WorldWideScience

Sample records for source overlap welding

  1. Laser Overlap Welding of Zinc-coated Steel on Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Hamed Tasalloti; Kah, Paul; Martikainen, Jukka

    Local reinforcement of aluminum with laser welded patches of zinc-coated steel can effectively contribute to crashworthiness, durability and weight reduction of car body. However, the weld between Zn-coated steel and aluminum is commonly susceptible to defects such as spatter, cavity and crack. The vaporization of Zn is commonly known as the main source of instability in the weld pool and cavity formation, especially in a lap joint configuration. Cracks are mainly due to the brittle intermetallic compounds growing at the weld interface of aluminum and steel. This study provides a review on the main metallurgical and mechanical concerns regarding laser overlap welding of Zn-coated steel on Al-alloy and the methods used by researchers to avoid the weld defects related to the vaporization of Zn and the poor metallurgical compatibility between steel and aluminum.

  2. Static and fatigue strengths of laser-welded overlap joints with controlled penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitanov, A. Y.; Ozersky, A. D.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.; Kislov, V. S.

    2002-04-01

    Static and fatigue strengths of laser welded overlap joints with controlled and full penetrations of 3 mm AISI 304 were investigated. The depth of penetration was controlled by employing certain combinations of laser power and travel speed. Experimental program showed that fatigue and static strengths are dependent on the weld width and independent of the depth of penetration. Larger weld width is attributed to higher static and fatigue strengths. The joints with full penetration possess the same strength characteristics as the samples with controlled penetration.

  3. Effect of Beam Energy on Weld Geometric Characteristics in Nd:YAG Laser Overlapping Spot Welding of Thin AISI 304 Stainless Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapsanska, Hana; Chmelickova, Hana; Hrabovsky, Miroslav

    2010-10-01

    Weld geometric characteristics in laser overlapping spot welding of 0.6-mm AISI 304 stainless steel sheets were investigated. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser with maximal average power of 150 W was used for welding experiments with different laser beam energies in the range of 3.5 J to 6.2 J, keeping all other processing parameters constant. The main objective of these experiments was to study the effect of energy changes and to identify the welding mode in dependency on the beam effective peak power density. Each weld surface and its cross section were analyzed using a laser scanning confocal microscope. The spot diameter on the specimen, weld width, and penetration depth were measured. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction was realized to describe the effect of energy changes on weld surface properties.

  4. Heat source model for welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan, D.D.

    2006-10-01

    One of the major industrial stakes of the welding simulation relates to the control of mechanical effects of the process (residual stress, distortions, fatigue strength... ). These effects are directly dependent on the temperature evolutions imposed during the welding process. To model this thermal loading, an original method is proposed instead of the usual methods like equivalent heat source approach or multi-physical approach. This method is based on the estimation of the weld pool shape together with the heat flux crossing the liquid/solid interface, from experimental data measured in the solid part. Its originality consists in solving an inverse Stefan problem specific to the welding process, and it is shown how to estimate the parameters of the weld pool shape. To solve the heat transfer problem, the interface liquid/solid is modeled by a Bezier curve ( 2-D) or a Bezier surface (3-D). This approach is well adapted to a wide diversity of weld pool shapes met for the majority of the current welding processes (TIG, MlG-MAG, Laser, FE, Hybrid). The number of parameters to be estimated is weak enough, according to the cases considered from 2 to 5 in 20 and 7 to 16 in 3D. A sensitivity study leads to specify the location of the sensors, their number and the set of measurements required to a good estimate. The application of the method on test results of welding TIG on thin stainless steel sheets in emerging and not emerging configurations, shows that only one measurement point is enough to estimate the various weld pool shapes in 20, and two points in 3D, whatever the penetration is full or not. In the last part of the work, a methodology is developed for the transient analysis. It is based on the Duvaut's transformation which overpasses the discontinuity of the liquid metal interface and therefore gives a continuous variable for the all spatial domain. Moreover, it allows to work on a fixed mesh grid and the new inverse problem is equivalent to identify a source

  5. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Friction Tapered Stud Overlap Welding for X65 Pipeline Steel Under Wet Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. C.; Jing, H. Y.; Han, Y. D.; Xu, L. Y.

    2017-08-01

    This paper exhibits a novel in situ remediation technique named friction tapered stud overlap welding (FTSOW) to repair a through crack in structures and components in extremely harsh environments. Furthermore, this paper presents variations in process data, including rotational speed, stud displacement, welding force, and torque for a typical FTSOW weld. In the present study, the effects of welding parameters on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the welding joints were investigated. Inapposite welding parameters consisted of low rotational speeds and welding forces, and when utilized, they increased the occurrence of a lack of bonding and unfilled defects within the weld. The microstructures with a welding zone and heat-affected zone mainly consisted of upper bainite. The hardness value was highest in the welding zone and lowest in the base material. During the pull-out tests, all the welds failed in the stud. Moreover, the defect-free welds broke at the interface of the lap plate and substrate during the cruciform uniaxial tensile test. The best tensile test results at different depths and shear tests were 721.6 MPa and 581.9 MPa, respectively. The favorable Charpy impact-absorbed energy was 68.64 J at 0 °C. The Charpy impact tests revealed a brittle fracture characteristic with a large area of cleavage.

  6. Microstructure and Hardness Profiles of Bifocal Laser-Welded DP-HSLA Steel Overlap Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajcar, A.; Matter, P.; Stano, S.; Wilk, Z.; Różański, M.

    2017-04-01

    The article presents results related to the bifocal laser welding of overlap joints made of HSLA and DP high-strength steels. The joints were made using a disk laser and a head enabling the 50-50% distribution of laser power. The effects of the laser welding rates and the distance between laser spots on morphological features and hardness profiles were analyzed. It was established that the positioning of beams at angles of 0° or 90° determined the hardness of the individual zones of the joints, without causing significant differences in microstructures of the steels. Microstructural features were inspected using scanning electron microscopy. Both steels revealed primarily martensitic-bainitic microstructures in the fusion zone and in the heat-affected zone. Mixed multiphase microstructures were revealed in the inter-critical heat-affected zone of the joint. The research involved the determination of parameters making it possible to reduce the hardness of joints and prevent the formation of the soft zone in the dual-phase steel.

  7. Effect of the overlapping factor on the microstructure and mechanical properties of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welded Ti6Al4V sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiao-Long; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Lin-Jie, E-mail: zhanglinjie@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2014-07-01

    The effect of the overlapping factor on the microstructures and mechanical properties of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welded Ti6Al4V alloy sheets was investigated by microstructural observations, microhardness tests, tensile tests and fatigue tests. A microstructural examination shows that by increasing the overlapping factor, the grains in the fusion zone become coarser, and the width of the heat affected zone increases. As overlapping factor increases, the width of region composed completely of martensite α′ and the secondary α phase in the heat affected zone increases, consequently the gradient of microstructure along the direction from the fusion zone to base metal decreases, so does the gradient of microhardness. The results of tensile and fatigue tests reveal that the joints made using medium overlapping factor exhibit better mechanical properties than those welded with low and high overlapping factors. Based on the experimental results, it can be stated that a sound weld of Ti6Al4V alloy can be obtained if an appropriate overlapping factor is used. - Highlights: • The weld quality of Ti6Al4V alloy under various overlapping factors was assessed. • Tensile and fatigue tests were conducted with as-welded specimen. • Localized strain across the weld was measured using DIC photogrammetry system. • A sound weld of Ti6Al4V alloy is obtained by using right overlapping factor.

  8. Laser welding parameters for manufacturing iridium-192 (Ir-192) source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anung Pujiyanto; Moch Subechi; Hotman Lubis; Diandono KY

    2013-01-01

    Number of cervical cancer patients in Indonesia is growing every year. One of cervical cancer treatment was fairly effective use brachytherapy treatment with radioisotope sources of iridium-192. Manufacturing of iridium sources for brachytherapy can be done by incorporating the iridium-192 into stainless steel microcapsules then welding using laser welder which the quality of the welding of iridium source (Ir-192) was determined by the welding parameters such as full power, energy frequency, average power and speed. Based on the result of leakage test using pressure -20 inch Hg and tensile test 2.5 bar showed the welding parameters III and IV did not have leakage and damaged. So that parameters III and IV are recommended to be applied to Ir-192 HDR's source. (author)

  9. Heat Source - Materials Interactions during Fusion Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-30

    the heat transported to the vo’Id 1po0l is carried by the welding current. Metal vapors from the weld pool. m11ay alter the distribhution of the weld...current, thereby a I tringpth heat flux and the el ,curomnjneti call y dIi ivon fluid flow in tho kqel1d 1) oo 1 . I t is aInt.1ij-) aLtd thta t his...icil id Jhi~.1 Sdl (iI h i,; notl (ifft-rcilt thanll t l 1g ilha precipi tation is wore prcelailt in Ohe .IO i(I ji)) inl the( I io id, tIowVtki c

  10. Mathematical Model and the Simulation of Electrical Arc Welding as Moving Source in Protector Gas Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenuta Suciu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The works presents the mathematical model of electrical arc welding, simulation of the electrical arc as a moving source with help programs software Ansys, passing through three stage of simulation: pre- processing, processing (solution and post-processing.

  11. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  12. Ultrasonic metal welding with a vibration source using longitudinal and torsional vibration transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Takuya; Tamada, Yosuke; Higuchi, Yusuke; Miura, Hikaru

    2017-07-01

    Conventional ultrasonic metal welding for joining dissimilar metals uses a linear vibration locus, although this method suffers from problems such as low overall weld strength. Our previous studies have shown that ultrasonic welding with a planar vibration locus improves the weld strength. However, the vibration source in our previous studies had problems in longitudinal-torsional vibration controllability and small welding tip. Therefore, the study of the optimal shape of the vibration locus was difficult. Furthermore, improvement of weld strength cannot be expected. We have developed a new ultrasonic vibration source that can control the longitudinal-torsional vibration and can connect to a large welding tip. In this study, we clarified the longitudinal-torsional vibration controllability of the developed ultrasonic vibration source. Moreover, we clarified that using the planar locus of the developed vibration source produced a higher weld strength than our previous studies, and clarified the optimal shape of the vibration locus.

  13. Advanced Functions of a Modern Power Source for GMAW Welding of Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the use of a modern welding power source equipped with advanced arc control functions. At the Laboratory of Welding Technologies of CTU in Prague we have focused on GMAW welding of steel using Sigma Galaxy, a modern welding power source produced by Migatronic. Sigma Galaxy is equipped with functions called Intelligent Arc Control and Sequence Repeat. According to the manufacturer, controlling an arc by these functions should significantly stabilize the welding process, lower the heat input and the deformation, and improve the weld quality. To evaluate the benefits of these functions completely, single V butt welds were performed on S275J2 structural steel 10 mm in thickness (2 weld layers: root+capping layer in PF and PG positions. Welding was monitored by the Welding Information System, and was compared with standard GMAW welding. The results have shown that these “intelligent” functions offer significant advantages for steel welding, especially in vertical and overhead positions, because they lower the heat input and improve the weld metal control.

  14. Laser welding of polypropylene using two different sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolfino, Chiara; Brabazon, Dermot; McCarthy, Éanna; Lertora, Enrico; Gambaro, Carla; Ahad, Inam Ul

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, laser weldability of neutral polypropylene has been investigated using fibre and carbon dioxide lasers. A design of experiment (DoE) was conducted in order to establish the influence of the main working parameters on the welding strength of the two types of laser. The welded samples were characterized by carrying out visual and microscopic inspection for the welding morphology and cross-section, and by distinguishing the tensile strength. The resulting weld quality was investigated by means of optical microscopy at weld cross-sections. The tensile strength of butt-welded materials was measured and compared to that of a corresponding bulk material.

  15. Effect of Inverter Power Source Characteristics on Welding Stability and Heat Affected Zone Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il’yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Mamadaliev, R. A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents results the research in the effect of power sources dynamic characteristics on stability of melting and electrode metal transfer to the weld pool shielded metal arc welding. It is proved that when applying inverter-type welding power sources, heat and mass transfer characteristics change, arc gap short-circuit time and drop generation time are reduced. This leads to reduction of weld pool heat content and contraction of the heat-affected zone by 36% in comparison the same parameters obtained using a diode rectifier.

  16. Evaluation and characterization of General Purpose Heat Source girth welds for the Cassini mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, C.M.; Moniz, P.F.; Reimus, M.A.H.

    1998-01-01

    General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHSs) are components of Radioisotopic thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) which provide electric power for deep space missions. Each GPHS consists of a 238 Pu oxide ceramic pellet encapsulated in a welded iridium alloy shell which forms a protective barrier against the release of plutonia in the unlikely event of a launch-pad failure or reentry incident. GPHS fueled clad girth weld flaw detection was paramount to ensuring this safety function, and was accomplished using both destructive and non-destructive evaluation techniques. The first girth weld produced from each welding campaign was metallographically examined for flaws such as incomplete weld penetration, cracks, or porosity which would render a GPHS unacceptable for flight applications. After an acceptable example weld was produced, the subsequently welded heat sources were evaluated non-destructively for flaws using ultrasonic immersion testing. Selected heat sources which failed ultrasonic testing would be radiographed, and/or, destructively evaluated to further characterize and document anomalous indications. Metallography was also performed on impacted heat sources to determine the condition of the welds

  17. Assessment of laserbeam-welded tubular overlap joints made of magnesium and aluminium under multiaxial loading; Bemessung laserstrahlgeschweisster Ueberlappverbindungen aus Magnesium und Aluminium unter mehrachsiger Beanspruchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exel, Nora; Wiebesiek, Jens; Sonsino, Cetin Morris [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlaessigkeit (LBF), Darmstadt (Germany); Hanselka, Holger [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlaessigkeit (LBF), Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Fachgebiet ' ' Systemzuverlaessigkeit und Maschinenakustik' '

    2013-07-01

    The present paper compares the wrought light-metal alloys AlMg3.5Mn and MgAl3Zn1 based on the fatigue behaviour of laserbeam-welded overlapped tubular joints. The experiments were carried out under pure axial, pure torsional and combined proportional as well as nonproportional loading. The test results were assessed by applying the notch stress concept with a reference radius of r{sub ref} = 0,05 mm and compared with allowable stresses taken from a standard. Finally, two stress based multiaxial hypothesis are compared to each other based on the test results. (orig.)

  18. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  19. Effect of beam energy on weld geometric characteristics in Nd:YAG laser overlapping spot welding of thin AISI 304 stainless steel sheets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lapšanská, Hana; Chmelíčková, Hana; Hrabovský, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 5 (2010), 1108-1115 ISSN 1073-5615 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN301370701 Grant - others:7FP EU(XE) 222279 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : Nd:YAG laser * laser weld ing Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2010

  20. Welding Metallurgy and Processing Issues for Joining of Power Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienert, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reardon, Patrick T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14

    Weldability issues with the pertinent alloys have been reviewed and preliminary results of our work on Haynes 25 have been presented. Further results on the mechanical properties and metallography on the EB welds are imminent. Hot-ductility experiments will commence within a few weeks. Aging studies on the effects of heat treatment using the Gleeble are also planned. MST-6 has extensive background in the welding metallurgy of the pertinent alloys. We also have considerable experience with the various welding processes to be used.

  1. Welding iridium heat-source capsules for space missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    A remote computer-controlled welding station was developed to encapsulate radioactive PuO 2 in iridium. Weld quench cracking caused an interruption in production of capsules for upcoming space missions. Hot crack sensitivity of the DOP-26 iridium alloy was associated with low melting constituents in the grain boundaries. The extent of cracking was reduced but could not be eliminated by changes to the welding operation. An ultrasonic test was developed to detect underbead cracks exceeding a threshold size. Production was continued using the ultrasonic test to reject capsules with detectable cracks

  2. Micro-processor controlled, analog operating transistorized power-source with reproducible welding parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puschner, P.

    1982-01-01

    The combination of transistorized power-sources controlled by means of micro-processors and welding equipment being developed with respect to new points of view for fully automatic welding of nuclear components feeds to systems fullfilling high demands in the field of nuclear technology. It is significant that there is a high reproduction of all process- and positioning parameters and an easy handling and programming by using an interactive dialoque-system with video-terminal and keyboard. The storage-possibility of complete sets of parameters allows a quick and hundred percent accurate repeat of complete welding jobs. A by-the-way effect is the full compatibility of parameter sets when using equipments of the same generation. Different welding heads and positioning equipment can be easily used. The complete system offers high flexibility and leads to welds with high quality. (orig.)

  3. A new method to estimate heat source parameters in gas metal arc welding simulation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Xiaolei; Xu, Jie; Liu, Zhaoheng; Huang, Shaojie; Fan, Yu; Sun, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •A new method for accurate simulation of heat source parameters was presented. •The partial least-squares regression analysis was recommended in the method. •The welding experiment results verified accuracy of the proposed method. -- Abstract: Heat source parameters were usually recommended by experience in welding simulation process, which induced error in simulation results (e.g. temperature distribution and residual stress). In this paper, a new method was developed to accurately estimate heat source parameters in welding simulation. In order to reduce the simulation complexity, a sensitivity analysis of heat source parameters was carried out. The relationships between heat source parameters and welding pool characteristics (fusion width (W), penetration depth (D) and peak temperature (T p )) were obtained with both the multiple regression analysis (MRA) and the partial least-squares regression analysis (PLSRA). Different regression models were employed in each regression method. Comparisons of both methods were performed. A welding experiment was carried out to verify the method. The results showed that both the MRA and the PLSRA were feasible and accurate for prediction of heat source parameters in welding simulation. However, the PLSRA was recommended for its advantages of requiring less simulation data

  4. Pulsed TIG welding in the fabrication of nuclear components and structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, W.; Males, B.O.

    1979-01-01

    TIG welding is an important welding technique in nuclear plant fabrication for the welding of critical components and structures where a high level of weld integrity is demanded. Whilst the process is ideally suited to precision welding, since the arc is a small intense heat source, it has proved to be somewhat intolerant to production variations in 'difficult' applications, such as tube to tube plate welding and orbital tube welding with tube in the fixed position. Whilst the problems directly associated with this intolerance (of the welding process) are less frequently observed when used manually, difficulties are experienced in fully mechanised welding operations particularly when welding to a relatively rigid approved procedure. Pulsing of the welding current was developed as a technique to achieve greater control of the behaviour of the weld pool. Instead of moving the weld pool in a continuous motion around the joint, welding was conducted intermittently in the form of overlapping spots. This technique, which offers significant advantages over continuous current welding has been exploited in nuclear fabrication for welding those components which demand a high level of weld quality. In this paper, the essential features of this technique are described and, in indicating its advantages, examples have been drawn from recent experiences on the welding of two types of joint for the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor, a tube sheet and a butt joint in the G Position. (author)

  5. Critical Analysis of Moving Heat Source Shape for ARC Welding Process of High Deposition Rate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ghosh, A.; Hloch, Sergej; Chattopadhyaya, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2014), s. 95-98 ISSN 1330-3651 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Gaussian heat distribution * oval heat source shape * Submerged Arc Welding Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.579, year: 2014 http://hrcak.srce.hr/index.php?show=clanak&id_clanak_jezik=172337

  6. Two Heat Source Models to Simulate Welding Processes with Magnetic Deflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Mazuco Clain

    Full Text Available Abstract The technique of weaving by magnetic arc deflection was developed a few years ago to enable the oscillation of the weld pool, thus, causing grain refinement and improving the properties on the welded joint. This paper aims to propose two heat source models that include effects of magnetic arc deflection on a bead-on-plate GTAW process in numerical simulations by using the finite element method. Two cases are studied. In the first case, non-deflected arc and straigth magnectic deflected arc along the torch movement are carried out and compared to numerical simulations. Temperatures at three different points on the backside of the plates (two away from the welding center line and one in its center and weld pools of SAE 1020 3.2 mm and 6 mm thick steel plates are analyzed. Results obtained by numerical simulations are close to the experimental ones. In the second case, welding with weaving (frequency of 1Hz on 3 mm thick steel plates is analyzed. The bead width and its visual presentation are compared to experimental results, which show good agreement with both proposed models.

  7. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  8. A Novel System for Source Characterization and Controlled Human Exposure to Nanoparticle Aggregates Generated During Gas–Metal Arc Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Isaxon, Christina; Dierschke, Katrin; Pagels, Joakim; Gudmundsson, Anders; Hagerman, Inger; Berglund, Margareta; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Assarsson, Eva; Andersson, Ulla B; Jönsson, Bo A; Bohgard, Mats; Nielsen, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    Abstract in Undetermined The aim of this study was to achieve a method to perform detailed characterization and human exposure studies of nanosized and nanostructured aerosol particles. The source chosen was mild steel, active gas, arc welding fume. The setup consisted of a generation chamber, where welding can be performed, connected to an airtight stainless steel 22 m(3) exposure chamber. Instrumentation, consisting of a tapered element oscillating microbalance, a scanning mobility particle...

  9. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  10. Aluminum Welding: Out-of-Position Welding of 5000 Series Aluminum Alloys Using Pulse GMAW Power Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    ALUMINIUM ALLOY SHEET: .063 INCH THICKNESS; ER 5356 ALUMINUM...QQ-A-200/5 QQ-A-200/4 ALUMINUM ALLOY COMPOSITION 5083 5086 5052 5456 5454 5052 5456 5454 5086 5083 TYPE OF MATERIAL Plate & Sheet Plate & Sheet Plate...Shapes, Tube, Wire 4.2 Filler Metals Filler wire alloys with the following for welding aluminum shall be in accordance chart: Base Alloy 5052 5083

  11. Heat Source Models in Simulation of Heat Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to investigate the effect of including the tool probe and the material flow in the numerical modelling of heat flow in Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The contact condition at the interface between the tool and workpiece controls the heat transfer mechanisms....... The convective heat transfer due to the material flow affects the temperature fields. Models presented previously in literature allow the heat to flow through the probe volume, and the majority of them neglect the influence of the contact condition as the sliding condition is assumed. In the present work......, a number of cases are established. Each case represents a combination of a contact condition, i.e. sliding and sticking, and a stage of refinement regarding the heat source distribution. In the most detailed models the heat flow is forced around the probe volume by prescribing a velocity field in shear...

  12. METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR LASER WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to laser welding of at least two adjacent, abutting or overlapping work pieces in a welding direction using multiple laser beams guided to a welding region, wherein at least two of the multiple laser beams are coupled into the welding region so as to form a melt and at least...

  13. Welding simulation of large-diameter thick-walled stainless steel pipe joints. Fast computation of residual stress and influence of heat source model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Akira; Serizawa, Hisashi; Nakacho, Keiji; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2011-01-01

    There are many weld zones in the apparatus and piping installed in nuclear power plants and residual stress generated in the zone by weld process is the most important influence factor for maintaining structural integrity. Though the weld residual stress is frequently evaluated using numerical simulation, fast simulation techniques have been demanded because of the enormous calculation times used. Recently, the fast weld residual stress evaluation based on three-dimensional accurate analysis became available through development of the Iterative Substructure Method (ISM). In this study, the computational performance of the welding simulation code using the ISM was improved to get faster computations and more accurate welding simulation. By adding functions such as parallel processing, the computation speed was much faster than that of the conventional finite element method code. Furthermore, the accuracy of the improved code was validated by measurements. The influence of two different weld heat source models on the simulation results was also investigated and it was found that the moving heat source was effective to achieve accurate weld simulation for multi-pass welds. (author)

  14. Low-Cost Open-Source Voltage and Current Monitor for Gas Metal Arc Weld 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arduino open-source microcontrollers are well known in sensor applications for scientific equipment and for controlling RepRap 3D printers. Recently low-cost open-source gas metal arc weld (GMAW RepRap 3D printers have been developed. The entry-level welders used have minimal controls and therefore lack any real-time measurement of welder voltage or current. The preliminary work on process optimization of GMAW 3D printers requires a low-cost sensor and data logger system to measure welder current and voltage. This paper reports on the development of a low-cost open-source power measurement sensor system based on Arduino architecture. The sensor system was designed, built, and tested with two entry-level MIG welders. The full bill of materials and open source designs are provided. Voltage and current were measured while making stepwise adjustments to the manual voltage setting on the welder. Three conditions were tested while welding with steel and aluminum wire on steel substrates to assess the role of electrode material, shield gas, and welding velocity. The results showed that the open source sensor circuit performed as designed and could be constructed for <$100 in components representing a significant potential value through lateral scaling and replication in the 3D printing community.

  15. Completeness and overlap in open access systems: Search engines, aggregate institutional repositories and physics-related open sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Ming-Yueh; Wu, Tai-Luan; Tseng, Ling-Li

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the completeness and overlap of coverage in physics of six open access scholarly communication systems, including two search engines (Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic), two aggregate institutional repositories (OAIster and OpenDOAR), and two physics-related open sources (arXiv.org and Astrophysics Data System). The 2001-2013 Nobel Laureates in Physics served as the sample. Bibliographic records of their publications were retrieved and downloaded from each system, and a computer program was developed to perform the analytical tasks of sorting, comparison, elimination, aggregation and statistical calculations. Quantitative analyses and cross-referencing were performed to determine the completeness and overlap of the system coverage of the six open access systems. The results may enable scholars to select an appropriate open access system as an efficient scholarly communication channel, and academic institutions may build institutional repositories or independently create citation index systems in the future. Suggestions on indicators and tools for academic assessment are presented based on the comprehensiveness assessment of each system.

  16. Completeness and overlap in open access systems: Search engines, aggregate institutional repositories and physics-related open sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yueh Tsay

    Full Text Available This study examines the completeness and overlap of coverage in physics of six open access scholarly communication systems, including two search engines (Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic, two aggregate institutional repositories (OAIster and OpenDOAR, and two physics-related open sources (arXiv.org and Astrophysics Data System. The 2001-2013 Nobel Laureates in Physics served as the sample. Bibliographic records of their publications were retrieved and downloaded from each system, and a computer program was developed to perform the analytical tasks of sorting, comparison, elimination, aggregation and statistical calculations. Quantitative analyses and cross-referencing were performed to determine the completeness and overlap of the system coverage of the six open access systems. The results may enable scholars to select an appropriate open access system as an efficient scholarly communication channel, and academic institutions may build institutional repositories or independently create citation index systems in the future. Suggestions on indicators and tools for academic assessment are presented based on the comprehensiveness assessment of each system.

  17. 3-D numerical evaluation of residual stress and deformation due welding process using simplified heat source models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslampanah, Amir Hossein [Islamic Azad University, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aalami-aleagha, Mohammad Ebrahim; Feli, Saeid [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaderi, Mohammad Reza [Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Thermal elastic-plastic finite element method has been employed to predict residual stress and deformation in a T-Fillet welded joint. An uncoupled thermal-mechanical three-dimensional (3-D) model has been developed. A nonlinear-transient heat flow analysis was used to obtain the temperature distribution; then by applying thermal results in the three dimensional elastic-plastic model, residual stress and deformation distribution were obtained. Experiments were carried out to find fusion zone dimensions and displacement. Two heat source models with infinite speed are proposed and the mechanical result of the mentioned models and normal moving heat source are compared.

  18. Heat source models in simulation of heat flow in friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to investigate the effect of including the tool probe and the material flow in the numerical modelling of heat flow in friction stir welding (FSW). The contact condition at the interface between the tool and workpiece controls the heat transfer mechanisms...

  19. Heat Source Models in Simulation of Heat Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to investigate the effect of including the tool probe and the material flow in the numerical modelling of heat flow in Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The contact condition at the interface between the tool and workpiece controls the heat transfer mechanisms...

  20. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnjak, A.; Tusek, J.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  1. Dictionary: Welding, cutting and allied processes. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiber, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    The dictionary contains approximately 40 000 entries covering all aspects of welding technology. It is based on the evaluation of numerous English, American and German sources. This comprehensive and up to date dictionary will be a reliable and helpful aid in evaluation and translating. The dictionary covers the following areas: Welding: gas welding, arc welding, gas shielded welding, resistance welding, welding of plastics, special welding processes; Cutting: flame cutting, arc cutting and special thermal cutting processes; Soldering: brazing and soldering; Other topics: thermal spraying, metal to metal adhesion, welding filler materials and other consumables, test methods, plant and equipment, accessories, automation, welding trade, general welding terminology. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Hybrid subtractive-additive-welding microfabrication for lab-on-chip applications via single amplified femtosecond laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonušauskas, Linas; Rekštytė, Sima; Buividas, Ričardas; Butkus, Simas; Gadonas, Roaldas; Juodkazis, Saulius; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2017-09-01

    An approach employing ultrafast laser hybrid subtractive-additive microfabrication, which combines ablation, three-dimensional nanolithography, and welding, is proposed for the realization of a lab-on-chip (LOC) device. A single amplified Yb:KGW femtosecond (fs)-pulsed laser source is shown to be suitable for fabricating microgrooves in glass slabs, polymerization of fine-meshes microfilter out of hybrid organic-inorganic photopolymer SZ2080 inside them, and, finally, sealing the whole chip with cover glass into a single monolithic piece. The created microfluidic device proved its particle sorting function by separating 1- and 10-μm polystyrene spheres in an aqueous mixture. All together, this proves that laser microfabrication based on a single amplified fs laser source is a flexible and versatile approach for the hybrid subtractive-additive manufacturing of functional mesoscale multimaterial LOC devices.

  3. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  4. Welding hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Welding technology is advancing rapidly in the developed countries and has converted into a science. Welding involving the use of electricity include resistance welding. Welding shops are opened in residential area, which was causing safety hazards, particularly the teenagers and children who eagerly see the welding arc with their naked eyes. There are radiation hazards from ultra violet rays which irritate the skin, eye irritation. Welding arc light of such intensity could damage the eyes. (Orig./A.B.)

  5. Automatic welding machine for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takaichi; Iizuka, Tomio; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Takami, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    A remotely controlled automatic special welding machine for piping was developed. This machine is utilized for long distance pipe lines, chemical plants, thermal power generating plants and nuclear power plants effectively from the viewpoint of good quality control, reduction of labor and good controllability. The function of this welding machine is to inspect the shape and dimensions of edge preparation before welding work by the sense of touch, to detect the temperature of melt pool, inspect the bead form by the sense of touch, and check the welding state by ITV during welding work, and to grind the bead surface and inspect the weld metal by ultrasonic test automatically after welding work. The construction of this welding system, the main specification of the apparatus, the welding procedure in detail, the electrical source of this welding machine, the cooling system, the structure and handling of guide ring, the central control system and the operating characteristics are explained. The working procedure and the effect by using this welding machine, and the application to nuclear power plants and the other industrial field are outlined. The HIDIC 08 is used as the controlling computer. This welding machine is useful for welding SUS piping as well as carbon steel piping. (Nakai, Y.)

  6. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...

  7. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  8. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  9. Resistance seam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the resistance seam welding process are presented. Types of seam welds, types of seam welding machines, seam welding power supplies, resistance seam welding parameters and seam welding characteristics of various metals

  10. Overlap in nitrogen sources and redistribution of nitrogen between trees and grasses in a semi-arid savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priyadarshini, K.V.R.; Prins, H.H.T.; Bie, de S.; Heitkonig, I.M.A.; Woodborne, S.; Gort, G.; Kirkman, K.; Fry, B.; Kroon, de H.

    2014-01-01

    A key question in savanna ecology is how trees and grasses coexist under N limitation. We used N stable isotopes and N content to study N source partitioning across seasons from trees and associated grasses in a semi-arid savanna. We also used 15N tracer additions to investigate possible

  11. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  12. Microstructural examination of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy welds made by pulsed Nd:YAG laser and TIG welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, R.B.; Varma, P.V.S.; Panakkal, J.P.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the weld microstructure of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy material. Bead on plate welds were made using pulsed Nd:YAG laser and TIG welding technique at different parameters. These welds were characterized at macro and microstructural level. Weld pools of Pulsed Laser and TIG welds were not resolved by optical microscopy. SEM too did not reveal much. Orientation imaging microscopy could reveal the presence of fine martensite. It was observed that microstructure is very sensitive to welding parameters. Microhardness studies suggested formation of martensite in the weld pool. It was also observed that laser welds had very sharp weld pool boundary as compared to TIG welds. Variation in microhardness of the weldment is seen and is influenced by overlapping of weld spots causing thermal treatment of previously deposited spots. (author)

  13. Hot wire TIG temper bead welding for nuclear repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.A.; Gilston, P.F.

    1989-08-01

    A preliminary assessment has been carried out to determine the suitability of the hot wire tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process for the repair of thick section, ferritic steel nuclear pressure vessels. The objective has been to identify a hot wire TIG temper bead procedure, suitable for repairs without post weld heat treatment. This procedure involves depositing two weld layers with carefully selected welding parameters such that overlapping thermal cycles produce a refined and tempered heat affected zone, HAZ, microstructure. (author)

  14. Welding complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, V.K.; Kuchuk-Yatsenko, S.I.; Sakharnov, V.A.; Galyan, B.A.; Krivenko, V.G.; Asoyants, G.B.

    1992-10-27

    A welding complex for construction of a continuous underwater pipeline is adapted to be installed aboard a ship. The complex includes a welding machine positionable at a joint of the pipeline with a pipe section to be welded, burr-removing trimmers positionable coaxially with the pipeline for displacement relative to the pipeline in the joint area, and a support device for the end part of the pipeline. A rotatably mounted holding device for setting, holding, and retaining the pipe section to be welded, the welding machine, and the trimmers is axially aligned with the end part of the pipeline. An accumulator is provided for storing and delivering successive pipe sections at a loading position laterally offset from the common axis of the pipeline and of the pipe section to be welded to it. The holding device includes a platform movable along the common axis of the pipeline and of the pipe section to be welded to it by a resistance butt welding machine, and a plate with a means for carrying the pipe section to be welded which is mounted on a pivot carried by the platform for rotation between the loading position and the aligning position. The welding complex of the invention provides for implementing resistance butt welding in construction of continuous underwater pipelines and ensures the accuracy of alignment and permanence of the gap between the edges being welded. The welding complex's structure allows handling of longer pipe sections, thus reducing the overall number of joints to be welded. 7 figs.

  15. Shielded Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 4. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in shielded metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety; theory, power sources, and…

  16. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  17. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  18. Welding of carbon steel vessels without post weld heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibb, M.; Bala, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The methods available for the repair welding of carbon steel vessels without post weld heat treatment and with particular reference to service in a sour environment have been reviewed. All the available techniques have the common aim of providing adequate properties in the weld metal and heat affected zone without the need for a full post weld stress relief. The heat that is required to provide the necessary metallurgical changes comes, therefore, from an alternate source. The two sources used are heat from suitably placed subsequent weld passes or from localized external heat sources. The technique presently being used by Ontario Hydro to repair vessels subject to sour service utilizes both a high preheat and a welding technique which is designed to temper the heat affected zone formed in the base material by the first weld pass. This technique is an improvement over the 'half bead' techniques given in the ASME X1 code and has been shown to be capable of reducing the hardness of the heat affected zone to an acceptable level. Certain recommendations have been made which could improve control of the technique presently used by Ontario Hydro and provide measurable parameters between procedural tests and the actual weld repairs

  19. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  20. Robotic Vision for Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  1. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  2. TIG welding power supply with improved efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергій Володимирович Гулаков

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the influence of the DC component of the welding current during TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas welding is discussed. Known methods of DC current cancellation are reviewed, such as capacitor bank or diode/thyristor network insertion in the secondary circuit of the welding transformer. A new method of controlling the magnitude and shape of the TIG welding current is proposed. The idea is to insert a controlled voltage source in the secondary circuit of the welding transformer. This controlled voltage source is realized using a full-bridge voltage source inverter (VSI. VSI control system design issues are discussed. VSI is controlled by a three-level hysteretic current controller, while current reference is generated using lookup table driven by PLL (Phase Locked Loop locked to the mains frequency. Simulation results are shown. The proposed topology of TIG power supply allows to provide magnitude and shape control of the welding current, with the limitation that its DC component must be zero. Thus, some capabilities of professional AC-TIG welders are obtained using substantially lower cost components: VSI built using high-current low voltage MOSFETs with control system based on 32-bit ARM microcontroller. The use of proposed TIG welding power supply will eliminate the DC component of the welding current, improve welding transformer’s power factor and improve welding technology by increasing the welding arc stability

  3. Review of laser hybrid welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus

    2004-01-01

    In this artucle an overview og the hybrid welding process is given. After a short historic overview, a review of the fundamental phenomenon taking place when a laser (CO2 or Nd:YAG) interacts in the same molten pool as a more conventional source of energy, e.g. tungsten in-active gas, plasma......, or metal inactive gas/metal active gas.This is followed by reports of how the many process parameters governing the hybrid welding process can be set and how the choice of secondary energy source, shielding gas, etc. can affect the overall welding process....

  4. Analysis of factors affecting fractures of rails welded by alumino-thermic welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergejs MIKHAYLOVS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On Latvian Railway the use of the alumino-thermic welding is widespread using the Elektro-Thermit Company technology. Today it is a basic method for rail joints on railway switches. The analysis of the metal structure in the thermic welding and in the thermic welded zone of rails showed that the weld metal had inclusions small pores and nonmetallics. Pores and nonmetallics are not reduce hardness but it is concentrators of stresses and sources of cracks development.

  5. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  6. Extending the process limits of laser polymer welding with high-brilliance beam sources (recent status and prospects of POLYBRIGHT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowinsky, A.; Boglea, A.

    2011-03-01

    Plastics play an important role in almost every facet of our lives and constitute a wide variety of products, from everyday products such as food and beverage packaging, over furniture and building materials to high tech products in the automotive, electronics, aerospace, white goods, medical and other sectors [1]. The objective of PolyBright, the European Research project on laser polymer welding, is to provide high speed and flexible laser manufacturing technology and expand the limits of current plastic part assembly. New laser polymer joining processes for optimized thermal management in combination with adapted wavelengths will provide higher quality, high processing speed up to 1 m/s and robust manufacturing processes at lower costs. Key innovations of the PolyBright project are fibre lasers with high powers up to 500 W, high speed scanning and flexible beam manipulation systems for simultaneous welding and high-resolution welding, such as dynamic masks and multi kHz scanning heads. With this initial step, PolyBright will break new paths in processing of advanced plastic products overcoming the quality and speed limitations of conventional plastic part assembly. Completely new concepts for high speed processing, flexibility and quality need to be established in combination with high brilliance lasers and related equipment. PolyBright will thus open new markets for laser systems with a short term potential of over several 100 laser installations per year and a future much larger market share in the still growing plastic market. PolyBright will hence establish a comprehensive and sustainable development activity on new high brilliance lasers that will strengthen the laser system industry.

  7. OVERLAPPING VIRTUAL CADASTRAL DOCUMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina - Cristina Marian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two cadastrale plans of buildings, can overlap virtual. Overlap is highlighted when digital reception. According to Law no. 7/1996 as amended and supplemented, to solve these problems is by updating the database graphs, the repositioning. This paper addresses the issue of overlapping virtual cadastre in the history of the period 1999-2012.

