WorldWideScience

Sample records for source management regulatory

  1. The regulatory actions in the management of disuse radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, W.A.; Cordoba, M.F.; Poletti, M.; Calabria, M.A.; Pirez, C.

    2010-01-01

    During the last years, different incidents related to the discovery of inadvertent radioactive material have been reported through the international information systems available. From the analysis of the information received it can be concluded that those situations are derived from the inadequate application of concepts such as 'safety culture' and 'risk perception' or inadequate physical safety measures towards radioactive sources by the licensee. Among the activities that the regulators perform during the use of radioactive material, the most important are the ones related to avoiding the existence of disused radioactive sources. In this regard, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) has implemented, through its Standards, regulatory mechanisms to adequately control and dispose of radioactive material. Concerning this matter, actions were taken in Argentina with the aim of disposing or keeping the custody in an authorized long term storage of every radioactive source used to measure thickness, humidity, level, weight, etc. that remained within the facilities without use and/or a suitable program to be reutilized within a period larger than six months. The objective of the present piece of work is to present the analysis and results of the actions fulfilled between 2002 and 2009, giving details about the regulatory activities performed in relation to the disposal and withdrawal of radioactive sources and the physical safety measures taken. (authors) [es

  2. Regulatory Oversight of Radioactive Sources through the Integrated Management of Safety and Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) has full regulatory competence; its mission is to oversee the safety and security of all the peaceful applications of atomic energy. All the radioactive sources having activity above the exemption level is registered and licensed both from safety and security points of view. The Hungarian central register of radioactive sources contains about 7,000 radioactive sources and 450 license holders. In order to use its limited resources the HAEA has decided to introduce an integrated regulatory oversight programme. Accordingly, during the licensing process and inspection activities the HAEA intends to assess both safety and security aspects at the same time. The article describes the Hungarian the various applications of radioactive materials, and summarizes the preparation activities of the HAEA. (author)

  3. Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This Safety Guide is intended to assist States in implementing the requirements established in Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1, Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, for a national regulatory infrastructure to regulate any practice involving radiation sources in medicine, industry, research, agriculture and education. The Safety Guide provides advice on the legislative basis for establishing regulatory bodies, including the effective independence of the regulatory body. It also provides guidance on implementing the functions and activities of regulatory bodies: the development of regulations and guides on radiation safety; implementation of a system for notification and authorization; carrying out regulatory inspections; taking necessary enforcement actions; and investigating accidents and circumstances potentially giving rise to accidents. The various aspects relating to the regulatory control of consumer products are explained, including justification, optimization of exposure, safety assessment and authorization. Guidance is also provided on the organization and staffing of regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Legal framework for a regulatory infrastructure; 3. Principal functions and activities of the regulatory body; 4. Regulatory control of the supply of consumer products; 5. Functions of the regulatory body shared with other governmental agencies; 6. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body; 7. Documentation of the functions and activities of the regulatory body; 8. Support services; 9. Quality management for the regulatory system.

  4. Regulatory control of radiation sources in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxtova, L.

    2001-01-01

    In Slovakia, there are two regulatory authorities. Regulatory control of the utilization of nuclear energy, based on the Slovak National Council's law No. 130/1998 on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, is exercised by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic. The second regulatory authority - the Ministry of Health - is empowered by law No. 72/1994 on the protection of human health to license radiation sources and is responsible for radiation protection supervision (there are nearly 3000 establishments with sealed sources, radiation generators and unsealed sources in Slovakia). Pursuant to a new radiation protection regulation based on international standards, radiation sources are to be categorized in six classes according to the associated exposure and contamination hazards. A national strategy for improving the safety of radiation sources over their life-cycle and for the management of disused and orphan sources is being prepared for governmental approval. (author)

  5. Managing Regulatory Body Competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, the IAEA published TECDOC 1254, which examined the way in which the recognized functions of a regulatory body for nuclear facilities results in competence needs. Using the systematic approach to training (SAT), TECDOC 1254 provided a framework for regulatory bodies for managing training and developing and their maintaining their competence. It has been successfully used by many regulators. The IAEA has also introduced a methodology and an assessment tool - Guidelines for Systematic Assessment of Regulatory Competence Needs (SARCoN) - which provides practical guidance on analysing the training and development needs of a regulatory body and, through a gap analysis, guidance on establishing competence needs and how to meet them. In 2009, the IAEA established a steering committee (supported by a bureau) with the mission to advise the IAEA on how it could best assist Member States to develop suitable competence management systems for their regulatory bodies. The committee recommended the development of a safety report on managing staff competence as an integral part of a regulatory body's management system. This Safety Report was developed in response to this request. It supersedes TECDOC 1254, broadens its application to regulatory bodies for all facilities and activities, and builds upon the experience gained through the application of TECDOC 1254 and SARCoN and the feedback received from Member States. This Safety Report applies to the management of adequate competence as needs change, and as such is equally applicable to the needs of States 'embarking' on a nuclear power programme. It also deals with the special case of building up the competence of regulatory bodies as part of the overall process of establishing an 'embarking' State's regulatory system

  6. Sources management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoux, H.; Gourmelon; Scanff, P.; Fournet, F.; Murith, Ch.; Saint-Paul, N.; Colson, P.; Jouve, A.; Feron, F.; Haranger, D.; Mathieu, P.; Paycha, F.; Israel, S.; Auboiroux, B.; Chartier, P.

    2005-01-01

    Organized by the section of technical protection of the French society of radiation protection ( S.F.R.P.), these two days had for objective to review the evolution of the rule relative to the sources of ionising radiations 'sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, electric generators'. They addressed all the actors concerned by the implementation of the new regulatory system in the different sectors of activities ( research, medicine and industry): Authorities, manufacturers, and suppliers of sources, holders and users, bodies involved in the approval of sources, carriers. (N.C.)

  7. Management systems for regulatory authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mpandanyama, Rujeko Lynette

    2015-02-01

    For a regulatory body to fulfil its statutory obligations, there is need to develop and implement a regulatory management system that has the necessary arrangements for achieving and maintaining high quality performance in regulating the safety of nuclear and radiation facilities under its authority. Hence, the regulatory management system needs to fully integrate the human resources, processes and physical resources of the organization. This study sought to provide an understanding of the concept, principles, policies and fundamentals of management systems as they relate to regulatory systems in the field of radiation protection and to make appropriate recommendations to ensure that an effective management system exists for the control of ionizing radiation and radiation sources and addresses all relevant stakeholders in Zimbabwe. A comparative analysis was done on the current management status and the ideal management system, which led to the identification of the gaps existing. The main key that was found to be of significance was lack of linkages between processes and management tools within the institution. (au)

  8. Management of the Regulatory Authority Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suman, H.

    2003-01-01

    Safe Management of the Regulatory Authority Information is one of the essential elements to ensure the effectiveness of the regulatory program as a whole. This paper briefly describes the information management basis in RNRO, which is in charge of the regulatory authority tasks in Syria. SINA-2, a computational tool prepared in RNRO for managing the information related to the inventory of radiation sources and users, is also introduced

  9. Radioactive waste management regulatory framework in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcenas, M.; Mejia, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the current regulatory framework concerning the radioactive waste management in Mexico. It is intended to show regulatory historical antecedents, the legal responsibilities assigned to institutions involved in the radioactive waste management, the sources of radioactive waste, and the development and preparation of national standards for fulfilling the legal framework for low level radioactive waste. It is at present the most important matter to be resolved. (author)

  10. Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources. Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This Safety Guide is intended to assist States in implementing the requirements established in Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1, Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, for a national regulatory infrastructure to regulate any practice involving radiation sources in medicine, industry, research, agriculture and education. The Safety Guide provides advice on the legislative basis for establishing regulatory bodies, including the effective independence of the regulatory body. It also provides guidance on implementing the functions and activities of regulatory bodies: the development of regulations and guides on radiation safety; implementation of a system for notification and authorization; carrying out regulatory inspections; taking necessary enforcement actions; and investigating accidents and circumstances potentially giving rise to accidents. The various aspects relating to the regulatory control of consumer products are explained, including justification, optimization of exposure, safety assessment and authorization. Guidance is also provided on the organization and staffing of regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Legal framework for a regulatory infrastructure; 3. Principal functions and activities of the regulatory body; 4. Regulatory control of the supply of consumer products; 5. Functions of the regulatory body shared with other governmental agencies; 6. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body; 7. Documentation of the functions and activities of the regulatory body; 8. Support services; 9. Quality management for the regulatory system.

  11. Regulatory control of radiation sources. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The basic requirements for the protection of persons against exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources were established in the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Basic Safety Standards), jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/ NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) (the Sponsoring Organizations). The application of the Basic Safety Standards is based on the presumption that national infrastructures are in place to enable governments to discharge their responsibilities for radiation protection and safety. Requirements relating to the legal and governmental infrastructure for the safety of nuclear facilities and sources of ionizing radiation, radiation protection, the safe management of radioactive waste and the safe transport of radioactive material are established in the Safety Requirements on Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1. This Safety Guide, which is jointly sponsored by the FAO, the IAEA, the International Labour Office, the PAHO and the WHO, gives detailed guidance on the key elements for the organization and operation of a national regulatory infrastructure for radiation safety, with particular reference to the functions of the national regulatory body that are necessary to ensure the implementation of the Basic Safety Standards. The Safety Guide is based technically on material first published in IAEA-TECDOC-10671, which was jointly sponsored by the FAO, the IAEA, the OECD/NEA, the PAHO and the WHO. The requirements established in GS-R-1 have been taken into account. The Safety Guide is oriented towards national

  12. Management of 'orphan' sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telleria, D.; Spano, F.; Rudelli, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The experience has shown that most of the accidents with severe radiological consequences take place when radioactive sources were beyond the control system. In Argentina, the primary framework in radiological safety was established in the late fifties, with a non-prescriptive regulatory approach. For any application involving radioactive material, users must be authorised by the Authority, unless the application has demonstrated to be exempted. The licensees are responsible for ensuring protection against the risk associated with exposure to radiation, and for safety of radioactive sources. To obtain an authorisation, the applicant has to prove to the Authority knowledge and capability to carry on an application. Not only normal operation circumstances are considered, but every conceivable accidental situation. It has been shown the existence of radioactive sources not attributed to an authorised user or installation, and therefore outside of the primary control structure described above. These sources, from here on called 'orphans' recognise several origins. The regulatory authority should necessary foresee mechanisms to afford early detection and management of these sources, before an undesired consequence arises. Up to some extent, the deployment of multiple and varied organisations or procedures, could be understood as a 'defence in depth' concept, applied to the control. (author)

  13. Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data Inventory data asset contains measured summary compliance information on light-duty, heavy-duty, and non-road...

  14. Optimizing critical source control of five priority-regulatory trace elements from industrial wastewater in China: Implications for health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjun; Wang, Jinnan; Yu, Yang; Jiang, Hongqiang; Liu, Nianlei; Bi, Jun; Liu, Miaomiao

    2018-04-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of toxic trace elements (TEs) have caused worldwide concern due to their adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. Based on a stochastic simulation of factors' probability distribution, we established a bottom-up model to estimate the amounts of five priority-regulatory TEs released to aquatic environments from industrial processes in China. Total TE emissions in China in 2010 were estimated at approximately 2.27 t of Hg, 310.09 t of As, 318.17 t of Pb, 79.72 t of Cd, and 1040.32 t of Cr. Raw chemicals, smelting, and mining were the leading sources of TE emissions. There are apparent regional differences in TE pollution. TE emissions are much higher in eastern and central China than in the western provinces and are higher in the south than in the north. This spatial distribution was characterized in detail by allocating the emissions to 10 km × 10 km grid cells. Furthermore, the risk control for the overall emission grid was optimized according to each cell's emission and risk rank. The results show that to control 80% of TE emissions from major sources, the number of top-priority control cells would be between 200 and 400, and less than 10% of the total population would be positively affected. Based on TE risk rankings, decreasing the population weighted risk would increase the number of controlled cells by a factor of 0.3-0.5, but the affected population would increase by a factor of 0.8-1.5. In this case, the adverse effects on people's health would be reduced significantly. Finally, an optimized strategy to control TE emissions is proposed in terms of a cost-benefit trade-off. The estimates in this paper can be used to help establish a regional TE inventory and cyclic simulation, and it can also play supporting roles in minimizing TE health risks and maximizing resilience. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulatory Control of Radioactive Sources in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M.; Martin, J.L., E-mail: mrm@csn.es [Nuclear Safety Council, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    The arrangements for the regulatory control of the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources in Spain are described. Emphasis is given to the situations which are most likely to result in the loss of control of sources and on the procedures introduced to reduce the likelihood of losses in these cases. Finally, the strategy for locating sources which have been lost from control (orphan sources) is described. (author)

  16. Regulatory aspects of sludge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharples, F.E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of radioactive waste land disposal restrictions by discussing the following topics: highlights of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act history; purposes of land disposal restrictions; regulatory definition of land disposal; US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) implementation of land disposal restrictions; schedules for implementing land disposal restrictions; solvent and dioxin wastes; classification of liquid hazardous and radioactive wastes; generator and treatment, storage, and disposal responsibilities; variances and extensions; and options for mixed waste management. Land disposal restrictions take into account the long-term uncertainties associated with land disposal, the need to manage waste right the first time they are disposed, and the persistence toxicity, mobility, propensity to bioaccumulate, and volume. In the Department of Energy system land disposal restrictions affect mixed waste management and site remedial action programs

  17. The regulatory function in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, A.; Pescatore, C.

    2008-01-01

    Allan Duncan, expert to NEA and former Chief Inspector for Pollution (United Kingdom), elaborated on the regulatory function in the domain of radioactive waste management. The preparation of a document and a brochure on the subject has been one of the main tasks of the Regulators' Forum since its creation in 2001. He stressed that management of NORM waste was generally subject to different standards than similar radioactive waste from a nuclear source, for no obvious reason than that of public perception. He also pointed out the large number of 'regulatory bodies' involved in the regulation of radioactive waste management facilities and particularly geological disposal facilities, and their links to the Government. He gave the example of the United Kingdom. He stressed the fact that, since there will not be continuous control, licensing of geological disposal is an act of trust in the regulatory system. A. Duncan gave the position of two Commissions in England on deep geological disposal. The UK Sustainable Development Commission says, 'it is impossible to guarantee safety over long-term disposal of (nuclear) waste' which implies that nuclear fission power should be shut down; CoRWM, the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management, recommends instead geological disposal for existing wastes as a broadly acceptable solution. As a concluding remark A. Duncan focused the attention on the general question of what current society needs to do in order to meet its obligations to future generations with respect to disposal of long-lived wastes. (authors)

  18. Regulatory Information by Topic: Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulatory information about emergencies, including chemical accident prevention, risk management plans (RMPs), chemical reporting, community right to know, and oil spills and hazardous substances releases.

  19. Sealed radioactive source management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources have been used in a wide range of application in medicine, agriculture, geology, industry and other fields. Since its utilization many sources have become out of use and became waste but no proper management. This has lead to many accidents causing deaths and serious radiation injuries worldwide. Spent sources application is expanding but their management has seen little improvements. Sealed radioactive sources have become a security risk calling for prompt action. Source management helps to maintain sources in a good physical status and provide means of source tracking and control. It also provides a well documented process of the sources making any future management options safe, secure and cost effective. Last but not least good source management substantially reduces the risk of accidents and eliminates the risk of malicious use. The International Atomic Energy Agency assists Member States to build the infrastructure to properly manage sealed radioactive sources. The assistance includes training of national experts to handle, condition and properly store the sources. For Member States that do not have proper facilities, we provide the technical assistance to design a proper facility to properly manage the radioactive sources and provide for their proper storage. For Member States that need to condition their sources properly but don't have the required infrastructure we provide direct assistance to physically help them with source recovery and provide an international expert team to properly condition their sources and render them safe and secure. We offer software (Radioactive Waste Management Registry) to properly keep a complete record on the sources and provide for efficient tracking. This also helps with proper planning and decision making for long term management

  20. The regulatory control of radiation sources in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Birol, E.

    2001-01-01

    In Turkey, the national competent authority for regulating activities involving radioactive sources is the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, which implements the responsibility for the safety and security of radiation sources through its Radiation Health and Safety Department. The report describes the organization of the regulatory infrastructure for radiation safety in Turkey and, after a brief explanation of the current legal framework for such purpose, it refers to how the management of radiation sources is carried out and to the new provisions regarding radiation sources, including inspections of licensees and training on source safety. Finally, the report provides information on the Ikitelli radiological accident in Turkey and the current public concern about radiation sources after it happened. (author)

  1. Regulatory control, nuclear safety regulation and waste management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.

    2000-01-01

    This article presents the challenges that faces the spanish regulatory authority. The deregulation of electricity industry imposes severe changes in nuclear power economics and forces nuclear power to compete with other sources of electricity. A pressure is perceived for regulatory effectiveness primarily since the cost of regulation is a component of the cost of the product. This effectiveness gain in regulatory control will be reached through systematic strategic analysis, formulation and implementation. The regulatory aspects of plant life extension and of waste management are examined

  2. Safe management of spent radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso; Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Valdezco, E.M.; Choi, Kwang-Sub

    2003-01-01

    Presented are 8 investigation reports concerning the safe management of spent radiation source (SRS) during the current 2 years. Four reports from Japan are: Scheme for SRS management (approach and present status of the SRS management and consideration toward solving problems); Current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) activities related to safety of radiation sources (Chronology of action plan development, Outline of revised action plan, and Asian regional activities); Current status of SRS management in Japan (Regulation system, Obligations of licensed users, Regulatory system on sealed sources, Status in the incidents on sources occurred, Incident of source loss, and Incidents of orphan sources); and SRS management system in Japan (Current status of using of sealed sources, collection system of SRS-Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) services, and Disposal of SRS). Four reports from the Asian countries also concern the current statuses of SRS management in the Philippine (Radioactive waste sources, Waste management strategies, Conditioning of Ra sources, Ra project action plan, as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) program, Dose assessment, Regulations on radioactive waste, Action plan on the safety and security of sources, IAEA Regional Demonstration Centers, and sitting studies for a near surface disposal facility); Thailand (Current status of using sealed sources, Inventory of SRS, and Current topics of SRS management); Indonesia (Principles of management of radiation sources, Legislative framework of SRS management practices, Regulatory on SRS, management of sealed SRS, management hurdles, and reported incidents); and Korea (Regulatory frame work, Collection systems of SRS, Radioisotope waste generation, Radiation exposure incident, and Scrap monitoring system). (N.I.)

  3. [Source data management in clinical researches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Effie; Yao, Chen; Zhang, Zi-bao; Liu, Yu-xiu

    2015-11-01

    Source data and its source documents are the foundation of clinical research. Proper source data management plays an essential role for compliance with regulatory and GCP requirements. Both paper and electronic source data co-exist in China. Due to the increasing use of electronic technology in pharmaceutical and health care industry, electronic data source becomes an upcoming trend with clear advantages. To face new opportunities and to ensure data integrity, quality and traceability from source data to regulatory submission, this document demonstrates important concepts, principles and best practices during managing source data. It includes but not limited to: (1) important concepts of source data (e.g., source data originator, source data elements, source data identifier for audit trail, etc.); (2) various modalities of source data collection in paper and electronic methods (e.g., paper CRF, EDC, Patient Report Outcomes/eCOA, etc.); (3) seven main principles recommended in the aspect of data collection, traceability, quality standards, access control, quality control, certified copy and security during source data management; (4) a life cycle from source data creation to obsolete is used as an example to illustrate consideration and implementation of source data management.

  4. Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data Inventory data asset contains measured summary compliance information on light-duty, heavy-duty, and non-road engine manufacturers by model, as well as fee payment data required by Title II of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act, to certify engines for sale in the U.S. and collect compliance certification fees. Data submitted by manufacturers falls into 12 industries: Heavy Duty Compression Ignition, Marine Spark Ignition, Heavy Duty Spark Ignition, Marine Compression Ignition, Snowmobile, Motorcycle & ATV, Non-Road Compression Ignition, Non-Road Small Spark Ignition, Light-Duty, Evaporative Components, Non-Road Large Spark Ignition, and Locomotive. Title II also requires the collection of fees from manufacturers submitting for compliance certification. Manufacturers submit data on an annual basis, to document engine model changes for certification. Manufacturers also submit compliance information on already certified in-use vehicles randomly selected by the EPA (1) year into their life and (4) years into their life to ensure that emissions systems continue to function appropriately over time.The EPA performs targeted confirmatory tests on approximately 15% of vehicles submitted for certification. Confirmatory data on engines is associated with its corresponding submission data to verify the accuracy of manufacturer submission beyond standard business rules.Section 209 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clea

  5. Sources management; La gestion des sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansoux, H.; Gourmelon; Scanff, P.; Fournet, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Murith, Ch. [Office Federal de la SantePublique (Switzerland); Saint-Paul, N. [NOVAR, 75 - Paris (France); Colson, P. [Electricite de France (EDF/DPN), 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Jouve, A.; Feron, F. [Direction Generale de al Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France); Haranger, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Mathieu, P. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France); Paycha, F. [CHU Louis Mourier, Unitede Medecine Nucleaire Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, 92 - Colombes (France); Israel, S. [CEGELEC NDT et la gestion des sources radioactives (France); Auboiroux, B. [APAVE (France); Chartier, P. [DRIRE de Basse-Normandie, Div. Surete Nucleaire et Radioprotection, 14 - Caen (France)

    2005-07-01

    Organized by the section of technical protection of the French society of radiation protection ( S.F.R.P.), these two days had for objective to review the evolution of the rule relative to the sources of ionising radiations 'sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, electric generators'. They addressed all the actors concerned by the implementation of the new regulatory system in the different sectors of activities ( research, medicine and industry): Authorities, manufacturers, and suppliers of sources, holders and users, bodies involved in the approval of sources, carriers. (N.C.)

  6. The regulatory control of radioactive sources in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojkind, Roberto Hector [Autoridade Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-12-31

    Argentina has been conducting nuclear activities for more than forty years, and as early as in 1956 established a Regulatory Authority. Procedures for compliance monitoring and enforcement have been in use in the regulatory control of radioactive sources, and regulatory standards and regulations had been set in Argentina, before the accident in Goiania. The conclusions drawn from that accident encouraged in Argentina the improvement of some regulatory procedures and helped to enhance the quality of the regulatory process. Therefore, the effectiveness of the control of spent radioactive sources has gradually increased, and enforcement actions to prevent radioactive sources ending up in the public domain improved. Some lessons learned in Argentina from the accident in Goiania and the main characteristics of an effective enforcement program helpful to prevent radiological accidents in industrial, medical, research and teaching uses of radioactive sources are presented. (author) 9 refs; e-mail: rrojkind at sede.arn.gov.br

  7. The regulatory control of radioactive sources in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojkind, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    Argentina has been conducting nuclear activities for more than forty years, and had established a Regulatory Authority as early as in 1956. Procedures for compliance monitoring and enforcement have been in use in the regulatory control of radioactive sources, and regulatory standards and regulations were in force in Argentina before the accident in Goiania. The conclusions drawn from the Goiania accident encouraged the Argentine authorities to improve some regulatory procedures and helped to enhance the quality of the regulatory process. As a result, the effectiveness of the control of spent radioactive sources has gradually increased, and enforcement actions to prevent radioactive sources ending up in the public domain have improved. Lessons learned in Argentina from the accident in Goiania are presented as well as the main characteristics of an effective enforcement programme to prevent radiological accidents when radioactive sources are used for industrial, medical, research and teaching purposes. (author)

  8. The regulatory control of radioactive sources in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojkind, Roberto Hector

    1997-01-01

    Argentina has been conducting nuclear activities for more than forty years, and as early as in 1956 established a Regulatory Authority. Procedures for compliance monitoring and enforcement have been in use in the regulatory control of radioactive sources, and regulatory standards and regulations had been set in Argentina, before the accident in Goiania. The conclusions drawn from that accident encouraged in Argentina the improvement of some regulatory procedures and helped to enhance the quality of the regulatory process. Therefore, the effectiveness of the control of spent radioactive sources has gradually increased, and enforcement actions to prevent radioactive sources ending up in the public domain improved. Some lessons learned in Argentina from the accident in Goiania and the main characteristics of an effective enforcement program helpful to prevent radiological accidents in industrial, medical, research and teaching uses of radioactive sources are presented. (author)

  9. Mission Risk Reduction Regulatory Change Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division supports NASA's mission to pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery, and aeronautics research by integrating environmental considerations into programs and projects early-on, thereby proactively reducing NASA's exposure to institutional, programmatic and operational risk. As part of this effort, NASA established the Principal Center for Regulatory Risk Analysis and Communication (RRAC PC) as a resource for detecting, analyzing, and communicating environmental regulatory risks to the NASA stakeholder community. The RRAC PC focuses on detecting emerging environmental regulations and other operational change drivers that may pose risks to NASA programs and facilities, and effectively communicating the potential risks. For example, regulatory change may restrict how and where certain activities or operations may be conducted. Regulatory change can also directly affect the ability to use certain materials by mandating a production phase-out or restricting usage applications of certain materials. Regulatory change can result in significant adverse impacts to NASA programs and facilities due to NASA's stringent performance requirements for materials and components related to human-rated space vehicles. Even if a regulation does not directly affect NASA operations, U.S. and international regulations can pose program risks indirectly through requirements levied on manufacturers and vendors of components and materials. For example, manufacturers can change their formulations to comply with new regulatory requirements. Such changes can require time-consuming and costly requalification certification for use in human spaceflight programs. The RRAC PC has implemented a system for proactively managing regulatory change to minimize potential adverse impacts to NASA programs and facilities. This presentation highlights the process utilized by the RRACPC to communicate regulatory change and the associated

  10. Effective Regulatory Control of Radioactive Sources in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.; Yuan, C.; Fan, S.; Su, S.

    2004-01-01

    Since the incident of radioactively contaminated buildings first surfaced in Taiwan in 1992, efforts have been made by AEC (Atomic Energy Council) of Taiwan to prevent recurrence of similar incidents involving radioactive materials and to achieve effective regulatory control over radioactive sources. The most important milestone is when AEC began to enforce IRPA he Ionizing Radiation Protection Act with the promulgation of 18 relevant regulations on Feb. 1, 2003. In order to enhance accountability of radioactive material and equipment capable of producing ionizing radiation, AEC develops and begins implementing a RPCS Radiation Protection Control System which is a powerful tool in controlling radiation safety and security. In addition, AEC develops a monthly registration program via internet, an o n-line reporting system f or owners/operators of radioactive sources, to improve monitoring of sealed sources (in-use and not-in-use). The registration requirement applies to 469 licensees possessing about 3,000 sealed sources in Taiwan. Because of the threat of orphan sources, AEC has made great efforts in preventing their contamination of construction steel material by establishing and enforcing the RPMMPIRCB Regulation for Preventive Measures and Management Plans for Incident of Radioactively Contaminated Buildings. To comply with this regulation, all 19 of Taiwan's steel factories with melting furnace have installed portal-type radiation detection system to monitor incoming scrap metal. (Author)

  11. Regulatory control of radiation sources and radioactive materials in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, A.T.; Fenton, D.; O'Flaherty, T.

