cavities for quadrature-phase-shifting. In this paper, a dual-cavity FFPI is newly proposed to measure the displacement on a nanometer-scale with a specific type of signal processing. In the signal processing, a novel phase-compensation algorithm is applied to force the phase difference to be exactly 90 degrees without any physical adjustment. As a result, the paper shows that the phase-compensated dual-cavity FFPI can effectively measure nanometer-scale displacement with high resolution under dynamic conditions.

  8. Accelerator-based Single-shot Ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscope with Picosecond Temporal Resolution and Nanometer Spatial Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, D.; Fu, F.; Zhang, J.; Huang, X.; Wang, L.; Wang, X.; Wan, W.

    2014-01-01

    We present feasibility study of an accelerator-based ultrafast transmission electron microscope (u-TEM) capable of producing a full field image in a single-shot with simultaneous picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution. We study key physics related to performance of u-TEMs, and discuss major challenges as well as possible solutions for practical realization of u-TEMs. The feasibility of u-TEMs is confirmed through simulations using realistic electron beam parameters. W...

  9. Nanometer and molecular materials: the greatness of the very tiny; Materiales manometricos y moleculares: la grandeza de lo infimo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rincon, Marina [Centro de Investigacion en Energia (CIE) de la UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Some of the materials have been present in our lives for many years, and now appear with unique or improved properties by the fact that they can be manufactured in the nanometer scale; that is, a million times smaller than a millimeter and with geometries that include the nanodots, the nanotubes, the nanowires, to mention a few of them. The most popular is the titanium dioxide (Titania), known by many as the white pigment in paints, sunscreens, cosmetics and others for their null toxicity, low cost and high stability. Strictly speaking, these features are really applicable to the micrometric material (which is a thousand times larger than the nanometer) and it is still to be proven toxicity and stability of the nanometer materials; but it is a fact that the nanometer titania is very popular in a multitude of applications that have to do with catalysis, sensors, and energy conversion and storing. We will also deal with conductive polymers, which are molecular conjugated materials. [Spanish] Algunos de los materiales han estado presentes en nuestras vidas por muchos anos y ahora aparecen con propiedades unicas o mejoradas por el hecho de que se pueden fabricar en la escala de los nanometros; esto es, un millon de veces mas pequenos que un milimetro y con geometrias que comprenden los nanopuntos, los nanotubos, los nanoalambres, por mencionar algunas. El mas popular es el dioxido de titanio (titania), conocido por muchos como el pigmento blanco de las pinturas, filtros solares, cosmeticos y demas, por su nula toxicidad, bajo costo y gran estabilidad. Estrictamente hablando, estas caracteristicas son realmente aplicables al material micrometrico (que es mil veces mas grande que el nanometrico) y todavia esta por probarse la toxicidad y estabilidad de los nanomateriales; pero es un hecho que la titania nanometrica es muy popular en un sinfin de aplicaciones que tienen que ver con catalisis, sensores, y conversion y almacenamiento de energia. Hablaremos tambien de

  10. Passive micromechanical tags. An investigation into writing information at nanometer resolution on micrometer size objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmieder, R.W.; Bastasz, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have completed a 3-year study of the technology related to the development of micron-sized passive micromechanical tags. The project was motivated by the discovery in 1990 by the present authors that low energy, high charge state ions (e.g., Xe +44 ) can produce nanometer-size damage sites on solid surfaces, and the realization that a pattern of these sites represents information. It was envisioned that extremely small, chemically inert, mechanical tags carrying a large label could be fabricated for a variety of applications, including tracking of controlled substances, document verification, process control, research, and engineering. Potential applications exist in the data storage, chemical, food, security, and other industries. The goals of this project were fully accomplished, and they are fully documented here. The work was both experimental and developmental. Most of the experimental effort was a search for appropriate tag materials. Several good materials were found, and the upper limits of information density were determined (ca. 10 12 bit/cm 2 ). Most of the developmental work involved inventing systems and strategies for using these tags, and compiling available technologies for implementing them. The technology provided herein is application-specific: first, the application must be specified, then the tag can be developed for it. The project was not intended to develop a single tag for a single application or for all possible applications. Rather, it was meant to provide the enabling technology for fabricating tags for a range of applications. The results of this project provide sufficient information to proceed directly with such development

  11. Passive micromechanical tags. An investigation into writing information at nanometer resolution on micrometer size objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieder, R.W.; Bastasz, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have completed a 3-year study of the technology related to the development of micron-sized passive micromechanical tags. The project was motivated by the discovery in 1990 by the present authors that low energy, high charge state ions (e.g., Xe{sup +44}) can produce nanometer-size damage sites on solid surfaces, and the realization that a pattern of these sites represents information. It was envisioned that extremely small, chemically inert, mechanical tags carrying a large label could be fabricated for a variety of applications, including tracking of controlled substances, document verification, process control, research, and engineering. Potential applications exist in the data storage, chemical, food, security, and other industries. The goals of this project were fully accomplished, and they are fully documented here. The work was both experimental and developmental. Most of the experimental effort was a search for appropriate tag materials. Several good materials were found, and the upper limits of information density were determined (ca. 10{sup 12} bit/cm{sup 2}). Most of the developmental work involved inventing systems and strategies for using these tags, and compiling available technologies for implementing them. The technology provided herein is application-specific: first, the application must be specified, then the tag can be developed for it. The project was not intended to develop a single tag for a single application or for all possible applications. Rather, it was meant to provide the enabling technology for fabricating tags for a range of applications. The results of this project provide sufficient information to proceed directly with such development.

  12. Assessing the concept of structure sensitivity or insensitivity for sub-nanometer catalyst materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Andrew S.; Rötzer, Marian D.; Ridge, Claron J.; Yoon, Bokwon; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Landman, Uzi; Heiz, Ueli

    2016-10-01

    The nature of the nano-catalyzed hydrogenation of ethylene, yielding benchmark information pertaining to the concept of structure sensitivity/insensitivity and its applicability at the bottom of the catalyst particle size-range, is explored with experiments on size-selected Ptn (n = 7-40) clusters soft-landed on MgO, in conjunction with first-principles simulations. As in the case of larger particles both the direct ethylene hydrogenation channel and the parallel hydrogenation-dehydrogenation ethylidyne-producing route must be considered, with the fundamental uncovering that at the reaction exhibits characteristics consistent with structure sensitivity, in contrast to the structure insensitivity found for larger particles. In this size-regime, the chemical properties can be modulated and tuned by a single atom, reflected by the onset of low temperature hydrogenation at T > 150 K catalyzed by Ptn (n ≥ 10) clusters, with maximum room temperature reactivity observed for Pt13 using a pulsed molecular beam technique. Structure insensitive behavior, inherent for specific cluster sizes at ambient temperatures, can be induced in the more active sizes, e.g. Pt13, by a temperature increase, up to 400 K, which opens dehydrogenation channels leading to ethylidyne formation. This reaction channel was, however found to be attenuated on Pt20, as catalyst activity remained elevated after the 400 K step. Pt30 displayed behavior which can be understood from extrapolating bulk properties to this size range; in particular the calculated d-band center. In the non-scalable sub-nanometer size regime, however, precise control of particle size may be used for atom-by-atom tuning and manipulation of catalyzed hydrogenation activity and selectivity.

  13. Wetting at the nanometer scale: effects of long-range forces and substrate heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checco, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Wetting phenomena on the nano-scale remain poorly understood in spite of their growing theoretical and practical interest. In this context, the present work aimed at studying partial wetting of nanometer-sized alkane droplets on 'model' surfaces build by self-assembly of organic monolayers. For this purpose a novel technique, based on 'noncontact' Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), has been developed to image, with minimal artefacts, drops of adjustable size directly condensed on so- lid surfaces. We have thus shown that contact angle of alkanes, wetting a weakly heterogeneous, silanized substrate, noticeably decreases from its macroscopic value for droplets sizes in the submicron range. The line tension, arising in this case from purely dispersive long-range interactions between the liquid and the substrate, is theoretically too weak to be responsible for the observed effect. Therefore we have supposed that contact angle is affected by mesoscopic chemical heterogeneities of the substrate whenever the droplets size becomes sufficiently small. This scenario has been supported by numerical simulations based on a simplified model of the spatial distribution of surface defects. Similar experiments, performed on different substrates (monolayers made of alkane-thiols self-assembled on gold and of alkyl chains covalently bound onto a silicon surface), have also shown that wetting on small scales is strongly affected by minimal physical and chemical surface heterogeneities. Finally, to provide further examples of the potential of the above mentioned AFM technique, we have studied the wettability of nano-structured surfaces and the local wetting properties of hair. (author) [fr

  14. Modulation of Magnetic Properties at the Nanometer Scale in Continuously Graded Ferromagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Fallarino

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ferromagnetic alloy materials with designed composition depth profiles provide an efficient route for the control of magnetism at the nanometer length scale. In this regard, cobalt-chromium and cobalt-ruthenium alloys constitute powerful model systems. They exhibit easy-to-tune magnetic properties such as saturation magnetization MS and Curie temperature TC while preserving their crystalline structure over a wide composition range. In order to demonstrate this materials design potential, we have grown a series of graded Co1−xCrx and Co1−wRuw (10 1 ¯ 0 epitaxial thin films, with x and w following predefined concentration profiles. Structural analysis measurements verify the epitaxial nature and crystallographic quality of our entire sample sets, which were designed to exhibit in-plane c-axis orientation and thus a magnetic in-plane easy axis to achieve suppression of magnetostatic domain generation. Temperature and field-dependent magnetic depth profiles have been measured by means of polarized neutron reflectometry. In both investigated structures, TC and MS are found to vary as a function of depth in accordance with the predefined compositional depth profiles. Our Co1−wRuw sample structures, which exhibit very steep material gradients, allow us to determine the localization limit for compositionally graded materials, which we find to be of the order of 1 nm. The Co1−xCrx systems show the expected U-shaped TC and MS depth profiles, for which these specific samples were designed. The corresponding temperature dependent magnetization profile is then utilized to control the coupling along the film depth, which even allows for a sharp onset of decoupling of top and bottom sample parts at elevated temperatures.

  15. Mathematics revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Elizabeth

    1979-01-01

    Mathematics Revealed focuses on the principles, processes, operations, and exercises in mathematics.The book first offers information on whole numbers, fractions, and decimals and percents. Discussions focus on measuring length, percent, decimals, numbers as products, addition and subtraction of fractions, mixed numbers and ratios, division of fractions, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The text then examines positive and negative numbers and powers and computation. Topics include division and averages, multiplication, ratios, and measurements, scientific notation and estim

  16. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Kyle L; Pop, Eric; King, William P

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K(-1). This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  17. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, Kyle L. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); King, William P., E-mail: wpk@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K{sup −1}. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  18. Formation and surface strengthening of nano-meter embedded phases during high energy Ti implanted and annealed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tonghe; Wu Yuguang; Cui Ping; Wang Ping

    1999-12-01

    Observation of transmission electron microscope indicated that the phase of FeTi 2 with 3.5-20 nm in diameter is embedded in high energy Ti implanted layer. It's average diameter is 8 nm. The nano-meter phases were embedded among dislocations and grain boundary in Ti implanted steel at 400 degree C. The wear resistance has been improved. The embedded structure can be changed obviously after annealing. The structure has been changed slightly after annealing at annealing temperature raging from 350 to 500 degree C, however, the hardness and wear resistance of implanted layer increased greatly. The maximum of hardness is obtained when the sample was annealed at 500 degree C for 20 min. It can be seen that the strengthening of implanted layer has enhanced by annealing indeed. The grain boundary and dislocations have disappeared; the diameter of nano-meter phases increased from 10 nm to 15 nm after annealing at temperature of 750 degree C and 1000 degree respectively. The average densities of nano-meter phases are 8.8 x 10 10 /cm 2 and 6.5 x 10 10 /cm 2 respectively for both of annealing temperature. The hardness decreased obviously when the annealing temperature is greater than 750 degree C

  19. Micrometer and nanometer scale photopatterning of proteins on glass surfaces by photo-degradation of films formed from oligo(ethylene glycol) terminated silanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizazu, Getachew; el Zubir, Osama; Patole, Samson; McLaren, Anna; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Mothersole, David J; Adawi, Ali; Hunter, C Neil; Lidzey, David G; Lopez, Gabriel P; Leggett, Graham J

    2012-12-01

    Exposure of films formed by the adsorption of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) functionalized trichlorosilanes on glass to UV light from a frequency-doubled argon ion laser (244 nm) causes photodegradation of the OEG chain. Although the rate of degradation is substantially slower than for monolayers of OEG terminated thiolates on gold, it is nevertheless possible to form micrometer-scale patterns by elective adsorption of streptavidin to exposed regions. A low density of aldehyde functional groups is produced, and this enables derivatization with nitrilotriacetic acid via an amine linker. Complexation with nickel enables the site-specific immobilization of histidine-tagged yellow and green fluorescent proteins. Nanometer-scale patterns may be fabricated using a Lloyd's mirror interferometer, with a sample and mirror set at right angles to each other. At low exposures, partial degradation of the OEG chains does not remove the protein-resistance of the surface, even though friction force microscopy reveals the formation of patterns. At an exposure of ca. 18 J cm(-2), the modified regions became adhesive to proteins in a narrow region ca. 30 nm (λ/8) wide. As the exposure is increased further the lines quickly broaden to ca. 90 nm. Adjustment of the angle between the sample and mirror enables the fabrication of lines of His-tagged green fluorescent protein at a period of 340 nm that could be resolved using a confocal microscope.

  20. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colliex, Christian, E-mail: christian.colliex@u-psud.fr; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-03-15

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  1. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliex, Christian; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-03-01

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  2. Long-term irradiation effects on reactor-pressure vessel steels. Investigations on the nanometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Arne

    2017-06-01

    The exposure of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels to neutron irradiation gives rise to irradiation-enhanced diffusion, a rearrangement of solute atoms and, consequently, a degradation of the mechanical properties. The increasing age of existing nuclear power plants raises new questions specific to long-term operation. Two of them are addressed in this thesis: flux effects and the late-blooming effect. Can low-flux irradiations up to a given fluence be reproduced by more rapid high-flux irradiations up to the same fluence? Can the irradiation response of RPV steels be extrapolated to higher fluences or are there unexpected ''late-blooming'' effects. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), atom-probe tomography (APT) and Vickers-hardness testing were applied. A novel Monte-Carlo based fitting algorithm for SANS data was implemented in order to derive statistically reliable characteristics of irradiation-induced solute-atom clusters. APT was applied in selected cases to gain additional information on the composition and the shape of clusters. Vickers hardness testing was performed on the SANS samples to link the nanometer-scale changes to irradiation hardening. The investigations on flux effects show that clusters forming upon high-flux irradiation are smaller and tend to have a higher number density compared to low-flux irradiations at a given neutron fluence. The measured flux dependence of the cluster-size distribution is consistent with the framework of deterministic growth (but not with coarsening) in combination with radiation-enhanced diffusion. Since the two effects on cluster-size and volume fraction partly cancel each other out, no significant effect on the hardening is observed. The investigations of a possible late-blooming effect indicate that the very existence (yes or no) of such an effect depends on the irradiation conditions. Irradiations at lower fluxes and a lower temperature (255 C) give rise to a significant increase of the

  3. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colliex, Christian; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-01-01

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  4. Nanometer-thin TiO2 enhances skeletal muscle cell phenotype and behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishizaki K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ken Ishizaki*, Yoshihiko Sugita*, Fuminori Iwasa, Hajime Minamikawa, Takeshi Ueno, Masahiro Yamada, Takeo Suzuki, Takahiro OgawaLaboratory for Bone and Implant Sciences, The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, Division of Advanced Prosthodontics, Biomaterials and Hospital Dentistry, UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA, USA*Authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The independent role of the surface chemistry of titanium in determining its biological properties is yet to be determined. Although titanium implants are often in contact with muscle tissue, the interaction of muscle cells with titanium is largely unknown. This study tested the hypotheses that the surface chemistry of clinically established microroughened titanium surfaces could be controllably varied by coating with a minimally thin layer of TiO2 (ideally pico-to-nanometer in thickness without altering the existing topographical and roughness features, and that the change in superficial chemistry of titanium is effective in improving the biological properties of titanium.Methods and results: Acid-etched microroughened titanium surfaces were coated with TiO2 using slow-rate sputter deposition of molten TiO2 nanoparticles. A TiO2 coating of 300 pm to 6.3 nm increased the surface oxygen on the titanium substrates in a controllable manner, but did not alter the existing microscale architecture and roughness of the substrates. Cells derived from rat skeletal muscles showed increased attachment, spread, adhesion strength, proliferation, gene expression, and collagen production at the initial and early stage of culture on 6.3 nm thick TiO2-coated microroughened titanium surfaces compared with uncoated titanium surfaces.Conclusion: Using an exemplary slow-rate sputter deposition technique of molten TiO2 nanoparticles, this study demonstrated that titanium substrates, even with microscale roughness, can be sufficiently chemically modified to

  5. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420 21...

  6. Room temperature magnetism of few-nanometers-thick Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(111) films on Pt(111) and Ru(0001) studied in ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewandowski, M., E-mail: lewandowski@amu.edu.pl [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Miłosz, Z.; Michalak, N.; Ranecki, R. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Sveklo, I.; Kurant, Z.; Maziewski, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Białystok, Lipowa 41, 15-424 Białystok (Poland); Mielcarek, S. [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Luciński, T. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Jurga, S. [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-09-30

    Few-nanometers-thick Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(111) films were epitaxially grown on Pt(111) and Ru(0001) single crystal supports by sequential iron deposition and oxidation in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. The growth of well-ordered magnetite films was confirmed by low energy electron diffraction. The films were covered with a protective Au layer and subjected to magnetic and structural studies in ambient conditions. Magnetic hysteresis loops, recorded using magneto-optical Kerr effect apparatus, confirmed magnetic ordering in both films at room temperature. The Kerr measurements indicated in-plane orientation of magnetization, which was supported by the lack of magnetic contrast in magnetic force microscopy images. Atomic force microscopy revealed significant differences in morphology of the films, tentatively attributed to different lattice mismatch with Pt(111) and Ru(0001) single crystal supports. - Highlights: • Few-nanometers-thick Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(111) films were grown on Pt(111) and Ru(0001). • Magnetic properties were studied using MOKE and AFM/MFM in ambient conditions. • The films exhibited in-plane magnetic ordering at room temperature. • Differences in magnetic properties were tentatively assigned to structural differences.

  7. Revealing Rembrandt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Parker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Our results emphasised the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt’s portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings.

  8. Luminescent Oxygen Gas Sensors Based on Nanometer-Thick Hybrid Films of Iridium Complexes and Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisako Sato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Ir(III complexes in photo-responsive molecular devices for oxygen gas sensing is reviewed. Attention is focused on the immobilization of Ir(III complexes in organic or inorganic host materials such as polymers, silica and clays in order to enhance robustness and reliability. Our recent works on constructing nanometer-thick films comprised of cyclometalated cationic Ir(III complexes and clay minerals are described. The achievement of multi-emitting properties in response to oxygen pressure is demonstrated.

  9. Nanometer, submicron and micron sized aluminum powder prepared by semi-solid mechanical stirring method with addition of ceramic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, X.H.; Jiang, D.L.; Dong, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Composite powder, which is a mixture of Al/Al 2 O 3 composite particles and nanometer, submicron and micron sized aluminum powder, was prepared by semi-solid mechanical stirring method with addition of Al 2 O 3 ceramic particles. The ceramic particles have an average diameter of 80 μm and a volume fraction of 15% in the slurry. The methods used to measure the size distribution of particles greater than 50 μm and less than 50 μm were sieve analysis and photosedimentation, respectively. The surface morphology and transverse sections of the composite powder of different sizes were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical microscope and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results indicate that the composite powder prepared in present work have a wide size distribution ranging from less than 50-900 μm, and the aluminum particles and Al/Al 2 O 3 composite particles are separated and isolated. The particles greater than 200 μm and less than 50 μm are almost pure aluminum powder. The rate of conversion of ingot aluminum into particles less than 1 μm containing nanometer and submicron sizes is 1.777 wt.% in this work. The aluminum powder of different sizes has different shape and surface morphology, quasi-spherical in shape with rough surface for aluminum particles of micron scale, irregular in shape for aluminum particles of submicron scale, and quite close to a globular or an excellent globular in shape for aluminum particles of nanometer size. On the other hand, the surface of ceramic particle was coated by aluminum particles with maximum thickness less than 10 μm containing nanometer and submicron sizes as a single layer. It is suggested that the surface of ceramic particles can provide more nucleation sites for solidification of liquid aluminum and the nucleation of liquid aluminum can take place readily, grow and adhere on the surface of ceramic particles, although it is poorly wetted by the liquid aluminum and the semi-solid slurry can

  10. Accelerator-based single-shot ultrafast transmission electron microscope with picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, D.; Fu, F.; Zhang, J.; Huang, X.; Wang, L.; Wang, X.; Wan, W.

    2014-09-01

    We present feasibility study of an accelerator-based ultrafast transmission electron microscope (u-TEM) capable of producing a full field image in a single-shot with simultaneous picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution. We study key physics related to performance of u-TEMs and discuss major challenges as well as possible solutions for practical realization of u-TEMs. The feasibility of u-TEMs is confirmed through simulations using realistic electron beam parameters. We anticipate that u-TEMs with a product of temporal and spatial resolution beyond 10-19 ms will open up new opportunities in probing matter at ultrafast temporal and ultrasmall spatial scales.

  11. Pseudopotential-based electron quantum transport: Theoretical formulation and application to nanometer-scale silicon nanowire transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Jingtian, E-mail: jingtian.fang@utdallas.edu; Vandenberghe, William G.; Fu, Bo; Fischetti, Massimo V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2016-01-21

    We present a formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials. This formalism offers explicit atomistic wavefunctions and an accurate band structure, enabling a detailed study of the characteristics of devices with a nanometer-scale channel and body. Assuming externally applied potentials that change slowly along the electron-transport direction, we invoke the envelope-wavefunction approximation to apply the open boundary conditions and to develop the transport equations. We construct the full-band open boundary conditions (self-energies of device contacts) from the complex band structure of the contacts. We solve the transport equations and present the expressions required to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ∼66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ∼2.5 mV/V. Our theoretical calculations predict that low-dimensionality channels in a 3D GAA architecture are able to meet the performance requirements of future devices in terms of SS swing and electrostatic control.

  12. Development of a sub-nanometer positioning device: combining a new linear motor with linear motion ball guide ways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, J; Tanaka, T; Masuda, I

    2010-01-01

    A new type of linear motor described in this note has some advantages compared with conventional motors. The attractive magnetic force between the stator (permanent magnets) and mover (armature) is diminished almost to zero. The efficiency is better because the magnetic flux leakage is very small, the size of motor is smaller and detent (force ripple) is smaller than for conventional motors. Therefore, we think that this motor is greatly suitable for ultra-precision positioning as an actuator. An ultra-precision positioning device using this motor and linear motion ball guide ways is newly developed by making the device very rigid and using a suitable control method. Moreover, the positioning performance is evaluated by a positioning resolution, and deviation and dispersion errors. As a result of repeated step response tests, the positioning resolution is 0.3 nm, with the deviation error and dispersion error (3σ) being sub-nanometer. Consequently, the positioning device achieves sub-nanometer positioning. (technical design note)

  13. A new capacitive long-range displacement nanometer sensor with differential sensing structure based on time-grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhicheng; Peng, Kai; Liu, Xiaokang; Pu, Hongji; Chen, Ziran

    2018-05-01

    High-precision displacement sensors, which can measure large displacements with nanometer resolution, are key components in many ultra-precision fabrication machines. In this paper, a new capacitive nanometer displacement sensor with differential sensing structure is proposed for long-range linear displacement measurements based on an approach denoted time grating. Analytical models established using electric field coupling theory and an area integral method indicate that common-mode interference will result in a first-harmonic error in the measurement results. To reduce the common-mode interference, the proposed sensor design employs a differential sensing structure, which adopts a second group of induction electrodes spatially separated from the first group of induction electrodes by a half-pitch length. Experimental results based on a prototype sensor demonstrate that the measurement accuracy and the stability of the sensor are substantially improved after adopting the differential sensing structure. Finally, a prototype sensor achieves a measurement accuracy of  ±200 nm over the full 200 mm measurement range of the sensor.

  14. Investigation on the photocatalytic degradation of pyrene on soil surfaces using nanometer anatase TiO2 under UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Dianbo; Li Peijun; Li Xiaojun; Zhao Qing; Zhang Yinqiu; Jia Chunyun; Li Peng

    2010-01-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of pyrene on soil surfaces was investigated in the presence of nanometer anatase TiO 2 under a variety of conditions. After being spiked with pyrene, soil samples loaded with different amounts of TiO 2 (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4%, w/w) were exposed to UV irradiation for 25 h. The results indicated that the photocatalytic degradation of pyrene followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. TiO 2 accelerated the degradation of pyrene generally as indicated by the half-life reduction from 45.90 to 31.36 h, corresponding to the TiO 2 amounts from 0% to 4%, respectively. The effects of H 2 O 2 , light intensity and humic acids on the degradation of pyrene were also investigated. The degradation of pyrene increased along with increasing the concentration of H 2 O 2 , light intensity and the concentration of humic acids. All results indicated that the photocatalytic method in the presence of nanometer anatase TiO 2 was an advisable choice for the treatments of PAHs polluted soil in the future.

  15. A Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) for Rapid Measurement of High-concentration Size Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, H.-S.; Chen, D.-R.; Pui, David Y.H.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a fast-response nanometer aerosol size analyzer (nASA) that is capable of scanning 30 size channels between 3 and 100 nm in a total time of 3 s. The analyzer includes a bipolar charger (Po 210 ), an extended-length nanometer differential mobility analyzer (Nano-DMA), and an electrometer (TSI 3068). This combination of components provides particle size spectra at a scan rate of 0.1 s per channel free of uncertainties caused by response-time-induced smearing. The nASA thus offers a fast response for aerosol size distribution measurements in high-concentration conditions and also eliminates the need for applying a de-smearing algorithm to resulting data. In addition, because of its thermodynamically stable means of particle detection, the nASA is useful for applications requiring measurements over a broad range of sample pressures and temperatures. Indeed, experimental transfer functions determined for the extended-length Nano-DMA using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique indicate the nASA provides good size resolution at pressures as low as 200 Torr. Also, as was demonstrated in tests to characterize the soot emissions from the J85-GE engine of a T-38 aircraft, the broad dynamic concentration range of the nASA makes it particularly suitable for studies of combustion or particle formation processes. Further details of the nASA performance as well as results from calibrations, laboratory tests and field applications are presented below

  16. 2D surface optical lattice formed by plasmon polaritons with application to nanometer-scale molecular deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanning; Xu, Supeng; Li, Tao; Yin, Yaling; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2017-08-10

    Surface plasmon polaritons, due to their tight spatial confinement and high local intensity, hold great promises in nanofabrication which is beyond the diffraction limit of conventional lithography. Here, we demonstrate theoretically the 2D surface optical lattices based on the surface plasmon polariton interference field, and the potential application to nanometer-scale molecular deposition. We present the different topologies of lattices generated by simple configurations on the substrate. By explicit theoretical derivations, we explain their formation and characteristics including field distribution, periodicity and phase dependence. We conclude that the topologies can not only possess a high stability, but also be dynamically manipulated via changing the polarization of the excitation laser. Nanometer-scale molecular deposition is simulated with these 2D lattices and discussed for improving the deposition resolution. The periodic lattice point with a width resolution of 33.2 nm can be obtained when the fullerene molecular beam is well-collimated. Our study can offer a superior alternative method to fabricate the spatially complicated 2D nanostructures, with the deposition array pitch serving as a reference standard for accurate and traceable metrology of the SI length standard.