  8. Temperature effect on Sn-Bi alloy using ultrasonic pulse echo overlap method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Radzi Sudin; Mohd Salleh Mohd Deni; Mohd Khairi Saidin

    1996-01-01

    Sn-Bi alloy has a potential to replace toxic Sn-Pb welds. The effect of temperature up to melt point can be seen through changes of elasticity constant using Ultrasonic Pulse Echo overlap method. Although the effect of temperature will decrease the strength but there are no phase changes to stop it to be used as suitable welded material in electronic industry

  9. Friction Stir Welding of Tapered Thickness Welds Using an Adjustable Pin Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn; Venable, Richard; Lawless, Kirby

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) can be used for joining weld lands that vary in thickness along the length of the weld. An adjustable pin tool mechanism can be used to accomplish this in a single-pass, full-penetration weld by providing for precise changes in the pin length relative to the shoulder face during the weld process. The difficulty with this approach is in accurately adjusting the pin length to provide a consistent penetration ligament throughout the weld. The weld technique, control system, and instrumentation must account for mechanical and thermal compliances of the tooling system to conduct tapered welds successfully. In this study, a combination of static and in-situ measurements, as well as active control, is used to locate the pin accurately and maintain the desired penetration ligament. Frictional forces at the pin/shoulder interface were a source of error that affected accurate pin position. A traditional FSW pin tool design that requires a lead angle was used to join butt weld configurations that included both constant thickness and tapered sections. The pitch axis of the tooling was fixed throughout the weld; therefore, the effective lead angle in the tapered sections was restricted to within the tolerances allowed by the pin tool design. The sensitivity of the FSW process to factors such as thickness offset, joint gap, centerline offset, and taper transition offset were also studied. The joint gap and the thickness offset demonstrated the most adverse affects on the weld quality. Two separate tooling configurations were used to conduct tapered thickness welds successfully. The weld configurations included sections in which the thickness decreased along the weld, as well as sections in which the thickness increased along the weld. The data presented here include weld metallography, strength data, and process load data.

  10. Numerical evaluation of multipass welding temperature field in API 5L X80 steel welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nóbrega

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many are the metallurgical changes suffered by materials when subjected to welding thermal cycle, promoting a considerable influence on the welded structures thermo mechanical properties. In project phase, one alternative for evaluating the welding cycle variable, would be the employment of computational methods through simulation. So, this paper presents an evaluation of the temperature field in a multipass welding of API 5L X80 steel used for oil and gas transportation, using the ABAQUS ® software, based on Finite Elements Method (FEM. During the simulation complex phenomena are considerable including: Variation in physical and mechanical properties of materials as a function of temperature, welding speed and the different mechanisms of heat exchange with the environment (convection and radiation were used. These considerations allow a more robust mathematical modeling for the welding process. An analytical heat source proposed by Goldak, to model the heat input in order to characterize the multipass welding through the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process on root and the SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding process for the filling passes were used. So, it was possible to evaluate the effect of each welding pass on the welded joint temperature field, through the temperature peaks and cooling rates values during the welding process.

  11. Laser welding of fused quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  12. Ultrasound in arc welding: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Tiago Vieira; Bohórquez, Carlos Enrique Niño

    2015-02-01

    During the last decade, the introduction of ultrasound techniques in arc welding with the intention of improving the operational performance and technical characteristics of the welding processes have been studied intensively. In this work is presented a broad review of the literature surrounding the utilization of this technique. Firstly, we discuss the use of traditional mechanical transducers to generate ultrasound in arc welding. Furthermore, we describe the various methods and their application in arc-welding processes. After, is presented a recent method of introducing ultrasonic energy in arc welding, which forms a potential alternative to the use of traditional mechanical type transducers. This method was originally developed in the late 1990s and is called arc with ultrasonic excitation of current. Here, the arc acts not only as a thermal source but also as an emission mechanism for ultrasound, acting directly on the weld pool. We presented and discussed various innovative concepts based on this method, which allows the introduction of ultrasonic energy in the arc welding without the need of any auxiliary device of welding. In addition, we also presented the variations of this method reported in the literature. Finally, we have described the respective effects attributed to the use of this method in the welding of different materials using various welding processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Precision welding unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanke, R.

    1982-01-01

    The advantages of mechanized orbital-welding in TIG-pulse-technique are exact calculated heat input welding data adapted the certain welding position, reproducibility, high quality standard, lower physical, requirements of the operator. (orig.)

  14. Prevention and early diagnostic of health insult at welding works

    OpenAIRE

    Motejlková, Kateřina

    2010-01-01

    The work is dealing with problems of safety aspects of welding in conjunction with connected preventive provisions. The work seeks to outline complex problem particularly by integration of information from obtainable sources dealing with only alone part of the wide range topic. From technological point of view there are briefly described different welding processes with their summary of health hazards referring to welding. It contains provisions relation impeding health during welding activit...

  15. Sleep overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overlap syndrome, which is known as the coexistence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, was first defined by Flenley. Although it can refer to concomitant occurrence of any of the pulmonary diseases and OSA, overlap syndrome is commonly considered as the coexistence of OSA and COPD. This disease has unique adverse health consequences distinct from either condition alone. Given the high prevalence of each solitary disease, overlap syndrome is also likely to be common and clinically relevant. Despite the fact that overlap syndrome has been described in the literature for nearly 30 years, paucity of evaluations and studies limited the discussion on diagnosis, prevalence, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcomes of this disease. This review article addresses these issues by reviewing several recent studies conducted in Iran or other countries. This review suggests that overlap syndrome has worse outcomes than either disease alone. Our findings accentuated the urgent need for further studies on overlap syndrome and all overlaps between OSA and chronic pulmonary disease to provide a deeper insight into diagnosis and non-invasive treatments of this disease.

  16. Laser based spot weld characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  17. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  18. Multi-physics modeling and numerical simulation of weld pool in GTA welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Minh-Chien

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we develop a 3D physical and numerical model of the GTA (Gas Tungsten Arc) welding process in order to predict, for given welding parameters, useful quantities for the designer of welded assembly: weld bead shape, fluid flow in the weld pool as well as thermal distribution in the work piece. The model is developed in the Cast3M (http://www-cast3m.cea.fr/) finite element software and takes into account the main physical phenomena acting in the work piece and particularly in the weld pool, subject to source terms modeling the arc part of the welding process. A steady solution of this model is thought for and involves the coupling of the nonlinear thermohydraulics and electromagnetic equations together with the displacement of the deformable free surface of the weld pool. A first step in the development consisted in modeling the electromagnetic phenomena with two different numerical methods, in comparing the numerical results obtained with those of the literature and in quantifying the importance of the Lorentz force and the Joule effect compared to the other mechanical and thermal sources by computing power balances. Then, in order to assess the predictive capability of the model, simulations of various welding configurations are performed: variation in the chemical composition of the material, of the welding speed, of the prescribed arc pressure and of the welding positions, which is a focus of this work, are studied. A good agreement is obtained between the results of our model and other experimental and numerical results of the literature. Eventually, a model accounting for metal filling is proposed and its results are discussed. Thus, our complete model can be seen as a solid foundation towards future totally-coupled 3D welding models including the arc and it will be included in WPROCESS the in-house CEA software dedicated to the numerical simulation of welding. (author) [fr

  19. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  20. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  1. Investigation of flux-powder wire’s components-stabilizers on welding and technological properties in underwater welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Ю. Каховський

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on long-term experience of welding by mechanized flux-cored wires, the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute investigated a self-protecting flux-cored wire for wet underwater welding of stainless steels type 18-10. It allows to perform welding of butt, fillet and overlapped joints in flat and vertical positions of high-alloy corrosion-resistant steels type of 18-10 (AISI 304L, 308L, 347 and 321. The article presents results of development of welding-repair technology using self-shielded flux-cored wire for wet underwater welding of high-alloy stainless steels type 18-10. Also, the article describes a method of increasing the process stability of the arc in wet underwater welding high corrosion resistant steels type 18-10 by self-shielded flux cored wire. Studied welding characteristics of the weld metal with the introduction of the charge wire components stabilizers. The application of this technology allows partially or completely reducing the human participation in welding process under the extreme conditions: at large depth, in radioactive environments (in case of NPS and also gaining a significant economic effect due to greater efficiency (productivity of welding-repair works. The practical value of this technology consists in possibility of welding-repair works directly under water without any additional assembly works. As to its properties the developed self-shielding wire for underwater welding of high-alloy corrosion resistant steel meets completely the requirements of class (B of the International standard ANSI/AWS D3.6 on underwater welding

  2. Experimental and numerical studies on the issues in laser welding of light-weight alloys in a zero-gap lap joint configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harooni, Masoud

    current study a non-destructive evaluation method based on spectroscopy is proposed to detect the presence of pores in the lap joint of laser welded AZ31B magnesium alloy. The electron temperature that is calculated by the Boltzmann plot method is correlated to the presence of pores in the weld bead. A separate series of experiments was performed to evaluate the effect of an oxide coating layer on the dynamic behavior of the molten pool in the laser welding of an AZ31B magnesium alloy in a zero-gap lap joint configuration. A high speed CCD camera assisted with a green laser as an illumination source was selected to record the weld pool dynamics. Another technique used in this study was two-pass laser welding process to join AZ31B magnesium sheet in a zero-gap, lap-shear configuration. Two groups of samples including one pass laser welding (OPLW) and two pass laser welding (TPLW) were studied. In the two pass laser welding procedure, the first pass is performed by a defocused laser beam on the top of the two overlapped sheets in order to preheat the faying surface prior to laser welding, while the second pass is applied to melt and eventually weld the samples. Tensile and microhardness tests were used to measure the mechanical properties of the laser welded samples. A spectrometer was also used in real-time to correlate pore formation with calculated electron temperature using the Boltzmann plot method. The results of calculated electron temperature confirmed the previous results in earlier chapter. Magnesium and aluminum are two alloys which are used in different industries mainly due to their light weight. The main use of these two alloys is in automotive industry. Since different parts of the automobiles can be manufactured with each of these two alloys, it is essential to evaluate the joining feasibility of dissimilar metals such as aluminum to magnesium. A 4 kW fiber laser is used to join AZ31B magnesium alloy to AA 6014 using an overlap joint configuration. Two

  3. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  4. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  5. Welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drews, P.; Schulze Frielinghaus, W.

    1978-01-01

    This is a survey, with 198 literature references, of the papers published in the fields of welding and cutting within the last three years. The subjects dealt with are: weldability of the materials - Welding methods - Thermal cutting - Shaping and calculation of welded joints - Environmental protection in welding and cutting. (orig.) [de

  6. Determination of Informal Sector as Urban Pollution Source : Fume Characterization of Small-scale Manual Metal Arc Welding using Factor Analysis in Bandung City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastiti, A.; Pramudyastuti, D.Y.; Oginawati, K.; Santoso, M.

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, the informal sector, particularly small-scale welding activities, are considered to be an important contributor to urban air pollution although studies in this sector are limited. This study aims to identify the composition of small-scale welding fume in order to further investigate the effects and set control strategies and urban pollution abatement policies. Breathing zone air samples were collected from 30 mild steel manual metal arc welders and 17 non-welders in Bandung City, West Java, Indonesia. The respirable particulates in air samples were analyzed using gravimetric method, and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was employed to identify characteristic of welding fume. It was found that respirable particulates concentration in welders (range : 315.6 and 3,735.93 µgm -3 ; average 1,545.436 µgm -3 ) were significantly higher than in non-welders (range : 41.84 and 1,688.03 µgm -3 ; average : 375.783 µgm -3 ). Welders' breathing zones contain Fe>Na>K>Mn>Al >Cr>Ti>Cl>Br>I>Zn>Sb>V>Co>Sc; while non-welders' breathing zones contain Cr>F>Al>Ti>Na>Br>I>Mn>Cl>Co>Zn>Sc. Inter-species correlation analysis conducted using Statgraphic Ver. 4.0 shows that Fe (range : n.d. - 775.19 µgm -3 ; average: 0.1674µgm -3 ), Co (range : n.d. - 0.51 µgm -3 ; average: 0.000082 µgm -3 ), Mn (range : 0.39 - 148.37 µgm -3 ; average: 0.0374 µgm -3 ), Na (range: 0.17 and 623.85 µgm -3 ; average: 0.0973 µgm -3 ) and K (range : n.d. - 301.15 µgm -3 ; average: 0.0535 µgm -3 ) were emitted from welding activity, and thus are considered as components of welding fume which contribute to urban air pollution. Although welding fume and the identified species in welding fume were still below permissible limit, small-scale welding activities have great potential in emitting higher fume concentration due to due to high variability of welding activities, such as welding frequency, materials being welded, and varied environmental conditions. (author)

  7. Determination of Informal Sector as Urban Pollution Source : Fume Characterization of Small-scale Manual Metal Arc Welding using Factor Analysis in Bandung City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nastiti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries, the informal sector, particularly small-scale welding activities, are considered to be an important contributor to urban air pollution although studies in this sector are limited. This study aims to identify the composition of small-scale welding fume in order to further investigate the effects and set control strategies and urban pollution abatement policies. Breathing zone air samples were collected from 30 mild steel manual metal arc welders and 17 non-welders in Bandung City, West Java, Indonesia. The respirable particulates in air samples were analyzed using gravimetric method, and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA was employed to identify characteristic of welding fume. It was found that respirable particulates concentration in welders (range : 315.6 and 3,735.93 µgm-3; average 1,545.436 µgm-3 were significantly higher than in non-welders (range : 41.84 and 1,688.03 µgm-3; average : 375.783 µgm-3. Welders’ breathing zones contain Fe>Na>K>Mn>Al >Cr>Ti>Cl>Br>I>Zn>Sb>V>Co>Sc; while non-welders’ breathing zones contain Cr>F>Al>Ti>Na>Br>I>Mn>Cl>Co>Zn>Sc. Inter-species correlation analysis conducted using Statgraphic Ver. 4.0 shows that Fe (range : n.d. – 775.19 µgm-3; average: 0.1674 µgm-3, Co (range : n.d. – 0.51 µgm-3; average: 0.000082 µgm-3, Mn (range : 0.39 – 148.37 µgm-3; average: 0.0374 µgm-3, Na (range: 0.17 and 623.85 µgm-3; average: 0.0973 µgm-3 and K (range : n.d. – 301.15 µgm-3; average: 0.0535 µgm-3 were emitted from welding activity, and thus are considered as components of welding fume which contribute to urban air pollution. Although welding fume and the identified species in welding fume were still below permissible limit, small-scale welding activities have great potential in emitting higher fume concentration due to due to high variability of welding activities, such as welding frequency, materials being welded, and varied environmental conditions

  8. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  9. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  10. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-01-01

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  11. Contributions of welding technology to power plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    Welding repairs can be a very major factor in the time and cost of maintenance outages of a power plant. The use of advanced equipment and procedures for welding can contribute significantly to reducing maintenance costs and increasing reliability. Plant failures have too often been caused by problems associated with welding, some due to improper choice of base materials, others due to welding defects. For example, stress corrosion cracking in weldments in BWR austenitic stainless steel piping was a major source of loss of availability in the 1980s. Examples of the use of improved welding equipment and procedures has been demonstrated to reduce outage time and improved weld integrity in several major areas. New welding techniques, such as laser welding, have the potential for addressing maintenance problems that can not be addressed at all with conventional welding technology and/or may provide a means of reducing greatly the time and cost of welding fabrications or repair. Methods of ensuring that the best available technology is applied in weld repair is a major problem today in the utility industry. Solutions need to be sought to remedy this situation. The key role of welding in minimizing plant outages is being recognized and steps taken to further the development and use of optimum technology

  12. CRADA Final Report: Weld Predictor App

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billings, Jay Jay [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2018-01-25

    application software tool “WeldPredictor” ( https://eweldpredictor.ewi.org ). About 1400 users have tested this application. This project marked the beginning of development on the next version of WeldPredictor that addresses many outstanding features of the original, including 3D models, allow more material hardening laws, model material phase transformation, and uses open source finite element solvers to quickly solve problems (as opposed to expensive commercial tools).

  13. Laser weld jig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Haupt, David L.

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece (10, FIG. 1) along a predetermined weld line (12) that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip (32) on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members (34, 36). Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space (17) at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig (24) forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts (22, 20) to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  14. Analysis and validation of laser spot weld-induced distortion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorovsky, G.A.; Kanouff, M.P.; Maccallum, D.O.; Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1999-12-09

    Laser spot welding is an ideal process for joining small parts with tight tolerances on weld size, location, and distortion, particularly those with near-by heat sensitive features. It is also key to understanding the overlapping laser spot seam welding process. Rather than attempting to simulate the laser beam-to-part coupling (particularly if a keyhole occurs), it was measured by calorimetry. This data was then used to calculate the thermal and structural response of a laser spot welded SS304 disk using the finite element method. Five combinations of process parameter values were studied. Calculations were compared to experimental data for temperature and distortion profiles measured by thermocouples and surface profiling. Results are discussed in terms of experimental and modeling factors. The authors then suggest appropriate parameters for laser spot welding.

  15. Automatic welding of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briola, J.

    1958-01-01

    The welding process depends on the type of fuel element, the can material and the number of cartridges to be welded: - inert-gas welding (used for G2 and the 1. set of EL3), - inert atmosphere arc welding (used for welding uranium and zirconium), - electronic welding (used for the 2. set of EL3 and the tank of Proserpine). (author) [fr

  16. Diffusion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniault, J.; Gillet, R.

    1969-01-01

    After a brief recall of the principle, and of the advantages of the method, we give some examples of metallic bonding in a first part where we describe preliminary trials: Ta-Mo, Zr-Zr, Zr-Nb, Nb-stainless steel, Mo-stainless steel, aluminium-aluminium (A5-A5). The second part of the note is devoted to trials on construction elements: on tubular elements for bonding between Mo or Nb on one hand, and stainless steel on the other hand (We indicate in what conditions the bonding are tight and what are their mechanical strength and their resistance to thermic cycles). We indicate, in this chapter, a method to obtain radiation windows in Be welded on an element made of stainless steel. (authors) [fr

  17. Critical Assessment of Temperature Distribution in Submerged Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Negi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature distribution during any welding process holds the key for understanding and predicting several important welding attributes like heat affected zone, microstructure of the weld, residual stress, and distortion during welding. The accuracy of the analytical approaches for modeling temperature distribution during welding has been constrained by oversimplified assumptions regarding boundary conditions and material properties. In this paper, an attempt has been made to model the temperature distribution during submerged arc welding process using finite element modeling technique implemented in ANSYS v12. In the present analysis, heat source is assumed to be double-ellipsoidal with Gaussian volumetric heat generation. Furthermore, variation of material properties with temperature and both convective and radiant heat loss boundary condition have been considered. The predicted temperature distribution is then validated against the experimental results obtained by thermal imaging of the welded plate, and they are found to be in a good agreement.

  18. Development of Alternative Technology to PWHT in Site Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. D.; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, M. C.; Kim, K. B.; Sung, K. W

    2007-04-15

    ASME Section IX added requirements for qualification when using temper bead welding in the 2004 edition. The temper bead welding techniques which can satisfy the requirements of the Code are needed to use them in the site repair welding. The optimized welding parameters can be obtained when controlling the process to supercritically-reheat and to subcritically-reheat the coarse grain region sequently. The microstructures of SCFGCG obtained from the Gleegle simulated specimens and those of post weld heat treated coarse grain region are compared. The obtained both microstructures showed almost similar patterns. mid bead deposition technique Suggested in this study has a technical concept that the mid beads are deposited between the deposited initial beads repeatedly in a bead layer, which gives a lot of reheating effects on brittle microstructure in HAZ. This newly suggested technique is considered to have more effective tempering effect than the conventional temper bead technique which has concept to deposit one type of beads in a bead layer. The suggested modeling in this study can simulate well the SMAW process. Hence this modeling was used in analyzing the more complicated welding process of multi-layer welding. The modeling was used to analyze the tempering effect on the microstructures of HAZ by considering the patterns of overlapping of the reheating regions under the consequently deposited beads. When considering the crack path in the ever-matched weld metal condition, the interface may have a resistance against the crack propagation. A182 filler and A625 filler were used to make the weld specimens which have different weld metal conditions. The crack directed toward the under-matched weld metal may propagate across the fusion line easier than that of the even-matched weld metal condition.

  19. Comparison of Plasma, Metal Inactive Gas (MIG) and Tungsten Inactive Gas (TIG) Processes for Laser Hybrid Welding (302)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    source, ignition and running torch stability, weld phase transformation and change in ductility and overall weld quality are described. The results show that all three processes can successfully be integrated with a CO2 laser beam for hybrid welding. Due to the pilot arc in plasma welding, this process......, the MIG process is more difficult to control than laser/plasma and laser/TIG processes. All three types of secondary heat sources enable an increased ductility of the weld as compared to pure laser welding when welding 1.8 mm GA 260 with a TIG torch and 2.13 mm CMn steel with a plasma arc or MIG...

  20. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešnjak, A.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels is studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shielding gases and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared. Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas, i.e., a 98 % Ar/2 % H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joints was compared to that of resistance-spot welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a larger weld spot diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same.

    El artículo describe el proceso de soldeo de aceros inoxidables ferríticos por puntos con plasma. La investigación se centró en el establecimiento de los parámetros óptimos de la soldadura, la definición del gas de plasma y de protección más adecuado, así como del equipo óptimo para la realización de la soldadura. Las uniones de láminas de aceros inoxidables ferríticos de 0,8 mm de espesor, soldadas a solape por puntos con plasma, se inspeccionaron visualmente y se ensayaron mecánicamente mediante el ensayo de cizalladura por tracción. Se realizaron macro pulidos. Los resultados de la investigación demostraron que la solución más adecuada para el soldeo por puntos con plasma es elegir el mismo gas de plasma que de protección. Es decir, una mezcla de 98 % de argón y 2 % de hidrógeno. La resistencia a la cizalladura por tracción de las uniones soldadas por puntos con plasma fue comparada con la resistencia de las uniones soldadas por resistencia por puntos. Se llegó a la conclusión de que las uniones soldadas por resistencia soportan una carga algo mayor que la uniones

  1. Residual stresses in zircaloy welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J. R.; Fernandez, L; Vizcaino, P.; Banchik, A.D.; Samper, R; Martinez, R. L; Almer, J; Motta, A.T.; Colas, K.B; Kerr, M.; Daymond, M.R

    2009-01-01

    Welds in Zirconium-based alloys are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, as H enters the material due to dissociation of water. The yield strain for hydride cracking has a complex dependence on H concentration, stress state and texture. The large thermal gradients produced by the applied heat; drastically changes the texture of the material in the heat affected zone, enhancing the susceptibility to delayed hydride cracking. Normally hydrides tend to form as platelets that are parallel to the normal direction, but when welding plates, hydride platelets may form on cooling with their planes parallel to the weld and through the thickness of the plates. If, in addition to this there are significant tensile stresses, the susceptibility of the heat affected zone to delayed hydride cracking will be increased. Here we have measured the macroscopic and microscopic residual stressed that appear after PLASMA welding of two 6mm thick Zircaloy-4 plates. The measurements were based on neutron and synchrotron diffraction experiments performed at the Isis Facility, UK, and at Advanced Photon Source, USA, respectively. The experiments allowed assessing the effect of a post-weld heat treatment consisting of a steady increase in temperature from room temperature to 450oC over a period of 4.5 hours; followed by cooling with an equivalent cooling rate. Peak tensile stresses of (175± 10) MPa along the longitudinal direction were found in the as-welded specimen, which were moderately reduced to (150±10) MPa after the heat-treatment. The parent material showed intergranular stresses of (56±4) MPa, which disappeared on entering the heat-affected zone. In-situ experiments during themal cyclong of the material showed that these intergranular stresses result from the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficient of the hexagonal crystal lattice. [es

  2. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 μm in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 μm spot diameter and 0.6 m min -1 welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min -1 with fibre laser beams of 360 μm or 560 μm in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min -1 welding speed and 360 μm spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively

  3. The microstructure and mechanical properties of a welded molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadsworth, J.; Morse, G.R.; Chewey, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    Wrought Ti-Zr-Mo (TZM) alloy has been welded using electron beam, laser and tungsten-inert gas welding techniques. The microstructure, tensile properties and fracture surfaces of these welded samples have been examined. Although the welds have been found to be defect free, a disparity in grain size leading to large strength differences exists between the weld and parent metal. Tensile tests have revealed that fusion zone strengths are typical of those expected for the grain size in the weld metal. However, brittle behavior is also always observed, with fracture initiating at grain boundaries and propagating by intergranular and cleavage modes. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis has eliminated oxygen or other interstitial elements as sources of grain boundary embrittlement. It is proposed that brittle behavior is a result of local high strain rates in the weld zone. These local high strain rates arise from the strength difference between the wrought parent metal and the weld metal as a result of the strong grain size dependence of TZM. It is shown that, either by reducing the strain rate of testing or by removing the grain size difference between the parent and weld metals by heat treatment, significant ductility can in fact be achieved in tensile-tested butt-welded TZM. Thus, it is proposed that TZM welds are not inherently brittle as had commonly been believed. (Auth.)

  4. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  5. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  6. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  7. [Dermatopolymyositis and overlap syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović-Rackov, Lj; Mitrović, D; Andjelković, Z; Popović, M; Janković-Mladenovska, S

    1998-01-01

    Clinical characteristics and immunoserological features of patients with overlap myositis treated in Clinic for Rheumatology of Military Medical Academy in the period 1978-1996 are presented in the study. Retrospective and partially prospective study included 16 patients with the diagnosis of dermatopolymyositis associated with some other systemic disease of connective tissue (SDCT) in overlap syndrome. There were 12-females of average age 37.33 years and 4 males of average age 52.25 years. Complete laboratory investigation included the determination of muscular enzymes values. Immunoserological analyses were also performed (RF, Le cells, ANA, ICs, immunoglobulins, cryoglobulins and complement), EMNG examination of pelvis and shoulder and pH examination of skin, subcutaneous tissue and muscles. The combination of the diseases was found in 11 patients, 7 were with PSS, 2 with SLE, 1 with RA and one with PAN. Three diseases were associated in 4 patients, SLE and RA in 2, PSS and RA in 1, thyroiditis and sicca complex in 1. Five-fold combination of disease was found in 1 patient. More frequent occurrence of fever, polyarthritis, skin manifestations, Raynoud's phenomenon, the involvement of serosas, lungs and heart, histological finding of skin and/or muscle vasculitis and larger presence of ANA, ICs, hypergammaglobulinemia and hypocomplementemia pointed out the dominant disorder of humoral immunity which was most probably connected with associated SDCT.

  8. Nondestructive testing of weldings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, U.

    1984-02-01

    Today the nondestructive testing of materials with transverse weldings would be often neglect. Because the production of this parts will get more expensive it is interesting to test the parts eg. cans with ultrasound. Within this research program we developed a testing device for automatically testing of materials with transverse weldings, e.g. tubes. Functional characteristics: after putting in the test tube in the testing device the transducer is adjusted automatically to the best adjustment. This takes place with three step motors. The mechanic of adjustments gets its information from an optimal computer. The optimal computer processes the signals, which it gets from the automatic evaluator during the adjustment and stores the optimal adjustment parameters. With an additional equipment on can identify the exact source of error, if the testing device turns out and the repairing of the part can take place very fast. With an appropiate mechanical science the devide is useable in a production line with high flow rate. (orig.) [de

  9. A novel weld seam detection method for space weld seam of narrow butt joint in laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wen Jun; Huang, Yu; Zhang, Yong

    2018-02-01

    Structured light measurement is widely used for weld seam detection owing to its high measurement precision and robust. However, there is nearly no geometrical deformation of the stripe projected onto weld face, whose seam width is less than 0.1 mm and without misalignment. So, it's very difficult to ensure an exact retrieval of the seam feature. This issue is raised as laser welding for butt joint of thin metal plate is widely applied. Moreover, measurement for the seam width, seam center and the normal vector of the weld face at the same time during welding process is of great importance to the welding quality but rarely reported. Consequently, a seam measurement method based on vision sensor for space weld seam of narrow butt joint is proposed in this article. Three laser stripes with different wave length are project on the weldment, in which two red laser stripes are designed and used to measure the three dimensional profile of the weld face by the principle of optical triangulation, and the third green laser stripe is used as light source to measure the edge and the centerline of the seam by the principle of passive vision sensor. The corresponding image process algorithm is proposed to extract the centerline of the red laser stripes as well as the seam feature. All these three laser stripes are captured and processed in a single image so that the three dimensional position of the space weld seam can be obtained simultaneously. Finally, the result of experiment reveals that the proposed method can meet the precision demand of space narrow butt joint.

  10. Application of lap laser welding technology on stainless steel railway vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxiao; Wang, Chunsheng; He, Guangzhong; Li, Wei; Liu, Liguo

    2016-10-01

    Stainless steel railway vehicles with so many advantages, such as lightweight, antirust, low cost of maintenance and simple manufacturing process, so the production of high level stainless steel railway vehicles has become the development strategy of European, American and other developed nations. The current stainless steel railway vehicles body and structure are usually assembled by resistance spot welding process. The weak points of this process are the poor surface quality and bad airtight due to the pressure of electrodes. In this study, the partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated to resolve the problems, by controlling the laser to stop at the second plate in the appropriate penetration. The lap laser welding joint of stainless steel railway vehicle car body with partial penetration has higher strength and surface quality than those of resistance spot welding joint. The biggest problem of lap laser welding technology is to find the balance of the strength and surface quality with different penetrations. The mechanism of overlap laser welding of stainless steel, mechanical tests, microstructure analysis, the optimization of welding parameters, analysis of fatigue performance, the design of laser welding stainless steel railway vehicles structure and the development of non-destructive testing technology were systematically studied before lap laser welding process to be applied in manufacture of railway vehicles. The results of the experiments and study show that high-quality surface state and higher fatigue strength can be achieved by the partial penetration overlap laser welding of the side panel structure, and the structure strength of the car body can be higher than the requirements of En12663, the standard of structural requirements of railway vehicles bodies. Our company has produced the stainless steel subway and high way railway vehicles by using overlap laser welding technology. The application of lap laser welding will be a big

  11. Numerical simulation of temperature field in multiple-wire submerged arc welding of X80 pipeline steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunyan; Jiang, Han; Wu, Lichao; Kan, Chenxia; Yu, Wen

    2018-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) simulation was implemented to predict the temperature distribution during multiple-wire submerged arc welding (SAW) throughout the welded joint of X80 pipeline steel. A moving heat source model based on Goldak’s double-ellipsoid heat flux distribution was applied in the simulation to capture the heating effect of the welding arc. Effects of welding speed, wire spacing and leading wire current on temperature distribution were further investigated. The simulation results show that both welding speed and wire spacing have significant effects on welding temperature distribution in X80 pipeline steel welded joint.

  12. Strain signatures associated to the formation of hot cracks during laser beam welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenlocher, Christian; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The local surface displacement during the laser beam welding process of MgSi alloyed aluminum sheets (AA6014) in overlap configuration was optically determined near the weld seam by means of digital correlation of images recorded with a high-speed video camera. The analysis allowed the time- and space-resolved determination of the plane strain in the immediate vicinity of the solidification zone behind the weld pool. The observations revealed characteristic signatures in the temporal evolution of the strain that are related to the formation of centerline cracks in laser beam welding.

  13. Estudio del empleo de inversores resonantes de alta frecuencia en la recuperación de fuentes de soldadura; Study of the employment of high frequency resonant inverters in the recovery of welding sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Portal Gallardo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo, se realizará un análisis pormenorizado de la evolución de las fuentes de soldadura en suúltima etapa, para plantear las previsiones futuras que se esperan en este campo que tanta importanciatiene en la actualidad. Por otra parte, y teniendo en cuenta los nuevos requerimientos de eficiencia yfiabilidad que se les exige a las fuentes de soldadura, es preciso analizar si la tecnología de fabricación deestas fuentes se encuentra tan madura como se dice o es preciso impulsarla más en algunos aspectosconcretos de la misma. In this article, it will be carried out an itemized analysis of the welding sources evolution in their last stage,to outline the future forecasts that are expected in this field that so much importance has at the presenttime. On the other hand, and keeping in mind the new requirements of efficiency and reliability that aredemanded to the welding sources, is necessary to analyze if the technology of production of these sourcesis as mature as it is said or it is necessary to impel it more in some concrete aspects of the same one.

  14. Nano- and Microparticles in Welding Aerosol: Granulometric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, K. Yu.; Drozd, V. A.; Chaika, V. V.; Gridasov, A. V.; Kholodov, A. S.; Golokhvast, K. S.

    The paper presents the first results of the study of the size of particles appearing in the welding process by means of laser granulometry. It is shown that welding aerosol is the source of nano-and micro-sized particles extremely dangerous for human and animal health. Particle size distribution in the microrange was from 1 to 10 μm and up to 100%. It is shown that in 9 cases out of 28 with the use of various welding modes, welding rods and components the emission of aerosol with nano-sized particles (from 45.5% to 99.4%) is observed.

  15. Keyhole depth instability in case of CW CO2 laser beam welding of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gives rise to irregular humps. Keywords. Ambient and under water welding; keyhole collapse; weld depth instabilities; humps. 1. Introduction. The high-power CO2 laser sources with Gaussian beam distribution are currently used for welding of thick stainless steels (Binda et al 2004). In the case of LBW, heat and fluid flow.

  16. Prediction of Welding Deformation and Residual Stress of Stiffened Plates Based on Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, R. X.; Guo, Z. F.; Lei, Z. K.

    2017-12-01

    Thermo-elastic-plastic (TEP) method is a method that can accurately predict welding deformation and residual stresses, but the premise is to select the appropriate heat source parameters. Aiming at the two welded joints in the stiffened plate studied in this paper, the welding experiments of simple components were carried out respectively, and the corresponding welding deformation and residual stresses were measured. Based on the welding experiment, the corresponding TEP model was established, and the corresponding heat source parameters were obtained according to the experimental data. The comparison between the experimental results and the numerical results shows that the obtained heat source parameters can well predict the welding deformation and residual stress of the welded structure. And then, the obtained heat source parameters were applied to the TEP model of the stiffened plate. The prediction results show that the T-type fillet welds of the stiffened plate can reduce the angular deformation caused by the butt welds to a certain extent. In addition, we can also find that the heat of the subsequent welds can reduce the residual stresses at the completed welds. This method not only can save a lot of experimental costs and time, but also can accurately predict the welding deformation and residual stresses.

  17. A Weld Position Recognition Method Based on Directional and Structured Light Information Fusion in Multi-Layer/Multi-Pass Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinle; Du, Dong; Wang, Li; Chang, Shuhe; Peng, Guodong; Wang, Wenzhu

    2018-01-01

    Multi-layer/multi-pass welding (MLMPW) technology is widely used in the energy industry to join thick components. During automatic welding using robots or other actuators, it is very important to recognize the actual weld pass position using visual methods, which can then be used not only to perform reasonable path planning for actuators, but also to correct any deviations between the welding torch and the weld pass position in real time. However, due to the small geometrical differences between adjacent weld passes, existing weld position recognition technologies such as structured light methods are not suitable for weld position detection in MLMPW. This paper proposes a novel method for weld position detection, which fuses various kinds of information in MLMPW. First, a synchronous acquisition method is developed to obtain various kinds of visual information when directional light and structured light sources are on, respectively. Then, interferences are eliminated by fusing adjacent images. Finally, the information from directional and structured light images is fused to obtain the 3D positions of the weld passes. Experiment results show that each process can be done in 30 ms and the deviation is less than 0.6 mm. The proposed method can be used for automatic path planning and seam tracking in the robotic MLMPW process as well as electron beam freeform fabrication process. PMID:29304026

  18. A Weld Position Recognition Method Based on Directional and Structured Light Information Fusion in Multi-Layer/Multi-Pass Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinle Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-layer/multi-pass welding (MLMPW technology is widely used in the energy industry to join thick components. During automatic welding using robots or other actuators, it is very important to recognize the actual weld pass position using visual methods, which can then be used not only to perform reasonable path planning for actuators, but also to correct any deviations between the welding torch and the weld pass position in real time. However, due to the small geometrical differences between adjacent weld passes, existing weld position recognition technologies such as structured light methods are not suitable for weld position detection in MLMPW. This paper proposes a novel method for weld position detection, which fuses various kinds of information in MLMPW. First, a synchronous acquisition method is developed to obtain various kinds of visual information when directional light and structured light sources are on, respectively. Then, interferences are eliminated by fusing adjacent images. Finally, the information from directional and structured light images is fused to obtain the 3D positions of the weld passes. Experiment results show that each process can be done in 30 ms and the deviation is less than 0.6 mm. The proposed method can be used for automatic path planning and seam tracking in the robotic MLMPW process as well as electron beam freeform fabrication process.

  19. Ultrasonic Guided Wave Propagation through Welded Lap Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius Jankauskas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research presented here is the investigation of ultrasonic guided wave (UGW propagation through the lap joint welded plates used in the construction of a storage tank floors. The investigations have been performed using numerical simulation by finite element method (FEM and tested by measurement of the transmission losses of the guided waves transmitted through the welded lap joints. Propagation of the symmetric S0 mode in the welded stainless steel plates in the cases of different lap joint overlap width, operation frequency, and additional plate bonding caused by corrosion were investigated. It was shown that the transmission losses of the S0 mode can vary in the range of 2 dB to 8 dB depending on the ratio between lap joint width and wavelength. It was also demonstrated that additional bonding in the overlap zone caused by corrosion can essentially reduce transmission losses.

  20. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied...

  1. Seam tracking for laser welding with an industrial robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; van Amerongen, J.; Jonker, Jan B.; Jonker, J.B.; Regtien, Paulus P.L.; Regtien, P.

    2001-01-01

    Because of their construction and flexibility, industrial robots are suitable to be used, with a laser source and an optical fiber, for laser welding of 3D products. However, the positioning accuracy of robots are insufficient for laser welding. Also the product and clamping tolerances are too wide

  2. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  3. Impact testing of welded samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundeen, Calvin D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate how welding practice and joint design affect the performance of the joint. Also demonstrated is the importance of weld inspection to ensure quality welds.