    2001-01-01

    The primary legislation governing safety in uses of ionizing radiation in Ireland is the Radiological Protection Act, 1991. This Act provided for the establishment in 1992 of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, and gives the Institute the functions and powers which enable it to be the regulatory body for all matters relating to ionizing radiation. A Ministerial Order made under the Act in 2000 consolidates previous regulations and, in particular, provides for the implementation in Irish law of the 1996 European Union Directive which lays down basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation. Under the legislation, the custody, use and a number of other activities involving radioactive substances and irradiating apparatus require a licence issued by the Institute. Currently some 1260 licences are in force. Of these, some 850 are in respect of irradiating apparatus only and are issued principally to dentists and veterinary surgeons. The remaining licences involve sealed radiation sources and/or unsealed radioactive substances used in medicine, industry or education. A schedule attached to each licence fully lists the sealed sources to which the licence applies, and also the quantities of radioactive substances which may be acquired or held under the licence. It is an offence to dispose of, or otherwise relinquish possession of, any licensable material other than in accordance with terms and conditions of the licence. Disused sources are returned to the original supplier or, where this is not possible, stored under licence by the licensee who used them. Enforcement of the licensing provisions relies primarily on the programme of inspection of licensees, carried out by the Institute's inspectors. The Institute's Regulatory Service has a complement of four inspectors, one of whom is the Manager of the Service. The Manager reports to one of the Institute's Principal

  12. The regulatory control of radiation sources in Australia -- The challenges of a federal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loy, J.; Colgan, P.

    2001-01-01

    The report refers to the challenges that Australia is facing, as a federal nation having a Commonwealth Government and six States and two territories, in establishing appropriate regulatory control of radiation sources. Information on the national inventory of radiation sources and existing regulatory infrastructure, including the system of notification, registration, licensing, inspection and enforcement, is explained in the report. The national provisions for the management of disused sources; the planning, preparedness and response to abnormal events and emergencies; the recovery of control over orphan sources; and education and training; are specifically emphasized. (author)

  13. Regulatory control of radiation sources in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coy, K.

    1998-01-01

    The regulatory programme governing the safe use of radioisotopes in Germany is based on the federal legislation enacted as Atomic Energy Control Act (Atomgesetz) and Radiation Protection Ordinance (Strahlen-schutzverordnung) and its implementation by the competent authorities of the individual states. Despite this highly decentralized infrastructure of enforcement the basic principles of regulations described in this paper such as authorization criteria, conditions imposed as well as depth and intensity of inspection balanced according to the individual radiation hazard involved are harmonized to the greatest possible extent by regular coordination among the competent authorities as well as a series of technical regulations such as standards and guidelines. (author)

  14. Effective regulatory control of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meserve, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the situation in the USA regarding government control over use of radiation sources, the challenges it faces and the potential paths to their resolution. In the light of the large number of radiation sources in use worldwide, the safety record on balance is remarkably good. But there is still considerable room for improvement. The IAEA has an important role to play, and it is playing it effectively

  15. The regulatory control of ionizing radiation sources in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastauskas, A.; Ziliukas, J.; Morkunas, G.

    1998-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Centre of the Ministry of Health is the regulatory authority responsible for radiation protection of the public and of workers using sources of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. One of its responsibilities is the control of radioactive sources, which includes keeping the registry, investigating persons arrested while illegally carrying or in possession of radioactive material, decision making and control of users of radioactive sources. The computer based registry contains a directory of more than 24,000 sources and some 800 users in research, medicine and industry. Most of these sources are found in smoke detectors and X ray equipment. The potentially most dangerous sources for therapy and industry (sealed and unsealed) are also listed in this registry. Problems connected with the regulatory control of radioactive sources in Lithuania are presented and their solution is discussed. (author)

  16. Regulatory commitment management and the managing of licensing documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roxey, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Regulatory Commitment Management (RCM) Project was designed to strengthen Baltimore Gas ampersand Electric's (BG ampersand E's) ability to identify, implement, and maintain regulatory commitments. The first part of this project involved the development of a clear commitment management process. The second part was the development of a tool that enhances the ability to retrieve information from documents, and the third part of the project dealt with the actual identification of historical commitments. This paper represents the first opportunity for BG ampersand E to discuss some of the success of the second part and the preliminary findings of the third part of the project

  17. Regulatory framework for the management of radioactive wastes in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amato, E.; Siraky, G.; Petraitis, E.; Novo, R.

    2000-01-01

    The legal and regulatory framework within which the radioactive waste management is carried out in Argentina are exposed. The activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) in relation to facility inspections, safety assessments and collaboration with international agencies in the matter are also presented. Further, the regulatory criteria applied to waste management are reported. (author)

  18. Management of Disused Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt - 13512

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Y.T.; Hasan, M.A.; Lasheen, Y.F.

    2013-01-01

    The future safe development of nuclear energy and progressive increasing use of sealed sources in medicine, research, industry and other fields in Egypt depends on the safe and secure management of disused radioactive sealed sources. In the past years have determined the necessity to formulate and apply the integrated management program for radioactive sealed sources to assure harmless and ecological rational management of disused sealed sources in Egypt. The waste management system in Egypt comprises operational and regulatory capabilities. Both of these activities are performed under legislations. The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center HLWMC, is considered as a centralized radioactive waste management facility in Egypt by law 7/2010. (authors)

  19. Regulatory control of radiation sources in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daroy, Rosita R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the radiation protection and safety infrastructure providing emphasis on the regulation and control of radiation sources in the Philippines. It deals with the experiences of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, as a regulatory body, in the regulation and control of radioactive materials in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine, industrial radiography, industrial gauges, industrial irradiators, and well logging. This paper includes an inventory of the sources and types of devices/equipment used by licensed users of radioactive materials in the Philippines as a contribution to the data base being prepared by the IAEA. The problems encountered by the regulatory body in the licensing and enforcement process, as well as the lessons learned from incidents involving radioactive materials are discussed. Plans for improving compliance to the regulations and enhancing the effectiveness of PNRI's regulatory functions are presented. (author)

  20. Electricity generation: regulatory mechanisms to incentive renewable alternative energy sources in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaliero, Carla Kazue Nakao; Silva, E.P. da

    2005-01-01

    The dissemination of renewable alternative energy sources for electricity generation has always being done through regulatory mechanisms, created and managed by the government of each country. Since these sources are more costly to generate, they have received incentives in response to worldwide environmental concerns, above all with regard to the reduction of CO 2 emissions. In Brazil, the electricity generation from renewable alternative sources is experiencing a new phase of growth. Until a short time ago, environmental appeal was the strongest incentive to these sources in Brazil but it was insufficient to attain its objective. With the electricity crisis and the rationing imposed in 2001, another important factor gained awareness: the need to diversify energy sources. Within this context, this work has the objective of analyzing the regulatory mechanisms recently developed to stimulate electricity generation from renewable alternative energy sources in Brazil by following the experience of other countries such as the United States, United Kingdom and Germany

  1. Control of radioactive sources in industry through regulatory inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leocadio, J.C.; Ramalho, A.T.; Pinho, A.S.; Lourenco, M.M.J.; Nicola, M.S.; D'Avila, R.L.; Melo, I.F.; Cucco, A.C.S.

    2005-01-01

    In Brazil, the applications of ionizing radiation in industry are accomplished about 900 radioactive facilities, which handle approximately 3.000 radiation sources. The control of radioactive sources used in industrial installations authorized by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) is accomplished by Servico de Radioprotecao na Industria Radiativa (SERIR) of the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. This service carries out regulatory inspections in the practices of industrial radiography, nuclear gauges, industrial irradiators and oil wells logging. The frequency of inspections depends on the type of practice, ranging from a year to 5 years, depending on the risk involved. This paper presents a brief description of the situation of radiation safety in the use of radioactive sources in the industries of the country. The results obtained with regulatory inspections at industrial installations demonstrate that the conditions of safety and radiation protection in these facilities are satisfactory when compared with the technical regulations, both national and international

  2. Data Management in a Regulatory Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Grønning

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of Article 57(2 in 2012 the European Medicines Agency (EMA embarked on a digitalization journey that foreseeably would ensure greater product oversight and interoperability across the community. This initiative has subsequently led to additional focus from the agency with respect to the utilization and harmonization of data as part of the regulatory process. Driven by both internal and external factors, the EMA have through the European Union telematics strategy laid the foundation for the regulatory-driven services that may be expected from the community the coming years. Supported by standardization initiatives (e.g., ISO Identification of Medicinal Products, the EMA is gradually building an information management-driven approach to data utilization and exploitation within drug evaluation and approval. Primarily driven by the increasing demand for signal detection, the EMA is additionally hoping to leverage the establishment of defined information models and supporting controlled terms to safeguard future activities within the community. Collectively, the overall community may seek to gain from the overall digitalization roadmap proposed by the EMA and interesting opportunities may be sought as part of the transition. Already now pharmaceutical companies are gradually adapting to this new paradigm and actively seeking to explore how they may leverage the future EMA operating model to serve internal business requirements. If successful, the collective efforts from industry and regulators may lead to an unprecedented product oversight and offer regulators the opportunity to proactively drive corrective actions and, therefore, improve patient safety.

  3. Orphan Sources. Extending Radiological Protection outside the Regulatory Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eugenio Gil [Deputy Director for Emergency, Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Radioactive sources that are not under appropriate regulatory control-Orphan sources- can result in a number of undesirable consequences including human health impacts, socio-psychological impacts, political and economic impacts, as well as environmental impacts. Many countries are now in the process of introducing the necessary measures to regain an appropriate level of control over them. For a variety of historical and economic reasons, there could already be sources in any specific country that are not within the usual regulatory system. Some of these may be known about, others may not. Therefore a national strategy is needed to ascertain the likelihood and magnitude of the issue of radioactive source control problem within a country and the priorities necessary to address the problems identified. A well-developed plan for improving control over all relevant radioactive sources tailored to the national situation will ensure optimum use of resources such as time, money and personnel. It will allow these limited resources to be allocated appropriately to ensure that control is first regained over those sources presenting the highest risks. This lecture shows a way to develop an appropriate national strategy for regaining control over orphan sources. The methodology described in this lecture is basically based in the IAEA Recommendations. (author)

  4. Orphan Sources. Extending Radiological Protection outside the Regulatory Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eugenio Gil

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive sources that are not under appropriate regulatory control-Orphan sources- can result in a number of undesirable consequences including human health impacts, socio-psychological impacts, political and economic impacts, as well as environmental impacts. Many countries are now in the process of introducing the necessary measures to regain an appropriate level of control over them. For a variety of historical and economic reasons, there could already be sources in any specific country that are not within the usual regulatory system. Some of these may be known about, others may not. Therefore a national strategy is needed to ascertain the likelihood and magnitude of the issue of radioactive source control problem within a country and the priorities necessary to address the problems identified. A well-developed plan for improving control over all relevant radioactive sources tailored to the national situation will ensure optimum use of resources such as time, money and personnel. It will allow these limited resources to be allocated appropriately to ensure that control is first regained over those sources presenting the highest risks. This lecture shows a way to develop an appropriate national strategy for regaining control over orphan sources. The methodology described in this lecture is basically based in the IAEA Recommendations. (author)

  5. Regulatory control for safe usage of radiation sources in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, P.K.; Sonawane, A.U.

    1998-01-01

    The widespread applications of radioactive materials and radiation generating equipment in the field of industry, medicine agriculture and research in India necessitated the establishment of an efficient regulatory framework and consequently the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) was constituted to exercise regulatory control over the safe usage of the radioactive materials and the radiation generating equipment. The Atomic Energy Act, 1962 and the Radiation Protection Rules, 1971 promulgated under the Act forms the basis of radiation safety in India and Chairman, AERB is the Competent Authority to enforce the regulatory provisions of the Radiation Protection Rules, 1971, for safe use of radiation source in the country. AERB has published a number of documents such as Radiation Surveillance Procedures, Standards, Codes, Guides and Manuals for safe use and handling of radioactive materials and radiation generating equipment. Apart from nuclear fuel cycle documents, these publications pertain to industrial radiography, medical application of radiation, transport of radioactive material, industrial gamma irradiators, X-ray units etc. AERB safety related publications are based on international standards e.g. BSS, IAEA, ICRP, ISO etc. This paper outlines the methodology of regulatory control exercised by AERB for safe use of the radioactive materials and the radiation generating equipment in the country. (author)

  6. Regulatory Aspect of an Ageing Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic, I.; Zabric, I.; Savli, S.

    2006-01-01

    The aspects of plant ageing management (AM) gained increasing attention over the last ten years. Numerous technical studies have been performed to study the impact of ageing mechanisms on the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. National research activities have been initiated or are in progress to provide the technical basis for decision making processes. The long-term operation of nuclear power plants is influenced by economic considerations, the socio-economic environment including public acceptance, developments in research and the regulatory framework, the availability of technical infrastructure to maintain and service the systems, structures and components as well as qualified personnel. Besides national activities there are a number of international activities in particular under the umbrella of the IAEA, the OECD and the EU. The paper will provide the summary on Nuclear Plant Life Management (PLIM) (or Ageing Management Program (AMP)) and Plant Life Extension (PLEX) development in USA and European countries. Also, insights from such effort currently performing in Slovenia will be discussed.(author)

  7. Management of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ho Shin; Chung, Jong Kyu; Park, Chan Geol; Hur, Phil Jong; Lee, Taek Ho; Han, Jung Soo

    2001-12-01

    To have reliability for radioactive material control using regular report, we performed as follows, review for the regular report, corrective action and review for the available database, conform for the reported database, review for traceability of the reported database. To use the radioactive material safety regulation, we developed management program and constructed the database

  8. Management of radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ho Shin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jong Kyu; Park, Chan Geol; Hur, Phil Jong; Lee, Taek Ho; Han, Jung Soo [RADTEK Co., Ltd., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    To have reliability for radioactive material control using regular report, we performed as follows, review for the regular report, corrective action and review for the available database, conform for the reported database, review for traceability of the reported database. To use the radioactive material safety regulation, we developed management program and constructed the database.

  9. Management of radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ho Shin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Science, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jong Kyu; Park, Chan Geol; Lee, Taek Ho; Han, Jung Soo [RADTECH, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    To have reliability for radioactive material control using regular report, we performed as follows: review for the regular report, corrective action and review for the available database, conform for the reported database, review for traceability of the reported database. To use the radioactive material safety regulation, we developed management program and constructed the database.

  10. Regulatory control of radiation sources in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daroy, Rosita R

    1996-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the radiation protection and safety infrastructure providing emphasis on the regulation and control of radiation sources in the Philippines. It deals with the experiences of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, as a regulatory body, in the regulation and control of radioactive materials in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine, industrial radiography, industrial gauges, industrial irradiators, and well logging. This paper includes an inventory of the sources and types of devices/equipment used by licensed users of radioactive materials in the Philippines as a contribution to the data base being prepared by the IAEA. The problems encountered by the regulatory body in the licensing and enforcement process, as well as the lessons learned from incidents involving radioactive materials are discussed. Plans for improving compliance to the regulations and enhancing the effectiveness of PNRI`s regulatory functions are presented. (author). Paper presented during the IAEA Regional (RCA) Workshop on System of Notification, Registration, Licensing, and Control of Radiation Sources and Installations, Jakarta, Indonesia, 24-28 April 1995. 6 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Management of spent sealed radioactive sources in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecille, L.; Taylor, D.

    2000-01-01

    For several years, the European Commission (EC) has been active in the field of spent sealed radioactive sources (SSRS) to improve management schemes and to prepare Euratom Directives that will impact on national legislation and regulatory schemes in European Member States (MS). The main safety issues related to the management of SSRS are described and recommendations made are presented. Additional projects are outlined. (author)

  12. Regulatory aspects of radiation sources safety in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollani, K.; Kushe, R.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper are presented the regulatory aspects of the radiation sources safety in Albania, based in the new Radiological Protection Act and Regulations. The radiation protection infrastructures and procedures are described as well as their functioning for the implementation of relevant activities such as licensing and regular inspection, personal dose monitoring, emergency preparedness which are developed in the frame of the IAEA Technical Co-operation Programme. The issue of the security of radiation sources is dealt in close relation with the preparation and use of the inventory of all radiation sources in the country. A special attention is paid to the identification and location of lost sources for their finding and secure storage. (author)

  13. Regulatory Risk Management of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Glenn R.

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory risk reflects both the likelihood of adverse outcomes during regulatory interactions and the severity of those outcomes. In the arena of advanced nuclear power plant licensing and construction, such adverse outcomes may include, for example, required design changes and construction delays. These, in turn, could significantly affect the economics of the plant and the generation portfolio in which it will operate. In this paper, the author addresses these issues through the lens of risk management. The paper considers various tools and techniques of regulatory risk management, including design diversity and hedging strategies. The effectiveness of alternate approaches is weighed and recommendations are made in several regulatory contexts. (author)

  14. The regulatory control over radiation sources: the Brazilian experience and some lessons learned from industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, E.L.C.; Gomes, J.D.R.L.; Gomes, R.S.; Costa, M.L.L.; Thomé, Z.D.; Instituto Militar de Engenharia

    2017-01-01

    This study gives an overview of the activities of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), as the Brazilian nuclear regulatory authority. These activities are described, especially those related to management of orphan sources and radioactive material in scrap metal considering the actions already put into place by CNEN during the licensing and controlling of radioactive sources in the industry and other facilities. In Brazil, there is not yet an effective system for controlling the scrap metal and recycling industry, thus a coordinated approach to achieve a harmonized and effective response with the involvement of third parties is needed, especially the metal industries and ores facilities. These practices call for stringent regulatory control, in order to reduce the occurrence of orphan sources, and consequently, radioactive material appearing in scrap metal. Some challenges of managing the national radiation sources register systems will be discussed, in order to cover effectively all the radiation source history (in a 'from the cradle to the grave' basis), and the dynamic maintenance and update of these data. The main industrial applications considered in this work are those dealing with constant movement of sources all over the country, with geographical issues to be considered in the managing and controlling actions, such as gammagraphy and well-logging. This study aims to identify and promote good practices to prevent inadvertent diversion of radioactive material, taking into account existing international recommendations and some lessons learned in national level. (author)

  15. The regulatory control over radiation sources: the Brazilian experience and some lessons learned from industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, E.L.C.; Gomes, J.D.R.L.; Gomes, R.S.; Costa, M.L.L.; Thomé, Z.D., E-mail: evaldo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jlopes@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: rogeriog@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: mara@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: zielithome@gmail.com [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Radioproteção e Segurança Nuclear; Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Seção de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    This study gives an overview of the activities of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), as the Brazilian nuclear regulatory authority. These activities are described, especially those related to management of orphan sources and radioactive material in scrap metal considering the actions already put into place by CNEN during the licensing and controlling of radioactive sources in the industry and other facilities. In Brazil, there is not yet an effective system for controlling the scrap metal and recycling industry, thus a coordinated approach to achieve a harmonized and effective response with the involvement of third parties is needed, especially the metal industries and ores facilities. These practices call for stringent regulatory control, in order to reduce the occurrence of orphan sources, and consequently, radioactive material appearing in scrap metal. Some challenges of managing the national radiation sources register systems will be discussed, in order to cover effectively all the radiation source history (in a 'from the cradle to the grave' basis), and the dynamic maintenance and update of these data. The main industrial applications considered in this work are those dealing with constant movement of sources all over the country, with geographical issues to be considered in the managing and controlling actions, such as gammagraphy and well-logging. This study aims to identify and promote good practices to prevent inadvertent diversion of radioactive material, taking into account existing international recommendations and some lessons learned in national level. (author)

  16. South African Regulatory Framework for Nuclear Power Plant Life Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbebe, B.Z.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the regulatory approach to plant life management (PLiM) adopted by the National Nuclear Regulator (NNR) in South Africa, the licensing basis and regulatory requirements for Koeberg Nuclear Power Station (KNPS),operational programmes ensuring continued safe operation, issues related to the ageing of the plant, and the requirements for spent fuel as well as radioactive waste management. The paper will further present insights from the Periodic Safety Review (PSR) and Long Term Asset Management. (author)

  17. Averting Regulatory Enforcement: Evidence from New Source Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keohane, N.O.; Mansur, E.T.; Voynov, A. [Yale University, New York, NY (USA)

    2009-09-15

    This paper explores firms' response to regulatory enforcement. New Source Review (NSR), a provision of the Clean Air Act, imposes stringent emissions limitations on significantly modified older power plants. In 1999, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sued owners of 46 plants for NSR violations. We study how electricity companies respond to both the perceived threat of future action, and the action itself. A discrete choice model estimates plants likelihood of being named in lawsuits increases with large historic emissions and investments. On the eve of the lawsuits, emissions at plants with a one standard deviation greater probability of being sued fell approximately 10%.

  18. Technical Support Organization Knowledge Management for Nuclear Regulatory Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.; Ramsey, J.; Katsenelenbogen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge management awareness has increased through the nuclear industrial and regulatory community leading to better understanding of the handling of critical information. Utilizing, managing and regulating the application of nuclear power require an extensive system of expertise and associated research through established organizations. The long term maintenance of the specific expertise is only viable by using scientific knowledge management principles all through the national nuclear infrastructure involving regulatory, industrial, academic and other research institutions. National governments in countries operating or planning to establish nuclear facilities have instituted regulatory regimes on the use of nuclear materials and facilities to insure a high level of operational safety. (author

  19. Challenges in Regulating Radiation Sources and Associated Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shehzad, A.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation sources are widely used in the fields of medical, industry, agriculture, research, etc. Owing to the inherent risk of exposure to ionizing radiations while using the radiation sources and management of associated waste, safety measures are of utmost importance including robust regulatory control. Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA) is responsible for supervising all matters pertaining to nuclear safety and radiation protection in the country. Since its inception, PNRA has made rigorous efforts to regulate the radiation facilities for which regulatory framework was further strengthened by taking into account international norms/practices and implemented afterwards. However, due to vibrant use of these facilities, there are numerous challenges being faced while implementing the regulatory framework. These challenges pertains to shielding design of some facilities, control over service provider for QC/repair maintenance of radiation equipment, assessment of patient doses, and establishment of national diagnostic reference levels for radiological procedures. Further, the regulatory framework also delineate requirements to minimize the generation of associated radioactive waste as low as practicable. The requirements also necessitates that certain sealed radioactive sources (SRS) are returned to the supplier upon completion of their useful life, while other radioactive sources are required to be transported for storage at designated radioactive waste storage facilities in the country, which requires commitment from the licensee. This paper will briefly describe the challenges in regulating the radiation sources and issues related to the waste management associated with these facilities. (author)

  20. Cloud based spectrum manager for future wireless regulatory environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masonta, MT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory environment in radio frequency spectrum management lags the advancement of wireless technologies, especially in the area of cognitive radio and dynamic spectrum access. In this paper we argue that the solution towards spectrum Pareto...

  1. Regulatory inspection: a powerful tool to control industrial radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C.A. da; Leocadio, J.C.; Ramalho, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    An important contribution for Brazilian development, especially for the quality control of products, is the use of radiation sources by conventional industries. There are in Brazil roughly 3,000 radioactive sources spread out among 950 industries. The main industrial practices involved are: industrial radiography, industrial irradiators, industrial accelerators, well logging petroleum and nuclear gauges. More than 1,800 Radiation Protection Officers (RPOs) were qualified to work in these practices. The present work presents a brief description of the safety control over industrial radioactive installations performed by the Brazilian Regulatory Authority, i.e. the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN). This paper also describes the national system for radiation safety inspections, the regulation infrastructure and the national inventory of industrial installations. The inspections are based on specific indicators, and their periodicity depends on the risk and type of installation. The present work discusses some relevant aspects that must be considered during the inspections, in order to make the inspections more efficient in controlling the sources. One of these aspects regards the evaluation of the storage place for the sources, a very important parameter for preventing future risky situations. (author)

  2. Radioactive source management in Daya Bay NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Chun Yang

    2000-01-01

    'Small sources causes big accidents' had occurred worldwide many times. Radioactive source management in Nuclear Power Plant in very important for its safety record. This paper introduces the way and experience of radioactive source management in Daya Bay NPP from aspects of clarifying the responsibilities, centralizing the management of high radioactivity sources, work process management and experience feedback etc. (author)

  3. Nuclear knowledge management system in the regulatory activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Klevtsov, A.L.; Kravchenko, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Important issues on collection, storage and spread of knowledge among organisation dealing with the use of nuclear technologies, role of close cooperation between enterprises and organizations in developing knowledge management, general requirements for creating a nuclear knowledge management system are considered. Recommendations and the main mechanisms are identified to create the knowledge management system in technical support organizations of the regulatory authority.

  4. Regulatory control of radiation sources and radioactive materials: The UK position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englefield, C.; Holyoak, B.; Ledgerwood, K.; Littlewood, K.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the organizations involved in the regulation of the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials across the UK. The safety of radiation sources is within the regulatory remit of the Health and Safety Executive, under the Health and safety of Work Act 1974 and associated regulations. Any employer using radiation sources has a statutory duty to comply with this legislation, thereby protecting workers and the public from undue risk. From a radioactive waste management perspective, the storage and use of radioactive materials and the accumulation and disposal of radioactive waste are regulated by the environment agencies of England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993. Special regulatory arrangements apply to nuclear sites, such as power stations and fuel cycle plants, and some additional bodies are involved in the regulation of the security of fissile materials. An explanation is given in the paper as to how these organizations to work together to provide a comprehensive and effective regulatory regime. An overview of how these regulators have recently started to work more closely with other enforcement bodies, such as the Police and Customs and Excise is also given, to illustrate the approach that is being applied in the UK to deal with orphan sources and illicit trafficking. (author)

  5. Fused Regression for Multi-source Gene Regulatory Network Inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Y Lam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding gene regulatory networks is critical to understanding cellular differentiation and response to external stimuli. Methods for global network inference have been developed and applied to a variety of species. Most approaches consider the problem of network inference independently in each species, despite evidence that gene regulation can be conserved even in distantly related species. Further, network inference is often confined to single data-types (single platforms and single cell types. We introduce a method for multi-source network inference that allows simultaneous estimation of gene regulatory networks in multiple species or biological processes through the introduction of priors based on known gene relationships such as orthology incorporated using fused regression. This approach improves network inference performance even when orthology mapping and conservation are incomplete. We refine this method by presenting an algorithm that extracts the true conserved subnetwork from a larger set of potentially conserved interactions and demonstrate the utility of our method in cross species network inference. Last, we demonstrate our method's utility in learning from data collected on different experimental platforms.