  17. In vivo MR imaging of nanometer magnetically labeled bone marrow stromal cells transplanted via portal vein in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ping; Wang Jianhua; Yan Zhiping; Hu Meiyu; Xu Pengju; Zhou Meiling; Ya Fuhua; Fan Sheung-tat; Luk John-m

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo magnetic resonance imaging with a conventional 1.5-T system for tracking of intra-portal vein transplantation nanometer magnetically labeled BMSCs in rat liver. Methods: BMSCs were isolated from 5 SD rats bone marrow with the density gradient centrifugation method. Then BMSCs were labeled with nanometer superpara-magnetic iron oxide and transfection agent. Cell labeling efficiency was assessed with determination of the percentage of Peris Prussian blue stain. Then BMSCs transplanted into normal rats' livers via portal vein. The receipts were divided into 5 groups ,including sham control,2 h ,3 d,7 d and 2 w after transplantation. Follow-up serial T 1 WI,T 2 WI and T 2 * -weighted gradient- echo MR imaging were performed at 1.5 T MRI system. MR imaging findings were compared with histology. Results: Cell labeling efficiency was more than 95% by Perls Prussian blue stain. After transplantation of labeled BMSCs via portal vein, liver's had diffuse granular signal intensity appearance in T 2 * WI MRI. Cells were detected for up to 2 w in receipts' liver's. At histologic analysis, signal intensity loss correlated with iron-loaded cells. Conclusion: MR imaging could aid in monitoring of magnetically labeled BMSCs administered via portal vein in vivo. (authors)

  18. Comparison of nanoaerosol sources and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Eritt, Markus [Institute for Environmental Physics (IUP), Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg (Germany); Meinen, Jan; Comouth, Andreas; Leisner, Thomas [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Atmospheric Aerosol Research (IMK-AAF), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Environmental Physics (IUP), Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A variety of sources for atmospheric aerosols in the nanometer range (electrospray ionization, microwave plasma reactor, atomizer and soot generator) are presented. Different materials, such as silicon oxides, iron oxides and soot, were tested with helium or air as carrier gas. The aerosol size distribution (SMPS, TEM, TOF, PMS) and the fraction of charged particles (Quartz Crystal Microbalance) are shown. The influence of different source parameters such as carrier gas and pressure and finally the applicability for laboratory experiments with atmospheric relevance and nano-toxicological topics is discussed.

  19. Final Report of Project Nanometer Structures for Fuel Cells and Displays, etc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Qing

    2011-12-15

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment induced self-assembly has been used to form various periodic nano-size wave-ordered structures (WOS). Such WOS can be used as hard etching masks to produce nanowire arrays, trenches etc., on other materials by means of traditional etching or ion sputtering. These periodic nano-size structures have a wide range of applications, including flat panel displays, optical electronics, and clean energy technologies (solar and fuel cells, lithium batteries). In order to achieve high throughput of the above processes, a large area RF-driven multicusp nitrogen ion source has been developed for the application of nitrogen ion beam induced surface modification. An integrated ion beam system, which can house either a large area RF-driven multicusp ion source or a commercially available microwave ion source (Roth & Rau AG Tamiris 400-f) have been designed, manufactured, assembled, and tested.

  20. SIMS diagnostics of nanometer semiconductor structures with the use of cesium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovit, A.N.; Vyatkin, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    The modernization of cesium ion source was carried out to increase the lifetime, the power range of primary ions and temporary stability of primary ion beam. The elements depth profiles obtained with the help of primary cesium ions and primary iodine ions are in good agreement with transmission electron microscopy data [ru

  1. Nanometers to centimeters: novel optical nano-antennas, with an eye to scaled production

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Timothy D.; Cadusch, Jasper J.; Earl, Stuart K.; Panchenko, Evgeniy; Mulvaney, Paul; Davis, Timothy J.; Roberts, Ann

    2016-03-01

    Optical nano-antennas have been the focus of intense research recently due to their ability to manipulate electromagnetic radiation on a subwavelength scale, and there is major interest in such devices for a wide variety of applications in photonics, sensing, and imaging. Significant effort has been put into developing highly compact, novel, next-generation light sources, which have great potential in realizing efficient sub-wavelength single photon sources and enhanced biological and chemical sensors. We have developed a number of innovative optical antenna designs including elements of chiral metasurfaces for enabling circularly polarized emission from quantum sources, new designs derived from Radio Frequency (RF) elements for quantum source enhancement and directionality, and nanostructures for investigating plasmonic dark-modes that have the ability to significantly reduce the Q-factor of nano-antennas. A challenge, however, remains the development of a scalable nanofabrication technology. The capacity to mass-produce nano-antennas will have a considerable impact on the commercial viability of these devices, and greatly improve research throughput. Here we present recent progress in the development of scalable fabrication strategies for producing of nano-antennas and antenna arrays, along with slot based plasmonic optical devices.

  2. Implications for the crustal Architecture in West Antarctica revealed by the means of depth-to-the-bottom of the magnetic source (DBMS) mapping and 3D FEM geothermal heat flux models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadek, Ricarda; Gohl, Karsten; Kaul, Norbert

    2017-04-01

    The West Antarctic Rift System (WARS) is one of the largest rift systems in the world, which displays unique coupled relationships between tectonic processes and ice sheet dynamics. Palaeo-ice streams have eroded troughs across the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) that today route warm ocean deep water to the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) grounding zone and reinforce dynamic ice sheet thinning. Rift basins, which cut across West Antarctica's landward-sloping shelves, promote ice sheet instability. Young, continental rift systems are regions with significantly elevated geothermal heat flux (GHF), because the transient thermal perturbation to the lithosphere caused by rifting requires 100 m.y. to reach long-term thermal equilibrium. The GHF in this region is, especially on small scales, poorly constrained and suspected to be heterogeneous as a reflection of the distribution of tectonic and volcanic activity along the complex branching geometry of the WARS, which reflects its multi-stage history and structural inheritance. We investigate the crustal architecture and the possible effects of rifting history from the WARS on the ASE ice sheet dynamics, by the use of depth-to-the-bottom of the magnetic source (DBMS) estimates. These are based on airborne-magnetic anomaly data and provide an additional insight into the deeper crustal properties. With the DBMS estimates we reveal spatial changes at the bottom of the igneous crust and the thickness of the magnetic layer, which can be further incorporated into tectonic interpretations. The DBMS also marks an important temperature transition zone of approximately 580°C and therefore serves as a boundary condition for our numerical FEM models in 2D and 3D. On balance, and by comparison to global values, we find average GHF of 90 mWm-2 with spatial variations due to crustal heterogeneities and volcanic activities. This estimate is 30% more than commonly used in ice sheet models in the ASE region.

  3. Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Diffraction Reveals Transient Structural Distortions of Ternary Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Mann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Home-based soft X-ray time-resolved scattering experiments with nanosecond time resolution (10 ns and nanometer spatial resolution were carried out at a table top soft X-ray plasma source (2.2–5.2 nm. The investigated system was the lyotropic liquid crystal C16E7/paraffin/glycerol/formamide/IR 5. Usually, major changes in physical, chemical, and/or optical properties of the sample occur as a result of structural changes and shrinking morphology. Here, these effects occur as a consequence of the energy absorption in the sample upon optical laser excitation in the IR regime. The liquid crystal shows changes in the structural response within few hundred nanoseconds showing a time decay of 182 ns. A decrease of the Bragg peak diffracted intensity of 30% and a coherent macroscopic movement of the Bragg reflection are found as a response to the optical pump. The Bragg reflection movement is established to be isotropic and diffusion controlled (1 μs. Structural processes are analyzed in the Patterson analysis framework of the time-varying diffraction peaks revealing that the inter-lamellar distance increases by 2.7 Å resulting in an elongation of the coherently expanding lamella crystallite. The present studies emphasize the possibility of applying TR-SXRD techniques for studying the mechanical dynamics of nanosystems.

  4. Mechanism and Prediction of Gas Permeation through Sub-Nanometer Graphene Pores: Comparison of Theory and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhe; Govind Rajan, Ananth; Misra, Rahul Prasanna; Drahushuk, Lee W; Agrawal, Kumar Varoon; Strano, Michael S; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2017-08-22

    Due to its atomic thickness, porous graphene with sub-nanometer pore sizes constitutes a promising candidate for gas separation membranes that exhibit ultrahigh permeances. While graphene pores can greatly facilitate gas mixture separation, there is currently no validated analytical framework with which one can predict gas permeation through a given graphene pore. In this work, we simulate the permeation of adsorptive gases, such as CO 2 and CH 4 , through sub-nanometer graphene pores using molecular dynamics simulations. We show that gas permeation can typically be decoupled into two steps: (1) adsorption of gas molecules to the pore mouth and (2) translocation of gas molecules from the pore mouth on one side of the graphene membrane to the pore mouth on the other side. We find that the translocation rate coefficient can be expressed using an Arrhenius-type equation, where the energy barrier and the pre-exponential factor can be theoretically predicted using the transition state theory for classical barrier crossing events. We propose a relation between the pre-exponential factor and the entropy penalty of a gas molecule crossing the pore. Furthermore, on the basis of the theory, we propose an efficient algorithm to calculate CO 2 and CH 4 permeances per pore for sub-nanometer graphene pores of any shape. For the CO 2 /CH 4 mixture, the graphene nanopores exhibit a trade-off between the CO 2 permeance and the CO 2 /CH 4 separation factor. This upper bound on a Robeson plot of selectivity versus permeance for a given pore density is predicted and described by the theory. Pores with CO 2 /CH 4 separation factors higher than 10 2 have CO 2 permeances per pore lower than 10 -22 mol s -1 Pa -1 , and pores with separation factors of ∼10 have CO 2 permeances per pore between 10 -22 and 10 -21 mol s -1 Pa -1 . Finally, we show that a pore density of 10 14 m -2 is required for a porous graphene membrane to exceed the permeance-selectivity upper bound of polymeric

  5. Differential optical shadow sensor for sub-nanometer displacement measurement and its application to drag-free satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Andreas; Tan, Si; Saraf, Shailendhar; Alfauwaz, Abdul; DeBra, Dan; Buchman, Sasha; Lipa, John A

    2017-10-16

    We present a method for 3D sub-nanometer displacement measurement using a set of differential optical shadow sensors. It is based on using pairs of collimated beams on opposite sides of an object that are partially blocked by it. Applied to a sphere, our 3-axis sensor module consists of 8 parallel beam-detector sets for redundancy. The sphere blocks half of each beam's power in the nominal centered position, and any displacement can be measured by the differential optical power changes amongst the pairs of detectors. We have experimentally demonstrated a displacement sensitivity of 0.87nm/Hz at 1 Hz and 0.39nm/Hz at 10 Hz. We describe the application of the module to the inertial sensor of a drag-free satellite, which can potentially be used for navigation, geodesy and fundamental science experiments as well as ground based applications.

  6. Mechanically activated self-propagated high-temperature synthesis of nanometer-structured MgB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radev, D.D.; Marinov, M.; Tumbalev, V.; Radev, I.; Konstantinov, L.

    2005-01-01

    Nanometer-sized MgB 2 was prepared via a two-step modification of the mechanically activated self-propagated high-temperature synthesis. The experimental conditions and some structural and phase characteristics of the synthesized product are reported. It is shown that a single-phase material can be prepared after 2 h of intense mechanical treatment of the starting magnesium and boron powders and a synthesis induced at a current-pulse density of 30 A cm -2 . The average size of MgB 2 particles synthesized in this way is 70-80 nm. It is also shown that using the same reagents and the 'classic' high-temperature interaction at 850 deg C with a protective atmosphere of pure Ar, mean particle size of the MgB 2 obtained is 50 μm

  7. Characterization of nanometer-scale porosity in reservoir carbonate rock by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Mitra, Sushanta K; Vick, Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Sedimentary carbonate rocks are one of the principal porous structures in natural reservoirs of hydrocarbons such as crude oil and natural gas. Efficient hydrocarbon recovery requires an understanding of the carbonate pore structure, but the nature of sedimentary carbonate rock formation and the toughness of the material make proper analysis difficult. In this study, a novel preparation method was used on a dolomitic carbonate sample, and selected regions were then serially sectioned and imaged by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. The resulting series of images were used to construct detailed three-dimensional representations of the microscopic pore spaces and analyze them quantitatively. We show for the first time the presence of nanometer-scale pores (50-300 nm) inside the solid dolomite matrix. We also show the degree of connectivity of these pores with micron-scale pores (2-5 μm) that were observed to further link with bulk pores outside the matrix.

  8. Fabrication of nanometer flat areas onto YBa2Cu3O7-x thin film surfaces by scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtanen, J.A.; Suketu, P.; Huth, G.C.; Cho, Z.H.

    1991-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope was used to mechanically ''mill'' nanometer flat areas of up to 1600 μm 2 on high temperature superconducting (HTS) films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x which were originally formed by laser ablation. Flatness to a standard deviation of 2 nm in height was found to be characteristic of milled areas. It was subsequently possible to mill trenches and ditches onto these flat areas. Scanning tunneling measurements of the exposed layered structure of the milled HTS surface are also reported. Surface modifications are also possible by the application of voltage pulse to the tunneling tip. The combination of electrical pulses and milling offer a possibility of mixed electromechanical patterning of the film

  9. Large-scale freestanding nanometer-thick graphite pellicles for mass production of nanodevices beyond 10 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seul-Gi; Shin, Dong-Wook; Kim, Taesung; Kim, Sooyoung; Lee, Jung Hun; Lee, Chang Gu; Yang, Cheol-Woong; Lee, Sungjoo; Cho, Sang Jin; Jeon, Hwan Chul; Kim, Mun Ja; Kim, Byung-Gook; Yoo, Ji-Beom

    2015-09-21

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) has received much attention in the semiconductor industry as a promising candidate to extend dimensional scaling beyond 10 nm. We present a new pellicle material, nanometer-thick graphite film (NGF), which shows an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) transmission of 92% at a thickness of 18 nm. The maximum temperature induced by laser irradiation (λ = 800 nm) of 9.9 W cm(-2) was 267 °C, due to the high thermal conductivity of the NGF. The freestanding NGF was found to be chemically stable during annealing at 500 °C in a hydrogen environment. A 50 × 50 mm large area freestanding NGF was fabricated using the wet and dry transfer (WaDT) method. The NGF can be used as an EUVL pellicle for the mass production of nanodevices beyond 10 nm.

  10. Preparation of poly (methyl methacrylate)/nanometer calcium carbonate composite by in-situ emulsion polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史建明; 包永忠; 黄志明; 翁志学

    2004-01-01

    Methyl methacrylate (MMA) emulsion polymerization in the presence of nanometer calcium carbonate(nano-CaCO3) surface modified with γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) was carried out to prepare poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/nano-CaCO3 composite. The reaction between nano-CaCO3 and MPTMS, and the grafting of PMMA onto nano-CaCO3 were confirmed by infrared spectrum. The grafting ratio and grafting efficiency of PMMA on nano-CaCO3 modified with MPTMS were much higher than that on nano-CaCO3 modified with stearic acid. The grafting ratio of PMMA increased as the weight ratio between MMA and nano-CaCO3 increased, while the grafting efficiency of PMMA decreased. Transmission electron micrograph showed that nano-CaCO3 covered with PMMA was formed by in-situ emulsion polymerization.

  11. Mechanical design of multiple zone plates precision alignment apparatus for hard X-ray focusing in twenty-nanometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Deming; Liu, Jie; Gleber, Sophie C.; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Lai, Barry; Maser, Jorg M.; Roehrig, Christian; Wojcik, Michael J.; Vogt, Franz Stefan

    2017-04-04

    An enhanced mechanical design of multiple zone plates precision alignment apparatus for hard x-ray focusing in a twenty-nanometer scale is provided. The precision alignment apparatus includes a zone plate alignment base frame; a plurality of zone plates; and a plurality of zone plate holders, each said zone plate holder for mounting and aligning a respective zone plate for hard x-ray focusing. At least one respective positioning stage drives and positions each respective zone plate holder. Each respective positioning stage is mounted on the zone plate alignment base frame. A respective linkage component connects each respective positioning stage and the respective zone plate holder. The zone plate alignment base frame, each zone plate holder and each linkage component is formed of a selected material for providing thermal expansion stability and positioning stability for the precision alignment apparatus.

  12. Crossed Ga2O3/SnO2 multiwire architecture: a local structure study with nanometer resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Criado, Gema; Segura-Ruiz, Jaime; Chu, Manh-Hung; Tucoulou, Remi; López, Iñaki; Nogales, Emilio; Mendez, Bianchi; Piqueras, Javier

    2014-10-08

    Crossed nanowire structures are the basis for high-density integration of a variety of nanodevices. Owing to the critical role of nanowires intersections in creating hybrid architectures, it has become a challenge to investigate the local structure in crossing points in metal oxide nanowires. Thus, if intentionally grown crossed nanowires are well-patterned, an ideal model to study the junction is formed. By combining electron and synchrotron beam nanoprobes, we show here experimental evidence of the role of impurities in the coupling formation, structural modifications, and atomic site configuration based on crossed Ga2O3/SnO2 nanowires. Our experiment opens new avenues for further local structure studies with both nanometer resolution and elemental sensitivity.

  13. Compressive flow behavior of Cu thin films and Cu/Nb multilayers containing nanometer-scale helium bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, N.; Mara, N.A.; Wang, Y.Q.; Nastasi, M.; Misra, A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Firstly micro-pillar compression technique has been used to measure the implanted metal films. → The magnitude of radiation hardening decreased with decreasing layer thickness. → When thickness decreases to 2.5 nm, no hardening and no loss in deformability after implantation. -- Focused-ion-beam machined compression specimens were used to investigate the effect of nanometer-scale helium bubbles on the strength and deformability of sputter-deposited Cu and Cu/Nb multilayers with different layer thickness. The flow strength of Cu films increased by more than a factor of 2 due to helium bubbles but in multilayers, the magnitude of radiation hardening decreased with decreasing layer thickness. When the layer thickness decreases to 2.5 nm, insignificant hardening and no measurable loss in deformability is observed after implantation.

  14. Synthesis of Nanometer-Sized Poly (methyl methacrylate) Polymer Network by Gold Nanoparticle Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Ken; Hsieh, Shang-Yu; Ko, Fu-Hsiang; Chu, Tieh-Chi; Dai, Bau-Tong

    2003-06-01

    Gold nanoparticle/polymer composites have been produced using a one-system polymer synthesis. The linear polymer, poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA, MW = 15,000 g/mol) is applied for the stabilization of gold nanoparticles. The Fourier transfer infrared (FT-IR) analysis data and transition electron microscopy (TEM) image reveal that the core shell structure of gold/PMMA nanocomposite has been synthesized. The ratio of the concentration of the capping polymer material to the concentration of the gold precursor could control the sizes of gold nanoparticles. With specific concentration of the reductant, the core-shell nanostructure could be fluctuated in order. After heating treatment, the network structure of PMMA capped gold nanoparticles could be synthesized as confirmed by the TEM image. The result indicates that PMMA not only acts as the stabilizer, but also as the bridge of the neighboring gold nanoparticles.

  15. Growth Processes of Particles up to Nanometer in High-Frequency SiH4 Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Shiratani, M.; Fukuzawa, T.; Koga, K.

    2000-01-01

    Growth processes of particles in high-frequency SiH 4 discharges have been understood fairly well in a size range above 10 nm. Recently, we have developed two in situ particle detection methods to study those of particles (clusters) in a size range below ∼ 10 nm. The studies have clarified time evolution of their density and size and revealed the following facts: the cluster density amounts to ∼ 10 11 cm -3 under the device quality low-power and low-pressure conditions: the discharge modulation, substrate heating and H 2 dilution are quite effective in suppressing the cluster growth. We have proposed the cluster growth model explaining reasonably the obtained results. (author)

  16. Attofarad resolution capacitance-voltage measurement of nanometer scale field effect transistors utilizing ambient noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokirmak, Ali; Inaltekin, Hazer; Tiwari, Sandip

    2009-01-01

    A high resolution capacitance-voltage (C-V) characterization technique, enabling direct measurement of electronic properties at the nanoscale in devices such as nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) through the use of random fluctuations, is described. The minimum noise level required for achieving sub-aF (10 -18 F) resolution, the leveraging of stochastic resonance, and the effect of higher levels of noise are illustrated through simulations. The non-linear ΔC gate-source/drain -V gate response of FETs is utilized to determine the inversion layer capacitance (C inv ) and carrier mobility. The technique is demonstrated by extracting the carrier concentration and effective electron mobility in a nanoscale Si FET with C inv = 60 aF.

  17. Characterization of the molecular distribution of drugs in glassy solid dispersions at the nano-meter scale, using differential scanning calorimetry and gravimetric water vapour sorption techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drooge, D J; Hinrichs, W L J; Visser, M R; Frijlink, H W

    2006-03-09

    The molecular distribution in fully amorphous solid dispersions consisting of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP)-diazepam and inulin-diazepam was studied. One glass transition temperature (T(g)), as determined by temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC), was observed in PVP-diazepam solid dispersions prepared by fusion for all drug loads tested (10-80 wt.%). The T(g) of these solid dispersions gradually changed with composition and decreased from 177 degrees C for pure PVP to 46 degrees C for diazepam. These observations indicate that diazepam was dispersed in PVP on a molecular level. However, in PVP-diazepam solid dispersions prepared by freeze drying, two T(g)'s were observed for drug loads above 35 wt.% indicating phase separation. One T(g) indicated the presence of amorphous diazepam clusters, the other T(g) was attributed to a PVP-rich phase in which diazepam was dispersed on a molecular level. With both the value of the latter T(g) and the DeltaC(p) of the diazepam glass transition the concentrations of molecular dispersed diazepam could be calculated (27-35 wt.%). Both methods gave similar results. Water vapour sorption (DVS) experiments revealed that the PVP-matrix was hydrophobised by the incorporated diazepam. TMDSC and DVS results were used to estimate the size of diazepam clusters in freeze dried PVP-diazepam solid dispersions, which appeared to be in the nano-meter range. The inulin-diazepam solid dispersions prepared by spray freeze drying showed one T(g) for drug loads up to 35 wt.% indicating homogeneous distribution on a molecular level. However, this T(g) was independent of the drug load, which is unexpected because diazepam has a lower T(g) than inulin (46 and 155 degrees C, respectively). For higher drug loads, a T(g) of diazepam as well as a T(g) of the inulin-rich phase was observed, indicating the formation of amorphous diazepam clusters. From the DeltaC(p) of the diazepam glass transition the amount of molecularly dispersed

  18. Orphan sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pust, R.; Urbancik, L.

    2008-01-01

    The presentation describes how the stable detection systems (hereinafter referred to as S DS ) have contributed to reveal the uncontrolled sources of ionizing radiation on the territory of the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) Brno Regional Centre (RC Brno). It also describes the emergencies which were solved by or in which the workers from the Brno. Regional Centre participated in. The contribution is divided into the following chapters: A. SDS systems installed on the territory of SONS RC Brno; B. Selected unusual emergencies; C. Comments to individual emergencies; D. Aspects of SDS operation in term of their users; E. Aspects of SDS operation and related activities in term of radiation protection; F. Current state of orphan sources. (authors)

  19. Industrial Implementation of Environmentally Friendly Nanometal Electroplating Process for Chromium and Copper Beryllium Replacement using Low Cost Pulse Current Power Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-10

    FINAL REPORT Industrial Implementation of Environmentally Friendly Nanometal Electroplating Process for Chromium and Copper Beryllium...35 3.2 Phase II – Development/Verification that Nanotechnology Based Electroplating Process to Replace EHC/Cu-Be Processes are Compatible With...36 3.3 Phase III – Development of 200kW Power Supply and Compatible Nanostructured Electroplating Processed for Commercialization

  20. Development and characterization of electron sources for diffraction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casandruc, Albert

    2015-12-15

    The dream to control chemical reactions that are essential to life is now closer than ever to gratify. Recent scientific progress has made it possible to investigate phenomena and processes which deploy at the angstroms scale and at rates on the order femtoseconds. Techniques such as Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) are currently able to reveal the spatial atomic configuration of systems with unit cell sizes on the order of a few nanometers with about 100 femtosecond temporal resolution. Still, major advances are needed for structural interrogation of biological systems like protein crystals, which have unit cell sizes of 10 nanometers or larger, and sample sizes of less than one micrometer. For such samples, the performance of these electron-based techniques is now limited by the quality, in particular the brightness, of the electron source. The current Ph.D. work represents a contribution towards the development and the characterization of electron sources which are essential to static and time-resolved electron diffraction techniques. The focus was on electron source fabrication and electron beam characterization measurements, using the solenoid and the aperture scan techniques, but also on the development and maintenance of the relevant experimental setups. As a result, new experimental facilities are now available in the group and, at the same time, novel concepts for generating electron beams for electron diffraction applications have been developed. In terms of existing electron sources, the capability to trigger and detect field emission from single double-gated field emitter Mo tips was successfully proven. These sharp emitter tips promise high brightness electron beams, but for investigating individual such structures, new engineering was needed. Secondly, the influence of the surface electric field on electron beam properties has been systematically performed for flat Mo photocathodes. This study is very valuable especially for state

  1. Development and characterization of electron sources for diffraction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casandruc, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The dream to control chemical reactions that are essential to life is now closer than ever to gratify. Recent scientific progress has made it possible to investigate phenomena and processes which deploy at the angstroms scale and at rates on the order femtoseconds. Techniques such as Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) are currently able to reveal the spatial atomic configuration of systems with unit cell sizes on the order of a few nanometers with about 100 femtosecond temporal resolution. Still, major advances are needed for structural interrogation of biological systems like protein crystals, which have unit cell sizes of 10 nanometers or larger, and sample sizes of less than one micrometer. For such samples, the performance of these electron-based techniques is now limited by the quality, in particular the brightness, of the electron source. The current Ph.D. work represents a contribution towards the development and the characterization of electron sources which are essential to static and time-resolved electron diffraction techniques. The focus was on electron source fabrication and electron beam characterization measurements, using the solenoid and the aperture scan techniques, but also on the development and maintenance of the relevant experimental setups. As a result, new experimental facilities are now available in the group and, at the same time, novel concepts for generating electron beams for electron diffraction applications have been developed. In terms of existing electron sources, the capability to trigger and detect field emission from single double-gated field emitter Mo tips was successfully proven. These sharp emitter tips promise high brightness electron beams, but for investigating individual such structures, new engineering was needed. Secondly, the influence of the surface electric field on electron beam properties has been systematically performed for flat Mo photocathodes. This study is very valuable especially for state

  2. Development of high strength hot rolled low carbon copper-bearing steel containing nanometer sized carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaniraj, M.P. [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young-Min [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joonho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Nam Hoon [Sheet Product Design Group, Hyundai Steel Co., North Industrial Street 1400, 343-823, DangJin 343-823 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Ik; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Jung, Woo-Sang [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae-Hyeok, E-mail: jhshim@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, In-Suk, E-mail: insukchoi@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    A low carbon ferritic steel was alloyed with Ti, Mo and Cu with the intention of achieving greater increment in strength by multiple precipitate strengthening. The steel is hot rolled and subjected to interrupted cooling to enable precipitation of Ti–Mo carbides and copper. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out to determine equilibrium phase fractions at different temperatures. Microstructure characterization using transmission electron microscopy and composition analysis revealed that the steel contains ~5 nm size precipitates of (Ti,Mo)C. Precipitation kinetics calculations using MatCalc software showed that mainly body centered cubic copper precipitates of size < 5nm form under the cooling conditions in the present study. The steel has the high tensile strength of 853 MPa and good ductility. The yield strength increases by 420 MPa, which is more than that achieved in hot rolled low carbon ferritic steels with only copper precipitates or only carbide precipitates. The precipitation and strengthening contribution of copper and (Ti,Mo)C precipitates and their effect on the work hardening behavior is discussed.