  4. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  5. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  6. Increased risk of parkinsonism associated with welding exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Brad A; Criswell, Susan R; Lundin, Jessica I; Hobson, Angela; Seixas, Noah; Kotzbauer, Paul T; Evanoff, Bradley A; Perlmutter, Joel S; Zhang, Jing; Sheppard, Lianne; Checkoway, Harvey

    2012-10-01

    Manganese (Mn), an established neurotoxicant, is a common component of welding fume. The neurological phenotype associated with welding exposures has not been well described. Prior epidemiologic evidence linking occupational welding to parkinsonism is mixed, and remains controversial. This was a cross-sectional and nested case-control study to investigate the prevalence and phenotype of parkinsonism among 811 shipyard and fabrication welders recruited from trade unions. Two reference groups included 59 non-welder trade workers and 118 newly diagnosed, untreated idiopathic PD patients. Study subjects were examined by a movement disorders specialist using the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor subsection 3 (UPDRS3). Parkinsonism cases were defined as welders with UPDRS3 score ≥15. Normal was defined as UPDRS3welding. Adjusted prevalence ratios for parkinsonism were calculated in relation to quartiles of welding years. The overall prevalence estimate of parkinsonism was 15.6% in welding exposed workers compared to 0% in the reference group. Among welders, we observed a U-shaped dose-response relation between weighted welding exposure-years and parkinsonism. UPDRS3 scores for most domains were similar between welders and newly diagnosed idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) patients, except for greater frequency of rest tremor and asymmetry in PD patients. This work-site based study among welders demonstrates a high prevalence of parkinsonism compared to nonwelding-exposed workers and a clinical phenotype that overlaps substantially with PD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  8. Single-pulse Conduction Limited Laser Welding Using A Diffractive Optical Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, C. Y.; Bolut, M.; Sundqvist, J.; Kaplan, A. F. H.; Assunção, E.; Quintino, L.; Blackburn, J.

    Conduction limited laser welding is commonly used in electronic and battery applications, where a high width-to-depth ratio weld is desirable. A laser beam with Gaussian or top-hat distributions is often used to produce conduction limited spot welds. Both these energy distributions result in a higher proportion of the laser beam energy being introduced towards the centre of the welded spot and consequently, a reduced penetration weld towards the circumference of the beam spot. The use of diffractive optical elements to tailor the energy distribution of the laser beam has been evaluated. An incident laser beam with an energy distribution in the shape of a ring or C-shape was projected onto the material, which results in heat propagating towards the centre, producing a shallow weld with a consistent depth of penetration across the entire overlapped joint. The results confirmed a corresponding thermal model which predicted an even distribution of heat at the joint interface.

  9. Manual tube welding torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.H.; Smith, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    In a welding torch which fits over a tube intermediate the ends thereof for welding the juncture between the tube and a boss on the back side of a tube plate, a split housing encloses a tungsten electrode, a filler wire duct and a fiber optic bundle arranged to observe the welding process. A shielding gas duct is provided in the housing. A screw is provided for setting electrode/work distance. Difficult remote tube welding operations can be performed with the apparatus. (author)

  10. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  11. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  12. Overlapping clusters for distributed computation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirrokni, Vahab (Google Research, New York, NY); Andersen, Reid (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA); Gleich, David F.

    2010-11-01

    Scalable, distributed algorithms must address communication problems. We investigate overlapping clusters, or vertex partitions that intersect, for graph computations. This setup stores more of the graph than required but then affords the ease of implementation of vertex partitioned algorithms. Our hope is that this technique allows us to reduce communication in a computation on a distributed graph. The motivation above draws on recent work in communication avoiding algorithms. Mohiyuddin et al. (SC09) design a matrix-powers kernel that gives rise to an overlapping partition. Fritzsche et al. (CSC2009) develop an overlapping clustering for a Schwarz method. Both techniques extend an initial partitioning with overlap. Our procedure generates overlap directly. Indeed, Schwarz methods are commonly used to capitalize on overlap. Elsewhere, overlapping communities (Ahn et al, Nature 2009; Mishra et al. WAW2007) are now a popular model of structure in social networks. These have long been studied in statistics (Cole and Wishart, CompJ 1970). We present two types of results: (i) an estimated swapping probability {rho}{infinity}; and (ii) the communication volume of a parallel PageRank solution (link-following {alpha} = 0.85) using an additive Schwarz method. The volume ratio is the amount of extra storage for the overlap (2 means we store the graph twice). Below, as the ratio increases, the swapping probability and PageRank communication volume decreases.

  13. The algorithm of verification of welding process for plastic pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzasinski, R.

    2017-08-01

    The study analyzes the process of butt welding of PE pipes in terms of proper selection of connector parameters. The process was oriented to the elements performed as a series of types of pipes. Polymeric materials commonly referred to as polymers or plastics, synthetic materials are produced from oil products in the polyreaction compounds of low molecular weight, called monomers. During the polyreactions monomers combine to build a macromolecule material monomer named with the prefix poly polypropylene, polyethylene or polyurethane, creating particles in solid state on the order of 0,2 to 0,4 mm. Finished products from polymers of virtually any shape and size are obtained by compression molding, injection molding, extrusion, laminating, centrifugal casting, etc. Weld can only be a thermoplastic that softens at an elevated temperature, and thus can be connected via a clamp. Depending on the source and method of supplying heat include the following welding processes: welding contact, radiant welding, friction welding, dielectric welding, ultrasonic welding. The analysis will be welding contact. In connection with the development of new generation of polyethylene, and the production of pipes with increasing dimensions (diameter, wall thickness) is important to select the correct process.

  14. Comparative study of TIG and SMAW root welding passes on ductile iron cast weldability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cárcel-Carrasco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the weldability of ductile iron when: (I a root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG process using an Inconel 625 source rod and filler welds are subsequently applied using coated electrodes with 97,6%Ni; and (II welds on ductile iron exclusively made using the manual shielded metal arc welding technique (SMAW. Both types of welds are performed on ductile iron specimen test plates that are subjected to preheat and post-weld annealing treatments. Samples with TIG root-welding pass shown higher hardness but slightly lower ductility and strength. Both types of welding achieved better ductile and strength properties than ones found in literature.

  15. Modeling cast IN-738 superalloy gas tungsten arc welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifaz, E.A.; Richards, N.L.

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-element thermal model has been developed to generate weld profiles, and to analyze transient heat flow, thermal gradients and thermal cycles in cast IN-738 superalloy gas tungsten arc welds. Outputs of the model (cooling rates, the thermal gradient G and the growth rate R) were used to describe solidification structures found around the weld pool for three different welding speeds at constant heat input. Calculations around the weld pool indicate that the cooling rate increases from the fusion line to the centerline at all welding speeds. It was also observed that the cooling rate (G x R) and the ratio G/R fall with welding speed. For instance, as the welding speed is increased, the cooling rates at the centerline, fusion line and penetration depth decrease. Moreover, it was observed that as the power and welding speed both increase (but keeping the heat input constant), the weld pool becomes wider and more elongated, shifting from circular to elliptical shaped. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS FE code on the basis of a time-increment Lagrangian formulation. The heat source represented by a moving Gaussian power density distribution is applied over the top surface of the specimen during a period of time that depends on the welding speed. Temperature-dependent material properties and the effect of forced convection due to the flow of the shielding gas are included in the model. Numerically predicted sizes of the melt-pool zone and dendrite secondary arm spacing induced by the gas tungsten arc welding process are also given

  16. Ultrasonically-assisted Thermal Stir Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A welding head assembly has a work piece disposed between its containment plates' opposing surfaces with the work piece being maintained in a plastic state thereof at least in a vicinity of the welding head assembly's stir rod as the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis. The welding head assembly and the work piece experience relative movement there between in a direction perpendicular to the rod's longitudinal axis as the work piece is subjected to a compressive force applied by the containment plates. A first source coupled to the first containment plate applies a first ultrasonic wave thereto such that the first ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement. A second source coupled to the second containment plate applies a second ultrasonic wave thereto such that the second ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.

  17. Weld pool control in ND: YAG laser Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, S.

    2003-01-01

    During laser welding small parameter variations can result in defects and loss of quality in the weld. An important quality in Tailor Made Blanks is the weld depth. In this thesis a number of feedback control strategies are developed to control the weld depth on-line.

  18. Optimization of weld overlay dimensions for butt-welded pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chintapalli, A.; Ku, F.H.; Miessi, G.A., E-mail: achintapalli@structint.com, E-mail: fku@structint.com, E-mail: amiessi@structint.com [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., San Jose, California (United States); Yee, R.K., E-mail: Raymond.Yee@sjsu.edu [San Jose State Univ., San Jose, California (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Weld overlay technique can be used on a welded pipe with a flaw in the butt weld to prevent it from cracking further. Due to the application of weld overlay on top of the weld, compressive stresses are developed in the pipe wall and the weld. These stresses counteract the effect of the residual stresses from the butt weld and tensile stresses produced in the pipe during normal operation. Existing guidelines in the nuclear industry specify minimum dimensions (length and thickness) of the weld overlay. However, there is no guideline regarding the optimum repair dimensions that should be used to obtain minimum residual stresses induced by the weld overlay technique. The optimum dimensions in this study refer to the minimum material that can be used for the weld overlay. This results in reduced cost, time and exposure to radiation. Hence a size sensitivity study is performed by varying three parameters, the width and thickness of the weld overlay, and the size of the pipe being repaired. The repaired pipe is assumed to be subjected to typical pressurizer water reactor (PWR) operating conditions. The weld overlay process is simulated using an axisymmetric finite element model. The axial and hoop stresses in the region of the butt weld after the weld overlay are compared. The results from this study will be analyzed to establish optimum dimensions of the weld overlay for various pipe sizes to mitigate axial and circumferential crack initiation at the butt weld. (author)

  19. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  20. Explosion metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoff, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community

  1. Laser Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  2. Advanced Welding Torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    In order to more easily join the huge sections of the Space Shuttle external tank, Marshall Space Flight Center initiated development of the existing concept of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding. VPPA welding employs a variable current waveform that allows the system to operate for preset time increments in either of two polarity modes for effective joining of light alloys.

  3. DC arc weld starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  4. Welding technology for energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Quest for efficiency leads to extremes of operating temperature both high and low, at which for reasons of safety there must be adequate strengths and ductilities of materials under transient as well as steady conditions. The demand for large unit plant sizes arises from the need to achieve economies of scale. It has the effect of progressively increasing the section sizes over which such material properties must be sustained, and also leads to a preference for welded joints which approach the homogeneity of parent materials. The economic pressure to use impure sources of fuels creates problems of erosion and corrosion. The approach to materials and joining must be interdisciplinary and must also have regard to the broad classification of components. This paper is concerned with the present development and future prospects of the newer welding processes such as electron beam, friction and diffusion bonding, in comparison with the range of arc fusion processes, together with the joint properties that are obtained. It also makes reference to particular problems such as site construction, repair, remote welding and heat treatment

  5. How long do satellites need to overlap? Evaluation of climate data stability from overlapping satellite records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherhead, Elizabeth C.; Harder, Jerald; Araujo-Pradere, Eduardo A.; Bodeker, Greg; English, Jason M.; Flynn, Lawrence E.; Frith, Stacey M.; Lazo, Jeffrey K.; Pilewskie, Peter; Weber, Mark; Woods, Thomas N.

    2017-12-01

    applicable to satellite Earth observations. Approaches for Earth observations offer additional challenges due to the complexity of the observations, but Earth observations may also benefit from ancillary observations taken from ground-based and in situ sources. Difficult choices need to be made when monitoring approaches are considered; we outline some attempts at optimizing networks based on economic principles. The careful evaluation of monitoring overlap is important to the appropriate application of observational resources and to the usefulness of current and future observations.

  6. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  7. Improving Stiffness-to-weight Ratio of Spot-welded Structures based upon Nonlinear Finite Element Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengyong

    2017-07-01

    Spot welding has been widely used for vehicle body construction due to its advantages of high speed and adaptability for automation. An effort to increase the stiffness-to-weight ratio of spot-welded structures is investigated based upon nonlinear finite element analysis. Topology optimization is conducted for reducing weight in the overlapping regions by choosing an appropriate topology. Three spot-welded models (lap, doubt-hat and T-shape) that approximate “typical” vehicle body components are studied for validating and illustrating the proposed method. It is concluded that removing underutilized material from overlapping regions can result in a significant increase in structural stiffness-to-weight ratio.

  8. Calibration Fixture For Welding Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Krisztina J.

    1990-01-01

    Compact, lightweight device used in any position or orientation. Calibration fixture designed for use on robotic gas/tungsten-arc welding torch equipped with vision-based seam-tracking system. Through optics in hollow torch cylinder, video camera obtains image of weld, viewing along line of sight coaxial with welding electrode. Attaches to welding-torch cylinder in place of gas cup normally attached in use. By use of longer or shorter extension tube, fixture accommodates welding electrode of unusual length.

  9. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  10. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  11. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  12. Laser Welding Of Stainless Steel By Means Of "Flat-Top" Energy Distribution Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionoro, G.; Minutolo, F. Memola C.; Tagliaferri, V.

    1989-06-01

    Laser welding of stainless steel AISI 304 and AISI 405 is investigated. Laser source with "flat-top" energy distribution is employed which produces welded joints with similar geometry to other conventional welding techniques. Mechanical properties of the welds are however very similar to those typical of deep penetration processes. Microhardness and bend tests as well as micrograph examinations have been carried out on the welds. The test pieces exhibited good mechanical strength and in particular acceptable ductility. Theoretical considerations based on widely accepted thermal models have also confirmed that the process proceeds at high efficiency energy transfer.

  13. Diffusion welding of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susei, Shuzo; Matsui, Shigetomo; Yamada, Takeshi

    1978-01-01

    Recently, the materials with high heat resistance, corrosion resistance or strength have been developed, and some of them cannot be welded by ordinary method. Thereupon solid phase joining method is noticed, the mechanism of which is entirely different from conventional fusion welding. Among various solid phase joining methods, diffusion welding has many features. In case of joining same material, the joint can be made chemically and mechanically same as the parent material, and in case of joining different materials, joining can be made without forming any harmful compound, and the embrittlement of joints can be avoided. Kawasaki Heavy Industries Corp. has carried out a series of research on the diffusion welding of various metals, but in this paper, the characteristics of the joints of same material and different materials in titanium alloys are reported. The diffusion welding apparatus used adopts radiation heating using a tungsten heater and a hydraulic cylinder for pressing. The atmosphere of welded materials is kept in vacuum. The tested materials were industrial pure titanium TB 35 and Ti-6 Al-4 V alloy. The weldability of these materials by diffusion welding was studied, and it was confirmed that the joint efficiency of 100% was able to be obtained. However, for the practical application, more studies are required. (Kako, I.)

  14. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  15. Weld pool oscillation during gas tungsten arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, You Hong

    The oscillation behavior of Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) weld pools in mild steels Fe 360 and in austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 is considered. Special attention is given to the possibility of using the weld pool oscillation behavior as a sensor of weld pool geometry during welding, which is one of the objectives in adaptive control of the welding process. The topics discussed include the theoretical background of the oscillation phenomenon, the direct observation of weld pool oscillation, the experimental determination of the relation between the weld pool geometry and the oscillation frequency both under stationary arc conditions and under traveling arc conditions and the possibility of sensing the weld pool geometry, especially the weld pool penetration, by monitoring the oscillation frequency.

  16. Simultaneous laser cutting and welding of metal foil to edge of a plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method of welding an ultra-thin foil to the edge of a thicker sheet to form a vacuum insulation panel comprising the steps of providing an ultra-thin foil having a thickness less than 0.002, providing a top plate having an edge and a bottom plate having an edge, clamping the foil to the edge of the plate wherein the clamps act as heat sinks to distribute heat through the foil, providing a laser, moving the laser relative to the foil and the plate edges to form overlapping weld beads to weld the foil to the plate edges while simultaneously cutting the foil along the weld line formed by the overlapping beads.

  17. Effects of Heat Input and Bead Generation Methods on Finite Element Analysis of Multi-Pass Welding Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Dong; Kim, Ji Hoon; Bahn, Chi Bum [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Welding residual stresses are determined by various factors such as heat input, initial temperature of molten bead, heating time, cooling time, cooling conditions, and boundary conditions. In this study, a sensitivity analysis was performed to find the major factors and reasonable assumptions for simulation. Two-dimensional axisymmetric simulation was conducted by using commercial finite element analysis program ABAQUS, for multi-pass Alloy 82 welds in a 304 Stainless Steel and SA-105 Carbon Steel. The major object is to evaluate effects of the heat input methods and weld bead generation methods on the welding residual stress distribution. Totally four kinds of methods were compared. From the previous results, we could make the following conclusions. 1. Although there are non-negligible differences in HAZ depending on heat input method, welding residual stress distributions have roughly similar trends. However, it is needed to perform the more exact analysis to apply heat energy more carefully into the individual bead. 2. Residual stress distribution were similar for the two weld bead generation technique. However, overlapping was happened when element birth technique was applied. Effects of overlapping could not ignore as deformation increases. However, overlapping problem was avoided when quiet element technique was used. 3. Since existence of inactive bead elements, inaccurate weld residual stresses could be occurred in boundaries of previous and next weld elements in case of quiet element technique.

  18. New tools to analyze overlapping coding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayegan, Amir H; Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2016-12-13

    generalize the notion of codon preference index (CPI) to overlapping coding regions, and use RNAsampleCDS to generate control sequences required in the computation of CPI for the Gag-Pol overlapping coding region of HIV-1. These applications show that RNAsampleCDS constitutes a unique tool in the software arsenal now available to evolutionary biologists. Source code for the programs and additional data are available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAsampleCDS/ .

  19. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  20. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  1. Half bead welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.; Holz, P.P.

    1978-05-01

    The ORNL has employed the Section XI half-bead procedure for six repair welds. Table 2 identifies the repairs and the components upon which they were accomplished. The weld repairs were performed to permit us to evaluate material properties, residual stresses, weld repair procedures, and structural behavior of repaired pressure vessels. As a consequence of our study we concluded that when the half bead procedure is correctly applied: (1) there is no metallurgical degradation of the base material, (2) residual stresses of yield point magnitude will be present, and (3) the structural integrity of the pressure vessel is not impaired at Charpy V-notch upper shelf temperatures

  2. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  3. Numerical analysis of laser welding with consideration analytical methods of determining phase transformations and mechanical properties of welded joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piekarska Wiesława

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical analysis of laser welding process with consideration analytical methods determining phase transformations and mechanical properties of welded joints are presents in this paper. The analytical CCT diagram and final structural composition of S355 steel are presented. The empirical relations presents in paper are determined by chemical compositions investigated steel and cooling rate between temperatures 800-500°C (t8/5. Phase composition and mechanical properties each of structures of steel in weld and heat affected zone (HAZ are determined on the basis of analytical methods. Laser welded flat is used in numerical simulations in ABAQUS. Mathematical modes of volumetric welding source are used in the calculations. Temperature fields, shape and size of melting zone for selected points in the cross-section of the joint are determined on the basis of thermal cycles obtained numerical.

  4. Distortion and residual stresses in laser beam weld shaft-hub joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschenhenke, F.; Hofmann, M.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    In laser beam welding, a serious challenge is to control the distortion during the process. Understanding the whole process chain in view of different distortion potentials applied in each processing step provides the ability to control the distortion of the welded components. Every manufacturing step induces residual stresses in the component which can be released by the heat of the welding process, while further residual stresses are introduced into the welded parts upon cooling. The laser beam sources of the new generation permit a high power welding process and high beam quality at the same time. These laser beams are capable of producing deep and narrow seams. Thus the thermal strains of the joined parts are expected to be minimized. Especially axial welded shaft-hub joints show an irregular distribution of bending deformation, which is caused by the self-influencing welding gap. This work deals with the investigation of different laser beam sources and their effect on the welding distortion in axial welded shafthub joints made of steel (20MnCr5). The aim of the work done was to achieve minimal distortion after the welding process. To characterize the influences on the distortion behaviour of the welded parts, residual stresses have been determined by neutron diffraction.

  5. Laser weld jig. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarigan, P.; Haupt, D.L.

    1980-12-05

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece along a predetermined weld line that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members. Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reusable jig forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  6. Degradation Processes of Al-Zn Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding of metal materials belongs to non-demountable joints. Current trend especially in an automotive industry is to join materials with a different melting temperature. Most of all, there are dural profiles with ferrite or austenite steel. The reason for this is the effort to lower the weight of the whole construction and at the same time preserve sufficient mechanical characteristics. However, there is a big risk of different electrical potentials of both of these metals in this type of non-demountable joints. The experimental part of this paper brings evaluation of mechanical-corrosion processes of overlapped joints produced by the CMT (cold metal transfer method. The base material for weld bead is dural sheet AlMg3 and dural sheet with a surface treatment aluzinc DX51D+AZ 150. Material AlSi5 in the form of a wire was used as an additional material for a welding bath. Method CMT was used in order to create a weld bead. Initial analysis of weld bead was done visually using a binocular microscope. Further, a metallographic analysis of weld bead and base material was processed. The aim was to identify the heat affected area around the welded joint. Microhardness of intermetallic aluminium phases was measured, after the identification of intermetallic phases a chemical analysis EDS was processed. Prepared samples underwent corrosion degradation in a salt spray environment in compliance with the norm ČSN EN ISO 9227. Visual and metallographic evaluation of the individual samples was processed after every week of exposition to the salt spray environment. The goal of this experiment was to record the initial impulse of galvanic corrosion which consists in corrosion degradation in the area of welded joint.

  7. Effect of Local Post Weld Heat Treatment on Tensile Properties in Friction Stir Welded 2219-O Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Guannan; Sun, Lei; Lin, Caiyuan; Lin, Yanli

    2017-11-01

    To improve the formability of the aluminum alloy welds and overcome the size limitation of the bulk post weld heat treatment (BPWHT) on large size friction stir welded joints, a local post weld heat treatment method (LPWHT) was proposed. In this method, the resistance heating as the moving heat source is adopted to only heat the weld seam. The temperature field of LPWHT and its influence on the mechanical properties and formability of FSW 2219-O Al alloy joints was investigated. The evaluation of the tensile properties of FSW samples was also examined by mapping the global and local strain distribution using the digital image correlation methodology. The results indicated that the formability was improved greatly after LPWHT, while the hardness distribution of the FSW joint was homogenized. The maximum elongation can reach 1.4 times that of as-welded joints with increase the strength and the strain of the nugget zone increased from 3 to 8% when annealing at 300 °C. The heterogeneity on the tensile deformation of the as-welded joints was improved by the nugget zone showing large local strain value and the reason was given according to the dimple fracture characteristics at different annealing temperatures. The tensile strength and elongation of LPWHT can reach 93.3 and 96.1% of the BPWHT, respectively. Thus, the LPWHT can be advantageous compared to the BPWHT for large size welds.

  8. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  9. Neutral polypropylene laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolfino, Chiara; Lertora, Enrico; Gambaro, Carla

    2016-10-01

    The joining of polymeric materials is a technology used in many industrial applications, from transport to telecommunications and the medical sector. A new technology for the joining of polymers is the laser welding process. In particular, fibre laser welding is a flexible technology which allows high process speed and the realization of good quality joints. Despite its application becoming more widespread in the production of assemblies of high precision, the application of laser technology for the welding of polymers has not been the subject of many studies up to now. This study focused on the welding of neutral polypropylene. The window process parameter was identified, without the use of additives to increase radiation absorption, and a mechanical characterization was conducted in order to evaluate the quality of the joints realized.

  10. Welding of refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessmann, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    This review primarily summarizes welding evaluations supported by NASA-Lewis Research Center in the 1960s. A literature search run in preparation for this review indicates that more recent work is modest by comparison. Hence, this review restates these accomplishments briefly and addresses opportunities which have evolved in welding technology (such as lasers) in the intervening decade. Emphasis in this review is given to tantalum- and niobium-base alloys. Considerable work was also done to assure that a consistent comparison was made with tungsten. A wide variety of candidate alloys derived primarily from developments directed at aircraft propulsion applications were available. Early efforts by NASA were directed at screening studies to select promising structural alloys for the space power application. This objective required fine tuning of welding procedures, e.g., the demonstration of stringent standards for control of welding atmosphere to assure good corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metals. 16 figures, 6 tables

  11. Process Control of Stainless Steel Laser Welding using an Optical Spectroscopic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuk, A. R.; Aarts, R. G. K. M.; Veld, A. J. Huis in't.; Sibillano, T.; Rizzi, D.; Ancona, A.

    The in-process monitoring and real-time control of the penetration depth during laser welding is evaluated. An optical collimator collects the optical emission for measurement with a fast spectrometer. The sensor data are used to calculate the electron temperature and subsequently to determine the weld quality of overlap welds in AISI 304 stainless steel sheets performed both with CW Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers. A PI-controller adjusts the laser power aiming at a constant penetration depth and has been tested for Nd:YAG laser welding. Optical inspection of the weld verifies the results obtained with the proposed closed-loop system of spectroscopic sensor and controller.

  12. A welding technology using RobotStudio

    OpenAIRE

    Cohal Viorel

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in designing a welding workstation by using offline programming in RobotStudio. The developed model was used to simulate welding elements of a welded assembly. Welding routes are obtained offline. By using ArcWelding module and VirtualArc there were obtained parameters of welding technology, which are automatically in WPS.

  13. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  14. Topological susceptibility from the overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Pica, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    The chiral symmetry at finite lattice spacing of Ginsparg-Wilson fermionic actions constrains the renormalization of the lattice operators; in particular, the topological susceptibility does not require any renormalization, when using a fermionic estimator to define the topological charge....... Therefore, the overlap formalism appears as an appealing candidate to study the continuum limit of the topological susceptibility while keeping the systematic errors under theoretical control. We present results for the SU(3) pure gauge theory using the index of the overlap Dirac operator to study...... the topology of the gauge configurations. The topological charge is obtained from the zero modes of the overlap and using a new algorithm for the spectral flow analysis. A detailed comparison with cooling techniques is presented. Particular care is taken in assessing the systematic errors. Relatively high...

  15. Neutron activation analysis of airborne thorium liberated during welding operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typically, reactive metals such as aluminum are welded using a thoriated tungsten welding electrode which is attached to a source of argon gas such that the local atmosphere around the weld is inert. The metal is heated by the arc formed between the electrode and the grounded component to be welded. During this process, some of the electrode is vaporized in the arc and is potentially liberated to the surrounding air. This situation may result in a hazardous airborne thorium level. Because the electrode is consumed during welding, the electrode tip must be repeatedly dressed by grinding the tip to a fine point so that the optimal welding conditions are maintained. These grinding activities may also release thorium to the air. Data generated in the 1950s suggested that these electrodes posed no significant health hazard and seemed to justify their exemption from licensing requirements for source material. Since that time, other studies have been performed and present conflicting results as to the level of risk. Values both above and below the health protection limit in use in the United States, have been reported in the literature recently. This study is being undertaken to provide additional data which may be useful in evaluating both the chemical toxicity risk and radiological dose assessment criteria associated with thoriated tungsten welding operations

  16. Numerical analysis of the heat and fluid flow in a weld pool with a dynamic keyhole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.S.; Zhang, T.; Feng, Y.H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A model is developed to simulate the weld pool with a dynamic keyhole. ► The heat and fluid flow in such a moving plasma arc weld pool is analyzed. ► A combined volumetric heat source is established for such a model. ► The heat source height is adjusted by the keyhole depth at each time step. -- Abstract: In keyhole plasma arc welding, the interaction between the keyhole and the weld pool occurs when the keyhole appears inside the weld pool. The change of the keyhole shape and dimensions has direct effect on the heat and fluid flow in the weld pool, and the latter will also influence the keyhole geometry. In this study, the coupled behaviors of weld pool and keyhole are treated to develop a three-dimensional model for analyzing the heat and fluid flow inside a weld pool with a dynamic keyhole. In view of the characteristics of PAW process, a combined volumetric heat source model (double-ellipsoid plus conic body source) is established, and one of its distribution parameters is adjusted dynamically with the variation of the depth of keyhole. The physical phenomena, such as the weld pool development, the keyhole formation, the evolution of fluid flow and thermal field, the full-penetration of the test plates, and the transformation from a blind keyhole to an open keyhole, are quantitatively analyzed. The numerical results reveal the regularity of fluid flow in weld pool with a keyhole. The calculated keyhole shape and the fusion zone of plasma arc welds are compared with the experimental measurements. Both agree with each other generally. It lays foundation for optimizing the welding process parameters and improving the stability of plasma arc welding process

  17. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  18. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  19. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  20. Research on fatigue behavior and residual stress of large-scale cruciform welding joint with groove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Liu, Yu; Liu, Yong; Gao, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The fatigue behavior of the large-scale cruciform welding joint with groove was studied. • The longitudinal residual stress of the large-scale cruciform welding joint was tested by contour method. • The fatigue fracture mechanism of the large-scale cruciform welding joint with groove was analyzed. - Abstract: Fatigue fracture behavior of the 30 mm thick Q460C-Z steel cruciform welded joint with groove was investigated. The fatigue test results indicated that fatigue strength of 30 mm thick Q460C-Z steel cruciform welded joint with groove can reach fatigue level of 80 MPa (FAT80). Fatigue crack source of the failure specimen initiated from weld toe. Meanwhile, the microcrack was also found in the fusion zones of the fatigue failure specimen, which was caused by weld quality and weld metal integrity resulting from the multi-pass welds. Two-dimensional map of the longitudinal residual stress of 30 mm thick Q460C-Z steel cruciform welded joint with groove was obtained by using the contour method. The stress nephogram of Two-dimensional map indicated that longitudinal residual stress in the welding center is the largest

  1. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  2. Resistance Spot Welding of dissimilar Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the properties of resistance spot welds between low carbon steel and austenitic CrNi stainless steel. The thickness of the welded dissimilar materials was 2 mm. A DeltaSpot welding gun with a process tape was used for welding the dissimilar steels. Resistance spot welds were produced with various welding parameters (welding currents ranging from 7 to 8 kA. Light microscopy, microhardness measurements across the welded joints, and EDX analysis were used to evaluate the quality of the resistance spot welds. The results confirm the applicability of DeltaSpot welding for this combination of materials.

  3. Laser welding engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhieh, N. M.; El Eesawi, M. E.; Hashkel, A. E.

    2007-01-01

    Laser welding was in its early life used mainly for unusual applications where no other welding process would be suitable that was twenty five years ago. Today, laser welding is a fully developed part of the metal working industry, routinely producing welds for common items such as cigarette lighters, which springs, motor/transformer lamination, hermetic seals, battery and pacemaker cans and hybrid circuit packages. Yet very few manufacturing engineering have seriously considers employing lasers in their own operations. Why? There are many reasons, but a main one must be not acquainted with the operation and capabilities of a laser system. Other reasons, such as a relatively high initial cost and a concern about using lasers in the manufacturing environment, also are frequently cited, and the complexity of the component and flexibility of the light delivery system. Laser welding could be used in place of many different standard processes, such as resistance (spot or seam), submerged arc, RF induction, high-frequency resistance, ultrasonic and electronic and electron-beam. while each of these techniques has established an independent function in the manufacturing world, the flexible laser welding approach will operate efficiently and economically in many different applications. Its flexibility will even permit the welding system to be used for other machining function, such as drilling, scribing, sealing and serializing. In this article, we will look at how laser welding works and what benefits it can offer to manufacturing engineers. Some industry observers state that there are already 2,000 laser machine tools being used for cutting, welding and drilling and that the number could reach 30,000 over the next 15 years as manufacturing engineers become more aware of the capabilities of lasers [1). While most laser applications are dedicated to one product or process that involves high-volume, long-run manufacturing, the flexibility of a laser to supply energy to hard

  4. Robotic Welding and Inspection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. B. Smartt; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; C. I. Nichol; D. E. Clark; K. L. Skinner; M. L. Clark; T. G. Kaser; C. R. Tolle

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a robotic system for GTA welding of lids on cylindrical vessels. The system consists of an articulated robot arm, a rotating positioner, end effectors for welding, grinding, ultrasonic and eddy current inspection. Features include weld viewing cameras, modular software, and text-based procedural files for process and motion trajectories.

  5. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  6. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  7. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Weld Strength for Aluminum Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Bita; Hetrick, Elizabeth T.; Mozurkewich, George; Reatherford, Larry V.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of using an ultrasonic, non-destructive technique for post-process evaluation of aluminum ultrasonic spot welds. A focused immersion transducer was utilized to obtain a C-scan of the weld interface, from which a weighted ultrasonic contact area was estimated. Weldments were subsequently tested destructively to determine the weld strength. The square root of the weld contact area displayed a relatively good correlation with weld strength, r2=0.85.

  8. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  9. Ultrasonic Spot and Torsion Welding of Aluminum to Titanium Alloys: Process, Properties and Interfacial Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balle, Frank; Magin, Jens

    Hybrid lightweight structures shape the development of future vehicles in traffic engineering and the aerospace industry. For multi-material concepts made out of aluminum and titanium alloys, the ultrasonic welding technique is an alternative effective joining technology. The overlapped structures can be welded in the solid state, even without gas shielding. In this paper the conventional ultrasonic spot welding with longitudinal oscillation mode is compared to the recent ultrasonic torsion welding with a torsional mode at 20 kHz working frequency. For each technique the process parameters welding force, welding energy and oscillation amplitude were optimized for the hybrid joints using design of experiments. Relationships between the process parameters, mechanical properties and related welding zone should be understood. Central aspects of the research project are microscopic studies of the joining zone in cross section and extensive fracture surface analysis. Detailed electron microscopy and spectroscopy of the hybrid interface help to understand the interfacial formation during ultrasonic welding as well as to transfer the gained knowledge for further multi-metal joints.

  10. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  11. Milestones in welding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolby, Richard E.

    2013-09-01

    Sir Alan's PhD thesis describes his research into cracking during arc welding of armour steels. Throughout his career, he had a strong interest in defects of all types, how they formed in metallic structures and how the larger ones could be detected and sized by non-destructive techniques. He was also vitally concerned with how defects impacted on the engineering integrity of welded structures, particularly the risk of fracture in nuclear plant. This study presents a view of some of the major milestones in global welding technology that took place over the 60 or more years of Sir Alan's career and highlights those where he had a personal and direct involvement.

  12. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive lung diseases represent a major health problem worldwide due to their high prevalence associated with elevated socioeconomic costs. Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are chronic obstructive ventilatory disorders with airway inflammation, however they are separate nosological entities based on thedifferent development, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and prognostic features. However, these diseases may coexist and can be defined as the coexistence of increased variability of airflow in a patient with incompletely reversible airway obstruction. This phenotype is called asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. The syndrome is a clinical and scientific challenge as the majority of these patients have been excluded from the clinical and pharmacological trials, thus well-defined clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches are lacking. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature focusing on pathophysiological and clinical features, and discuss possible therapeutic approaches of patients with asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1304-1313.

  13. Influence of Main Characteristic Features of Spot Welding on Welded Connection/Joint Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Quran, Firas M. F.; Matarneh, M. I.; Belik, A. G.

    2014-03-01

    To provide the required quality of welded connection in spot welding, an investigation of the influence of characteristic features of welding conditions on the welded connection strength and choice of the best process parameters are carried out.

  14. Combining Welding Expert Systems With Welding Databases to Improve Shipbuilding Production (The National Shipbuilding Research Program)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vandetverldt, Hans H; Johnston, Sterling; Jones, Jerald E; White, Dawn; Cleveland, B

    1989-01-01

    .... The WELDEXCELL system is a WELDing EXpert manufacturing CELL that provides computerized technical support information, off-line weld planning, and an integrated welding robot/welding system/vision system controller...

  15. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... are hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Both welding methods are applied for a full penetration butt-weld of 10 mm thick plates made of thermomechanically hot-rolled, low-carbon, fine-grain S355ML grade steel used in offshore steel structures. The welding residual stress state...

  16. Spot Welding of Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohal, V.

    2017-08-01

    Honeycomb structures are used to prepare meals water jet cutting machines for textile. These honeycomb structures are made of stainless steel sheet thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm. Corrugated sheet metal strips are between two gears with special tooth profile. Hexagonal cells for obtaining these strips are welded points between them. Spot welding device is three electrodes in the upper part, which carries three welding points across the width of the strip of corrugated sheet metal. Spot welding device filled with press and advance mechanisms. The paper presents the values of the regime for spot welding.

  17. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  18. Mechanized hyperbaric welding by robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.; Santos, J.F. dos; Bohm, K.H.; Hensel, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    At the GKSS-Forschungszentrum investigations are carried out on mechanized welded test plates produced under working pressure between 10 to 110 bar in breathable TRIMIX-5-atmosphere. The welds are performed by a modified industrial robot, which was adapted in its components to withstand these severe conditions. Variations on the welding parameters were made to maintain a stable arc as well as to provide on indication of the effect of the variables on the mechanical properties of the welded joint. During all tests the robot showed a very good function. Good reliable welds were achieved meeting the requirements according API II04 or BS 4515-1984. (orig.) [de

  19. Understanding Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum explains the friction stir welding process in terms of two basic concepts: the concentration of deformation in a shear surface enveloping the tool and the composition of the overall plastic flow field around the tool from simple flow field components. It is demonstrated how weld structure may be understood and torque, drag, and lateral tool forces may be estimated using these concepts. Some discrepancies between computations and accompanying empirical data are discussed in the text. This work is intended to be helpful to engineers in diagnosing problems and advancing technology.

  20. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...

  1. Welding method by remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashinokuchi, Minoru.

    1994-01-01

    Water is charged into a pit (or a water reservoir) and an article to be welded is placed on a support in the pit by remote handling. A steel plate is disposed so as to cover the article to be welded by remote handling. The welding device is positioned to the portion to be welded and fixed in a state where the article to be welded is shielded from radiation by water and the steel plate. Water in the pit is drained till the portion to be welded is exposed to the atmosphere. Then, welding is conducted. After completion of the welding, water is charged again to the pit and the welding device and fixing jigs are decomposed in a state where the article to be welded is shielded again from radiation by water and the steel plate. Subsequently, the steel plate is removed by remote handling. Then, the article to be welded is returned from the pit to a temporary placing pool by remote handling. This can reduce operator's exposure. Further, since the amount of the shielding materials can be minimized, the amount of radioactive wastes can be decreased. (I.N.)

  2. Visualization of Spot- welding Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution devotes to monitoring of processes running during joining of steel sheets by incadescent so called point welding using non-destructive trial method – acoustic emission (AE. The joining process is detailed described within experimental measuring from the point of view of metallurgic effects runnig during weld creation (records obtained by means of AE method. It takes into consideration quality of joined steels within welding data of steel producer. Steel welding (determined by chemical composition during mechanical verification and firmness of welds consider results of measurement AE and fracture effect of point joints. The measurement also demonstrates conclusion about connection of metallurgic processes with material wave effects (AE measurement and their impact on firmness of joint at steel with guaranteed welding, difficult welding and at their potential combination.

  3. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance with...

  4. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  5. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures...

  6. Tool For Robotic Resistive Roll Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilber, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Roll-welding attachment for robot simple, inexpensive device incorporating modified commercial resistance-welding gun. Modified welding gun easily attaches to end effector of robot. Robot applies welding force and moves electrode wheel along prescribed path. Resistance-welding current starts and stops automatically according to force exerted against workpiece. Used to apply brazing foil to workpiece.