  6. Information system fur the management of a regulatory programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, P.; Mrabit, K.; Miaw, S.

    1998-01-01

    A Regulatory Programme to monitor safety of activities involving radiation sources, implies the existence of a Regulatory Authority empowered by legislation to issue radiation protection regulations and to monitor compliance with those regulations. The core element of the programme is a system of notification and authorization (registration and licensing), inspection and enforcement. The efficiency of this system is largely dependent on the availability of reliable information on the inventory of radiation sources and installations, the administrative status of the facilities (authorization), prompt processing of inspection reports and follow up of regulatory actions, including monitoring deadlines. Essential data relevant to safety, such as personal dosimetry for occupationally exposed individuals, inspection findings and incident reports would provide, in addition, an insight on the overall safety of the country. A simple but comprehensive Regulatory Authority Information System (RAIS) linked to the authorization and inspection process will largely facilitate regulatory decisions and actions. A readily available and reliable information from the various regulatory activities will facilitate planning, optimization of resources, monitoring safety related data, disseminating safety information, making decisions and follow up regulatory actions including monitoring dead lines. The implementation of the system in more than 50 countries will contribute to experience exchange and harmonization of regulatory activities. (author)

  7. Quality management of the nuclear regulatory body. Peer discussions on regulatory practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the ninth series of peer discussions on regulatory practices entitled Nuclear Regulatory Body Quality Management, held in March and May 2001, and which involved the participation of senior nuclear regulators from 23 IAEA Member States. This report conveys the essence of two peer group discussions and highlights some good practices identified by the participating senior regulators. The objective of the discussions was to share experiences of regulatory bodies in implementing QM systems in their own work so as to ensure that the regulatory control over the licensees is effective and efficient and is commensurate with the mandate assigned by their governments. The shared experiences and good practices presented in the report, however, do not necessarily reflect the views of and good practices endorsed by the governments of the nominating Member States, the organizations to which the regulators belong, or the IAEA. The report sets down the peer group's experience in developing, implementing and evaluating QM within their regulatory bodies and identifies points to bear in mind when introducing such a system. This report is structured so that it covers the subject matter under the main headings of: application of quality management to regulatory work; development and implementation of quality management; assessment and improvement of performance; and good practices

  8. Improvement of the effectiveness of regulatory management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The project ARCAL LXVI has as its objective strengthening the national capabilities of the regulatory authorities to achieve an adequate level of radiation safety by training their staff in the implementation of the safety guidelines developed by a prior TC regional project under the framework of the ARCAL Programme and to measure its effectiveness. Detailed program of activities for the years 2001/2002 is presented at this meeting

  9. Legislative and regulatory framework of radioactive waste management in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutoiu, D.

    2000-01-01

    The paper intent is to present an update on the Romanian legislative and regulatory framework in the area of radioactive waste management. Based on the experiences gained by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control in the past years, the recent legislative initiatives related to the coherent radwaste management policy at the national level are presented. (author)

  10. The IAEA Regional Training Course on Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Materials of the IAEA Regional Training Course contains 8 presented lectures. Authors deals with regulatory control of radiation sources. The next materials of the IAEA were presented: Organization and implementation of a national regulatory infrastructure governing protection against ionizing radiation and the safety of radiation sources. (IAEA-TECDOC-1067); Safety assessment plants for authorization and inspection of radiation sources (IAEA-TECDOC-1113); Regulatory authority information system RAIS, Version 2.0, Instruction manual

  11. Regulatory approach to accident management in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, L.

    1989-01-01

    The Swedish accident management program includes the following components: definition of overall safety and radiation protection objectives for the program; definition of appropriate accident management strategies to reach these objectives, based on plant-specific severe accident analysis; development and installation of appropriate accident management systems and associated management procedure; definition of roles and resposibilities for plant staff involved in accident management and implementation of appropriate training programs. The discussion of these components tries to highlight the basic technical concepts and approaches and the underlying safety philosophy rather than going into design details. 5 figs., 7 refs

  12. Regulatory framework, strategy and radioactive waste management in Zambia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banda, S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Zambia is involved in the peaceful application in Nuclear Science and Technology which cover the agriculture, human health, industry, research and education sectors. In the execution of the projects various radioactive sources and radioisotopes are used. The data from the Radiation Protection Board show that there are 136 organizations and 971 Radiation workers benefit from the regulatory control and personnel Dosimetry service that is provided by the Board. The radiation user institutions are broken down as follows: medical (106), industrial (18), research (10) and (2) in teaching. The radioactive waste generated and spent sources are managed, in several ways depending on the type . In addition to radioactive waste generated by various application there are new developments concerning the management of spent sources mainly brought into control by the detection of illicit trade or trafficking activities by the Police, Drug Enforcement Commission, and the vigilant people of the community. The challenge for Zambia is to set-up a Radioactive Waste Management Facility preferably under the National Institute for Scientific and Industrial Research (NISIR). The RPB should legally designate NISIR for this function and assist to have the Government provide support that is required to have an operation and effective facility. One Radioactive Waste Interim Storage Shed at Kalulushi. This shed was put up by a copper mining conglomerate which now has been privatized. It is hoped that this facility can be licensed by Radiation Protection Board to be run by private enterprise for storage of prescribed spent radioactive sources and materials. This shed should be technically competent persons and should have good equipment for the purpose. The application in industry (NDT, mining, radiation sterilization, pipeline and construction, human health (nuclear medicine, radioimmunoassay and radiotherapy practices) and agriculture (use of P-32) required that a National Strategy

  13. Implementation of a database for the management of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOHAMAD, M.

    2012-01-01

    In Madagascar, the application of nuclear technology continues to develop. In order to protect the human health and his environment against the harmful effects of the ionizing radiation, each user of radioactive sources has to implement a program of nuclear security and safety and to declare their sources at Regulatory Authority. This Authority must have access to all the informations relating to all the sources and their uses. This work is based on the elaboration of a software using python as programming language and SQlite as database. It makes possible to computerize the radioactive sources management.This application unifies the various existing databases and centralizes the activities of the radioactive sources management.The objective is to follow the movement of each source in the Malagasy territory in order to avoid the risks related on the use of the radioactive sources and the illicit traffic. [fr

  14. Management and disposal of disused sealed radioactive sources in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, D.A.; Angus, M.J.; Cecille, L.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Sealed radioactive sources have been widely used for many decades in industry, medicine and research. Although most countries have laid down a regulatory framework to control sealed sources, there are still a number of uncertainties concerning the management of historical Ra- 226 alpha sources and the possibility of retrieving non-registered sources. Both these uncertainties may represent high radiological risks for the population. In addition, management schemes and practises implemented in different countries can be somewhat conflicting and create problems for storage and disposal. This paper describes the results of three studies that were carried out between 1998 and 2001 to consider the situation relating to the regulation and management of spent sealed radioactive sources (SSRS) in each of the fifteen current European Union (EU) member states and the ten central and eastern European (C and EE) countries that are currently being considered for admission to the European Union (namely, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia). The general aim of the studies was to acquire a thorough understanding of the management of SSRS in each country, in order to recommend improvements in management schemes and to establish whether the application of common disposal criteria would be advantageous. The studies covered the following activities: Estimation of the inventory of SSRS in store and disposed in each country; Analysis of the relevant regulations and regulatory framework in each country; Description and review of the current management practises in each country; Estimation of the number of unregistered SSRS (including identification of the reasons why SSRS are lost' and recommending ways of recovering lost' sources). It was important to understand the full life-cycle of sealed radioactive sources, from manufacture through to disposal. Much of the information contained in these studies was obtained

  15. Leveraging network utility management practices for regulatory purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    Electric utilities around the globe are entering a phase where they must modernize and implement smart grid technologies. In order to optimize system architecture, asset replacement, and future operating costs, it the utilities must implement robust and flexible asset management structures. This report discussed the ways in which regulators assess investment plans. It focused on the implicit or explicit use of an asset management approach, including principles; processes; input and outputs; decision-making criteria and prioritization methods. The Ontario Energy Board staff were familiarized with the principles and objectives of established and emerging asset management processes and underlying analytic processes, systems and tools in order to ensure that investment information provided by network utilities regarding rates and other applications could be evaluated effectively. Specifically, the report discussed the need for and importance of asset management and provided further details of international markets and their regulatory approaches to asset management. The report also discussed regulatory approaches for review of asset management underlying investment plans as well as an overview of international regulatory practice for review of network utility asset management. It was concluded that options for strengthening regulatory guidance and assessment included utilizing appropriate and effective benchmarking to assess, promote and provide incentives for best practices and steer clear of the potential perverse incentives. 21 tabs., 17 figs., 1 appendix.

  16. Safe management of discussed sealed sources in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallaupoma, M.

    2000-01-01

    The future safe development of nuclear energy and progressive increasing use of sealed sources in medicine, research, industry and other fields in Peru, in the past years have determined the necessity to formulate and apply an Institutional policy to assure harmless and ecologically rational management of disused sealed sources in Peru. Some results of the studies, which served as a basis for design and construction of a facility for treatment, conditioning and storage of conditioned sealed sources are presented in this paper. The waste management system in Peru comprises operational and regulatory capabilities. Both of these activities are performed under a legislation. The Nuclear Research Center RACSO has a radioactive waste management department which is in charge of the management of disused sealed sources produced in the country. It is considered as a centralized waste processing and storage facility (WPSF). (author)

  17. The Future Regulatory Challenges of Liquidity Risk Management

    OpenAIRE

    Petr Teply

    2011-01-01

    Liquidity risk management ranks to key concepts applied in finance. Liquidity is defined as a capacity to obtain funding when needed, while liquidity risk means as a threat to this capacity to generate cash at fair costs. In the paper we present challenges of liquidity risk management resulting from the 2007- 2009 global financial upheaval. We see five main regulatory liquidity risk management issues requiring revision in coming years: liquidity measurement, intra-day and...

  18. 77 FR 33253 - Regulatory Guide 8.33, Quality Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0126] Regulatory Guide 8.33, Quality Management Program... Regulatory Commission (NRC or Commission) is withdrawing Regulatory Guide (RG) 8.33, ``Quality Management... Quality Management Program was deleted from the regulations as part of an overall revision in 2002 of the...

  19. Management of disused sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukauskas, D.; Skridaila, N.

    2003-01-01

    The report presents the requirements on management of disused sealed sources in Lithuania; disused sealed source disposal facilities; performed safety analysis and planed repository safety improvements. The requirements on pre-disposal management of Disused Sealed Sources (DSS) are presented. The requirements on disposal of short lived VLLW and LILW (A, B and C classes) radioactive waste approved in 2002-2003. Generic Waste Acceptance Criteria for Near Surface Disposal, P-2003-01 approved in 2003. Requirements on disposal of Low and intermediate level long lived waste do not exist (D and E classes). Requirements for the disposal of disused sealed sources (F class) do not exist. Disposal method for the F class - Near Surface or Deep geological repository, depending on the waste acceptance criteria. Only one repository for institutional radioactive waste exist in Lithuania - Maisiagala repository. It is near surface RADON type disposal facility, built in 1963 and closed in 1988. It was constructed of the monolithic reinforced concrete with the dimensions 5 m x 15 m x 3 m, the thickness of the sidewalls is about 0.25 m and the thickness of the bottom is about 0.2 m. The overall volume is about 200 m 3 . At time of closure only three fifths of the volume had been filled. The empty two fifths of the vault were filled with concrete, then with sand, then with the concrete (0.01 m), hot bitumen and the 0.05 m asphalt layers. Monolithic concrete that was covered with bitumen and 0.05 m thick layer of asphalt closed the vault. Sand layer the thickness of which was not less than 1.2 m formed the cap. Disused radioactive sources embedded in a biological shielding were buried together with their shielding, the sources without the shielding were buried in two stainless steel containers. The total activity of buried radioactive nuclides is 3.42.10 -15 Bq (calculated according the documentation). There are some uncertainties about the inventory: from 1963 to 1973. After the

  20. Policy, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Records Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Policy, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Records Management in the ... of any country and are essential to the administration of law in the justice system. ... as the Kenya Public Archives and Documentation Service Act Cap 19 of 1965; the ...

  1. Managing the high level waste nuclear regulatory commission licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, K.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the process for obtaining Nuclear Regulatory Commission permits for the high level waste storage facility is basically the same process commercial nuclear power plants followed to obtain construction permits and operating licenses for their facilities. Therefore, the experience from licensing commercial reactors can be applied to the high level waste facility. Proper management of the licensing process will be the key to the successful project. The management of the licensing process was categorized into four areas as follows: responsibility, organization, communication and documentation. Drawing on experience from nuclear power plant licensing and basic management principles, the management requirement for successfully accomplishing the project goals are discussed

  2. Regulatory control of radiation sources and radioactive materials in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Prouza, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes legal and regulatory provisions for radiation protection and safe use of sources of ionizing radiation in the Czech Republic with special emphasis on aspects of bringing activities under regulatory control and releasing them from it. It covers the development of a new legal framework, the work of the regulatory body, an overview of sources in use and provisions to achieve effective regulatory control of facilities and releases of radioactive material into the environment. Also, it describes reported unusual events with a proposed scheme for their classification and evaluation. (author)

  3. 78 FR 70354 - Conceptual Example of a Proposed Risk Management Regulatory Framework Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0254] Conceptual Example of a Proposed Risk Management Regulatory Framework Policy Statement AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Conceptual example of a... ``openness,'' a white paper on a Conceptual Example of a Proposed Risk Management Regulatory Framework (RMRF...

  4. An approach for risk management and regulatory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, See-Meng

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and potential applications of a PRA methodology for risk management and regulatory applications in the U.S. nuclear industry. The new PRA methodology centers on the development of time-dependent configuration risk profiles for evaluating the effectiveness of operational risk management programs at U.S. nuclear power plants. Configuration-risk profiles have been used as risk-information tools for (1) a better understanding of the impact of daily operational activities on plant safety and (2) proactive planning of operational activities to manage risk. Trial applications of the methodology were undertaken to demonstrate that configuration-risk profiles can be developed routinely, and can be useful for various industry and regulatory applications. Lessons learned include a better understanding of the issues and characteristics of PRA models available to industry, and identifying the attributes and pitfalls in the development of risk profiles. (author)

  5. Regulatory safety aspects of nuclear waste management operations in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundararajan, A.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy in India as part of its programme to harness the nuclear energy for generation of nuclear power has been operating a whole range of nuclear fuel cycle facilities including waste management plants for more than four decades. The waste management plants include three high level waste immobilisation plants, one in operation, one under commissioning and one more under construction. Atomic Energy Regulatory Board is mandated to review and authorise from the safety angle the siting, the design, the construction and the operation of the waste management plants. The regulatory procedures, which involve multi-tier review adopted for ensuring the safety of these facilities, are described in this paper. (author)

  6. Probabilistic risk assessment methodology for risk management and regulatory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    See Meng Wong; Kelly, D.L.; Riley, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and potential applications of PRA methodology for risk management and regulatory applications in the U.S. nuclear industry. The new PRA methodology centers on the development of This paper discusses the time-dependent configuration risk profile for evaluating the effectiveness of operational risk management programs at U.S. nuclear power plants. Configuration-risk profiles have been used as risk-information tools for (1) a better understanding of the impact of daily operational activities on plant safety, and (2) proactive planning of operational activities to manage risk. Trial applications of the methodology were undertaken to demonstrate that configuration-risk profiles can be developed routinely, and can be useful for various industry and regulatory applications. Lessons learned include a better understanding of the issues and characteristics of PRA models available to industry, and identifying the attributes and pitfalls in the developement of risk profiles

  7. Legal and Regulatory Frameworks for Decommissioning and Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leech, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Safe and efficient decommissioning and waste management requires clear structures for allocating responsibility and funding. Organisation of decommissioning and waste management activities and the regulatory environment within which those activities are undertaken should also allow the supply chain to prosper and, wherever possible, reduce barriers to international availability of resources and waste facilities. Radioactive waste treatment and disposal in particular raises both legal and political challenges to effective international co-operation, yet options for decommissioning and waste management are maximised where international barriers can be minimised. Added to this, international nuclear liabilities issues must be managed so as to avoid unnecessary deterrents to international mobility of capability within the decommissioning market. Contractual terms and insurance arrangements for international shipments of nuclear waste and materials will also need to take into account imminent changes to liabilities conventions, ensuring compliance and management of compliance costs (of both insurance and management time). This paper explores legal and commercial structures intended to support effective decommissioning and waste management and examines regulatory and commercial factors affecting the ability of facility operators to utilise internationally available capability. It focusses on: - strategic approaches developed in the UK to address decommissioning and waste management liabilities associated with the UK's first and second generation civil nuclear sites and comparison of those approaches with other jurisdictions with significant decommissioning liabilities; - liability and compliance risks associated with navigating international nuclear liabilities regimes in context of both mobility of decommissioning capability and international waste shipment; and - regulatory issues affecting international availability of waste treatment facilities, including

  8. Improving regulatory capacity to manage risks associated with trade agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Helen L; Smith, Richard D; Drahos, Peter

    2015-03-21

    Modern trade negotiations have delivered a plethora of bilateral and regional preferential trade agreements (PTAs), which involve considerable risk to public health, thus placing demands on governments to strengthen administrative regulatory capacities in regard to the negotiation, implementation and on-going management of PTAs. In terms of risk management, the administrative regulatory capacity requisite for appropriate negotiation of PTAs is different to that for the implementation or on-going management of PTAs, but at all stages the capacity needed is expensive, skill-intensive and requires considerable infrastructure, which smaller and poorer states especially struggle to find. It is also a task generally underestimated. If states do not find ways to increase their capacities then PTAs are likely to become much greater drivers of health inequities. Developing countries especially struggle to find this capacity. In this article we set out the importance of administrative regulatory capacity and coordination to manage the risks to public health associated with PTAs, and suggest ways countries can improve their capacity.

  9. Cradle to Grave: Managing Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources in the Mediterranean Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, Sasha

    2014-01-01

    Some countries in the Mediterranean region lack appropriate facilities for the safe management or disposal of radioactive waste such as disused radioactive sources. Disused radioactive sources could be lost, stolen or abandoned and thus fall outside the regulatory control. Such loss of control over disused sources presents a significant risk to the public and the environment

  10. Regulatory and management approaches to NORM residues in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, M.; Teng, I.L.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) processing industries in Malaysia include oil and gas production and mineral processing plants. These industries are controlled by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board of Malaysia (AELB) through the enforcement of the Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984 (Act 304). Related regulations have been developed in order to ensure the safety of workers and members of the public. However, more regulations are necessary for the safe handling of NORM. NORM processing generates various types of NORM residues that require proper management. As for low-level NORM residues, landfill disposal can be exempted from regulatory control if the Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) shows that the additional dose to the members of the public is below the limit set by the authority. This paper outlines the regulatory and management approaches to NORM residues in Malaysia. (author)

  11. Knowledge management in the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahab, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In 2006, the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority has initiated a regulatory knowledge management process to face the loss of knowledge resulting from retiring experts, the generation gap, and the existing need to train new human resources. A number of projects have been started together with the technical assistance of the National Public Administration Institute to preserve knowledge and render it explicit for the coming generations. These projects include 'The History of the Expert's Learning Process' in which the majority of the most critical experts have been interviewed so far. The results of this project help envision a training structure and prospective projects. An Internet Site has also been created on the Intranet in order to render knowledge explicit and facilitate the tools for knowledge management initiatives. Furthermore, ARN's knowledge map project has also been started. (author) [es

  12. 76 FR 72220 - Incorporation of Risk Management Concepts in Regulatory Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    ... actions? 4. What are the key characteristics for a holistic risk management regulatory structure for... accomplishing the goal of a holistic risk management regulatory structure? How could these challenges be... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0269] Incorporation of Risk Management Concepts in...

  13. Regulatory issues for nuclear power plant life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, J.

    2000-01-01

    The workshop of 26-27 june 2000, on nuclear power Plant LIfe Management (PLIM), also included working groups in which major issues facing PLIM activities for nuclear power plants were identified and discussed. The second group was on Regulation. The Regulatory Working Group will attempt to identify some of the more pertinent issues affecting nuclear plant regulation in a changing PLIM environment, to identify some possible actions to be taken to address these issues, and to identify some of the parties responsible for taking these actions. Some preliminary regulatory issues are noted below. This is not intended to be a comprehensive list of such issues but rather is intended to stimulate discussion among the experts attending this Workshop. One of the concerns in the regulatory arena is how the structural integrity of the plants can be assured for an extended lifetime. Technological advances directed toward the following are likely to be important factors in the regulatory process of life extension. - Preventive and corrective maintenance (e.g., water chemistry control, pressure vessel annealing, and replacement of core internals). - Ageing and degradation mechanisms and evaluation (e.g., embrittlement, wear, corrosion/erosion, fatigue, and stress corrosion). - Monitoring, surveillance, and inspection (e.g., fatigue monitoring and non-destructive testing). - Optimisation of maintenance (e.g., using risk-based analysis). On the business side, there is concern about technical support by manufacturers, fuel companies, and construction companies. Maintaining a strong technical base and skilled workers in a potentially declining environment is another concern in the regulatory community. Waste management and decommissioning remain significant issue regarding PLIM. These issues affect all three areas of concern - technology, business, and regulation. It is against this background, that the issues put forth in this paper are presented. The objective of presenting these

  14. Algorithms for the process management of sealed source brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, M.J.; Ulin, K.; Sternick, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Incidents and misadministrations suggest that brachytherapy may benefit form clarification of the quality management program and other mandates of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To that end, flowcharts of step by step subprocesses were developed and formatted with dedicated software. The overall process was similarly organized in a complex flowchart termed a general process map. Procedural and structural indicators associated with each flowchart and map were critiqued and pre-existing documentation was revised. open-quotes Step-regulation tablesclose quotes were created to refer steps and subprocesses to Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules and recommendations in their sequences of applicability. Brachytherapy algorithms were specified as programmable, recursive processes, including therapeutic dose determination and monitoring doses to the public. These algorithms are embodied in flowcharts and step-regulation tables. A general algorithm is suggested as a template form which other facilities may derive tools to facilitate process management of sealed source brachytherapy. 11 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Initiating Knowledge Management Project in a Regulatory Body in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakdee, K.; Apichaibukol, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Thailand is one of countries that have adopted the use of nuclear technology in various applications such as medical, agricultural, industrial and research applications. Recognizing this enormous potential in many applications, the Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP) as a regulatory body under the Ministry of Science and Technology, carries out a variety of activities to disseminate and promote youth, entrepreneurs and public on the awareness of the atomic energy in Thailand. In recent years, “knowledge management” is one of the key factors that contribute to safe, secure and efficient operation of nuclear activities and facilities but also for the regulatory processes as well. In this regards, the OAP is aware and recognize of the importance of studying and initiating nuclear knowledge and human resource development programme in the regulatory body. Even though, the OAP has been initiating the project on nuclear knowledge and human resources for several years but the present status of the projects still remain in primarily stage of the initiating. This paper describes the initiating of nuclear knowledge in the past and present status for knowledge management project in regulatory body in Thailand. (author

  16. Knowledge Management Tools in Application to Regulatory Body Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, E.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents the application of knowledge management tools to regulatory authority activity. Knowledge management tools are considered a means for improving the efficiency of regulator activities. Three case studies are considered: 1. a knowledge management audit procedure in the regulator (tools for knowledge management audit application, results and the audit outcomes); 2. the development of a guide to identify causes of discrepancies and shortcomings revealed during inspections in NPP maintenance (ontologies of factors influencing on a maintenance quality and causes of discrepancies and shortcoming development); 3. the development of a knowledge portal for regulator (regulator needs which could be covered by the portal, definition and basic function of the portal, it’s functioning principles, development goals and tasks, common model, development stages). (author)

  17. Ionizing radiation sources: very diversified means, multiple applications and a changing regulatory environment. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the conference organised by the French society of radiation protection about ionizing radiation source means, applications and regulatory environment. Twenty eight presentations (slides) are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Overview of sources - some quantitative data from the national inventory of ionizing radiation sources (Yann Billarand, IRSN); 2 - Overview of sources (Jerome Fradin, ASN); 3 - Regulatory framework (Sylvie Rodde, ASN); 4 - Alternatives to Iridium radiography - the case of pressure devices at the manufacturing stage (Henri Walaszek, Cetim; Bruno Kowalski, Welding Institute); 5 - Dosimetric stakes of medical scanner examinations (Jean-Louis Greffe, Charleroi hospital of Medical University); 6 - The removal of ionic smoke detectors (Bruno Charpentier, ASN); 7 - Joint-activity and reciprocal liabilities - Organisation of labour risk prevention in case of companies joint-activity (Paulo Pinto, DGT); 8 - Consideration of gamma-graphic testing in the organization of a unit outage activities (Jean-Gabriel Leonard, EDF); 9 - Radiological risk control at a closed and independent work field (Stephane Sartelet, Areva); 10 - Incidents and accidents status and typology (Pascale Scanff, IRSN); 11 - Regional overview of radiation protection significant events (Philippe Menechal, ASN); 12 - Incident leading to a tritium contamination in and urban area - consequences and experience feedback (Laurence Fusil, CEA); 13 - Experience feedback - loss of sealing of a calibration source (Philippe Mougnard, Areva); 14 - Blocking incident of a 60 Co source (Bruno Delille, Salvarem); 15 - Triggering of gantry's alarm: status of findings (Philippe Prat, Syctom); 16 - Non-medical electric devices: regulatory changes (Sophie Dagois, IRSN; Jerome Fradin, ASN); 17 - Evaluation of the dose equivalent rate in pulsed fields: method proposed by the IRSN and implementation test (Laurent Donadille, IRSN

  18. Main Activities to Improve the Control of Radioactive Sources and Maintain an Effective Regulatory Nuclear Systems in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marechal, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2006, the Directorate of Nuclear Safety and Security, DRS, of National Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, has gone through many improvements. In 2006 CNEN signed the commitment to the recommendations of the Code of Conduct on The Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and the Guidance on The Import and Export of Radioactive Sources. The DRS is responsible for the licensing and control of nuclear facilities, fuel cycle, waste management and the control of radioactive sources and authorizations of medical and industrial installations. In 2009 the department responsible for the control of radioactive sources and authorizations of medical and industrial installations implemented an “Electronic Management System” in which this System integrates the transport department and waste management department. The Electronic Management System is linked to the register of radioactive sources and facilities and there is an access on line to the Customs, making the control of import and export of radioactive sources robust, efficient and fast. During the period from 2006 until 2015 the most relevant regulations related to the control of radioactive sources and authorizations of medical and industrial installations were reviewed and some were elaborated and issued. These documents were in line with the Categorization of Radioactive Sources and the International Basic Safety Standards, issued in the IAEA Safety Standard Series as General Safety Requirements Part 3 (GSR Part 3). The paper describes all the steps that were adopted in order to implement these systems and the improvements on our Nuclear Regulatory Systems. (author)

  19. Knowledge Management Implementation In Indonesia Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurwidi Astuti, Y.H.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) acquires the task and function to control the safety, security and safeguards in the field of nuclear energy through the development of legislation, licensing services, inspection and enforcement. Which is supported by review and assessment, emergency preparedness. Knowledge Management (KM) is importance for BAPETEN to achieve the Regulatory body effectiveness and product innovation. The Chairman of BAPETEN has set policies statement for KM implementation. To implement a knowledge management program, BAPETEN creates KM guidelines that includes blueprint and roadmap KM programme based on a KM readiness survey. The KM readiness survey involves 20% of staff who represent each unit and discussions with the senior manager of BAPETEN, and the result of readiness survey produce 13 KM BAPETEN initiatives strategic. After the initiative strategic has been obtained, BAPETEN creates the Roadmap of BAPETEN Knowledge Management for 2015–2019 programme for KM People with the activity sozialization of KM Guidebook, workshop SMART knowledge worker, nurture Community of practices (COP) and develop social network analysis (SNE). KM Process with activity focus group discussion, KM Readyness survey, KM Statement, KM Bapeten Guidebook, knowledge mapping, knowledge harvesting. KM Technology with activity develop knowledge system or portal, e-learning. (author

  20. Regulatory aspects of the radioactive waste management in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siraky, Graciela

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes briefly the legislative and regulatory framework in which the radioactive waste management is carried out in Argentina. The activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) and the applied approaches in relation to inspection of facilities, safety assessments of associated systems and collaboration in the matter with international agencies are also exposed. The 'National Law of the Nuclear Activity' (No. 24804), in force since April 1997, assigns to NRA the following functions: to regulate and to inspect nuclear activities regarding radiological and nuclear safety, physical protection of nuclear materials, in order to verify that such materials are used exclusively with peaceful purposes and also, to advise the National Executive Power in matters of its competence. For the fulfilment of these functions the Law grants to NRA the necessary legal competence to develop, to establish and to apply a regulatory system to all nuclear activities carried out in Argentina. The activity of NRA is carried out in the framework of a regulatory system whose fundamental aspect in the approach adopted to establish the requirements of safety, which is know as 'of performance'. This system has a group of rules known as 'AR Standards' (AR: abbreviation of Regulatory Authority) that, among other requirements, establish that the construction, operation and decommissioning of a nuclear installation can not start without the corresponding construction, operation or decommissioning license. In that sense, besides having the legal competence in the topic, NRA has developed its necessary technical competence to evaluate, with own criteria, all radiological and nuclear safety aspects involved in the grant of licenses and to guarantee an appropriate level of control in the facilities. In relation to the radioactive waste management, NRA has developed some basic criteria. These criteria underline the requirements put to the 'Responsible Entity' that generates or manages

  1. Swedish REGULATORY APPROACH TO SAFETY Assessment AND SEVERE ACCIDENT MANAGEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.; Sandervaag, O.