  3. Electrochemical studies on nanometal oxide-activated carbon composite electrodes for aqueous supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mui Yen; Khiew, Poi Sim; Isa, Dino; Chiu, Wee Siong

    2014-11-01

    In present study, the electrochemical performance of eco-friendly and cost-effective titanium oxide (TiO2)-based and zinc oxide-based nanocomposite electrodes were studied in neutral aqueous Na2SO3 electrolyte, respectively. The electrochemical properties of these composite electrodes were studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge (CD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results reveal that these two nanocomposite electrodes achieve the highest specific capacitance at fairly low oxide loading onto activated carbon (AC) electrodes, respectively. Considerable enhancement of the electrochemical properties of TiO2/AC and ZnO/AC nanocomposite electrodes is achieved via synergistic effects contributed from the nanostructured metal oxides and the high surface area mesoporous AC. Cations and anions from metal oxides and aqueous electrolyte such as Ti4+, Zn2+, Na+ and SO32- can occupy some pores within the high-surface-area AC electrodes, forming the electric double layer at the electrode-electrolyte interface. Additionally, both TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles can provide favourable surface adsorption sites for SO32- anions which subsequently facilitate the faradaic processes for pseudocapacitive effect. These two systems provide the low cost material electrodes and the low environmental impact electrolyte which offer the increased charge storage without compromising charge storage kinetics.

  4. Activated Carbon-Fly Ash-Nanometal Oxide Composite Materials: Preparation, Characterization, and Tributyltin Removal Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olushola S. Ayanda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The physicochemical properties, nature, and morphology of composite materials involving activated carbon, fly ash, nFe3O4, nSiO2, and nZnO were investigated and compared. Nature and morphology characterizations were carried out by means of scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Other physicochemical characterizations undertaken were CNH analysis, ash content, pH, point of zero charge, and surface area and porosity determination by BET. Experimental results obtained revealed that activated carbon, nSiO2, activated carbon-fly ash, activated carbon-fly ash-nFe3O4, activated carbon-fly ash-nSiO2, and activated carbon-fly ash-nZnO composite materials exhibited net negative charge on their surfaces while fly ash, nFe3O4, and nZnO possessed net positive charge on their surfaces. Relatively higher removal efficiency (>99% of TBT was obtained for all the composite materials compared to their respective precursors except for activated carbon. These composite materials therefore offer great potential for the remediation of TBT in wastewaters.

  5. In situ probing the interior of single bacterial cells at nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Boyin; Wah Ng, Tuck; Fu, Jing; Hemayet Uddin, Md; Paterson, David L; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel approach to probe the interior of single bacterial cells at nanometre resolution by combining focused ion beam (FIB) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After removing layers of pre-defined thickness in the order of 100 nm on the target bacterial cells with FIB milling, AFM of different modes can be employed to probe the cellular interior under both ambient and aqueous environments. Our initial investigations focused on the surface topology induced by FIB milling and the hydration effects on AFM measurements, followed by assessment of the sample protocols. With fine-tuning of the process parameters, in situ AFM probing beneath the bacterial cell wall was achieved for the first time. We further demonstrate the proposed method by performing a spatial mapping of intracellular elasticity and chemistry of the multi-drug resistant strain Klebsiella pneumoniae cells prior to and after it was exposed to the ‘last-line’ antibiotic polymyxin B. Our results revealed increased stiffness occurring in both surface and interior regions of the treated cells, suggesting loss of integrity of the outer membrane from polymyxin treatments. In addition, the hydrophobicity measurement using a functionalized AFM tip was able to highlight the evident hydrophobic portion of the cell such as the regions containing cell membrane. We expect that the proposed FIB–AFM platform will help in gaining deeper insights of bacteria–drug interactions to develop potential strategies for combating multi-drug resistance. (paper)

  6. Interparticle potential of 10 nanometer titanium nanoparticles in liquid sodium: Theoretical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Jae; Park, Gun Yeop; Park, Hyun Sun; Baek, Je Hyun [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A suspension of titanium nanoparticles (Ti NPs) in liquid sodium (Na) has been proposed as a method to mitigate the violent sodium-water reaction (SWR). The interparticle potential between Ti NPs in liquid Na may play a significant role in the agglomeration of NPs on the reaction surface and in the bulk liquid Na, since the potential contributes to a reduction in the long-term dispersion stability. For the effective control of the SWR with NPs, a physical understanding of the molecular dynamics of NPs in liquid Na is key. Therefore in this study, the nonretarded Van der Waals model and the solvation potential model are employed to analyze the interparticle potential. The ab initio calculation reveals that a strong repulsive force driven by the solvation potential exceeds the interparticle attraction and predicts the agglomeration energy required for two 10-nm Ti NPs to be 4 x 10{sup -17} J. The collision theory suggests that Ti NPs can be effective suppressors of the SWR due to the high energy barrier that prevents significant agglomeration of Ti NPs in quiescent liquid Na.

  7. Plan of study to determine if the isotopic ratios [delta]15 N and [delta]18 O can reveal the sources of nitrate discharged by the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglin, William A.; Kendall, Carol; Goolsby, Donald A.; Boyer, Laurie L.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate and other nutrients discharged from the Mississippi River basin are suspected of causing a zone of depleted dissolved oxygen (hypoxic zone) in the Gulf of Mexico each summer. The hypoxic zone may have an adverse effect on aquatic life and commercial fisheries. Commercial fertilizers are the dominant source of nitrogen input to the Mississippi basin. Other nitrogen sources include animal waste, fixation of atmospheric nitrogen by legumes, precipitation, domestic and industrial effluent, and the soil. The inputs of nitrogen from most of these sources to the Mississippi basin can be estimated and the outputs in surface water can be measured. However, nitrogen from each source is affected differently by physical, chemical, and biological processes that control nitrogen cycling in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Hence, the relative contributions from the various sources of nitrogen to nitrate load in the Mississippi River are unknown because the different sources may not contribute proportionally to their inputs in the basin. It may be possible to determine the relative contributions of the major sources of nitrate in river water using the stable isotopic ratios d15N and d18O of the nitrate ion. A few researchers have used the d15N and/or d18O isotope ratios to determine sources of nitrate in ground water, headwater catchments, and small rivers, but little is known about the isotopic composition of nitrate in larger rivers. The objective of this study is to measure the isotopic composition of nitrate and suspended organic matter in the Mississippi River and its major tributaries, in discharge to the Gulf of Mexico, and in streamflow from smaller watersheds that have distinct sources of nitrogen (row crops, animal wastes, and urban effluents) or are minimally impacted by man (undeveloped). Samples from seven sites on the Mississippi River and its tributaries and from 17 sites in smaller watersheds within the Mississippi River basin will be analyzed for d15N and

  8. Synthesis and characterization of nanometer sized thermoelectric lead-antimony-silver-tellurium compounds and related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petri, Denis

    2012-01-01

    precipitates and crystal defects the thermal conductivity was generally low. Similar to other reports the powder processing caused a deleterious effect on the electrical conductivity. The comparison between short term annealed and long term sintered polycrystalline bulk samples revealed that the annealing temperature caused partly connected particles for the LAST-derivates but well sintered compacts for the non-LAST-compounds. For both classes, long-term sintering caused a simultanious increase of both thermopower and electrical conductivity which shows that co-ball milling leads to a decoupling of those two properties. This could prove usefull in further investigations and the development of new thermoelectric materials and the processing thereof.

  9. Next-Generation Photon Sources for Grand Challenges in Science and Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-05-01

    report identifies two aspects of energy science in which next-generation ultraviolet and X-ray light sources will have the deepest and broadest impact: (1) The temporal evolution of electrons, spins, atoms, and chemical reactions, down to the femtosecond time scale. (2) Spectroscopic and structural imaging of nano objects (or nanoscale regions of inhomogeneous materials) with nanometer spatial resolution and ultimate spectral resolution. The dual advances of temporal and spatial resolution promised by fourth-generation light sources ideally match the challenges of control science. Femtosecond time resolution has opened completely new territory where atomic motion can be followed in real time and electronic excitations and decay processes can be followed over time. Coherent imaging with short-wavelength radiation will make it possible to access the nanometer length scale, where intrinsic quantum behavior becomes dominant. Performing spectroscopy on individual nanometer-scale objects rather than on conglomerates will eliminate the blurring of the energy levels induced by particle size and shape distributions and reveal the energetics of single functional units. Energy resolution limited only by the uncertainty relation is enabled by these advances. Current storage-ring-based light sources and their incremental enhancements cannot meet the need for femtosecond time resolution, nanometer spatial resolution, intrinsic energy resolution, full coherence over energy ranges up to hard X-rays, and peak brilliance required to enable the new science outlined in this report. In fact, the new, unexplored territory is so expansive that no single currently imagined light source technology can fulfill the whole potential. Both technological and economic challenges require resolution as we move forward. For example, femtosecond time resolution and high peak brilliance are required for following chemical reactions in real time, but lower peak brilliance and high repetition rate are needed

  10. Optomechanical Design of a Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Instrument with Nanometer-Scale Active Vibration Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Preissner, C.; Smolyanitskiy, A.; Maser, J.; Winarski, R.; Holt, M.; Lai, B.; Vogt, S.; Stephenson, G. B.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a new hard x-ray nanoprobe instrument that is one of the centerpieces of the characterization facilities of the Center for Nanoscale Materials being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. This new probe will cover an energy range of 3-30 keV with 30-nm spacial resolution. The system is designed to accommodate x-ray optics with a resolution limit of 10 nm, therefore, it requires staging of x-ray optics and specimens with a mechanical repeatability of better than 5 nm. Fast feedback for differential vibration control between the zone-plate x-ray optics and the sample holder has been implemented in the design using a digital-signal-processor-based real-time closed-loop feedback technique. A specially designed, custom-built laser Doppler displacement meter system provides two-dimensional differential displacement measurements with subnanometer resolution between the zone-plate x-ray optics and the sample holder. The optomechanical design of the instrument positioning stage system with nanometer-scale active vibration control is presented in this paper

  11. Optomechanical design of a hard x-ray nanoprobe instrument with active vibration control in nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Maser, J.; Holt, M.; Winarski, R.; Preissner, C.; Smolyanitskiy, A.; Lai, B.; Vogt, S.; Stephenson, G.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a new hard x-ray nanoprobe instrument that is one of the centerpieces of the characterization facilities of the Center for Nanoscale Materials being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. This new probe will cover an energy range of 3-30 keV with 30-nm spatial resolution. The system is designed to accommodate x-ray optics with a resolution limit of 10 nm, therefore, it requires staging of x-ray optics and specimens with a mechanical repeatability of better than 5 nm. Fast feedback for differential vibration control between the zone-plate x-ray optics and the sample holder has been implemented in the design using a digital-signal-processor-based real-time closed-loop feedback technique. A specially designed, custom-built laser Doppler displacement meter system provides two-dimensional differential displacement measurements with subnanometer resolution between the zone-plate x-ray optics and the sample holder. The optomechanical design of the instrument positioning stage system with nanometer-scale active vibration control is presented in this paper.

  12. Simple and rapid spectrophotometric determination of trace titanium (IV) enriched by nanometer size zirconium dioxide in natural water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Fengying; Li Shunxing; Lin Luxiu; Cheng Liqing

    2009-01-01

    A novel method for preconcentration of Ti(IV) with nanometer size ZrO 2 and determination by spectrophotometry has been developed. Ti(IV) was selectively adsorbed on 300 mg ZrO 2 from 500 mL solution at pH 6.0, then eluted by 5 mL 11.3 mol L -1 HF. The eluent added was diantipyrylmethane (DAPM, as chromogenic reagent) and ascorbic acid (as masking agent), used for the analysis of Ti(IV) by measuring the absorbance at 390 nm with spectrophotometry, based on the chromogenic reaction between the Ti(IV) and DAPM. This method gave a concentration enhancement of 100 for 500 mL sample, eliminated the sizable interferences on direct determination with spectrophotometry. Detection limit (3σ, n = 11) of 0.1 μg L -1 was obtained. The method was applied to determine the concentration of Ti(IV) in river water and seawater and the analytical recoveries of Ti(IV) added to samples were 97.6-101.3%.

  13. Ultrahigh-power supercapacitors based on highly conductive graphene nanosheet/nanometer-sized carbide-derived carbon frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Pengtao; Zhang, Xuesha; Hou, Meiling; Liu, Yanyan; Liu, Ting; Liu, Kang; Zhang, Ruijun

    2018-06-22

    In order to develop energy storage devices with high power performance, electrodes should hold well-defined pathways for efficient ionic and electronic transport. Herein, we demonstrate a highly conductive graphene nanosheet/nanometer-sized carbide-derived carbon framework (hcGNS/nCDC). In this architecture, nCDC possesses short transport paths for electrolyte ions, thus ensuring the rapid ions transportation. The excellent electrical conductivity of hcGNS can reduce the electrode internal resistance for the supercapacitor and thus endows the hcGNS/nCDC composite electrodes with excellent electronic transportation performance. Electrochemical measurements show that the cyclic voltammogram of hcGNS/nCDC can maintain a rectangular-like shape with the increase of the scan rate from 5 mV s -1 to 20 V s -1 , and the specific capacitance retention is up to 51% even at a high scan rate of 20 V s -1 , suggesting ultrahigh power performance, which, to the best of our knowledge, is among the best power performances reported so far for the carbon materials. Furthermore, the hcGNS/nCDC composite also shows an excellent cycling stability (no drop in its capacitance occurs even after 10000 cycles). This work demonstrates the advantage in the ultrahigh power performance for the framework having both short transport pathways for electrolyte ions and high electrical conductivity.

  14. A general approach to homogeneous sub-nanometer metallic particle/graphene composites by S-coordinator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Senhao; Wang, Wei; Gu, Shangzhi; Zhang, Guoxin; Song, Ningning

    2018-05-01

    In this study, sulphur-modified reduced graphene oxide (S-rGO) was employed as substrate to investigate the growth mechanism of metal and metallic nanoparticles (NPs). It is observed that the monodispersed Au, SnO2, FeO(OH) and Co3S4 NPs in sub-nanometer (sub-nm) with narrow size distribution were successfully anchored on S-rGO, respectively. The results indicate that the S contained radicals, viz. the Cdbnd S and Csbnd Ssbnd C functional groups play an important role in determining the homogeneous distribution of NPs on S-rGO by providing active sites for the NPs anchoring and nucleation. In additional, as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), the as-synthesized sub-nm sized Co3S4/S-rGO and SnO2/S-rGO composites show excellent Li storage performance. It could be stabilized at ca. 600 mAh/g after formation cycle with the coulombic efficiency of 98%. It is expected that the strategy of growing sub-nm sized metallic component onto graphene by applying sulphur functionalities could be utilized as a general method to prepare monodispersed graphene-based NPs with other metals, especially with transition metals in sub-nm sizes.

  15. Ultrahigh-power supercapacitors based on highly conductive graphene nanosheet/nanometer-sized carbide-derived carbon frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Pengtao; Zhang, Xuesha; Hou, Meiling; Liu, Yanyan; Liu, Ting; Liu, Kang; Zhang, Ruijun

    2018-06-01

    In order to develop energy storage devices with high power performance, electrodes should hold well-defined pathways for efficient ionic and electronic transport. Herein, we demonstrate a highly conductive graphene nanosheet/nanometer-sized carbide-derived carbon framework (hcGNS/nCDC). In this architecture, nCDC possesses short transport paths for electrolyte ions, thus ensuring the rapid ions transportation. The excellent electrical conductivity of hcGNS can reduce the electrode internal resistance for the supercapacitor and thus endows the hcGNS/nCDC composite electrodes with excellent electronic transportation performance. Electrochemical measurements show that the cyclic voltammogram of hcGNS/nCDC can maintain a rectangular-like shape with the increase of the scan rate from 5 mV s‑1 to 20 V s‑1, and the specific capacitance retention is up to 51% even at a high scan rate of 20 V s‑1, suggesting ultrahigh power performance, which, to the best of our knowledge, is among the best power performances reported so far for the carbon materials. Furthermore, the hcGNS/nCDC composite also shows an excellent cycling stability (no drop in its capacitance occurs even after 10000 cycles). This work demonstrates the advantage in the ultrahigh power performance for the framework having both short transport pathways for electrolyte ions and high electrical conductivity.

  16. Maskless X-Ray Writing of Electrical Devices on a Superconducting Oxide with Nanometer Resolution and Online Process Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino, Lorenzo; Bonino, Valentina; Agostino, Angelo; Prestipino, Carmelo; Borfecchia, Elisa; Lamberti, Carlo; Operti, Lorenza; Fretto, Matteo; De Leo, Natascia; Truccato, Marco

    2017-08-22

    X-ray nanofabrication has so far been usually limited to mask methods involving photoresist impression and subsequent etching. Herein we show that an innovative maskless X-ray nanopatterning approach allows writing electrical devices with nanometer feature size. In particular we fabricated a Josephson device on a Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ (Bi-2212) superconducting oxide micro-crystal by drawing two single lines of only 50 nm in width using a 17.4 keV synchrotron nano-beam. A precise control of the fabrication process was achieved by monitoring in situ the variations of the device electrical resistance during X-ray irradiation, thus finely tuning the irradiation time to drive the material into a non-superconducting state only in the irradiated regions, without significantly perturbing the crystal structure. Time-dependent finite element model simulations show that a possible microscopic origin of this effect can be related to the instantaneous temperature increase induced by the intense synchrotron picosecond X-ray pulses. These results prove that a conceptually new patterning method for oxide electrical devices, based on the local change of electrical properties, is actually possible with potential advantages in terms of heat dissipation, chemical contamination, miniaturization and high aspect ratio of the devices.

  17. Interdiffusion in nanometer-scale multilayers investigated by in situ low-angle x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Hua; Bai, Hai Yang; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, J. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, W. K.

    1999-04-01

    An in situ low-angle x-ray diffraction technique is used to investigate interdiffusion phenomena in various metal-metal and metal-amorphous Si nanometer-scale compositionally modulated multilayers (ML's). The temperature-dependent interdiffusivities are obtained by accurately monitoring the decay of the first-order modulation peak as a function of annealing time. Activation enthalpies and preexponential factors for the interdiffusion in the Fe-Ti, Ag-Bi, Fe-Mo, Mo-Si, Ni-Si, Nb-Si, and Ag-Si ML's are determined. Activation enthalpies and preexponential factors for the interdiffusion in the ML's are very small compared with that in amorphous alloys and crystalline solids. The relation between the atomic-size difference and interdiffusion in the ML's are investigated. The observed interdiffusion characteristics are compared with that in amorphous alloys and crystalline α-Zr, α-Ti, and Si. The experimental results suggest that a collective atomic-jumping mechanism govern the interdiffusion in the ML's, the collective proposal involving 8-15 atoms moving between extended nonequilibrium defects by thermal activation. The role of the interdiffusion in the solid-state reaction in the ML's is also discussed.

  18. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of an additive element in metal oxide nanometer film using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Junshan; Liu, Shiming; Sun, Meiling; Dong, Lili

    2018-01-20

    The photoelectric performance of metal ion-doped TiO 2 film will be improved with the changing of the compositions and concentrations of additive elements. In this work, the TiO 2 films doped with different Sn concentrations were obtained with the hydrothermal method. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the Sn element in TiO 2 film was achieved with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with the calibration curves plotted accordingly. The photoelectric characteristics of TiO 2 films doped with different Sn content were observed with UV visible absorption spectra and J-V curves. All results showed that Sn doping could improve the optical absorption to be red-shifted and advance the photoelectric properties of the TiO 2 films. We had obtained that when the concentration of Sn doping in TiO 2 films was 11.89  mmol/L, which was calculated by the LIBS calibration curves, the current density of the film was the largest, which indicated the best photoelectric performance. It indicated that LIBS was a potential and feasible measured method, which was applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of the additive element in metal oxide nanometer film.

  19. Quantitative x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simple algorithm to determine the amount of atoms in the outermost few nanometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tougaard, Sven

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that due to inelastic electron scattering, the measured x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peak intensity depends strongly on the in-depth atom distribution. Quantification based only on the peak intensity can therefore give large errors. The problem was basically solved by developing algorithms for the detailed analysis of the energy distribution of emitted electrons. These algorithms have been extensively tested experimentally and found to be able to determine the depth distribution of atoms with nanometer resolution. Practical application of these algorithms has increased after ready-to-use software packages were made available and they are now being used in laboratories worldwide. These software packages are easy to use but they need operator interaction. They are not well suited for automatic data processing and there is an additional need for simplified quantification strategies that can be automated. In this article we report on a very simple algorithm. It is a slightly more accurate version of our previous algorithm. The algorithm gives the amount of atoms within the outermost three inelastic mean free paths and it also gives a rough estimate for the in-depth distribution. An experimental example of its application is also presented

  20. Physical and chemical characterization of fly ashes from Swiss waste incineration plants and determination of the ash fraction in the nanometer range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buha, Jelena; Mueller, Nicole; Nowack, Bernd; Ulrich, Andrea; Losert, Sabrina; Wang, Jing

    2014-05-06

    Waste incineration had been identified as an important source of ultrafine air pollutants resulting in elaborated treatment systems for exhaust air. Nowadays, these systems are able to remove almost all ultrafine particles. However, the fate of ultrafine particles caught in the filters has received little attention so far. Based on the use of engineered nano-objects (ENO) and their transfer into the waste stream, it can be expected that not only combustion generated nanoparticles are found in fly ashes but that many ENO finally end up in this matrix. A more detailed characterization of the nanoparticulate fraction of fly ashes is therefore needed. Physical and chemical characterizations were performed for fly ashes from five selected waste incineration plants (WIPs) with different input materials such as municipal waste, wood and sewage sludge. The intrinsic densities of the fly ashes were in the range of 2.7-3.2 g/cm(3). When the fly ash particle became airborne, the effective density depended on the particle size, increasing from 0.7-0.8 g/cm(3) for 100-150 nm to 2 g/cm(3) for 350-500 nm. The fly ash samples were fractionated at 2 μm, yielding fine fractions (2 μm). The size distributions of the fine fractions in the airborne form were further characterized, which allowed calculation of the percentage of the fly ash particles below 100 nm. We found the highest mass-based percentage was about 0.07%; the number percentage in the fine fraction was in the range of 4.8% to 22%. Comparison with modeling results showed that ENO may constitute a considerable part of the fly ash particles below 100 nm. Chemical analyses showed that for the municipal waste samples Ca and Al were present in higher concentrations in the coarse fraction; for the mixed wood and sludge sample the P concentration was higher in the coarse fraction; for most other samples and elements they were enriched in the fine fraction. Electron microscopic images of fly ashes showed a wide range of

  1. Revealing Amphiphilic Nanodornains of Anti-Biofouling Polymer Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amadei, CA; Yang, R; Chiesa, M; Gleason, KK; Santos, S

    2014-04-09

    Undesired bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on wetted surfaces leads to significant economic and environmental costs in various industries. Amphiphilic coatings with molecular hydrophilic and hydrophobic patches can mitigate such biofouling effectively in an environmentally friendly manner. The coatings are synthesized by copolymerizing (Hydroxyethyl)methacrylate and perfluorodecylacrylate via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). In previous studies, the size of the patches was estimated to be similar to 1.4-1.75 nm by fitting protein adsorption data to a theoretical model. However, no direct observations of the molecular heterogeneity exist and therefore the origin of the fouling resistance of amphiphilic coatings remains unclear. Here, the amphiphilic nature is investigated by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). High-resolution images obtained by penetrating and oscillating the AFM tip under the naturally present water layer with sub-nanometer amplitudes reveal, for the first time, the existence of amphiphilic nanodomains (1-2 nm(2)). Compositional heterogeneity at the nanoscale is further corroborated by a statistical analysis on the data obtained with dynamic AM-AFM force spectroscopy. Variations in the long range attractive forces, responsible for water affinity, are also identified. These nanoscopic results on the polymers wettability are also confirmed by contact angle measurements (i.e., static and dynamic). The unprecedented ability to visualize the amphiphilic nanodomains as well as sub-nanometer crystalline structures provides strong evidence for the existence of previously postulated nanostructures, and sheds light on the underlying antifouling mechanism of amphiphilic chemistry.

  2. Multi-tissue transcriptomic study reveals the main role of liver in the chicken adaptive response to a switch in dietary energy source through the transcriptional regulation of lipogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Désert , Colette; Baeza , Elisabeth; Aite , Meziane; Boutin , Morgane; Le Cam , Aurélie; Montfort , Jérôme; Houee-Bigot , M.; Blum , Yuna; Roux , Pierre-François; Hennequet-Antier , Christelle; Berri , Cécile; Metayer-Coustard , Sonia; Collin , Anne; Allais , Sophie; Le Bihan , Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    The 178 microarrays are MIAME compliant and available in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) through GEO Series accession number GSE104042 andplatform number GPL19630.; Background: Because the cost of cereals is unstable and represents a large part of production charges for meattype chicken, there is an urge to formulate alternative diets from more cost-effective feedstuff. We have recently shown that meat-type chicken source is prone to adapt to dietary starch substitution with fat and fiber. The ...

  3. Source of Nitrous Oxide Emissions during the Cow Manure Composting Process as Revealed by Isotopomer Analysis of and amoA Abundance in Betaproteobacterial Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Koki; Toyoda, Sakae; Shimojima, Ryosuke; Osada, Takashi; Hanajima, Dai; Morioka, Riki; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2010-01-01

    A molecular analysis of betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizers and a N2O isotopomer analysis were conducted to study the sources of N2O emissions during the cow manure composting process. Much NO2−-N and NO3−-N and the Nitrosomonas europaea-like amoA gene were detected at the surface, especially at the top of the composting pile, suggesting that these ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) significantly contribute to the nitrification which occurs at the surface layer of compost piles. However, the 15N site preference within the asymmetric N2O molecule (SP = δ15Nα − δ15Nβ, where 15Nα and 15Nβ represent the 15N/14N ratios at the center and end sites of the nitrogen atoms, respectively) indicated that the source of N2O emissions just after the compost was turned originated mainly from the denitrification process. Based on these results, the reduction of accumulated NO2−-N or NO3−-N after turning was identified as the main source of N2O emissions. The site preference and bulk δ15N results also indicate that the rate of N2O reduction was relatively low, and an increased value for the site preference indicates that the nitrification which occurred mainly in the surface layer of the pile partially contributed to N2O emissions between the turnings. PMID:20048060

  4. Resolving three-dimensional shape of sub-50 nm wide lines with nanometer-scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attota, Ravikiran; Dixson, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the three-dimensional (3-D) shape variations of nanometer-scale objects can be resolved and measured with sub-nanometer scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes by analyzing 4-D optical data using the through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) method. These initial results show that TSOM-determined cross-sectional (3-D) shape differences of 30 nm–40 nm wide lines agree well with critical-dimension atomic force microscope measurements. The TSOM method showed a linewidth uncertainty of 1.22 nm (k = 2). Complex optical simulations are not needed for analysis using the TSOM method, making the process simple, economical, fast, and ideally suited for high volume nanomanufacturing process monitoring.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of a nanometer-sized optical fiber electrode based on selective chemical etching for scanning electrochemical/optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Kenichi; Ohkawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Sho; Ueda, Akio; Niwa, Osamu; Suzuki, Koji

    2006-03-15

    We have already reported a method for fabricating ultramicroelectrodes (Suzuki, K. JP Patent, 2004-45394, 2004). This method is based on the selective chemical etching of optical fibers. In this work, we undertake a detailed investigation involving a combination of etched optical fibers with various types of tapered tip (protruding-shape, double- (or pencil-) shape and triple-tapered electrode) and insulation with electrophoretic paint. Our goal is to establish a method for fabricating nanometer-sized optical fiber electrodes with high reproducibility. As a result, we realized pencil-shaped and triple-tapered electrodes that had radii in the nanometer range with high reproducibility. These nanometer-sized electrodes showed well-defined sigmoidal curves and stable diffusion-limited responses with cyclic voltammetry. The pencil-shaped optical fiber, which has a conical tip with a cone angle of 20 degrees , was effective for controlling the electrode radius. The pencil-shaped electrodes had higher reproducibility and smaller electrode radii (r(app) etched optical fiber electrodes. By using a pencil-shaped electrode with a 105-nm radius as a probe, we obtained simultaneous electrochemical and optical images of an implantable interdigitated array electrode. We achieved nanometer-scale resolution with a combination of scanning electrochemical microscopy SECM and optical microscopy. The resolution of the electrochemical and optical images indicated sizes of 300 and 930 nm, respectively. The neurites of living PC12 cells were also successfully imaged on a 1.6-microm scale by using the negative feedback mode of an SECM.