  7. Sensor integration for robotic laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Ostendorf, A; Hoult, A.; Lu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The use of robotic laser welding is increasing among industrial applications, because of its ability to weld objects in three dimensions. Robotic laser welding involves three sub-processes: seam detection and tracking, welding process control, and weld seam inspection. Usually, for each sub-process,

  8. Integrated sensors for robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Beyer, E.; Dausinger, F; Ostendorf, A; Otto, A.

    2005-01-01

    A welding head is under development with integrated sensory systems for robotic laser welding applications. Robotic laser welding requires sensory systems that are capable to accurately guide the welding head over a seam in three-dimensional space and provide information about the welding process as

  9. Application of infrared imaging for quality inspection in resistance spot welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Wanchuck; Chin, Charles W.; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Hsin; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Hanbing; Sklad, Philip S.

    2009-05-01

    Infrared thermal imaging method was applied for the development of a non-destructive inspection technique to determine the quality of resistance spot welds. The current work is an initial feasibility study based on post-mortem inspection. First, resistance spot welds were fabricated on dual phase steel sheets (DP 590 steel) with carefullycontrolled welding parameters. It created welds with desirable and undesirable qualities in terms of nugget size, indentation depth, and voids and cracks. Second, five different heating and cooling methods were evaluated. The heating or cooling source was applied on one side of the weld stack while the surface temperature change on the other side of the weld was recorded using an infrared camera. Correlation between the weld quality and the "thermal signature" of each weld was established. Finally, a simplified thermal finite element analysis was developed to simulate the heat flow during inspection. The thermal model provided insight into the effect of the nugget size and indentation depth on the peak temperature and heating rate. The results reported in this work indicate that the IR thermography technique is feasible for weld quality inspection due to the distinguish temperature profiles for different welds and the repeatability and consistency in measurement.

  10. Development of Temper Bead Welding Process for Weld Overlay of Dissimilar Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byeon, J. G.; Park, K. S.; Kim, Y. J. [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    In recent years, the dissimilar weld metal used to connect stainless steel piping and low alloy steel or carbon steel components have experienced cracking in nuclear reactor piping systems. The cracking has been observed in several Pressurized Water Reactors in overseas. In Several cases, the cracking was repaired using structural weld overlays, a repair technique that has been in use in the U.S. in Boiling Water Reactors for over twenty years. Although weld overlays have been used primarily as a repair for flawed piping, they can also be applied at locations that have not yet exhibited any cracking, but are considered susceptible to cracking. The purpose of this research is to develop the temper bead weld process for the weld overlay of the dissimilar weld pipe. We developed equipment for the overlay system, applied Procedure Qualification(PQ) for the temper bead welding process.

  11. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  12. Welding in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The 3rd international conference 'Welding in nuclear engineering', organized in 1978 by the Deutscher Verband fuer Schweisstechnik e.V., was, like the two foregoing conferences in 1970 and 1974, an absolute success. The noteworthy echo to this meeting in the international technical world - the number of 650 participants from 26 countries is self-evidence - and this fact, was for the Deutscher Verband fuer Schweisstechnik e.V. occasion and at the same time an obligation now to follow in the same way, the meeting that was started 12 years ago, by organizing the international conference 'Welding in nuclear engineering'. The conference this year offers in addition to the two plenary session lectures, 34 short reports and a further 28 single contributions in the form of two poster-sessions. Unfortunately, it was again not possible to accept all the papers submitted because the conference was limited to 2 days only. Nevertheless, the papers will offer a representative cross-section through the total range of welding engineering. In particular, the poster session, which take place for the first time within the scope of a meeting organized by the Working Group 'Welding in Nuclear Engineering', should contribute to the aim that this time again the discussions will form the main point of the conference. (orig./RW) [de

  13. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...

  14. Fluctuations in Overlapping Generations Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, Mich

    In the present paper stationary pure-exchange overlapping generations economies with l  goods per date and m consumers per generation are considered. It is shown that for an open and dense set of utility functions there exist endowment vectors such that n-cycles exist for n = l +1 and l  = m....... The approach to existence of endogenous fluctuations is basic in the sense that the prime ingredients are the implicit function theorem and linear algebra. Moreover the approach is applied to show that for an open and dense set of utility functions there exist endowment vectors such that sunspot equilibria...

  15. Exposure assessment of aluminum arc welding radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chiung-yu; Lan, Cheng-hang; Juang, Yow-jer; Tsao, Ta-ho; Dai, Yu-tung; Liu, Hung-hsin; Chen, Chiou-jong

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the non-ionizing radiation (NIR) exposure, especially optical radiation levels, and potential health hazard from aluminum arc welding processes based on the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) method. The irradiance from the optical radiation emissions can be calculated with various biological effective parameters [i.e., S(lambda), B(lambda), R(lambda)] for NIR hazard assessments. The aluminum arc welding processing scatters bright light with NIR emission including ultraviolet radiation (UVR), visible, and infrared spectra. The UVR effective irradiance (Eeff) has a mean value of 1,100 microW cm at 100 cm distance from the arc spot. The maximum allowance time (tmax) is 2.79 s according to the ACGIH guideline. Blue-light hazard effective irradiance (EBlue) has a mean value of 1840 microW cm (300-700 nm) at 100 cm with a tmax of 5.45 s exposure allowance. Retinal thermal hazard effective calculation shows mean values of 320 mW cm(-2) sr(-1) and 25.4 mW (cm-2) (380-875 nm) for LRetina (spectral radiance) and ERetina (spectral irradiance), respectively. From this study, the NIR measurement from welding optical radiation emissions has been established to evaluate separate types of hazards to the eye and skin simultaneously. The NIR exposure assessment can be applied to other optical emissions from industrial sources. The data from welding assessment strongly suggest employees involved in aluminum welding processing must be fitted with appropriate personal protection devices such as masks and gloves to prevent serious injuries of the skin and eyes upon intense optical exposure.

  16. Acoustic emission monitoring during welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prine, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    Weld repair is a major cost item, particularly in the fabrication of heavy section weldments such as pressure vessels. A heavy section repair can frequently leave the weld with worse problems than the original flaw. These problems may include damage to weld microstructure as well as added residual stress. The removal of flaws through in-process repair can minimize these problems and certainly, the removal of one or two passes and their replacement with automatic welding procedure is considerably cheaper than a heavy section post weld repair. The major barrier to application of in-process repair is the lack of an effective in-process inspection procedure. In-process monitoring of Acoustic Emission shows great promise for providing this much needed tool. The successful application of acoustic emission to in-process weld monitoring requires that advanced signal processing and pattern recognition techniques be applied if the flaw related acoustic emission is to be separated from the overwhelming amount of background noise present in welding. GARD, INC. has studied the problem of applying in-process acoustic emission monitoring to weld inspection for over 9 years and has empirically developed AE signal processing techniques which allow typical weld flaws to be detected, located, and characterized. This paper discusses these techniques and describes a recent successful field test of a microcomputer based AE weld monitor in a nuclear fabrication plant. (author)

  17. Galvanic corrosion of beryllium welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is difficult to weld because it is highly susceptible to cracking. The most commonly used filler metal in beryllium welds is Al-12 wt.% Si. Beryllium has been successfully welded using Al-Si filler metal with more than 30 wt.% Al. This filler creates an aluminum-rich fusion zone with a low melting point that tends to backfill cracks. Drawbacks to adding a filler metal include a reduction in service temperature, a lowering of the tensile strength of the weld, and the possibility for galvanic corrosion to occur at the weld. To evaluate the degree of interaction between Be and Al-Si in an actual weld, sections from a mock beryllium weldment were exposed to 0.1 M Cl - solution. Results indicate that the galvanic couple between Be and the Al-Si weld material results in the cathodic protection of the weld and of the anodic dissolution of the bulk Be material. While the cathodic protection of Al is generally inefficient, the high anodic dissolution rate of the bulk Be during pitting corrosion combined with the insulating properties of the Be oxide afford some protection of the Al-Si weld material. Although dissolution of the Be precipitate in the weld material does occur, no corrosion of the Al-Si matrix was observed

  18. The investigation of abnormal particle-coarsening phenomena in friction stir repair weld of 2219-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bo; Shen, Yifu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Defective friction stir welds were repaired by overlapping FSW technique. → Abnormal Al 2 Cu-coarsening phenomena were found in 2219-T6 friction stir repair weld. → Three formation mechanisms were proposed for reasonable explanations. -- Abstract: The single-pass friction stir weld of aluminum 2219-T6 with weld-defects was repaired by overlapping friction stir welding technique. However, without any post weld heat treatment process, it was found that the phenomena of abnormal particle-coarsening of Al 2 Cu had occurred in the overlapping friction stir repair welds. The detecting results of non-destructive X-ray inspection proved that not only one group of repair FSW process parameters could lead to occurrence of the abnormal phenomena. And the abnormally coarsened particles always appeared on the advancing side of repair welds rather than the retreating side where the fracture behaviors occurred after mechanical tensile testing. The size of the biggest particle lying in the dark bands of 'Onion-rings' was more than 150 μm. After the related investigation by scanning electron microscope and X-ray energy spectrometer, three types of formation mechanisms were proposed for reasonably explaining the abnormal phenomenon: Aggregation Mechanism, Diffusion Mechanisms I and II. Aggregation Mechanism was according to the motion-laws of stir-pin. Diffusion Mechanisms were based on the classical theories of precipitate growth in metallic systems. The combined action of the three detailed mechanisms contributed to the abnormal coarsening behavior of Al 2 Cu particles in the friction stir repair weld.

  19. Definition of the Mathematical Model Coefficients on the Weld Size of Butt Joint Without Edge Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, Vladimir P.; Melzitdinova, Anna V.

    2017-10-01

    This paper represents the definition methods for thermal constants according to the data of the weld width under the normal-circular heat source. The method is based on isoline contouring of “effective power – temperature conductivity coefficient”. The definition of coefficients provides setting requirements to the precision of welding parameters support with the enough accuracy for an engineering practice.

  20. Improvements in and relating to welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, B.D.

    1979-01-01

    This invention concerns apparatus for use in welding, particularly welding which must be effected in a predetermined, for example, inert atmosphere, e.g. the welding of reactive materials such as zircaloy, titanium, magnesium, aluminium, etc. (U.K.)

  1. Horizontal electron beam welding for stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Olivera, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Stainless steel samples have been realized by local vacuum apparatus for electron beam welding applications to reactor core shell realizations. The best welding parameters have been determined by a systematic study. The welds have been characterized by mechanical tests [fr

  2. In-field Welding and Coating Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) created both laboratory and infield girth weld samples to evaluate the effects of weld geometry and hydrogen off-gassing on the performance of protective coatings. Laboratory made plat...

  3. Welding residual stress distributions for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Ju Hee; Bae, Hong Yeol; OH, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyungsoo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Tae Kwang [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    In pressurized water nuclear reactors, dissimilar metal welds are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking. To access this problem, accurate estimation of welding residual stresses is important. This paper provides general welding residual stress profiles in dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds using finite element analysis. By introducing a simplified shape for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds, changes in the welding residual stress distribution can be seen using a geometry variable. Based on the results, a welding residual stress profile for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds is proposed that modifies the existing welding residual stress profile for austenitic pipe butt welds.

  4. Developments in welding and joining methods of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilarczyk, J.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of the welding technology on the economy development. The welding and joining methods review. The particular role of the laser welding and its interesting applications: with filler metal, twin spot laser welding, hybrid welding process, remote welding. The fiber lasers. The high intensity electron beams applications for surface modification. The TIG welding with the use of the active flux. Friction welding, friction stir welding and friction linear welding. (author)

  5. Factors affecting weld root morphology in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostevarg, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Welding production efficiency is usually optimised if full penetration can be achieved in a single pass. Techniques such as electron and laser beam welding offer deep high speed keyhole welding, especially since multi-kilowatt lasers became available. However, there are limitations for these techniques when considering weld imperfections such as weld cap undercuts, interior porosity or humps at the root. The thickness of sheets during full penetration welding is practically limited by these root humps. The mechanisms behind root morphology formation are not yet satisfactory understood. In this paper root humping is studied by reviewing previous studies and findings and also by sample examination and process observation by high speed imaging. Different process regimes governing root quality are presented, categorized and explained. Even though this study mainly covers laser beam and laser arc hybrid welding, the presented findings can generally be applied full penetration welding in medium to thick sheets, especially the discussion of surface tension effects. As a final result of this analysis, a map of methods to optimise weld root topology is presented.

  6. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...

  7. Metals welding by using laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qaisy, R.A.W.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work, same welding ''conduction limited type'' under atmospheric conditions was performed using pulsed Ng:YAG laser to weld; low carbon steel (LCS), stainless steel (304) (SUS304), stainless steel (303) (SUS303), and brass. Microstructure of welded zone, heat affected zone (HAZ), and the laser energy on penetration depth and effective diameter were studied. Tensile test, micro-hardness, and surface roughness of welded and parent metals were also dealt with. Melting efficiency was worked out and an under vacuum seam welding of low carbon steel has been accomplished. Finally spot welding of aluminium tungsten, and platinium wires were employed using different layer energies. 34 tabs.; 82 figs.; 51 refs.; 1 app

  8. Corrosion of carbon steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, B.

    1988-09-01

    This report assesses the factors which cause preferential attack to occur in carbon steel fusion welds. It was concluded that the main factors were: the inclusion content of the weld metal, the potential of the weld metal being less noble than that of the parent, and the presence of low-temperature transformation products in the heat-affected zone of the weld. These factors should be minimized or eliminated as appropriate so that the corrosion allowances determined for carbon steel waste drums is also adequate for the welds. An experimental/theoretical approach is recommended to evaluate the relative corrosion resistance of welds prepared from BS 4360 grade 43A steel to that of the parent material. (author)

  9. Effect of wavelength and pulse duration on laser micro-welding of monocrystalline silicon and glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, I. H. W.; Okamoto, Y.; Okada, A.; Jiang, H.; Sakagawa, T.

    2016-04-01

    Micro-welding characteristics of silicon and glass by pulsed lasers are described. In this study, four types of laser beam, which are nanosecond pulsed laser and picosecond pulsed laser of 532 and 1064 nm in wavelength, were used for joining monocrystalline silicon and glass. Influence of wavelength and pulse duration on micro-welding of monocrystalline silicon and glass was experimentally investigated under the same spot diameter, and the molten area of monocrystalline silicon and glass was characterized. Finally, the breaking strength was evaluated for the overlap weld joint with different pulse duration and wavelength. A splash area of molten silicon around the weld bead line was obvious in the nanosecond pulsed laser. On the other hand, there was no remarkable molten splash around the weld bead line in the picosecond pulsed laser. Breaking strength of specimens with 1064 nm wavelength was higher than with 532 nm wavelength in nanosecond laser, whereas breaking strength of laser-irradiated specimen by picosecond pulse duration was higher than that by nanosecond pulse duration. It is concluded that the combination of picosecond pulse duration and infrared wavelength leads to the stable molten area appearance of the weld bead and higher breaking strength in micro-welding of glass and monocrystalline silicon.

  10. The reliability of the repair weld joints of aged high temperature components in fossil power boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Hiroyuki [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Ohtani, Ryuichi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Fujii, Kazuya [Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Yokoyama, Tomomitsu; Nishimura, Nobuhiko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Komei [Japan Steel Works Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    It is of fundamental engineering importance to be able to give reliable assessments of the effective service life of the critical components used within fossil power plants, particularly for those operating for prolonged periods. It is common practice for such assessments to have been estimated using destructive tests, typically the stress rupture test, this having been recognized as one of the most reliable evaluation methods available. Its only drawback is that it often does not permit the component to be in use following the sampling of the test specimen without repairing. The current piece of work focuses on the reliability of the repair welds of components for specimens taken from fossil power plants, having been in service for prolonged periods. Several such repairs to welds have been made to an old power boiler, in particular to a superheater header which is fabricated from 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. Under close examination the repairs to the girth weldment showed susceptibilities of weld cracking, similar to that observed in as-manufactured material. Within the repaired region of the welded joint the microstructure, tensile properties and toughness seemed to be unaffected. The hardness attained its minimum value within the heat affected zone, HAZ of the repair weld, overlapping that of original girth weld HAZ. Furthermore, the stress rupture strength achieved its minimum value at the same position taking on the same value as the strength associated with the aged girth welded joint. (orig.)

  11. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  12. Steel Collet For Welding Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.; Burley, Richard K.; Fogul, Irving

    1992-01-01

    Improved steel collet holds electrode for tungsten inert-gas welding but allows quick and easy replacement. Also ensures reliable arc starting. Slip-on compression ring compresses tapered section of body of collet around inner end of welding electrode. Collet mounted in receptacle below stack of lenses and filters in coaxial-vision welding torch. Blind hole in collet protects outermost lens from damage by electrode.

  13. The influence of shielding gas in hybrid LASER MIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Giovanni; Campana, Giampaolo; Fortunato, Alessandro; Ascari, Alessandro

    2007-07-01

    Hybrid LASER-GMAW welding technique has been recently studied and developed in order to meet the needs of modern welding industries. The two sources involved in this process play, in fact, a complementary role: fast welding speed, deep bead penetration and high energy concentration can be achieved through the LASER beam, while gap bridgeability and cost-effectiveness are typical of the GMAW process. Particularly interesting, in this context, is the CO 2 LASER-MIG welding which differs from the Nd:YAG LASER-MIG technique for the high powers that can be exploited and for the good power/cost ratio of the process. This paper is a part of a wide study on the hybrid CO 2 LASER-MIG welding and investigates the influence of the shielding gas both on the stability of the process and on the dimensional characteristics of the weld bead. Two different parameters have been taken into consideration in order to develop this analysis: the shielding gas composition and the shielding gas flow. The experiment, performed on AISI 304 stainless steel plates, has been planned exploiting design of experiment techniques. The results have been analyzed through a statistical approach in order to determine the real influence of each parameter on the overall process.

  14. Modelling of GMA welding in short-arc mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planckaert, J.P.

    2008-07-01

    Nowadays there is a lot of welding processes giving an answer to the great diversity of joints to realize and to the characteristics of the metals employed. The first chapter describes the different power sources used in welding. After that, a more detailed explanation of arc welding is given. Finally we present the design of a welding test bed. One can, of course, use an empirical approach to optimize a process. Nevertheless there are advantages in choosing an analytical approach since we can expect significant progress in the understanding of the dynamical interactions in the arc. That's why we present in the second chapter the theoretical knowledge concerning the behaviour of the molten metal transferred during Gas Metal Arc Welding. This work involves as well an experimental aspect required for the elaboration of the databases used to build the model. The recordings were made at CTAS on a test bed equipped with an acquisition system for measuring voltage, current, wire feed speed and high speed videos. The third chapter presents our research of a segmentation method to measure some relevant quantities. We propose a software sensor based on the active contour theory and we show good results on experimental movies. An adjustment step of the model is needed and described in the fourth chapter. The created simulator allows us to interpret some important phenomena in welding, to make a sensitive study 'without risk' and to give theoretical defect signatures. (author)

  15. Passive Visual Sensing in Automatic Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao

    and the weld pool, has also prevented the realization of a closed-loop control system for many years, even though a variety of sensors have been developed. Among all the sensor systems, visual sensors have the advantage of receiving visual information and have been drawn more and more attentions. Typical...... sources and are dicult to be widely employed in industry. Compared to human welders, existing sensor systems exhibit severe limitations as mentioned above. With the protection of only a welding shield glass, i.e., without any auxiliary illumination (passive), human welders can extract visual information...... and thoroughly investigated the development of a passive vision system which is only equipped with a single o-the-shelf CCD camera and optical lters, yet capable of extracting sucient information for the control purpose. From the hardware side, we have studies the selection of proper optical lters to reduce...

  16. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence...... effect of the post-welding conditions when subjecting a friction stir weld to loading transverse to the weld line. The numerical model of the friction stir welded joint, employs a step-wise modeling approach to combine an in-situ weld simulation with a post-welding failure analysis. Using the commercial...... the weld performance. The objective of this paper is to discuss some of the main conflicts that arise when taking both the post-welding material conditions and stressestrain state into account in a subsequent structural analysis. The discussion is here based on a preliminary numerical study of the possible...

  17. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  18. The Effect of Weld Penetration on Blast Performance of Welded Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    programmable robot as shown in Figure 6. The welding robot was used to maximise consistency between the welded coupons. Table 3 contains information regarding...Coupon Weld Characterisation Welding is an inherently variable process and while robotic welding provides better control of weld quality there is... robotic welding , while John Norrish provided advice and logistical support. At DSTO Edinburgh, John Williams performed the duties of firing and safety

  19. Integrated Voltage—Current Monitoring and Control of Gas Metal Arc Weld Magnetic Ball-Jointed Open Source 3-D Printer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuenyong Nilsiam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To provide process optimization of metal fabricating self-replicating rapid prototyper (RepRap 3-D printers requires a low-cost sensor and data logger system to measure current (I and voltage (V of the gas metal arc welders (GMAW. This paper builds on previous open-source hardware development to provide a real-time measurement of welder I-V where the measuring circuit is connected to two analog inputs of the Arduino that is used to control the 3-D printer itself. Franklin firmware accessed through a web interface that is used to control the printer allows storing the measured values and downloading those stored readings to the user’s computer. To test this custom current and voltage monitoring device this study reports on its use on an upgraded all metal RepRap during the printing of aluminum alloy (ER1100, ER4043, ER4943, ER4047, and ER5356. The voltage and current data were analyzed on a per alloy basis and also layer-by-layer in order to evaluate the device’s efficacy as a monitoring device for 3-D printing and the results of the integrated design are discussed.

  20. Solid State Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.; Walker, Bryant

    2012-01-01

    What is TSW and USW? TSW is a solid state weld process consisting of an induction coil heating source, a stir rod, and non-rotating containment plates Independent heating, stirring and forging controls Decouples the heating, stirring and forging process elements of FSW. USW is a solid state weld process consisting of an induction coil heating source, a stir rod, and a non-rotating containment plate; Ultrasonic energy integrated into non-rotating containment plate and stir rod; Independent heating, stirring and forging controls; Decouples the heating, stirring and forging process elements of FSW.

  1. Laser welding of copper and aluminium battery interconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bono, Paola; Blackburn, Jon

    2015-07-01

    The adoption of lithium-ion and/or super-capacitor battery technologies is a current hot topic in the automotive industry. For both battery types, the terminals and busbars are manufactured from copper (Cu) and/or aluminium-based (Al-based) alloys, as a result of their high electrical and thermal conductivities. Laser welding is considered an attractive process to industry due to its easy automotability, high processing speed and highly repeatable cost-effective processing. However, laser welding of Cu-Cu and Al-Al joints presents several difficulties due to the high surface reflectivity at infrared (IR) wavelengths. This behaviour becomes even more critical when processing thin sheets and foils.This paper summarises recent work performed to develop laser welding techniques suitable for monometallic joining of Cu-Cu and Al-Al electrical interconnections. Laser welding of multiple overlapped foils (with thickness in the range of 17μm-100μm) were investigated.

  2. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE-soft......-software package ABAQUS. In this work, the results have been qualitatively evaluated....

  3. Effect of Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    Present work is aimed to improve stress corrosion cracking resistance of high nitrogen steel and its welds. An attempt to weld high nitrogen steel of 5 mm thick plate using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with three high strength age hardenable fillers i.e., 11-10 PH filler, PH 13- 8Mo and maraging grade of MDN 250 filler is made. Welds were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers hardness testing of the welds was carried out to study the mechanical behaviour of welds. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were done to determine pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was carried out using constant load type machine with applied stress of 50% yield strength and in 45% MgCl2 solution boiling at 155°C. The results of the present investigation established that improvement in resistance to stress corrosion cracking was observed for PH 13- 8Mo GTA welds when compared to 11-10 PH and MDN 250 GTA welds. However, All GTA welds failed in the weld interface region. This may be attributed to relatively lower pitting potential in weld interface which acts as active site and the initiation source of pitting.

  4. Sustainability of Welding Process through Bobbin Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sued, M. K.; Samsuri, S. S. M.; Kassim, M. K. A. M.; Nasir, S. N. N. M.

    2018-03-01

    Welding process is in high demand, which required a competitive technology to be adopted. This is important for sustaining the needs of the joining industries without ignoring the impact of the process to the environment. Friction stir welding (FSW) is stated to be benefitting the environment through low energy consumption, which cannot be achieved through traditional arc welding. However, this is not well documented, especially for bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW). Therefore, an investigation is conducted by measuring current consumption of the machine during the BFSW process. From the measurement, different phases of BFSW welding process and its electrical demand are presented. It is found that in general total energy in BFSW is about 130kW inclusive of all identified process phases. The phase that utilise for joint formation is in weld phase that used the highest total energy of 120kWs. The recorded total energy is still far below the traditional welding technology and the conventional friction stir welding (CFSW) energy demand. This indicates that BFSW technology with its vast benefit able to sustain the joining technology in near future.

  5. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  6. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  7. Experimental investigations of tungsten inert gas assisted friction stir welding of pure copper plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, M. A.; Boșneag, A.; Nitu, E.; Iordache, M.

    2017-10-01

    Welding copper and its alloys is usually difficult to join by conventional fusion welding processes because of high thermal diffusivity of the copper, alloying elements, necessity of using a shielding gas and a clean surface. To overcome this inconvenience, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a solid state joining process that relies on frictional heating and plastic deformation, is used as a feasible welding process. In order to achieve an increased welding speed and a reduction in tool wear, this process is assisted by another one (WIG) which generates and adds heat to the process. The aim of this paper is to identify the influence of the additional heat on the process parameters and on the welding joint properties (distribution of the temperature, hardness and roughness). The research includes two experiments for the FSW process and one experiment for tungsten inert gas assisted FSW process. The outcomes of the investigation are compared and analysed for both welding variants. Adding a supplementary heat source, the plates are preheated and are obtain some advantages such as reduced forces used in process and FSW tool wear, faster and better plasticization of the material, increased welding speed and a proper weld quality.

  8. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of arc welding of DMR-249A steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Pamnani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-mechanical attributes of DMR-249A steel weld joints manufactured by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and activated gas tungsten arc welding (A-GTAW processes were studied using Finite Element Model (FEM simulation. The thermal gradients and residual stresses were analyzed with SYSWELD software using double ellipsoidal heat source distribution model. The numerically estimated temperature distribution was validated with online temperature measurements using thermocouples. The predicted residual stresses profile across the weld joints was compared with the values experimentally measured using non-destructive techniques. The measured and predicted thermal cycles and residual stress profile was observed to be comparable. The residual stress developed in double sided A-GTAW joint were marginally higher in comparison to five pass SMAW joint due to phase transformation associated with high heat input per weld pass for A-GTAW process. The present investigations suggest the applicability of numerical modeling as an effective approach for predicting the thermo-mechanical properties influenced by welding techniques for DMR-249A steel weld joints. The tensile, impact and micro-hardness tests were carried to compare the welds. Considering benefits of high productivity and savings of labor and cost associated with A-GTAW compared to SMAW process, the minor variation in residual stress build up of A-GTAW joint can be neglected to develop A-GTAW as qualified alternative welding technique for DMR-249A steel.

  9. Thermomechanically coupled conduction mode laser welding simulations using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haoyue; Eberhard, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Process simulations of conduction mode laser welding are performed using the meshless Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The solid phase is modeled based on the governing equations in thermoelasticity. For the liquid phase, surface tension effects are taken into account to simulate the melt flow in the weld pool, including the Marangoni force caused by a temperature-dependent surface tension gradient. A non-isothermal solid-liquid phase transition with the release or absorption of additional energy known as the latent heat of fusion is considered. The major heat transfer through conduction is modeled, whereas heat convection and radiation are neglected. The energy input from the laser beam is modeled as a Gaussian heat source acting on the initial material surface. The developed model is implemented in Pasimodo. Numerical results obtained with the model are presented for laser spot welding and seam welding of aluminum and iron. The change of process parameters like welding speed and laser power, and their effects on weld dimensions are investigated. Furthermore, simulations may be useful to obtain the threshold for deep penetration welding and to assess the overall welding quality. A scalability and performance analysis of the implemented SPH algorithm in Pasimodo is run in a shared memory environment. The analysis reveals the potential of large welding simulations on multi-core machines.

  10. Electron-beam welding of thorium-doped iridium alloy sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Liu, C.T.; Hudson, J.D.

    1979-04-01

    Modified iridium alloys containing 100 ppM Th were found to be very susceptible to hot-cracking during gas tungsten-arc and electron-beam welding. However, the electron-beam welding process showed greater promise of success in welding these alloys, in particular Ir--0.3% W doped with 200 ppM Th and 50 ppM Al. The weldability of this particular alloy was extremely sensitive to the welding parameters, such as beam focus condition and welding speed, and the resulting fusion zone structure. At low speed successful electron-beam welds were made over a narrow range of beam focus conditions. However, at high speeds successful welds can be made over an extended range of focus conditions. The fusion zone grain structure is a strong function of welding speed and focus condition, as well. In the welds that showed hot-cracking, a region of positive segregation of thorium was identified at the fusion boundary. This highly thorium-segregated region seems to act as a potential source for the nucleation of a liquation crack, which later grows as a centerline crack

  11. Process stability during fiber laser-arc hybrid welding of thick steel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaziv, Ivan; Frostevarg, Jan; Akselsen, Odd M.; Kaplan, Alexander F. H.

    2018-03-01

    Thick steel plates are frequently used in shipbuilding, pipelines and other related heavy industries, and are usually joined by arc welding. Deep penetration laser-arc hybrid welding could increase productivity but has not been thoroughly investigated, and is therefore usually limited to applications with medium thickness (5-15 mm) sections. A major concern is process stability, especially when using modern welding consumables such as metal-cored wire and advanced welding equipment. High speed imaging allows direct observation of the process so that process behavior and phenomena can be studied. In this paper, 45 mm thick high strength steel was welded (butt joint double-sided) using the fiber laser-MAG hybrid process utilizing a metal-cored wire without pre-heating. Process stability was monitored under a wide range of welding parameters. It was found that the technique can be used successfully to weld thick sections with appropriate quality when the parameters are optimized. When comparing conventional pulsed and the more advanced cold metal transfer pulse (CMT+P) arc modes, it was found that both can provide high quality welds. CMT+P arc mode can provide more stable droplet transfer over a limited range of travel speeds. At higher travel speeds, an unstable metal transfer mechanism was observed. Comparing leading arc and trailing arc arrangements, the leading arc configuration can provide higher quality welds and more stable processing at longer inter-distances between the heat sources.

  12. Laser welding of sheet metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian

    Laser welding of sheet metals is an important application of high power lasers, and has many advantages over conventional welding techniques. Laser welding has a great potential to replace other welding technique in the car-body manufacturing because of high laser weld quality and relatively low manufacturing cost associated with the laser technique. However, a few problems related to the laser welding of sheet metals limit its applications in industries. To have a better understanding of the welding process, laser welding experimental studies and theoretical analysis are necessary. Temperature-dependent absorptivities of various metals are obtained theoretically for COsb2, COIL (Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser) and Nd:YAG lasers. It is found that the absorptivities for COIL and Nd:YAG lasers are 2.84 and 3.16 times higher than for the COsb2 laser, and the absorptivity increases with increasing temperature of the metals. Surface roughness and oxide films can enhance the absorption significantly. The reflectivity of as-received steel sheets decreases from 65-80% to 30-40% with surface oxide films for COsb2 lasers. Laser welding experiments show that the tensile strengths of the weld metals are higher than the base metals. For samples with surface oxide films, the oxygen concentration in the weld metals is found to be higher than in the specimens without oxidation, and the toughness of the weld metals is degraded. When steel powders are added to bridge the gap between two sheets, the oxygen content in the weld metals decreases and the toughness increases. A mathematical model is developed for the melt depth due to a stationary laser beam. The model results show that the melt depth increases rapidly with time at the beginning of laser irradiation and then increases slowly. Also, the melt depth is found to increase rapidly with laser intensities and then increases slowly for higher intensity. The average rate of melting and the times to reach the melting and boiling

  13. Classification and elimination of overlapped entities in DXF files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R.A. Atia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer aided engineering; design, drafting and manufacturing, software packages are widely used in modern industry. The product development cycle, from idea to manufacturing, goes through different stages using different computer aided programs. These programs exchange a lot of information in different formats. One of these formats is 2D drawing in DXF standard format. The exchanged files suffer from overlapped entities and different interpretation for entity formats. This paper emphasizes on the sources of this problem and its negative effects. Moreover, it introduces software for eliminating the overlapping entities and re-classification of them. In addition, the paper explains the algorithms, which are encapsulated in the software.

  14. The Numerical and Experimental Investigation of the Multi-layer Laser-MIG Hybrid Welding for Fe36Ni Invar Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Liu, Yun; Ou, Wenmin; Gu, Cheng; Wei, Yanhong

    2015-12-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations of multi-layer laser-MIG hybrid welding for Fe36Ni Invar alloy were presented in this paper. The multi-layer laser-MIG hybrid welding experiments with different parameters were conducted for the 19.5-mm-thick Invar plates. A finite element (FE) model was established to predict the temperature field, residual stress, and deformation distribution during and after welding. A plane-conical combined heat source model was used to simulate the laser-MIG hybrid welding process. Different numbers of welding layers were chosen to study the effect of welding layer on the temperature field, residual stress, and deformation distribution. It was found that the maximum residual stress of Invar plates after laser-MIG hybrid welding is 300 MPa and maximum deformation is 0.4 mm, so that laser-MIG hybrid welding can be used in actual manufacture of Invar moulds.

  15. Influence of Hardening Model on Weld Residual Stress Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens

    2009-06-01

    This study is the third stage of a project sponsored by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) to improve the weld residual stress modelling procedures currently used in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine which material hardening model gave the best agreement with experimentally measured weld residual stress distributions. Two girth weld geometries were considered: 19mm and 65mm thick girth welds with Rin/t ratios of 10.5 and 2.8, respectively. The FE solver ABAQUS Standard v6.5 was used for analysis. As a preliminary step some improvements were made to the welding simulation procedure used in part one of the project. First, monotonic stress strain curves and a mixed isotropic/kinematic hardening model were sourced from the literature for 316 stainless steel. Second, more detailed information was obtained regarding the geometry and welding sequence for the Case 1 weld (compared with phase 1 of this project). Following the preliminary step, welding simulations were conducted using isotropic, kinematic and mixed hardening models. The isotropic hardening model gave the best overall agreement with experimental measurements; it is therefore recommended for future use in welding simulations. The mixed hardening model gave good agreement for predictions of the hoop stress but tended to under estimate the magnitude of the axial stress. It must be noted that two different sources of data were used for the isotropic and mixed models in this study and this may have contributed to the discrepancy in predictions. When defining a mixed hardening model it is difficult to delineate the relative contributions of isotropic and kinematic hardening and for the model used it may be that a greater isotropic hardening component should have been specified. The kinematic hardening model consistently underestimated the magnitude of both the axial and hoop stress and is not recommended for use. Two sensitivity studies were also conducted. In the first the effect of using a

  16. Orbital TIG (GTAW) welding for highest weld joint quality requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitza, M.

    2001-01-01

    Due to its many advantages orbital TIG (GTAW) welding has become the major standard for mechanised tube and pipe weldings in various industries such as: Semiconductor, food and beverage, dairy and brewery, chemical and bio-/pharmaceutical industry, vessel construction, aerospace, offshore and shipbuilding, heat-exchanger, fossil and nuclear power generation. Today's state-of-the-art technology allows orbital weldings of tubes, pipes, fittings or similar parts from 2,3 mm O.D. up to unlimited sizes (including flat plate). Wall thicknesses from 0,3 mm to 175 mm (narrow groove) can easily be accommodated. For difficult applications like inbore weldings, valve seat repairs or video-controlled remote welds, special equipment can be provided or individually manufactured on customer's demand. (orig.) [de

  17. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  18. Improving the Quality of Welding Seam of Automatic Welding of Buckets Based on TCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min

    2018-02-01

    Since February 2014, the welding defects of the automatic welding line of buckets have been frequently appeared. The average repair time of each bucket is 26min, which seriously affects the production efficiency and welding quality. We conducted troubleshooting, and found the main reasons for the welding defects of the buckets were the deviations of the center points of the robot tools and the poor quality of the locating welding. We corrected the gripper, welding torch, and accuracy of repeat positioning of robots to control the quality of positioning welding. The welding defect rate of buckets was reduced greatly, ensuring the production efficiency and welding quality.

  19. An Analysis of the Weldability of Ductile Cast Iron Using Inconel 625 for the Root Weld and Electrodes Coated in 97.6% Nickel for the Filler Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco-Javier Cárcel-Carrasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the weldability of ductile cast iron when the root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG welding process employing an Inconel 625 source rod, and when the filler welds are applied with electrodes coated with 97.6% Ni. The welds were performed on ductile cast iron specimen test plates sized 300 mm × 90 mm × 10 mm with edges tapered at angles of 60°. The plates were subjected to two heat treatments. This article analyzes the influence on weldability of the various types of electrodes and the effect of preheat treatments. Finally, a microstructure analysis is made of the material next to the weld in the metal-weld interface and in the weld itself. The microstructure produced is correlated with the strength of the welds. We treat an alloy with 97.6% Ni, which prevents the formation of carbides. With a heat treatment at 900 °C and 97.6% Ni, there is a dissolution of all carbides, forming nodules in ferritic matrix graphite.