    1997-01-01

    The Swedish regulatory approach to safety assessment and severe accident management is briefly described. The safety assessment program, which focuses on prevention of incidents and accidents, has three main components: periodic safety reviews, probabilistic safety analysis, and analysis of postulated disturbances and accident progression sequences. Management and man-technology-organisation issues, as well as inspections, play a key role in safety assessment. Basis for severe accident management were established by the Government decisions in 1981 and 1986. By the end of 1988, the severe accident mitigation systems and emergency operating procedures were implemented at all Swedish reactors. The severe accident research has continued after 1988 for further verification of the protection provided by the systems and reduction of remaining uncertainties in risk dominant phenomena

  2. Regulatory requirements of radiation and radioactive sources in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundara Rao, I.S.

    1993-01-01

    Manufacture and supply of radiation sources, their use and the disposal of radioactive materials are regulated through the application of Safe Disposal Radioactive Wastes Rules 1987. Salient aspects of these are discussed

  3. Total quality management of cobalt-60 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    Total Quality Management of Cobalt-60 sources by a supplier requires a life cycle approach to source management. This covers various aspects, including design, manufacturing, installation, field inspection, source surveillance and return of cobalt-60 sources at the end of their useful life. The Total Quality Management approach demonstrates a strong industry commitment to the beneficial use of gamma technology for industrial irradiation applications in both developed nations and in those nations who are developing their infrastructure and techniques for the beneficial use of this technology. MDS Nordion continues to demonstrate its support and commitment to the industry by developing and implementing state-of-the-art standards for the safe use of cobalt-60 sources

  4. Open Source Approach to Project Management Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo MARGEA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing large projects involving different groups of people and complex tasks can be challenging. The solution is to use Project management software, which allows a more efficient management of projects. However, famous project management systems can be costly and may require expensive custom servers. Even if free software is not as complex as Microsoft Project, is noteworthy to think that not all projects need all the features, amenities and power of such systems. There are free and open source software alternatives that meet the needs of most projects, and that allow Web access based on different platforms and locations. A starting stage in adopting an OSS in-house is finding and identifying existing open source solution. In this paper we present an overview of Open Source Project Management Software (OSPMS based on articles, reviews, books and developers’ web sites, about those that seem to be the most popular software in this category.

  5. Regulatory control of radioactive sources: an international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flakus, F.N.

    1998-01-01

    Within its Regular Programme and its Technical Co-operation Programme, the IAEA undertakes a number of activities in support of national efforts aimed at strengthening national infrastructures for the control of radiation sources. The framework of these activities is described. (author)

  6. Supplemental Information Source Document Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Craig [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Halpern, Jonathan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wrons, Ralph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reiser, Anita [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mond, Michael du [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shain, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This Supplemental Information Source Document for Waste Management was prepared in support of future analyses including those that may be performed as part of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement. This document presents information about waste management practices at SNL/NM, including definitions, inventory data, and an overview of current activities.

  7. Certified training for nuclear and radioactive source security management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive sources are used by hospitals, research facilities and industry for such purposes as diagnosing and treating illnesses, sterilising equipment and inspecting welds. Unfortunately, many States, regulatory authorities and licensees may not appreciate how people with malevolent intentions could use radioactive sources, and statistics confirm that a number of security incidents happen around the globe. The adversary could be common thieves, activists, insiders, terrorists and organised crime groups. Mitigating this risk requires well trained and competent staff who have developed the knowledge, attributes and skills necessary to successfully discharge their security responsibilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Institute for Nuclear Security are leading international training efforts. The target audience is a multi-disciplinary group of professionals with management responsibilities for security at facilities with radioactive sources. These efforts to promote training and competence amongst practitioners have been recognised at the 2014 and 2016 Nuclear Security and Nuclear Industry Summits. (author)

  8. The United States initiative for international radioactive source management (ISRM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraine, N.; Karhnak, J.

    1999-01-01

    The United States takes seriously the potential problems from uncontrolled radioactive sources. To address these problems, the United States Department of State is leading the development of an initiative for International Radioactive Source Management (ISRM). The Department of State, through a number of Federal and state agencies, regulatory bodies and private industry, will endeavor to provide coordinated support to the international community, particularly through IAEA, to assist in the development and implementation of risk-based clearance levels to support import/export of radioactive contaminated metals and the tracking, management, identification, remediation, and disposition of 'lost sources' entering nation states and targeted industries. The United States believes that the international control of radioactive sources is critical in avoiding wide-spread contamination of the world metal supply. Thus the initiative has four objectives: (1) Protect sources from becoming lost (Tracking management); (2) Identify primary locations where sources have been lost (Stop future losses); (3) Locate lost sources (monitor and retrieve); and (4) Educate and train (deploy knowledge and technology). A number of efforts already underway in the United States support the overall initiative. The EPA has provided a grant to the Conference of Radiation Program Control Directors (CRCPD) to develop a nation-wide program for the disposition of orphaned radioactive sources. This program now has internet visibility and a toll-free telephone number to call for assistance in the disposal of sources. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Department of Energy (DOE), and other government agencies as well as private companies are assisting CRCPD in this program. The NRC has begun a program to improve control of radioactive sources in the United States, and also intends to promulgate a regulation defining conditions for the release of materials from licensed facilities. The DOE is

  9. Livestock Disease Management for Trading Across Different Regulatory Regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Andrew M; Jones, Glyn; Kleczkowski, Adam; Naylor, Rebecca; Timmis, Jon; White, Piran C L; Touza, Julia

    2018-02-12

    The maintenance of livestock health depends on the combined actions of many different actors, both within and across different regulatory frameworks. Prior work recognised that private risk management choices have the ability to reduce the spread of infection to trading partners. We evaluate the efficiency of farmers' alternative biosecurity choices in terms of their own-benefits from unilateral strategies and quantify the impact they may have in filtering the disease externality of trade. We use bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) in England and Scotland as a case study, since this provides an example of a situation where contrasting strategies for BVD management occur between selling and purchasing farms. We use an agent-based bioeconomic model to assess the payoff dependence of farmers connected by trade but using different BVD management strategies. We compare three disease management actions: test-cull, test-cull with vaccination and vaccination alone. For a two-farm trading situation, all actions carried out by the selling farm provide substantial benefits to the purchasing farm in terms of disease avoided, with the greatest benefit resulting from test-culling with vaccination on the selling farm. Likewise, unilateral disease strategies by purchasers can be effective in reducing disease risks created through trade. We conclude that regulation needs to balance the trade-off between private gains from those bearing the disease management costs and the positive spillover effects on others.

  10. Radioactive sealed sources inventory and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez C, G.; Mallaupoma G, M.; Cruz C, W.

    1996-01-01

    This report is related to the management of radioactive wastes, that is to say, related to the sealed sources utilized in industry, medicine and research jobs, that can not be used anymore, because of their life time termination or their activity decay to useless limits. Owing to this fact, it is necessary to take them to the Management Plant of Radioactive waste in the 'RACSO' Nuclear Center, as it is specified by the National Authority Technical Office (OTAN) regulations in Peru. The experience gained by IPEN in the sealed source management is shown in the table which informs about the radionuclide types, activity and volume amount for years. In the 'RACSO' Nuclear Center, 63 sealed sources are stored and right measures are being adopted in order to be conditioned by cementation in 200 lt steel reinforced cylinders, which are proper to their transportation and storage. A flow-chart shows the steps that the national users should follow in order to manage radioactive sealed sources and so that minimize the risks. Resulting from the agreement between the users and managers, a systematic coordination is developed, verifying the information related to the source characterization, the way of transportation and the future conditioning. It also involves the cost aspects, which in some cases, represent a big problem in the management. (authors). 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  12. Open Source GIS based integrated watershed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. M.; Lindsay, J.; Berg, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Optimal land and water management to address future and current resource stresses and allocation challenges requires the development of state-of-the-art geomatics and hydrological modelling tools. Future hydrological modelling tools should be of high resolution, process based with real-time capability to assess changing resource issues critical to short, medium and long-term enviromental management. The objective here is to merge two renowned, well published resource modeling programs to create an source toolbox for integrated land and water management applications. This work will facilitate a much increased efficiency in land and water resource security, management and planning. Following an 'open-source' philosophy, the tools will be computer platform independent with source code freely available, maximizing knowledge transfer and the global value of the proposed research. The envisioned set of water resource management tools will be housed within 'Whitebox Geospatial Analysis Tools'. Whitebox, is an open-source geographical information system (GIS) developed by Dr. John Lindsay at the University of Guelph. The emphasis of the Whitebox project has been to develop a user-friendly interface for advanced spatial analysis in environmental applications. The plugin architecture of the software is ideal for the tight-integration of spatially distributed models and spatial analysis algorithms such as those contained within the GENESYS suite. Open-source development extends knowledge and technology transfer to a broad range of end-users and builds Canadian capability to address complex resource management problems with better tools and expertise for managers in Canada and around the world. GENESYS (Generate Earth Systems Science input) is an innovative, efficient, high-resolution hydro- and agro-meteorological model for complex terrain watersheds developed under the direction of Dr. James Byrne. GENESYS is an outstanding research and applications tool to address

  13. Management of spent sealed sources in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisnubroto, D.S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the effort of the Center for Development of Radioactive Waste Management (CDRWM) to develop and implement activities in maintaining and improving the safety of spent sealed radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials over their life cycle. There is a wide variety of uses of radiation sources and radioactive materials in Indonesia, while the CDRWM plan to cover all spent radiation sources. Primary consideration is given to sealed radiation sources with relatively high levels of radioactivity which might necessitate interventional measures should control over them be lost. The policy of the Government of Indonesia for spent radiation sources is, whenever possible, spent sealed sources should be returned to the supplier. CDRWM has a general principle that sealed sources should not be removed from their holders, or the holders physically modified (except for Ra-226 needles, smoke detector and lighting preventer). (author)

  14. Implementation of a Quality Management System in regulatory inspection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires do Rio, Monica; Ferreira, Paulo Roberto; Cunha, Paulo G. da; Acar, Maria Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - IRD -, of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, started in 2001, the implementation of a quality management system (SGQ), in the inspection, testing and calibration activities. The SGQ was an institutional guideline and is inserted in a larger system of management of the IRD started in 1999, with the adoption of the National Quality Award criteria - PNQ, within the Project for Excellence in Technological Research of Associacao Brasileira das Instituicoes de Pesquisas Tecnologicas - ABIPTI (Brazilian Association of Technological Research institutions). The proposed quality management system and adopted at the IRD was developed and implemented in accordance with the requirements of NBR ISO/IEC 17025 - General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories, and ISO/IEC 17020 - General criteria for operation of various types of bodies performing inspections. For regulatory inspection activities, the quality system was implemented on three program inspection services of radiological protection led, respectively, by clinics and hospitals that operate radiotherapy services; industries that use nuclear gauges in their control or productive processes and power reactor operators (CNAAA) - just the environmental part. It was formed a pioneering team of inspectors for standardizing the processes, procedures and starting the implementation of the system in the areas. This work describes the implementation process steps, including difficulties, learning and advantages of the adoption of a quality management system in inspection activities

  15. Knowledge Management for Enhancing Regulatory Body Capabilities in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apichaibukol, A.; Pakdee, K.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In order to be a learning organization, the Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP) has appointed a knowledge-management team in an attempt to manage internal knowledge, both tacit knowledge and explicit knowledge, systematically. In principle, the seven steps of knowledge management will be applied for OAP KM, namely; 1. Knowledge identification including the knowledge required of the Regulatory Body. 2. Knowledge creation and acquisition including knowledge sharing, transfer and how to maintain knowledge external factors such as a customers, stakeholder, etc. 3. Knowledge organization based on knowledge structure is needed for a systematic knowledge retention in the future. 4. Knowledge refinement with ISO standards in document storage. 5. Knowledge access for example, using information technology management through web board. 6. Knowledge sharing, OAP staff through numerous methods designed to transfer implicit and tacit knowledge such as formal classroom and on-the-job training, informal Communities of Practice, mentoring. 7. Learning is OAP group continually enhancing their capabilities and making decisions, solving problems and improving the organization. OAP staff could apply knowledge for organization development and planning for a supporting guideline. (author

  16. Room source management decontamination in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, D.; Montanez, Osvaldo

    1998-01-01

    A surface,work materials and tools contamination it produced for Ra-226 sources management in des use in Uruguayan radioactive waste and sources management and storage room specifically in the Uruguay Republic University in Nuclear Search Center. A surface contamination direct was performed measurement with Eberline alpha particles Contamat FHT 111M with 42 496/30 sounder. It found greater and least contamination grade in all cement floor as well as in tables where was managed with Ra-226 sources. A value measured surface contamination can see in the Room scheme with more 200 Bq/cm in extension small places. A segregation between work materials and tools considerate d free contamination was realized. The contaminated objects was separated for a future treatment. A proceeding followed in the decontamination was inhale, abrasion,sweep essays in different representative zones, obtain decontamination factors and residual activity

  17. Regulatory aspects of management of change - Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear licensees are increasingly required to adapt to a more challenging commercial environment as moves to de-regulate electricity markets gather pace. One of the costs that is often perceived as being amenable to control is staffing, and hence there is significant exploration of new strategies for managing staffing levels. This report presents the outputs from a Workshop convened by the Special Experts' Group in Human and Organisational Factors (SEGHOF) of the Committee for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and organised by the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). The purpose of the workshop was to facilitate the exchange of views on, and approaches towards, the regulation of organisational change. The major risks associated with organisational change were discussed, and a range of regulatory challenges was identified for detailed discussion. There was agreement that the licensee must retain the responsibility to manage its own business but that organisational issues should be subject to regulatory scrutiny if they have the potential to impact on safety. The regulator should be able to demonstrate an approach to oversight of organisational change which is valid, transparent and consistent, and should inform the licensee of its expectations in terms of information supplied, communication and timing. The workshop confirmed that there is significant agreement between regulators concerning the need for licensees to put in place arrangements to manage organisational change. There was also broad consensus on what should constitute the elements of a licensee's management of change process. Differing views were evident about the balance between regulatory scrutiny of the process, as opposed to the outcomes of change, which largely represents differing regulatory regimes and philosophies. However, it was acknowledged that the regulator must be capable of taking an early view of the adequacy of proposed changes, rather than monitoring outcomes alone

  18. Management of Spent Radiation Source from Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisyah

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays the use of radioactive source for both radiodiagnostic and radiotherapy in Indonesia hospital increases rapidly. Sealed source used in radiotherapy among others for brachytherapy, teletherapy, bone densitometry, whole blood irradiation and gamma knife (radiosurgery). In line with this, the waste of spent radiation sources will be generated in hospitals. Of course these spent radiation sources must be treated correctly in order to maintain the safety of both the public and the environment. According to the Act No. 10/1997, BATAN, in care of the Radioactive Waste Management Center is the national appointed agency for the management of radioactive waste. The option for waste management by hospitals needs to be expound, either by re-exporting to the supplier of origin, re-exporting to other supplier, re-use by other licensee or sending to the Radioactive Waste Management Center. Usually the waste sent by the hospitals to the center comprises of sealed radiation source of 60 Co, 137 Cs or 226 Ra. The management of spent radiation source in the center is carried out in several steps i.e. conditioning, temporary storage, and long-term storage (final disposal). The conditioning of non 226 Ra is carried out by placing the waste in a 200 litter drum shell, 950 or 350 litter concrete shells, depends on the activity and dimension of the spent radiation source. The conditioning of 226 Ra is carried out by encapsulating the waste in a stainless steel container for long-term storage shield which then placed in a 200 litter drum shell. The temporary storage of the conditioned spent radiation source is carried out by storing it in the center’s temporary storages, either low or medium activity waste. Finally, the conditioned spent radiation source is buried in a disposal facility. For medium half-life spent radiation source, the final disposal is burial it in a shallow-land disposal; mean while, for long half-life spent radiation source, the final disposal is burial it in

  19. 10 CFR 40.11 - Persons using source material under certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Persons using source material under certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracts. 40.11 Section 40.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracts. Except to the extent that...

  20. Management and share of regulatory information through web; development of regulatory information management system for Korea next generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Lee, J. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Lee, S. H.; Yun, Y. C.; Park, M. I.

    2001-01-01

    The Regulatory Information Management System developed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety supports researchers who are in charge of developing SRRG for the Korea Next Generation Reactors, manage the developed SRRG and development process, and make it possible to share the SRRG information and background knowledge through the internet with the nuclear-related personnel and the public. From the experience of the system operation, the search engine is repalced to manage the native SRRG files directly. This change eliminates the inconsistency between native files and database files and improve the search exactness by automatic indexing function. The user interface of the internet homepage (http://kngr.kins.re.kr) is completely rebuilded and allows SRRG developers to manage the search system and the atomic energy regulations database on the Web without the help of the client programs. General users are also able to utilize more convenient search function and additional information by the improved interface. The system is running under the backup system and firewall system for the data protection and security

  1. Management and share of regulatory information through web; development of regulatory information management system for Korea next generation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Lee, J. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Lee, S. H. [KINS, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Y. C.; Park, M. I. [LG-EDS Systems, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    The Regulatory Information Management System developed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety supports researchers who are in charge of developing SRRG for the Korea Next Generation Reactors, manage the developed SRRG and development process, and make it possible to share the SRRG information and background knowledge through the internet with the nuclear-related personnel and the public. From the experience of the system operation, the search engine is repalced to manage the native SRRG files directly. This change eliminates the inconsistency between native files and database files and improve the search exactness by automatic indexing function. The user interface of the internet homepage (http://kngr.kins.re.kr) is completely rebuilded and allows SRRG developers to manage the search system and the atomic energy regulations database on the Web without the help of the client programs. General users are also able to utilize more convenient search function and additional information by the improved interface. The system is running under the backup system and firewall system for the data protection and security.

  2. Waste management outlook for mountain regions: Sources and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semernya, Larisa; Ramola, Aditi; Alfthan, Björn; Giacovelli, Claudia

    2017-09-01

    Following the release of the global waste management outlook in 2015, the United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment), through its International Environmental Technology Centre, is elaborating a series of region-specific and thematic waste management outlooks that provide policy recommendations and solutions based on current practices in developing and developed countries. The Waste Management Outlook for Mountain Regions is the first report in this series. Mountain regions present unique challenges to waste management; while remoteness is often associated with costly and difficult transport of waste, the potential impact of waste pollutants is higher owing to the steep terrain and rivers transporting waste downstream. The Outlook shows that waste management in mountain regions is a cross-sectoral issue of global concern that deserves immediate attention. Noting that there is no 'one solution fits all', there is a need for a more landscape-type specific and regional research on waste management, the enhancement of policy and regulatory frameworks, and increased stakeholder engagement and awareness to achieve sustainable waste management in mountain areas. This short communication provides an overview of the key findings of the Outlook and highlights aspects that need further research. These are grouped per source of waste: Mountain communities, tourism, and mining. Issues such as waste crime, plastic pollution, and the linkages between exposure to natural disasters and waste are also presented.

  3. Emergency management in nuclear power plants: a regulatory view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Vikas; Chander, Vipin; Vijayan, P.; Nair, P.S.; Krishnamurthy, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear power plants in India adopts a high level of defence in depth concept in design and operates at highest degree of safety, however the possibility of nuclear accidents cannot be ruled out. The safety and regulatory review of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) in India are carried out by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Section 33 of Atomic Energy (Radiation Protection) Rules-2004 provides the basic requirements of emergency preparedness aspects for a nuclear facility. Prior to the issuance of a license for the operation of NPPs, AERB ensures that the site specific emergency response manuals are in place and tested. The emergency response plan includes the emergency response organization, their responsibilities, the detailed scheme of emergency preparedness, response, facilities, equipments, coordination and support of various organizations and other technical aspects. These emergency preparedness plans are tested at periodic interval to check the overall effectiveness. The plant and site emergency exercise is handled by the plant authorities as per the site emergency plan. The events with off-site consequences are handled by the district authorities according to the off-site emergency plan. In off-site emergency exercises, observers from AERB and other associated organizations participate. Observations of the participants are discussed in the feedback session of the exercise for their disposition. This paper reviews the current level of emergency planning and preparedness, statistics of emergency exercises conducted and their salient findings. The paper highlights improvement in the emergency management programme over the years including development of advance technical support systems. The major challenges in off-site emergency management programme such as industrial growth and increase in population within the sterilized zone, frequent transfer of district officials and the floating population around the NPPs are outlined. The areas for improvement in

  4. Investigation on regulatory requirements for radiation safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok; Choi, Yoon Seok; Cho, Dae Hyung

    2013-01-01

    NRC recognizes that efficient management of radiation safety plan is an important factor to achieve radiation safety service. In case of Korea, the contents to perform the actual radiation safety management are legally contained in radiation safety management reports based on the Nuclear Safety Act. It is to prioritize the importance of safety regulations in each sector in accordance with the current situation of radiation and radioactive isotopes-used industry and to provide a basis for deriving safety requirements and safety regulations system maintenance by the priority of radiation safety management regulations. It would be helpful to achieve regulations to conform to reality based on international standards if consistent safety requirements is developed for domestic users, national standards and international standards on the basis of the results of questions answered by radiation safety managers, who lead on-site radiation safety management, about the priority of important factors in radioactive sources use, sales, production, moving user companies, to check whether derived configuration requirements for radiation safety management are suitable for domestic status

  5. The regulatory action in the problem of radioactive sources processed as scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, Walter Adrian; Cateriano, Miguel Angel

    2005-01-01

    The loss of control of a radioactive source can result in a radiological emergency, especially if that source is treated as scrap. This paper presents a case registered in Argentina about discovery of a radioactive source of Kr-85, 9.25 GBq, used in a computer for industrial measurement of thickness. The radioactive source, without registration or identification, was registered by a portal for detection of radioactive material in the middle of the scrap that entered daily in the oven of a important steel company. From there, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (RNA) conducted an investigation to determine the origin of the radioactive source, and in parallel made, in the laboratories of measurement, identification of radioactive material inside the source. This led to a company in financial and judicial bankruptcy, which had not notified the RNA about this situation, and also possessed, according to records, other eleven sources with similar characteristics. Finally the actions and regulatory effort allowed the localization of all the radioactive sources of this company, and its storage and deposit in an authorised repository

  6. Current regulatory and licensing status for byproduct sources, facilities and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, G.L.; Jensen, G.A.; Hazelton, R.F.

    1985-02-01

    Public use of nuclear byproducts, especially radioactive isotopes, will require approval by various regulatory agencies. Use of cesium-137 as an irradiation source for sterilizing medical products will require US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval. Two applications have been filed with NRC, and approval is expected soon. Widespread use of irradiation for food products depends on a favorable ruling by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A ruling is pending that would permit irradiation of fruits and vegetables up to 100 krad. NRC also controls the use of isotopes in remote power generators, but little regulatory action has been required in recent years. Recent development of radioluminescent (RL) lighting for runway lights has led to interest by commercial manufacturers. At the present time, a license has been issued to at least one manufacturer for sale of tritium-powered runway lights. 28 refs., 1 fig

  7. Organization and implementation of a national programme of regulatory control of sources in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippova, I.