  6. Electrospraying and ultraviolet light curing of nanometer-thin polydimethylsiloxane membranes for low-voltage dielectric elastomer transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmani, Bekim; Töpper, Tino; Siketanc, Matej; Kovacs, Gabor M.; Müller, Bert

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer transducers (DETs) have attracted interest as actuators, sensors, and even as self-sensing actuators for applications in medicine, soft robotics, and microfluidics. To reach strains of more than 10 %, they currently require operating voltages of several hundred volts. In medical applications for artificial muscles, however, their operation is limited to a very few tens of volts, which implies high permittivity materials and thin-film structures. Such micro- or nanostructures can be prepared using electro-spraying, a cost-effective technique that allows upscaling using multiple nozzles for the fabrication of silicone films down to nanometer thickness. Deposition rates of several micrometers per hour have already been reached. It has been recently demonstrated that such membranes can be fabricated by electro-spraying and subsequent ultraviolet light irradiation. Herein, we introduce a relatively fast deposition of a dimethyl silicone copolymer fluid that contains mercaptopropyl side chains in addition to the methyl groups. Its elastic modulus was tuned with the irradiation dose of the 200 W Hg-Xe lamp. We also investigated the formation of elastomer films, using polymer concentrations in ethyl acetate of 1, 2, 5 and 10 vol%. After curing, the surface roughness was measured by means of atomic force microscopy. This instrument also enabled us to determine the average elastic modulus out of, for example, 400 nanoindentation measurements, using a spherical tip with a radius of 500 nm. The elastomer films were cured for a period of less than one minute, a speed that makes it feasible to combine electro-spraying and in situ curing in a single process step for fabricating low-voltage, multilayer DETs.

  7. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy characterization of intermetallics formed in Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers during thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.L.; Peng, T.X.; Cao, B.S.; Lei, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Intermetallics formation in the Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers magnetron-sputtering deposited on Si(100) substrate during thermal annealing at 623-873 K was investigated by using small and wide angle X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers were constructed with bilayer thickness of 16.2 nm and the sublayer thickness ratio of 1:1. At the annealing temperature of 623 K, intermetallics FeTi were formed by nucleation at the triple joins of α-Fe(Ti)/α-Ti interface and α-Ti grain boundary with an orientational correlation of FeTi(110)//α-Ti(100) and FeTi[001]//α-Ti[001] to adjacent α-Ti grains. The lateral growth of intermetallics FeTi which is dependent on the diffusion path of Ti led to a coalescence into an intermetallic layer. With an increase in the annealing temperature, intermetallics Fe 2 Ti were formed between the intermetallics FeTi and the excess Fe due to the limitation of Fe and Ti atomic concentrations, resulting in the coexistence of intermetallics FeTi and Fe 2 Ti. It was found that the low energy interface as well as the dominant diffusion path constrained the nucleation and growth of intermetallics during interfacial reaction in the nanometer-scale metallic multilayers.

  8. Obtaining of iron particles of nanometer size in a natural zeolite; Obtencion de particulas de hierro de tamano nanometrico en una zeolita natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xingu C, E. G.

    2013-07-01

    The zeolites are aluminosilicates with cavities that can act as molecular sieve. Their crystalline structure is formed by tetrahedrons that get together giving place to a three-dimensional net, in which each oxygen is shared by two silicon atoms, being this way part of the tecto silicate minerals, its external and internal areas reach the hundred square meters for gram, they are located in a natural way in a large part of earth crust and also exist in a synthetic way. In Mexico there are different locations of zeolitic material whose important component is the clinoptilolite. In this work the results of three zeolitic materials coming from San Luis Potosi are shown, the samples were milled and sieved for its initial characterization, to know its chemical composition, crystalline phases, morphology, topology and thermal behavior before and after its homo-ionization with sodium chloride, its use as support of iron particles of nanometer size. The description of the synthesis of iron particles of nanometer size is also presented, as well as the comparison with the particles of nanometer size synthesized without support after its characterization. The characterization techniques used during the experimental work were: Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Infrared spectroscopy, specific area by means of BET and thermogravimetry analysis. (Author)

  9. Study of nanometer-level precise phase-shift system used in electronic speckle shearography and phase-shift pattern interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Chao; Liu, Zhongling; Zhou, Ge; Zhang, Yimo

    2011-11-01

    The nanometer-level precise phase-shift system is designed to realize the phase-shift interferometry in electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry. The PZT is used as driving component of phase-shift system and translation component of flexure hinge is developed to realize micro displacement of non-friction and non-clearance. Closed-loop control system is designed for high-precision micro displacement, in which embedded digital control system is developed for completing control algorithm and capacitive sensor is used as feedback part for measuring micro displacement in real time. Dynamic model and control model of the nanometer-level precise phase-shift system is analyzed, and high-precision micro displacement is realized with digital PID control algorithm on this basis. It is proved with experiments that the location precision of the precise phase-shift system to step signal of displacement is less than 2nm and the location precision to continuous signal of displacement is less than 5nm, which is satisfied with the request of the electronic speckle shearography and phase-shift pattern interferometry. The stripe images of four-step phase-shift interferometry and the final phase distributed image correlated with distortion of objects are listed in this paper to prove the validity of nanometer-level precise phase-shift system.

  10. Cryochemistry of Nanometals

    OpenAIRE

    Shabatina, Tatyana I.; Sergeev, Gleb B.

    2010-01-01

    This survey of literature data and of the results obtained by the authors of the review shows that the methods of cryochemistry and cryonanochemistry make it possible to carry out and control self-assembling processes of metal atoms to form subnano- and nanosized aggregates, perform competitive chemical interactions of atoms, small clusters and nanosized metal particles with different organic and inorganic substances. At present time the effective approaches of cryochemistry are being develop...

  11. Environmental Science Program at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nico, Peter; A; Anastasio, Cort; Dodge, Cleveland; Fendorf, Scott; Francis, A.J.; Hubbard, Susan; Shuh, David; Tomutsa, Liviu; Tufano, Kate; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Werner, Michelle; Williams, Ken

    2006-04-05

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) has a variety of capabilities that are applicable to very different types of environmental systems. Shown are the basic descriptions of four of the approximately 35 beam lines at the ALS. The complimentary capabilities of these four beam lines allow for investigations that range from a spatial scale of a few nanometers to several millimeters. The Environmental Science Program at the Advanced Light Source seeks to promote and assist environmental research, particularly on the four beam lines described in this report. Several short examples of the types of research conducted on these beam lines are also described.

  12. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals That Lactose Acts as an Inducer and Provides Proper Carbon Sources for Enhancing Exopolysaccharide Yield in the Deep-Sea Bacterium Zunongwangia profunda SM-A87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qi-Long; Li, Yi; Sun, Mei-Ling; Rong, Jin-Cheng; Liu, Sheng-Bo; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Su, Hai-Nan; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Zhang, Xi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Many marine bacteria secrete exopolysaccharides (EPSs) that have important ecological and physiological functions. Numerous nutritional and environmental factors influence bacterial EPS production. However, the regulatory mechanisms of EPS production are poorly understood. The deep-sea Bacteroidetes bacterium Zunongwangia profunda SM-A87 can produce high quantities of EPS, and its EPS production is enhanced significantly by lactose. Here, we studied the reasons behind the significant advantage that lactose has over other carbon sources in EPS production in SM-A87. RNA-seq technologies were used to study lactose-regulated genes in SM-A87. The expression level of genes within the EPS gene cluster was up-regulated when lactose was added. Supplement of lactose also influenced the expression of genes located outside the EPS gene cluster that are also involved in EPS biosynthesis. The major glycosyl components of SM-A87 EPS are mannose, glucose and galactose. Genomic metabolic pathway analyses showed that the EPS precursor GDP-mannose can be synthesized from glucose, while the precursor UDP-glucose must be synthesized from galactose. Lactose can provide glucose and galactose simultaneously and prevent glucose inhibition. Lactose can also greatly stimulate the growth of SM-A87. Taken together, lactose acts not only as an inducer but also as a carbohydrate source for EPS production. This research broadens our knowledge of the regulation of EPS production in marine bacteria. PMID:25679965

  13. Spatio-temporal isotopic signatures (δ13 C and δ15 N) reveal that two sympatric West African mullet species do not feed on the same basal production sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Loc'h, F; Durand, J-D; Diop, K; Panfili, J

    2015-04-01

    Potential trophic competition between two sympatric mullet species, Mugil cephalus and Mugil curema, was explored in the hypersaline estuary of the Saloum Delta (Senegal) using δ(13) C and δ(15) N composition of muscle tissues. Between species, δ(15) N compositions were similar, suggesting a similar trophic level, while the difference in δ(13) C compositions indicated that these species did not feed from exactly the same basal production sources or at least not in the same proportions. This result provides the first evidence of isotopic niche segregation between two limno-benthophageous species belonging to the geographically widespread, and often locally abundant, Mugilidae family. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  14. Histological and histomorphometric evaluation of implant with nanometer scale and oxidized surface. in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvino, V; Iezzi, G; Trubiani, O; Traini, T; Piattelli, M

    2012-01-01

    The biological fixation of an implant to bone is influenced by numerous factors, including surface chemistry and surface topography. Various methods have been developed to create rough implant surfaces in order to improve the clinical performance of implants and to guarantee a stable mechanical bone-implant interface. Anodic oxidation is a dental implant surface modification technique that results in oxide layer growth up to a thickness of 1–10 micron. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the surface through the osteoblasts cells growth and the influence of oxidixed surface on BIC percent, in the human posterior maxilla after 2 months of unloaded healing. In vitro commercially available primary human osteoblasts (NHOst) from both femur and tibia of different donor systems (Lonza Walkersville Inc, Walkersville, MD, USA) were grown in Osteoblast Growth Media (OBM) (Lonza). Osteogenic differentiation was induced for a period of 4 weeks by the OGM medium (OBM basal medium supplemented with 200nM of hydrocortisone-21-hemisuccinate and 7.5 mM of glycerophosphate). The viability of NHOst cells seeded test A and B was measured by the quantitative colorimetric MTT (3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2Htetrazoliumbromide test) (Promega, Milan, Italy). One custom-made 2 x 10-mm site evaluation implant (SEI) with nanometer scale and oxidized surface (test) ( Evo Plan 1 Health s.r.l. - Amaro, UD, Italy), and one SEI with hydroxyapatite sandblasted surface (control) (Osseogrip Plan 1 Health s.r.l. – Amaro, UD, Italy), were placed in the posterior maxilla of 15 patients. Patients received one of each type of SEI placed on controlateral side. The proliferation rate studied by the MTT assay showed that during the incubation time, starting at 24 h, an increased proliferation rate was evident in Test B respect to Test A. After 2 months of unloaded healing BIC percent was significantly higher in oxidized implants. BIC percent mean values for the

  15. Characterization and H2-O2 reactivity of noble nano-metal tailored single wall nano-carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K Kaneko; T Itoh; E Bekyarova; H Kanoh; S Utsumi; H Tanaka; M Yudasaka; S Iijima; S Iijima

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Single wall carbon nano-tube (SWNT) and single wall carbon nano-horn (SWNH) have nano-spaces in their particles and the nano-spaces become open by oxidation. In particular, SWNH forms a unique colloidal structure which has micropores and meso-pores between the SWNH particles. Although non-treated SWNH colloids have quasi-one dimensional nano-pores [1], oxidized SWNH colloids have both of interstitial and internal nano-pores [2-5]. SWNH colloids show excellent supercritical methane storage ability [6], molecular sieving effect [7], and unique hydrogen adsorption characteristic [8]. Selective adsorptivity of SWNH colloids for H 2 and D 2 due to uncertainty principle of those molecules was shown [9-10]. As SWNH has no metallic impurities, we can study the effect of tailoring of metallic nano-particles on the surface activities of SWNH [11]. We tailored Pd or Pt nano-particles on SWNH and SWNH oxidized at 823 K (ox-SWNH) using poly[(2-oxo-pyrrolidine-1-yl)ethylene]. The oxidation of SWNH donates nano-scale windows to the single wall. The tailored metal amount was determined by TG analysis. TEM showed uniform dispersion of nano-metal particles of 2-3 nm in the diameter on SWNH. The nitrogen adsorption amount of SWNH oxidized decreases by tailoring, indicating that nano-particles are attached to the nano-scale windows. The electronic states of tailored metals were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface activities of Pd tailored SWNH and ox-SWNH were examined for the reaction of hydrogen and oxygen near room temperature. The catalytic reactivities of Pd tailored SWNH and ox-SWNH were 4 times greater than that of Pd-dispersed activated carbon. The temperature dependence of the surface activity will be discussed with the relevance to the tube porosity. References [1] T. Ohba et al, J. Phys. Chem. In press. [2] S. Utsumi et al, J. Phys. Chem. In press. [3] C.- Min Yang, et al. Adv. Mater. In press. [4]C.M. Yang, J

  16. How does a carnivore guild utilise a substantial but unpredictable anthropogenic food source? Scavenging on hunter-shot ungulate carcasses by wild dogs/dingoes, red foxes and feral cats in south-eastern Australia revealed by camera traps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Forsyth

    Full Text Available There is much interest in understanding how anthropogenic food resources subsidise carnivore populations. Carcasses of hunter-shot ungulates are a potentially substantial food source for mammalian carnivores. The sambar deer (Rusa unicolor is a large (≥ 150 kg exotic ungulate that can be hunted throughout the year in south-eastern Australia, and hunters are not required to remove or bury carcasses. We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo, red foxes (Vulpes vulpes and feral cats (Felis catus utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons (i.e. winter and spring. We placed carcasses at 1-km intervals along each of six transects that extended 4-km into forest from farm boundaries. Visits to carcasses were monitored using camera traps, and the rate of change in edible biomass estimated at ∼ 14-day intervals. Wild dogs and foxes fed on 70% and 60% of 30 carcasses, respectively, but feral cats seldom (10% fed on carcasses. Spatial and temporal patterns of visits to carcasses were consistent with the hypothesis that foxes avoid wild dogs. Wild dog activity peaked at carcasses 2 and 3 km from farms, a likely legacy of wild dog control, whereas fox activity peaked at carcasses 0 and 4 km from farms. Wild dog activity peaked at dawn and dusk, whereas nearly all fox activity occurred after dusk and before dawn. Neither wild dogs nor foxes remained at carcasses for long periods and the amount of feeding activity by either species was a less important predictor of the loss of edible biomass than season. Reasons for the low impacts of wild dogs and foxes on sambar deer carcass biomass include the spatially and temporally unpredictable distribution of carcasses in the landscape, the rapid rate of edible biomass decomposition in warm periods, low wild dog densities and the availability of alternative food resources.

  17. How does a carnivore guild utilise a substantial but unpredictable anthropogenic food source? Scavenging on hunter-shot ungulate carcasses by wild dogs/dingoes, red foxes and feral cats in south-eastern Australia revealed by camera traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, David M; Woodford, Luke; Moloney, Paul D; Hampton, Jordan O; Woolnough, Andrew P; Tucker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in understanding how anthropogenic food resources subsidise carnivore populations. Carcasses of hunter-shot ungulates are a potentially substantial food source for mammalian carnivores. The sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) is a large (≥ 150 kg) exotic ungulate that can be hunted throughout the year in south-eastern Australia, and hunters are not required to remove or bury carcasses. We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons (i.e. winter and spring). We placed carcasses at 1-km intervals along each of six transects that extended 4-km into forest from farm boundaries. Visits to carcasses were monitored using camera traps, and the rate of change in edible biomass estimated at ∼ 14-day intervals. Wild dogs and foxes fed on 70% and 60% of 30 carcasses, respectively, but feral cats seldom (10%) fed on carcasses. Spatial and temporal patterns of visits to carcasses were consistent with the hypothesis that foxes avoid wild dogs. Wild dog activity peaked at carcasses 2 and 3 km from farms, a likely legacy of wild dog control, whereas fox activity peaked at carcasses 0 and 4 km from farms. Wild dog activity peaked at dawn and dusk, whereas nearly all fox activity occurred after dusk and before dawn. Neither wild dogs nor foxes remained at carcasses for long periods and the amount of feeding activity by either species was a less important predictor of the loss of edible biomass than season. Reasons for the low impacts of wild dogs and foxes on sambar deer carcass biomass include the spatially and temporally unpredictable distribution of carcasses in the landscape, the rapid rate of edible biomass decomposition in warm periods, low wild dog densities and the availability of alternative food resources.

  18. How Does a Carnivore Guild Utilise a Substantial but Unpredictable Anthropogenic Food Source? Scavenging on Hunter-Shot Ungulate Carcasses by Wild Dogs/Dingoes, Red Foxes and Feral Cats in South-Eastern Australia Revealed by Camera Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, David M.; Woodford, Luke; Moloney, Paul D.; Hampton, Jordan O.; Woolnough, Andrew P.; Tucker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in understanding how anthropogenic food resources subsidise carnivore populations. Carcasses of hunter-shot ungulates are a potentially substantial food source for mammalian carnivores. The sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) is a large (≥150 kg) exotic ungulate that can be hunted throughout the year in south-eastern Australia, and hunters are not required to remove or bury carcasses. We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons (i.e. winter and spring). We placed carcasses at 1-km intervals along each of six transects that extended 4-km into forest from farm boundaries. Visits to carcasses were monitored using camera traps, and the rate of change in edible biomass estimated at ∼14-day intervals. Wild dogs and foxes fed on 70% and 60% of 30 carcasses, respectively, but feral cats seldom (10%) fed on carcasses. Spatial and temporal patterns of visits to carcasses were consistent with the hypothesis that foxes avoid wild dogs. Wild dog activity peaked at carcasses 2 and 3 km from farms, a likely legacy of wild dog control, whereas fox activity peaked at carcasses 0 and 4 km from farms. Wild dog activity peaked at dawn and dusk, whereas nearly all fox activity occurred after dusk and before dawn. Neither wild dogs nor foxes remained at carcasses for long periods and the amount of feeding activity by either species was a less important predictor of the loss of edible biomass than season. Reasons for the low impacts of wild dogs and foxes on sambar deer carcass biomass include the spatially and temporally unpredictable distribution of carcasses in the landscape, the rapid rate of edible biomass decomposition in warm periods, low wild dog densities and the availability of alternative food resources. PMID:24918425

  19. Direct observation of nanometer-scale amorphous layers and oxide crystallites at grain boundaries in polycrystalline Sr1−xKxFe2As2 superconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Lei

    2011-06-01

    We report here an atomic resolution study of the structure and composition of the grain boundaries in polycrystallineSr0.6K0.4Fe2As2superconductor. A large fraction of grain boundaries contain amorphous layers larger than the coherence length, while some others contain nanometer-scale crystallites sandwiched in between amorphous layers. We also find that there is significant oxygen enrichment at the grain boundaries. Such results explain the relatively low transport critical current density (Jc) of polycrystalline samples with respect to that of bicrystal films.

  20. Synthesis of nanometer-size inorganic materials for the examination of particle size effects on heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Sean Christian

    The effect of acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation on the precipitation of inorganic catalytic materials, specifically titania supported gold, was investigated. The overall objective was to understand the fundamental factors involved in synthesizing nanometer-size catalytic materials in the 1--10 nm range in a cavitating field. Materials with grain sizes in this range have been associated with enhanced catalytic activity compared to larger grain size materials. A new chemical approach was used to produce titania supported gold by co-precipitation with higher gold yields compared to other synthesis methods. Using this approach, it was determined that acoustic cavitation was unable to influence the gold mean crystallite size compared to non-sonicated catalysts. However, gold concentration on the catalysts was found to be very important for CO oxidation activity. By decreasing the gold concentration from a weight loading of 0.50% down to approximately 0.05%, the rate of reaction per mole of gold was found to increase by a factor of 19. Hydrodynamic cavitation at low pressures (6.9--48 bar) was determined to have no effect on gold crystallite size at a fixed gold content for the same precipitation technique used in the acoustic cavitation studies. By changing the chemistry of the precipitation system, however, it was found that a synergy existed between the dilution of the gold precursor solution, the orifice diameter, and the reducing agent addition rate. Individually, these factors were found to have little effect and only their interaction allowed gold grain size control in the range of 8--80 nm. Further modification of the system chemistry and the use of hydrodynamic cavitation at pressures in excess of 690 bar allowed the systematic control of gold crystallite size in the range of 2--9 nm for catalysts containing 2.27 +/- 0.17% gold. In addition, it was shown that the enhanced mixing due to cavitation led to larger gold yields compared to classical syntheses. The

  1. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.; Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2008-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA s Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This report specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as a final report for that internship. The topics discussed include: the documentation of REVEAL source code; the migration of REVEAL to other platforms; and an end-to-end field test that successfully validates the efforts.

  2. Passive behavior of a bulk nanostructured 316L austenitic stainless steel consisting of nanometer-sized grains with embedded nano-twin bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tianshu; Liu, Li; Zhang, Bin; Li, Ying; Yan, Fengkai; Tao, Nairong; Wang, Fuhui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanometer-grains (NG) and bundles of nano-twins (NT) is synthesized in 316L. • (NG + NT) and NT enhance the concentration of active Fe Fe in the passive film. • (NG + NT) and NT enhance the passive ability. • A Cr 0 -enriched layer forms at the passive film/metal interface. - Abstract: The passive behavior of a bulk nanostructured 316L austenitic stainless steel consisting of nanometer-sized grains (NG) and nano-twin bundles (NT) are investigated. The electrochemical results indicate that the spontaneous passivation ability and growth rate of passive film are improved. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that a Cr 0 -enriched layer forms at the passive film/metal interface. More nucleation sites afforded by the nanostructures and the enhanced diffusion rate of charged species across the passive film are believed to be responsible for the improved passive ability. The PDM model is introduced to elaborate the microscopic process of passivation

  3. Computational evaluation of sub-nanometer cluster activity of singly exposed copper atom with various coordinative environment in catalytic CO2 transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Ramasamy; Thamaraichelvan, Arunachalam; Ganesan, Tharumeya Kuppusamy; Viswanathan, Balasubramanian

    2017-02-01

    Metal cluster, at sub-nanometer level has a unique property in the activation of small molecules, in contrast to that of bulk surface. In the present work, singly exposed active site of copper metal cluster at sub-nanometer level was designed to arrive at the energy minimised configurations, binding energy, electrostatic potential map, frontier molecular orbitals and partial density of states. The ab initio molecular dynamics was carried out to probe the catalytic nature of the cluster. Further, the stability of the metal cluster and its catalytic activity in the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO were evaluated by means of computational hydrogen electrode via calculation of the free energy profile using DFT/B3LYP level of theory in vacuum. The activity of the cluster is ascertained from the fact that the copper atom, present in a two coordinative environment, performs a more selective conversion of CO2 to CO at an applied potential of -0.35 V which is comparatively lower than that of higher coordinative sites. The present study helps to design any sub-nano level metal catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 to various value added chemicals.

  4. The Synergistic Effect of Leukocyte Platelet-Rich Fibrin and Micrometer/Nanometer Surface Texturing on Bone Healing around Immediately Placed Implants: An Experimental Study in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Rodrigo F.; Gil, Luiz Fernando; Tovar, Nick; Janal, Malvin N.; Marao, Heloisa Fonseca; Pinto, Nelson; Coelho, Paulo G.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. This study evaluated the effects of L-PRF presence and implant surface texture on bone healing around immediately placed implants. Methods. The first mandibular molars of 8 beagle dogs were bilaterally extracted, and implants (Blossom™, Intra-Lock International, Boca Raton, FL) were placed in the mesial or distal extraction sockets in an interpolated fashion per animal. Two implant surfaces were distributed per sockets: (1) dual acid-etched (DAE, micrometer scale textured) and (2) micrometer/nanometer scale textured (Ossean™ surface). L-PRF (Intraspin system, Intra-Lock International) was placed in a split-mouth design to fill the macrogap between implant and socket walls on one side of the mandible. The contralateral side received implants without L-PRF. A mixed-model ANOVA (at α = 0.05) evaluated the effect of implant surface, presence of L-PRF, and socket position (mesial or distal), individually or in combination on bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO). Results. BAFO values were significantly higher for the Ossean relative to the DAE surface on the larger mesial socket. The presence of L-PRF resulted in higher BAFO. The Ossean surface and L-PRF presence resulted in significantly higher BAFO. Conclusion. L-PRF and the micro-/nanometer scale textured surface resulted in increased bone formation around immediately placed implants. PMID:28042577

  5. The Synergistic Effect of Leukocyte Platelet-Rich Fibrin and Micrometer/Nanometer Surface Texturing on Bone Healing around Immediately Placed Implants: An Experimental Study in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo F. Neiva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. This study evaluated the effects of L-PRF presence and implant surface texture on bone healing around immediately placed implants. Methods. The first mandibular molars of 8 beagle dogs were bilaterally extracted, and implants (Blossom™, Intra-Lock International, Boca Raton, FL were placed in the mesial or distal extraction sockets in an interpolated fashion per animal. Two implant surfaces were distributed per sockets: (1 dual acid-etched (DAE, micrometer scale textured and (2 micrometer/nanometer scale textured (Ossean™ surface. L-PRF (Intraspin system, Intra-Lock International was placed in a split-mouth design to fill the macrogap between implant and socket walls on one side of the mandible. The contralateral side received implants without L-PRF. A mixed-model ANOVA (at α=0.05 evaluated the effect of implant surface, presence of L-PRF, and socket position (mesial or distal, individually or in combination on bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO. Results. BAFO values were significantly higher for the Ossean relative to the DAE surface on the larger mesial socket. The presence of L-PRF resulted in higher BAFO. The Ossean surface and L-PRF presence resulted in significantly higher BAFO. Conclusion. L-PRF and the micro-/nanometer scale textured surface resulted in increased bone formation around immediately placed implants.

  6. Source Water Protection Contaminant Sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Simplified aggregation of potential contaminant sources used for Source Water Assessment and Protection. The data is derived from IDNR, IDALS, and US EPA program...

  7. Accessing vs Sourcing Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awate, Snehal; Larsen, Marcus M.; Mudambi, Ram

    2015-01-01

    to get on par with industry leaders. An in-depth comparison of knowledge flows reveals that within AMNEs, headquarters often serves the primary source of knowledge for R&D subsidiaries. In contrast, within EMNEs, headquarters accesses knowledge from R&D subsidiaries in advanced economies for innovation...

  8. Positron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, R.

    1994-01-01

    A tentative survey of positron sources is given. Physical processes on which positron generation is based are indicated and analyzed. Explanation of the general features of electromagnetic interactions and nuclear β + decay makes it possible to predict the yield and emittance for a given optical matching system between the positron source and the accelerator. Some kinds of matching systems commonly used - mainly working with solenoidal field - are studied and the acceptance volume calculated. Such knowledge is helpful in comparing different matching systems. Since for large machines, a significant distance exists between the positron source and the experimental facility, positron emittance has to be preserved during beam transfer over large distances and methods used for that purpose are indicated. Comparison of existing positron sources leads to extrapolation to sources for future linear colliders. Some new ideas associated with these sources are also presented. (orig.)

  9. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  10. Sources management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoux, H.; Gourmelon; Scanff, P.; Fournet, F.; Murith, Ch.; Saint-Paul, N.; Colson, P.; Jouve, A.; Feron, F.; Haranger, D.; Mathieu, P.; Paycha, F.; Israel, S.; Auboiroux, B.; Chartier, P.

    2005-01-01

    Organized by the section of technical protection of the French society of radiation protection ( S.F.R.P.), these two days had for objective to review the evolution of the rule relative to the sources of ionising radiations 'sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, electric generators'. They addressed all the actors concerned by the implementation of the new regulatory system in the different sectors of activities ( research, medicine and industry): Authorities, manufacturers, and suppliers of sources, holders and users, bodies involved in the approval of sources, carriers. (N.C.)