  20. Non-destructive three-dimensional evaluation of pores at different welded joints and their effects on joints strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Rie; Takayama, Yasuko; Tsuchida, Fujio; Nakajima, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the porosity in different laser welded cast alloys non-destructively using X-ray micro-focus computerized tomography (micro-CT) and to evaluate the effect of porosity on the tensile strength of the welded joints. The welding procedure was conducted in rectangular cast metals, CoCr, Ti and platinum added gold alloy (AuPt). The metal plates were butted CoCr to CoCr (CoCr/CoCr) or Ti to Ti (Ti/Ti) for welding of similar metals and Ti to AuPt (Ti/AuPt) for welding of dissimilar metals. Specimens were welded under several laser-welding conditions; with groove (normal), without groove (no groove), spatter, crack, or no overlapped welding (no overlap) (n=5). Porosity in the welded area was evaluated using a micro-CT. Tensile strength of the welded specimens was measured at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Multiple comparisons of the group means were performed using ANOVA and Fisher's multiple comparisons test (α=.05). The relationship between the porosity and the tensile strength was investigated with a regression analysis. Three-dimensional images of Ti/AuPt could not be obtained due to metal artifacts and the tensile specimens of Ti/AuPt were debonded prior to the tensile test. All other welded specimens had porosity in the welded area and the porosities ranged from 0.01% to 0.17%. The fractures of most of the CoCr/CoCr and Ti/Ti specimens occurred in the parent metals. Joint strength had no relationship with the porosity in the welded area (R(2)=0.148 for CoCr/CoCr, R(2)=0.088 for Ti/Ti, respectively). The small amount of porosity caused by the laser-welding procedures did not affect the joint strength. The joint strength of Ti/AuPt was too weak to be used clinically. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Residual stress reduction in the penetration nozzle weld joint by overlay welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Wenchun; Luo, Yun; Wang, B.Y.; Tu, S.T.; Gong, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Residual stress reduction in penetration weld nozzle by overlay welding was studied. • The overlay weld can decrease the residual stress in the weld root. • Long overlay welding is proposed in the actual welding. • Overlay weld to decrease residual stress is more suitable for thin nozzle. - Abstract: Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the penetration nozzle weld joint endangers the structural reliability of pressure vessels in nuclear and chemical industries. How to decrease the residual stress is very critical to ensure the structure integrity. In this paper, a new method, which uses overlay welding on the inner surface of nozzle, is proposed to decrease the residual stresses in the penetration joint. Finite element simulation is used to study the change of weld residual stresses before and after overlay welding. It reveals that this method can mainly decrease the residual stress in the weld root. Before overlay welding, large tensile residual stresses are generated in the weld root. After overlay weld, the tensile hoop stress in weld root has been decreased about 45%, and the radial stress has been decreased to compressive stress, which is helpful to decrease the susceptibility to SCC. With the increase of overlay welding length, the residual stress in weld root has been greatly decreased, and thus the long overlay welding is proposed in the actual welding. It also finds that this method is more suitable for thin nozzle rather than thick nozzle

  2. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  3. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding. Th...

  4. Welding--Trade or Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, C. E.; Smith, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a collaborative program between schools with the purpose of training and providing advanced education in welding. Modern manufacturing is turning to automation to increase productivity, but it can be a great challenge to program robots and other computer-controlled welding and joining systems. Computer programming and…

  5. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  6. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... of normal video and high speed video (100 Hz) can not reveal any instability in the process when humping occurs. Contrary to this, photo diode signals (sampled at 3 kHz) clearly indicate a characteristic signal when humps occur.When the seam area and seam width have manually been measured on high speed...

  7. Laser welding of tailored blanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecas, P.; Gouveia, H.; Quintino, L.; Olsen, F.O.

    1998-01-01

    Laser welding has an increasing role in the automotive industry, namely on the sub-assemblies manufacturing. Several sheet-shape parts are laser welded, on a dissimilar combination of thicknesses and materials, and are afterwards formed (stamped) being transformed in a vehicle body component. In this paper low carbon CO 2 laser welding, on the thicknesses of 1,25 and 0.75 mm, formability investigation is described. There will be a description of how the laser welded blanks behave in different forming tests, and the influence of misalignment and undercut on the formability. The quality is evaluated by measuring the limit strain and limit effective strain for the laser welded sheets and the base material, which will be presented in a forming limit diagram. (Author) 14 refs

  8. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  9. Reappraising and Redirecting Research on the Victim-Offender Overlap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Mark T; Mulford, Carrie F

    2017-01-01

    The strong positive association between offending and victimization, or the victim-offender overlap, has received considerable amount of research attention in recent years. Empirical research has made important strides in unpacking the sources of the phenomenon, but important questions remain unanswered. Ambiguity surrounds the utility of certain theoretical explanations for the overlap, the nature of the phenomenon, and the methodological tools used to examine its etiology. Owing to these knowledge gaps, the scientific meaning of the victim-offender overlap is unclear. Moreover, a number of potentially important theoretical arguments are rarely subject to empirical testing in this line of research. The purpose of this article is to use a narrative review methodology to provide a critical reappraisal of the theoretical, empirical, and methodological research on the victim-offender overlap and offer directions for ways forward to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon. This review includes critical analysis of 78 academic publications, along with a table that summarizes the key findings and conclusions from 18 critical empirical studies that have contributed to our understanding of the victim-offender overlap. We offer recommendations for the continued development of theoretical and methodological tools to better understand this complex phenomenon.

  10. Tailor-welded blanks and their production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi

    2005-01-01

    Tailor welded blanks had been widely used in the automobile industry. A tailor welded blank consists of several flat sheets that were laser welded together before stamping. A combination of different materials, thickness, and coatings could be welded together to form a blank for stamping car body panels. As for the material for automobile industry, this technology was one of the development trend for automobile industry because of its weight reduction, safety improvement and economical use of materials. In this paper, the characters and production of tailor welded blanks in the market were discussed in detail. There had two major methods to produce tailor welded blanks. Laser welding would replace mesh seam welding for the production of tailor welded blanks in the future. The requirements on the edge preparation of unwelded blanks for tailor welded blanks were higher than the other steel processing technology. In order to produce the laser welded blank, there had the other process before the laser welding in the factory. In the world, there had three kinds of patterns for the large volume production of tailor welded blanks. In China, steel factory played the important role in the promotion of the application of tailor welded blanks. The competition for the supply of tailor welded blanks to the automobile industry would become fierce in the near future. As a result, the demand for the quality control on the production of tailor welded blanks would be the first priority concern for the factory.

  11. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal... fusion welded on class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in...

  12. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler and...

  13. Electron beam welding fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mara, G.L.; Armstrong, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The electron beam welding process is described and the unique mode of operation and penetration explained by a description of the forces operating within the weld pool. This penetration model is demonstrated by high speed cinematography of the weld pool on several materials. The conditions under which weld defects are formed are discussed and examples are presented. (auth)

  14. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... butt welds must meet the following: (1) Butt welds of pipes made from carbon, carbon manganese, or low alloy steels must meet § 56.50-105 of this chapter, including the requirements for post-weld heat treatment. (2) Except for piping inside an independent cargo tank type A, B, or C, butt welds must be 100...

  15. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  16. Machine for welding solar cell connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorans, D.Y.

    1977-08-09

    A machine for welding a connection wire over a solar cell electrode is described which comprises a base, a welding mount for the solar cell which is supported on the base, means for holding the solar cell on the welding mount, welding electrodes, means to lower the welding electrodes over the solar cell and the connection wire superimposed thereon, means for applying electric current pulses to said welding electrodes. It is characterized by the fact that it further comprises means for imparting to said mount an alternating transverse movement in relation to said base before and during the welding operation.

  17. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Hybrid laser-arc welding of galvanized high-strength steels in a gap-free lap-joint configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanglu

    In order to meet the industry demands for increased fuel efficiency and enhanced mechanical and structural performance of vehicles as well as provided excellent corrosion resistance, more and more galvanized advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have been used to fabricate automobile parts such as panels, bumpers, and front rails. The automotive industry has shown tremendous interest in using laser welding to join galvanized dual phase steels because of lower heat input and higher welding speed. However, the laser welding process tends to become dramatically unstable in the presence of highly pressurized zinc vapor because of the low boiling point of zinc, around 906°C, compared to higher melting point of steel, over 1500°C. A large number of spatters are produced by expelling the liquid metal from the molten pool by the pressurized zinc vapor. Different weld defects such as blowholes and porosities appear in the welds. So far, limited information has been reported on welding of galvanized high strength dual-phase steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. There is no open literature on the successful attainment of defect-free welds from the laser or hybrid welding of galvanized high-strength steels. To address the significant industry demand, in this study, different welding techniques and monitoring methods are used to study the features of the welding process of galvanized DP steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. The current research covers: (i) a feasibility study on the welding of galvanized DP 980 steels in a lap joint configuration using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), laser welding, hybrid laser/arc welding with the common molten pool, laser welding with the assistance of GTAW preheating source and hybrid laser-variable polarity gas tungsten arc welding (Laser-VPGTAW) techniques (Chapter 2-4); (ii) a welding process monitoring of the welding techniques including the use of machine vision and acoustic emission technique (Chapter 5); (iii

  19. Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki

    2002-01-01

    It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater

  20. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  1. Real time computer controlled weld skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, adaptive control, automatic welding system was developed. This system utilizes the general case geometrical relationships between a weldment and a weld skate to precisely maintain constant weld speed and torch angle along a contoured workplace. The system is compatible with the gas tungsten arc weld process or can be adapted to other weld processes. Heli-arc cutting and machine tool routing operations are possible applications.

  2. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  3. Weld Magnification Factor Approach in Cruciform Joints Considering Post Welding Cooling Medium and Weld Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Araque

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to develop an experimental-theoretical analysis about the influence of the cooling medium and the geometry of the welding bead profile in fatigue life and the associated parameters with structural integrity of welded joints. A welded joint with cruciform geometry is considered using SMAW (Shielded Metal ArcWelding, plates in structural steel ASTM A36 HR of 8 mm of thickness, and E6013 electrode input. A three-dimensional computational model of the cruciform joint was created using the finite element method. For this model, the surface undulation of the cord and differentiation in the mechanical properties of the fusion zone were considered, the heat-affected zone (HAZ and base material, respectively. In addition, an initial residual stress field, which was established experimentally, was considered. The results were a set of analytical expressions for the weld magnification factor Mk. It was found that values for the latter decrease markedly in function of the intensity of the cooling medium used in the post welding cooling phase, mainly due to the effect of the residual compressive stresses. The obtained models of behavior of the weld magnification factor are compared with the results from other researchers with some small differences, mainly due to the inclusion of the cooling effect of the post weld and the variation of the leg of the weld bead. The obtained analytical equations in the present research for Mk can be used in management models of life and structural integrity for this type of welded joint.

  4. Design Optimization and Fatigue Analysis of Laser Stake Welded Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    I I I _ I I I I I I I I Figure 2.10: Deformed finite element model of the joint (Il/hA, w/h=0.6 and alh =1). I I I * 52 I i shape functions. This...can be observed that at a minimum weld-width of w/h = 0.2 Ithe factor of safety increases as the overlap increase up to a value of alh = 1.5, beyond...Hl4s=l, wlh=0.6, alh =l) used for almost all joint configurations analyzd with FRACN21). * 92 I Iallocated at the crack surfaces to enforce contact

  5. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  6. Standardization of the WPS and Development of the Welding Process Management System for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hong Seok; Lee, Jang Wook; Cho, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sang Hoon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to integrate existing WPS(welding procedure specification) and PQR(procedure qualification records) which are kept by every branch office respectively and to develop a specialized program that will assist in the creation of WPS and PQR in accordance with the ASME Sec. IX, III, B31.1, etc. These research results make possible not only to ensure structural integrity by applying WPS and PQR correctly but also to cut down on expenses by managing the welding process efficiently. Moreover, as the specialized program will be linked with ERP system between KHNP and KPS, an administration action of welding process will be dealt with on-line. The backgrounds of this study are as follows; · Need to apply WPS correctly and promptly · Need to cut down on expenses due to overlapping development WPS · Need to manage welding resources efficiently · Need to standardize welding QA(quality assurance) documents · Need to improve efficiency of administrative welding process

  7. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  8. 10,170 flawless welds

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The welding of tubes containing the principal current-carrying busbars in the LHC magnets was one of the main activities of the SMACC project. After a year of preparation and another of intense activity in the tunnel, the last weld was completed on Wednesday 14 May. Over 10,170 welds have been inspected and not a single fault has been found.    The welder (above) creates the weld using an orbital welding machine (below) specifically designed for CERN. Each of the eight sectors of the LHC contains around 210 interconnects between the superconducting magnets. Consolidating these interconnections was the SMACC project’s primary objective. One of the last jobs before closing the interconnects is the welding of the M lines: each has a 104 mm diameter and a radial clearance of just 45 mm. In total: 10,170 welds carried out in a single year of activities. A true challenge, which was carried out by a team of 30 highly specialised welders, working under the supervision o...

  9. Truss Assembly and Welding by Intelligent Precision Jigging Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komendera, Erik; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR) prototype that enables the precise alignment and welding of titanium space telescope optical benches. The IPJR, equipped with micron accuracy sensors and actuators, worked in tandem with a lower precision remote controlled manipulator. The combined system assembled and welded a 2 m truss from stock titanium components. The calibration of the IPJR, and the difference between the predicted and the truss dimensions as-built, identified additional sources of error that should be addressed in the next generation of IPJRs in 2D and 3D.

  10. Development and Verification of a Weld Simulation Capability for VAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    verified. For heat transfer analyses, these included an element birth algorithm for tracking the states of weld elements with moving heat sources, a...process. Temperature-dependent structural material properties were implemented and multi-pass welding was supported. For heat transfer analysis...mobiles, ainsi que la capacité de générer des vecteurs de charge thermique basés sur le modèle de Goldak et celle de traiter adéquatement les

  11. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Hung Tseng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO2 and Al2O3 were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO2 leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al2O3. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO2, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO2 has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al2O3 does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO2 uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al2O3 results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  12. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Lin, Po-Yu

    2014-06-20

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO₂ and Al₂O₃ were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO₂ leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al₂O₃. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO₂, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO₂ has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al₂O₃ does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO₂ uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al₂O₃ results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  13. Distributions of temperature and stress fields on penetration assembly during multi-pass welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Li Li

    2010-01-01

    Welding is a fundamental manufacturing technique used to join metal components. They cause errors during the assembly of the structure and reduce the strength of the structure. Based on an elastic-plastic-model, a three-dimensional finite element numerical simulation of a stainless steel penetration assembly during multi-pass welding with girth welds is carried out in this paper. And then the transient temperature field and the real-time dynamic stresses field of the structure are obtained. The heat source is modeled as a moving heat flux along girth welds following a double ellipsoid distribution. The 'birth and death' element method is applied to simulate the gradual growth of welding pass metal. The way of predicting the residual stresses in this paper can prepare an error-minimizing guide at design stage and can be used in accuracy management.

  14. A model for the evolution of fluid permeability in welding volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jeremie; Llewellin, Ed; Heap, Michael; Scheu, Bettina; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallee, Yan; Dobson, Katherine; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Magmas fragment forming a transiently granular material, which can weld back to a fluid-continuum. This process results in dramatic changes in the porosity of the material, which impacts the fluid permeability. First, we present stochastic simulations of spheres, designed to represent ash particles, in a 3D volume, for which the spheres are permitted to overlap. We use these simulations to show that we can quantitatively predict the surface area and pore-cluster size distribution of these geometrical objects through the full range of inter-sphere gas volume fractions. Second, we perform high temperature sintering experiments using analogue viscous droplets while imaging the internal structure of the sintering packs in situ using synchrotron-source X-rays and volume-reconstruction algorithms. We show that the evolution of structure in these time-resolved 3D datasets are comparable to the sphere-population simulations and to ex-situ tests. We use LBflow, a lattice-Boltzmann fluid flow simulation tool, to quantify the fluid-permeability between the sphere populations (simulation) and the sintering droplets (experimental). We scale the fluid permeability in both systems with the quantitative prediction of internal surface area and find a universal behaviour that additionally agrees well with other published datasets for natural samples. Finally, we use a model for the kinetics of sintering to convert the scaling between the permeability and the internal surface area into a model for the kinetics of the decay of permeability. We propose that this will be a useful tool for predicting the longevity of degassing pathways in granular-filled cracks in conduits and shallow lava domes as well as during the sedimentation of exceptional hot ignimbrites that undergo compaction and welding. Fruitful future research would quantify the effect of pore-cluster anisotropy development in the evolution of fluid permeability.

  15. 3-D design method for welding groove and seal weld of reactor CRDM adapter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Baiyong; Wang Xiaobin; Zhu Xiaoyong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the analysis of 2 D and 3 D shapes of welding groove and seal weld of reactor CRDM adapter, four intersecting curves are defined, and a method and gist to 3 D design of adapter welding groove and seal weld is proposed. Parameterized design of adapter welding groove and seal weld has been realized using UG software, and the main factors which affect the welding section areas have been analyzed. Compared with the measurement, the error of weld section area of each adapter created by spline fitting method is less than 0.8%. (authors)

  16. Plasticity Theory of Fillet Welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with simple methods for calculation of fillet welds based on the theory of plasticity. In developing the solutions the lower-bound theorem is used. The welding material and parts of the base material are subdivided into triangular regions with homogeneous stress fields; thereby...... a safe and statically admissible stress distribution is established. The plasticity solutions are compared with tests carried out at the Engineering Academy of Denmark, Lyngby, in the early nineties, and old fillet weld tests. The new failure conditions are in very good agreement with the yield load...

  17. The risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slagor, Rebekka Michaelsen; Dornonville de la Cour, Morten; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There are indications that solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) increases the risk of cataract, but there is only circumstantial evidence that metal welding, an important occupational source of UVR exposure, is a risk factor. The objective of this study is to unravel if metal welding...... increases the risk of cataract. Method: We compared the risk of being diagnosed with cataract from 1987–2012 in a historic cohort of 4288 male metal arc welders against a reference group comprised of Danish skilled and unskilled male workers with similar age distribution. For the welders’ cohort.......95–1.21] and the adjusted HR was 1.08 (95% CI 0.95–1.22). Age and diabetes were as expected strong risk factors. Conclusion: We found no increased risk of developing cataract among Danish metal welders who worked with arc welding from 1950–1985. This may be attributed to the effectiveness of personal safety equipment....

  18. Characteristics of welding fume aerosol investigated in three Swedish workshops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaxon, C; Pagels, J; Gudmundsson, A; Bohgard, M; Asbach, C; John, A C; Kuhlbusch, T A J; Karlsson, J E; Kammer, R; Tinnerberg, H; Nielsen, J

    2009-01-01

    Potentially high human exposures to nanometer sized airborne particles occur due to welding and other thermal processes in industrial environments. Detailed field measurements of physical and chemical particle characteristics were performed in three work-shops in Sweden. Measurements were performed both in the plume 5-20 cm above the welding point and in the background air (more than 5 m away from the nearest known particle source). Particle number and mass concentrations were measured on-line. A low pressure impactor was used for size-resolved chemical particle composition. The in-plume measurements generated the chemical signatures for different welding processes. These signatures were then used to identify contributions from various processes to the particle concentrations in different size classes. The background number and mass concentrations increased by more than an order of magnitude during intense activities in the work-shops compared to low activities during breaks.

  19. Acoustic field measurements in austenitic welds and dissimilar welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemnitz, P.; Richter, U.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic field measurements were performed in identical specimen geometries of NPP components, in order to contribute the results to the interpretation of US testing results and evaluation of the testing reliability. With an electrodynamic probe of type T, the sonic fields were scanned by scanning heads at 45 T, 45 L, 60 L, and 70 L. The following selected groups of measured data are discussed in the paper: (a) acoustic fields in a narrow-gap weld and a dissimilar weld; (b) longitudinal sound impact testing of welds for detection of transverse defects; (c) variation of transmissibility of acoustic waves along a welded seam; (d) strength and range of the secondary creep wave; (e) multiply reflected sonic modes. (orig./CB) [de

  20. Neural overlap in processing music and speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing. PMID:25646513

  1. Neural overlap in processing music and speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L

    2015-03-19

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  3. Robotic system for orbital welding of pipes; Sistema robotizado para soldagem orbital de dutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracarense, Alexandre Queiroz; Lima II, Eduardo Jose; Torres, Guilherme Fortunato; Ramalho, Frederico [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Felizardo, Ivanilza; Zanon, Gislaine Pires [ROTECH Tecnologia Robotica Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This work presents the robotic system projected for orbital welding of pipelines of oil and gas. The system consists of a controller (microcomputer), that allows the execution of all the referring tasks to the welding in an autonomous way, and two manipulates, to what are coupled the welding torches that are connected to a welding power source with double wire feeders. With this system, GMA W process is used to execute the root pass, while FCA W process, besides the GMA W, is used for the filling and finishing passes. The system has four degrees of freedom, allowing the control of stick out, travel speed, torch angle and positioning. Besides these, the arc voltage and and welding current are also controlled during the process. Knowing that for each welding position (plane, vertical up and down and over head) a great group of parameters must be used, several tests were accomplished. With these values a controlled variation could be accomplished in an uninterrupted way when welding position changes, getting the increase of the productivity and also the quality of the weld performed by a robotic system. (author)

  4. Materials participation in welded joints manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2016-08-01

    Management of materials dilution to form a joint with higher features asked by complex metallic structures is a problem that took attention and efforts of welding processes researchers and this communication will give a little contribution presenting some scientific and experimental results of dilution processes studied by Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department. Liquid state welding processes have a strong dependence related to dilution of base and filler materials, the most important are for automatic joining using welding. The paper presents a review of some scientific works already published and their contributions, results of dilution coefficient evaluation using weighing, graphics and software applied for shielded metal arc welding process. Paper results could be used for welders’ qualification, welding procedure specification and other welding processes researchers’ activities. The results of Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department, show dilution coefficient values between 20-30 % of base material and 70-80 % of filler material for studied welding process.

  5. Special grain boundaries in the nugget zone of friction stir welded AA6061-T6 under various welding parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Wang [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Yong, Zou, E-mail: yzou@sdu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Xuemei, Liu [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Matsuda, Kenji [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2016-08-01

    The age hardenable AA6061-T6 plate was butt welded by friction stir welding. The total heat input, generated by friction between the tool and work piece and plastic deformation, results in a consumption of meta-stable phases in the nugget zone. Precipitation phenomena were closely related to the diffusion of the solute atoms. The existence of special grain boundaries like Σ1a and Σ3 will increase the difficulty in diffusion, which will improve the hardness in the nugget zone. Furthermore, the formation of Σ3 grain boundaries can result from an impingement of re-crystallized grains coming from texture components in twin relationship already. An appropriate strain level may benefit the development of the twin components with a similar intensity. The welding parameters have an effect on heat source mode and the strain level. Then, the type of dynamic re-crystallization and distribution of the special grain boundaries was altered by changing the parameters.

  6. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  7. Method for enhanced control of welding processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaffer, Donald A.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Tung, David M.; Schroder, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

  8. Guidelines for Controlling Indoor Air Quality Problems Associated with Kilns, Copiers, and Welding in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ronald W.; And Others

    Guidelines for controlling indoor air quality problems associated with kilns, copiers, and welding in schools are provided in this document. Individual sections on kilns, duplicating equipment, and welding operations contain information on the following: sources of contaminants; health effects; methods of control; ventilation strategies; and…

  9. Thermomechanical Modelling of Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes a generic programme for analysis, optimization and development of resistance spot and projection welding. The programme includes an electrical model determining electric current and voltage distribution as well as heat generation, a thermal model calculating heat...

  10. Laser Welding of Ship Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brayton, W. C; Banas, C. M; Peters, G. T

    1979-01-01

    ... joint cleanliness and fitup conditions. In the current program, welds were formed between surfaces with nonperfect fitup, between plasma-cut surfaces, between surfaces deliberately mismatched to provide a varging joint gap and under out...

  11. Welding and Production Metallurgy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This 6000 square foot facility represents the only welding laboratory of its kind within DA. It is capable of conducting investigations associated with solid state...

  12. Welding development for LMFBR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaughter, G.M.; Edmonds, D.P.; Goodwin, G.M.; King, J.F.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    High-quality welds with suitable properties for long-time elevated-temperature nuclear service are among the most critical needs in today's welding technology. Safe, reliable, and economic generation of future power depends on welded construction in systems such as Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs). Rapid thermal transients in LMFBR systems at coolant temperatures around 590 to 650 0 C (1000 to 1200 0 F) could cause creep and creep-fatigue damage that is not encountered in lower temperature reactor systems. The undesirable consequences of interaction between the two working fluids - sodium and steam - in the steam generators are also of major concern. Thus sound welds that have excellent reliability over a 30-year service life are essential. Several programs are actively underway at ORNL to satisfy this critical need and selected portions of three of these programs are discussed briefly

  13. Optimization of control bank overlap for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jae Seung; Cho, Byung Oh; Zee, Sung Quun

    1998-07-01

    In the pressurized water reactor, control banks are operated by 40% effective core height overlap to avoid decrease of differential rod worth. This overlap does not effect on the core depletion history because the pressurized water reactor core operated at all rod out condition for the most of the operation time. For the boron free reactor SMART, however, one or more control banks are always inserted in the core to maintain critical condition, and the control bank overlap effects on the core depletion history. Since the cycle length of SMART is limited by three-dimensional core peaking factor at EOC, at which the control bank located at the core center is withdrawn, the cycle length of SMART is affected by the control bank overlap. In this report, the effect of control bank overlap on the core depletion history was evaluated. It is concluded that 60 cm control bank overlap corresponding to 30% effective core height was selected not to increase maximum peaking factor at EOC so that the control bank overlap does not affect the cycle length of the core. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs., 19 figs

  14. Ship construction and welding

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Nisith R

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses various aspects of ship construction, from ship types and construction materials, to welding technologies and accuracy control. The contents of the book are logically organized and divided into twenty-one chapters. The book covers structural arrangement with longitudinal and transverse framing systems based on the service load, and explains basic structural elements like hatch side girders, hatch end beams, stringers, etc. along with structural subassemblies like floors, bulkheads, inner bottom, decks and shells. It presents in detail double bottom construction, wing tanks & duct keels, fore & aft end structures, etc., together with necessary illustrations. The midship sections of various ship types are introduced, together with structural continuity and alignment in ship structures. With regard to construction materials, the book discusses steel, aluminum alloys and fiber reinforced composites. Various methods of steel material preparation are discussed, and plate cutting and form...

  15. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  16. Effects of post weld heat treatment and weld overlay on the residual stress and mechanical properties in dissimilar metal weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Ribeiro, Vladimir S.; Vilela, Alisson H.F.; Almeida, Camila R.O.; Rabello, Emerson G.

    2017-01-01

    The object of this work is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe joint between carbon steel (A-106 Gr B) and stainless steel (A-312 TP316L) pipes and filler metals of Nickel alloy (82/182), which find wide application in the field of chemical, oil, petroleum industries, fossil fuel and nuclear power plant. A lot of the failures that have occurred in dissimilar metal welded are affected greatly by residual stresses. Residual stress is often a cause of premature failure of critical components under normal operation of welded components. Several methods have been tested and developed for removing the tensile residual stresses. The aim of the methods is to reduce the tensile stress state or to create compressive stresses at a predefined area, such as the inner surface of a welded pipe joint. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and weld overlay (WOL) are two of the residual stress mitigation methods which reduce the tensile residual stress, create compressive stresses and arrest crack initiation and crack growth. The technique used to substantially minimized or eliminated this failure development in the root weld is the post weld heat treatments (stress relief heat treatment) or the weld overlay. In this work was studied the effectiveness in reducing internal residual stress in dissimilar metal welded pipe joints subjected to post weld heat treatment and weld overlay, measurement by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. Also held was mechanical characterization of the welded pipe joint itself. (author)

  17. Influence of Welding Process and Post Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Pitting Corrosion Behavior of Dissimilar Aluminium Alloy Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Ramana, V. S. N.; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    Welding of dissimilar Aluminum alloy welds is becoming important in aerospace, shipbuilding and defence applications. In the present work, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar aluminium alloys using conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and friction stir welding (FSW) processes. An attempt was also made to study the effect of post weld heat treatment (T4 condition) on microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of these welds. Results of the present investigation established the differences in microstructures of the base metals in T4 condition and in annealed conditions. It is evident that the thickness of the PMZ is relatively more on AA2014 side than that of AA6061 side. In FS welds, lamellar like shear bands are well noticed on the top of the stir zone. The concentration profile of dissimilar friction stir weld in T4 condition revealed that no diffusion has taken place at the interface. Poor Hardness is observed in all regions of FS welds compared to that of GTA welds. Pitting corrosion resistance of the dissimilar FS welds in all regions was improved by post weld heat treatment.

  18. Effects of post weld heat treatment and weld overlay on the residual stress and mechanical properties in dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Ribeiro, Vladimir S.; Vilela, Alisson H.F.; Almeida, Camila R.O.; Rabello, Emerson G., E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: camilarezende.cr@gmail.com, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br, E-mail: vladimirsoler@hotmail.com, E-mail: ahfv02@outlook.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The object of this work is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe joint between carbon steel (A-106 Gr B) and stainless steel (A-312 TP316L) pipes and filler metals of Nickel alloy (82/182), which find wide application in the field of chemical, oil, petroleum industries, fossil fuel and nuclear power plant. A lot of the failures that have occurred in dissimilar metal welded are affected greatly by residual stresses. Residual stress is often a cause of premature failure of critical components under normal operation of welded components. Several methods have been tested and developed for removing the tensile residual stresses. The aim of the methods is to reduce the tensile stress state or to create compressive stresses at a predefined area, such as the inner surface of a welded pipe joint. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and weld overlay (WOL) are two of the residual stress mitigation methods which reduce the tensile residual stress, create compressive stresses and arrest crack initiation and crack growth. The technique used to substantially minimized or eliminated this failure development in the root weld is the post weld heat treatments (stress relief heat treatment) or the weld overlay. In this work was studied the effectiveness in reducing internal residual stress in dissimilar metal welded pipe joints subjected to post weld heat treatment and weld overlay, measurement by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. Also held was mechanical characterization of the welded pipe joint itself. (author)

  19. Prediction of peak overlap in NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefke, Frederik; Schmucki, Roland; Güntert, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peak overlap is one of the major factors complicating the analysis of biomolecular NMR spectra. We present a general method for predicting the extent of peak overlap in multidimensional NMR spectra and its validation using both, experimental data sets and Monte Carlo simulation. The method is based on knowledge of the magnetization transfer pathways of the NMR experiments and chemical shift statistics from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Assuming a normal distribution with characteristic mean value and standard deviation for the chemical shift of each observable atom, an analytic expression was derived for the expected overlap probability of the cross peaks. The analytical approach was verified to agree with the average peak overlap in a large number of individual peak lists simulated using the same chemical shift statistics. The method was applied to eight proteins, including an intrinsically disordered one, for which the prediction results could be compared with the actual overlap based on the experimentally measured chemical shifts. The extent of overlap predicted using only statistical chemical shift information was in good agreement with the overlap that was observed when the measured shifts were used in the virtual spectrum, except for the intrinsically disordered protein. Since the spectral complexity of a protein NMR spectrum is a crucial factor for protein structure determination, analytical overlap prediction can be used to identify potentially difficult proteins before conducting NMR experiments. Overlap predictions can be tailored to particular classes of proteins by preparing statistics from corresponding protein databases. The method is also suitable for optimizing recording parameters and labeling schemes for NMR experiments and improving the reliability of automated spectra analysis and protein structure determination.

  20. Nuclear fuel rod end plug weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, M. A.; Patrick, S. S.; Rice, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method for testing TIG (tungsten inert gas) welds of end plugs on a sealed nuclear reactor fuel rod. An X-ray fluorescent spectrograph testing unit detects tungsten inclusion weld defects in the top end plug's seal weld. Separate ultrasonic weld inspection system testing units test the top end plug's seal and girth welds and test the bottom end plug's girth weld for penetration, porosity and wall thinning defects. The nuclear fuel rod is automatically moved into and out from each testing unit and is automatically transported between the testing units by rod handling devices. A controller supervises the operation of the testing units and the rod handling devices

  1. Induction heat treatment of laser welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Sørensen, Joakim Ilsing

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a new approach based on induction heat-treatment of flat laser welded sheets is presented. With this new concept, the ductility of high strength steels GA260 with a thickness of 1.8 mm and CMn with a thickness of 2.13 mm is believed to be improved by prolonging the cooling time from...... 750º to 450º C. Initially, a simple analytical model was used to calculate the ideal energy contributions from a CO2 high power laser source together with an induction heat source such that the temperature can be kept at 600º C for 2.5 seconds. This knowledge was then used for the design...... of an induction coil. A number of systematic laboratory tests were then performed in order to study the effects of the coil on bead-on-plate laser welded samples. In these tests, important parameters such as coil current and distance between coil and sample were varied. Temperature measurements were made...

  2. Robust Control of Welding Robot for Tracking a Rectangular Welding Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manh Dung Ngo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights a welding robot (WR for its end effector to track a rectangular welding line (RWL. The WR includes five actuators which use a DC motor as a power source. Two controllers are proposed to control the WR's end effector: a main controller and a servo controller. Firstly, based on WR's kinematic equations and its feedback errors using backstepping method the main controller is proposed to design the reference-inputs for the WR's actuators in order that the WR's end effector tracks the RWL. Secondly, based on the dynamic equation of WR's actuator, the servo controller is designed using an active disturbance rejection control method. Finally, a control system incorporated with the main controller and the servo controllers make the WR's end effector robustly track a RWL in the presence of the modeling uncertainty and disturbances during the welding process. In experiment, the main controller which has a function as a master of the control system links to the five servo controllers which have a function as a slave via I2C communication. The effectiveness of the proposed control system is proven through the simulation and experimental results.

  3. Robust Control of Welding Robot for Tracking a Rectangular Welding Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manh Dung Ngo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights a welding robot (WR for its end effector to track a rectangular welding line (RWL. The WR includes five actuators which use a DC motor as a power source. Two controllers are proposed to control the WR's end effector: a main controller and a servo controller. Firstly, based on WR's kinematic equations and its feedback errors using backstepping method the main controller is proposed to design the reference-inputs for the WR's actuators in order that the WR's end effector tracks the RWL. Secondly, based on the dynamic equation of WR's actuator, the servo controller is designed using an active disturbance rejection control method. Finally, a control system incorporated with the main controller and the servo controllers make the WR's end effector robustly track a RWL in the presence of the modeling uncertainty and disturbances during the welding process. In experiment, the main controller which has a function as a master of the control system links to the five servo controllers which have a function as a slave via I2C communication. The effectiveness of the proposed control system is proven through the simulation and experimental results.

  4. Occupational health concerns in the welding industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczynski, R E

    2000-12-01

    The Workplace Safety and Health Branch initiated a proactive study in the welding industry in Manitoba. Eight welding companies participated in this study. Health concerns raised by welders were welders' flash, sore/red/teary eyes, headaches, nosebleeds, and a black mucous discharge from their nasal membrane. Most welders expressed concern regarding excessive smoke levels in the workplace and inadequate ventilation. Types of welding identified were MIG mild steel, MIG stainless steel, and TIG aluminum. Monitoring involved an assessment of noise levels, fume composition, and carbon monoxide and ozone concentrations. Metal analyses were according to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 7300. Noise dosimeters used were the Quest model 100 and Micro 14 & 15. Carbon monoxide was monitored using the Gastech Model 4700 and ozone using the AID Portable Ozone Meter Model 560. In Manitoba, a hearing conservation program is required when the equivalent sound exposure level (normalized Lex 8-hr) exceeds 80 dBA-weighted. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' threshold limit value-time weighted average (ACGIH TLV-TWA) for iron is 5.0 mg/m3, manganese is 0.2 mg/m3, carbon monoxide is 25 ppm, and ozone is 0.05 ppm (heavy work), 0.08 ppm (moderate work), and 0.1 ppm (light work). Welders' personal exposures to manganese ranged from 0.01-4.93 mg/m3 (N = 42; AM = 0.5; GM = 0.2; SD +/- 0.9; GSD +/- 3.2) and to iron ranged from 0.04-16.29 mg/m3 (N = 42; AM = 3.0; GM = 1.4; SD +/- 3.5; GSD +/- 2.5). Noise exposures ranged from 79-98 dBA (N = 44; AM = 88.9; GM = 88.8; SD +/- 4.2; GSD +/- 1.0). Carbon monoxide levels were less than 5.0 ppm (at source) and ozone levels varied from 0.4-0.6 ppm (at source). Ventilation upgrades in the workplace were required in most welding shops. Only 7 percent of the welders wore respiratory protection. A hearing conservation program and hearing protection were required at all monitored workplaces.

  5. Application of the bead flush method to welded pipes to evaluate residual stresses nondestructively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.; Yamamoto, M.

    2002-01-01

    To assess the structural integrity of welded structures during the design and in-service inspection, it is important to evaluate welding residual stresses. Recently, the design process of structures has shifted from 'the design by rule' to 'the design by analysis' using the FEM (finite element method) codes. As the design process advances, analytical processes have formed a link in the chain of manufacturing and in-service inspection procedures. Under this circumstance, authors have proposed a new method called 'the Bead Flush Method', to evaluate the welding residual stresses by utilizing the FEM data constructed during the structural design. In this method, eigenstrains as sources of residual stresses are calculated from released elastic strains after removal of reinforcement of the weld by applying the inverse analysis. Then, residual stresses as well as displacements at any location concerned are evaluated by imposing eigenstrains as initial strains in the FEM analysis. Mechanical properties required through this analysis are the elastic constants at room temperature. No further properties, such as temperature dependencies of the yield strength and the thermal coefficient, are needed. By now, we have confirmed its utility for welded plates by computer simulations and experiments. In this study, further development of this method for application to welded pipes was attempted. Despite its relatively simple shape of pipes (axe symmetrical) compared with welded plates (3-dimentional), welded pipe problems are more complicated than those of welded plates from a view point of the inverse analysis. As a first step, a basic formulization was attempted to overcome this difficulty and future problems to be solved were made clear. Then computer simulations of the bead flush method conducted for a thin walled welded pipe confirmed its utility. Refs. 2 (author)

  6. Welding of Thin Steel Plates by Hybrid Welding Process Combined TIG Arc with YAG Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taewon; Suga, Yasuo; Koike, Takashi

    TIG arc welding and laser welding are used widely in the world. However, these welding processes have some advantages and problems respectively. In order to improve problems and make use of advantages of the arc welding and the laser welding processes, hybrid welding process combined the TIG arc with the YAG laser was studied. Especially, the suitable welding conditions for thin steel plate welding were investigated to obtain sound weld with beautiful surface and back beads but without weld defects. As a result, it was confirmed that the shot position of the laser beam is very important to obtain sound welds in hybrid welding. Therefore, a new intelligent system to monitor the welding area using vision sensor is constructed. Furthermore, control system to shot the laser beam to a selected position in molten pool, which is formed by TIG arc, is constructed. As a result of welding experiments using these systems, it is confirmed that the hybrid welding process and the control system are effective on the stable welding of thin stainless steel plates.

  7. Overlapping resonances in e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dothan, Y.; Horn, D.

    1976-06-01

    The application of the general formalism of two overlapping resonances to the inclusive process of hadron production in e + e - annihilation is discussed. The strong dip observed near 4 GeV can be fitted by three different classes of solutions, all of which have to use an overlap close to its maximal value. This suggests that both resonances have one common main decay channel. The implications of this conclusion are briefly discussed

  8. Magnetic pulse welding on the cutting edge of industrial applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Miranda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Pulse Welding (MPW applies the electromagnetic principles postulated in the XIXth century and later demonstrated. In recent years the process has been developed to meet highly demanding market needs involving dissimilar material joining, specially involving difficult-to-weld materials. It is a very high speed joining process that uses an electromagnetic force to accelerate one material against the other, resulting in a solid state weld with no external heat source and no thermal distortions. A high power source, the capacitor, a discharge switch and a coil constitute the minimum equipment necessary for this process. A high intensity current flowing through a coil near an electrically conductive material, locally produce an intense magnetic field that generates eddy currents in the flyer according to Lenz law. The induced electromotive force gives rise to a current whose magnetic field opposes the original change in magnetic flux. The effect of this secondary current moving in the primary magnetic field is the generation of a Lorentz force, which accelerates the flyer at a very high speed. If a piece of material is placed in the trajectory of the flyer, the impact will produce an atomic bond in a solid state weld. This paper discusses the fundamentals of the process in terms of phenomenology and analytical modeling and numerical simulation. Recent industrial applications are presented in terms of materials, joint configurations and real examples as well as advantages and disadvantages of the process.