    1998-01-01

    The application of ionizing radiation and radioactive material in fields such as medicine, industry, teaching and research is constantly increasing. Consequently, any country using ionizing radiation and radioactive material in these applications must ensure that they are used safely. In order to achieve this goal a country must establish appropriate national infrastructure related to radiation protection and safety. This requires appropriate regulatory mechanism together with an enforcement ability. The national infrastructure adopted in a country will depend on the actual needs of the country, the size and the complexity of the regulated practices and sources, as well as on the regulatory tradition in the country. The national infrastructure in Estonia comprises of three main components: legislation, regulatory authority, resources. (author)

  8. 77 FR 70846 - Regulatory Guide 1.182, “Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0285] Regulatory Guide 1.182, ``Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear Power Plants'' AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... withdrawing Regulatory Guide (RG)1.182, Revision (Rev.) 0, ``Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance...

  9. Regulatory control and challenges in Medical facilities using ionising radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    Medical facilities utilising ionising radiation sources for diagnostic and treatment of cancer are regulated under the provisions of Atomic Energy (Radiation Protection) Rules, 2004 promulgated under the Atomic Energy Act 1962. The Competent Authority for the enforcement of the rules is Chairman, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Practice specific codes are issued by AERB for medical facilities such as Radiotherapy, Nuclear Medicine and Radiology. Regulatory process for control of medical facilities covers the entire life cycle of the radiation sources in three stages viz pre-Iicensing, during useful life and decommissioning and disposal. Pre-Iicensing requirements include use of type approved sources and equipment, approval of design layout of the facility and installation, exclusive (safe and secure) source storage facility when the equipment is not in use, radiation (area/individual) monitoring devices, qualified, trained and certified manpower, emergency response plans and commitment from the licensee for the safe disposal of disused/decayed sources. Compliance to these requirements makes the applicant eligible to obtain license from AERB for the operation of the medical facility. During the use of radiation sources, specific prior approval of the Competent Authority is required in respect of every source replacement, sale, transfer, transport, import and export. Further, all licensees are required to send the periodic safety Status reports to AERB as well as reporting of any off normal events. AERB conducts inspection of the facilities to ensure compliance with the safety requirements during operation of the facility. Violation of safety norms by licensee attracts enforcement action which includes suspension, modification or withdrawal of licensee for operation of the facility. Upon completion of the useful life of the source, the licensee decommissions the facility and returns the source to the original supplier. For returning the source, prior

  10. Temporary Operational Protocol for making safe and managing Orphaned or Seized Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This protocol outlines the arrangements to manage the safe interim storage of an orphaned radioactive source or of a source identified for seizure, pending its ultimate disposal. Such sources may be sources found outside of regulatory control, detected at a frontier or seized in the public interest. This includes a radioactive source arising from a CBRN, chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, incident, following neutralisation of any associated dispersal device and confirmation of the suspect object as radioactive. The arrangements in this protocol are meant to be consistent with and used in conjunction with relevant protocols to the Major Emergency Framework Document and may be revisited as necessary as those protocols are further developed

  11. Principles for the exemption of radiation sources and practices from regulatory control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Radiation sources, including equipment and installations, which emit ionizing radiations, are potentially harmful to health and their use should therefore be regulated. Some types of radiation source, however, do not need to be subject to regulatory control, because they present such a low hazard that it would be a needless waste of time and effort to exercise control by a regulatory process and they can therefore be exempted from it. An Advisory Group Meeting was convened in Vienna in March 1988 sponsored jointly by the IAEA and NEA. This Safety Guide is the result of that meeting and represents a first international consensus on the subject of exemption principles. This document is issued as an IAEA Safety Guide since it recommends a procedure which might be followed in implementing the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for Radiation Protection. Its purpose is to recommend a policy on exemptions from the BSS system of notification, registration and licensing. 15 refs

  12. Regulatory impact of nuclear reactor accident source term assumptions. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasedag, W.F.; Blond, R.M.; Jankowski, M.W.

    1981-06-01

    This report addresses the reactor accident source term implications on accident evaluations, regulations and regulatory requirements, engineered safety features, emergency planning, probabilistic risk assessment, and licensing practice. Assessment of the impact of source term modifications and evaluation of the effects in Design Basis Accident analyses, assuming a change of the chemical form of iodine from elemental to cesium iodide, has been provided. Engineered safety features used in current LWR designs are found to be effective for all postulated combinations of iodine source terms under DBA conditions. In terms of potential accident consequences, it is not expected that the difference in chemical form between elemental iodine and cesium iodide would be significant. In order to account for the current information on source terms, a spectrum of accident scenerios is discussed to realistically estimate the source terms resulting from a range of potential accident conditions

  13. Design and development of an informatics management system as a support for the Regulatory Authority in the Republic of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes Ramos, Maryzury; Prendes Alonso, Miguel; Jova Sed, Luis

    2008-01-01

    The regulatory activity in the country is carried out by the National Center for Nuclear Safety (CNSN) according to the international recommendations. To develop this, CNSN is supported by the Center for Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) which it's in charged of guaranteeing the technical scientific support for this activity. These centers have been working in the last years in the design and development of a computing tool that allows the management of all important information, which should be controlled by the Regulatory Authority. The authorization processes of the practices and the inspection program require the use, register and evaluation of an important volume of information that grows as the number of practices and facilities are increases. Consequently the systematizing of this information needs an automated management system. The objective of this work is to show the level of automation reached by the National Regulatory Authority using RASSYN program. This program allows an efficient management of the information related to the radiation sources nationwide, the practices ascribed to these sources, the personnel involved in these practices and the dose received, the equipment measuring and detecting of radiations, the generated waste, the occurred radiological incidents, the conditions and requisites of the granted authorizations and the results of the inspection program, among others. The possibilities of RASSYN system to process the information given by the users and the ones produced by the regulatory authority are described. The automatic generation of the annual inspections plan, according to the previously defined criteria and the system of alerts on the state of fulfillment of radiological protection requirements make RASSYN a useful tool to optimize the functioning of the regulatory system. The versatility of the statistical reports allows to guarantees not only the requirements of the regulatory authority but also the expectations coming

  14. Management of development of renewable energy sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inić Branimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper: 'Management of development of renewable energy sources is to point out the possible solutions for neutralizing the threat of energy shortages. The paper outlines major short and long term energy problems facing humanity. The increase of world human population is, inevitably, accompanied by higher energy consumption. Reserves decrease of nonrenewable energy sources like oil, gas, and coal is a major threat to maintaining current living conditions, and thus requires solutions in order to neutralize the threat. This is why the management of development of renewable energy sources is an imperative for Serbia. The paper emphasizes the use of solar energy, because the annual average of solar radiation in Serbia is about 40% higher than the European average, however, the actual use of the sun's energy to generate electricity in Serbia is far behind the countries of the European Union. Solar energy is clean, renewable, and the fact that 4.2 kilowatt-hours are received daily per square meter averaged over the entire surface of the planet, makes it an almost unused energy source, Compared to EU countries, the price of non-renewable derived energy is, on average, higher in Serbia. Taking this into consideration, the use of solar energy, as an unused resource, imposes itself as indispensable.

  15. CONTENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (CMS OPEN SOURCE WEBSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela Lăzărică

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Firms need flexible software applications, which may be adaptable to dynamic changes of the modern business environment; they also need more control over their software costs, security and trust in purchased and implemented software. Moreover, they need to be free of individual software vendors and license costs for the software, etc. The solution of this problem consisted in open source applications and open source technology has proven that it can often provide high-quality software being a challenge for old models of software development and maintenance. The first content management system was announced in the late 90s. The offer of such software systems is varied and each of them has its own characteristics. This requires a comparative analysis of viable open-source systems in order to choose the most appropriate imposed goals. In this context, the paper illustrates the use of an open source content management system, like WordPress, to develop a content site in design of websites and analyzeits characteristics.

  16. Security of handling radioactive sources and the role of the regulatory body in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, M.

    1998-01-01

    The motivation of the present paper was undertaken to discuss the system adopted by the National Centre for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NCNSRC) in handling the radioactive sources inside the country. The system concentrates mainly on the role of the centre concerning three main categories namely regulations, licensing and training. The mutual co-operation between the regulatory body and the other agencies concerning this matter is going to be presented. (author)

  17. Integrated Management Program for Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt IMPRSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, A.; El-Adham, K.

    2004-01-01

    Sealed sources are usually in capsules made of stainless steel. They are the size of a pen or a finger and contain one of hundreds of radioactive elements (e.g., Iridium, Radium) or their isotopes. They are air-tight and very durable, contain the radioactive material but not radiation. They are used in the health sector, industry, military, and universities. Incidents occurred in Met Halfa, Egypt, 2000 (Iridium-192); Goiania, Brazil, 1987 (Cesium-137); Mexico and Southwest U.S., 1977 -1984 (Cobalt-60); Peru, 1999 (Iridium-1992); Poland 2001 (Cobalt-60). The IMPRSS Mission is based on a joined partnership between the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, the Egyptian Ministry of Health, the Sandia National Laboratories, the International Atomic Energy Agency and others. The IMPRSS Mission protects human health and the environment in Egypt from mismanaged sealed sources, is developed jointly with MOH and EAEA, provides capabilities for managing radioactive sealed sources in Egypt, increases public awareness, provides education and training, improves emergency response capabilities, develops a permanent disposal facility, ensures the program is self-sustaining and ensures close coordination with the IAEA. Infrastructure how to manage sealed sources is discussed. It includes awareness, tracking and inventory control, security, recovery, conditioning and storage, recycling and disposal. Emergency response, regulatory reform, education and training and its targets are provided. The government of Egypt can protect the people of Egypt and is ready for emergencies. Prevention is the first line of defence and detection is the second line of defence. Adequate Emergency Response saves lives and adequate control reduces risk of mismanaged uses or deliberate misuses of sources. A Cradle-to-Grave approach is built on existing capabilities at EAEA and MOH

  18. Radiation protection and regulatory aspects in the use of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Amit; Dash Sharma, P.K.; Sonawane, A.U.

    2012-01-01

    disposal of unused sources. The national regulatory authority, i.e., Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) has carefully considered these aspects in its regulatory programme aimed to ensure the safety of radiation sources all the time so that use of radiation sources does not cause unacceptable impact on the health of workers, members of the public and on the environment. AERB ensures this by enforcing provisions of the Atomic Energy (Radiation Protection) Rules, 2004 and other relevant rules issued under the Atomic Energy Act, 1962 and the safety codes, safety standards, directives etc.

  19. An electronic regulatory document management system for a clinical trial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenle; Durkalski, Valerie; Pauls, Keith; Dillon, Catherine; Kim, Jaemyung; Kolk, Deneil; Silbergleit, Robert; Stevenson, Valerie; Palesch, Yuko

    2010-01-01

    A computerized regulatory document management system has been developed as a module in a comprehensive Clinical Trial Management System (CTMS) designed for an NIH-funded clinical trial network in order to more efficiently manage and track regulatory compliance. Within the network, several institutions and investigators are involved in multiple trials, and each trial has regulatory document requirements. Some of these documents are trial specific while others apply across multiple trials. The latter causes a possible redundancy in document collection and management. To address these and other related challenges, a central regulatory document management system was designed. This manuscript shares the design of the system as well as examples of it use in current studies. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulatory Technology Development Plan - Sodium Fast Reactor. Mechanistic Source Term - Trial Calculation. Work Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabaskas, David; Bucknor, Matthew; Jerden, James; Brunett, Acacia J.

    2016-01-01

    The overall objective of the SFR Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP) effort is to identify and address potential impediments to the SFR regulatory licensing process. In FY14, an analysis by Argonne identified the development of an SFR-specific MST methodology as an existing licensing gap with high regulatory importance and a potentially long lead-time to closure. This work was followed by an initial examination of the current state-of-knowledge regarding SFR source term development (ANLART-3), which reported several potential gaps. Among these were the potential inadequacies of current computational tools to properly model and assess the transport and retention of radionuclides during a metal fuel pool-type SFR core damage incident. The objective of the current work is to determine the adequacy of existing computational tools, and the associated knowledge database, for the calculation of an SFR MST. To accomplish this task, a trial MST calculation will be performed using available computational tools to establish their limitations with regard to relevant radionuclide release/retention/transport phenomena. The application of existing modeling tools will provide a definitive test to assess their suitability for an SFR MST calculation, while also identifying potential gaps in the current knowledge base and providing insight into open issues regarding regulatory criteria/requirements. The findings of this analysis will assist in determining future research and development needs.

  1. 77 FR 40817 - Low-Level Radioactive Waste Regulatory Management Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ...-2011-0012] RIN-3150-AI92 Low-Level Radioactive Waste Regulatory Management Issues AGENCY: Nuclear... regulatory time of compliance for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility, allowing licensees the... system, and revising the NRC's licensing requirements for land disposal of radioactive waste. DATES: The...

  2. TWRS configuration management requirement source document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vann, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The TWRS Configuration Management (CM) Requirement Source document prescribes CM as a basic product life-cycle function by which work and activities are conducted or accomplished. This document serves as the requirements basis for the TWRS CM program. The objective of the TWRS CM program is to establish consistency among requirements, physical/functional configuration, information, and documentation for TWRS and TWRS products, and to maintain this consistency throughout the life-cycle of TWRS and the product, particularly as changes are being made

  3. Certified Training for Nuclear and Radioactive Source Security Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Radioactive sources are used by hospitals, research facilities and industry for such purposes as diagnosing and treating illnesses, sterilising equipment and inspecting welds. Unfortunately, many States, regulatory authorities and licensees may not appreciate how people with malevolent intentions could use radioactive sources, and statistics confirm that a number of security incidents happen around the globe. The adversary could be common thieves, activists, insiders, terrorists and organised crime groups. Mitigating this risk requires well trained and competent staff who have developed the knowledge, attributes and skills necessary to successfully discharge their security responsibilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Institute for Nuclear Security are leading international training efforts. The target audience is a multi-disciplinary group of professionals with management responsibilities for security at facilities with radioactive sources. These efforts to promote training and competence amongst practitioners have been recognised at the 2014 and 2016 Nuclear Security and Nuclear Industry Summits. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Development and implementation of the regulatory control of sources in Latin American Model Project countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferruz Cruz, P.

    2001-01-01

    After a general assessment of the situation regarding radiation safety and the radiation protection infrastructure in Latin American countries, several of them were invited to participate in a Model Project oriented, in some cases, towards establishing a mechanism for national regulatory control of radiation sources, and in others, towards upgrading their national control programme. All these activities aimed at reaching an effective and sustainable radiation protection infrastructure based on international basic safety standards. The paper presents a general overview of the current situation with regard to radiation protection within the Model Project countries in Latin America after almost five years of activities. It includes: the implementation of regulatory issues; the control of occupational, medical and public exposures; emergency response and waste safety issues. The paper also presents some lessons learned during implementation concerning the numerous activities involved in this interregional project. (author)

  5. Regulatory switches for hierarchical use of carbon sources in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S. Perez-Alfaro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study the preferential use of carbon sources in the bacterium Escherichia coli. To that end we engineered transcriptional fusions of the reporter gene gfpmut2, downstream of transcription-factor promoters, and analyzed their activity under several conditions. The chosen transcription factors are known to regulate catabolic operons associated to the consumption of alternative sugars. The obtained results indicate the following hierarchical order of sugar preference in this bacterium: glucose > arabinose > sorbitol > galactose. Further dynamical results allowed us to conjecture that this hierarchical behavior might be operated by at least the following three regulatory strategies: 1 the coordinated activation of the corresponding operons by the global regulator catabolic repressor protein (CRP, 2 their asymmetrical responses to specific and unspecific sugars and, 3 the architecture of the associated gene regulatory networks.

  6. Telemental Health for Children and Adolescents: An Overview of Legal, Regulatory, and Risk Management Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Gregory M; Luxton, David D

    2016-04-01

    The use of technology to provide telemental healthcare continues to increase; however, little has been written about the legal and regulatory issues involved in providing this form of care to children and adolescents. This article reviews existing laws and regulations to summarize the risk management issues relevant to providing telemental healthcare to children and adolescents. There are several legal and regulatory areas in which telemental health clinicians need to have awareness. These areas include: 1) Licensure, 2) malpractice liability, 3) credentialing and privileging, 4) informed consent, 5) security and privacy, and 6) emergency management. Although legal and regulatory challenges remain in providing telemental healthcare to children and adolescents, it is possible to overcome these challenges with knowledge of the issues and appropriate risk management strategies. We provide general knowledge of these key legal and regulatory issues, along with some risk management recommendations.

  7. Regulatory control and management of radioactive materials in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, A.M.; Parami, V.K.; Domondon, D.B.

    2001-01-01

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) by virtue of Republic Act 2067, as amended, Republic Act 5207 and Executive Order 128 (1987), was mandated to promote, advance and regulate the safe and peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology in the Philippines. The PNRI was formerly the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission, established in 1958. This report aims to share the information and experience of PNRI as a regulatory authority on the administrative, technical and managerial aspects to ensure the safety and security of radioactive material in the country. It describes the country's regulatory framework, operational experiences, international co-operation including reporting system and database, and radiological safety assessment and compliance monitoring. It also briefly discusses the current development of the country's radiological emergency response plan and the radiation protection services offered by the PNRI. In the discussion and recommendations, some of the results of the regulatory information conferences conducted with the end-users are enumerated. (author)

  8. Development of regulatory technologies of key issues of radiation sources in the medical and industrial fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seong; Kim, Byung Soo; Ku, Bon Chul

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this research is to provide with rational bases to address the key issues raising up during the expansion of RI/RG usage in the medical and industrial fields, thus eventually contribute to enhancing the effectiveness of national regulatory systems. Related key issues that are introduced in the medical and industrial fields are analyzed and some outcomes are produced. The following results are attained. - Estimation Methodology Development of Regulatory Effects for the Use of Radioactive Substances, - Survey on Domestic Status of Nuclear Materials and Review on Domestic/Foreign Regulatory System for Nuclear Materials Regulation, - Comparative Analysis of KSTAR and Fusion Facilities of Advanced Countries, - Radiological Characteristics of Proton Therapy and Analysis of Foreign Cases and Systems, - Detection and Safety Analysis of Leak Radiation of High Energy Medical Generators, - Survey and Analysis on Usage and Requirements of Sealed Sources, - Incidents/Accidents Reporting System for RI-related Facilities, - Development of Audio-Visual Education Materials for Radiation Workers, - Development of Major Safety Procedures for Portable RIs, - Expansion of Existing DB for Radiation Devices including New Domestic Ones, - Survey of Foreign Status of Quality Maintenance System for Radiation equipment

  9. Strengthening of safety and security of radioactive sources: new regulatory challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Messaoudi, M.; Essadki M Lferde, H.; Moutia, Z. [Faculte des Sciences, Dept. de Physique, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-07-01

    The answer to these new regulatory challenges was given by implementation of divers measures aimed at strengthening of safety and security of radioactive sources and to prevent the malevolent use of radioactive sources. The international basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources (B.S.S.) require the establishment and implementation of security measures of radioactive sources to ensure that protection and safety requirements are met. The IAEA has engaged in an extensive effort to establish and/or strengthen national radiation protection and radiological safety infrastructure, including legislation and regulation, a regulatory authority empowered to authorize and inspect regulated activities, an adequate number of trained personnel and technical services that are beyond the capabilities required of the authorized legal persons. The Moroccan authority makes steady efforts to strengthen national radiation safety infrastructure by participating in IAEA model project for upgrading radiation protection infrastructure, to implement the revised version of code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources. Indeed, Morocco expressed its adhesion with the technical assistance project of the IAEA in 2001, carrying on the reinforcement of the national infrastructure of regulation and control of the radioactive materials. The control over radioactive sources is an essential element for maintaining high level of security and safety of radioactive sources. The IAEA T.E.C.-D.O.C.-1388 serves as reference document to implement the control culture. The security problems with which the world is confronted showed that the uses of radioactive sources should subject reinforcements of safety, of control and of security of the radioactive sources. For this purpose, the IAEA launched an action plan for the safety and security of radioactive sources. The IAEA guide Security of radioactive sources will help the

  10. Strengthening of safety and security of radioactive sources: new regulatory challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Messaoudi, M.; Essadki M Lferde, H.; Moutia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The answer to these new regulatory challenges was given by implementation of divers measures aimed at strengthening of safety and security of radioactive sources and to prevent the malevolent use of radioactive sources. The international basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources (B.S.S.) require the establishment and implementation of security measures of radioactive sources to ensure that protection and safety requirements are met. The IAEA has engaged in an extensive effort to establish and/or strengthen national radiation protection and radiological safety infrastructure, including legislation and regulation, a regulatory authority empowered to authorize and inspect regulated activities, an adequate number of trained personnel and technical services that are beyond the capabilities required of the authorized legal persons. The Moroccan authority makes steady efforts to strengthen national radiation safety infrastructure by participating in IAEA model project for upgrading radiation protection infrastructure, to implement the revised version of code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources. Indeed, Morocco expressed its adhesion with the technical assistance project of the IAEA in 2001, carrying on the reinforcement of the national infrastructure of regulation and control of the radioactive materials. The control over radioactive sources is an essential element for maintaining high level of security and safety of radioactive sources. The IAEA T.E.C.-D.O.C.-1388 serves as reference document to implement the control culture. The security problems with which the world is confronted showed that the uses of radioactive sources should subject reinforcements of safety, of control and of security of the radioactive sources. For this purpose, the IAEA launched an action plan for the safety and security of radioactive sources. The IAEA guide Security of radioactive sources will help the

  11. Health care managers' perspectives on the sources of evidence in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Evidence-based management (EBMgt) has been developed as a management framework for improving the quality of management decisions. To use that, we need to identify the source of evidence in decision-making. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the sources of evidence in managing ...

  12. Current issues and regulatory infrastructure aspects on radioactive waste management in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear facilities that exist throughout Romania perform a broad range of missions from research to nuclear materials production to radioactive waste management, and to deactivation and decommissioning. As a consequence, there is a broad array of external regulations and internal requirements that potentially applies to a facility or activity. Therefore, the management of radioactive waste occurs within a larger context of managing hazards, both radiological and industrial, at these facilities. At the same time, concern for upgrading existing facilities used for radioactive waste management, as called for in Article 12, fits into a larger framework of safety management. The primary objective of the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body-CNCAN on legislation and regulatory infrastructure for the safety of radioactive waste management is to protect human health and the environment now and in the future. It is unanimously recognized that a well developed regulated system for the management and disposal of radioactive waste is a prerequisite for both public and market acceptance of nuclear energy. It is to underline that the continuing internationalization of the nuclear industry following terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 stresses the need for national legislation and regulatory infrastructure to be based on internationally endorsed principles and safety standards. The paper presents some aspects of the Romanian experience on the national legislative and regulatory system related to the followings aspects of the safety aspects of radioactive waste management: definition of responsibilities; nuclear and radiation safety requirements; siting and licensing procedures; regulatory functions; international co-operation and coherence on strategies and criteria in the area of safety of radioactive waste management. Finally, prescriptive and goal oriented national as well international regimes in the field of the safety of radioactive waste management are briefly commented

  13. Building Energy Management Open Source Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Saifur [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2017-08-25

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy in November 2013, a Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS) platform was engineered to improve sensing and control of equipment in small- and medium-sized commercial buildings. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), small- (5,000 square feet or smaller) and medium-sized (between 5,001 to 50,000 square feet) commercial buildings constitute about 95% of all commercial buildings in the U.S. These buildings typically do not have Building Automation Systems (BAS) to monitor and control building operation. While commercial BAS solutions exist, including those from Siemens, Honeywell, Johnsons Controls and many more, they are not cost effective in the context of small- and medium-sized commercial buildings, and typically work with specific controller products from the same company. BEMOSS targets small and medium-sized commercial buildings to address this gap.

  14. Building Energy Management Open Source Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-06-20

    This is the repository for Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS), which is an open source operating system that is engineered to improve sensing and control of equipment in small- and medium-sized commercial buildings. BEMOSS offers the following key features: (1) Open source, open architecture – BEMOSS is an open source operating system that is built upon VOLTTRON – a distributed agent platform developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). BEMOSS was designed to make it easy for hardware manufacturers to seamlessly interface their devices with BEMOSS. Software developers can also contribute to adding additional BEMOSS functionalities and applications. (2) Plug & play – BEMOSS was designed to automatically discover supported load controllers (including smart thermostats, VAV/RTUs, lighting load controllers and plug load controllers) in commercial buildings. (3) Interoperability – BEMOSS was designed to work with load control devices form different manufacturers that operate on different communication technologies and data exchange protocols. (4) Cost effectiveness – Implementation of BEMOSS deemed to be cost-effective as it was built upon a robust open source platform that can operate on a low-cost single-board computer, such as Odroid. This feature could contribute to its rapid deployment in small- or medium-sized commercial buildings. (5) Scalability and ease of deployment – With its multi-node architecture, BEMOSS provides a distributed architecture where load controllers in a multi-floor and high occupancy building could be monitored and controlled by multiple single-board computers hosting BEMOSS. This makes it possible for a building engineer to deploy BEMOSS in one zone of a building, be comfortable with its operation, and later on expand the deployment to the entire building to make it more energy efficient. (6) Ability to provide local and remote monitoring – BEMOSS provides both local and remote monitoring

  15. Crowd Sourcing to Improve Urban Stormwater Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsker, B. S.; Band, L. E.; Heidari Haratmeh, B.; Law, N. L.; Leonard, L. N.; Rai, A.

    2017-12-01

    Over half of the world's population currently lives in urban areas, a number predicted to grow to 60 percent by 2030. Urban areas face unprecedented and growing challenges that threaten society's long-term wellbeing, including poverty; chronic health problems; widespread pollution and resource degradation; and increased natural disasters. These are "wicked" problems involving "systems of systems" that require unprecedented information sharing and collaboration across disciplines and organizational boundaries. Cities are recognizing that the increasing stream of data and information ("Big Data"), informatics, and modeling can support rapid advances on these challenges. Nonetheless, information technology solutions can only be effective in addressing these challenges through deeply human and systems perspectives. A stakeholder-driven approach ("crowd sourcing") is needed to develop urban systems that address multiple needs, such as parks that capture and treat stormwater while improving human and ecosystem health and wellbeing. We have developed informatics- and Cloud-based collaborative methods that enable crowd sourcing of green stormwater infrastructure (GSI: rain gardens, bioswales, trees, etc.) design and management. The methods use machine learning, social media data, and interactive design tools (called IDEAS-GI) to identify locations and features of GSI that perform best on a suite of objectives, including life cycle cost, stormwater volume reduction, and air pollution reduction. Insights will be presented on GI features that best meet stakeholder needs and are therefore most likely to improve human wellbeing and be well maintained.