  11. Low-cost, high-precision micro-lensed optical fiber providing deep-micrometer to deep-nanometer-level light focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Sy-Bor; Sundaram, Vijay M; McBride, Daniel; Yang, Yu

    2016-04-15

    A new type of micro-lensed optical fiber through stacking appropriate high-refractive microspheres at designed locations with respect to the cleaved end of an optical fiber is numerically and experimentally demonstrated. This new type of micro-lensed optical fiber can be precisely constructed with low cost and high speed. Deep micrometer-scale and submicrometer-scale far-field light spots can be achieved when the optical fibers are multimode and single mode, respectively. By placing an appropriate teardrop dielectric nanoscale scatterer at the far-field spot of this new type of micro-lensed optical fiber, a deep-nanometer near-field spot can also be generated with high intensity and minimum joule heating, which is valuable in high-speed, high-resolution, and high-power nanoscale detection compared with traditional near-field optical fibers containing a significant portion of metallic material.

  12. Frontier of nanometer devices. Part 2. Trends in nanostructure fabrication technology. Nanometa debaisu kenkyu saizensen. 2. Nanometa bisai kako gijutsu no genjo to tenbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, S [NEC Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-06-20

    Nanometer fabrication technology shows a remarkable progress. Conventional electric beam enables 10 nm lithography and the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) enable fabrication below 10 nm even to the level of atom and molecule manipulation. This paper describes the recent trends in nanotechnology (nanolithography and nano dry etching) by the use of electron and ion beams. In the atom technology by the use of STM, studies are in progress on processing with atomic force, electric field evaporation and chemical reaction. Moreover, this paper describes recent development in nano natural lithography, self-formation lithography, atomic layer lithography and nanolithography using electron beam holography. The present state and future prospects are discussed. 31 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Imaging Live Cells at the Nanometer-Scale with Single-Molecule Microscopy: Obstacles and Achievements in Experiment Optimization for Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Beth L.; Matson, Jyl S.; DiRita, Victor J.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy enables biological investigations inside living cells to achieve millisecond- and nanometer-scale resolution. Although single-molecule-based methods are becoming increasingly accessible to non-experts, optimizing new single-molecule experiments can be challenging, in particular when super-resolution imaging and tracking are applied to live cells. In this review, we summarize common obstacles to live-cell single-molecule microscopy and describe the methods we have developed and applied to overcome these challenges in live bacteria. We examine the choice of fluorophore and labeling scheme, approaches to achieving single-molecule levels of fluorescence, considerations for maintaining cell viability, and strategies for detecting single-molecule signals in the presence of noise and sample drift. We also discuss methods for analyzing single-molecule trajectories and the challenges presented by the finite size of a bacterial cell and the curvature of the bacterial membrane. PMID:25123183

  14. Imaging Nanometer Phase Coexistence at Defects During the Insulator-Metal Phase Transformation in VO2 Thin Films by Resonant Soft X-ray Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidas, Luciana; Günther, Christian M; Miller, Timothy A; Pfau, Bastian; Perez-Salinas, Daniel; Martínez, Elías; Schneider, Michael; Gührs, Erik; Gargiani, Pierluigi; Valvidares, Manuel; Marvel, Robert E; Hallman, Kent A; Haglund, Richard F; Eisebitt, Stefan; Wall, Simon

    2018-05-18

    We use resonant soft X-ray holography to image the insulator-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with element and polarization specificity and nanometer spatial resolution. We observe that nanoscale inhomogeneity in the film results in spatial-dependent transition pathways between the insulating and metallic states. Additional nanoscale phases form in the vicinity of defects which are not apparent in the initial or final states of the system, which would be missed in area-integrated X-ray absorption measurements. These intermediate phases are vital to understand the phase transition in VO 2 , and our results demonstrate how resonant imaging can be used to understand the electronic properties of phase-separated correlated materials obtained by X-ray absorption.

  15. Development of X-Y servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuators for position control with high response, large stroke and nanometer accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to develop a X-Y dual-axial intelligent servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuator for position control with high response, large stroke (250 mm, 200 mm) and nanometer accuracy (20 nm). In each axis, the rodless pneumatic actuator serves to position in coarse stroke and the piezoelectric actuator compensates in fine stroke. Thus, the overall control systems of the single axis become a dual-input single-output (DISO) system. Although the rodless pneumatic actuator has relatively larger friction force, it has the advantage of mechanism for multi-axial development. Thus, the X-Y dual-axial positioning system is developed based on the servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuator. In addition, the decoupling self-organizing fuzzy sliding mode control is developed as the intelligent control strategies. Finally, the proposed novel intelligent X-Y dual-axial servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuators are implemented and verified experimentally.

  16. Development of X-Y Servo Pneumatic-Piezoelectric Hybrid Actuators for Position Control with High Response, Large Stroke and Nanometer Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Hsiung Chiang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop a X-Y dual-axial intelligent servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuator for position control with high response, large stroke (250 mm, 200 mm and nanometer accuracy (20 nm. In each axis, the rodless pneumatic actuator serves to position in coarse stroke and the piezoelectric actuator compensates in fine stroke. Thus, the overall control systems of the single axis become a dual-input single-output (DISO system. Although the rodless pneumatic actuator has relatively larger friction force, it has the advantage of mechanism for multi-axial development. Thus, the X-Y dual-axial positioning system is developed based on the servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuator. In addition, the decoupling self-organizing fuzzy sliding mode control is developed as the intelligent control strategies. Finally, the proposed novel intelligent X-Y dual-axial servo pneumatic-piezoelectric hybrid actuators are implemented and verified experimentally.

  17. Nanometer-scale, quantitative composition mappings of InGaN layers from a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantzas, K; Voss, P L; Ougazzaden, A; Patriarche, G; Largeau, L; Mauguin, O; Troadec, D; Gautier, S; Moudakir, T; Suresh, S

    2012-01-01

    Using elastic scattering theory we show that a small set of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) measurements is sufficient to experimentally evaluate the scattering function of electrons in high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission microscopy (HAADF-STEM). We then demonstrate how to use this function to transform qualitative HAADF-STEM images of InGaN layers into precise, quantitative chemical maps of the indium composition. The maps obtained in this way combine the resolution of HAADF-STEM and the chemical precision of EDX. We illustrate the potential of such chemical maps by using them to investigate nanometer-scale fluctuations in the indium composition and their impact on the growth of epitaxial InGaN layers. (paper)

  18. Computational evaluation of sub-nanometer cluster activity of singly exposed copper atom with various coordinative environment in catalytic CO{sub 2} transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, Ramasamy [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625 009 (India); National Center for Catalysis Research, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600 036 (India); Thamaraichelvan, Arunachalam [Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chettinad Hospital & Research Institute, Kelambakkam, Tamilnadu 603 103 (India); Ganesan, Tharumeya Kuppusamy [Department of Chemistry, The American College, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625 002 (India); Viswanathan, Balasubramanian, E-mail: bvnathan@iitm.ac.in [National Center for Catalysis Research, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600 036 (India)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • On interaction with adsorbate CO{sub 2,} the adsorbent changes its configuration around the metal. • Electron transfer is faster in low coordinative environment of Cu. • CO formation is more favorable on Cu sites with even coordination number. • Cu at coordination number two has a over potential of −0.35 V. - Abstract: Metal cluster, at sub-nanometer level has a unique property in the activation of small molecules, in contrast to that of bulk surface. In the present work, singly exposed active site of copper metal cluster at sub-nanometer level was designed to arrive at the energy minimised configurations, binding energy, electrostatic potential map, frontier molecular orbitals and partial density of states. The ab initio molecular dynamics was carried out to probe the catalytic nature of the cluster. Further, the stability of the metal cluster and its catalytic activity in the electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to CO were evaluated by means of computational hydrogen electrode via calculation of the free energy profile using DFT/B3LYP level of theory in vacuum. The activity of the cluster is ascertained from the fact that the copper atom, present in a two coordinative environment, performs a more selective conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO at an applied potential of −0.35 V which is comparatively lower than that of higher coordinative sites. The present study helps to design any sub-nano level metal catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to various value added chemicals.

  19. Characterization of nanometer-thick polycrystalline silicon with phonon-boundary scattering enhanced thermoelectric properties and its application in infrared sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huchuan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Lee, Chengkuo

    2015-01-14

    Although significantly reducing the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires has been reported, it remains a challenge to integrate silicon nanowires with structure materials and electrodes in the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. In this paper, we investigated the thermal conductivity of nanometer-thick polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) theoretically and experimentally. By leveraging the phonon-boundary scattering, the thermal conductivity of 52 nm thick poly-Si was measured as low as around 12 W mK(-1) which is only about 10% of the value of bulk single crystalline silicon. The ZT of n-doped and p-doped 52 nm thick poly-Si was measured as 0.067 and 0.024, respectively, while most previously reported data had values of about 0.02 and 0.01 for a poly-Si layer with a thickness of 0.5 μm and above. Thermopile infrared sensors comprising 128 pairs of thermocouples made of either n-doped or p-doped nanometer-thick poly-Si strips in a series connected by an aluminium (Al) metal interconnect layer are fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology. The measured vacuum specific detectivity (D*) of the n-doped and p-doped thermopile infrared (IR) sensors are 3.00 × 10(8) and 1.83 × 10(8) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) for sensors of 52 nm thick poly-Si, and 5.75 × 10(7) and 3.95 × 10(7) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) for sensors of 300 nm thick poly-Si, respectively. The outstanding thermoelectric properties indicate our approach is promising for diverse applications using ultrathin poly-Si technology.

  20. Sourcing Excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi

    2011-01-01

    Sourcing Excellence is one of the key performance indicators (KPIs) in this world of ever changing sourcing strategies. Manufacturing companies need to access and diagnose the reliability and competencies of existing suppliers in order to coordinate and develop them. This would help in managing...

  1. Revealing the Maximum Strength in Nanotwinned Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, L.; Chen, X.; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2009-01-01

    boundary–related processes. We investigated the maximum strength of nanotwinned copper samples with different twin thicknesses. We found that the strength increases with decreasing twin thickness, reaching a maximum at 15 nanometers, followed by a softening at smaller values that is accompanied by enhanced...

  2. Positron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, R.

    1989-01-01

    A tentative survey of positron sources is given. Physical processes on which positron generation is based are indicated and analyzed. Explanation of the general features of electromagnetic interactions and nuclear β + decay makes it possible to predict the yield and emittance for a given optical matching system between the positron source and the accelerator. Some kinds of matching systems commonly used - mainly working with solenoidal fields - are studied and the acceptance volume calculated. Such knowledge is helpful in comparing different matching systems. Since for large machines, a significant distance exists between the positron source and the experimental facility, positron emittance has to be preserved during beam transfer over large distances and methods used for that purpose are indicated. Comparison of existing positron sources leads to extrapolation to sources for future linear colliders

  3. Revealing Insights from Data

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Urbon, Pere

    2015-01-01

    data for extreme read/write deployments. About the speakers Pere Urbon is a software engineer at Elastic and prolific open source contributor. He’s spent more than a decade as a technologist, honing his love of data and databases as a researcher and coder. Pere has also spoken at many conferences worldwide, with a particu...

  4. Nucleation and growth mechanism for flame synthesis of MoO2 hollow microchannels with nanometer wall thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchan-Merchan, Wilson; Saveliev, Alexei V; Taylor, Aaron M

    2009-12-01

    The growth and morphological evolution of molybdenum-oxide microstructures formed in the high temperature environment of a counter-flow oxy-fuel flame using molybdenum probes is studied. Experiments conducted using various probe retention times show the sequence of the morphological changes. The morphological row begins with micron size objects exhibiting polygonal cubic shape, develops into elongated channels, changes to large structures with leaf-like shape, and ends in dendritic structures. Time of probe-flame interaction is found to be a governing parameter controlling the wide variety of morphological patterns; a molecular level growth mechanism is attributed to their development. This study reveals that the structures are grown in several consecutive stages: material "evaporation and transportation", "transformation", "nucleation", "initial growth", "intermediate growth", and "final growth". XRD analysis shows that the chemical compositions of all structures correspond to MoO(2).

  5. Observation of enhanced infrared absorption in silicon supersaturated with gold by pulsed laser melting of nanometer-thick gold films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Philippe K.; Yang, Wenjie; Hudspeth, Quentin; Lim, Shao Qi; Williams, Jim S.; Warrender, Jeffrey M.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate that pulsed laser melting (PLM) of thin 1, 5, and 10 nm-thick vapor-deposited gold layers on silicon enhances its room-temperature sub-band gap infrared absorption, as in the case of ion-implanted and PLM-treated silicon. The former approach offers reduced fabrication complexity and avoids implantation-induced lattice damage compared to ion implantation and pulsed laser melting, while exhibiting comparable optical absorptance. We additionally observed strong broadband absorptance enhancement in PLM samples made using 5- and 10-nm-thick gold layers. Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering analysis indicate that such an enhancement could be explained by absorption by a metastable, disordered and gold-rich surface layer. The sheet resistance and the diode electrical characteristics further elucidate the role of gold-supersaturation in silicon, revealing the promise for future silicon-based infrared device applications.

  6. Study of crystalline thin films and nanofibers by means of the laser–plasma EUV-source based microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachulak, P.W.; Bartnik, A.; Baranowska-Korczyc, A.; Pánek, D.; Brůža, P.; Kostecki, J.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Jarocki, R.; Szczurek, M.; Fronc, K.; Elbaum, D.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2013-01-01

    New developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology require nanometer scale resolution imaging tools and techniques such as an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) microscopy, based on Fresnel zone plates. In this paper, we report on applications of a desk-top microscopy using a laser-plasma EUV source based on a gas-puff target for studies of morphology of thin silicon membranes coated with NaCl crystals and samples composed of ZnO nanofibers

  7. Direct observation and analysis of york-shell materials using low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy: Nanometal-particles encapsulated in metal-oxide, carbon, and polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Asahina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanometal particles show characteristic features in chemical and physical properties depending on their sizes and shapes. For keeping and further enhancing their features, the particles should be protected from coalescence or degradation. One approach is to encapsulate the nanometal particles inside pores with chemically inert or functional materials, such as carbon, polymer, and metal oxides, which contain mesopores to allow permeation of only chemicals not the nanometal particles. Recently developed low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was applied to the study of structural, chemical, and electron state of both nanometal particles and encapsulating materials in york-shell materials of Au@C, Ru/Pt@C, Au@TiO2, and Pt@Polymer. Progresses in the following categories were shown for the york-shell materials: (i resolution of topographic image contrast by secondary electrons, of atomic-number contrast by back-scattered electrons, and of elemental mapping by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy; (ii sample preparation for observing internal structures; and (iii X-ray spectroscopy such as soft X-ray emission spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was also used for characterization of Au@C.

  8. Direct observation and analysis of yolk-shell materials using low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy: Nanometal-particles encapsulated in metal-oxide, carbon, and polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asahina, Shunsuke; Suga, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Hideyuki [JEOL Ltd., SM Business Unit, Tokyo (Japan); Young Jeong, Hu [Graduate School of EEWS, WCU/BK21+, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Galeano, Carolina; Schüth, Ferdi [Department of Heterogeneous Catalysis, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Mülheim (Germany); Terasaki, Osamu, E-mail: terasaki@mmk.su.se, E-mail: terasaki@kaist.ac.kr [Graduate School of EEWS, WCU/BK21+, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Berzelii Centre EXSELENT on Porous Materials, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-11-01

    Nanometal particles show characteristic features in chemical and physical properties depending on their sizes and shapes. For keeping and further enhancing their features, the particles should be protected from coalescence or degradation. One approach is to encapsulate the nanometal particles inside pores with chemically inert or functional materials, such as carbon, polymer, and metal oxides, which contain mesopores to allow permeation of only chemicals not the nanometal particles. Recently developed low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was applied to the study of structural, chemical, and electron state of both nanometal particles and encapsulating materials in yolk-shell materials of Au@C, Ru/Pt@C, Au@TiO{sub 2}, and Pt@Polymer. Progresses in the following categories were shown for the yolk-shell materials: (i) resolution of topographic image contrast by secondary electrons, of atomic-number contrast by back-scattered electrons, and of elemental mapping by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy; (ii) sample preparation for observing internal structures; and (iii) X-ray spectroscopy such as soft X-ray emission spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was also used for characterization of Au@C.

  9. Peri-Implant Endosseous Healing Properties of Dual Acid-Etched Mini-Implants with a Nanometer-Sized Deposition of CaP : A Histological and Histomorphometric Human Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telleman, Gerdien; Albrektsson, Tomas; Hoffman, Maria; Johansson, Carina B.; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this histological and histomorphometric study was to compare the early peri-implant endosseous healing properties of a dual acid-etched (DAE) surface (Osseotite (R), Implant Innovations Inc., Palm Beach Gardens, FL, USA) with a DAE surface modified with nanometer-sized calcium

  10. Nanometer size diesel exhaust particles are selectively toxic to dopaminergic neurons: the role of microglia, phagocytosis, and NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, M L; Wu, X; Pei, Z; Li, G; Wang, T; Qin, L; Wilson, B; Yang, J; Hong, J S; Veronesi, B

    2004-10-01

    The contributing role of environmental factors to the development of Parkinson's disease has become increasingly evident. We report that mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures treated with diesel exhaust particles (DEP; 0.22 microM) (5-50 microg/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in dopaminergic (DA) neurons, as determined by DA-uptake assay and tyrosine-hydroxylase immunocytochemistry (ICC). The selective toxicity of DEP for DA neurons was demonstrated by the lack of DEP effect on both GABA uptake and Neu-N immunoreactive cell number. The critical role of microglia was demonstrated by the failure of neuron-enriched cultures to exhibit DEP-induced DA neurotoxicity, where DEP-induced DA neuron death was reinstated with the addition of microglia to neuron-enriched cultures. OX-42 ICC staining of DEP treated neuron-glia cultures revealed changes in microglia morphology indicative of activation. Intracellular reactive oxygen species and superoxide were produced from enriched-microglia cultures in response to DEP. Neuron-glia cultures from NADPH oxidase deficient (PHOX-/-) mice were insensitive to DEP neurotoxicity when compared with control mice (PHOX+/+). Cytochalasin D inhibited DEP-induced superoxide production in enriched-microglia cultures, implying that DEP must be phagocytized by microglia to produce superoxide. Together, these in vitro data indicate that DEP selectively damages DA neurons through the phagocytic activation of microglial NADPH oxidase and consequent oxidative insult.

  11. Junction Quality of SnO2-Based Perovskite Solar Cells Investigated by Nanometer-Scale Electrical Potential Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chuanxiao; Wang, Changlei; Ke, Weijun; Gorman, Brian P; Ye, Jichun; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Yan, Yanfa; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M

    2017-11-08

    Electron-selective layers (ESLs) and hole-selective layers (HSLs) are critical in high-efficiency organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite (PS) solar cells for charge-carrier transport, separation, and collection. We developed a procedure to assess the quality of the ESL/PS junction by measuring potential distribution on the cross section of SnO 2 -based PS solar cells using Kelvin probe force microscopy. Using the potential profiling, we compared three types of cells made of different ESLs but otherwise having an identical device structure: (1) cells with PS deposited directly on bare fluorine-doped SnO 2 (FTO)-coated glass; (2) cells with an intrinsic SnO 2 thin layer on the top of FTO as an effective ESL; and (3) cells with the SnO 2 ESL and adding a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of fullerene. The results reveal two major potential drops or electric fields at the ESL/PS and PS/HSL interfaces. The electric-field ratio between the ESL/PS and PS/HSL interfaces increased in devices as follows: FTO ESL ESL cells may result from the reduction in voltage loss at the PS/HSL back interface and the improvement of V oc from the prevention of hole recombination at the ESL/PS front interface. The further improvements with adding an SAM is caused by the defect passivation at the ESL/PS interface, and hence, improvement of the junction quality. These nanoelectrical findings suggest possibilities for improving the device performance by further optimizing the SnO 2 -based ESL material quality and the ESL/PS interface.

  12. Naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide layer-based transistors with nanometer oxide and side chain dielectrics operating below one volt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Byung Jun; Martinez Hardigree, Josue F; Dhar, Bal Mukund; Dawidczyk, Thomas J; Sun, Jia; See, Kevin Cua; Katz, Howard E

    2011-04-26

    We designed a new naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide (NTCDI) semiconductor molecule with long fluoroalkylbenzyl side chains. The side chains, 1.2 nm long, not only aid in self-assembly and kinetically stabilize injected electrons but also act as part of the gate dielectric in field-effect transistors. On Si substrates coated only with the 2 nm thick native oxide, NTCDI semiconductor films were deposited with thicknesses from 17 to 120 nm. Top contact Au electrodes were deposited as sources and drains. The devices showed good transistor characteristics in air with 0.1-1 μA of drain current at 0.5 V of V(G) and V(DS) and W/L of 10-20, even though channel width (250 μm) is over 1000 times the distance (20 nm) between gate and drain electrodes. The extracted capacitance-times-mobility product, an expression of the sheet transconductance, can exceed 100 nS V(-1), 2 orders of magnitude higher than typical organic transistors. The vertical low-frequency capacitance with gate voltage applied in the accumulation regime reached as high as 650 nF/cm(2), matching the harmonic sum of capacitances of the native oxide and one side chain and indicating that some gate-induced carriers in such devices are distributed among all of the NTCDI core layers, although the preponderance of the carriers are still near the gate electrode. Besides demonstrating and analyzing thickness-dependent NTCDI-based transistor behavior, we also showed <1 V detection of dinitrotoluene vapor by such transistors.

  13. Neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap

  14. Crowd Sourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has contributed new words and slang to our daily vernacular. A few terms, such as tweeting, texting, sexting, blogging, and googling, have become common in most vocabularies and in many languages, and are now included in the dictionary. A new buzzword making the rounds in industry is crowd sourcing, which involves outsourcing an activity, task, or problem by sending it to people or groups outside a business or a practice. Crowd sourcing allows doctors and practices to tap the wisdom of many instead of relying only on the few members of their close-knit group. This article defines "crowd sourcing," offers examples, and explains how to get started with this approach that can increase your ability to finish a task or solve problems that you don't have the time or expertise to accomplish.

  15. Revealing the programming process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens; Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important goals of an introductory programming course is that the students learn a systematic approach to the development of computer programs. Revealing the programming process is an important part of this; however, textbooks do not address the issue -- probably because...... the textbook medium is static and therefore ill-suited to expose the process of programming. We have found that process recordings in the form of captured narrated programming sessions are a simple, cheap, and efficient way of providing the revelation.We identify seven different elements of the programming...

  16. TypeScript revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Maharry, Dan

    2013-01-01

    TypeScript Revealed is a quick 100-page guide to Anders Hejlsberg's new take on JavaScript. With this brief, fast-paced introduction to TypeScript, .NET, Web and Windows 8 application developers who are already familiar with JavaScript will easily get up to speed with TypeScript and decide whether or not to start incorporating it into their own development. TypeScript is 'JavaScript for Application-scale development'; a superset of JavaScript that brings to it an additional object-oriented-like syntax familiar to .NET programmers that compiles down into simple, clean JavaScript that any browse

  17. Energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, Gy.

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive review is presented of the available sources of energy in the world is presented. About 80 percent of primary energy utilization is based on fossile fuels, and their dominant role is not expected to change in the foreseeable future. Data are given on petroleum, natural gas and coal based power production. The role and economic aspects of nuclear power are analyzed. A brief summary of renewable energy sources is presented. The future prospects of the world's energy resources are discussed, and the special position of Hungary regarding fossil, nuclear and renewable energy and the country's energy potential is evaluated. (R.P.)

  18. Continuous scanning of the mobility and size distribution of charged clusters and nanometer particles in atmospheric air and the Balanced Scanning Mobility Analyzer BSMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammet, H.

    2006-12-01

    Measuring of charged nanometer particles in atmospheric air is a routine task in research on atmospheric electricity, where these particles are called the atmospheric ions. An aspiration condenser is the most popular instrument for measuring atmospheric ions. Continuous scanning of a mobility distribution is possible when the aspiration condenser is connected as an arm of a balanced bridge. Transfer function of an aspiration condenser is calculated according to the measurements of geometric dimensions, air flow rate, driving voltage, and electric current. The most complicated phase of the calibration is the estimation of the inlet loss of ions due to the Brownian deposition. The available models of ion deposition on the protective inlet screen and the inlet control electrofilter have the uncertainty of about 20%. To keep the uncertainty of measurements low the adsorption should not exceed a few tens of percent. The online conversion of the mobility distribution to the size distribution and a correct reduction of inlet losses are possible when air temperature and pressure are measured simultaneously with the mobility distribution. Two instruments called the Balanced Scanning Mobility Analyzers (BSMA) were manufactured and tested in routine atmospheric measurements. The concentration of atmospheric ions of the size of about a few nanometers is very low and a high air flow rate is required to collect enough of ion current. The air flow of 52 l/s exceeds the air flow in usual aerosol instruments by 2-3 orders of magnitude. The high flow rate reduces the time of ion passage to 60 ms and the heating of air in an analyzer to 0.2 K, which suppresses a possible transformation of ions inside the instrument. The mobility range of the BSMA of 0.032-3.2 cm 2 V - 1 s - 1 is logarithmically uniformly divided into 16 fractions. The size distribution is presented by 12 fractions in the diameter range of 0.4-7.5 nm. The measurement noise of a fraction concentration is typically

  19. Reduction of Bacterial Pathogens and Potential Surrogates on the Surface of Almonds Using High-Intensity 405-Nanometer Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Alison; Niemira, Brendan A; Sites, Joseph; Boyd, Glenn; Gurtler, Joshua B; Tyrell, Breanna; Fleck, Melissa

    2016-11-01

    The disinfecting properties of high-intensity monochromatic blue light (MBL) were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella , and nonpathogenic bacteria inoculated onto the surface of almonds. MBL was generated from an array of narrow-band 405-nm light-emitting diodes. Almonds were inoculated with higher or lower levels (8 or 5 CFU/g) of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella , as well as nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 and an avirulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium, for evaluation as potential surrogates for their respective pathogens. Inoculated almonds were treated with MBL for 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 min at a working distance of 7 cm. Simultaneous to treatment, cooling air was directed onto the almonds at a rate of 4 ft 3 /min (1.89 ×10 -3 m 3 /s), sourced through a container of dry ice. An infrared camera was used to monitor the temperature readings after each run. For E. coli K-12, reductions of up to 1.85 or 1.63 log CFU/g were seen for higher and lower inoculum levels, respectively; reductions up to 2.44 and 1.44 log CFU/g were seen for E. coli O157:H7 (higher and lower inoculation levels, respectively). Attenuated Salmonella was reduced by up to 0.54 and 0.97 log CFU/g, whereas pathogenic Salmonella was reduced by up to 0.70 and 0.55 log CFU/g (higher and lower inoculation levels, respectively). Inoculation level did not significantly impact minimum effective treatment times, which ranged from 1 to 4 min. Temperatures remained below ambient throughout treatment, indicating that MBL is a nonthermal antimicrobial process. The nonpathogenic strains of E. coli and Salmonella each responded to MBL in a comparable manner to their pathogenic counterparts. These results suggest that these nonpathogenic strains may be useful in experiments with MBL in which a surrogate is required, and that MBL warrants further investigation as a potential antimicrobial treatment for low-moisture foods.