  9. High Strain Rate Testing of Welded DOP-26 Iridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneibel, J. H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, R. G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carmichael, C. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fox, E. E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 is used to produce Clad Vent Set cups that protect the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) which provide electric power for spacecraft and rovers. In a previous study, the tensile properties of DOP-26 were measured over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures and reported in ORNL/TM-2007/81. While that study established the properties of the base material, the fabrication of the heat sources requires welding, and the mechanical properties of welded DOP-26 have not been extensively characterized in the past. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the mechanical properties of DOP-26 specimens containing a transverse weld in the center of their gage sections. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 750, 900, and 1090°C and engineering strain rates of 1×10-3 and 10 s-1. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1×10-4 Torr. The welded specimens had a significantly higher yield stress, by up to a factor of ~2, than the non-welded base material. The yield stress did not depend on the strain rate except at 1090°C, where it was slightly higher for the faster strain rate. The ultimate tensile stress, on the other hand, was significantly higher for the faster strain rate at temperatures of 750°C and above. At 750°C and above, the specimens deformed at 1×10-3 s-1 showed pronounced necking resulting sometimes in perfect chisel-edge fracture. The specimens deformed at 10 s-1 exhibited this fracture behavior only at the highest test temperature, 1090°C. Fracture occurred usually in the fusion zone of the weld and was, in most cases, primarily intergranular.

  10. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Meibian; Jian, Le; Bin, Pingfan; Xing, Mingluan; Lou, Jianlin; Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  11. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Meibian [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Jian, Le [Curtin University of Technology, School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (Australia); Bin, Pingfan [Wujin District Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Xing, Mingluan [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Lou, Jianlin [Zhejiang Academy of Medical Sciences (China); Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua, E-mail: hzou@cdc.zj.cn [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China)

    2013-11-15

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  12. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meibian; Jian, Le; Bin, Pingfan; Xing, Mingluan; Lou, Jianlin; Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua

    2013-11-01

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding ( P size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000-18,000 and 560-320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace exposure to nanoparticles.

  13. Mechanical Behaviour of Inconel 718 Thin-Walled Laser Welded Components for Aircraft Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Lertora

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel alloys are very important in many aerospace applications, especially to manufacture gas turbines and aero engine components, where high strength and temperature resistance are necessary. These kinds of alloys have to be welded with high energy density processes, in order to preserve their high mechanical properties. In this work, CO2 laser overlap joints between Inconel 718 sheets of limited thickness in the absence of postweld heat treatment were made. The main application of this kind of joint is the manufacturing of a helicopter engine component. In particular the aim was to obtain a specific cross section geometry, necessary to overcome the mechanical stresses found in these working conditions without failure. Static and dynamic tests were performed to assess the welds and the parent material fatigue life behaviour. Furthermore, the life trend was identified. This research pointed out that a full joint shape control is possible by choosing proper welding parameters and that the laser beam process allows the maintenance of high tensile strength and ductility of Inconel 718 but caused many liquation microcracks in the heat affected zone (HAZ. In spite of these microcracks, the fatigue behaviour of the overlap welds complies with the technical specifications required by the application.

  14. Spot Welding of 6061 Aluminum Alloy by Friction Stir Spot Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Tashkandi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on the effect of welding parameters on the lap-shear fracture load of the welded joints prepared by friction stir spot welding. Four different weld parameters were analyzed: rotational speed, dwell time, pin length and shoulder size of the welding tool. It was found that the lap-shear fracture load increases with an increase of the welding parameters to a limited value and decreases with further increase. The strong welded joints failed under nugget-pull out fracture.

  15. Mechanical and electrochemical characteristics with welding materials in robotic MIG welding of dissimilar Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Jong; Han, Min Su; Woo, Yong Bin [Mokpo Maritime Univ., Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In this study, mechanical and electrochemical characteristics with welding material in MIG welded with ROBOT for dissimilar Al alloys were investigated using various experiment methods. The MIG welding by ROBOT with ER5183 and ER5556 for the 5456-H116 and 6061-T6 Al alloy were carried out. The hardness of welding zone was lower than that of base metal. In electrochemical experiment, ER5183 welding material presented excellent characteristics. The yield strength and maximum tensile strength in welding with welding material of ER5183 presented lower value than those of ER5556. The elongation and time-to-fracture showed the opposite results.

  16. Conceptual design of modular fixture for frame welding and drilling process integration case study: Student chair in UNS industrial engineering integrated practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, Tofiq Dwiki; Priadythama, Ilham; Herdiman, Lobes

    2018-02-01

    Welding and drilling are main processes of making chair frame from metal material. Commonly, chair frame construction includes many arcs which bring difficulties for its welding and drilling process. In UNS industrial engineering integrated practicum there are welding fixtures which use to fixing frame component position for welding purpose. In order to achieve exact holes position for assembling purpose, manual drilling processes were conducted after the frame was joined. Unfortunately, after it was welded the frame material become hard and increase drilling tools wear rate as well as reduce holes position accuracy. The previous welding fixture was not equipped with clamping system and cannot accommodate drilling process. To solve this problem, our idea is to reorder the drilling process so that it can be execute before welding. Thus, this research aims to propose conceptual design of modular fixture which can integrate welding and drilling process. We used Generic Product Development Process to address the design concept. We collected design requirements from 3 source, jig and fixture theoretical concepts, user requirements, and clamping part standards. From 2 alternatives fixture tables, we propose the first which equipped with mounting slots instead of holes. We test the concept by building a full sized prototype and test its works by conducting welding and drilling of a student chair frame. Result from the welding and drilling trials showed that the holes are on precise position after welding. Based on this result, we conclude that the concept can be a consideration for application in UNS Industrial Engineering Integrated Practicum.

  17. Effect of Multi-repair Welding on Fatigue Performance of Aluminum Alloy Profile Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, You-De; Shi, Chun-Yuan; Tian, Hong-Lei

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum alloy profile has been widely used in the manufacture of the rail vehicles. But it's necessary for the repair welding of the welded joints to be conducted because some defects exist in the weld such as porosity, inclusions and incomplete penetrations in the welding processes. In this paper, the influence of the multi-repair welding of 6005A aluminum alloy profile butt welded joints on the fatigue performance are investigated based on the results of fatigue tests. The parameters of curves and the fatigue strength of the welded joints are calculated, and Goodman fatigue limit diagram is also obtained. The results show that fatigue strength of aluminum alloy profile butt welded joints, in condition of 107 cycle life, meet the standard requirement for the as-welded, repair welded state one time or two times respectively.

  18. Bringing Pulsed Laser Welding into Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    performed and is currently in progress in collaboration with a major Danish company, who currently is applying laser welding in several production lines. Furthermore some case stories from development work on laser welding for industri-al production will be described. One case story describes a current...... production of hermetic weld seams produced on radiator thermostats applying pulsed laser welding. This application has now been running in several years. 2 laser systems are currently welding each serving two welding stations. Another case story is describing a high precision assembly technique of a product......-nationally the group is mostly known for its contri-butions to the development of the laser cutting process, but further it has been active within laser welding, both in assisting industry in bringing laser welding into production in several cases and in performing fundamental R & D. In this paper some research...

  19. Polyimide weld bonding for titanium alloy joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Kurland, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two weld bonding processes were developed for joining titanium alloy; one process utilizes a weld-through technique and the other a capillary-flow technique. The adhesive used for the weld-through process is similar to the P4/A5F system. A new polyimide laminating resin, BFBI/BMPM, was used in the capillary-flow process. Static property information was generated for weld-bonded joints over the temperature range of 219 K (-65 F) to 561 K (+550 F) and fatigue strength information was generated at room temperature. Significant improvement in fatigue strength was demonstrated for weld-bonded joints over spot-welded joints. A demonstration was made of the applicability of the weld-through weld-bonding process for fabricating stringer stiffened skin panels.

  20. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  1. Development of fully automatic pipe welding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanioka, Shin-ichi; Nakano, Mitsuhiro; Tejima, Akio; Yamada, Minoru; Saito, Tatsuo; Saito, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Rikio

    1985-01-01

    We have succeeded in developing a fully automatic TIG welding system; namely CAPTIG that enables unmanned welding operations from the initial layer to the final finishing layer continuously. This welding system is designed for continuous, multilayered welding of thick and large diameter fixed pipes of nuclear power plants and large-size boiler plants where high-quality welding is demanded. In the tests conducted with this welding system, several hours of continuous unmanned welding corroborated that excellent beads are formed, good results are obtained in radiographic inspection and that quality welding is possible most reliably. This system incorporates a microcomputer for fully automatic controls by which it features a seam tracking function, wire feed position automatic control function, a self-checking function for inter-pass temperature, cooling water temperature and wire reserve. (author)

  2. Defect rates in butt welded steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guille-Stevens, D.; Silcock, P.

    1980-01-01

    As the primary circuit of CANDU reactors consists largely of pipe, the reliability of pipe welds is of interest to reactor designers. A project involving 64 000 manual and semi-automatic pipe welds was inspected to the requirements of ANSI B31.3. Records of 6 000 carbon steel and 1 900 alloy steel butt welds ranging from 50 to 400 mm were inspected by radiography and ultrasonics, and analysed. No correlation between defects and number of weld passes was observed. However, small pipes exhibited a higher defect rate, per weld length and per weld volume, than did large pipes. Porosity was the major cause of defects (60 per cent) followed by root defects (27 per cent); only one crack was recorded. The results show that small (50 mm) pipe welds have the highest defect rate; however, the low overall rate shows that high standards can be maintained over many thousand welds [af

  3. Physical bases for diffusion welding processes optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulygina, S.M.; Berber, N.N.; Mukhambetov, D.G.

    1999-01-01

    One of wide-spread method of different materials joint is diffusion welding. It has being brought off at the expense of mutual diffusion of atoms of contacting surfaces under long-duration curing at its heating and compression. Welding regime in dependence from properties of welding details is defining of three parameters: temperature, pressure, time. Problem of diffusion welding optimization concludes in determination less values of these parameters, complying with requirements for quality of welded joint. In the work experiments on diffusion welding for calculated temperature and for given surface's roughness were carried out. Tests conduct on samples of iron and iron-nickel alloy with size 1·1·1 cm 3 . Optimal regime of diffusion welding of examined samples in vacuum is defined. It includes compression of welding samples, heating, isothermal holding at temperature 650 deg C during 0.5 h and affords the required homogeneity of joint

  4. Experimental and simulated strength of spot welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bennedbæk, Rune A.K.; Larsen, Morten B.

    2014-01-01

    Weld strength testing of single spots in DP600 steel is presented for the three typical testing procedures, i.e. tensile-shear, cross-tension and peel testing. Spot welds are performed at two sets of welding parameters and strength testing under these conditions is presented by load......-elongation curves revealing the maximum load and the elongation at break. Welding and strength testing is simulated by SORPAS® 3D, which allows the two processes to be prepared in a combined simulation, such that the simulated welding properties are naturally applied to the simulation of strength testing. Besides...... the size and shape of the weld nugget, these properties include the new strength of the material in the weld and the heat affected zone based on the predicted hardness resulting from microstructural phase changes simulated during cooling of the weld before strength testing. Comparisons between overall...

  5. Interpretation of aluminum-alloy weld radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, P. C.; Risch, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    Report proposes radiographic terminology standardization which allows scientific interpretation of radiographic films to replace dependence on individual judgement and experience. Report includes over 50 photographic pages where radiographs of aluminum welds with defects are compared with prepared weld sections photomacrographs.

  6. Laser-GMA Hybrid Pipe Welding System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reutzel, Edward W; Kern, Ludwig; Sullivan, Michael J; Tressler, Jay F; Avalos, Juan

    2007-01-01

    The combination of laser welding with conventional gas metal arc welding technology offers substantial increases in production rate of joining pipe through single-pass joining compared to multi-pass...

  7. Recent developments in underwater repair welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offer, H.P.; Chapman, T.L.; Willis, E.R.; Maslakowski, J.; Van Diemen, P.; Smith, B.W.

    2001-01-01

    As nuclear plants age and reactor internal components begin to show increased evidence of age-related phenomena such as corrosion and fatigue, interest in the development of cost-effective mitigation and repair remedies grows. One technology currently receiving greater development and application program focus is underwater welding. Underwater welding, as used herein, is the application of weld metal to a substrate surface that is wet, but locally dry in the immediate area surrounding the welding torch. The locally dry environment is achieved by the use of a mechanical device that is specifically designed for water exclusion from the welding torch, surface to be welded, and the welding groove. This paper will explore recent developments in the use of underwater welding as a mitigation and repair technique. (author)

  8. Investigation and development of friction stir welding process for unreinforced polyphenylene sulfide and reinforced polyetheretherketone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hossain

    The joining of thermoplastics through welding, a specific form of fusion bonding, offers numerous advantages over mechanical joining. It eliminates the use of costly fasteners and has only a limited effect on the strength of the parts being joined since it does not require the introduction of holes and loading pins, and it does not create significant stress concentrations. A specific form of welding, Friction Stir Welding, was investigated for the creation of butt joints of unreinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) and short carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) plates. Friction stir welding requires a rotating pin, a shoulder arrangement, relative movement between the tool and the weld piece and a clamping mechanism to hold the weld piece in place. Analytical models and experimental results show that the heat generated by the FSW tool is insufficient to produce the heat required to weld thermoplastic materials which makes FSW of polymers different from FSW of metals. A second heat source is required for preheating the thermoplastic parts prior to welding. A resistance type surface heater was placed at the bottom of two identical weld pieces for the experiments. Two types of shoulder design i.e. a rotating shoulder and a stationary shoulder were developed. Taguchi's Design of Experiment method was utilized to investigate the welding process, where duration of heating, process temperature, tool rotational speed and tool traverse speed were used as the welding parameters. The quality of the welding process was assumed to be indicated by the weld strength. DoE revealed that one of the process parameters, tool traverse speed, had significant influence on the tensile strength of PPS samples. While PPS sample showed relatively lower tensile strength with higher traverse speed, short carbon fiber reinforced PEEK samples had higher tensile strength with higher traverse speeds. In addition to tensile tests on dog bone shaped specimen, fracture toughness tests

  9. Processing Welding Images For Robot Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    Image data from two distinct windows used to locate weld features. Analyzer part of vision system described in companion article, "Image Control in Automatic Welding Vision System" (MFS-26035). Horizontal video lines define windows for viewing unwelded joint and weld pool. Data from picture elements outside windows not processed. Widely-separated local features carry no significance, but closely spaced features indicate welding feature. Image processor assigns confidence level to group of local features according to spacing and pattern.

  10. Stereoscopic Video Weld-Seam Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Larry Z.

    1991-01-01

    Stereoscopic video camera and laser illuminator operates in conjunction with image-data-processing computer to locate weld seam and to map surface features in vicinity of seam. Intended to track seams to guide placement of welding torch in automatic welding system and to yield information on qualities of welds. More sensitive than prior optical seam trackers and suitable for use in production environment. Tracks nearly invisible gap between butted machined edges of two plates.

  11. Welding data adquisition based on FPGA

    OpenAIRE

    Millán Vázquez de la Torre, Rafael Luis; Quero Reboul, José Manuel; García Franquelo, Leopoldo

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the use of FPGA in data acquisition and digital preprocessing of the electric current signal of resistance welding stations. This work demonstrates that electric current has enough information to classify this kind of welds in mass production industries. Parameters extracted with the FPGA excite a classifier that accept o reject the welding junction. This system has been developed using a neural classifier and installed in a welding station of General Motors in Cádiz (Spai...

  12. Structural degradation of heterogeneous welded joints

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Schmidová; Petr Hanus

    2012-01-01

    Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analyses of heterogeneous weld interfaces experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the weld interface and the circumstances under which...

  13. Microscopic Analysis of Welded Dental Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    S. Porojan; L. Sandu; F. Topalâ

    2011-01-01

    Microplasma welding is a less expensive alternative to laser welding in dental technology. The aim of the study was to highlight discontinuities present in the microplasma welded joints of dental base metal alloys by visual analysis. Five base metal alloys designated for fixed prostheses manufacture were selected for the experiments. Using these plates, preliminary tests were conducted by microplasma welding in butt joint configuration, without filler material, bilaterall...

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Arc Weld and Friction Stir Weld in Al 6061-T6 Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Byoung Hyun; Kim, Heung Ju; Chang, Woong Seong; Kweon, Young Gak

    2006-01-01

    For the evaluation of corrosion resistance of Al 6061-T6 Alloy, Tafel method and immersion test was performed with Friction Stir Weld(FSW) and Gas Metal Arc Weld(GMAW). The Tafel and immersion test results indicated that GMA weld was severely attacked compared with those of friction stir weld. It may be mainly due to the galvanic corrosion mechanism act on the GMA weld

  15. Apparatus-program complex for automated estimation of welded joints quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ptitsyn, V.P.; Schastlivtsev, A.M.; Firstov, V.G.; Buryak, V.I.; Zenin, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    A complex consisting of an optical scanning device, a videographic adapter with a graphic monitor, a personal computer, a complex of programs realizing the functions of automatic analysis of radiographic pattern of a welded joint in statics, namely: pattern input abd storage, optimal linear and nonlinear filtration of source pattern to obtain a true chart of defects, welded joint defect recognition in four groups: pore, crack, incomplete fusion, inclusions is described

  16. Overlapping coalition formation games in wireless communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tianyu; Saad, Walid; Han, Zhu

    2017-01-01

    This brief introduces overlapping coalition formation games (OCF games), a novel mathematical framework from cooperative game theory that can be used to model, design and analyze cooperative scenarios in future wireless communication networks. The concepts of OCF games are explained, and several algorithmic aspects are studied. In addition, several major application scenarios are discussed. These applications are drawn from a variety of fields that include radio resource allocation in dense wireless networks, cooperative spectrum sensing for cognitive radio networks, and resource management for crowd sourcing. For each application, the use of OCF games is discussed in detail in order to show how this framework can be used to solve relevant wireless networking problems. Overlapping Coalition Formation Games in Wireless Communication Networks provides researchers, students and practitioners with a concise overview of existing works in this emerging area, exploring the relevant fundamental theories, key techniqu...

  17. Friction welding thermal and metallurgical characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    This book provides insight into the thermal analysis of friction welding incorporating welding parameters such as external, duration, breaking load, and material properties. The morphological and metallurgical changes associated with the resulting weld sites are analysed using characterization methods such as electron scanning microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Nuclear reaction analysis.

  18. 49 CFR 195.224 - Welding: Weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Weather. 195.224 Section 195.224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.224 Welding: Weather. Welding must be protected from weather conditions that...

  19. 49 CFR 179.200-10 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.200-10 Section 179.200-10... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-10 Welding. (a) All joints... W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be...

  20. 49 CFR 179.100-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.100-9 Section 179.100-9... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-9 Welding. (a) All..., appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be...

  1. 49 CFR 179.11 - Welding certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding certification. 179.11 Section 179.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Design Requirements § 179.11 Welding certification. (a) Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall...

  2. 30 CFR 77.408 - Welding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding operations. 77.408 Section 77.408 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.408 Welding operations. Welding operations shall be shielded and the...

  3. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design temperature...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1729 - Welding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding operations. 75.1729 Section 75.1729 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1729 Welding operations. Welding...

  5. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints... of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy...

  6. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.400-11 Section 179.400-11...-11 Welding. (a) Except for closure of openings and a maximum of two circumferential closing joints in... subchapter). (d) Each welding procedure, welder, and fabricator must be approved. [Amdt. 179-32, 48 FR 27708...

  7. Orbital Welding Head Held By Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangl, Kenneth J.; Graham, Benny F.; Nesmith, Malcolm F.; Mcferrin, David C.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital welding head positioned by robot controls motion and voltage of arc-welding torch mounted in head. New head encircles part at torch end, and held and manipulated by robot arm at opposite end. Entire welding operation automated. Useful for operations in hazardous environments.

  8. Simulating Welding-Robot Trajectories For Previewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Maureen L.; Sliwinski, Karen E.

    1992-01-01

    New method devised for generating welding-tool paths; parts of off-line-programmed test trajectories of computer-controlled welding robot. Reduces time necessary to set up simulation of welding process and eliminates some errors by reducing amount of repetition. Provides visual feedback similar to graphical simulation used in off-line-programming process after development of model.

  9. New process for weld metal reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebel, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    The industry-wide nature of weld cracking alerts one to the possibility that there is a fundamental law being overlooked. And in overlooking this law, industry is unable to counteract it. That law mandates that restraint during welding causes internal stress; internal stress causes weld metal to crack. Component restraint during welding, according to the welding standard, is the major cause of weld metal failures. When the metal working industry accepts this fact and begins to counter the effects of restraint, the number of weld failures experienced fall dramatically. Bonal Technologies, inc., of Detroit, has developed the first consistently effective non-thermal process to relieve stress caused by restraint during welding. Bonal's patented Mets-Lax sub-resonant stress relief acts as a restraint neutralizer when used during welding. Meta-Lax weld conditioning produces a finer more uniform weld grain structure. A finer, more uniform grain structure is a clear metallurgical indication of improved mechanical weld properties. Other benefits like less internal stress, and less warpage are also achieved

  10. Calibration Check For Programmed Welding Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwinski, Karen E.; Anderson, Ronald R.; Osterloh, Mark R.

    1992-01-01

    Preweld calibration check helps to ensure welding torch on computer-controlled welding robot mounted properly, right gas cup selected, and length of extension of electrode adjusted correctly. Performed by operator just before dry run for each set of parts welded. Procedure takes 2 to 3 minutes and enables correction of errors before parts or equipment damaged.

  11. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... point of operation, shall be effectively guarded by the use of a device such as an electronic eye safety..., the secondary of all welding transformers used in multispot, projection and seam welding machines shall be grounded. This may be done by permanently grounding one side of the welding secondary current...

  12. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J. R.; Kor, L. J.; Oleksiak, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Control of porosity in weld beads was major objective in development of aluminum welding program. Porosity, most difficult defect to control, is caused by hydrogen gas unable to escape during solidification. Hard tooling allows hotter bead than free-fall tooling so hydrogen bubbles can boil out instead of forming pores. Welding position, moisture, and cleanliness are other important factors in control of porosity.

  13. Fracture toughness of stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of temperature, composition and weld-process variations on the fracture toughness behavior for Types 308 and 16-8-2 stainless steel (SS) welds were examined using the multiple-specimen J/sub R/-curve procedure. Fracture characteristics were found to be dependent on temperature and weld process but not on filler material. Gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welds exhibited the highest fracture toughness, a shielded metal-arc (SMA) weld exhibited an intermediate toughness and submerged-arc (SA) welds yielded the lowest toughness. Minimum-expected fracture properties were defined from lower-bound J/sub c/ and tearing modulus values generated here and in previous studies. Fractographic examination revealed that microvoid coalescence was the operative fracture mechanism for all welds. Second phase particles of manganese silicide were found to be detrimental to the ductile fracture behavior because they separated from the matrix during the initial stages of plastic straining. In SA welds, the high density of inclusions resulting from silicon pickup from the flux promoted premature dimple rupture. The weld produced by the SMA process contained substantially less manganese silicide, while GTA welds contained no silicide inclusions. Delta ferrite particles present in all welds were substantially more resistant to local failure than the silicide phase. In welds containing little or no manganese silicide, delta ferrite particles initiated microvoid coalescence but only after extensive plastic straining

  14. Study on visual image information detection of external angle weld based on arc welding robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaorui; Liu, Nansheng; Sheng, Wei; Hu, Xian; Ai, Xiaopu; Wei, Yiqing

    2009-11-01

    Nowadays, the chief development trend in modern welding technology is welding automation and welding intelligence. External angle weld has a certain proportion in mechanical manufacture industries. In the real-time welding process, due to hot deformation and the fixture of workpieces used frequently, torch will detach welding orbit causes deviation, which will affect welding quality. Therefore, elimination weld deviation is the key to the weld automatic tracking system. In this paper, the authors use the self-developed structured light vision sensor system which has significant advantage compared with arc sensors to capture real-time weld images. In the project of VC++6.0 real-time weld image processing, after binaryzation with threshold value seventy, 3*1 median filter, thinning, obtain weld main stripe. Then, using the extraction algorithm this paper proposed to obtain weld feature points, and compute position of weld. Experiment result verified that the extraction algorithm can locate feature points rapidly and compute the weld deviation accurately.

  15. Laser weld process monitoring and control using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation from a weld pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chin Man

    2000-06-01

    The application of high power Nd: YAG lasers for precision welding in industry has been growing quite fast these days in diverse areas such as the automobile, the electronics and the aerospace industries. These diverse applications also require the new developments for the precise control and the reliable process monitoring. Due to the hostile environment in laser welding, a remote monitoring is required. The present development relates in general to weld process monitoring techniques, and more particularly to improved methods and apparatus for real-time monitoring of thermal radiation of a weld pool to monitor a size variation and a focus shift of the weld pool for weld process control, utilizing the chromatic aberration of focusing lens or lenses. The monitoring technique of the size variation and the focus shift of a weld pool is developed by using the chromatic filtering of the thermal radiation from a weld pool. The monitoring of weld pool size variation can also be used to monitor the weld depth in a laser welding. Furthermore, the monitoring of the size variation of a weld pool is independent of the focus shift of a weld pool and the monitoring of the focus shift of a weld pool is independent of the size variation of a weld pool.

  16. Laser weld process monitoring and control using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation from a weld pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chin Man

    2000-06-01

    The application of high power Nd: YAG lasers for precision welding in industry has been growing quite fast these days in diverse areas such as the automobile, the electronics and the aerospace industries. These diverse applications also require the new developments for the precise control and the reliable process monitoring. Due to the hostile environment in laser welding, a remote monitoring is required. The present development relates in general to weld process monitoring techniques, and more particularly to improved methods and apparatus for real-time monitoring of thermal radiation of a weld pool to monitor a size variation and a focus shift of the weld pool for weld process control, utilizing the chromatic aberration of focusing lens or lenses. The monitoring technique of the size variation and the focus shift of a weld pool is developed by using the chromatic filtering of the thermal radiation from a weld pool. The monitoring of weld pool size variation can also be used to monitor the weld depth in a laser welding. Furthermore, the monitoring of the size variation of a weld pool is independent of the focus shift of a weld pool and the monitoring of the focus shift of a weld pool is independent of the size variation of a weld pool

  17. Microstructure modeling in weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Babu, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    Since microstructure development in the weld metal region is controlled by various physical processes, there is a need for integrated predictive models based on fundamental principles to describe and predict the effect of these physical processes. These integrated models should be based on various tools available for modeling microstructure development in a wide variety of alloy systems and welding processes. In this paper, the principles, methodology, and future directions of modeling thermochemical reactions in liquid, solidification, and solid state transformations are discussed with some examples for low-alloy steel, stainless steel, and Ni-base superalloy. Thermochemical deoxidation reactions in liquid low-alloy steel lead to oxide inclusion formation. This inclusion formation has been modeled by combining principles of ladle metallurgy and overall transformation kinetics. The model's comparison with the experimental data and the ongoing work on coupling this inclusion model with the numerical models of heat transfer and fluid flow are discussed. Also, recent advances in theoretical and physical modeling of the solidification process are reviewed with regard to predicting the solidification modes, grain structure development, segregation effects, and nonequilibrium solidification in welds. The effects of solid state phase transformations on microstructure development and various methods of modeling these transformations are reviewed. Successful models, based on diffusion-controlled growth and plate growth theories, on microstructure development in low-alloy steel and stainless steel weld metals are outlined. This paper also addresses the importance of advanced analytical techniques to understand the solid state transformation mechanisms in welds

  18. Re-austenitisation of chromium-bearing pressure vessel steels during the weld thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, Druce; Li, Huijun; Jones, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Steels with chromium contents between 0.5 and 12 wt% are commonly used for fabrication of creep resistant pressure vessels (PV) for the power generation industry. Most of these steels are susceptible to Type IV creep failure in the intercritical and/ or grain refined regions of the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the parent metal. The re-austenitisation process plays a central role in establishing the transformed microstructures and the creep resistance of the various sub-zones of the HAZ. The high alloy content and the presence of alloy-rich carbides in the as-supplied parent plate can significantly retard the kinetics of transformation to austenite, resulting in both incomplete austenitisation and inhomogeneous austenite. Overlapping weld thermal cycles in multi-pass welds add further complexity to the progressive development of microstructure over the course of the welding process. In order to clarify structural evolution, thermal simulation has been used to study the effects of successive thermal cycles on the structures and properties of the HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The results showed that, before post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), the HAZ microstructures and properties, particularly in doubly reheated sub-zones, were highly heterogeneous and differed markedly from those of the base steel. It is concluded that close control of the thermal cycle by pre-heat, weld heat input and post-heat is necessary to obtain a heat affected zone with microstructures and properties compatible with those of the base plate.

  19. Mitigation of sensitisation effects in unstabilised 12%Cr ferritic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmelo, Martin van; Nolan, David; Norrish, John

    2007-01-01

    Sensitisation in the heat-affected zones of ferritic stainless steel welds is typically prevented by stabilisation of the parent material with titanium or niobium, and suitable design of the overall composition to produce a suitably high ferrite factor. However, such alloy modification has proven to be economically unviable for thick gauge (>10 mm) plate products and therefore unstabilised 12%Cr (3CR12) material is still currently being used for heavy gauge structural applications in many parts of the world. The aim of the current work was to review the mechanisms responsible for sensitisation in these unstabilised ferritic stainless steels, and to characterise the sensitisation effects arising from multipass welding procedures. The objective was to determine the influence of welding parameters, and thereby to recommend mitigating strategies. Two particular sensitisation modes were found to occur in the current work, although only one was predominant and considered problematic from a practical perspective. It was found that with proper positioning of weld capping runs and control of weld overlap, it is possible to ensure that sensitising isotherms remain buried beneath the parent surface, and so reduce harmful corrosion effects

  20. Temperature and heating time effect on the structure and mechanical properties of niobium-to-steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivov, E.N.; D'yachenko, V.V.; Krutogolovov, N.P.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the Nb-steel joints with the samples of VN2-AEH Nb base lloy and KH18N10T stainless steel 0.5 mm thick welded up both with intermetallic compound filler material and without it as an overlapping structure with steel flare. The samples for a rupture tests were cut out across the joint. The welded joint of Nb with steel were tested at 700 to 1200 deg C (with a short-term hold-up), and also at room temperature. The tests have shown that the tensile strength of welded joints under static rupture at room temperature is determined by the Nb strength (54 to 59 kg/mm 2 ), at the temperature of 700 to 1200 deg C with a short-term hold-up by the strength of stainless steel (27 to 2.8 kO/mm 2 ). A prolonged heating (700 to 1300 deg C) of the welded joints of Nb with steel was conducted in a crucible vacuum furnace under vacuum of 10 -5 to 10 -6 mm Hg. The samples cooled down to the room temperature underwent mechanical tests and metallographic analysis. A prolonged hold-up of the welded joint at 700 deg C does not substantially affect the metal structure and tensile strength. The heating above 1000 deg C results in the formation of an intermetallic compound layer in the weld metal, which sharply decreases the mechanical properties of the welded joints. The results of testing are presented in tables and diagrams. Thus, the welded joints of Nb with stainless steel, when heated within a prolonged period at 700 deg C, exhibit workability under a static rupture test. Increasing the heating temperature up to 1000 deg C brings to the decrease in the mechanical properties of the welded joints

  1. Overlapping genetic codes for overlapping frameshifted genes in Testudines, and Lepidochelys olivacea as special case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial genes code for additional proteins after +2 frameshifts by reassigning stops to code for amino acids, which defines overlapping genetic codes for overlapping genes. Turtles recode stops UAR → Trp and AGR → Lys (AGR → Gly in the marine Olive Ridley turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea). In Lepidochelys the +2 frameshifted mitochondrial Cytb gene lacks stops, open reading frames from other genes code for unknown proteins, and for regular mitochondrial proteins after frameshifts according to the overlapping genetic code. Lepidochelys' inversion between proteins coded by regular and overlapping genetic codes substantiates the existence of overlap coding. ND4 differs among Lepidochelys mitochondrial genomes: it is regular in DQ486893; in NC_011516, the open reading frame codes for another protein, the regular ND4 protein is coded by the frameshifted sequence reassigning stops as in other turtles. These systematic patterns are incompatible with Genbank/sequencing errors and DNA decay. Random mixing of synonymous codons, conserving main frame coding properties, shows optimization of natural sequences for overlap coding; Ka/Ks analyses show high positive (directional) selection on overlapping genes. Tests based on circular genetic codes confirm programmed frameshifts in ND3 and ND4l genes, and predicted frameshift sites for overlap coding in Lepidochelys. Chelonian mitochondria adapt for overlapping gene expression: cloverleaf formation by antisense tRNAs with predicted anticodons matching stops coevolves with overlap coding; antisense tRNAs with predicted expanded anticodons (frameshift suppressor tRNAs) associate with frameshift-coding in ND3 and ND4l, a potential regulation of frameshifted overlap coding. Anaeroby perhaps switched between regular and overlap coding genes in Lepidochelys. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Percussive arc welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollar, Jr., Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    A percussive arc welding apparatus includes a generally cylindrical actuator body having front and rear end portions and defining an internal recess. The front end of the body includes an opening. A solenoid assembly is provided in the rear end portion in the internal recess of the body, and an actuator shaft assembly is provided in the front end portion in the internal recess of the actuator body. The actuator shaft assembly includes a generally cylindrical actuator block having first and second end portions, and an actuator shaft having a front end extending through the opening in the actuator body, and the rear end connected to the first end portion of the actuator block. The second end portion of the actuator block is in operational engagement with the solenoid shaft by a non-rigid connection to reduce the adverse rebound effects of the actuator shaft. A generally transversely extending pin is rigidly secured to the rear end of the shaft. One end of the pin is received in a slot in the nose housing sleeve to prevent rotation of the actuator shaft during operation of the apparatus.

  3. Nondestructive Online Detection of Welding Defects in Track Crane Boom Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive detection of structural component of track crane is a difficult and costly problem. In the present study, acoustic emission (AE was used to detect two kinds of typical welding defects, that is, welding porosity and incomplete penetration, in the truck crane boom. Firstly, a subsidiary test specimen with special preset welding defect was designed and added on the boom surface with the aid of steel plates to get the synchronous deformation of the main boom. Then, the AE feature information of the welding defect could be got without influencing normal operation of equipment. As a result, the rudimentary location analysis can be attained using the linear location method and the two kinds of welding defects can be distinguished clearly using AE characteristic parameters such as amplitude and centroid frequency. Also, through the comparison of two loading processes, we concluded that the signal produced during the first loading process was mainly caused by plastic deformation damage and during the second loading process the stress release and structure friction between sections in welding area are the main acoustic emission sources. Thus, the AE is an available tool for nondestructive online detection of latent welding defects of structural component of track crane.

  4. Laser Beam Welding of Thick Titanium Sheets in the Field of Marine Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, André; Gumenyuk, Andrey; Lammers, Marco; Malletschek, Andreas; Rethmeier, Michael

    The ever larger requirements of the material selection in the range of maritime industry necessitate the application of high-tech materials. Titanium because of its excellent mechanical properties at low weight is an attractive alternative for the construction of ships. The goal of this investigation was to design a welding method for joining samples of 16 mm thick Ti3Al2.5 V. The welding experiments with a 20 kW Yb-fiber laser source and varying combinations of parameters were intended to qualify the laser beam welding process. The welding results were analyzed by non-destructive and destructive testing. In addition, the welding tests were recorded with two high-speed cameras to observe the weld pool and the vapor plume. The evaluation of the high-speed images in correlation with the results of non-destructive testing shows, that a significant improvement of process stability and weld quality can be achieved by the suppression of the vapor plume.

  5. SAGE: String-overlap Assembly of GEnomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Lucian; Haider, Bahlul; Molnar, Michael; Solis-Oba, Roberto

    2014-09-15

    De novo genome assembly of next-generation sequencing data is one of the most important current problems in bioinformatics, essential in many biological applications. In spite of significant amount of work in this area, better solutions are still very much needed. We present a new program, SAGE, for de novo genome assembly. As opposed to most assemblers, which are de Bruijn graph based, SAGE uses the string-overlap graph. SAGE builds upon great existing work on string-overlap graph and maximum likelihood assembly, bringing an important number of new ideas, such as the efficient computation of the transitive reduction of the string overlap graph, the use of (generalized) edge multiplicity statistics for more accurate estimation of read copy counts, and the improved use of mate pairs and min-cost flow for supporting edge merging. The assemblies produced by SAGE for several short and medium-size genomes compared favourably with those of existing leading assemblers. SAGE benefits from innovations in almost every aspect of the assembly process: error correction of input reads, string-overlap graph construction, read copy counts estimation, overlap graph analysis and reduction, contig extraction, and scaffolding. We hope that these new ideas will help advance the current state-of-the-art in an essential area of research in genomics.

  6. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  7. Robotic Tool Changer For Automated Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.

    1994-01-01

    Prototype robotic tool changer for automated welding system eliminates need for most manual tool setups and attendant problems: operates rapidly, always chooses designated tool, maneuvers tip of welding torch or other tool in correct position, and reliably connects water, gas, welding wire, high-voltage electrical signals, and ground. Also loads tools other than those for welding. Intended for use in robotic work cell producing all good parts, no rejects. In production, robot welds part, tests for flaws, and reworks as necessary before releasing it.

  8. Experimental and simulated strength of spot welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bennedbæk, Rune A.K.; Larsen, Morten B.

    2014-01-01

    -elongation curves revealing the maximum load and the elongation at break. Welding and strength testing is simulated by SORPAS® 3D, which allows the two processes to be prepared in a combined simulation, such that the simulated welding properties are naturally applied to the simulation of strength testing. Besides...... the size and shape of the weld nugget, these properties include the new strength of the material in the weld and the heat affected zone based on the predicted hardness resulting from microstructural phase changes simulated during cooling of the weld before strength testing. Comparisons between overall...