  16. Alternative sources of power generation, incentives and regulatory mandates: a theoretical approach to the Colombian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, Carlos M; Zuluaga Monica M; Dyner, Isaac

    2005-01-01

    Alternative Energy Generation Sources are turning relevant in several countries worldwide because of technology improvement and the environmental treatment. In this paper, the most common problems of renewable energy sources are accomplished, different incentives and regulatory mandates from several countries are exposed, and a first theoretical approach to a renewable energies incentive system in Colombia is discussed. The paper is fundamentally in theoretical aspects and international experience in renewable energies incentives to accelerate their diffusion; features are analyzed towards a special incentive system for renewable energies in Colombia. As a conclusion, in Colombia will be apply indirect incentives like low interest rate, taxes exemptions and so on. But these incentives are applied to limit the support of electricity productivity in generating organizations.

  17. Regulatory control and safety of radiation and radioactive sources in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    The application of ionizing radiation and radioactive sources in different fields such as, medicine, industry, agriculture, research and teaching is constantly increasing in Bangladesh. Any system enacted to control exposure to ionizing radiation has as primary objective the protection of health of people against the deleterious effects of radiation. Establishing the appropriate level of radiological protection and safety of radiation sources used in practice or intervention attains this objective. The regulatory program governing the safe use of radioactive and radiation sources in Bangladesh is based on the legislation enacted as Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NSRC) Act-93 and NSRC Rules-97 and its implementation by the competent authority. The radiation control infrastructures and procedure are described as well as their functioning for the implementation of relevant activities such as licensing, regular inspection, personal dose monitoring, emergency preparedness, etc. The issue of security of radiation source is dealt in close relation with the preparation and use of the inventory of all radiation sources in the country

  18. Managing education/training resources to survive regulatory change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Headley-Walker, L.; DeSain, G.

    1985-01-01

    The road to development of nuclear training and education programs that prepare operators to not only competently operate a commercial nuclear power plant under routine conditions but also acquire the knowledge, experience, and confidence necessary to perform under the rigors of a significant off-normal incident has been filled with speculative opinion, recommendations, disagreement, guidelines, and downright confusion. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) had not produced a regulation that specifically addresses the nature of education/training related to off-normal incidents. No one educational process currently offered fully addresses the ideal solution for those employed in the nuclear industry. The only practical solution must be the result of collaborative efforts between utilities and educational resources. The Regents College Degree Collaboration Model provides a worthy vehicle for positive movement toward this solution and survival of the ever-changing regulatory constraints in education

  19. Regulatory control for safe usage of ionizing radiation sources in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In Bangladesh, there is a widespread and continuos growth in the use of the ionizing radiation sources both radioactive materials and radiation generating equipment in the field of industry, medicine, agriculture, research, teaching etc. In industry, they are employed in production as well as quality control such as non-destructive testing (radiography), nucleonic gauging, radiotracer techniques and in radiation processing. Medical applications of ionizing radiation include X-ray radiography, X-ray fluoroscopy, CT scan, mammography, nuclear medicine, beam therapy and brachytherapy. Besides radioisotopes are also used for research applications, viz., scattering experiments, tracer studies, etc. In agriculture, the uptake of nutrients by soil, and parts of plants are studied using suitable radionuclides. In all the above applications radioisotopes in two forms namely sealed sources and open sources in different chemical forms are employed with source strengths varying from micro curies to mega curies. The benefits to man from the use of ionizing radiation and sources of radiation are accompanied by risks which may result from exposure of man to ionizing radiation. In order to have an effective control on the use of radiation sources and to ensure radiological safety of the user as well as the public, Government of Bangladesh has promulgated Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NSRC) rules 1997 under the NSRC Act 1993. The Bangladesh Atomic Energy commission (BAEC) is the competent authority for formulating rules and regulations for ensuring radiological safety. BAEC is legally responsible for developing and strengthening the necessary radiation protection infrastructure in the country through the effective enforcement and implementation of regulatory requirements, criteria, obligations, guiding, codes etc. in order to save man and the related environment from the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation. In Bangladesh, only those persons who have been

  20. Improvement of Regulatory Framework for Long-Term Operation and Ageing Management of NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostenko, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory framework for long-term operation and ageing management of NPP units in Ukraine was reviewed and deficiencies were identified. The procedure for improving regulatory framework for long-term operation and ageing management is presented. It takes into consideration IAEA recommendations and international practices, as well as experience obtained in long-term operation efforts for Rivne NPP-1, 2 and South Ukraine NPP-1. The paper demonstrates interrelations between standards and technical documents on long-term operation and ageing management. The information is presented regarding the current state of regulatory and legal documentation development and industry-specific standards on long-term operation and ageing management of NPP units in Ukraine

  1. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's role in the management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernero, R.M.; Kalman, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) role in the management of radioactive waste. It provides an overview of the NRC's programs for the management of High-Level and Low-Level radioctive wastes and uranium mill tailings. (author) 7 refs

  2. Report on the legislation in the field of nuclear safety and regulatory control of radiation sources and radioactive materials in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolundzija, V.

    2001-01-01

    The national regulatory infrastructure in Yugoslavia is described in the report, including the legal framework governing the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials. The organization and competencies of the Yugoslav Nuclear Safety Administration are explained, in particular regarding the national system of notification, registration, licensing, inspection and enforcement of radiation sources and radioactive materials, where the Federal Ministry of Economy and the Federal Ministry of Labour, Health and Social Policy are sharing competencies. Finally, the report refers to the national provisions on the management of disused sources; on planning, preparedness and response to abnormal events and emergencies; on the recovery of control over orphan sources; and on the education and training in the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials. (author)

  3. Expert Views on Regulatory Preparedness for Managing the Risks of Nanotechnologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudrie, Christian E. H.; Satterfield, Terre; Kandlikar, Milind; Harthorn, Barbara H.

    2013-01-01

    The potential and promise of nanotechnologies depends in large part on the ability for regulatory systems to assess and manage their benefits and risks. However, considerable uncertainty persists regarding the health and environmental implications of nanomaterials, hence the capacity for existing regulations to meet this challenge has been widely questioned. Here we draw from a survey (N=254) of US-based nano-scientists and engineers, environmental health and safety scientists, and regulatory scientists and decision-makers, to ask whether nano experts regard regulatory agencies as prepared for managing nanomaterial risks. We find that all three expert groups view regulatory agencies as unprepared. The effect is strongest for regulators themselves, and less so for scientists conducting basic, applied, or health and safety work on nanomaterials. Those who see nanotechnology risks as novel, uncertain, and difficult to assess are particularly likely to see agencies as unprepared. Trust in regulatory agencies, views of stakeholder responsibility regarding the management of risks, and socio-political values were also found to be small but significant drivers of perceived agency preparedness. These results underscore the need for new tools and methods to enable the assessment of nanomaterial risks, and to renew confidence in regulatory agencies’ ability to oversee their growing use and application in society. PMID:24244662

  4. Expert views on regulatory preparedness for managing the risks of nanotechnologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian E H Beaudrie

    Full Text Available The potential and promise of nanotechnologies depends in large part on the ability for regulatory systems to assess and manage their benefits and risks. However, considerable uncertainty persists regarding the health and environmental implications of nanomaterials, hence the capacity for existing regulations to meet this challenge has been widely questioned. Here we draw from a survey (N=254 of US-based nano-scientists and engineers, environmental health and safety scientists, and regulatory scientists and decision-makers, to ask whether nano experts regard regulatory agencies as prepared for managing nanomaterial risks. We find that all three expert groups view regulatory agencies as unprepared. The effect is strongest for regulators themselves, and less so for scientists conducting basic, applied, or health and safety work on nanomaterials. Those who see nanotechnology risks as novel, uncertain, and difficult to assess are particularly likely to see agencies as unprepared. Trust in regulatory agencies, views of stakeholder responsibility regarding the management of risks, and socio-political values were also found to be small but significant drivers of perceived agency preparedness. These results underscore the need for new tools and methods to enable the assessment of nanomaterial risks, and to renew confidence in regulatory agencies' ability to oversee their growing use and application in society.

  5. Open Source for Knowledge and Learning Management: Strategies beyond Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytras, Miltiadis, Ed.; Naeve, Ambjorn, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    In the last years, knowledge and learning management have made a significant impact on the IT research community. "Open Source for Knowledge and Learning Management: Strategies Beyond Tools" presents learning and knowledge management from a point of view where the basic tools and applications are provided by open source technologies.…

  6. Knowledge management for efficient quantitative analyses during regulatory reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krudys, Kevin; Li, Fang; Florian, Jeffry; Tornoe, Christoffer; Chen, Ying; Bhattaram, Atul; Jadhav, Pravin; Neal, Lauren; Wang, Yaning; Gobburu, Joga; Lee, Peter I D

    2011-11-01

    Knowledge management comprises the strategies and methods employed to generate and leverage knowledge within an organization. This report outlines the activities within the Division of Pharmacometrics at the US FDA to effectively manage knowledge with the ultimate goal of improving drug development and advancing public health. The infrastructure required for pharmacometric knowledge management includes provisions for data standards, queryable databases, libraries of modeling tools, archiving of analysis results and reporting templates for effective communication. Two examples of knowledge management systems developed within the Division of Pharmacometrics are used to illustrate these principles. The benefits of sound knowledge management include increased productivity, allowing reviewers to focus on research questions spanning new drug applications, such as improved trial design and biomarker development. The future of knowledge management depends on the collaboration between the FDA and industry to implement data and model standards to enhance sharing and dissemination of knowledge.

  7. National regulatory authorities with competence in the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-08-01

    The Buenos Aires Conference, hosted by the Government of Argentina, was attended by 89 regulatory officials from 57 Member States. The conference provided a forum for fostering the exchange of information and experience on the development of adequate regulatory systems for effective control of the safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials. This publication contains 64 individual presentations delivered at the Conference. Each of them was indexed separately.

  8. National regulatory authorities with competence in the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Buenos Aires Conference, hosted by the Government of Argentina, was attended by 89 regulatory officials from 57 Member States. The conference provided a forum for fostering the exchange of information and experience on the development of adequate regulatory systems for effective control of the safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials. This publication contains 64 individual presentations delivered at the Conference. Each of them was indexed separately

  9. CNCAN Knowledge Management Process and Tools in Support of Sustainable Development of Regulatory Competences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronea, M.; Ciurea, C.; Oprisescu, M.; Liutiev, C.; Ghinea, P.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents the knowledge management process and the knowledge management portal developed by CNCAN, in the framework of the Regional Excellence Project on Regulatory Capacity Building in Nuclear and Radiological Safety, Emergency Preparedness and Response in Romania. The activities of this project started in 2014. The general process for knowledge management is presented, together with its sub-processes: identification of the necessary knowledge; identification of the risk of knowledge loss; acquisition and/or creation of knowledge; knowledge retention (capture, collect, store and organize knowledge); knowledge utilization; review of the effectiveness of the knowledge management process; identification of opportunities for improving the knowledge management process. The paper also presents a set of indicators of the effectiveness of the knowledge management process and the artifacts, espoused values and basic assumptions supporting an effective knowledge management process. The necessary knowledge has been identified using the IAEA recommendations on managing regulatory body competence and the SARCoN methodology. The knowledge management process has been developed based on the IAEA publications on knowledge management in the nuclear industry and in regulatory bodies. The implementation of the process and the development of the portal are ongoing, with more than 20% of the staff using the portal. (author

  10. Organizational Learning, Building and Sustaining Core Competencies: Knowledge Management Initiatives on Inspection and Regulatory Enforcement in BAPETEN Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daeng Beta, W. P.; Nurwidi Astuti, Y. H.; Hermawan, A. S.; Syaifulloh, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Regulatory inspection and law enforcement are among the core competencies of the Indonesia Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN). Knowledge management (KM) initiatives are based on strategic planning of BAPETEN. KM in BAPETEN is in its early stage, it is realized since 2015–2016, although its elements have stayed in service for 18 years. Its architecture and performance-information are: to conduct risk based inspection for medical, industrial and research facilities; to plan, monitor and evaluate of effective inspection, including standard operating procedures (SOPs); to utilize inspectors for safety security of radiation sources along with coordination with related stakeholders; to enforce the safety and security facilities report to users; to optimize reliable data communication, processing and information technology (B@LIS); to perform regulatory enforcement along with other related stakeholders. KM processes are performed through the “Socialization, Externalization, Combination, Internalization” (SECI) model. Technical knowledge for inspectors are based on the IAEA–TECDOC–1526 plus supporting knowledge. With KM, innovation products can easily be used, because they are documented, distributed in a KM portal, knowledge is shared through the BAPETEN website, B@LIS database and others. Our challenge is that KM initiatives still need a tremendous effort, not only internally, but also externally, especially in coordination and collaboration. Information access brings about not only positive but also negative impacts. Innovations in regulatory inspection and law enforcement in BAPETEN are planned innovations, sustained, and systematically performed. (author

  11. Exemption of radiation sources and practices from regulatory control: Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document is an interim report on progress at the IAEA on exemption principles and their application to low-level radioactive waste disposal. In the first part of the document the general principles for the exemption of radiation sources and practices from regulatory control are described. The exempt quantities of low-level radioactive wastes for disposal to municipal landfill or by incineration including methods for their derivation and generic values are contained in the second part of the document. In the appendices the individual effective dose equivalents and committed effective dose equivalents by pathway for waste concentrations of 1 Bq.g -1 and some quoted limits from the literature on dust concentrations at the outlet of municipal waste incinerators are estimated

  12. Legislation and regulatory infrastructure for the safety of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, L.

    2000-01-01

    The essential generic characteristics of a national legislative and regulatory system for the safety of radioactive waste management are defined and discussed. The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management as well as other relevant international legal instruments and guidelines are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the following characteristics of a national legislative and regulatory system: (i) definition of responsibilities, (ii) financing of future costs, (iii) nuclear and radiation safety requirements, (iv) siting and licensing procedures, (v) regulatory functions, and (vi) international co-operation. It is concluded that there exists an internationally endorsed basis for establishing effective national legislation and regulatory infrastructures for the safety of radioactive waste management. It is underlined that the continuing internationalization of the nuclear industry stresses the need for national legislation and regulatory infrastructure to be based on such internationally endorsed principles and standards. It is pointed out that regulators are accountable to the public and have to gain public trust by being active in the public arena, demonstrating their competence and integrity. Finally, prescriptive and goal-oriented international safety regimes are briefly discussed in the light of experience so far gained with the Convention on Nuclear Safety. (author)

  13. Regulatory Technology Development Plan - Sodium Fast Reactor: Mechanistic Source Term - Trial Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabaskas, David

    2016-01-01

    The potential release of radioactive material during a plant incident, referred to as the source term, is a vital design metric and will be a major focus of advanced reactor licensing. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated an expectation for advanced reactor vendors to present a mechanistic assessment of the potential source term in their license applications. The mechanistic source term presents an opportunity for vendors to realistically assess the radiological consequences of an incident, and may allow reduced emergency planning zones and smaller plant sites. However, the development of a mechanistic source term for advanced reactors is not without challenges, as there are often numerous phenomena impacting the transportation and retention of radionuclides. This project sought to evaluate U.S. capabilities regarding the mechanistic assessment of radionuclide release from core damage incidents at metal fueled, pool-type sodium fast reactors (SFRs). The purpose of the analysis was to identify, and prioritize, any gaps regarding computational tools or data necessary for the modeling of radionuclide transport and retention phenomena. To accomplish this task, a parallel-path analysis approach was utilized. One path, led by Argonne and Sandia National Laboratories, sought to perform a mechanistic source term assessment using available codes, data, and models, with the goal to identify gaps in the current knowledge base. The second path, performed by an independent contractor, performed sensitivity analyses to determine the importance of particular radionuclides and transport phenomena in regards to offsite consequences. The results of the two pathways were combined to prioritize gaps in current capabilities.

  14. Regulatory Technology Development Plan - Sodium Fast Reactor: Mechanistic Source Term – Trial Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabaskas, David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Bucknor, Matthew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Jerden, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Brunett, Acacia J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Denman, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Clark, Andrew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Denning, Richard S. [Consultant, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The potential release of radioactive material during a plant incident, referred to as the source term, is a vital design metric and will be a major focus of advanced reactor licensing. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated an expectation for advanced reactor vendors to present a mechanistic assessment of the potential source term in their license applications. The mechanistic source term presents an opportunity for vendors to realistically assess the radiological consequences of an incident, and may allow reduced emergency planning zones and smaller plant sites. However, the development of a mechanistic source term for advanced reactors is not without challenges, as there are often numerous phenomena impacting the transportation and retention of radionuclides. This project sought to evaluate U.S. capabilities regarding the mechanistic assessment of radionuclide release from core damage incidents at metal fueled, pool-type sodium fast reactors (SFRs). The purpose of the analysis was to identify, and prioritize, any gaps regarding computational tools or data necessary for the modeling of radionuclide transport and retention phenomena. To accomplish this task, a parallel-path analysis approach was utilized. One path, led by Argonne and Sandia National Laboratories, sought to perform a mechanistic source term assessment using available codes, data, and models, with the goal to identify gaps in the current knowledge base. The second path, performed by an independent contractor, performed sensitivity analyses to determine the importance of particular radionuclides and transport phenomena in regards to offsite consequences. The results of the two pathways were combined to prioritize gaps in current capabilities.

  15. WWER nuclear waste management regulatory experience in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varjoranta, Tero

    2000-01-01

    About 30% of all electricity produced in Finland is generated by nuclear power. Four reactors, with a total capacity of 2 656 MW e (net), are currently in operation. At Loviisa, there are two 488 MW e WWER units (recently upgraded 440-units) and at Olkiluoto two 840 MW e BWR units. At the Loviisa plant conditioning, storage and final disposal of low-and intermediate-level wastes from reactor operation will take place at the NPP sites. Intermediate level ion exchange resins and evaporation concentrates are currently stored in tanks. However, a license application for constructing a solidification plant based on cementation is currently under STUKs regulatory review. The construction of the final repository for I/LLW at the Loviisa site was started in 1993 and the Government granted the operating license in 1998. The nuclear legislation requires disposal of spent fuel into the Finnish bedrock. (Authors)

  16. Management of financial sources for innovative development: foreign countries experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyba O. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Authors have analyzed and synthesized the main features of financial sources management for innovative development in development economies of foreign countries. The article describes the peculiarities of above mentioned type of management, using the examples of such countries as Germany, USA and Japan, which represent different kinds of economy and society. The main sources for innovative development financing are highlighted within the national economies conditions. The authors proposed the generalized models of financial sources management for innovative development. The information will be useful for Ukrainian model of financial sources management development.

  17. Managing in the Regulatory Thicket : Regulation Legitimacy and Expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirkhanyan, Anna A.; Meier, Kenneth J.; O'Toole, Laurence J.

    Although the influence of government regulation on organizations is undeniable, empirical research in this field is scarce. This article investigates how the understanding of and attitudes toward government regulation among public, nonprofit, and for-profit managers affect organizational

  18. Human Impacts and Management of Carbon Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, S.; Edmonds, J.; Socolow, R.; Surles, T.

    1999-08-20

    The energy system dominates human-induced carbon flows on our planet. Globally, six billion tons of carbon are contained in the fossil fuels removed from below the ground every year. More than 90% of the carbon in fossil fuels is used for energy purposes, with carbon dioxide as the carbon product and the atmosphere as the initial destination for the carbon dioxide. Significantly affecting the carbon flows associated with fossil fuels is an immense undertaking. Four principal technological approaches are available to affect these carbon flows: (1) Fossil fuels and other energy resources can be utilized more efficiently; (2) Energy sources other than fossil fuels can be used; (3) Carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels can be trapped and redirected, preventing it from reaching the atmosphere (fossil carbon sequestration); and (4) One can work outside the energy system to remove carbon dioxide biologically from the atmosphere (biological carbon sequestration). An optimum carbon management strategy will surely implement all four approaches and a wise R&D program will have vigorous sub-programs in all four areas. These programs can be effective by integrating scenario analyses into the planning process. A number of future scenarios must be evaluated to determine the need for the new technologies in a future energy mix. This planning activity must be an iterative process. At present, R&D in the first two areas--energy efficiency and non-fossil fuel energy resources--is relatively well developed. By contrast, R&D in the third and the fourth areas--the two carbon sequestration options--is less well developed. The task before the workshop was to recommend ways to initiate a vigorous carbon sequestration research program without compromising the strength of the current programs in the first two areas. We recommend that this task be fulfilled by initiating several new programs in parallel. First, we recommend that a vigorous carbon sequestration program be launched

  19. Regulatory instrument review: Management of aging of LWR [light water reactor] major safety-related components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werry, E.V.

    1990-10-01

    This report comprises Volume 1 of a review of US nuclear plant regulatory instruments to determine the amount and kind of information they contain on managing the aging of safety-related components in US nuclear power plants. The review was conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Eight selected regulatory instruments, e.g., NRC Regulatory Guides and the Code of Federal Regulations, were reviewed for safety-related information on five selected components: reactor pressure vessels, steam generators, primary piping, pressurizers, and emergency diesel generators. Volume 2 will be concluded in FY 1991 and will also cover selected major safety-related components, e.g., pumps, valves and cables. The focus of the review was on 26 NPAR-defined safety-related aging issues, including examination, inspection, and maintenance and repair; excessive/harsh testing; and irradiation embrittlement. The major conclusion of the review is that safety-related regulatory instruments do provide implicit guidance for aging management, but include little explicit guidance. The major recommendation is that the instruments be revised or augmented to explicitly address the management of aging

  20. Impact of a Fragmented Regulatory Environment on Sustainable Urban Development Design Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Anne London

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The building project development approval process is increasingly complex and fraught with conflict due to the rise of the sustainable urban development movement and inclusive decision making. Coupled with this, government decision-making decentralization has resulted in a fragmented and over-regulated compliance system. Problems arising from the process include wasted resources, excessive time delays, increased holding and litigation costs, inadequate planning coordination, high levels of advocacy costs and a divisive politicized approval process. In Australia, despite attempts by government and industry associations, numerous problems are still unresolved. Design managers increasingly assume a liaison role during the approval phase. There is a long tradition of planning theory literature which provides context for understanding the knowledge-power-participation relationship for this paper. This study investigated the policy, process and practice conflicts during the approval stage in achieving sustainable urban developments. Three regional local government areas within one state jurisdiction and observations from detailed structured focus group interviews involving 23 stakeholders, proposers and assessors were analysed to explore this conflictual environment. As a result of regulatory fragmentation and excessive consultation, various persuasion tactics have been developed by all stakeholders of which `reciprocity' and `authority' were identified as the most common. Two challenges for design managers were thus identified: first, the emergence of the role of a by default central informal arbitrator across conflicting planning instruments; and, second, as a navigator through a set of persuasion tactics. An inclusive knowledge-based design management framework for sustainable urban development is proposed considering Habermas' communicative planning theory, Foucaltian governance and discursive powers thesis and Cialdini's persuasion theory, as

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission low-level radioactive waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    It is believed that the priorities of NRC work in low-level waste management as described in this action plan are consistent with the needs of the overall national waste management program. Present licensing procedures and criteria are adequate for the short term, and priority attention is being given to the longer term, when the quantities of waste to be managed will be greater and licensing demand will increase. The plan makes use of expertise within NRC to achieve early results and is coordinated with other Federal agencies having related responsibilities. Since NRC decisions will affect industry, other governmental jurisdictions, private interest groups, and the public at large, procedures were developed to involve them in planning the program

  2. Regulatory infrastructure for the control of radiation sources in the Africa region: Status, needs and programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skornik, K.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, several African countries have taken steps towards creating or strengthening legal, administrative and technical mechanisms for the regulation and control of peaceful uses of nuclear technology, and towards improving the effectiveness and sustainability of radiation protection measures based on international standards. This stems from a growing awareness that a proper national infrastructure is a prerequisite for the implementation of safety standards to achieve and maintain the desired level of protection and safety, particularly in such sectors as public health and industry. Also, other issues of global and regional interest, such as the control of radiation sources, including the handling of hazardous waste, and response capabilities in the case of a radiological emergency, have contributed to a better perception of risks associated with deficiencies in or lack of adequate national radiation protection control mechanisms. Too often, however, this awareness has not been matched with adequate progress in the establishment of a regulatory framework for the control of radiation sources. This paper presents a summary of the current status of radiation protection infrastructure in all African Member States. On a background of still existing weaknesses and challenges, an overview of the Agency's response to assistance needs and programmes in this field is discussed. (author)

  3. Inspection of radiation sources and regulatory enforcement (supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-08-01

    The achievement and maintenance of a high level of safety in the use of radiation sources depends on there being a sound legal and governmental infrastructure, including a national regulatory body with well-defined responsibilities and functions. These responsibilities and functions include establishing and implementing a system for carrying out regulatory inspections, and taking necessary enforcement actions. The Safety Requirements publication entitled Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety establishes the requirements for legal and governmental infrastructure. The term 'infrastructure' refers to the underlying structure of systems and organizations. This includes requirements concerning the establishment of a regulatory body for radiation sources and the responsibilities and functions assigned to it. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Basic Safety Standards or the BSS) establish basic requirements for protection against risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. The application of the BSS is based on the presumption that national infrastructures are in place to enable governments to discharge their responsibilities to for radiation protection and safety. This TECDOC provides practical guidance on the processes for carrying out regulatory inspections and taking enforcement actions. It includes information on the development and use of procedures and standard review plans (i.e. checklists) for inspection. Specific procedures for inspection of radiation practices and sources are provided in the Appendices

  4. Inspection of radiation sources and regulatory enforcement (supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    The achievement and maintenance of a high level of safety in the use of radiation sources depends on there being a sound legal and governmental infrastructure, including a national regulatory body with well-defined responsibilities and functions. These responsibilities and functions include establishing and implementing a system for carrying out regulatory inspections, and taking necessary enforcement actions. The Safety Requirements publication entitled Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety establishes the requirements for legal and governmental infrastructure. The term 'infrastructure' refers to the underlying structure of systems and organizations. This includes requirements concerning the establishment of a regulatory body for radiation sources and the responsibilities and functions assigned to it. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Basic Safety Standards or the BSS) establish basic requirements for protection against risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. The application of the BSS is based on the presumption that national infrastructures are in place to enable governments to discharge their responsibilities to for radiation protection and safety. This TECDOC provides practical guidance on the processes for carrying out regulatory inspections and taking enforcement actions. It includes information on the development and use of procedures and standard review plans (i.e. checklists) for inspection. Specific procedures for inspection of radiation practices and sources are provided in the Appendices

  5. International principles for exemption from regulatory control and their application to waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsley, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the main features of the international consensus on principles for exempting radiation sources and practices from regulatory control reached at a meeting in Vienna in March 1988. Some remaining problems, both of a philosophical and technical nature especially related to the application of the principles to radioactive waste disposal, are discussed

  6. National Project Management Corp (United States). [Technical and regulatory aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBor, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the VHTR fuel cycle which involves: (i) use of light water cooled reactor (LWR) spent fuel as kernel feedstock; (ii) recycle of spent VHTR fuel; (iii) use of the VHTR in the management of transuranics (TRU); and, (iv) the geologic storage performance of spent VHTR fuel

  7. [GMOs in food: risk assessment, scientific management and regulatory aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casse, F; Hervieu, F

    2003-03-01

    Genetic transformation constitutes a new tool for improvement of microorganisms, animals and plants used in food. We present foreseeable risks, as well as management measures to avoid unsuspected risks of GMOs. Few risks are specific to GMOs. Present elements of French and European regulations concerning placing on the market and follow up GMOs and other novel foods are described.