  20. Ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The specifications of a set of point-shape electrodes of non-corrodable material that can hold a film of liquid material of equal thickness is described. Contained in a jacket, this set forms an ion source. The electrode is made of tungsten with a glassy carbon layer for insulation and an outer layer of aluminium-oxide ceramic material

  1. Chemistry of plutonium revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connick, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    In 1941 one goal of the Manhattan Project was to unravel the chemistry of the synthetic element plutonium as rapidly as possible. In this paper the work carried out at Berkeley from the spring of 1942 to the summer of 1945 is described briefly. The aqueous chemistry of plutonium is quite remarkable. Important insights were obtained from tracer experiments, but the full complexity was not revealed until macroscopic amounts (milligrams) became available. Because processes for separation from fission products were based on aqueous solutions, such solution chemistry was emphasized, particularly precipitation and oxidation-reduction behavior. The latter turned out to be unusually intricate when it was discovered that two more oxidation states existed in aqueous solution than had previously been suspected. Further, an equilibrium was rapidly established among the four aqueous oxidation states, while at the same time any three were not in equilibrium. These and other observations made while doing a crash study of a previously unknown element are reported

  2. Android Emotions Revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a method for designing facial interfaces for sociable android robots with respect to the fundamental rules of human affect expression. Extending the work of Paul Ekman towards a robotic direction, we follow the judgment-based approach for evaluating facial expressions to test...... findings are based on the results derived from a number of judgments, and suggest that before programming the facial expressions of a Geminoid, the Original should pass through the proposed procedure. According to our recommendations, the facial expressions of an android should be tested by judges, even...... in which case an android robot like the Geminoid|DK –a duplicate of an Original person- reveals emotions convincingly; when following an empirical perspective, or when following a theoretical one. The methodology includes the processes of acquiring the empirical data, and gathering feedback on them. Our...

  3. Inexpensive read-out for coincident electron spectroscopy with a transmission electron microscope at nanometer scale using micro channel plates and multistrip anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollander, R.W.; Bom, V.R.; Van Eijk, C.W.E.; Faber, J.S.; Hoevers, H.; Kruit, P.

    1994-01-01

    The elemental composition of a sample at nanometer scale is determined by measurement of the characteristic energy of Auger electrons, emitted in coincidence with incoming primary electrons from a microbeam in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Single electrons are detected with position sensitive detectors, consisting of MicroChannel Plates (MCP) and MultiStrip Anodes (MSA), one for the energy of the Auger electrons (Auger-detector) and one for the energy loss of primary electrons (EELS-detector). The MSAs are sensed with LeCroy 2735DC preamplifiers. The fast readout is based on LeCroy's PCOS III system. On the detection of a coincidence (Event) energy data of Auger and EELS are combined with timing data to an Event word. Event words are stored in list mode in a VME memory module. Blocks of Event words are scanned by transputers in VME and two-dimensional energy histograms are filled using the timing information to obtain a maximal true/accidental ratio. The resulting histograms are stored on disk of a PC-386, which also controls data taking. The system is designed to handle 10 5 Events per second, 90% of which are accidental. In the histograms the ''true'' to ''accidental'' ratio will be 5. The dead time is 15%. ((orig.))

  4. Determination of mercury and selenium in herbal medicines and hair by using a nanometer TiO2-coated quartz tube atomizer and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shun-Xing; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Cai, Shu-Jie; Cai, Tian-Shou

    2011-01-01

    The nanometer TiO 2 particle was coated onto the inner wall of a T-shaped quartz tube atomizer (QTA) and then was used as a new atomizer (NT-QTA) for the determination of Hg and Se by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). After coating 67.4 mg TiO 2 on a quartz tube, the analytical performance of NT-QTA-HGAAS was compared to conventional QTA-HGAAS and it was improved as follows: (a) the linear range of the calibration curves was expanded from 10.0-80.0 ng mL -1 to 5.0-150.0 ng mL -1 for Hg, and from 10.0-70.0 ng mL -1 to 5.0-100.0 ng mL -1 for Se; (b) the characteristic concentration of was decreased from 2.8 ng mL -1 /1% to 1.1 ng mL -1 /1% for Hg and from 1.2 ng mL -1 /1% to 0.8 ng mL -1 /1% for Se; and (c) the interference from the coexistence of As on the determination of Hg and Se could be eliminated. The achieved technique was applied for the determination of Hg and Se in herbal medicines and hair.

  5. Resolving the three-dimensional microstructure of polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrodes using nanometer-scale X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epting, William K.; Gelb, Jeff; Litster, Shawn

    2012-02-08

    The electrodes of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) are composite porous layers consisting of carbon and platinum nanoparticles and a polymer electrolyte binder. The proper composition and arrangement of these materials for fast reactant transport and high electrochemical activity is crucial to achieving high performance, long lifetimes, and low costs. Here, the microstructure of a PEFC electrode using nanometer-scale X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) with a resolution of 50 nm is investigated. The nano-CT instrument obtains this resolution for the low-atomic-number catalyst support and binder using a combination of a Fresnel zone plate objective and Zernike phase contrast imaging. High-resolution, non-destructive imaging of the three-dimensional (3D) microstructures provides important new information on the size and form of the catalyst particle agglomerates and pore spaces. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) is applied to evaluate the limits of the resolution and to verify the 3D reconstructions. The computational reconstructions and size distributions obtained with nano-CT can be used for evaluating electrode preparation, performing pore-scale simulations, and extracting effective morphological parameters for large-scale computational models. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Photoinduced non-linear optical effects in the ZnS-Al, In-Sn doped film-glass nanometer-sized interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kityk, I.V.; Makowska-Janusik, M.; Ebothe, J.; El Hichou, A.; El Idrissi, B.; Addou, M.

    2002-01-01

    The effective nanometer-sized thin layer (about 1-2 nm) located between a crystalline ZnS film and glass substrate is studied here using photoinduced optical and second-order non-linear optical (second harmonic generation (SHG) and electrooptics effects) techniques. A photoinduced shift of the effective energy gap is found for the first time in ZnS films doped with the same amount (4 at.%) of different elements, namely, In, Al and Sn. The photoinduced second-order non-linear optical properties (linear electrooptics (LEO) and SHG) of the specimens show a good correlation with the corresponding features of the linear optical susceptibilities, particularly, the imaginary part of dielectric susceptibility near the absorption edge. The maximal response of the photoinduced signal is observed for the pump-probe delaying time of about 20 ps. The performed experimental measurements indicate that the observed effects are stimulated by two factors: the first one is connected with the interface potential gradients at the glass-ZnS film boarder; the second one is a consequence of the additional polarization due to the insertion of Al, In and Sn atoms. The observed phenomenon may be proposed as a sensitive tool for investigation of thin semiconducting-glass interface layer. Moreover, such nanolayers may be applied in quantum electronic devices

  7. Tritium sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glodic, S.; Boreli, F.

    1993-01-01

    Tritium is the only radioactive isotope of hydrogen. It directly follows the metabolism of water and it can be bound into genetic material, so it is very important to control levels of contamination. In order to define the state of contamination it is necessary to establish 'zero level', i.e. actual global inventory. The importance of tritium contamination monitoring increases with the development of fusion power installations. Different sources of tritium are analyzed and summarized in this paper. (author)

  8. Source rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakr F. Makky

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available West Beni Suef Concession is located at the western part of Beni Suef Basin which is a relatively under-explored basin and lies about 150 km south of Cairo. The major goal of this study is to evaluate the source rock by using different techniques as Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Vitrinite reflectance (%Ro, and well log data of some Cretaceous sequences including Abu Roash (E, F and G members, Kharita and Betty formations. The BasinMod 1D program is used in this study to construct the burial history and calculate the levels of thermal maturity of the Fayoum-1X well based on calibration of measured %Ro and Tmax against calculated %Ro model. The calculated Total Organic Carbon (TOC content from well log data compared with the measured TOC from the Rock-Eval pyrolysis in Fayoum-1X well is shown to match against the shale source rock but gives high values against the limestone source rock. For that, a new model is derived from well log data to calculate accurately the TOC content against the limestone source rock in the study area. The organic matter existing in Abu Roash (F member is fair to excellent and capable of generating a significant amount of hydrocarbons (oil prone produced from (mixed type I/II kerogen. The generation potential of kerogen in Abu Roash (E and G members and Betty formations is ranging from poor to fair, and generating hydrocarbons of oil and gas prone (mixed type II/III kerogen. Eventually, kerogen (type III of Kharita Formation has poor to very good generation potential and mainly produces gas. Thermal maturation of the measured %Ro, calculated %Ro model, Tmax and Production index (PI indicates that Abu Roash (F member exciting in the onset of oil generation, whereas Abu Roash (E and G members, Kharita and Betty formations entered the peak of oil generation.

  9. Radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabkina, L.E.; Mazurek, V.; Myascedov, D.N.; Prokhorov, P.; Kachalov, V.A.; Ziv, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    A radioactive layer in a radioactive source is sealed by the application of a sealing layer on the radioactive layer. The sealing layer can consist of a film of oxide of titanium, tin, zirconium, aluminum, or chromium. Preferably, the sealing layer is pure titanium dioxide. The radioactive layer is embedded in a finish enamel which, in turn, is on a priming enamel which surrounds a substrate

  10. Muon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2001-01-01

    A full high energy muon collider may take considerable time to realize. However, intermediate steps in its direction are possible and could help facilitate the process. Employing an intense muon source to carry out forefront low energy research, such as the search for muon-number non-conservation, represents one interesting possibility. For example, the MECO proposal at BNL aims for 2 x 10 -17 sensitivity in their search for coherent muon-electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. To reach that goal requires the production, capture and stopping of muons at an unprecedented 10 11 μ/sec. If successful, such an effort would significantly advance the state of muon technology. More ambitious ideas for utilizing high intensity muon sources are also being explored. Building a muon storage ring for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams is particularly exciting.We present an overview of muon sources and example of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Factory at BNL with various detector location possibilities

  11. Convolutive Blind Source Separation Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Larsen, Jan; Kjems, Ulrik

    2008-01-01

    During the past decades, much attention has been given to the separation of mixed sources, in particular for the blind case where both the sources and the mixing process are unknown and only recordings of the mixtures are available. In several situations it is desirable to recover all sources from...... the recorded mixtures, or at least to segregate a particular source. Furthermore, it may be useful to identify the mixing process itself to reveal information about the physical mixing system. In some simple mixing models each recording consists of a sum of differently weighted source signals. However, in many...... real-world applications, such as in acoustics, the mixing process is more complex. In such systems, the mixtures are weighted and delayed, and each source contributes to the sum with multiple delays corresponding to the multiple paths by which an acoustic signal propagates to a microphone...

  12. Sources of Macroeconomic Fluctuations in MENA Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Balcilar, Mehmet; Bagzibagli, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    A close examination of the MENA region economies reveals a number of fundamental sources of macroeconomic fluctuations. These include economic factors such as exchange rate instability, large public debt, current account deficits, and escalation of inflation. The political factors such as government instability, corruption, bureaucracy, and internal conflicts also are major sources of macroeconomic instability. Thus, the sources of macroeconomic fluctuations in these countri...

  13. Study of vibrations and stabilization of linear collider final doublets at the sub-nanometer scale; Etude des vibrations et de la stabilisation a l'echelle sous-nanometrique des doublets finaux d'un collisionneur lineaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzon, B

    2007-11-15

    CLIC is one of the current projects of high energy linear colliders. Vertical beam sizes of 0.7 nm at the time of the collision and fast ground motion of a few nanometers impose an active stabilization of the final doublets at a fifth of nanometer above 4 Hz. The majority of my work concerned vibrations and active stabilization study of cantilever and slim beams in order to be representative of the final doublets of CLIC. In a first part, measured performances of different types of vibration sensors associated to an appropriate instrumentation showed that accurate measurements of ground motion are possible from 0.1 Hz up to 2000 Hz on a quiet site. Also, electrochemical sensors answering a priori the specifications of CLIC can be incorporated in the active stabilization at a fifth of nanometer. In a second part, an experimental and numerical study of beam vibrations enabled to validate the efficiency of the numerical prediction incorporated then in the simulation of the active stabilization. Also, a study of the impact of ground motion and of acoustic noise on beam vibrations showed that an active stabilization is necessary at least up to 1000 Hz. In a third part, results on the active stabilization of a beam at its two first resonances are shown down to amplitudes of a tenth of nanometer above 4 Hz by using in parallel a commercial system performing passive and active stabilization of the clamping. The last part is related to a study of a support for the final doublets of a linear collider prototype in phase of finalization, the ATF2 prototype. This work showed that relative motion between this support and the ground is below imposed tolerances (6 nm above 0.1 Hz) with appropriate boundary conditions. (author)

  14. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.

    2011-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA's Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This presentation specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as an overview of the content of the final report for that internship.

  15. Cosmic Flasher Reveals All!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    predicted to cause "starquakes" in which the solid crust of the neutron star is cracked, releasing energy. That energy is released in two forms -- a burst of gamma-rays and X-rays and an ejection of subatomic particles at nearly the speed of light. The gamma-ray and X-ray burst lasts no more than a few minutes, while the ejected particles, interacting with the star's magnetic field, can produce detectable amounts of radio emission for several days. On August 27, the SGR called 1900+14 underwent a tremendous burst, the likes of which had not been seen since 1979. "For a number of years now, I've been routinely looking toward the region of sky where we thought this thing might be," said Frail, "hoping the magnetar would show itself." It did not disappoint; on September 3, the VLA found a new source of radio emission where one had not previously existed. The source quickly faded from view one week later. The immediate importance of this finding is that it provides a new and independent confirmation of the magnetar model. These impulsive particle "winds," predicted by theory, carry as much energy as the flashes of hard X-ray emission and are important in slowing down the spinning magnetar. This discovery also allows astronomers to pinpoint the exact location of the SGR to allow further study of the magnetar with other powerful telescopes. "Trying to find this source of gamma-rays was like nighttime sailing with a broken lighthouse; now, we're no longer in the dark, and can study the magnetar for years to come," said Bloom. In time, the free-flowing particle wind can inflate a nebula called a plerion. "This 'windbag nebula' can tell us a lot about the outflow of particles and the burst history of the object," Frail said. "In fact, studying this phenomenon can give us information about the magnetar that we can't learn any other way." The VLA is an instrument of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative

  16. Auto-assembly of nanometer thick, water soluble layers of plasmid DNA complexed with diamines and basic amino acids on graphite: Greatest DNA protection is obtained with arginine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, T.T.; Boulanouar, O. [Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UMR CNRS 6249 Chrono-Environnement, 16, Route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Heintz, O. [Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UMR CNRS 6303Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, DTAI/Centre de micro/nano caractérisation, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Fromm, M., E-mail: michel.fromm@univ-fcomte.fr [Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UMR CNRS 6249 Chrono-Environnement, 16, Route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the ability of diamines as well as basic amino acids to condense DNA onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite with minimum damage after re-dissolution in water. Based on a bibliographic survey we briefly summarize DNA binding properties with diamines as compared to basic amino acids. Thus, solutions of DNA complexed with these linkers were drop-cast in order to deposit ultra-thin layers on the surface of HOPG in the absence or presence of Tris buffer. Atomic Force Microscopy analyses showed that, at a fixed ligand-DNA mixing ratio of 16, the mean thickness of the layers can be statistically predicted to lie in the range 0–50 nm with a maximum standard deviation ± 6 nm, using a simple linear law depending on the DNA concentration. The morphology of the layers appears to be ligand-dependent. While the layers containing diamines present holes, those formed in the presence of basic amino acids, except for lysine, are much more compact and dense. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements provide compositional information indicating that, compared to the maximum number of DNA sites to which the ligands may bind, the basic amino acids Arg and His are present in large excess. Conservation of the supercoiled topology of the DNA plasmids was studied after recovery of the complex layers in water. Remarkably, arginine has the best protection capabilities whether Tris was present or not in the initial solution. - Highlights: • Characterization of nanometer scaled layers composed of pUC21 plasmid DNA • Relation between nature of the ligand and structure of the layers • Capacities of the ligands to protect plasmids from strand break depending on their nature.

  17. [Study of relationship between powder-size gradation and mechanical properties of Zirconia toughened glass infiltrated nanometer-ceramic composite powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Feng; Xu, Ling; Liao, Yun-mao; Chao, Yong-lie

    2003-07-01

    The fabrication of all-ceramic dental restorations is challenged by ceramics' relatively low flexural strength and intrinsic poor resistance to fracture. This paper aimed at investigating the relationships between powder-size gradation and mechanical properties of Zirconia toughened glass infiltrated nanometer-ceramic composite (Al(2)O(3)-nZrO(2)). Al(2)O(3)-nZrO(2) ceramics powder (W) was processed by combination methods of chemical co-precipitation and ball milling with addition of different powder-sized ZrO(2). Field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the particle size distribution and characterize the particle morphology of powders. The matrix compacts were made by slip-casting technique and sintered to 1,450 degrees C and flexural strength and the fracture toughness of them were measured. 1. The particle distribution of Al(2)O(3)-nZrO(2) ceramics powder ranges from 0.02 - 3.5 micro m and among them the superfine particles almost accounted for 20%. 2. The ceramic matrix samples with addition of nZrO(2) (W) showed much higher flexural strength (115.434 +/- 5.319) MPa and fracture toughness (2.04 +/- 0.10) MPa m(1/2) than those of pure Al(2)O(3) ceramics (62.763 +/- 7.220 MPa; 1.16 +/- 0.02 MPa m(1/2)). The particle size of additive ZrO(2) may impose influences on mechanical properties of Al(2)O(3)-nZrO(2) ceramics matrix. Good homogeneity and reasonable powder-size gradation of ceramic powder can improve the mechanical properties of material.

  18. Role of W and Mn for reliable 1X nanometer-node ultra-large-scale integration Cu interconnects proved by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shima, K.; Shimizu, H.; Momose, T.; Shimogaki, Y. [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tu, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Takamizawa, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2014-09-29

    We used atom probe tomography (APT) to study the use of a Cu(Mn) as a seed layer of Cu, and a Co(W) single-layer as reliable Cu diffusion barriers for future interconnects in ultra-large-scale integration. The use of Co(W) layer enhances adhesion of Cu to prevent electromigration and stress-induced voiding failures. The use of Cu(Mn) as seed layer may enhance the diffusion barrier performance of Co(W) by stuffing the Cu diffusion pass with Mn. APT was used to visualize the distribution of W and Mn in three dimensions with sub-nanometer resolution. W was found to segregate at the grain boundaries of Co, which prevents diffusion of Cu via the grain boundaries. Mn was found to diffuse from the Cu(Mn) layer to Co(W) layer and selectively segregate at the Co(W) grain boundaries with W, reinforcing the barrier properties of Co(W) layer. Hence, a Co(W) barrier coupled with a Cu(Mn) seed layer can form a sufficient diffusion barrier with film that is less than 2.0-nm-thick. The diffusion barrier behavior was preserved following a 1-h annealing at 400 °C. The underlayer of the Cu interconnects requires a large adhesion strength with the Cu, as well as low electrical resistivity. The use of Co(W) has previously been shown to satisfy these requirements, and addition of Mn is not expected to deteriorate these properties.

  19. Universal liquid-phase laser fabrication of various nano-metals encapsulated by ultrathin carbon shells for deep-UV plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Yang, Chao; Li, Xiao-Ming; Lei, Tian-Yu; Sun, Hao-Xuan; Dai, Li-Ping; Gu, Yu; Ning, Xue; Zhou, Ting; Wang, Chao; Zeng, Hai-Bo; Xiong, Jie

    2017-06-29

    The exploration of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) beyond the usual visible waveband, for example within the ultraviolet (UV) or deep-ultraviolet (D-UV) regions, is of great significance due to its unique applications in secret communications and optics. However, it is still challenging to universally synthesize the corresponding metal nanostructures due to their high activity. Herein, we report a universal, eco-friendly, facile and rapid synthesis of various nano-metals encapsulated by ultrathin carbon shells, significantly with a remarkable deep-UV LSPR characteristic, via a liquid-phase laser fabrication method. Firstly, a new generation of the laser ablation in liquid (LAL) method has been developed with an emphasis on the elaborate selection of solvents to generate ultrathin carbon shells, and hence to stabilize the formed metal nanocrystals. As a result, a series of metal@carbon nanoparticles (NPs), including Cr@C, Ti@C, Fe@C, V@C, Al@C, Sn@C, Mn@C and Pd@C, can be fabricated by this modified LAL method. Interestingly, these NPs exhibit LSPR peaks in the range of 200-330 nm, which are very rare for localized surface plasmon resonance. Consequently, the UV plasmonic effects of these metal@carbon NPs were demonstrated both by the observed enhancement in UV photoluminescence (PL) from the carbon nanoshells and by the improvement of the photo-responsivity of UV GaN photodetectors. This work could provide a universal method for carbon shelled metal NPs and expand plasmonics into the D-UV waveband.

  20. Microdosimetry in the nanometer region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biavati, M.H.; Rossi, H.H.; Goldhagen, P.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental work on the grid avalanche chamber has been continued. Several aspects of problems related to chamber operation, in particular the efficiency, have been investigated. These include a study of background and noise fluctuations with an effort to decrease and stabilize them, an effort to decrease light leaks, and an effort to determine if the light measured by the photomultiplier tube comes from the gas itself or from the scintillator. Work was also done on measuring coincidences between the solid state detector (which registers alpha particle traversals of the chamber) and the photomultiplier tube output, since all of the necessary electronics have finally been obtained. A study of the shape of equipotentials in the detector region was undertaken and also an apparatus was developed to apply thin coatings in a vacuum system

  1. A simple and versatile mini-arc plasma source for nanocrystal synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Junhong; Lu Ganhua; Zhu Liying; Flagan, Richard C.

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystals in the lower-nanometer-size range are attracting growing interest due to their unique properties. A simple and versatile atmospheric direct current mini-arc plasma source has been developed to produce nanoparticles as small as a few nanometers. The nanoparticles are formed by direct vaporization of solid precursors followed by a rapid quenching. Both semiconductor tin oxide and metallic silver nanoparticles have been produced at rates of 1-10 mg/h using the mini-arc source. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that most nanoparticles as produced are nonagglomerated and crystalline. Size distributions of nanoparticles measured with an online scanning electrical mobility spectrometer are broader than the self-preserving distribution, suggesting that the nanoparticle growth is coagulation-dominated, and that the particles experience a range of residence times. The electrical charges carried by as-produced aerosol nanoparticles facilitate the manipulation of nanoparticles. The new mini-arc plasma source hence shows promise to accelerate the exploration of nanostructured materials

  2. Track structure of protons and other light ions in liquid water: applications of the LIonTrack code at the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, G; Galassi, M E; Tilly, N; Ahnesjö, A; Fernández-Varea, J M

    2013-06-01

    The LIonTrack (Light Ion Track) Monte Carlo (MC) code for the simulation of H(+), He(2+), and other light ions in liquid water is presented together with the results of a novel investigation of energy-deposition site properties from single ion tracks. The continuum distorted-wave formalism with the eikonal initial state approximation (CDW-EIS) is employed to generate the initial energy and angle of the electrons emitted in ionizing collisions of the ions with H2O molecules. The model of Dingfelder et al. ["Electron inelastic-scattering cross sections in liquid water," Radiat. Phys. Chem. 53, 1-18 (1998); "Comparisons of calculations with PARTRAC and NOREC: Transport of electrons in liquid water," Radiat. Res. 169, 584-594 (2008)] is linked to the general-purpose MC code PENELOPE/penEasy to simulate the inelastic interactions of the secondary electrons in liquid water. In this way, the extended PENELOPE/penEasy code may provide an improved description of the 3D distribution of energy deposits (EDs), making it suitable for applications at the micrometer and nanometer scales. Single-ionization cross sections calculated with the ab initio CDW-EIS formalism are compared to available experimental values, some of them reported very recently, and the theoretical electronic stopping powers are benchmarked against those recommended by the ICRU. The authors also analyze distinct aspects of the spatial patterns of EDs, such as the frequency of nearest-neighbor distances for various radiation qualities, and the variation of the mean specific energy imparted in nanoscopic targets located around the track. For 1 MeV/u particles, the C(6+) ions generate about 15 times more clusters of six EDs within an ED distance of 3 nm than H(+). On average clusters of two to three EDs for 1 MeV/u H(+) and clusters of four to five EDs for 1 MeV/u C(6+) could be expected for a modeling double strand break distance of 3.4 nm.

  3. Introscopy using gamma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, Yu.V.; Leonov, B.I.; Najorov, A.N.; Smirnov, N.N.; Firstov, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described of working with standard 170 Tm, 75 Se, 192 Ir, 137 Cs and 60 Co sources at the activity of 1-4000 Ci, during television gamma introscopy of steel products. Experiments involving the RI-10T introscope are carried out to determine prospects of using various radiation sources. The results of using X-ray instruments for control of steel products are also shown for comparison. In introscopy of X-rayed steel products over 25 mm thick, spreading of the edge of the detected groove image is shown to be comparable when using X radiation and gamma radiation of standard sources. Sensitivity of control by fluorographic introscope in X-raying and gamma irradiation of products over 25 mm thick will presumably be the same owing to the detector storage capacity. The use of commercial gamma flaw detecting instruments together with a television introscope permits to reliably reveal defects of 0.5-2.0 mm in size, eliminating possible instability of operation of X-ray instruments, particularly in field conditions

  4. Characterization of strong (241)Am sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterlund, Anna; Chernikova, Dina; Cartemo, Petty; Axell, Kåre; Nordlund, Anders; Skarnemark, Gunnar; Ekberg, Christian; Ramebäck, Henrik

    2015-05-01

    Gamma ray spectra of strong (241)Am sources may reveal information about the source composition as there may be other radioactive nuclides such as progeny and radioactive impurities present. In this work the possibility to use gamma spectrometry to identify inherent signatures in (241)Am sources in order to differentiate sources from each other, is investigated. The studied signatures are age, i.e. time passed since last chemical separation, and presence of impurities. The spectra of some sources show a number of Doppler broadened peaks in the spectrum which indicate the presence of nuclear reactions on light elements within the sources. The results show that the investigated sources can be differentiated between by age and/or presence of impurities. These spectral features would be useful information in a national nuclear forensics library (NNFL) in cases when the visual information on the source, e.g. the source number, is unavailable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of ultrathin dextran layers: Time dependent nanostructure in aqueous environments revealed by OWLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saftics, Andras; Kurunczi, Sándor; Szekrényes, Zsolt; Kamarás, Katalin; Khánh, Nguyen Quoc; Sulyok, Attila; Bősze, Szilvia; Horvath, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Surface coatings of the polysaccharide dextran and its derivatives are key ingredients especially in label-free biosensors for the suppression of non-specific binding and for receptor immobilization. Nevertheless, the nanostructure of these ultrathin coatings and its tailoring by the variation of the preparation conditions have not been profoundly characterized and understood. In this work carboxymethylated dextran (CMD) was prepared and used for fabricating ultrathin surface coatings. A grafting method based on covalent coupling to aminosilane- and epoxysilane-functionalized surfaces was applied to obtain thin CMD layers. The carboxyl moiety of the CMD was coupled to the aminated surface by EDC-NHS reagents, while CMD coupling through epoxysilane molecules was performed without any additional reagents. The surface analysis following the grafting procedures consisted of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS). The XPS and AFM measurements showed that the grafting resulted in a very thin dextran layer of a few nanometers. The OWLS method allowed devising the structure of the interfacial dextran layers by the evaluation of the optogeometrical parameters. The alteration in the nanostructure of the CMD layer with the chemical composition of the silane coverage and the pH of the grafting solution was revealed by in situ OWLS, specifically, lain down chains were found to be prevalent on the surface under neutral and basic conditions on epoxysilylated surfaces. The developed methodologies allowed to design and fabricate nanometer scale CMD layers with well-controlled surface structure, which are very difficult to characterize in aqueous environments using present instrumentations and highly hydrated surface layers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bridging the Gap between the Nanometer-Scale Bottom-Up and Micrometer-Scale Top-Down Approaches for Site-Defined InP/InAs Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Rainville, Christophe; Salmon, Adrian; Takiguchi, Masato; Tateno, Kouta; Gotoh, Hideki

    2015-11-24

    This work presents a method that bridges the gap between the nanometer-scale bottom-up and micrometer-scale top-down approaches for site-defined nanostructures, which has long been a significant challenge for applications that require low-cost and high-throughput manufacturing processes. We realized the bridging by controlling the seed indium nanoparticle position through a self-assembly process. Site-defined InP nanowires were then grown from the indium-nanoparticle array in the vapor-liquid-solid mode through a "seed and grow" process. The nanometer-scale indium particles do not always occupy the same locations within the micrometer-scale open window of an InP exposed substrate due to the scale difference. We developed a technique for aligning the nanometer-scale indium particles on the same side of the micrometer-scale window by structuring the surface of a misoriented InP (111)B substrate. Finally, we demonstrated that the developed method can be used to grow a uniform InP/InAs axial-heterostructure nanowire array. The ability to form a heterostructure nanowire array with this method makes it possible to tune the emission wavelength over a wide range by employing the quantum confinement effect and thus expand the application of this technology to optoelectronic devices. Successfully pairing a controllable bottom-up growth technique with a top-down substrate preparation technique greatly improves the potential for the mass-production and widespread adoption of this technology.