  9. Advances in welding science - a perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Babu, S.S.; DebRoy, T.

    1995-01-01

    The ultimate goal of welding technology is to improve the joint integrity and increase productivity. Over the years, welding has been more of an art than a science, but in the last few decades major advances have taken place in welding science and technology. With the development of new methodologies at the crossroads of basic and applied sciences, enormous opportunities and potential exist to develop a science-based tailoring of composition, structure, and properties of welds with intelligent control and automation of the welding processes

  10. FLIC-overlap fermions and topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamleh, W.; Kusterer, D.J.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    APE smearing the links in the irrelevant operators of clover fermions (Fat-Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) fermions) provides significant improvement in the condition number of the Hermitian-Dirac operator and gives rise to a factor of two savings in computing the overlap operator. This report investigates the effects of using a highly-improved definition of the lattice field-strength tensor F μν in the fermion action, made possible through the use of APE-smeared fat links in the construction of the irrelevant operators. Spurious double-zero crossings in the spectral flow of the Hermitian-Wilson Dirac operator associated with lattice artifacts at the scale of the lattice spacing are removed with FLIC fermions composed with an O(α 4 )-improved lattice field strength tensor. Hence, FLIC-Overlap fermions provide an additional benefit to the overlap formalism: a correct realization of topology in the fermion sector on the lattice

  11. A Social Network Model Exhibiting Tunable Overlapping Community Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, D.; Blenn, N.; Van Mieghem, P.F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Social networks, as well as many other real-world networks, exhibit overlapping community structure. In this paper, we present formulas which facilitate the computation for characterizing the overlapping community structure of networks. A hypergraph representation of networks with overlapping

  12. Modelling of the temperature field that accompanies friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosal Przemysław

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal modelling of the Friction Stir Welding process allows for better recognition and understanding of phenomena occurring during the joining process of different materials. It is of particular importance considering the possibilities of process technology parameters, optimization and the mechanical properties of the joint. This work demonstrates the numerical modelling of temperature distribution accompanying the process of friction stir welding. The axisymmetric problem described by Fourier’s type equation with internal heat source is considered. In order to solve the diffusive initial value problem a fully implicit scheme of the finite difference method is applied. The example under consideration deals with the friction stir welding of a plate (0.7 cm thick made of Al 6082-T6 by use of a tool made of tungsten alloy, whereas the material subjected to welding was TiC powder. Obtained results confirm both quantitatively and qualitatively experimental observations that the superior temperature corresponds to the zone where the pin joints the shoulder.

  13. Two-dimensional modeling of conduction-mode laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    WELD2D is a two-dimensional finite difference computer program suitable for modeling the conduction-mode welding process when the molten weld pool motion can be neglected. The code is currently structured to treat butt-welded geometries in a plane normal to the beam motion so that dissimilar materials may be considered. The surface heat transfer models used in the code include a Gaussian beam or uniform laser source, and a free electron theory reflectance calculation. Temperature-dependent material parameters are used in the reflectance calculation. Measured cold reflection data are used to include surface roughness or oxide effects until melt occurs, after which the surface is assumed to be smooth and clean. Blackbody reradiation and a simple natural convection model are also included in the upper surface boundary condition. Either an implicit or explicit finite-difference representation of the heat conduction equation in an enthalpy form is solved at each time step. This enables phase transition energies to be easily and accurately incorporated into the formulation. Temperature-dependent 9second-order polynominal dependence) thermal conductivities are used in the conduction calculations. Constant values of specific heat are used for each material phase. At present, material properties for six metals are included in the code. These are: aluminium, nickel, steel, molybdenum, copper and silicon

  14. Artificial Optical Radiation photobiological hazards in arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourzoulidis, G A; Achtipis, A; Topalis, F V; Kazasidis, M E; Pantelis, D; Markoulis, A; Kappas, C; Bourousis, C A

    2016-08-01

    Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) is associated with crucial social, economic, cultural and technical issues. A highly specialized OHS sector deals with the photobiological hazards from artificial optical radiation (AOR), which is divided into visible light, UV and IR emitted during various activities and which is legally covered by European Directive 2006/25/EC. Among the enormous amount of sources emitting AOR, the most important non-coherent ones to consider for health effects to the whole optical range, are arcs created during metal welding. This survey presents the effort to assess the complicated exposure limits of the Directive in the controlled environment of a welding laboratory. Sensors covering the UV and blue light range were set to measure typical welding procedures reproduced in the laboratory. Initial results, apart from apparently justifying the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) due to even subsecond overexposures measured, also set the basis to evaluate PPE's properties and support an integrated risk assessment of the complex welding environment. These results can also improve workers' and employer's information and training about radiation hazards, which is a crucial OHS demand. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagor, Rebekka Michaelsen; La Cour, Morten; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2016-09-01

    There are indications that solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) increases the risk of cataract, but there is only circumstantial evidence that metal welding, an important occupational source of UVR exposure, is a risk factor. The objective of this study is to unravel if metal welding increases the risk of cataract. We compared the risk of being diagnosed with cataract from 1987-2012 in a historic cohort of 4288 male metal arc welders against a reference group comprised of Danish skilled and unskilled male workers with similar age distribution. For the welders' cohort, information on welding was collected from questionnaires and, for both cohorts, information about cataract diagnosis and operation was gathered from Danish national registers. Using Cox regression analysis, the hazard ratio (HR) for cataract diagnosis and/or operation was calculated in the follow-up period adjusted for baseline data regarding age, diabetes, and social group. There were 266 welders and 29 007 referents with a diagnosis and/or operation for cataract. The unadjusted HR for cataract comparing ever-welders with referents was 1.07 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.95-1.21] and the adjusted HR was 1.08 (95% CI 0.95-1.22). Age and diabetes were as expected strong risk factors. We found no increased risk of developing cataract among Danish metal welders who worked with arc welding from 1950-1985. This may be attributed to the effectiveness of personal safety equipment.

  16. Welding engineering manual. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruge, J.; Thomas, K.

    1988-01-01

    Characteristics of the methods for weld calculation, based on the rules of the strength theory, are pointed out for static and dynamic stress. Among other things, the calculation rules for pressure vessels, pipeline construction and for steam boiler plants are dealt with in detail. The application of programmable pocket computers is also pointed out. Furthermore, an introduction to CAD is given which exemplarily contains a construction catalogue for welded joints. An introductory consideration of the finite element method is to solve problems of fracture mechanics. (HP) With 428 figs [de

  17. Advantages of new micro-jet welding technology on weld microstructure control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan PIWNIK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An innovative apparatus to welding process with micro-jet cooling of the weld made it possible to carry out technological tests, which have proved theoretical considerations about this problem. This project gives real opportunities for professional development in the field of welding with controlling the parameters of weld structure. These tests have proved that the new micro-jet technology has the potential for growth. It may be great achievement of welding technology in order to increase weld metal strength. The new technology with micro-jet cooling may have many practical applications in many fields, for example such as in the transport industry or to repair damaged metal elements. The advantages of the new device over the traditional system are the ability to control the structure of the weld, the weld mechanical performance increases and improve the quality of welded joints.

  18. Closing the weld gap with laser/mig hybrid welding process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Wiwe, Bjarne David

    2003-01-01

    for obtaining sound welds are identified. The welds are quality assessed according to ISO 13.919-1 and EN25817, transversal hardness measurements are made and the heat input to the workpiece is calculated. The results show that the critical gap is 0.1 mm for a laser weld alone. With hybrid welding, this can...... be increased to 0.6 mm, even at a welding speed of 3.5 m/min. The maximum welding speed with the hybrid process is comparable to laser welding alone, 4.5 m/min. The measured hardness is comparable to MIG welding, and this corresponds to a 33 percent reduction compared to laser welding alone. The heat input...

  19. Variant selection of martensites in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaru; Yasuda, Hiroyuki Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined the variant selection of martensites in the weld metals. ► We also measured the residual stress developed in the butt and box welded joints. ► 24 martensite variants were randomly selected in the butt welded joint. ► High tensile residual stress in the box welded joint led to the strong variant selection. ► We discussed the rule of the variant selection focusing on the residual stress. -- Abstract: Martensitic transformation behavior in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld (LTTW) metal was examined focusing on the variant selection of martensites. The butt and box welded joints were prepared with LTTW metals and 980 MPa grade high strength steels. The residual stress of the welded joints, which was measured by a neutron diffraction technique, was effectively reduced by the expansion of the LTTW metals by the martensitic transformation during cooling after the welding process. In the LTTW metals, the retained austenite and martensite phases have the Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship. The variant selection of the martensites in the LTTW metals depended strongly on the type of welded joints. In the butt welded joint, 24 K–S variants were almost randomly selected while a few variants were preferentially chosen in the box welded joint. This suggests that the high residual stress developed in the box welded joint accelerated the formation of specific variants during the cooling process, in contrast to the butt welded joint with low residual stress

  20. EFFECTS OF ELECTRODE DEFORMATION OF RESISTANCE SPOT WELDING ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WELD GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachimani Charde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The resistance spot welding process is accomplished by forcing huge amounts of current flow from the upper electrode tip through the base metals to the lower electrode tip, or vice versa or in both directions. A weld joint is established between the metal sheets through fusion, resulting in a strong bond between the sheets without occupying additional space. The growth of the weld nugget (bond between sheets is therefore determined from the welding current density; sufficient time for current delivery; reasonable electrode pressing force; and the area provided for current delivery (electrode tip. The welding current and weld time control the root penetration, while the electrode pressing force and electrode tips successfully accomplish the connection during the welding process. Although the welding current and weld time cause the heat generation at the areas concerned (electrode tip area, the electrode tips’ diameter and electrode pressing forces also directly influence the welding process. In this research truncated-electrode deformation and mushrooming effects are observed, which result in the welded areas being inconsistent due to the expulsion. The copper to chromium ratio is varied from the tip to the end of the electrode whilst the welding process is repeated. The welding heat affects the electrode and the electrode itself influences the shape of the weld geometry.

  1. Experimental investigation on the weld pool formation process in plasma keyhole arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Anh, Nguyen; Tashiro, Shinichi; Van Hanh, Bui; Tanaka, Manabu

    2018-01-01

    This paper seeks to clarify the weld pool formation process in plasma keyhole arc welding (PKAW). We adopted, for the first time, the measurement of the 3D convection inside the weld pool in PKAW by stereo synchronous imaging of tungsten tracer particles using two sets of x-ray transmission systems. The 2D convection on the weld pool surface was also measured using zirconia tracer particles. Through these measurements, the convection in a wide range of weld pools from the vicinity of the keyhole to the rear region was successfully visualized. In order to discuss the heat transport process in a weld pool, the 2D temperature distribution on the weld pool surface was also measured by two-color pyrometry. The results of the comprehensive experimental measurement indicate that the shear force due to plasma flow is found to be the dominant driving force in the weld pool formation process in PKAW. Thus, heat transport in a weld pool is considered to be governed by two large convective patterns near the keyhole: (1) eddy pairs on the surface (perpendicular to the torch axis), and (2) eddy pairs on the bulk of the weld pool (on the plane of the torch). They are formed with an equal velocity of approximately 0.35 m s‑1 and are mainly driven by shear force. Furthermore, the flow velocity of the weld pool convection becomes considerably higher than that of other welding processes, such as TIG welding and GMA welding, due to larger plasma flow velocity.

  2. Validation of welded joint residual stress simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational mechanics is being increasingly applied to predict the state of residual stress in welded joints for nuclear power plant applications. Motives for undertaking such calculations include optimising the design of welded joints and weld procedures, assessing the effectiveness of mitigation processes, providing more realistic inputs to structural integrity assessments and underwriting safety cases for operating nuclear power plant. Fusion welding processes involve intense localised heating to melt the surfaces to be joined and introduction of molten weld filler metal. A complex residual stress field develops at the weld through solidification, differential thermal contraction, cyclic thermal plasticity, phase transformation and chemical diffusion processes. The calculation of weld residual stress involves detailed non-linear analyses where many assumptions and approximations have to be made. In consequence, the accuracy and reliability of solutions can be highly variable. This paper illustrates the degree of variability that can arise in weld residual stress simulation results and summarises the new R6 guidelines which aim to improve the reliability and accuracy of computational predictions. The requirements for validating weld simulations are reviewed where residual stresses are to be used in fracture mechanics analysis. This includes a discussion of how to obtain and interpret measurements from mock-ups, benchmark weldments and published data. Benchmark weldments are described that illustrate some of the issues and show how validation of numerical prediction of weld residual stress can be achieved. Finally, plans for developing the weld modelling guidelines and associated benchmarks are outlined

  3. Zircaloy welding in OPAL reactor reflector vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, L.; Martinez, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: This paper describes the development of the Zircaloy 4 welding processes applied in the fabrication of the Reflector Vessel for the OPAL reactor. As an introduction, a brief description is made of the geometric design of the Reflector Vessel, which is very complex, as it has many irradiation positions, beams tubes, channels, outer connections, and reinforcements. The complexity of this component demanded different welded joints and a careful manufacturing sequence, which comprised welding, machining, heat treatments, and quality control operations. Design and fabrication of different ad-hoc devices was also required, some of which are described in the present paper. For the purposes of issuing reliable welding procedures, the joints were previously set up through tests using samples and mock-ups. Procedures and welders were qualified in accordance with the ASME Code, Section IX. The welding methods used in the fabrication were GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) and PAW (Plasma Arc Welding), processes deemed adequate to weld these alloys, as they do not contaminate the material, for they are carried out within an inert gas atmosphere. Contrary to other welding methods commonly used for other materials, no welding fluxes or chemically-active gases are applied in these two processes. The advantages of both methods used are discussed. The welds were carried out in manual, orbital, or mechanized mode depending on the type of joint

  4. Sensor Control of Robot Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sias, F. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The potential for using computer vision as sensory feedback for robot gas-tungsten arc welding is investigated. The basic parameters that must be controlled while directing the movement of an arc welding torch are defined. The actions of a human welder are examined to aid in determining the sensory information that would permit a robot to make reproducible high strength welds. Special constraints imposed by both robot hardware and software are considered. Several sensory modalities that would potentially improve weld quality are examined. Special emphasis is directed to the use of computer vision for controlling gas-tungsten arc welding. Vendors of available automated seam tracking arc welding systems and of computer vision systems are surveyed. An assessment is made of the state of the art and the problems that must be solved in order to apply computer vision to robot controlled arc welding on the Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  5. Experimental analysis of cut welding in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorph, Pernille; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Bay, Niels

    1993-01-01

    Cut welding is a newly developed cold pressure welding process. In the present work, an experimental investigation was carried out analyzing the mechanisms involved in cut welding of a block to a strip. Experiments were carried out in technically pure aluminium. The investigation has involved...... tensile testing and metallographic investigations of the welds. The results show that this variant of cut welding is a very reproducible process giving a weld strength equal to 30-40% the strength of the parent material. The experiments have shown that the reason for this relatively low strength...... is an uneven pressure distribution along the weld due to a wave formed during sliding. Attempts to alter the material flow during sliding are presented....

  6. Development of high productivity pipeline girth welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yapp, David; Liratzis, Theocharis

    2010-01-01

    The trend for increased oil and gas consumption implies a growth of long-distance pipeline installations. Welding is a critical factor in the installation of pipelines, both onshore and offshore, and the rate at which the pipeline can be laid is generally determined by the speed of welding. This has resulted in substantial developments in pipeline welding techniques. Arc welding is still the dominant process used in practice, and forge welding processes have had limited successful application to date, in spite of large investments in process development. Power beam processes have also been investigated in detail and the latest laser systems now show promise for practical application. In recent years the use of high strength steels has substantially reduced the cost of pipeline installation, with X70 and X80 being commonly used. This use of high strength pipeline produced by thermomechanical processing has also been researched. They must all meet three requirments, high productivity, satisfactory weld properties, and weld quality

  7. Advances in solar cell welding technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidester, L.G.; Lott, D.R.

    1982-09-01

    In addition to developing the rigid substrate welded conventional cell panels for an earlier U.S. flight program, LMSC recently demonstrated a welded lightweight array system using both 2 x 4 and 5.9 x 5.9 cm wraparound solar cells. This weld system uses infrared sensing of weld joint temperature at the cell contact metalization interface to precisely control weld energy on each joint. Modules fabricated using this weld control system survived lowearth-orbit simulated 5-year tests (over 30,000 cycles) without joint failure. The data from these specifically configured modules, printed circuit substrate with copper interconnect and dielectric wraparound solar cells, can be used as a basis for developing weld schedules for additional cell array panel types.

  8. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ARC WELDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, R.A.; Stone, C.C.

    1960-05-10

    An apparatus and method are given for forming a welding arc which is rotated by a magnetic field very rapidly about an annular electrode so that a weld is produced simultaneously over all points of an annular or closed path. This invention inhibits outgassing from the jacket of a fuel slug which is being welded by adjusting the pressure throughout the welding cycle to establish a balance between the gas pressure within the jacket and that of the atmosphere surrounding the jacket. Furthermore, an improved control of the magnetic field producing rotation of the welding arc is disclosed whereby this rotation is prevented from splashing about the metal being welded as the welding arc makes it molten.

  9. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Plug Welds after Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadryś D.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve mechanical properties of plug welds. The main purpose of that paper was analyzing of mechanical properties of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling. The main way for it was comparison of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling and plug welds made by ordinary MIG welding method. It is interesting for steel because higher amount of acicular ferrite (AF in weld metal deposit (WMD is obtained in MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling in relation to ordinary MIG welding method. This article presents the influence of the cooling medium and the number of micro-jet streams on mechanical properties of the welded joint. Mechanical properties were described by force which is necessary to destroy weld joint.

  11. Study of the mechanical properties of welded joints by wet sub sea welding technique with tubular electrode; Estudo das propriedades mecanicas de juntas soldadas pela tecnica de soldagem subaquatica molhada com eletrodo tubular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichmann, Erwin Werner; Baixo, Carlos Eduardo Iconomos; Dutra, Jair Carlos [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Soldagem e Mecatronica - LABSOLDA]. E-mail: erwin@labsolda.ufsc.br; Santos, Valter Rocha dos [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Teixeira, Jose Claudio [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1997-07-01

    Some experiments conducted at LABSOLDA/UFSC - a welding laboratory of Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, Brazil - in order to identify mechanical properties, weld bead geometry and the quantity and dimensions of pores in weld beads produced by sub sea wet FCAW are described. Welding in shallow water with power source adjusted to operate in constant current characteristic mode and a set of parameters to establish an open arc transfer mode it was obtained weld beads with regular geometry and an acceptable profile, with low level of defects incidence, no pores and crack free. The tenacity measured by Charpy tests (0C) was 34 J and hardness of 119 HV-10 measured by Vickers tests. The methodology used in the experiments and the results obtained are discussed in the paper. (author)

  12. Studies on CO2-laser Hybrid-Welding of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    CO2-laser welding of copper is known to be difficult due to the high heat conductivity of the material and the high reflectivity of copper at the wavelength of the CO2-laser light. THis paper presents a study of laser welding of copper, applying laser hybrid welding. Welding was performed...... as a hybrid CO2-laser and GTAW welding process in 2 mm pure copper sheets. The purpose was to identify maximum welding speeds for the three independent welding processes, i.e. GTAW alone, laser alone and combined processes. After welding, representative welds were quality assesed according to inernational...

  13. Development of welding technique by remote control at the JMTR Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Michio; Iwamatu, Sigemi; Takada, Humiki

    2000-03-01

    Several kinds of welding techniques have been systematically developed using the remote controlled procedures in the JMTR Hot Laboratory. These are as follows, (1) re-instrumentation's of FP gas pressure gauge and thermocouple to an irradiated fuel rod for the centerline temperature measurement, (2) welding of the un-irradiated/irradiated specimen and machining process to produce tensile test specimens, (3) fabrication of Co-60 radiation source from materials for reactivity adjustment in JMTR core, (4) re-capsuling of irradiated materials in the different types of irradiation facilities. These research and development of circumferential and sealed welding for capsuling and welding of irradiated specimen for re-irradiation were implemented under the remote-controlled conditions in the Hot Cell. These techniques will be very indispensable for supporting the irradiation experiments to be conducted in the JMTR. (author)

  14. Analysis of Factors Affecting Fractures of Rails Welded by Alumino-Thermic Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Sergejevs, D; Mihailovs, S

    2008-01-01

    On Latvian Railway, the use of the thermic welding is widespread using the ELECTRO-THERMIT Company technology. Today it is a basic method for rail joints. Experience of the operation of rails welded by the thermic welding showed that every year occur from 2 to 3 fractures of thermic joints on the main tracks between stations of Latvian Railway.Such emergence of cracks in the weld joint alongside the scores indicates of great residual stresses in the weld joints made by the thermic welding.

  15. Residual Stress Analysis of an Overlay Weld on a Repair Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Soo; Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, I. C.; Byeon, J. G.; Park, K. S. [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    In recent years, the dissimilar metal, Alloy 82/182 welds used to connect stainless steel piping and low alloy steel or carbon steel components in nuclear reactor piping system have experienced the cracking due to primary water stress corrosion(PWSCC). It is well known that one reason of the cracking is the residual stress by the weld. But, it is difficult to estimate the weld residual stress exactly due to many parameters of a welding. In this paper, the analysis of 3 FEM models is performed to estimate the weld residual stress on the dissimilar metal weld exactly.

  16. Residual stress analysis of an overlay weld on a dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Soo; Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, Bong Sang (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea)); Jung, I.C.; Byeon, J.G.; Park, K.S. (Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Changwon (Korea)), e-mail: kskim5@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, a dissimilar metal, Alloy 82/182 welds used to connect stainless steel piping and low alloy steel or carbon steel components in nuclear reactor piping system have experienced a cracking due to a primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC). It is well known that one reason for the cracking is the residual stress by the weld. But, it is difficult to estimate the weld residual stress exactly due to many parameters of a welding. In this paper, the analysis of 3 FEM models is performed to estimate the weld residual stress on a dissimilar metal weld exactly

  17. 49 CFR 192.235 - Preparation for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preparation for welding. 192.235 Section 192.235... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.235 Preparation for welding. Before beginning any welding, the welding surfaces must be clean and free of any material that...

  18. General Mechanical Repair. Welding. Volume 2. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    Five units on welding are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are the following: introduction to oxyacetylene welding, oxyacetylene welding positions and applications, use of the cutting torch, introduction to shielded metal arc welding, and welding joints and positions. Each instructional unit generally contains eight components:…

  19. Microstructural, Micro-hardness and Sensitization Evaluation in HAZ of Type 316L Stainless Steel Joint with Narrow Gap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Faisal Shafiqul; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shi Chull [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    From Micro-hardness measurement HAZ zone was found approximately 1-1.5 mm in NGW and DL-EPR test confirmed that 316L NGW HAZ was not susceptible to sensitization as DOS <1% according to sensitization criteria based on reference. In nuclear power plants 316L stainless steels are commonly used material for their metallurgical stability, high corrosion resistance, and good creep and ductility properties at elevated temperatures. Welding zone considered as the weakest and failure initiation source of the components. For safety and economy of nuclear power plants accurate and dependable structural integrity assessment of main components like pressure vessels and piping are need as it joined by different welding process. In similar and dissimilar metal weld it has been observed that weld microstructure cause the variation of mechanical properties through the thickness direction. In the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) relative to the fusion line face a unique thermal experience during welding.

  20. Overlapping community detection using weighted consensus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many overlapping community detection algorithms have been proposed. Most of them are unstable and behave non-deterministically. In this paper, we use weighted consensus clustering for combining multiple base covers obtained by classic non-deterministic algorithms to improve the quality of the results. We first ...

  1. Overlapping domain decomposition methods for elliptic quasi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annaba 23000, Algeria. 2Hydrometeorological Institute of Formation and Research, B.P. 7019 Seddikia,. Oran 31025, Algeria. E-mail: haiourm@yahoo.fr; saleh_boulaares@yahoo.fr. MS received 23 April ...... of an overlapping nonmatch- ing grids method for the obstacle problem (Hindawi Publishing Corporation) (2006).

  2. A simple design rule for overlap joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2004-01-01

    For toughened and flexible adhesives it is found that a simple prediction model for overlap joints can be used to calculate the ultimate strength for the static load case. The absolute maximum strength for a lap joint is when the whole of the adhesive layer is at the shear yield strength. An

  3. Probabilistic entanglement transformation by local overlap modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, Luis, E-mail: lroa@udec.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Ladrón de Guevara, M.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Jara-Figueroa, C. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); González-Céspedes, E. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile)

    2013-01-03

    We present a strategy to transform the entanglement of two qubits under a local unitary-reduction process. Such procedure modifies the overlap between two pure states involved in a specific representation of the initial bipartite pure state. We study the scopes of the proposal and present a concrete scheme of experimental realization by using cold ions confined in linear Paul traps.

  4. Parallelizing SLPA for Scalable Overlapping Community Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Kuzmin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Communities in networks are groups of nodes whose connections to the nodes in a community are stronger than with the nodes in the rest of the network. Quite often nodes participate in multiple communities; that is, communities can overlap. In this paper, we first analyze what other researchers have done to utilize high performance computing to perform efficient community detection in social, biological, and other networks. We note that detection of overlapping communities is more computationally intensive than disjoint community detection, and the former presents new challenges that algorithm designers have to face. Moreover, the efficiency of many existing algorithms grows superlinearly with the network size making them unsuitable to process large datasets. We use the Speaker-Listener Label Propagation Algorithm (SLPA as the basis for our parallel overlapping community detection implementation. SLPA provides near linear time overlapping community detection and is well suited for parallelization. We explore the benefits of a multithreaded programming paradigm and show that it yields a significant performance gain over sequential execution while preserving the high quality of community detection. The algorithm was tested on four real-world datasets with up to 5.5 million nodes and 170 million edges. In order to assess the quality of community detection, at least 4 different metrics were used for each of the datasets.

  5. Autism and ADHD: Overlapping and Discriminating Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Mayes, Rebecca D.; Molitoris, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Children with ADHD and autism have some similar features, complicating a differential diagnosis. The purpose of our study was to determine the degree to which core ADHD and autistic symptoms overlap in and discriminate between children 2-16 years of age with autism and ADHD. Our study demonstrated that 847 children with autism were easily…

  6. Overlapping transcription structure of human cytomegalovirus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-01-21

    Jan 21, 2013 ... [Ma Y, Li M, Zheng B, Wang N, Gao S, Wang L, Qi Y, Sun Z and Ruan Q 2013 Overlapping transcription structure of human cytomegalovirus .... Genome structure of the UL139–UL141 gene region of H strain (GenBank GQ981646). The blank arrows ..... The genetic organization of the virus may provide a.

  7. Numerical Evaluation of Temperature Field and Residual Stresses in an API 5L X80 Steel Welded Joint Using the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jailson A. Da Nóbrega

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic materials undergo many metallurgical changes when subjected to welding thermal cycles, and these changes have a considerable influence on the thermo-mechanical properties of welded structures. One method for evaluating the welding thermal cycle variables, while still in the project phase, would be simulation using computational methods. This paper presents an evaluation of the temperature field and residual stresses in a multipass weld of API 5L X80 steel, which is extensively used in oil and gas industry, using the Finite Element Method (FEM. In the simulation, the following complex phenomena were considered: the variation in physical and mechanical properties of the material as a function of the temperature, welding speed and convection and radiation mechanisms. Additionally, in order to characterize a multipass weld using the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process for the root pass and the Shielded Metal Arc Welding process for the filling passes, the analytical heat source proposed by Goldak and Chakravarti was used. In addition, we were able to analyze the influence of the mesh refinement in the simulation results. The findings indicated a significant variation of about 50% in the peak temperature values. Furthermore, changes were observed in terms of the level and profile of the welded joint residual stresses when more than one welding pass was considered.

  8. Welding procedure specification for arc welding of St 52-3N steel plates with covered electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetkovski, S.; Slavkov, D.; Magdeski, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the results of approval welding technology for arc welding of plates made of St 52-3N steel are presented. Metal arc welding with covered electrode is used welding process. Test specimens are butt welded in different welding positions P A , P F , P C and P D . Before start welding preliminary welding procedure was prepared. After welding of test specimens non destructive and destructive testing was performed. Obtained results were compared with standard DIN 17100 which concerns to chemical composition and mechanical properties of base material. It was confirmed that in all cases mechanical properties of welded joint are higher than those of base material, so preliminary welding procedure (pWTS) can be accepted as welding procedure specification WPS for metal arc welding of St52-3N steel. (Original)

  9. Fundamentals of Welding. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    These instructional materials assist teachers in improving instruction on the fundamentals of welding. The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and 27 references. Seven units of…

  10. Projection welding for cost cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuncz, F. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Resistance projection welding is described pointing out the advantages, the machine requirements to be met, the suitability of various metals and/or metal combinations, the design considerations, the projection design requirements and their placement, and the limitations of this process

  11. Welding the CNGS decay tube

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    3.6 km of welds were required for the 1 km long CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) decay tube, in which particles produced in the collision with a proton and a graphite target will decay into muons and muon neutrinos. Four highly skilled welders performed this delicate task.

  12. Mechanics Model of Plug Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Q. K.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the mechanics of friction plug welding. The model accounts for coupling of plastic deformation (material flow) and thermal response (plastic heating). The model predictions of the torque, energy, and pull force on the plug were compared to the data of a recent experiment, and the agreements between predictions and data are encouraging.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH ON ULTRASONIC WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia LUCHIAN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the optimum ultrasound welding parameters of copper sheets usingstatic analysis methods results and microscopic structural analysis. Also it get the conclusion thatweld formation it’s produced after the plastic deformation process of metals because the action ofultrasonic energy in the joint area.

  14. Influence of weld discontinuities on strain controlled fatigue behavior of 308 stainless steel weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Valsan, M.; Sandhya, R.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed investigations have been performed for assessing the importance of weld discontinuities in strain controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 308 stainless steel (SS) welds. The LCF behavior of 308 SS welds containing defects was compared with that of type 304 SS base material and 308 SS sound weld metal. Weld pads were prepared by shielded metal arc welding process. Porosity and slag inclusions were introduced deliberately into the weld metal by grossly exaggerating the conditions normally causing such defects. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests have been conducted in air at 823 K on type 304 SS base and 308 SS sound weld metal employing strain amplitudes in the range from ±0.25 to ±0.8 percent. A single strain amplitude of ±0.25 percent was used for all the tests conducted on weld samples containing defects. The results indicated that the base material undergoes cyclic hardening whereas sound and defective welds experience cyclic softening. Base metal showed higher fatigue life than sound weld metal at all strain amplitudes. The presence of porosity and slag inclusions in the weld metal led to significant reduction in life. Porosity on the specimen surface has been found to be particularly harmful and caused a reduction in life by a factor of seven relative to sound weld metal

  15. Investigate The Effect Of Welding Parameters On Mechanical Properties During The Welding Of Al-6061 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Prasad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction welding is a solid state welding technique which is being used in recent times to weld similar as well as dissimilar metals for getting defect free weld. Many combinations like low carbon to stainless steel austenitic to ferrite stainless steel aluminium to copper and titanium to aluminium or steel have been tried out by various solid state welding processes with quite good results. In the present work the 3 level full factorial design has been employed to investigate the effect of welding parameters on tensile strength toughness and heat generation during the welding of Al-6061 alloy. Mathematical relationships between friction welding parameters and mechanical properties like heat generation tensile strength and toughness have also been developed. An attempt has also been made to examine the fracture surfaces of test specimens using SEM. It has been found that welding speed is the most significant parameter thats affect the heat generation tensile strength and toughness. it has been found that tensile strength and toughness during welding increases with increased in welding speed while tensile strength and toughness initially increased as the welding time increases after that it decreased with increase in welding time. The difference in weight of alloying elements can be clearly seen by analyzing spectrum of elements.

  16. Effect of narrow groove MAG welding oscillation parameters on weld formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu LUO

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the problem of narrow groove wall fusion, improving the weld formation, the welding test of different oscillation width and frequency is carried out by adopting the narrow high-speed swing MAG welding torch. On the basis of measuring the macro metallographic to determine the weld cross section size, the curve fitting of the variation trend of the weld section size with the swing width and the swing frequency is carried out. The effect of the high speed swing arc narrow groove welding MAG parameters on weld formation is studied. The results show that increasing the swing width or frequency can reduce the weld penetration and increase lateral wall penetration; when the swinging width makes side spacing greater than -05 mm and less than 1 mm, good weld forming will be gained; when the oscillation frequency increases to more than 5 Hz, weld finger penetration can be eliminated, but when it is above 9 Hz, increasing the swing frequency cannot cause obvious change of the dimension of weld. The effects of these oscillating parameters on weld formation can provide guidance for the selection of welding parameters.

  17. Welded joints integrity analysis and optimization for fiber laser welding of dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yuewei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Li, Peigen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Dissimilar materials welded joints provide many advantages in power, automotive, chemical, and spacecraft industries. The weld bead integrity which is determined by process parameters plays a significant role in the welding quality during the fiber laser welding (FLW) of dissimilar materials. In this paper, an optimization method by taking the integrity of the weld bead and weld area into consideration is proposed for FLW of dissimilar materials, the low carbon steel and stainless steel. The relationships between the weld bead integrity and process parameters are developed by the genetic algorithm optimized back propagation neural network (GA-BPNN). The particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is taken for optimizing the predicted outputs from GA-BPNN for the objective. Through the optimization process, the desired weld bead with good integrity and minimum weld area are obtained and the corresponding microstructure and microhardness are excellent. The mechanical properties of the optimized joints are greatly improved compared with that of the un-optimized welded joints. Moreover, the effects of significant factors are analyzed based on the statistical approach and the laser power (LP) is identified as the most significant factor on the weld bead integrity and weld area. The results indicate that the proposed method is effective for improving the reliability and stability of welded joints in the practical production.

  18. Laser welding of tailored blanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peças, P.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser welding has an incrising role in the automotive industry, namely on the sub-assemblies manufacturing. Several sheet-shape parts are laser welded, on a dissimilar combination of thicknesses and materials, and are afterwards formed (stamped being transformed in a vehicle body component. In this paper low carbon CO2 laser welding, on the thicknesses of 1,25 and 0,75 mm, formability investigation is described. There will be a description of how the laser welded blanks behave in different forming tests, and the influence of misalignment and undercut on the formibility. The quality is evaluated by measuring the limit strain and limit effective strain for the laser welded sheets and the base material, which will be presented in a forming limit diagram.

    A soldadura laser assume um papel cada vez mais importante na indústria automóvel, principalmente para a fabricação de sub-conjuntos constituídos por varias partes de chapa de diferentes espessuras (e diferentes materiais, que depois de estampados constituem um componente para integrar num veículo. Descreve-se neste artigo o trabalho de investigação de enformabilidade de chapa de ac.o de baixo carbono soldada por laser de CO2, nas espessuras de 1,25 e 0,75 mm. Apresenta-se uma descrição do comportamento das chapas soldadas por laser em diferentes testes de enformação, e a influência dos defeitos das soldaduras (desalinhamento e queda do banho-undercut no comportamento à enformação. A qualidade é avaliada pela medição da extensão limite e da extensão limite efectiva no material base e no material soldado, que serão representadas num diagrama de limite de enformabilidade.

  19. OPTIMIZATION OF PROCESS PARAMETERS TO MINIMIZE ANGULAR DISTORTION IN GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDED STAINLESS STEEL 202 GRADE PLATES USING PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. SUDHAKARAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on optimization of process parameters using particle swarm optimization to minimize angular distortion in 202 grade stainless steel gas tungsten arc welded plates. Angular distortion is a major problem and most pronounced among different types of distortion in butt welded plates. The process control parameters chosen for the study are welding gun angle, welding speed, plate length, welding current and gas flow rate. The experiments were conducted using design of experiments technique with five factor five level central composite rotatable design with full replication technique. A mathematical model was developed correlating the process parameters with angular distortion. A source code was developed in MATLAB 7.6 to do the optimization. The optimal process parameters gave a value of 0.0305° for angular distortion which demonstrates the accuracy of the model developed. The results indicate that the optimized values for the process parameters are capable of producing weld with minimum distortion.

  20. A 1993 review of welding in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes a prospect on Japanese welding technologies available in 1993. Amid the increasing research publications on non-ferrous metals as structural materials, publications are also increasing on steel materials as to their fracture and welding mechanics, and structural control. Studies are being made on ceramics with respect to its bonding, interface reaction mechanisms, and mechanical characteristics. The paper describes the progress and improvement in conventional technologies in welding and cutting processes. Especially active is the study on solid face welding such as pressure welding and diffusion. A considerable decrease is seen in reports on thermal spraying. The paper also introduces surface processing and hydrostatic pressure processing as new processing techniques. In the area of welding devices, practical use of arc welding robots has come to near a completion stage. Technological development and cost reduction are indispensable to transfer to visual sensing with a higher intelligence level. With respect to the performance of joints, a large number of research has been reported on welding deformation and residual stress. The paper also dwells on corrosion resistance and welding cracks. Quality assurance, inspection, and related standards are described. Details are given on application of welding to different industrial fields.

  1. Physical Nature of the Processes in Structure Forming, Phase and Chemical Composition of pipe Permanent Joints when MMA Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Danilov, V. I.; Sadykov, I. D.

    2016-04-01

    The paper outlines peculiarities of structure formation, phase and chemical composition in regard to heat content in molten electrode metal beads when pipe steel (steel 09G2S) welding using power sources with various energy characteristics. Mathematical calculations indicate an inverter power source provides minor heat content into the bead of electrode metal when welding. Experimental research has pointed at 4-9 % increase in impact strength of joints produced using an inverter power source in comparison with samples produced applying a diode rectifier. The following factors can possibly give rise to the increasing impact strength: difference in microstructures of weld joints, up to 50% shortening ferritic plates in metal of weld joint, change in dimensions of ferritic grains in the heat-affected zone by as much as 17.5 %, and decrease in the extent of heat-affected zone by 50%.

  2. ITER lip seal welding and cutting developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesy, B.; Cordier, J.J.; Jokinen, T. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kujanpää, V.; Karhu, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Le Barbier, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Määttä, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Martins, J.P.; Utin, Y. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Different TIG and Laser welding techniques are tested. • Twin spot laser welding techniques is the best. • Limited heat input gives a stable weld pool in all positions. • Penetrations is achieved. • Lip seal welding and cutting with a robotic arm is successfully performed on a representative mock-up. - Abstract: The welded lip seals form part of the torus primary vacuum boundary in between the port plugs and the vacuum vessel, and are classified as Protection Important Component. In order to refurbish the port plugs or the in-vessel components, port plugs have to be removed from the machine. The lip seal design must enable up to ten opening of the vacuum vessel during the life time operation of the ITER machine. Therefore proven, remote reliable cutting and re-welding are essential, as these operations need to be performed in the port cells in a nuclear environment, where human presence will be restricted. Moreover, the combination of size of the components to be welded (∼10 m long vacuum compatible thin welds) and the congested environment close to the core of the machine constraint the type and size of tools to be used. This paper describes the lip seal cutting and welding development programme performed at the VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland. Potential cutting and welding techniques are analyzed and compared. The development of the cutting, TIG and laser welding techniques on samples are presented. Effects of lip seal misalignments and optimization of the 2 welding processes are discussed. Finally, the manufacturing and test of the two 1.2 m × 1 m representative mock-ups are presented. The set-up and use of a robotic arm for the mock-up cutting and welding operations are also described.