  8. Canadian regulatory perspective on organization and management assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, P.H.; Schwarz, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    The Canadian nuclear industry is undergoing change in response to a variety of internal and external pressures on licensee organizations. Operational experience also indicates that management and human performance aspects are among the leading causes of unplanned events at licensed facilities. These observations have raised the CNSC's awareness of the importance of organization and management processes and human performance to the safety performance of a facility. The CNSC is utilizing quality management and organizational assessment approaches to address this issue. The Organization and Management Review Method has been developed to carry out organizational evaluations. The method has been applied to a number of nuclear facilities in Canada. Results have provided a more complete profile of the organizations and have thereby contributed to the oversight monitoring of licensees. Some of the data are being meta-analyzed to determine what influence culture has on the other organizational dimensions and whether there are performance indicators that can predict future safety performance. We hope that a clear profile of a 'good performer' will allow us to compare and rate facilities against a series of benchmarks or standards yet to be developed. Some of the challenges that the CNSC faces with respect to the implementation of the O and M Method are being addressed. All of the information relevant to safety performance should be taken into account when giving recommendations pertaining to licensing decisions. (author)

  9. Regulatory approaches in the United States of America for safe management and disposal of long-lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greeves, J.T.; Bell, M.J.; Nelson, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Regulation of the safe management and disposal of commercial, man-made, long-lived radioactive wastes in the United States is the responsibility of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In some instances, state regulatory authorities have entered into agreements with the NRC to exercise regulatory authority over management and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes and uranium mill tailings within their borders. The legal and regulatory framework employed to achieve safe management and disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes in the US regulatory system is quite detailed, and in many cases the requirements are considerably prescriptive. The NRC has undertaken an initiative to move in the direction of adopting risk-informed, performance-based and risk-informed, less-prescriptive regulations. The current status and future direction of the legal and regulatory framework for management and disposal of commercial long-lived radioactive waste in the US is described. (author)

  10. Securing radioactive sources through a proper management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Rogerio Pimenta

    2009-01-01

    The safety and security of radioactive sources have become a hot issue for the nuclear community in the last two decades. The Goiania accident in Brazil and the September 11th attack alerted governments and nuclear agencies around the world to the vulnerability of the thousands of disused radioactive sources ill-stored or misplaced in a myriad of ways, especially in countries with less developed infra-structure. Once the threat of environmental contamination or malevolent use of these sources became clear, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the American Government spawned initiatives to reduce this risk, basically stimulating the proper conditioning of the sources and, whenever possible, seeking their repatriation to the countries of origin. Since 1996 Brazil has been participating actively in this effort, having carried out hands-on operations to condition old radium sources in Latin American and Caribbean countries and also repatriated its own neutron sources to the United States. A new operation is presently being organized: the reconditioning of the high activity sources contained in teletherapy units stored in the country using a mobile hot cell developed in South Africa. Also an agreement is being negotiated between the US National Nuclear Security Agency and the Brazilian CNEN to repatriate hundreds of radioactive gauges presently stored at CNEN's source storage buildings. (author)

  11. Smart grids and power systems efficiency: regulatory tools and demand-side management impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergaentzle, Claire

    2015-01-01

    induced by peak shedding. To this end, we develop and use a linear optimization model and expand our analysis to interconnected countries endowed with differentiated generation means. The thesis shows dominant regulatory frameworks are unsuited to provide the necessary sets of incentive to efficiently develop smart technologies. This can cause delays in their integration to power grids. The quantitative evaluation of the impacts generated by demand-side management shows significant efficiency gains are achievable through final consumers' flexibility. However, such measures create new discrepancies regarding installed capacities profitability, future capacity adequacy, and highlight potential antagonism between missing money for flexible peak capacities and the development of low carbon energies. It is clear the issues raised by the development of smart grids call for informed public debate as power industries are essential to our societies. Among the considerable amount of elements to discuss, issues relative to financing the investment projects and the inclusion of the new sources of flexibility induced by the technology in competitive markets will be of priority. (author) [fr

  12. Recommended regulatory program plan for low-level radioactive waste management in Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The National Program for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management was instituted by the US Department of Energy to assist the states in carrying out this new federal policy. Based on the premise that the safe disposal of low-level waste is technologically feasible and that states have the necessary degree of authority to set management policy, the National Program is helping them to develop a responsive, comprehensive regulatory program. The State of Maryland is actively engaged with the National Program in its efforts to form a comprehensive management program. The purpose of this plan is to review existing statutory and regulatory program responsibilities and provide a recommended management scheme for low-level radioactive waste

  13. Strengthening the regulatory system through the implementation and use of a quality management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Eisner

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Quality management systems (QMS, based on ISO 9001 requirements, are applicable to government service organizations such as Health Canada’s Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate (BGTD. This communication presents the process that the BGTD followed since the early 2000s to implement a quality management system and describes how the regulatory system was improved as a result of this project. BGTD undertook the implementation of a quality management system based on ISO 9001 and containing aspects of ISO 17025 with the goal of strengthening the regulatory system through improvements in the people, processes, and services of the organization. We discuss the strategy used by BGTD to implement the QMS and the benefits that were realized from the various stages of implementation. The eight quality principals upon which the QMS standards of the ISO 9000 series are based were used by senior management as a framework to guide QMS implementation.

  14. 76 FR 9028 - Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ...] Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry AGENCY: Food and Drug... Duvall-Miller, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire... to provide the following: (1) Firsthand exposure to industry's drug development processes and (2) a...

  15. 75 FR 10806 - Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ...] Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry AGENCY: Food and Drug... INFORMATION CONTACT: Beth Duvall-Miller, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration... to provide the following: (1) First hand exposure to industry's drug development processes and (2) a...

  16. 77 FR 10538 - Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ...] Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry AGENCY: Food and Drug... Brum, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave...) Firsthand exposure to industry's drug development processes and (2) a venue for sharing information about...

  17. 78 FR 8544 - Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ...] Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry AGENCY: Food and Drug... Brum, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave... to industry's drug development processes and (2) a venue for sharing information about project...

  18. Recovering management information from source code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwiatkowski, L.; Verhoef, C.

    2013-01-01

    IT has become a production means for many organizations and an important element of business strategy. Even though its effective management is a must, reality shows that this area still remains in its infancy. IT management relies profoundly on relevant information which enables risk mitigation or

  19. Mosquito larval source management for controlling malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusting, Lucy S; Thwing, Julie; Sinclair, David; Fillinger, Ulrike; Gimnig, John; Bonner, Kimberly E; Bottomley, Christian; Lindsay, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria is an important cause of illness and death in people living in many parts of the world, especially sub-Saharan Africa. Long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) reduce malaria transmission by targeting the adult mosquito vector and are key components of malaria control programmes. However, mosquito numbers may also be reduced by larval source management (LSM), which targets mosquito larvae as they mature in aquatic habitats. This is conducted by permanently or temporarily reducing the availability of larval habitats (habitat modification and habitat manipulation), or by adding substances to standing water that either kill or inhibit the development of larvae (larviciding). Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of mosquito LSM for preventing malaria. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CABS Abstracts; and LILACS up to 24 October 2012. We handsearched the Tropical Diseases Bulletin from 1900 to 2010, the archives of the World Health Organization (up to 11 February 2011), and the literature database of the Armed Forces Pest Management Board (up to 2 March 2011). We also contacted colleagues in the field for relevant articles. Selection criteria We included cluster randomized controlled trials (cluster-RCTs), controlled before-and-after trials with at least one year of baseline data, and randomized cross-over trials that compared LSM with no LSM for malaria control. We excluded trials that evaluated biological control of anopheline mosquitoes with larvivorous fish. Data collection and analysis At least two authors assessed each trial for eligibility. We extracted data and at least two authors independently determined the risk of bias in the included studies. We resolved all disagreements through discussion with a third author. We analyzed the data using Review Manager 5 software

  20. Assessing and managing regulatory risk in renewable energy: Contrasts between Canada and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holburn, Guy L.F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstact: A challenge for energy firms when considering new investments is to balance expected financial gains against potential risks. However, while investment opportunities in different jurisdictions are often straightforward to identify, the policy or regulatory risks for investors are more difficult to accurately ascertain. Here, I provide a novel conceptual framework for how firms can assess regulatory risk that focuses on the institutional processes governing policy-making. Risks are lower – and policies will subsequently be more stable – in jurisdictions where regulatory agencies have greater autonomy from politicians and where policies are formulated through more ‘rigid’ policy-making processes. The contrasting development patterns of renewable energy policies in Ontario and Texas offer support for the framework. I further develop strategies for how firms can successfully manage regulatory risks in different types of environment. - Highlights: ► The paper provides a conceptual framework for how firms can assess regulatory risk. ► Risks are lower when regulators have greater autonomy from elected politicians. ► Risks are lower when policy-making processes are more ‘rigid’. ► Firms can strategically mitigate regulatory risk in different types of environment.

  1. Technical, environmental and regulatory aspects of waste management and their reflection in the IAEA programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, D.K.

    1982-01-01

    Within the IAEA training course on waste management this paper is intended to overview technological, radiological, encironmental, regulatory and institutional aspects of importance in establishing a waste management policy for nuclear power programmes; the objectives and results of IAEA activities in this field; and some current issues from a national and international perspective with special consideration on the needs of countries embarking on nuclear power. (orig./RW)

  2. Final report on Paradox Basin/Gulf Interior: Regulatory project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    This final report on the Regulatory Project Manager (RPM) program begins with a discussion of the key products produced during the 9-year effort and then focuses on the work performed in the major disciplines. The report then discusses the management of the work effort and the Quality Assurance (QA) program. It concludes with a brief discussion of the records turned over to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) at the conclusion of the work. 14 figs., 14 tabs

  3. Waste management strategy for nuclear fusion power systems from a regulatory perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1977-12-06

    A waste management strategy for future nuclear fusion power systems is developed using existing regulatory methodology. The first step is the development of a reference fuel cycle. Next, the waste streams from such a facility are identified. Then a waste management system is defined to safely handle and dispose of these wastes. The future regulator must identify the decisions necessary to establish waste management performance criteria. The data base and methodologies necessary to make these decisions must then be developed. Safe management of nuclear fusion wastes is not only a technological challenge, but encompasses significant social, political, and ethical questions as well.

  4. Waste management strategy for nuclear fusion power systems from a regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    A waste management strategy for future nuclear fusion power systems is developed using existing regulatory methodology. The first step is the development of a reference fuel cycle. Next, the waste streams from such a facility are identified. Then a waste management system is defined to safely handle and dispose of these wastes. The future regulator must identify the decisions necessary to establish waste management performance criteria. The data base and methodologies necessary to make these decisions must then be developed. Safe management of nuclear fusion wastes is not only a technological challenge, but encompasses significant social, political, and ethical questions as well

  5. Managing the security of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.

    2003-01-01

    The issue of security of radioactive sources had arisen as a result of incidents where people were unintentionally exposed in various parts of the world. However after 11 September 2001, the focus on security was intensified by concerns over those who might wish to use radioactive sources for malevolent purposes. This paper will discuss the questions of the type and nature of these concerns and outline a process for assessing the threat and then assigning security measures for sources. The paper is based on work done by the author while at the IAEA and published as part of IAEATecdoc-1355

  6. Knowledge Management at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, Jody

    2014-01-01

    KM Success Factors at NRC: • Clear governance, and roles and responsibilities is important – Strong leadership support; • Distributed networked model is effective – Centralized KM infrastructure management; – Decentralized, networked implementation; – Nested KM networks connect the NRC horizontally and vertically; • Priority focus on High Value/High Risk knowledge; • Keep KM practical - focus efforts on major work functions; • Encourage Communities of Practice and networks; • Use KM to advance informal workforce learning and development; • Leverage technology; • Keep evolving and improving

  7. Current and new developments in transport and regulatory issues concerning radioisotopes: managing change for minimum business impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Neil; Coppell, David; Rogers, David; Schrader, John

    2004-01-01

    Changes in the regulatory framework governing the Radiation Processing Industry have the potential to make a real business impact on day-to-day profitability. Many areas of the Radiation Processing Industry are affected by changes in the regulatory framework within which these areas are managed. When planning for such changes the transportation element in the shipment of sealed cobalt radiation sources is an area that is often neglected by some parts of the distribution chain. A balance must be struck between the cobalt supplier and the facility operator/customer that rests upon how much the customer needs to know about the intricacies of cobalt shipment. The objective of this paper is to highlight areas of possible business impact and reassure the users of sealed radiation sources that the global suppliers of these products are used to negotiating local variations in regulations governing the physical transportation of radiation sources, changes in regulations governing the design, manufacture and use of transportation containers and changes in the availability of commercial shippers and shipping routes. The major suppliers of industrial quantities of cobalt-60 are well placed to lead their customers through this complex process as a matter of routine

  8. Management of Spent and Disused Radiation Sources - The Zambian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabala, F.

    2002-01-01

    Zambia like all other countries in the world is faced with environmental problems brought about by a variety of human activities. In Zambia the major environmental issues as identified by Nation Environmental Action Plan (NEAP) of 1994 are water pollution, poor sanitation, land degradation, air pollution, poor waste management, misuse of chemicals, wildlife depletion and deforestation. Zambian has been using a lot of radioactive materials in its various industries. The country has taken several projects with help of external partners. These partners however left these projects in the hands of the Zambians without developing their capacities to manage these radioactive sources. The Government recognized the need to manage these sources and passed legislation governing the management of radioactive materials. The first act of Parliament on Radiation Protection work was passed in 1975 to legislate the use of ionizing radiation. However, because of financial constraints the Country is facing, these regulations have remained unimplemented. Fortunately the international Community has been working in partnership with the Zambian Government in the Management of Radioactive Material. Therefore this paper will present the following aspects of radioactive waste management in Zambia: review Existing Legislation in Zambia regarding management of spent/radioactive sources; capacity building in the field of management of radioactive waste; management of spent and disused radiation sources; existing disposal systems in Zambia regarding spent/orphaned sources; existing stocks of radioactive sources in the Zambian industries

  9. Management of spent sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, Roberto; Sordei, Gian-Maria; Hiromoto, Goro

    2002-01-01

    The number of sealed radiation sources used in industrial, medical, and research applications in Brazil amounts to hundreds of thousands. Spent or disused sources are being collected and stored as radioactive waste in nuclear research centers, awaiting for a decision on their final disposal. However, a safe and economically feasible disposal technology is unavailable. The aim of this paper is to report the development of the concept of a repository and a treatment process that will allow the final disposal of all the spent sealed sources in a safe, dedicated, and exclusive repository. The concept of the disposal system is a deep borehole in stable geologic media, meeting the radiological performance standards and safety requirements set by international organizations. (author)

  10. Alternative approaches to pollution control and waste management: Regulatory and economic instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the most common strategies and policy instruments (that is, regulatory and economic) used in developed and developing countries to achieve pollution control and waste management objectives. Although this topic has been at the center of theoretical controversy both within and outside the World Bank, the paper is not intended to contribute to this debate. Rather, its purpose is to explore how regulatory and economic instruments are used to control air and water pollution, protect ground water, and manage solid and hazardous wastes. The paper is directed to policy makers at the national, state, and local levels of government, as well as to other parties responsible for pollution control and waste management programs

  11. Regulatory modes and time management: how locomotors and assessors plan and perceive time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Clara; Pierro, Antonio; Chirumbolo, Antonio; Pica, Gennaro

    2014-06-01

    This research investigated the relationship between regulatory mode orientations (locomotion and assessment), time management behaviours and the perceived control of time. "Locomotion" refers to the aspect of self-regulation involving the movement from state to state, whereas "assessment" is the comparative aspect of self-regulation that refers to the critical evaluation of alternative goals and the means for achieving them. The Italian versions of the Time Management Behavior Scale and the Perceived Control of Time Scale, as well as the Locomotion and Assessment Regulatory Modes Scales were administered to 339 Italian participants (249 students and 90 employees). The results supported the notion that locomotors and assessors differ in the ways they perceive the control of time. Locomotion was found to be positively related to perceived control of time. In contrast, assessment was negatively related to perceived control of time. Furthermore, the two time management dimensions of setting goals and priorities and preference for organisation were shown to mediate the relationship between locomotion and perceived control of time, whereas assessment proved to be unrelated to all time management behaviours. These findings highlight the importance of regulatory modes for human behaviour regarding time management and perceived control of time. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  12. Regulatory Technology Development Plan Sodium Fast Reactor. Mechanistic Source Term Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabaskas, David S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, Acacia Joann [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bucknor, Matthew D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sofu, Tanju [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-02-28

    Construction and operation of a nuclear power installation in the U.S. requires licensing by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A vital part of this licensing process and integrated safety assessment entails the analysis of a source term (or source terms) that represents the release of radionuclides during normal operation and accident sequences. Historically, nuclear plant source term analyses have utilized deterministic, bounding assessments of the radionuclides released to the environment. Significant advancements in technical capabilities and the knowledge state have enabled the development of more realistic analyses such that a mechanistic source term (MST) assessment is now expected to be a requirement of advanced reactor licensing. This report focuses on the state of development of an MST for a sodium fast reactor (SFR), with the intent of aiding in the process of MST definition by qualitatively identifying and characterizing the major sources and transport processes of radionuclides. Due to common design characteristics among current U.S. SFR vendor designs, a metal-fuel, pool-type SFR has been selected as the reference design for this work, with all phenomenological discussions geared toward this specific reactor configuration. This works also aims to identify the key gaps and uncertainties in the current knowledge state that must be addressed for SFR MST development. It is anticipated that this knowledge state assessment can enable the coordination of technology and analysis tool development discussions such that any knowledge gaps may be addressed. Sources of radionuclides considered in this report include releases originating both in-vessel and ex-vessel, including in-core fuel, primary sodium and cover gas cleanup systems, and spent fuel movement and handling. Transport phenomena affecting various release groups are identified and qualitatively discussed, including fuel pin and primary coolant retention, and behavior in the cover gas and

  13. Open Source and Proprietary Project Management Tools for SMEs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Abramova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The dimensional growth and increasing difficulty in project management promoted the development of different tools that serve to facilitate project management and track project schedule, resources and overall progress. These tools offer a variety of features, from task and time management, up to integrated CRM (Customer Relationship Management and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning modules. Currently, a large number of project management software is available, to assist project team during the entire project lifecycle. We present the main differences between open source and proprietary project management tools and how those could be important for SMEs, describing the key features and how those can assist the project manager and the development team. In this paper, we analyse four open-source project management tools: OpenProject, ProjectLibre, Redmine, LibrePlan and four proprietary tools: Bitrix24, JIRA, Microsoft Project and Asana.

  14. Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources: Initiatives of the Forum of Nuclear Regulatory Bodies in Africa (FNRBA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, R.

    2010-01-01

    Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources: Initiatives of the Forum of Nuclear Regulatory Bodies in Africa(FNRBA) is a regional organization comprising of nuclear regulatory bodies it’s goals are to promote the establishment of regulatory infrastructure in all countries of the Region to adopt joint action plan for implementation of self-assessment and work with Member States to upgrade their regulatory infrastructures, develop and promote a framework for capacity building in areas of radiation and nuclear safety and security, to create an opportunity for mutual support and coordination of regional initiatives by leveraging the development and utilization of regional and international resources and expertise and to serve as reference body on matters relating to nuclear and radiation safety and security in the Region. Radioactive active sources continue to play an increasingly important role in socio-economic activities on the African continent. There is also an ever increasing need to ensure that radioactive sources are utilized in a safe and secure manner

  15. The detection of orphan radioactive sources and the regulatory attitude; La deteccion de fuentes radiactivas huerfanas y la actitud regulatoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truppa, W.; Amodei, A.; Castro, L.; Rojas, C. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Subgerencia Control de Instalaciones Radiactivas Clase ll y III, Av. Del Libertador 8250 Ciudad de Buenos Aires (C1429BNP) (Argentina)]. e-mail: wtruppa@sede.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    In the last decade, the appearance of orphan control radioactive sources has been one constant restlessness in the environment of the regulatory control. Of the well-known cases in the world the more common have been the appearance of type sources or industrial use, which by control lack, by negligence or abandonment were without the due protection and receipt. It is presented in this work the detection of a radioactive source of Cs-137 pickup among the scrap that entered to an important steelworks of the country, by a detector of portal type. Starting from there, Ia Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) it carried out a deep investigation to determine the origin of the radioactive source, which drove to detect and to put low control to other three radioactive sources of the same type used in level measurement, originally housed in a tank of daily consumption of gas-oil, inside a craft that it was broken up for it sale like scrap. During the execution of these tasks they took the regulatory collection, chord to what indicates the normative of the Argentine Republic, harmonized by the international requirements as for the control of radioactive material. (Author)

  16. Leadership, change management and social sourcing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Frank

    2013-01-01

    • Basic principles of Change Management • Group practice • TheoryU and Social Networking theory as framework for Leadership • Theory about Lean thinking as a method for improving Leadership skills and strategy deployment • Group practice in collegial peer coaching • Summary and mission setting for

  17. Multi-source remote sensing data management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Kai; Zhao Yingjun; Lu Donghua; Zhang Donghui; Wu Wenhuan

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, the author explored multi-source management problems of remote sensing data. The main idea is to use the mosaic dataset model, and the ways of an integreted display of image and its interpretation. Based on ArcGIS and IMINT feature knowledge platform, the author used the C# and other programming tools for development work, so as to design and implement multi-source remote sensing data management system function module which is able to simply, conveniently and efficiently manage multi-source remote sensing data. (authors)

  18. Assessing the role of regulatory bodies in managing health professional issues and errors in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso-Gill, Isabelle; Legido-Quigley, H; Panteli, D; Mckee, M

    2014-08-01

    This paper explores how medical regulatory bodies in nine European countries manage professional issues involving quality and patient safety, to build on limited existing information on procedures for regulating medical professionals in Europe. Twelve vignettes describing scenarios of concerns about standards of physicians were developed, covering clinical, criminal and administrative matters. Medical regulatory bodies in nine European countries were asked what action they would normally take in each situation. Their responses were related to their regulatory mandate. Responses varied greatly across participating countries. Regulators are always involved where patients are at risk or where a criminal offence is committed within the clinical setting. Non-criminal medical issues were generally handled by the employer, if any, at their discretion. Countries varied in the use of punitive measures, the extent to which they took an interest in issues arising outside professional activities, and whether they dealt with issues themselves or referred cases to another regulatory authority or took no action at all. There is little consistency across Europe on the regulation of medical professionals. There is considerable diversity in the range of topics that regulatory bodies oversee, with almost all covering health care quality and safety and others encompassing issues related to reputation, respect and trust. These inconsistencies have significant implications for professional mobility, patient safety and quality of care. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  19. Information management systems for integrating the technical data and regulatory requirements of environmental restoration activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geffen, C.A.; Garrett, B.A.; Walter, M.B.

    1990-03-01

    Current environmental regulations require that comprehensive planning be conducted before remediating a hazardous waste site to characterize the nature and extent of site contamination, calculate the risk to the public, and assess the effectiveness of various remediation technologies. Remediation of Department of Energy (DOE) sites contaminated with hazardous or mixed wastes will require the effective integration of scientific and engineering data with regulatory and institutional requirements. The information management challenge presented by waste site cleanup activities goes beyond merely dealing with the large quantity of data that will be generated. The information must be stored, managed, and presented in a way that provides some consistency in approach across sites, avoids duplication of effort, and facilitates responses to requests for information from the regulators and the public. This paper provides background information on the regulatory requirements for data gathering and analysis for environmental restoration activities, and outlines the data and information management requirements for completing the pre-remediation phases of an environmental restoration project. Information management systems for integrating the regulatory and institutional requirements of the environmental restoration process with the technical data and analysis requirements are also described. 7 refs

  20. Regulatory requirements important to Hanford single-shell tank waste management decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.F.; Woodruff, M.G.

    1989-06-01

    This report provides an initial analysis of the regulations that may be pertinent to SST management activities (e.g., characterization, disposal, retrieval, processing, etc.) and the interrelationships among those regulations. Waste disposal decisions regarding SST waste must consider the regulatory requirements against which technical solutions will be evaluated. Regulatory requirements can also be used as guidelines for management and disposal of waste in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment. Also, in cases where waste management regulations do not specifically address a waste form, such as radioactive mixed waste, the SST waste may come under the purview of a number of regulations related to radioactive waste management, hazardous waste management, and water and air quality protection. This report provides a comprehensive review of the environmental pollution control and radioactive waste management statutes and regulations that are relevant to SST waste characterization and management. Also, other statutes and regulations that contain technical standards that may be used in the absence of directly applicable regulations are analyzed. 8 refs., 4 figs

  1. The regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, the safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials in Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebeyehu Wolde, G.