  7. The Chandra Source Catalog : Automated Source Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Roger; Evans, I. N.; Evans, J. D.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Anderson, C. S.; Bonaventura, N. R.; Chen, J. C.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E.; Gibbs, D. G.; Grier, J. D.; Hall, D. M.; Harbo, P. N.; He, X.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Lauer, J.; McCollough, M. L.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Nichols, J. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Plummer, D. A.; Primini, F. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Rots, A. H.; Siemiginowska, A. L.; Sundheim, B. A.; Tibbetts, M. S.; Van Stone, D. W.; Winkelman, S. L.; Zografou, P.

    2009-01-01

    Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) master source pipeline processing seeks to automatically detect sources and compute their properties. Since Chandra is a pointed mission and not a sky survey, different sky regions are observed for a different number of times at varying orientations, resolutions, and other heterogeneous conditions. While this provides an opportunity to collect data from a potentially large number of observing passes, it also creates challenges in determining the best way to combine different detection results for the most accurate characterization of the detected sources. The CSC master source pipeline correlates data from multiple observations by updating existing cataloged source information with new data from the same sky region as they become available. This process sometimes leads to relatively straightforward conclusions, such as when single sources from two observations are similar in size and position. Other observation results require more logic to combine, such as one observation finding a single, large source and another identifying multiple, smaller sources at the same position. We present examples of different overlapping source detections processed in the current version of the CSC master source pipeline. We explain how they are resolved into entries in the master source database, and examine the challenges of computing source properties for the same source detected multiple times. Future enhancements are also discussed. This work is supported by NASA contract NAS8-03060 (CXC).

  8. Consumer Trust in Information Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Love

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Trust is essential to understanding public reaction to innovative issues. This research focuses on trust in information sources by explicating the construct of trust and testing a comprehensive model on several information sources about genetically modified foods. Results from a survey of 369 participants reveal the significance of projecting competence and the role of the environment in which a target public receives information. Perceptions of regulatory, social, business, and technical environments affect how likely individuals are to follow advice from institutions like the Food and Drug Administration and the news media. Future research should incorporate knowledge levels and personal relevance as variables likely to influence trusting relationships.

  9. Chernobyl source term estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Harvey, T.F.; Lange, R.

    1990-09-01

    The Chernobyl source term available for long-range transport was estimated by integration of radiological measurements with atmospheric dispersion modeling and by reactor core radionuclide inventory estimation in conjunction with WASH-1400 release fractions associated with specific chemical groups. The model simulations revealed that the radioactive cloud became segmented during the first day, with the lower section heading toward Scandinavia and the upper part heading in a southeasterly direction with subsequent transport across Asia to Japan, the North Pacific, and the west coast of North America. By optimizing the agreement between the observed cloud arrival times and duration of peak concentrations measured over Europe, Japan, Kuwait, and the US with the model predicted concentrations, it was possible to derive source term estimates for those radionuclides measured in airborne radioactivity. This was extended to radionuclides that were largely unmeasured in the environment by performing a reactor core radionuclide inventory analysis to obtain release fractions for the various chemical transport groups. These analyses indicated that essentially all of the noble gases, 60% of the radioiodines, 40% of the radiocesium, 10% of the tellurium and about 1% or less of the more refractory elements were released. These estimates are in excellent agreement with those obtained on the basis of worldwide deposition measurements. The Chernobyl source term was several orders of magnitude greater than those associated with the Windscale and TMI reactor accidents. However, the 137 Cs from the Chernobyl event is about 6% of that released by the US and USSR atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, while the 131 I and 90 Sr released by the Chernobyl accident was only about 0.1% of that released by the weapon tests. 13 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  10. Frontier of nanometer devices. Part 6. New devices with fully controlled electrons and photons. Nanometa debaisu kenkyu saizensen. 6. Denshi to koshi no kanzen seigyo wo mezashita jisedai debaisu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Y [The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science

    1994-06-20

    In the nanotechnology to realize an artificial structure of a magnitude of atomic size, new electron devices and photon devices are aimed by confining electron and controlling the behavior of the electron with transition of a quantum mechanical state including a tunneling effect. The degree of freedom of electron decreased when electron is confined in a very small area within semiconductor and is 1 in a quantum wire while it is 0 in a quantum box. Energy level of electron is completely dispersed. The condition required to realize the nanometer structure is examined and the formation techniques of semiconductor nanometer structure are studied. This paper describes research results by the authors aiming to realize quantum wire and quantum box structures. Ultrafine pattern of SiO2 is formed by electron beam drawing technique followed by crystal growth with a MOCVD method to form the quantum wire and quantum box structures successfully. Laser oscillation is successful at 77K with optical pumping using a quantum wire and vertical micro resonator. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Study of first electronic transition and hydrogen bonding state of ultra-thin water layer of nanometer thickness on an α-alumina surface by far-ultraviolet spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takeyoshi; Kinugasa, Tomoya

    2018-05-01

    The first electronic transition (A˜ ← X˜) and the hydrogen bonding state of an ultra-thin water layer of nanometer thickness between two α-alumina surfaces (0.5-20 nm) were studied using far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectroscopy in the wavelength range 140-180 nm. The ultra-thin water layer of nanometer thickness was prepared by squeezing a water droplet ( 1 μL) between a highly polished α-alumina prism and an α-alumina plate using a high pressure clamp ( 4.7 MPa), and the FUV spectra of the water layer at different thicknesses were measured using the attenuated total reflection method. As the water layer became thinner, the A˜ ← X˜ bands were gradually shifted to higher or lower energy relative to that of bulk water; at thicknesses smaller than 4 nm, these shifts were substantial (0.1-0.2 eV) in either case. The FUV spectra of the water layer with thickness lost at thicknesses below 4 nm, because of steric hydration forces between the α-alumina surfaces.

  12. Spinel Li{sub 2}CoTi{sub 3}O{sub 8} nanometer obtained for application as pigment; Espinela Li{sub 2}CoTi{sub 3}O{sub 8} nanometrica obtenida para aplicacion como pigmento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa de Camara, M. S.; Alves Pimentel, L.; Longo, E.; Nobrega Azevedo, L. da; Araujo Melo, D. M. de

    2016-05-01

    Pigments are used in ceramics, cosmetics, inks, and other applications widely materials. To this must be single and easily reproducible. Moreover, the pigments obtained in the nanoscale are more stable, reproducible and highlight color in small amounts compared with those obtained in micrometer scale. The mixed oxides with spinel structures AB{sub 2}O{sub 4} have important applications, including: pigments, refractories, catalytic and electronic ceramics. In this context, the aim of this work was the preparation of powder Li{sub 2}CoTi{sub 3}O{sub 8} spinel phase with nanometer particle size of the polymeric precursor method (Pechini) and characterization by means of thermal analysis (TG/DTA) X-ray diffraction (XRD), refined by the Rietveld method, BET, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman and colorimetric coordinates. The pigment was obtained by heat treatment of 400 degree centigrade to 1000 degree centigrade after pyrolysis at 300 degree centigrade/1 h for removing the organic material. Li{sub 2}CoTi{sub 3}O{sub 8} desired spinel phase was obtained from 500 degree centigrade, and presenting stability nanometer to about 1.300 degree centigrade. Spinel green phase introduced at temperatures in the range of 400 degree centigrade and 500 degree centigrade, and 600 degree centigrade at temperatures between blue and 1000 degree centigrade. (Author)

  13. Cellular Dynamics Revealed by Digital Holographic Microscopy☆

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, P.; Depeursinge, Christian; Jourdain, P.

    2016-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a new optical method that provides, without the use of any contrast agent, real-time, three-dimensional images of transparent living cells, with an axial sensitivity of a few tens of nanometers. They result from the hologram numerical reconstruction process, which permits a sub wavelength calculation of the phase shift, produced on the transmitted wave front, by the optically probed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS). Specifically, in addition to measurements of cellular surface morphometry and intracellular refractive index (RI), various biophysical cellular parameters including dry mass, absolute volume, membrane fluctuations at the nanoscale and biomechanical properties, transmembrane water permeability as swell as current, can be derived from the QPS. This article presents how quantitative phase DHM (QP-DHM) can explored cell dynamics at the nanoscale with a special attention to both the study of neuronal dynamics and the optical resolution of local neuronal network.

  14. Cellular Dynamics Revealed by Digital Holographic Microscopy☆

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, P.

    2016-11-22

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a new optical method that provides, without the use of any contrast agent, real-time, three-dimensional images of transparent living cells, with an axial sensitivity of a few tens of nanometers. They result from the hologram numerical reconstruction process, which permits a sub wavelength calculation of the phase shift, produced on the transmitted wave front, by the optically probed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS). Specifically, in addition to measurements of cellular surface morphometry and intracellular refractive index (RI), various biophysical cellular parameters including dry mass, absolute volume, membrane fluctuations at the nanoscale and biomechanical properties, transmembrane water permeability as swell as current, can be derived from the QPS. This article presents how quantitative phase DHM (QP-DHM) can explored cell dynamics at the nanoscale with a special attention to both the study of neuronal dynamics and the optical resolution of local neuronal network.

  15. Revealed preference with limited consideration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demuynck, T.; Seel, C.

    2014-01-01

    We derive revealed preference tests for models where individuals use consideration sets to simplify their consumption problem. Our basic test provides necessary and sufficient conditions for consistency of observed choices with the existence of consideration set restrictions. The same conditions can

  16. Decision Making and Revealed Preference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Rosa, Leonidas Enrique

    If our decision-making processes are to some extent shaped by evolutionary pressures and our environment is different from that to which we adapted, some of our choices will not be in our best interest. But revealed preference is the only tool that we have so far to conduct a normative analysis...

  17. Sources of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, L.

    1983-01-01

    Various sources of polarized neutrons are reviewed. Monoenergetic source produced with unpolarized or polarized beams, white sources of polarized neutrons, production by transmissions through polarized hydrogen targets and polarized thermal neutronsare discussed, with appropriate applications included. (U.K.)

  18. Pacemakers lower sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greatbatch, W.

    1984-01-01

    Energy sources for cardiac facing are considered including radioisotope sources, in a broad conceptual and historical framework.The main guidelines for future development of energy sources are assessed

  19. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology in microfabrications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 (micro)m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance

  20. Sources management; La gestion des sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansoux, H.; Gourmelon; Scanff, P.; Fournet, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Murith, Ch. [Office Federal de la SantePublique (Switzerland); Saint-Paul, N. [NOVAR, 75 - Paris (France); Colson, P. [Electricite de France (EDF/DPN), 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Jouve, A.; Feron, F. [Direction Generale de al Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France); Haranger, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Mathieu, P. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France); Paycha, F. [CHU Louis Mourier, Unitede Medecine Nucleaire Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, 92 - Colombes (France); Israel, S. [CEGELEC NDT et la gestion des sources radioactives (France); Auboiroux, B. [APAVE (France); Chartier, P. [DRIRE de Basse-Normandie, Div. Surete Nucleaire et Radioprotection, 14 - Caen (France)

    2005-07-01

    Organized by the section of technical protection of the French society of radiation protection ( S.F.R.P.), these two days had for objective to review the evolution of the rule relative to the sources of ionising radiations 'sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, electric generators'. They addressed all the actors concerned by the implementation of the new regulatory system in the different sectors of activities ( research, medicine and industry): Authorities, manufacturers, and suppliers of sources, holders and users, bodies involved in the approval of sources, carriers. (N.C.)

  1. Featured Image: Revealing Hidden Objects with Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-02-01

    Stunning color astronomical images can often be the motivation for astronomers to continue slogging through countless data files, calculations, and simulations as we seek to understand the mysteries of the universe. But sometimes the stunning images can, themselves, be the source of scientific discovery. This is the case with the below image of Lynds Dark Nebula 673, located in the Aquila constellation, that was captured with the Mayall 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory by a team of scientists led by Travis Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage). After creating the image with a novel color-composite imaging method that reveals faint H emission (visible in red in both images here), Rector and collaborators identified the presence of a dozen new Herbig-Haro objects small cloud patches that are caused when material is energetically flung out from newly born stars. The image adapted above shows three of the new objects, HH 118789, aligned with two previously known objects, HH 32 and 332 suggesting they are driven by the same source. For more beautiful images and insight into the authors discoveries, check out the article linked below!Full view of Lynds Dark Nebula 673. Click for the larger view this beautiful composite image deserves! [T.A. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage) and H. Schweiker (WIYN and NOAO/AURA/NSF)]CitationT. A. Rector et al 2018 ApJ 852 13. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa9ce1

  2. Science research with high-brilliance synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, Milan K.

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron-science has changed dramatically since the development of high brilliance electron accelerator-based light sources in 1990s. In the last twenty years or so, several such facilities have come up, particularly in developed countries, as material characterizations in relevant atmosphere and protein crystallography with tiny-crystals have strong implications in industrial competitiveness. Moreover several new techniques have been developed recently over the entire spectral range of emitted light, from infra-red to high energy X-rays, which have altered our basic understanding of various materials like biomaterials, nanomaterials, soft-matter and semiconductor quantum structures. In addition, rapid development of various X-ray imaging techniques for nondestructive evaluation of compositional/structural homogeneity of engineering materials with nanometer resolution will have tremendous impact in manufacturing industries. As India becomes a developed country, it must have access to such an advanced synchrotron facility in the country that enables knowledge generation in the ever-expanding fields of design-characterization-production of advanced materials and modern medicines. Development of such state-of-the art facility will also enable us to carry out frontier-basic-research in our own country and help us to retain and bring back Indian talents to India. Here we shall discuss briefly the characteristics of a high brilliance synchrotron source and outline the nature of basic and applied science research that can be done with such a state-of-the-art facility. (author)

  3. Source of cytotoxicity in a colloidal silver nanoparticle suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Manolya Kukut; Keleştemur, Seda; Altunbek, Mine; Culha, Mustafa

    2015-05-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly used in a variety of applications because of their potential antimicrobial activity and their plasmonic and conductivity properties. In this study, we investigated the source of cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production on human dermal fibroblast and human lung cancer (A549) cell lines upon exposure to AgNP colloidal suspensions prepared with the simplest and most commonly used Lee–Meisel method with a variety of reaction times and the concentrations of the reducing agent. The AgNPs synthesized with shorter reaction times were more cytotoxic and genotoxic due to the presence of a few nanometer-sized AgNP seeds. The suspensions prepared with an increased citrate concentration were not cytotoxic, but they induced more ROS generation on A549 cells due to the high citrate concentration. The genotoxicity of the suspension decreased significantly at the higher citrate concentrations. The analysis of both transmission electron microscopy images from the dried droplet areas of the colloidal suspensions and toxicity data indicated that the AgNP seeds were the major source of toxicity. The completion of the nucleation step and the formation of larger AgNPs effectively decreased the toxicity.

  4. Nano-biolistics: a method of biolistic transfection of cells and tissues using a gene gun with novel nanometer-sized projectiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lummis Sarah CR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biolistic transfection is proving an increasingly popular method of incorporating DNA or RNA into cells that are difficult to transfect using traditional methods. The technique routinely uses 'microparticles', which are ~1 μm diameter projectiles, fired into tissues using pressurised gas. These microparticles are efficient at delivering DNA into cells, but cannot efficiently transfect small cells and may cause significant tissue damage, thus limiting their potential usefulness. Here we describe the use of 40 nm diameter projectiles - nanoparticles - in biolistic transfections to determine if they are a suitable alternative to microparticles. Results Examination of transfection efficiencies in HEK293 cells, using a range of conditions including different DNA concentrations and different preparation procedures, reveals similar behaviour of microparticles and nanoparticles. The use of nanoparticles, however, resulted in ~30% fewer damaged HEK293 cells following transfection. Biolistic transfection of mouse ear tissue revealed similar depth penetration for the two types of particles, and also showed that 20% in microparticle-transfected samples. Visualising details of small cellular structures was also considerably enhanced when using nanoparticles. Conclusions We conclude that nanoparticles are as efficient for biolistic transfection as microparticles, and are more appropriate for use in small cells, when examining cellular structures and/or where tissue damage is a problem.

  5. Transparency masters for mathematics revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Elizabeth

    1980-01-01

    Transparency Masters for Mathematics Revealed focuses on master diagrams that can be used for transparencies for an overhead projector or duplicator masters for worksheets. The book offers information on a compilation of master diagrams prepared by John R. Stafford, Jr., audiovisual supervisor at the University of Missouri at Kansas City. Some of the transparencies are designed to be shown horizontally. The initial three masters are number lines and grids that can be used in a mathematics course, while the others are adaptations of text figures which are slightly altered in some instances. The

  6. The Chandra Source Catalog: Source Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Michael; Rots, A. H.; McCollough, M. L.; Primini, F. A.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Bonaventura, N. R.; Chen, J. C.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Evans, J. D.; Evans, I.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E. C.; Gibbs, D. G., II; Grier, J. D.; Hain, R.; Hall, D. M.; Harbo, P. N.; He, X.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Lauer, J.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Nichols, J. S.; Plummer, D. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Siemiginowska, A. L.; Sundheim, B. A.; Tibbetts, M. S.; van Stone, D. W.; Winkelman, S. L.; Zografou, P.

    2009-09-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) contains fields of view that have been studied with individual, uninterrupted observations that span integration times ranging from 1 ksec to 160 ksec, and a large number of which have received (multiple) repeat observations days to years later. The CSC thus offers an unprecedented look at the variability of the X-ray sky over a broad range of time scales, and across a wide diversity of variable X-ray sources: stars in the local galactic neighborhood, galactic and extragalactic X-ray binaries, Active Galactic Nuclei, etc. Here we describe the methods used to identify and quantify source variability within a single observation, and the methods used to assess the variability of a source when detected in multiple, individual observations. Three tests are used to detect source variability within a single observation: the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and its variant, the Kuiper test, and a Bayesian approach originally suggested by Gregory and Loredo. The latter test not only provides an indicator of variability, but is also used to create a best estimate of the variable lightcurve shape. We assess the performance of these tests via simulation of statistically stationary, variable processes with arbitrary input power spectral densities (here we concentrate on results of red noise simulations) at variety of mean count rates and fractional root mean square variabilities relevant to CSC sources. We also assess the false positive rate via simulations of constant sources whose sole source of fluctuation is Poisson noise. We compare these simulations to an assessment of the variability found in real CSC sources, and estimate the variability sensitivities of the CSC.

  7. THE CHANDRA SOURCE CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Ian N.; Primini, Francis A.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Doe, Stephen M.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G.; Grier, John D.; Hain, Roger M.; Harbo, Peter N.; He Xiangqun; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Davis, John E.; Houck, John C.; Hall, Diane M.

    2010-01-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents ∼<30''. The catalog (1) provides access to the best estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources, with good scientific fidelity, and directly supports scientific analysis using the individual source data; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to calibrated observational data and ancillary data products for individual X-ray sources, so that users can perform detailed further analysis using existing tools. The catalog includes real X-ray sources detected with flux estimates that are at least 3 times their estimated 1σ uncertainties in at least one energy band, while maintaining the number of spurious sources at a level of ∼<1 false source per field for a 100 ks observation. For each detected source, the CSC provides commonly tabulated quantities, including source position, extent, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics, derived from the observations in which the source is detected. In addition to these traditional catalog elements, for each X-ray source the CSC includes an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra from each observation in which a

  8. The Chandra Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ian N.; Primini, Francis A.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Davis, John E.; Doe, Stephen M.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Grier, John D.; Hain, Roger M.; Hall, Diane M.; Harbo, Peter N.; He, Xiangqun Helen; Houck, John C.; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Miller, Joseph B.; Mitschang, Arik W.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Plummer, David A.; Refsdal, Brian L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sundheim, Beth A.; Tibbetts, Michael S.; Van Stone, David W.; Winkelman, Sherry L.; Zografou, Panagoula

    2010-07-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents lsim30''. The catalog (1) provides access to the best estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources, with good scientific fidelity, and directly supports scientific analysis using the individual source data; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to calibrated observational data and ancillary data products for individual X-ray sources, so that users can perform detailed further analysis using existing tools. The catalog includes real X-ray sources detected with flux estimates that are at least 3 times their estimated 1σ uncertainties in at least one energy band, while maintaining the number of spurious sources at a level of lsim1 false source per field for a 100 ks observation. For each detected source, the CSC provides commonly tabulated quantities, including source position, extent, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics, derived from the observations in which the source is detected. In addition to these traditional catalog elements, for each X-ray source the CSC includes an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra from each observation in which a

  9. Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, B

    2013-01-01

    The application of the technique of laser resonance ionization to the production of singly charged ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an important component of many radioactive ion beam facilities. At CERN, for example, the RILIS is the most commonly used ion source of the ISOLDE facility, with a yearly operating time of up to 3000 hours. For some isotopes the RILIS can also be used as a fast and sensitive laser spectroscopy tool, provided that the spectral resolution is sufficiently high to reveal the influence of nuclear structure on the atomic spectra. This enables the study of nuclear properties of isotopes with production rates even lower than one ion per second and, in some cases, enables isomer selective ionization. The solutions available for the implementation of resonance laser ionization at radioactive ion beam facilities are summarized. Aspects such as the laser r...

  10. Organizational Dysfunctions: Sources and Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Pasieczny

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The purpose of this article is to identify and describe various types and sources of organizational dysfunctions. Research Design & Methods: The findings are based on literature review and an ongoing empirical research project conducted in private sector organisations. The empirical study can be situated within interpretative approach. In this qualitative project open interviews and observations were used to collect data. Findings: The study indicates that various types and sources of organizational dysfunctions can be identified in organizations operating in Poland. The sources of dysfunctions may be found both within the organization and its environment. Regardless of its specific features, most of the dysfunctions may be interpreted as an undesirable goal displacement. Very often areas of these dysfunctions are strongly interconnected and create a system that hinders organizational performance. Yet, it is difficult to study these phenomena as respondents are unwilling, for various reasons, to disclose the problems faced by their organizations. Implications & Recommendations: The results imply that the issue of organisational dysfunctions requires open, long-lasting and comparative studies. Recommendations for further studies are formulated in the last section of the paper. Contribution & Value Added: The paper provides insight into "the dark side of organising" by identifying sources and areas of dysfunctions. It also reveals difficulties connected with conducting research on dysfunctions in the Polish context.

  11. Communication Games Reveal Preparation Contextuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameedi, Alley; Tavakoli, Armin; Marques, Breno; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    A communication game consists of distributed parties attempting to jointly complete a task with restricted communication. Such games are useful tools for studying limitations of physical theories. A theory exhibits preparation contextuality whenever its predictions cannot be explained by a preparation noncontextual model. Here, we show that communication games performed in operational theories reveal the preparation contextuality of that theory. For statistics obtained in a particular family of communication games, we show a direct correspondence with correlations in spacelike separated events obeying the no-signaling principle. Using this, we prove that all mixed quantum states of any finite dimension are preparation contextual. We report on an experimental realization of a communication game involving three-level quantum systems from which we observe a strong violation of the constraints of preparation noncontextuality.

  12. The chemistry of plutonium revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connick, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    In 1941 one goal of the Manhattan Project was to unravel the chemistry of the synthetic element plutonium as rapidly as possible. Important insights were obtained from tracer experiments, but the full complexity of plutonium chemistry was not revealed until macroscopic amounts (milligrams) became available. Because processes for separation from fission products were aqueous solution based, such solution chemistry was emphasized, particularly precipitation and oxidation-reduction behavior. The latter turned out to be unusually intricate when it was discovered that two more oxidation states existed in aqueous solution than had previously been suspected. Further, it was found that an equilibrium was rapidly established among the four aqueous oxidation states while at the same time any three were not in equilibrium. These and other observations made while doing a crash study of a previously unknown element will be reported

  13. Plan competitions reveal entrepreneurial talent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madison, Alison L.

    2011-05-15

    Monthly economic diversity column for Tri-City Herald business section. Excerpt below: There’s something to be said for gaining valuable real-world experience in a structured, nurturing environment. Take for instance learning to scuba dive in the comfort of my resort pool rather than immediately hanging out with sharks while I figure out little things like oxygen tanks and avoiding underwater panic attacks. Likewise, graduate students are getting some excellent, supportive real-world training through university business plan competitions. These competitions are places where smart minds, new technologies, months of preparation and coaching, and some healthy pre-presentation jitters collide to reveal not only solid new business ideas, but also some promising entrepreneurial talent. In fact, professionals from around our region descend upon college campuses every spring to judge these events, which help to bridge the gap between academics and the real technology and business-driven economy.

  14. 2011 NATA - Emissions Sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes all emissions sources that were modeled in the 2011 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA), inlcluding point, nonpoint, and mobile sources, and...

  15. Biogenic Emission Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic emissions sources come from natural sources and need to accounted for in photochemical grid models. They are computed using a model which utilizes spatial information on vegetation and land use.

  16. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a next-generation spallation neutron source for neutron scattering that is currently the most powerful neutron source in...

  17. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  18. Dioxin emissions and sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The papers presented at the seminar discussed dioxin emissions and sources, dioxin pollution of soils, waste water and sewage sludge, stocktaking of emission sources, and exposure and risk analyses for dioxin and other pollutants. (EF) [de

  19. Improved Electrochemical Performance of LiFePO4@N-Doped Carbon Nanocomposites Using Polybenzoxazine as Nitrogen and Carbon Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Zhang, Geng; Li, Zhichen; Sheng, Wangjian; Zhang, Yichi; Gu, Jiangjiang; Zheng, Xinsheng; Cao, Feifei

    2016-10-03

    Polybenzoxazine is used as a novel carbon and nitrogen source for coating LiFePO 4 to obtain LiFePO 4 @nitrogen-doped carbon (LFP@NC) nanocomposites. The nitrogen-doped graphene-like carbon that is in situ coated on nanometer-sized LiFePO 4 particles can effectively enhance the electrical conductivity and provide fast Li + transport paths. When used as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, the LFP@NC nanocomposite (88.4 wt % of LiFePO 4 ) exhibits a favorable rate performance and stable cycling performance.

  20. Hidden acoustic information revealed by intentional nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, David R.

    2017-11-01

    Acoustic waves are omnipresent in modern life and are well described by the linearized equations of fluid dynamics. Once generated, acoustic waves carry and collect information about their source and the environment through which they propagate, respectively, and this information may be retrieved by analyzing recordings of these waves. Because of this, acoustics is the primary means for observation, surveillance, reconnaissance, and remote sensing in otherwise opaque environments, such as the Earth's oceans and crust, and the interior of the human body. For such information-retrieval tasks, acoustic fields are nearly always interrogated within their recorded frequency range or bandwidth. However, this frequency-range restriction is not general; acoustic fields may also carry (hidden) information at frequencies outside their bandwidth. Although such a claim may seem counter intuitive, hidden acoustic-field information can be revealed by re-introducing a marquee trait of fluid dynamics: nonlinearity. In particular, an intentional quadratic nonlinearity - a form of intra-signal heterodyning - can be used to obtain acoustic field information at frequencies outside a recorded acoustic field's bandwidth. This quadratic nonlinearity enables a variety of acoustic remote sensing applications that were long thought to be impossible. In particular, it allows the detrimental effects of sparse recordings and random scattering to be suppressed when the original acoustic field has sufficient bandwidth. In this presentation, the topic is developed heuristically, with a just brief exposition of the relevant mathematics. Hidden acoustic field information is then revealed from simulated and measured acoustic fields in simple and complicated acoustic environments involving frequencies from a few Hertz to more than 100 kHz, and propagation distances from tens of centimeters to hundreds of kilometers. Sponsored by ONR, NAVSEA, and NSF.