  3. Improving fatigue performance of rail thermite welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiar L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Rail transport development offers economic and ecological interests. Nevertheless, it requires heavy investments in rolling material and infrastructure. To be competitive, this transportation means must rely on safe and reliable infrastructure, which requires optimization of all implemented techniques and structure. Rail thermite (or aluminothermic welding is widely used within the railway industry for in-track welding during re-rail and defect replacement. The process provides numerous advantages against other welding technology commonly used. Obviously, future demands on train traffic are heavier axle loads, higher train speeds and increased traffic density. Thus, a new enhanced weld should be developed to prevent accidents due to fracture of welds and to lower maintenance costs. In order to improve such assembly process, a detailed metallurgical study coupled to a thermomechanical modelling of the phenomena involved in the thermite welding process is carried out. Obtained data enables us to develop a new improved thermite weld (type A. This joint is made by modifying the routinely specified procedure (type B used in a railway rail by a standard gap alumino-thermic weld. Joints of type A and B are tested and compared. Based on experimental temperature measurements, a finite element analysis is used to calculate the thermal residual stresses induced. In the vicinity of the weld, the residual stress patterns depend on the thermal conditions during welding as it also shown by litterature [1, 2]. In parallel, X-Ray diffraction has been used to map the residual stress field that is generated in welded rail of types A and B. Their effect on fatigue crack growth in rail welds is studied. An experimental study based on fatigue tests of rails welded by conventional and improved processes adjudicates on the new advances and results will be shown.

  4. Improving fatigue performance of rail thermite welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezzini-Aouad, M.; Flahaut, P.; Hariri, S.; Winiar, L.

    2010-06-01

    Rail transport development offers economic and ecological interests. Nevertheless, it requires heavy investments in rolling material and infrastructure. To be competitive, this transportation means must rely on safe and reliable infrastructure, which requires optimization of all implemented techniques and structure. Rail thermite (or aluminothermic) welding is widely used within the railway industry for in-track welding during re-rail and defect replacement. The process provides numerous advantages against other welding technology commonly used. Obviously, future demands on train traffic are heavier axle loads, higher train speeds and increased traffic density. Thus, a new enhanced weld should be developed to prevent accidents due to fracture of welds and to lower maintenance costs. In order to improve such assembly process, a detailed metallurgical study coupled to a thermomechanical modelling of the phenomena involved in the thermite welding process is carried out. Obtained data enables us to develop a new improved thermite weld (type A). This joint is made by modifying the routinely specified procedure (type B) used in a railway rail by a standard gap alumino-thermic weld. Joints of type A and B are tested and compared. Based on experimental temperature measurements, a finite element analysis is used to calculate the thermal residual stresses induced. In the vicinity of the weld, the residual stress patterns depend on the thermal conditions during welding as it also shown by litterature [1, 2]. In parallel, X-Ray diffraction has been used to map the residual stress field that is generated in welded rail of types A and B. Their effect on fatigue crack growth in rail welds is studied. An experimental study based on fatigue tests of rails welded by conventional and improved processes adjudicates on the new advances and results will be shown.

  5. Electron beam welding and laser welding of FRAGEMA fuel assembly components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, J.M.; Etellin, B.; Duthoo, B.; Wache, C.; Taillandier, T.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron balance and activity of the primary coolant circuit are improved in PWR if inconel 718 is replaced by a zirconium alloy for fuel element grids. This paper examines laser welding and EB welding of these zirconium alloy grids [fr

  6. Interpolation Algorithm and Mathematical Model in Automated Welding of Saddle-Shaped Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianghao Xue

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents welding torch pose model and interpolation algorithm of trajectory control of saddle-shaped weld formed by intersection of two pipes; the working principle, interpolation algorithm, welding experiment, and simulation result of the automatic welding system of the saddle-shaped weld are described. A variable angle interpolation method is used to control the trajectory and pose of the welding torch, which guarantees the constant linear terminal velocity. The mathematical model of the trajectory and pose of welding torch are established. Simulation and experiment have been carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and mathematical model. The results demonstrate that the interpolation algorithm is well within the interpolation requirements of the saddle-shaped weld and ideal feed rate stability.

  7. The impact of welding wire on the mechanical properties of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Mazur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of the mechanical properties of Hardox 450 steel welded joints. These welded joints were made in accordance with welding procedure specifications (WPS, which was prepared and  applied in the Wielton company. Fillers were provided by welding wires with two different diameters. The welding wire was G4Sil with diameter of 1.0 mm and 1.2 mm. The aim of this study was to examine whether the thickness of the welding wire has a direct effect on the properties of welded joints. Test specimens were made in similar parameters of the welding process. Then they were subjected to macroscopic research, tensile strength, impact strength and hardness

  8. Optimization of resistance spot welding parameters for microalloyed steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viňáš, Ján; Kaščák, Ľuboš; Greš, Miroslav

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of resistance spot welding of hot-dip galvanized microalloyed steel sheets used in car body production. The spot welds were made with various welding currents and welding time values, but with a constant pressing force of welding electrodes. The welding current and welding time are the dominant characteristics in spot welding that affect the quality of spot welds, as well as their dimensions and load-bearing capacity. The load-bearing capacity of welded joints was evaluated by tensile test according to STN 05 1122 standard and dimensions and inner defects were evaluated by metallographic analysis by light optical microscope. Thewelding parameters of investigated microalloyed steel sheets were optimized for resistance spot welding on the pneumatic welding machine BPK 20.

  9. New Welding Consumables and Practice for Highly Portable Field Repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, D

    2001-01-01

    .... Exothermally assisted arc welding was successfully accomplished with both SMA and self-shielded FCA welding consumables on steels and the optimum range of exothermic additions and welding parameters...

  10. Friction stir welding of 6061 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Rahman, M.A.M.S.

    2009-01-01

    6061 AA (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance such as marine frames, pipelines, storage tanks, and aircraft components [1]. It is also used for the manufacturing of fuel elements in the nuclear research reactors. Compared to many of the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural alloys, friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded is not melted and recast [2]. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding traverse speed, and tool profile play a major role in deciding the weld quality. Several FSW tools (differ from each other in pin angle, shoulder diameter, and shoulder concavity) have been used to fabricate a number of joints in order to obtain a tool with which a sound weld can be produced. It was found that the FSW tool with tapered cone pin, concave shoulder, and shoulder diameter equal to four times the welded plate thickness is suitable to produce a sound weld. The effect of the traverse speed on the global and local tensile properties of friction stir welded joints has been investigated in the 6061-T6 AA. The global tensile properties of the FSW joints were improved with increasing the traverse speed at constant rotation rate. It is found that the global tensile strength of the FSW joint is limited by the local tensile strength of the nearest region to the weld center at which the cross section is composed mainly of the HAZ. The effect of the initial butt surface on the formation of the zigzag line on the tensile properties of the welds was examined by using three types of welding samples differ in the preparation of the initial butt surface. The first type of samples welded without removing the oxide layer from the initial butt surface (uncleaned butt surfaces joint). In the second type of samples the oxide layer was removed from

  11. TIG welding phenomenon and properties of welds in welding atmospheres with various oxygen and nitrogen partial pressures. Pt. 2. Study on welding of zirconium alloy tubing. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, Kojiro; Mishima, Teruaki; Kurosawa, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Hajime

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of extremely low levels of oxygen and nitrogen partial pressure, P O2 and P N2 in pressurized TIG welding atmospheres on the welding phenomenon and properties of welds of zirconium alloy tubing. In TIG welding of Zircaloy-2 tubing in welding atmospheres with various P O2 and P N2 in total pressure (P T ) of 0.32 MPa (optionally 0.55 MPa), the arc voltages were measured and the properties of welds (surface discoloration, oxygen and nitrogen contents) were examined. Although definite arc voltage change is not observable at welding in ≤12.9 Pa of P O2 and 15.6-67.2 Pa of P O2+N2 (P O2 /P N2 =1/4), a tendency of arc voltage drop with increase of P N2 is observed at welding in 13.1-53.0 Pa of P N2 (P O2 =0.3 Pa). The surface of weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ) in the atmosphere of 0.3 Pa of P O2 and 1.3 Pa of P N2 remains bright. The surface discoloration is observable slightly on weld metal and HAZ in the atmosphere of 3.4 Pa of P O2 , and with increase of P O2 the initial straw color becomes darker until it gets partially blue. No surface discoloration is observable on weld metals and HAZ in the atmospheres of P N2 ≤ 53.0 Pa with 0.3 Pa of P O2 . The nitrogen content [N] in the weld metal increases linearly with increase of √P N2 , and the increasing rate of [N] in inner part of weld metal is lower than that of [N] in outer part. The oxygen content [O] in outer part of weld metal increases linearly with increase of √P O2 and shows same relations as [N] although the values of [O] in the weld metals fluctuate more than [N]. The increasing rates of [N] and [O] in the weld metal under P T =0.32 MPa are lower than that of [N] and [O] in the weld metal under P T =0.10 MPa which is reported in Report 3. (author)

  12. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  13. Risk Communication Concerning Welding Fumes for the Primary Preventive Care of Welding Apprentices in Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Cezar Vaz, Joana

    2015-01-01

    This study’s aim was to assess the perceptions of welding apprentices concerning welding fumes being associated with respiratory and cardiovascular disorders and assess the implementation of risk communication as a primary prevention tool in the welding training process. This quasi-experimental, non-randomized study with before-and-after design was conducted with 84 welding apprentices in Southern Brazil. Poisson Regression analysis was used. Relative Risk was the measure used with a 95% co...

  14. Extracting attosecond delays from spectrally overlapping interferograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Inga; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2018-02-01

    Attosecond interferometry is becoming an increasingly popular technique for measuring the dynamics of photoionization in real time. Whereas early measurements focused on atomic systems with very simple photoelectron spectra, the technique is now being applied to more complex systems including isolated molecules and solids. The increase in complexity translates into an augmented spectral congestion, unavoidably resulting in spectral overlap in attosecond interferograms. Here, we discuss currently used methods for phase retrieval and introduce two new approaches for determining attosecond photoemission delays from spectrally overlapping photoelectron spectra. We show that the previously used technique, consisting in the spectral integration of the areas of interest, does in general not provide reliable results. Our methods resolve this problem, thereby opening the technique of attosecond interferometry to complex systems and fully exploiting its specific advantages in terms of spectral resolution compared to attosecond streaking.

  15. Optical unmasking of spectrally overlapping RF signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, William; Yegnanarayanan, Siva; Kolodziej, Kenneth E; Juodawlkis, Paul W

    2017-10-30

    When two signals having overlapping frequency content are received at the same time, they interfere to obstruct detection of the information carried by each individual signal. We introduce here a new nonlinear optoelectronic filtering technique that enables the ability to individually detect two concurrent and spectrally overlapping signals, even when the amplitude ratio between the signals is as high as 100,000. We demonstrate our system for application in steganography where we unveil the information carried by a hidden desired RF signal, while a dominant interferer signal is intentionally transmitted nearby and at the same frequency. Our signal recovery technique, which operates assuming no a priori knowledge of either signal, presents an additional pathway that can be used to control how information can be processed and communicated.

  16. Pearson's Functions to Describe FSW Weld Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacombe, D.; Coupard, D.; Tcherniaeff, S.; Girot, F.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining technique particularly for aluminium alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this study, the geometry of the weld has been investigated and modelled using Pearson's functions. It has been demonstrated that the Pearson's parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis and geometric constant) can be used to characterize the weld geometry and the tensile strength of the weld assembly. Pearson's parameters and process parameters are strongly correlated allowing to define a control process procedure for FSW assemblies which make radiographic or ultrasonic controls unnecessary. Finally, an optimisation using a Generalized Gradient Method allows to determine the geometry of the weld which maximises the assembly tensile strength.

  17. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-01-01

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials. PMID:28788113

  18. Femtosecond fiber laser welding of dissimilar metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, welding of dissimilar metals was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, by using a high-energy high-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed under various processing parameters (pulse energy, repetition rate, and welding speed). Results showed that the formation of intermetallic brittle phases and welding defects could be effectively reduced. Strong welding quality with more than 210 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-aluminum and 175 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-magnesium has been demonstrated. A minimal heat affected zone and uniform and homogenous phase transformation in the welding region have been demonstrated. This laser-welding technique can be extended for various applications in semiconductor, automobile, aerospace, and biomedical industries.

  19. Orbital friction stir welding of aluminium pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhard, G.; Hillers, T.

    2002-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) was originally developed for flat plates. This contribution shows how it can be applied to the welding of aluminium pipes. Pipes made of AlMG 3 (EN5754), AlMg 4.5Mn (EN5083) and AlMgSi 0.5 (EN6106) with dimensions of Da 600 and 520 x 10-8 mm were welded. The FSW orbital system comprises an annular cage with integrated FSW head, a hydraulic system, and a control unit. The welds were tested successfully according to EN 288. The mechanical and technical properties of the welds were somewhat better than with the TIG orbital process, and welding times were about 40 percent shorter [de

  20. Underwater laser beam welding of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Takehisa; Tamura, Masataka; Kono, Wataru; Kawano, Shohei; Yoda, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Clacking (SCC) has been reported at Alloy 600 welds between nozzles and safe-end in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. Alloy 690, which has higher chromium content than Alloy 600, has been applied for cladding on Alloy 600 welds for repairing damaged SCC area. Toshiba has developed Underwater Laser Beam Welding technique. This method can be conducted without draining, so that the repairing period and the radiation exposure during the repair can be dramatically decreased. In some old PWRs, high-sulfur stainless steel is used as the materials for this section. It has a high susceptibility of weld cracks. Therefore, the optimum welding condition of Alloy 690 on the high-sulfur stainless steel was investigated with our Underwater Laser Beam Welding unit. Good cladding layer, without any crack, porosity or lack of fusion, could be obtained. (author)

  1. Structural degradation of heterogeneous welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Schmidová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analyses of heterogeneous weld interfaces experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the weld interface and the circumstances under which intercrystalline cracks form in the weld deposit layers. Structural analyses, chemical microanalyses and a hardness assessment were performed in order to identify the corresponding structural changes. The proportion of zonal vs. interdendritic segregation of the alloying elements in the degradation of the welded joint was distinguished. We described the nature of the structural heterogeneities produced, locally connected with the martensitic transformation. The chemical heterogeneity leading to the formation of martensite at grain boundaries was identified as the limiting effect.

  2. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  3. Infrared sensing techniques for adaptive robotic welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T.T.; Groom, K.; Madsen, N.H.; Chin, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using infrared sensors to monitor the welding process. Data was gathered using an infrared camera which was trained on the molten metal pool during the welding operation. Several types of process perturbations which result in weld defects were then intentionally induced and the resulting thermal images monitored. Gas tungsten arc using AC and DC currents and gas metal arc welding processes were investigated using steel, aluminum and stainless steel plate materials. The thermal images obtained in the three materials and different welding processes revealed nearly identical patterns for the same induced process perturbation. Based upon these results, infrared thermography is a method which may be very applicable to automation of the welding process

  4. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  5. Infrared sensing techniques for adaptive robotic welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T.T.; Groom, K.; Madsen, N.H.; Chin, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using infrared sensors to monitor the welding process. Data were gathered using an infrared camera which was trained on the molten metal pool during the welding operation. Several types of process perturbations which result in weld defects were then intentionally induced and the resulting thermal images monitored. Gas tungsten arc using ac and dc currents and gas metal arc welding processes were investigated using steel, aluminum and stainless steel plate materials. The thermal images obtained in the three materials and different welding processes revealed nearly identical patterns for the same induced process perturbation. Based upon these results, infrared thermography is a method which may be very applicable to automation of the welding process

  6. Automated Fuel Element Closure Welding System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlquist, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Automated Fuel Element Closure Welding System is a robotic device that will load and weld top end plugs onto nuclear fuel elements in a highly radioactive and inert gas environment. The system was developed at Argonne National Laboratory-West as part of the Fuel Cycle Demonstration. The welding system performs four main functions, it (1) injects a small amount of a xenon/krypton gas mixture into specific fuel elements, and (2) loads tiny end plugs into the tops of fuel element jackets, and (3) welds the end plugs to the element jackets, and (4) performs a dimensional inspection of the pre- and post-welded fuel elements. The system components are modular to facilitate remote replacement of failed parts. The entire system can be operated remotely in manual, semi-automatic, or fully automatic modes using a computer control system. The welding system is currently undergoing software testing and functional checkout

  7. Friction welded closures of waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid radioactive waste presently stored in underground tanks is to undergo a vitrifying process which will immobilize it into a solid form. This solid waste will be contained in a stainless steel canister. The canister opening requires a positive-seal weld, the properties and thickness of which must be at least equal to those of the canister material. All studies and tests performed in the work discussed in this paper have the inertia friction welding concept to be highly feasible in this application. This paper describes the decision to investigate the inertia friction welding process, the inertia friction welding process itself, and a proposed equipment design concept. This system would provide a positive, reliable, inspectable, and full-thickness seal weld while utilizing easily maintainable equipment. This high-quality weld can be achieved even in highly contaminated hot cell

  8. Friction Stir Welding of Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The friction stir welding process has been developed primarily for the welding of aluminum alloys. Other higher melting allows such, as steels are much more difficult to join. Special attention must be given to pin tool material selection and welding techniques. This paper addresses the joining of steels and other high melting point materials using the friction stir welding process. Pin tool material and welding parameters will be presented. Mechanical properties of weldments will also be presented. Significance: There are many applications for the friction stir welding process other than low melting aluminum alloys. The FSW process can be expanded for use with high melting alloys in the pressure vessel, railroad and ship building industries.

  9. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  10. The overlap between cyberbullying and traditional bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waasdorp, Tracy E; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2015-05-01

    Cyberbullying appears to be on the rise among adolescents due in part to increased access to electronic devices and less online supervision. Less is known about how cyberbullying differs from traditional bullying which occurs in person and the extent to which these two forms overlap. Our first aim was to examine the overlap of traditional bullying (relational, verbal, and physical) with cyberbullying. The second aim examined student- and school-level correlates of cyber victimization as compared to traditional victims. The final aim explored details of the cyberbullying experience (e.g., who sent the message, how was the message sent, and what was the message about). Data came from 28,104 adolescents (grades, 9-12) attending 58 high schools. Approximately 23% of the youth reported being victims of any form of bullying (cyber, relational, physical, and verbal) within the last month, with 25.6% of those victims reporting being cyberbullied. The largest proportion (50.3%) of victims reported they were victimized by all four forms, whereas only 4.6% reported being only cyberbullied. Multilevel analyses indicated that as compared to those who were only traditionally bullied, those who were cyberbullied were more likely to have externalizing (odds ratio = 1.44) and internalizing symptoms (odds ratio = 1.25). Additional analyses examined detailed characteristics of the cyberbullying experiences, indicating a relatively high level of overlap between cyber and traditional bullying. Implications for preventive interventions targeting youth involved with cyberbullying and its overlap with other forms of bullying are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Computer games in education: conflicts and overlaps!

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Nuno Sotero Alves da; Costa, Gonçalo Jorge Morais da; Pawlak, Piotr; Fonseca, Tiago Filipe Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Novel educational environments promote an increasing use of technological mash-ups, which include serious games. These games purpose is to facilitate learning and promote behavioural change, so this contribution debates their potential role into education. Beyond this traditional analysis, the authors explore the overlap between serious games and positive psychology as a way to minimise the ethical and social dilemmas of e-education which ...

  12. Binding sites analyser (BiSA: software for genomic binding sites archiving and overlap analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matloob Khushi

    Full Text Available Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding and histone modification reveals complex patterns of interactions. Identifying overlaps in binding patterns by different factors is a major objective of genomic studies, but existing methods to archive large numbers of datasets in a personalised database lack sophistication and utility. Therefore we have developed transcription factor DNA binding site analyser software (BiSA, for archiving of binding regions and easy identification of overlap with or proximity to other regions of interest. Analysis results can be restricted by chromosome or base pair overlap between regions or maximum distance between binding peaks. BiSA is capable of reporting overlapping regions that share common base pairs; regions that are nearby; regions that are not overlapping; and average region sizes. BiSA can identify genes located near binding regions of interest, genomic features near a gene or locus of interest and statistical significance of overlapping regions can also be reported. Overlapping results can be visualized as Venn diagrams. A major strength of BiSA is that it is supported by a comprehensive database of publicly available transcription factor binding sites and histone modifications, which can be directly compared to user data. The documentation and source code are available on http://bisa.sourceforge.net.

  13. A comparative study of ray tracing and CIVA simulation for ultrasonic examination of anisotropic inhomogeneous austenitic welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkoori, S. R.; Shokouhi, P.; Hoehne, C.; Rahman, M.-U.; Kreutzbruck, M.; Prager, J.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic examination of anisotropic inhomogeneous austenitic welds is challenging, because of the columnar grain structure of the weld leads to beam skewing and splitting. Modeling tools play an important role in understanding the ultrasound field propagation and optimization of experimental parameters during the ultrasonic testing of austenitic welds as well as the interpretation of the test results. In this contribution, an efficient theoretical model based on the ray tracing concepts is developed to calculate the ultrasonic fields in inhomogeneous austenitic welds quantitatively. The developed model determines the ultrasound fields by taking into account the directivity of the ray source, the inhomogenity of the weld as well as ray transmission coefficients. Directivity of the ray source in columnar grained austenitic materials (including layback orientation) is obtained in three dimensions based on Lamb's reciprocity theorem. Ray energy reflection and transmission coefficients at an interface between two general columnar grained austenitic materials are calculated in three dimensions. The ray tracing model predictions on inhomogeneous austenitic weld material are compared against those from CIVA, a commercial non-destructive modeling and simulation tool. The ultrasonic modeling tools in CIVA are based on semi-analytical solutions. For beam propagation simulation, a so-called "pencil method" is used, which involves modeling the probe as a set of individual source points, each radiating "a bundle" of diverging rays into the medium and integrating those elementary contributions. Inhomogenity in the weld region is approximated by mapping the grain orientations on weld macrograph. Simulation results for ultrasonic field profiles for an austenitic weld are shown to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results.

  14. Effects of Heat Input and Bead Generation Methods on Finite Element Analysis of Cylindrical Multi-Pass Welding Process of Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Dong; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hoon [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, a finite element analysis of a cylindrical multi-pass weldment for dissimilar metals was performed. The effects of the heat input method and weld bead generation method were considered. We compared two heat input methods: the heat flux method and the temperature method. We also compared two weld bead generation methods: the element birth method and the quiet element method. Although the results of the thermal analysis show deviations between the two heat input methods, the welding residual stresses were similar. Because the areas exposed to high temperature were similar and the strength of the material was very low in high temperature (above the 1000 ℃), the effects of the weld bead temperature were insignificant. The distributions of the welding residual stress were similar to each other. However, gaps and overlaps occurred on the welding boundary surfaces when the element birth method was applied. The quiet element method is more suitable for a large deformation model in order to simulate a more accurate weld shape.

  15. Effects of Heat Input and Bead Generation Methods on Finite Element Analysis of Cylindrical Multi-Pass Welding Process of Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won Dong; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a finite element analysis of a cylindrical multi-pass weldment for dissimilar metals was performed. The effects of the heat input method and weld bead generation method were considered. We compared two heat input methods: the heat flux method and the temperature method. We also compared two weld bead generation methods: the element birth method and the quiet element method. Although the results of the thermal analysis show deviations between the two heat input methods, the welding residual stresses were similar. Because the areas exposed to high temperature were similar and the strength of the material was very low in high temperature (above the 1000 ℃), the effects of the weld bead temperature were insignificant. The distributions of the welding residual stress were similar to each other. However, gaps and overlaps occurred on the welding boundary surfaces when the element birth method was applied. The quiet element method is more suitable for a large deformation model in order to simulate a more accurate weld shape.

  16. Boosting Active Contours for Weld Pool Visual Tracking in Automatic Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao; Fan, Zhun; Olsen, Søren Ingvor

    2015-01-01

    Detecting the shape of the non-rigid molten metal during welding, so-called weld pool visual sensing, is one of the central tasks for automating arc welding processes. It is challenging due to the strong interference of the high-intensity arc light and spatters as well as the lack of robust...

  17. Control of welding distortion during gas metal arc welding of AH36 plates by stress engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pazooki, A.M.A.; Hermans, M.J.M.; Richardson, I.M.

    2017-01-01

    Welding residual stress and distortion are strongly linked together. One of the ways to control or reduce the welding distortions is the manipulation of the generated stresses during welding, and final residual stresses exist in the workpiece (stress engineering). In this paper, the control of gas

  18. Determination of welding parameters for execution of weld overlayer on PWR nuclear reactor nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Gabriela M.; Lima, Luciana I.; Quinan, Marco A.; Schvartzman, Monica M.

    2009-01-01

    In the PWR reactors, nickel based dissimilar welds have been presented susceptibilities the stress corrosion (S C). For the mitigation the problem a deposition of weld layers on the external surface of the nozzle is an alternative, viewing to provoke the compression of the region subjected to S C. This paper presents a preliminary study on the determination of welding parameters to obtain these welding overlayers. Welding depositions were performed on a test piece welded with nickel 182 alloy, simulating the conditions of a nozzle used in a PWR nuclear power plant. The welding process was the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), and a nickel 52 alloy as addition material. The overlayers were performed on the base metals, carbon steel an stainless steel, changing the welding parameters and verifying the the time of each weld filet. After that, the samples were micro structurally characterized. The macro structures and the microstructures obtained through optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness are presented. The preliminary results make evident the good weld quality. However, a small weld parameters influence used in the base material microstructure (carbon steel and stainless steel). The obtained results in this study will be used as reference in the construction of a mock up which will simulate all the conditions of a pressurizer nozzle of PWR reactor

  19. Occupational rhinitis due to steel welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Roberto; Suarthana, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to welding fumes is a recognized respiratory hazard. Occupational asthma but not occupational rhinitis has been documented in workers exposed to steel welding fumes. We report a 26-year-old male with work-related rhinitis symptoms as well as lower airways symptoms suggestive of occupational asthma and metal fume fever associated with exposure to steel welding fumes. The diagnosis of occupational rhinitis was confirmed by specific inhalation challenge. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. STRUCTURAL DEGRADATION OF HETEROGENEOUS WELDED JOINTS

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Schmidová

    2012-01-01

    Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analysis of heterogeneous weld joints experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the fusion line and the circumstances under which interc...

  1. Numerical methods in simulation of resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Zhang, Wenqi

    2015-01-01

    Finite element simulation of resistance welding requires coupling betweenmechanical, thermal and electrical models. This paper presents the numerical models and theircouplings that are utilized in the computer program SORPAS. A mechanical model based onthe irreducible flow formulation is utilized...... a resistance welding point of view, the most essential coupling between the above mentioned models is the heat generation by electrical current due to Joule heating. The interaction between multiple objects is anothercritical feature of the numerical simulation of resistance welding because it influences...

  2. THE WELDING INDUSTRY IN BILIRAN PROVINCE, PHILIPPINES

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos P. Garcia*, Noel P. Tancinco

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the status of the welding industry in Biliran Province. Findings of the study highlighted in detail the characteristics of the welding shops, their owners, problems encountered, future plans, and their service status through the years. Facilities of the welding shops were moderately available (OWM=3.3); and supplies and materials were available (OWM=3.4). Shop personnel were sufficient (OWM=3.5); and location of shops was generally much accessible. Working capital of major...

  3. Smaller Coaxial-View Welding Torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangl, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Coaxial-view torch for gas/tungsten arc welding has only two-thirds length and width of its predecessor. Shape and size similar to that of commercial arc-welding torch (Linde HW-27 or equivalent), even though it contains lens system. Collet that holds electrode has unique design allowing greater passage of light. Used in small spaces previously inaccessible, also introduced into production welding operations with minimum of disturbance.

  4. Vacuum Deposition From A Welding Torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    Process derived from arc welding produces films of high quality. Modified gas/tungsten-arc welding process developed for use in outer space. Welding apparatus in process includes hollow tungsten electrode through which inert gas flows so arc struck between electrode and workpiece in vacuum of space. Offers advantages of fast deposition, possibility of applying directional impetus to flow of materials, very low pressure at surface being coated, and inert environment.

  5. Vertical overlap of probability density functions of cloud and precipitation hydrometeors: CLOUD AND PRECIPITATION PDF OVERLAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Lim, Kyo-Sun Sunny [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon Republic of Korea; Larson, Vincent E. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee Wisconsin USA; Wong, May [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Thayer-Calder, Katherine [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Ghan, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-11-05

    Coarse-resolution climate models increasingly rely on probability density functions (PDFs) to represent subgrid-scale variability of prognostic variables. While PDFs characterize the horizontal variability, a separate treatment is needed to account for the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. When sub-columns are drawn from these PDFs for microphysics or radiation parameterizations, appropriate vertical correlations must be enforced via PDF overlap specifications. This study evaluates the representation of PDF overlap in the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS) employed in the assumed PDF turbulence and cloud scheme called the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB). PDF overlap in CLUBB-SILHS simulations of continental and tropical oceanic deep convection is compared with overlap of PDF of various microphysics variables in cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of the same cases that explicitly predict the 3D structure of cloud and precipitation fields. CRM results show that PDF overlap varies significantly between different hydrometeor types, as well as between PDFs of mass and number mixing ratios for each species, - a distinction that the current SILHS implementation does not make. In CRM simulations that explicitly resolve cloud and precipitation structures, faster falling species, such as rain and graupel, exhibit significantly higher coherence in their vertical distributions than slow falling cloud liquid and ice. These results suggest that to improve the overlap treatment in the sub-column generator, the PDF correlations need to depend on hydrometeor properties, such as fall speeds, in addition to the currently implemented dependency on the turbulent convective length scale.

  6. Numerical and experimental study of heat transfers in an arc plasma. Application to TIG arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borel, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The arc welding is used for many industrial applications, especially GTA welding. Given the excellent quality of the produced welds, GTA welding is used for the majority of the interventions (repairs, joined sealing) on the French nuclear park. This work is part of a project carried out by EDF R and D which aims to simulate the whole process and builds a tool able to predict the welds quality. In this study, we focus on the development of a predictive model of the exchanged heat flux at the arc - work piece interface, responsible of the work piece fusion. The modeling of the arc plasma using the electric module of the hydrodynamics software Code Saturne R developed by EDF R and D is required. Two types of experimental tests are jointly carried out to validate this numerical model: i) on density and temperature measurements of plasma by atomic emission spectroscopy and ii) on the evaluation of the heat transfers on the work piece surface. This work also aims at demonstrate that the usual method of using an equivalent thermal source to model the welding process, can be replaced by our plasma model, without the numerous trials inherent to the usual method. (author)

  7. Improving Fatigue Performance of AHSS Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Kelly, Steve [ArcelorMittal USA; Hou, Wenkao [ArcelorMittal USA; Yan, Benda [ArcelorMittal USA; Wang, Zhifeng [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Yu, Zhenzhen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Liu, Stephen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden

    2015-03-01

    Reported herein is technical progress on a U.S. Department of Energy CRADA project with industry cost-share aimed at developing the technical basis and demonstrate the viability of innovative in-situ weld residual stresses mitigation technology that can substantially improve the weld fatigue performance and durability of auto-body structures. The developed technology would be costeffective and practical in high-volume vehicle production environment. Enhancing weld fatigue performance would address a critical technology gap that impedes the widespread use of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and other lightweight materials for auto body structure light-weighting. This means that the automotive industry can take full advantage of the AHSS in strength, durability and crashworthiness without the concern of the relatively weak weld fatigue performance. The project comprises both technological innovations in weld residual stress mitigation and due-diligence residual stress measurement and fatigue performance evaluation. Two approaches were investigated. The first one was the use of low temperature phase transformation (LTPT) weld filler wire, and the second focused on novel thermo-mechanical stress management technique. Both technical approaches have resulted in considerable improvement in fatigue lives of welded joints made of high-strength steels. Synchrotron diffraction measurement confirmed the reduction of high tensile weld residual stresses by the two weld residual stress mitigation techniques.

  8. Mechanical behaviour of dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escaravage, C.

    1990-01-01

    This report addresses the problems of dissimilar metal welds connecting an austenitic stainless steel component to a ferritic steel component. In LMFBRs such welds appear at the junction of the austenitic stainless steel vessel with the ferritic steel roof and in sodium and water or steam pipes. The latter are exposed to high temperatures in the creep range. A wide range of austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels (carbon steels, low allow steels and alloy steels) are covered; the study encompasses more than 20 different weld metals (austenitic stainless steels and nickel base alloys). The report begins with a presentation of the materials, geometries and welding procedures treated in the study, followed by a review of service experience from examinations of dissimilar metal welds after elevated temperature service, in particular failed welds. Results of laboratory tests performed for reproducing service failures are then discussed. A further section is devoted to a review of test results on fatigue behaviour and impact toughness for dissimilar metal welded joints when creep is not significant. Finally, the problem of residual life assessment is addressed. A set of recommendations concludes the report. They concern the material selection, welding procedure, life prediction and testing of dissimilar metal welds. 84 refs

  9. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  10. Protection of welded joints against corrosion degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Welded joints form an integral part of steel constructions. Welded joints are undetachable joints, which are however subjects of corrosion processes. The internal energy increases during the fusion welding especially in the heat affected places around the welded joint, which become initiating spot of corrosion degradation.The aim of the experiment is to put a welded joint produced by the MAG method to a test of corrosion degradation under the conditions of the norm ČSN ISO 9227 (salt-spray test. Organic and inorganic anticorrosion protections were applied on welded beads. First of all, there were prepared welded beads using the method MAG; secondly, metallographical analyses of welded metal, heat affected places and base material were processed. Further, microhardness as well as analysis of chemical composition using the EDS microscope were analysed. Based on a current trend in anticorrosion protections, there were chosen three types of protective coatings. First protective system was a double-layer synthetic system, where the base layer is formed by paint Pragroprimer S2000 and the upper layer by finishing paint Industrol S 2013. Second protective system is a duplex system formed by a combination of a base zinc coating with Zinorex paint. The last protective system was formed by zinc dipping only. Corrosion resistance of the individual tested samples was evaluated based on degradation of protective coating. The corrosion origin as well as the corrosion process were observed, the main criteria was the observation of welded bead.

  11. Welding of structural components and vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    'Welding of structural components and vessels' was chosen as the guiding topic for the 17th special conference in Munich so that current problems of this important area of application for welding engineering could be discussed in detail. The following topics were in the focus of the discussions: developments in steel, steel production and steel processing, reports on the practical application of welding in the manufacture of containers and pipes, quality assurance, product liability, safety considerations regarding creep-stressed components, problems of welding in large structures. 7 of the total number of 12 contributions were recorded separately for the data base ENERGY. (orig./MM) [de

  12. Study of the Zircaloy-2 welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Solano, R.; Jimenez Moreno, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    After a bibliographical analysis of the Zircaloy-2 properties its welding was approached. The selected procedure is the TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) d.c. arc-welding under an inert atmosphere vessel. A detailed description of the equipment and characteristics is given. During the tests two types of argon were used: one with 96 ppm. Impurities, the other with 7 ppm- impurities. It is al so mentioned the welding in helium atmosphere. The contamination of the welding was evaluated through hardness testing. (Author) 3 refs

  13. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  14. Nd:YAG laser welding aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, E. Jr.

    1992-02-01

    Autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding wrought 4047, 1100, 3003, 2219, 5052, 5086, 5456, and 6061 and cast A356 aluminum alloys to cast A356 aluminum alloy in restrained annular weld joints was investigated. The welds were 12.7 mm (0.375 in.) and 9.5 mm (0.375 in.) diameter with approximately 0.30 mm (0.012 in.) penetration. This investigation determined 4047 aluminum alloy to be the optimum alloy for autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding to cast A356 aluminum alloy. This report describes the investigation and its results.

  15. A processing circuit for overlapped pulse signals for a thermal neutron coincidence counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chul-Yong; Lee, Tae-hoon; Kim, Ho-dong

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a processing circuit for overlapped pulse signals. The overlapped pulse signals are generated when the pulse signals of a He-3 detector, by using a neutron coincidence counter, are connected to shift register coincidence electronics by an OR gate device. The developed circuit detects the overlapped pulse signals from among four input signals and produces new 50 ns pulse wide signals. We considered a case where two pulse signals are simultaneously overlapped among four signals. This circuit was tested with an ACP safeguards neutron counter (ASNC) for an advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) and a 252 Cf neutron source at high rates. The loss rate of the output signal was reduced by 1.27% for singles and 4.75% for doubles when compared with the OR gate device. Also the variation for the triples was much bigger.

  16. A processing circuit for overlapped pulse signals for a thermal neutron coincidence counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a processing circuit for overlapped pulse signals. The overlapped pulse signals are generated when the pulse signals of a He-3 detector, by using a neutron coincidence counter, are connected to shift register coincidence electronics by an OR gate device. The developed circuit detects the overlapped pulse signals from among four input signals and produces new 50 ns pulse wide signals. We considered a case where two pulse signals are simultaneously overlapped among four signals. This circuit was tested with an ACP safeguards neutron counter (ASNC) for an advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) and a (252)Cf neutron source at high rates. The loss rate of the output signal was reduced by 1.27% for singles and 4.75% for doubles when compared with the OR gate device. Also the variation for the triples was much bigger.

  17. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  18. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR.

  19. Occupational urticaria from welding polyurethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanerva, L.; Estlander, T.; Jolanki, R.; Laehteenmaeki, M.T.Ke.; Keskinen, H. (Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland))

    1991-05-01

    An urticarial reaction associated with high fever developed in a welder on four occasions while he was welding steel profiles filled with polyurethane. The fumes emitted during pyrolysis of polyurethane and inhaled by the patient probably caused the urticarial reaction. Provocation tests with two pyrolysis products, 4,4-diphenylmethane diisocyanate and 4,4-diaminophenylmethane, were negative. This case demonstrates the difficulty in detecting the cause of urticaria induced by airborne chemicals.

  20. Analysis of Thermo-Elastic Fracture Problem during Aluminium Alloy MIG Welding Using the Extended Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuanfang He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-elastic fracture problem and equations are established for aluminium alloy Metal Inert Gas (MIG welding, which include a moving heat source and a thermoelasticity equation with the initial and boundary conditions for a plate structure with a crack. The extended finite element method (XFEM is implemented to solve the thermo-elastic fracture problem of a plate structure with a crack under the effect of a moving heat source. The combination of the experimental measurement and simulation of the welding temperature field is done to verify the model and solution method. The numerical cases of the thermomechanical parameters and stress intensity factors (SIFs of the plate structure in the welding heating and cooling processes are investigated. The research results provide reference data and an approach for the analysis of the thermomechanical characteristics of the welding process.