  1. Sealed radioactive source management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources have been used in a wide range of application in medicine, agriculture, geology, industry and other fields. Since its utilization many sources have become out of use and became waste but no proper management. This has lead to many accidents causing deaths and serious radiation injuries worldwide. Spent sources application is expanding but their management has seen little improvements. Sealed radioactive sources have become a security risk calling for prompt action. Source management helps to maintain sources in a good physical status and provide means of source tracking and control. It also provides a well documented process of the sources making any future management options safe, secure and cost effective. Last but not least good source management substantially reduces the risk of accidents and eliminates the risk of malicious use. The International Atomic Energy Agency assists Member States to build the infrastructure to properly manage sealed radioactive sources. The assistance includes training of national experts to handle, condition and properly store the sources. For Member States that do not have proper facilities, we provide the technical assistance to design a proper facility to properly manage the radioactive sources and provide for their proper storage. For Member States that need to condition their sources properly but don't have the required infrastructure we provide direct assistance to physically help them with source recovery and provide an international expert team to properly condition their sources and render them safe and secure. We offer software (Radioactive Waste Management Registry) to properly keep a complete record on the sources and provide for efficient tracking. This also helps with proper planning and decision making for long term management

  2. Digital intelligence sources transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhen; Wang Renbo

    2011-01-01

    It presents from the collection of particle-ray counting, infrared data communication, real-time monitoring and alarming, GPRS and other issues start to realize the digital management of radioactive sources, complete the real-time monitoring of all aspects, include the storing of radioactive sources, transporting and using, framing intelligent radioactive sources transporter, as a result, achieving reliable security supervision of radioactive sources. (authors)

  3. Nanometer-scale elongation rate fluctuations in the Myriophyllum aquaticum (Parrot feather) stem were altered by radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senavirathna, Mudalige Don Hiranya Jayasanka; Asaeda, Takashi; Thilakarathne, Bodhipaksha Lalith Sanjaya; Kadono, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    The emission of radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR) by various wireless communication base stations has increased in recent years. While there is wide concern about the effects of EMR on humans and animals, the influence of EMR on plants is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of EMR on the growth dynamics of Myriophyllum aquaticum (Parrot feather) by measuring the nanometric elongation rate fluctuation (NERF) using a statistical interferometry technique. Plants were exposed to 2 GHz EMR at a maximum of 1.42 Wm(-2) for 1 h. After continuous exposure to EMR, M. aquaticum plants exhibited a statistically significant 51 ± 16% reduction in NERF standard deviation. Temperature observations revealed that EMR exposure did not cause dielectric heating of the plants. Therefore, the reduced NERF was due to a non-thermal effect caused by EMR exposure. The alteration in NERF continued for at least 2.5 h after EMR exposure and no significant recovery was found in post-EMR NERF during the experimental period.

  4. DNA with Parallel Strand Orientation: A Nanometer Distance Study with Spin Labels in the Watson-Crick and the Reverse Watson-Crick Double Helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunnicke, Dorith; Ding, Ping; Yang, Haozhe; Seela, Frank; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2015-10-29

    Parallel-stranded (ps) DNA characterized by its sugar-phosphate backbones pointing in the same direction represents an alternative pairing system to antiparallel-stranded (aps) DNA with the potential to inhibit transcription and translation. 25-mer oligonucleotides were selected containing only dA·dT base pairs to compare spin-labeled nucleobase distances over a range of 10 or 15 base pairs in ps DNA with those in aps DNA. By means of the copper(I)-catalyzed Huisgen-Meldal-Sharpless alkyne-azide cycloaddition, the spin label 4-azido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl was clicked to 7-ethynyl-7-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine to yield 25-mer oligonucleotides incorporating two spin labels. The interspin distances between spin labeled residues were determined by pulse EPR spectroscopy. The results reveal that in ps DNA these distances are between 5 and 10% longer than in aps DNA when the labeled DNA segment is located near the center of the double helix. The interspin distance in ps DNA becomes shorter compared with aps DNA when one of the spin labels occupies a position near the end of the double helix.

  5. Spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.S.; Bartholomew, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The principles and theory of spallation neutron sources are outlined and a comparison is given with other types of neutron source. A summary of the available accelerator types for spallation neutron sources and their advantages and disadvantages is presented. Suitable target materials are discussed for specific applications, and typical target assemblies shown. (U.K.)

  6. Global Sourcing of Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.; Petersen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    The global sourcing of services offers high returns but is also associated with high risks. The extent to which firms engage in ‘transformational’ global sourcing (i.e., global sourcing implying considerable changes in the home organization) chiefly depends on management's comfort zone which...

  7. Sources of pulsed radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of various sources of pulsed radiation are examined from the viewpoint of their importance to the radiation chemist, and some examples of uses of such sources are mentioned. A summary is given of the application of methods of physical dosimetry to pulsed sources, and the calibration of convenient chemical dosimeters by physical dosimetry is outlined. 7 figures, 1 table

  8. Investigating Primary Source Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Joanne; Hanlon, Ann M.; Levine, Jennie A.

    2009-01-01

    Primary source research requires students to acquire specialized research skills. This paper presents results from a user study testing the effectiveness of a Web guide designed to convey the concepts behind "primary source literacy". The study also evaluated students' strengths and weaknesses when conducting primary source research. (Contains 3…

  9. Open Source Business Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This analyses the Open source movement. Open source development process and management is seen different from the classical point of view. This focuses on characteristics and software market tendencies for the main Open source initiatives. It also points out the labor market future evolution for the software developers.

  10. Argonne inverted sputter source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yntema, J.L.; Billquist, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The emittance of the inverted sputter source with immersion lenses was measured to be about 5π mm mrad MeV/sup 1/2/ at the 75% level over a wide range of beam intensities. The use of the source in experiments with radioactive sputter targets and hydrogen loaded targets is described. Self contamination of the source is discussed

  11. A case of a found radiographic source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucelj, B.; Korun, M.; Kavsek, D.; Kreft, Z.; Krizman, M.; Martincic, R.; Rosman, M.; Sutej, T.

    1996-01-01

    High dose-rate levels were detected outdoors in the vicinity of a bunker used for storage of radiographic sources in a plant which manufactures metallic products. The investigation revealed that radiation was due to a buried sealed radiographic source, containing 28 GBq of 137 Cs. A special republic radiological emergency team removed the source in a carefully planned operation. There was no evidence for overexposure of the population or of radiographic and other workers of the plant. The highest dose to the recovery team was 50 μSv

  12. Dione and Rhea seasonal exospheres revealed by Cassini CAPS and INMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teolis, B. D.; Waite, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    A Dione O2 and CO2 exosphere of similar composition and density to Rhea's is confirmed by Cassini spacecraft Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) flyby data. INMS results from three Dione and two Rhea flybys show exospheric spatial and temporal variability indicative of seasonal exospheres, modulated by winter polar gas adsorption and desorption at the equinoxes. Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) pickup ion fluxes also show exospheric structure and evolution at Rhea consistent with INMS, after taking into consideration the anticipated charge exchange, electron impact, and photo-ionization rates. Data-model comparisons show the exospheric evolution to be consistent with polar frost diffusion into the surface regolith, which limits surface exposure and loss of the winter frost cap by sputtering. Implied O2 source rates of ∼45(7) × 1021 s-1 at Dione(Rhea) are ∼50(300) times less than expected from known O2 radiolysis yields from ion-irradiated pure water ice measured in the laboratory, ruling out secondary sputtering as a major exospheric contributor, and implying a nanometer scale surface refractory lag layer consisting of concentrated carbonaceous impurities. We estimate ∼30:1(2:1) relative O2:CO2 source rates at Dione(Rhea), consistent with a stoichiometric bulk composition below the lag layer of 0.01(0.13) C atoms per H2O molecule, deriving from endogenic constituents, implanted micrometeoritic organics, and (in particular at Dione) exogenous H2O delivery by E-ring grains. Impact deposition, gardening and vaporization may thereby control the global O2 source rates by fresh H2O ice exposure to surface radiolysis and trapped oxidant ejection.

  13. Hubble Images Reveal Jupiter's Auroras

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    These images, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, reveal changes in Jupiter's auroral emissions and how small auroral spots just outside the emission rings are linked to the planet's volcanic moon, Io. The images represent the most sensitive and sharply-detailed views ever taken of Jovian auroras.The top panel pinpoints the effects of emissions from Io, which is about the size of Earth's moon. The black-and-white image on the left, taken in visible light, shows how Io and Jupiter are linked by an invisible electrical current of charged particles called a 'flux tube.' The particles - ejected from Io (the bright spot on Jupiter's right) by volcanic eruptions - flow along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which thread through Io, to the planet's north and south magnetic poles. This image also shows the belts of clouds surrounding Jupiter as well as the Great Red Spot.The black-and-white image on the right, taken in ultraviolet light about 15 minutes later, shows Jupiter's auroral emissions at the north and south poles. Just outside these emissions are the auroral spots. Called 'footprints,' the spots are created when the particles in Io's 'flux tube' reach Jupiter's upper atmosphere and interact with hydrogen gas, making it fluoresce. In this image, Io is not observable because it is faint in the ultraviolet.The two ultraviolet images at the bottom of the picture show how the auroral emissions change in brightness and structure as Jupiter rotates. These false-color images also reveal how the magnetic field is offset from Jupiter's spin axis by 10 to 15 degrees. In the right image, the north auroral emission is rising over the left limb; the south auroral oval is beginning to set. The image on the left, obtained on a different date, shows a full view of the north aurora, with a strong emission inside the main auroral oval.The images were taken by the telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 between May 1994 and September 1995.This image and other images and data

  14. Source splitting via the point source method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potthast, Roland; Fazi, Filippo M; Nelson, Philip A

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for source identification and field splitting based on the point source method (Potthast 1998 A point-source method for inverse acoustic and electromagnetic obstacle scattering problems IMA J. Appl. Math. 61 119–40, Potthast R 1996 A fast new method to solve inverse scattering problems Inverse Problems 12 731–42). The task is to separate the sound fields u j , j = 1, ..., n of n element of N sound sources supported in different bounded domains G 1 , ..., G n in R 3 from measurements of the field on some microphone array—mathematically speaking from the knowledge of the sum of the fields u = u 1 + ... + u n on some open subset Λ of a plane. The main idea of the scheme is to calculate filter functions g 1 ,…, g n , n element of N, to construct u l for l = 1, ..., n from u| Λ in the form u l (x) = ∫ Λ g l,x (y)u(y)ds(y), l=1,... n. (1) We will provide the complete mathematical theory for the field splitting via the point source method. In particular, we describe uniqueness, solvability of the problem and convergence and stability of the algorithm. In the second part we describe the practical realization of the splitting for real data measurements carried out at the Institute for Sound and Vibration Research at Southampton, UK. A practical demonstration of the original recording and the splitting results for real data is available online

  15. ERP correlates of source memory: unitized source information increases familiarity-based retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Rachel A; Van den Boom, Wijnand; Yonelinas, Andrew P; Ranganath, Charan

    2011-01-07

    Source memory tests typically require subjects to make decisions about the context in which an item was encoded and are thought to depend on recollection of details from the study episode. Although it is generally believed that familiarity does not contribute to source memory, recent behavioral studies have suggested that familiarity may also support source recognition when item and source information are integrated, or "unitized," during study (Diana, Yonelinas, and Ranganath, 2008). However, an alternative explanation of these behavioral findings is that unitization affects the manner in which recollection contributes to performance, rather than increasing familiarity-based source memory. To discriminate between these possibilities, we conducted an event-related potential (ERP) study testing the hypothesis that unitization increases the contribution of familiarity to source recognition. Participants studied associations between words and background colors using tasks that either encouraged or discouraged unitization. ERPs were recorded during a source memory test for background color. The results revealed two distinct neural correlates of source recognition: a frontally distributed positivity that was associated with familiarity-based source memory in the high-unitization condition only and a parietally distributed positivity that was associated with recollection-based source memory in both the high- and low-unitization conditions. The ERP and behavioral findings provide converging evidence for the idea that familiarity can contribute to source recognition, particularly when source information is encoded as an item detail. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermal neutron source study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, T.M.

    1983-05-01

    The value of intense neutron beams for condensed matter research is discussed with emphasis on the complementary nature of steady state and pulsed neutron sources. A large body of information on neutron sources, both existing and planned, is then summarized under four major headings: fission reactors, electron accelerators with heavy metal targets, pulsed spallation sources and 'steady state' spallation sources. Although the cost of a spallation source is expected to exceed that of a fission reactor of the same flux by a factor of two, there are significant advantages for a spallation device such as the proposed Electronuclear Materials Test Facility (EMTF)

  17. Spallation neutrons pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the range of scientific applications which can use these pulsed neutrons sources: Studies on super fluids, measures to verify the crawling model for the polymers diffusion; these sources are also useful to study the neutron disintegration, the ultra cold neutrons. In certain applications which were not accessible by neutrons diffusion, for example, radiations damages, radionuclides production and activation analysis, the spallation sources find their use and their improvement will bring new possibilities. Among others contributions, one must notice the place at disposal of pulsed muons sources and neutrinos sources. (N.C.). 3 figs

  18. Compact microwave ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.; Walther, S.; Owren, H.W.

    1985-05-01

    A small microwave ion source has been fabricated from a quartz tube with one end enclosed by a two grid accelerator. The source is also enclosed by a cavity operated at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. Microwave power as high as 500 W can be coupled to the source plasma. The source has been operated with and without multicusp fields for different gases. In the case of hydrogen, ion current density of 200 mA/cm -2 with atomic ion species concentration as high as 80% has been extracted from the source

  19. Sources for charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arianer, J.

    1997-01-01

    This document is a basic course on charged particle sources for post-graduate students and thematic schools on large facilities and accelerator physics. A simple but precise description of the creation and the emission of charged particles is presented. This course relies on every year upgraded reference documents. Following relevant topics are considered: electronic emission processes, technological and practical considerations on electron guns, positron sources, production of neutral atoms, ionization, plasma and discharge, different types of positive and negative ion sources, polarized particle sources, materials for the construction of ion sources, low energy beam production and transport. (N.T.)

  20. Characterization of the main error sources of chromatic confocal probes for dimensional measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouira, H; El-Hayek, N; Yuan, X; Anwer, N

    2014-01-01

    Chromatic confocal probes are increasingly used in high-precision dimensional metrology applications such as roughness, form, thickness and surface profile measurements; however, their measurement behaviour is not well understood and must be characterized at a nanometre level. This paper provides a calibration bench for the characterization of two chromatic confocal probes of 20 and 350 µm travel ranges. The metrology loop that includes the chromatic confocal probe is stable and enables measurement repeatability at the nanometer level. With the proposed system, the major error sources, such as the relative axial and radial motions of the probe with respect to the sample, the material, colour and roughness of the measured sample, the relative deviation/tilt of the probe and the scanning speed are identified. Experimental test results show that the chromatic confocal probes are sensitive to these errors and that their measurement behaviour is highly dependent on them. (paper)

  1. Polarized source upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, T.B.; Rummel, R.L.; Carter, E.P.; Westerfeldt, C.R.; Lovette, A.W.; Edwards, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    The decision was made this past year to move the Lamb-shift polarized ion source which was first installed in the laboratory in 1970. The motivation was the need to improve the flexibility of spin-axis orientation by installing the ion source with a new Wien-filter spin precessor which is capable of rotating physically about the beam axis. The move of the polarized source was accomplished in approximately two months, with the accelerator being turned off for experiments during approximately four weeks of this time. The occasion of the move provided the opportunity to rewire completely the entire polarized ion source frame and to rebuild approximately half of the electronic chassis on the source. The result is an ion source which is now logically wired and carefully documented. Beams obtained from the source are much more stable than those previously available

  2. Polarized electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Polarized electron sources for high energy accelerators took a significant step forward with the introduction of a new laser-driven photocathode source for the SLC in 1992. With an electron beam polarization of >80% and with ∼99% uptime during continuous operation, this source is a key factor in the success of the current SLC high-energy physics program. The SLC source performance is used to illustrate both the capabilities and the limitations of solid-state sources. The beam requirements for future colliders are similar to that of the SLC with the addition in most cases of multiple-bunch operation. A design for the next generation accelerator source that can improve the operational characteristics and at least minimize some of the inherent limitations of present sources is presented. Finally, the possibilities for producing highly polarized electron beams for high-duty-factor accelerators are discussed

  3. Wavelength sweepable laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength sweepable laser source is disclosed, wherein the laser source is a semiconductor laser source adapted for generating laser light at a lasing wavelength. The laser source comprises a substrate, a first reflector, and a second reflector. The first and second reflector together defines...... and having a rest position, the second reflector and suspension together defining a microelectromechanical MEMS oscillator. The MEMS oscillator has a resonance frequency and is adapted for oscillating the second reflector on either side of the rest position.; The laser source further comprises electrical...... connections adapted for applying an electric field to the MEMS oscillator. Furthermore, a laser source system and a method of use of the laser source are disclosed....

  4. Stellar Sources of Gamma-ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Luchkov, B. I.

    2011-01-01

    Correlation analysis of Swift gamma-ray burst coordinates and nearby star locations (catalog Gliese) reveals 4 coincidences with good angular accuracy. The random probability is 4\\times 10^{-5}, so evidencing that coincident stars are indeed gamma-ray burst sources. Some additional search of stellar gamma-ray bursts is discussed.

  5. Orphan sources in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Cesarek, J.

    2005-01-01

    For decades the international standards and requirements postulate severe control over all lifecycle phases of radioactive sources in order to prevent risks associated with exposure of people and the environment. Despite this fact the orphan sources became a serious problem as a consequence of enlargement of economic transactions in many countries in Europe as well as in the world. The countries as well as international organisations, aware of this emerging problem, are trying to gain control over orphan sources using different approaches. These approaches include control over sources before they could become orphan sources. In addition, countries are also developing action plans in case that an orphan source could be found. The problems related to orphan sources in Slovenia is discussed based on the case studies from the last years. While in the nineties of the last century just a few cases of orphan sources were identified their number has increased substantially since 2003. The paper discusses the general reasons for the phenomena of orphan sources as well as the experience related to regaining control over orphan sources. (author)

  6. Advanced photon source low-energy undulator test line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    The injector system of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) consists of a linac capable of producing 450-MeV positrons or > 650-MeV electrons, a positron accumulator ring (PAR), and a booster synchrotron designed to accelerate particles to 7 GeV. There are long periods of time when these machines are not required for filling the main storage ring and instead can be used for synchrotron radiation research. We describe here an extension of the linac beam transport called the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL). The LEUTL will have a twofold purpose. The first is to fully characterize innovative, future generation undulators, some of which may prove difficult or impossible to measure by traditional techniques. These might include small-gap and superconducting undulators, very long undulators, undulators with designed-in internal focusing, and helical undulators. This technique also holds the promise of extending the magnetic measurement sensitivity beyond that presently attainable. This line will provide the capability to directly test undulators before their possible insertion into operating storage rings. A second use for the test line will be to investigate the generation of coherent radiation at wavelengths down to a few tens of nanometers

  7. X-ray nanoprobe project at Taiwan Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Gung-Chian, E-mail: gcyin@nsrrc.org.tw; Chang, Shih-Hung; Chen, Bo-Yi; Chen, Huang-Yeh; Lin, Bi-Hsuan; Tseng, Shao-Chin; Lee, Chien-Yu; Wu, Jian-Xing; Tang, Mau-Tsu [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shao-Yun [National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-27

    The hard X-ray nanoprobe facility at Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) provides versatile X-ray analysis techniques, with tens of nanometer resolution, including XRF, XAS, XEOL, projection microscope, CDI, etc. Resulting from the large numerical aperture obtained by utilizing Montel KB mirrors, the beamline with a moderate length 75 meters can conduct similar performance with those beamlines longer than 100 meters. The two silica-made Montel mirrors are 45 degree cut and placed in a V-shape to eliminate the gap loss and the deformation caused by gravity. The slope error of the KB mirror pair is less than 0.04 µrad accomplished by elastic emission machining (EEM) method. For the beamline, a horizontal DCM and two-stage focusing in horizontal direction is applied. For the endstation, a combination of SEM for quickly positioning the sample, a fly scanning system with laser interferometers, a precise temperature control system, and a load lock transfer system will be implemented. In this presentation, the design and construction progress of the beamline and endstation is reported. The endstation is scheduled to be in commissioning phase in 2016.

  8. Focus groups reveal consumer ambivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    According to qualitative research, Salvadoreans are ambivalent about the use of contraceptives. Since complete responsibility for management of the CSM project was accepted by the Association Demografica Salvadorena (ADS), the agency which operates the contraceptive social marketing project in El Salvador, in November 1980, the need for decisions in such areas as product price increases, introduction of new condom brands, promotion of the vaginal foaming tablet, and assessment of product sales performance had arisen. The ICSMP funded market research, completed during 1983, was intended to provide the data on which such decisions by ADS could be based. The qualitative research involved 8 focus groups, comprised of men and women, aged 18-45, contraceptive users and nonusers, from the middle and lower socioeconomic strata of the city of San Salvador and other suburban areas. In each group a moderator led discussion of family planning and probed respondents for specific attitudes, knowledge, and behavior regarding the use of contraceptives. To assess attitudes at a more emotional level, moderators asked respondents to "draw" their ideas on certain issues. A marked discrepancy was revealed between respondents' intellectual responses to the issues raised in group discussion, as opposed to their feelings expressed in the drawings. Intellectually, participants responded very positively to family planning practice, but when they were asked to draw their perceptions, ambivalent feelings emerged. Drawings of both the user and the nonuser convey primarily negative aspects for either choice. The user is tense and moody toward her children; the nonuser loses her attractiveness and "dies." Figures also show drawings of some of the attitudes of single and married male participants. 1 drawing shows an incomplete and a complete circle, symbolizing a sterilized man (incomplete) and a nonsterilized man (complete). Another picture depicts a chained man who has lost his freedom

  9. Point Pollution Sources Dimensioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta CUCULEANU

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a method for determining the main physical characteristics of the point pollution sources is presented. It can be used to find the main physical characteristics of them. The main physical characteristics of these sources are top inside source diameter and physical height. The top inside source diameter is calculated from gas flow-rate. For reckoning the physical height of the source one takes into account the relation given by the proportionality factor, defined as ratio between the plume rise and physical height of the source. The plume rise depends on the gas exit velocity and gas temperature. That relation is necessary for diminishing the environmental pollution when the production capacity of the plant varies, in comparison with the nominal one.

  10. Specification of brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    BCRU recommends that the following specification of gamma-ray brachytherapy sources be adopted. Unless otherwise stated, the output of a cylindrical source should be specified in air kerma rate at a point in free space at a distance of 1 m from the source on the radial plane of symmetry, i.e. the plane bisecting the active length and perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of the source. For a wire source the output should be specified for a 1 cm length. For any other construction of source, the point at which the output is specified should be stated. It is also recommended that the units in which the air kerma rate is expressed should be micrograys per hour (..mu..Gy/h).

  11. Global Sourcing Flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.; Petersen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    the higher costs (but decreased risk for value chain disruption) embedded in a more flexible global sourcing model that allows the firm to replicate and/or relocate activities across multiple locations. We develop a model and propositions on facilitating and constraining conditions of global sourcing...... sourcing flexibility. Here we draw on prior research in the fields of organizational flexibility, international business and global sourcing as well as case examples and secondary studies. In the second part of the paper, we discuss the implications of global sourcing flexibility for firm strategy...... and operations against the backdrop of the theory-based definition of the construct. We discuss in particular the importance of global sourcing flexibility for operational performance stability, and the trade-off between specialization benefits, emerging from location and service provider specialization, versus...

  12. Rf power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs

  13. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology

  14. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology

  15. Reference Sources in Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Sthapit, Dilip Man

    1995-01-01

    Information plays an important role in the development of every field. Therefore a brief knowledge regarding information sources is necessary to function in any field. There are many information sources about scientific and technical subjects. In this context there are many reference sources in Chemistry too. Chemistry is one important part of the science which deals with the study of the composition of substances and the chemical changes that they undergo. The purpose of this report is...

  16. Open-Source Colorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Anzalone, Gerald C.; Glover, Alexandra G.; Pearce, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of what have historically been sophisticated research-related sensors and tools has limited their adoption to a relatively small group of well-funded researchers. This paper provides a methodology for applying an open-source approach to design and development of a colorimeter. A 3-D printable, open-source colorimeter utilizing only open-source hardware and software solutions and readily available discrete components is discussed and its performance compared to a commercial porta...

  17. Source and replica calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalen, P.P.

    1994-01-01

    The starting point of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program is the energy and directional distributions of the prompt neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from the exploding bombs. A brief introduction to the neutron source calculations is presented. The development of our current understanding of the source problem is outlined. It is recommended that adjoint calculations be used to modify source spectra to resolve the neutron discrepancy problem

  18. Properties of neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The Conference presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: white neutron sources, primarily pulsed (6 papers); fast neutron fields (5 papers); Californium-252 prompt fission neutron spectra (14 papers); monoenergetic sources and filtered beams (11 papers); 14 MeV neutron sources (10 papers); selected special application (one paper); and a general interest session (4 papers). Individual abstracts were prepared separately for the papers

  19. Transparent and Highly Responsive Phototransistors Based on a Solution-Processed, Nanometers-Thick Active Layer, Embedding a High-Mobility Electron-Transporting Polymer and a Hole-Trapping Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranzi, Lorenzo; Pace, Giuseppina; Sassi, Mauro; Beverina, Luca; Caironi, Mario

    2017-08-30

    Organic materials are suitable for light sensing devices showing unique features such as low cost, large area, and flexibility. Moreover, transparent photodetectors are interesting for smart interfaces, windows, and display-integrated electronics. The ease of depositing ultrathin organic films with simple techniques enables low light absorbing active layers, resulting in the realization of transparent devices. Here, we demonstrate a strategy to obtain high efficiency organic photodetectors and phototransistors based on transparent active layers with a visible transmittance higher than 90%. The photoactive layer is composed of two phases, each a few nanometers thick. First, an acceptor polymer, which is a good electron-transporting material, on top of which a small molecule donor material is deposited, forming noncontinuous domains. The small molecule phase acts as a trap for holes, thus inducing a high photoconductive gain, resulting in a high photoresponsivity. The organic transparent detectors proposed here can reach very high external quantum efficiency and responsivity values, which in the case of the phototransistors can be as high as ∼74000% and 340 A W -1 at 570 nm respectively, despite an absorber total thickness below 10 nm. Moreover, frequency dependent 2D photocurrent mapping allows discrimination between the contribution of a fast but inefficient and highly spatially localized photoinduced injection mechanism at the electrodes, and the onset of a slower and spatially extended photoconductive process, leading to high responsivity.

  20. Determination of mercury and selenium in herbal medicines and hair by using a nanometer TiO{sub 2}-coated quartz tube atomizer and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shun-Xing, E-mail: lishunxing@fjzs.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science (Zhangzhou Normal University), Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Zheng, Feng-Ying [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science (Zhangzhou Normal University), Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Cai, Shu-Jie; Cai, Tian-Shou [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The nanometer TiO{sub 2} particle was coated onto the inner wall of a T-shaped quartz tube atomizer (QTA) and then was used as a new atomizer (NT-QTA) for the determination of Hg and Se by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). After coating 67.4 mg TiO{sub 2} on a quartz tube, the analytical performance of NT-QTA-HGAAS was compared to conventional QTA-HGAAS and it was improved as follows: (a) the linear range of the calibration curves was expanded from 10.0-80.0 ng mL{sup -1} to 5.0-150.0 ng mL{sup -1} for Hg, and from 10.0-70.0 ng mL{sup -1} to 5.0-100.0 ng mL{sup -1} for Se; (b) the characteristic concentration of was decreased from 2.8 ng mL{sup -1}/1% to 1.1 ng mL{sup -1}/1% for Hg and from 1.2 ng mL{sup -1}/1% to 0.8 ng mL{sup -1}/1% for Se; and (c) the interference from the coexistence of As on the determination of Hg and Se could be eliminated. The achieved technique was applied for the determination of Hg and Se in herbal medicines and hair.