    2003-01-01

    The application of Nuclear Techniques in Ethiopia started in the early sixties in the medical field and through time has gradually expanded to other areas. Following this growth the practice of Radiation Protection in Ethiopia dates back over 15 years. Radiation Protection Legislation 79/1993 was promulgated in December 1993, which has established an Autonomous Regulatory Authority to control and supervise the introduction and conduct of any practice involving ionizing radiation. Since 1998 the National Radiation Protection Authority has made a remarkable progress in terms of building a National Radiation Protection Infrastructure and is in a full swing transformation process towards a dynamic credible and competent regulatory Authority. The regulatory activities are designed in line with the main regulatory instruments, Notification, Authorization, Inspection and Enforcement. NRPA has a national inventory system and fully implemented the Regulatory Authority Information System (RAIS), which provides a systemic integration and will be instrumental to enhance the effectiveness of the regulatory system. A substantial progress has been made in the development and provision of support and technical services in the areas of Metrology and Calibration Services, Instrument Maintenance Service, Individual Monitoring of Personnel, Environmental and Food Monitoring and Interim Storage Facility for spent sources. Development of a national system for emergency preparedness and response is the current top agenda of NRPA. Towards ensuring an effective radiation protection and regulatory programme, NRPA is also making a proactive involvement in, expanding its outreach, information dissemination, awareness promotion and development of key human resources. In the last four years Ethiopia has been actively co-operating with IAEA in the framework of the Regional Model Projects RAF/9/024, RAF/9/028 and RAF/9/029. The inputs received through the project framework coupled with the

  2. Review of Sealed Source Designs and Manufacturing Techniques Affecting Disused Source Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    This publication presents an investigation on the influence of the design and technical features of sealed radioactive sources (SRSs) on predisposal and disposal activities when the sources become disused. The publication also addresses whether design modifications could contribute to safer and/or more efficient management of disused sources without compromising the benefits provided by the use of the sealed sources. This technical publication aims to collect information on the most typical design features and manufacturing techniques of sealed radioactive sources and examines how they affect the safe management of disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRS). The publication also aims to assist source designers and manufacturers by discussing design features that are important from the waste management point of view. It has been identified that most SRS manufacturers use similar geometries and materials for their designs and apply improved and reliable manufacturing techniques e.g. double- encapsulation. These designs and manufacturing techniques have been proven over time to reduce contamination levels in fabrication and handling, and improve source integrity and longevity. The current source designs and materials ensure as well as possible that SRSs will maintain their integrity in use and when they become disused. No significant improvement options to current designs have been identified. However, some design considerations were identified as important to facilitate source retrieval, to increase the possibility of re-use and to ensure minimal contamination risk and radioactive waste generation at recycling. It was also concluded that legible identifying markings on a source are critical for DSRS management. The publication emphasizes the need for a common understanding of the radioactive source's recommended working life (RWL) for manufacturers and regulators. The conditions of use (COU) are important for the determination of RWL. A formal system for specification

  3. PUREX source Aggregate Area management study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the PUREX Plant Aggregate Area in the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE)Hanford Site in Washington State. This scoping level study provides the basis for initiating Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities under the comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS) under RCRA. This report also integrates select RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations

  4. Management of Tritium in European Spallation Source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ene, Daniela; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Jensen, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    with the country regulation criteria. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the different aspects of the tritium management in ESS facility. Besides the design parameter study of the helium coolant purification system of the target the consequences of the tritium releasing into the environment were also...... of the results on soil examinations. With the assumption of 100% release of tritium to the atmosphere during the occurring of the extreme accidents, it was found as well that the total dose complies with the constraint....

  5. Ionizing radiation sources management in the Commonwealth of Independent States - CIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskra, A.; Bufetova, M.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation sources cover a broad band of power: from powerful NPP reactors and research reactors to portable radioisotope ionizing radiation sources applied in medicine, agriculture, industry and in the energy supply systems of remote facilities. At present, scales and use field of radionuclide sources in the CIS have the tendency to increase. In this connection, the issues of ionizing radiation sources management safety at all stages of their life cycle, from production to treatment, have been of a great importance. The materials on ionizing radiation sources inventory and treatment in the CIS (Russia, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Ukraine) are presented in the report. It is shown that in some republics, there is difficulty in ionizing radiation sources accounting and control system; the national regulatory and legal framework bases regulating activity on radioactive sources use, localization and treatment require update. Many problems are connected with the sources beyond state accounting. The problem of ionizing radiation sources use safety is complicated by the growing activity of various terrorist groups. The opportunity to use ionizing radiation sources with terrorism goals requires the application of defined systems of security and physical protection at all stages of their management. For this purpose a collective, with all CIS countries, organization of radioactive sources accounting and control as well as countermeasures on their illegal transportation and use are necessary. In this connection, the information collection regarding situation with providing of ionizing radiation sources safety, conditions of equipment and storage facilities, radioactive materials accounting and control system in the CIS countries is vitally needed

  6. The Nonactinide Isotope and Sealed Sources Management Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, J. L.; Polansky, G. F.; Parks, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    The Nonactinide Isotope and Sealed Sources Management Group (NISSMG) is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management and managed by Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL) to serve as a complex-wide resource for the management of DOE-owned Nonactinide Isotope and Sealed Source (NISS) materials. NISS materials are defined as including: any isotope in sealed sources or standards; and isotopes, regardless of form, with atomic number less than 90. The NISSMG assists DOE sites with the storage, reuse, disposition, transportation, and processing of these materials. The NISSMG has focused its efforts to date at DOE closure sites due to the immediacy of their problems. Recently, these efforts were broadened to include closure facilities at non-closure sites. Eventually, the NISSMG plans to make its resources available to all DOE sites. This paper documents the lessons learned in managing NISS materials at DOE sites to date

  7. The management and disposal of sealed sources in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drogou, A.

    2005-01-01

    The utilisation of sealed sources is very widespread in France, both in the medical and industrial fields. The rules for the management and retrieval of the sources are defined in the Decree of 4 April 2002. The principle of the retrieval of the sources is reliant on the supplier who is obliged to take back these sources. Financial guarantee systems have consequently been established to provide compensation for any failure by the supplier to take back the sources. The problems today in France are the absence of a disposal route and the management of the orphan sources. These have been integrated into the drawing up of the National Waste Management Plan (PNGDR) issued by the Minister for the Environment. Certain ideas and principles for the disposal of the sources have already been presented: Development of the principles of justification and recycling, development of disposal routes, development of a retrieval system for orphan sources; the importance of the establishment of financial guarantees for all the sources, the importance of consistency between the European regulations in order to have a simple return to the supplier in the case of imported sources. (author)

  8. Regulatory strategies for high-level radioactive waste management in nine countries: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This report provides information on the regulatory strategies being developed or implemented in nine countries for the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The study was performed by International Energy Associates Limited on behalf of Pacific Northwest Laboratories and the US Department of Energy. IEAL obtained information for this report from the regulatory authorities in each country, who also later reviewed drafts of the respective country sections of the report. The nine countries surveyed were Belgium, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. These countries were selected for study because they are among the largest producers of nuclear energy in the world today and have aggressive programs for spent fuel management and waste disposal

  9. R&D and Innovation Management in the Brazilian Electricity Sector: the Regulatory Constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denile Cominato Boer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2000 it became mandatory to the Brazilian electricity companies to invest in research, development and innovation (RDI. These investments are performed by firms and regulated by the Brazilian Electricity Regulatory Agency (ANEEL. Since then companies have sought ways to cope with this obligation creating internal structures and managerial processes. This article presents the evolution of RDI management routines and organizational models based on a multiple-case study conducted between 2011 and 2012 with seven companies that represent about 27% of the total RDI investment performed in the period of 2008 to 2013. The research showed that firms created minimalist management and organizational structures to handle with the RDI enforcement. Companies have been much more concerned with the regulatory risk (the risk of non-accomplishment with the obligations than to any strategic use of RDI effort since the legal framework is based on punishment rather than in stimulus.

  10. Aligning environmental and regulatory procedures with a holistic project management approach for residue deposits

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Snyman, BJ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available ). 1.1 Legislative responses in South Africa The advent of a democratic South Africa has brought about the promulgation of new environmental legislation. This was necessary to give legal effect to the principles of sustainability as laid down.... Often project delays can be ascribed to non-conformance to the legal and regulatory processes, because: • The South African EIA legislative process that is applicable to mine residue deposition does not focus on project management procedures, project...

  11. The knowledge management and the Library of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahab, Martin; Carregado, Maria A.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2006 the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina has implemented knowledge management activities to face the retirement of many of its scientific and technical members. The purpose of these actions are to preserve the knowledge and information of these personnel and to make it available for both, present and future generations. The ARN libraries play an important role in the accomplishment of these objectives through the coordination and realization of different projects and activities. (author) [es

  12. Information Source Selection and Management Framework in Wireless Sensor Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobgay, Sonam; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein; Prasad, Ramjee

    2013-01-01

    information source selection and management framework and presents an algorithm which selects the information source based on the information mismatch probability [1]. The sampling rate for every access is decided as per the maximum allowable power consumption limit. Index Terms-wireless sensor network...

  13. Perceived sources of conflict among academic and management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived sources of conflict among academic and management staff in colleges of education in Borno state, Nigeria. ... To what extent do male and female academic staff differ on the perceived sources of conflict? The study adopted an exploratory ... Chi-Square was computed to test for sex differences. The study found ...

  14. Open Source Library Management Systems: A Multidimensional Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balnaves, Edmund

    2008-01-01

    Open source library management systems have improved steadily in the last five years. They now present a credible option for small to medium libraries and library networks. An approach to their evaluation is proposed that takes account of three additional dimensions that only open source can offer: the developer and support community, the source…

  15. Maintenance management sourcing strategies and the condition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the face of the deplorable state of buildings across the various tertiary institutions in Nigeria, the need to deploy appropriate maintenance management strategy cannot be overemphasized. However, sourcing decision for maintenance services remains a tough one for decision makers as different sourcing option suit ...

  16. Groundwater contamination from waste management sites: The interaction between risk-based engineering design and regulatory policy: 1. Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massmann, Joel; Freeze, R. Allan

    1987-02-01

    This paper puts in place a risk-cost-benefit analysis for waste management facilities that explicitly recognizes the adversarial relationship that exists in a regulated market economy between the owner/operator of a waste management facility and the government regulatory agency under whose terms the facility must be licensed. The risk-cost-benefit analysis is set up from the perspective of the owner/operator. It can be used directly by the owner/operator to assess alternative design strategies. It can also be used by the regulatory agency to assess alternative regulatory policy, but only in an indirect manner, by examining the response of an owner/operator to the stimuli of various policies. The objective function is couched in terms of a discounted stream of benefits, costs, and risks over an engineering time horizon. Benefits are in the form of revenues for services provided; costs are those of construction and operation of the facility. Risk is defined as the cost associated with the probability of failure, with failure defined as the occurrence of a groundwater contamination event that violates the licensing requirements established for the facility. Failure requires a breach of the containment structure and contaminant migration through the hydrogeological environment to a compliance surface. The probability of failure can be estimated on the basis of reliability theory for the breach of containment and with a Monte-Carlo finite-element simulation for the advective contaminant transport. In the hydrogeological environment the hydraulic conductivity values are defined stochastically. The probability of failure is reduced by the presence of a monitoring network operated by the owner/operator and located between the source and the regulatory compliance surface. The level of reduction in the probability of failure depends on the probability of detection of the monitoring network, which can be calculated from the stochastic contaminant transport simulations. While

  17. Congruent Knowledge Management Behaviors as Discriminate Sources of Competitive Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnier-Watanabe, Remy; Senoo, Dai

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: While knowledge management has been shown to be a strategic source of competitive advantage, processes designed to enhance the productivity of knowledge do not, however, equally contribute to the organization's capabilities. Consequently, this research aims to focus on the relationship between each mode of the knowledge management process…

  18. Free and Open Source Management Information Systems and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    What is the impact of introducing an automated management information system within a microfinance institution or savings and credit cooperative on the employees, the clients and the business processes? The project will involve deployment of an open source management information system (Mifos Vanilla) in two ...

  19. Regulatory instrument review: Aging management of LWR cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werry, E.V.; Somasundaram, S.

    1995-09-01

    The results of Stage 2 of the Regulatory Instrument Review are presented in this volume. Selected regulatory instruments, such as the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Regulatory Guides, and ASME Codes, were investigated to determine the extent to which these regulations apply aging management to selected safety-related components in nuclear power plants. The Regulatory Instrument Review was funded by the NRC under the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Stage 2 of the review focused on four safety-related structures and components; namely, cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves. The review suggests that the primary-emphasis of the regulatory instruments was on the design, construction, start-up, and operation of a nuclear power plant, and that aging issues were primarily addressed after an aging-related problem was recognized. This Stage 2 review confirms the results of the prior review; (see Regulatory Instrument Review: Management of Aging of LWR Major Safety-Related Components NUREG/CR-5490. The observations indicate that the regulations generally address management of age-related degradation indirectly. Specific age-related degradation phenomena frequently are dealt with in bulletins and notices or through generic issues, letters, etc. The major recommendation of this report, therefore, is that the regulatory instruments should more directly and explicitly address the aging phenomenon and the management of the age-related degradation process

  20. Semiworks source aggregate area management study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the Semi-Works Aggregate Area in the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) . Hanford Site in Washington State. This scoping level study provides the basis for initiating Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations WD and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS) under RCRA. This report also integrates select RCRA treatment storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations. This approach is described and justified in The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Package. This strategy provides new concepts for: accelerating decision-malting by maximizing the use of existing data consistent with data quality objectives (DQOs); and undertaking expedited response actions (ERAS) and/or interim remedial measures (IRMs), as appropriate, to either remove threats to human health and welfare and the environment, or to reduce risk by reducing toxicity, mobility, or volume of contaminants

  1. Management of spent high activity radioactive sources (SHARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this report is to provide all people involved in the handling and management of high activity sources with sufficient information about processes that are required for the safe management of spent high activity radioactive sources (SHARS). This includes examples of spent source management that are already taking place and also a description of the range of appropriate options that are available for each stage in the management process. This report also aims to identify the important issues to be addressed in order to develop a waste management strategy as part of the integrated management strategy that takes account of international experience and the guidance and principles that have been learned from that experience. This report relates specifically to SHARS, which are spent sources that have the potential, with short exposures, to produce acute health effects if handled incorrectly. In addition, they may also incur significant economic costs in any retrieval or environmental remediation operation, following loss of or damage to such a source. The report provides guidance on the technical, administrative and economic issues associated with SHARS from the moment they cease to be in use through to disposal, including temporary storage, transport, conditioning and interim storage

  2. Misunderstanding the ``Nature'' of Co-Management: A Geography of Regulatory Science and Indigenous Knowledges (IK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Annette

    2013-11-01

    Governments, NGOs, and natural scientists have increased research and policy-making collaborations with Indigenous peoples for governing natural resources, including official co-management regimes. However, there is continuing dissatisfaction with such collaborations, and calls for better communication and mutual learning to create more “adaptive” co-management regimes. This, however, requires that both Western and Indigenous knowledge systems be equal participants in the “co-production” of regulatory data. In this article, I examine the power dynamics of one co-management regulatory regime, conducting a multi-sited ethnography of the practices of researching and managing one transnational migratory species, greater white-fronted geese ( Anser albifrons frontalis), who nest where Koyukon Athabascans in Alaska, USA, practice subsistence. Analyzing the ethnographic data through the literatures of critical geography, science studies and Indigenous Studies, I describe how the practice of researching for co-management can produce conflict. “Scaling” the data for the co-management regime can marginalize Indigenous understandings of human-environment relations. While Enlightenment-based practices in wildlife biology avoid “anthropomorphism,” Indigenous Studies describes identities that operate through non-modern, deeply imbricated human-nonhuman identities that do not separate “nature” and “society” in making knowledge. Thus, misunderstanding the “nature” of their collaborations causes biologists and managers to measure and research the system in ways that erase how subsistence-based Indigenous groups already “manage” wildlife: by living through their ethical commitments to their fellow beings. At the end of the article, I discuss how managers might learn from these ontological and epistemological differences to better “co-produce” data for co-management.

  3. Support in the development of Regulatory Procedures for licensing Lepse Waste Management Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This report describes a project intended to assist Gosatomnadzor of Russia develop a set of documents defining the regulatory requirements for information to be submitted to Gosatomnadzor in support of any application for a licence relating to the removal of spent nuclear fuel from the depot ship Lepse. The project resulted in the development of three regulatory documents covering the documentation required in support of a licence application, the requirements for quality assurance arrangements and the safety analysis report. The working method adopted involved staged development of draft material and review at workshops involving a wide variety of relevant Russian and western organizations. The input and output of the workshops was fully documented to provide an audit trail for the document development and the rationale for what has been included and what is excluded and why. The availability of the regulatory documents in English should significantly assist in the use of the documents by western partners in the actual industrial project. Important experience and information was exchanged among participants in the project. The developing understanding is an important element in providing confidence, from a western perspective, that appropriate regulatory supervision can be applied to industrial projects supported by organizations such as the European Commission and national agencies. The same working methods could be used in the next phase of Lepse regulatory support, i.e., support in development of the procedures for the regulatory review of licence applications, and, subsequently, support in the application of the regulatory inspection process to ensure licence conditions are being complied with. Similarly, these working methods could be used in providing regulatory support for nuclear and radiation safety related to other industrial projects involving radioactive waste management. The participants in this sub-project described in this report were Norwegian

  4. The Functions of Sourcing Intermediaries in Global Supply Risk Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Mette; Ellegaard, Chris

    The aim of this work-in-progress paper is to uncover the supply risk management functions performed by sourcing intermediaries. The purchasing and supply chain management literature, including the part of it concerned with supply risk, pays little attention to sourcing intermediaries....... But the fields of marketing and international business have investigated the intermediary including its high supply risk reducing potentials, suggesting that this supply chain entity may be highly relevant to supply risk management. In order to get a better understanding of the supply risk reducing properties...... of sourcing intermediaries, we perform a study of the Danish clothing industry. The study incorporate interviews across a range of functions and companies in this industry including retailers, producers, suppliers, and various types of intermediaries. We contribute by coupling the supply risk management...

  5. Assistance to Oil and Gas State Agencies and Industry through Continuation of Environmental and Production Data Management and a Water Regulatory Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, Ben; Arthur, Dan; Langhus, Bruce; Gillespie, Tom; Binder, Ben; Warner, Don; Roberts, Jim; Cox, D.O.

    2002-05-31

    This grant project was a major step toward completion of the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) project. Additionally the project addresses the needs identified during the projects initial phases. By implementing this project, the following outcomes were sought: (1) State regulatory agencies implemented more formalized environmental risk management practices as they pertain to the production of oil and gas, and injection via Class II wells. (2) Enhancement of oil and gas production by implementing a management system supporting the saving of abandoned or idle wells located in areas with a relatively low environmental risk of endangering underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) in a particular state. (3) Verification that protection of USDWs is adequate and additional restrictions of requirements are not necessary in areas with a relatively low environmental risk. (4) Standardization of data and information maintained by state regulatory agencies and decrease the regulatory cost burden on producers operating in multiple states, and (5) Development of a system for electronic data transfer among operators and state regulatory agencies and reduction of overall operator reporting burdens.

  6. Development of regulatory and legal framework for spent fuel and radwaste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezzubtsev, V.S.

    2012-01-01

    The Basics of National Policy in Nuclear and Radiation Safety assurance in the Russian Federation define the principles and objectives of nuclear and radiation safety of nuclear facilities during all stages of their life cycle. Russia's National Report at the Fourth Review Meeting of Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management reflected the organizational as well as legal and regulatory changes that have taken place over past three years. Amendments recently made to the Russian Nuclear Energy Law as well as the Law on Radwaste Management adopted in 2011 are discussed. Federal norms and regulations in the field of spent fuel and radwaste management are also presented. Organizational and legal reforms related to state safety regulation are described [ru

  7. The eSourcing Capability Model for Service Providers: Knowledge Manage-ment across the Sourcing Life-cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Laaksonen, Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Laaksonen, Pekka The eSourcing Capability Model for Service Providers: Knowledge Manage-ment across the Sourcing Life-cycle Jyväskylä: Jyväskylän yliopisto, 2011, 42 s. Tietojärjestelmätiede, kandidaatintutkielma Ohjaaja(t): Käkölä, Timo Tässä kandidaatintutkielmassa selvitettiin sitä, miten the eSourcing Capability Model for Service Providers-mallin käytännöt (practices) ovat liittyneet tietä-myksenhallinnan neljään prosessiin: tiedon luominen, varastointi/noutaminen, jakamine...

  8. Open source electronic health records and chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater, Jason C; Kwon, Nancy J; Nathanson, Ashley; Muckle, Alison E; Brown, Alexa; Cornejo, Kerri

    2014-02-01

    To study and report on the use of open source electronic health records (EHR) to assist with chronic care management within safety net medical settings, such as community health centers (CHC). The study was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago from April to September 2010. The NORC team undertook a comprehensive environmental scan, including a literature review, a dozen key informant interviews using a semistructured protocol, and a series of site visits to CHC that currently use an open source EHR. Two of the sites chosen by NORC were actively using an open source EHR to assist in the redesign of their care delivery system to support more effective chronic disease management. This included incorporating the chronic care model into an CHC and using the EHR to help facilitate its elements, such as care teams for patients, in addition to maintaining health records on indigent populations, such as tuberculosis status on homeless patients. The ability to modify the open-source EHR to adapt to the CHC environment and leverage the ecosystem of providers and users to assist in this process provided significant advantages in chronic care management. Improvements in diabetes management, controlled hypertension and increases in tuberculosis vaccinations were assisted through the use of these open source systems. The flexibility and adaptability of open source EHR demonstrated its utility and viability in the provision of necessary and needed chronic disease care among populations served by CHC.

  9. Safe management of smoke detectors containing radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, M.; Benitez, J.C.; Castillo, R.A.; Berdellans, A.; Hernandez, J.M.; Pirez, C.J.; Soto, P.G.

    2013-01-01

    Ionic smoke detectors contain radioactive sources that could be Am-241, Pu-238, Pu-239, Kr-85, etc. According to Cuban regulations (Resolution 96 /2003 of the Minister of Science Technology and Environment), smoke detectors, once become disused, should be managed as radioactive waste. For this reason, disused smoke detectors should be transferred to the Centre for Radiation Protection and Hygiene, the organization responsible for radioactive waste management in the country. More than 20 000 smoke detectors have been collected by the CPHR and stored at the Centralized Waste Management Facility. There are 28 different models of smoke detectors of different origin. They contain between 18 - 37 kBq of Am-241 or between 0.37 - 37 MBq of Plutonium or around 37 MBq of Kr-85. The safe management of ionic smoke detectors consists in dismantling the devices, recovering the radioactive sources and conditioning them for long term storage and disposal. The rest of non-radioactive materials should be segregated (plastic, metal and electronic components) for recycling. A technical manual was developed with specific instructions for dismantling each model of smoke detector and recovering the radioactive sources. Instructions for segregation of non-radioactive components are also included in the manual. Most of smoke detectors contain long lived radioactive sources (Am-241, Pu-238, Pu-239), so especial attention was given to the management of these sources. A methodology was developed for conditioning of radioactive sources, consisting in encapsulating them for long term storage. The retrievability of the sources (sealed capsules with radioactive sources) for future disposal was also considered. A documented procedure was elaborated for these operations. (author)

  10. Managing Nonpoint Source Pollution in Western Washington: Landowner Learning Methods and Motivations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Clare M.

    2009-06-01

    States, territories, and tribes identify nonpoint source pollution as responsible for more than half of the Nation’s existing and threatened water quality impairments, making it the principal remaining cause of water quality problems across the United States. Combinations of education, technical and financial assistance, and regulatory measures are used to inform landowners about nonpoint source pollution issues, and to stimulate the use of best management practices. A mail survey of non-commercial riparian landowners investigated how they learn about best management practices, the efficacy of different educational techniques, and what motivates them to implement land management activities. Landowners experience a variety of educational techniques, and rank those that include direct personal contact as more effective than brochures, advertisements, radio, internet, or television. The most important motivations for implementing best management practices were linked with elements of a personal stewardship ethic, accountability, personal commitment, and feasibility. Nonpoint source education and social marketing campaigns should include direct interpersonal contacts, and appeal to landowner motivations of caring, responsibility, and personal commitment.

  11. Learning Management Systems and Comparison of Open Source Learning Management Systems and Proprietary Learning Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yücel Yılmaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of learning has been increasingly gaining importance for individuals, businesses and communities in the age of information. On the other hand, developments in information and communication technologies take effect in the field of learning activities. With these technologies, barriers of time and space against the learning activities largely disappear and these technologies make it easier to carry out these activities more effectively. There remain a lot of questions regarding selection of learning management system (LMS to be used for the management of e-learning processes by all organizations conducing educational practices including universities, companies, non-profit organizations, etc. The main questions are as follows: Shall we choose open source LMS or commercial LMS? Can the selected LMS meet existing needs and future potential needs for the organization? What are the possibilities of technical support in the management of LMS? What kind of problems may be experienced in the use of LMS and how can these problems be solved? How much effective can officials in the organization be in the management of LMS? In this study, primarily e-learning and the concept of LMS will be discussed, and in the next section, as for answers to these questions, open source LMSs and centrally developed LMSs will be examined and their advantages and disadvantages relative to each other will be discussed.

  12. Strategic sourcing and procurement of facilities management services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2017-01-01

    /methodology/approach: The paper investigates a strategic sourcing and procurement process in a large public organisation in Denmark based on participating in internal meetings, a workshop, document studies and interviews. The process is compared to a new ISO standard with guidance on strategic sourcing and development of FM......Purpose: The purpose it to provide insights into strategic sourcing concerning Facilities Management (FM) and how it can contribute to a sourcing decision that combines the benefits of internal and external provision with consideration of business risk and cost. Design...... agreements. Findings: A problem in the new ISO standard is that it is based on sequential model starting with detailing the demand and needs before investigating sourcing option. The case shows that the way needs are specified are depending on the chosen sourcing models. Based on a thorough analysis...

  13. Management of Disused Sealed Sources in Hungary - 13077

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitany, Sandor

    2013-01-01

    Since 1976 the spent and disused radioactive sources arisen in Hungary are stored in a central storage facility called Radioactive Waste Treatment and Disposal Facility operated by Public Limited Company for Radioactive Waste Management. The Facility is responsible for the record keeping, the waste acceptance procedure, the shipment and the storage or disposal (whether a certain source meets the waste acceptance criteria for disposal or not) of sources. Based on the more than 35 year old operation of the facility many experiences have been gathered regarding the technology for long-term storage of sources, the attitude of the users of sources, the evolution of the legislation and the national record keeping system. Recently a new legislation for the security of radioactive materials (including sources) was introduced, first in Central-Europe. It requires special security arrangements from the facility for transport and for storage. Due to the ongoing retrieval of radioactive waste formerly disposed of, partly containing sealed sources, there is a new challenge in the physical inventory control of historical waste. The paper would show the effect of the changes in the legislation system of record keeping or security on the users' attitude for discard of sources and on the management of the sources in the facility. The facility has a unique storage technology (shallow boreholes) in the narrow region. The sealed sources are placed into vertical pipes sunk into the surface. In the beginning, each of the sources were dropped into the pipe directly, recently they are placed in a metal tube first ensuring the retrieval. The lessons learned will be presented. There were several issues to introduce the new security arrangements (partly financially supported by US DOE) for storage and for transportation of sealed sources. These issues are addressed. In the past part of the sealed sources were disposed together with solid radioactive waste packaged in plastic bags. A waste

  14. Management of Disused Sealed Sources in Hungary - 13077

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapitany, Sandor [PURAM, Puskas Tivadar street 11, Budaors, Pest 2040 (Hungary)

    2013-07-01

    Since 1976 the spent and disused radioactive sources arisen in Hungary are stored in a central storage facility called Radioactive Waste Treatment and Disposal Facility operated by Public Limited Company for Radioactive Waste Management. The Facility is responsible for the record keeping, the waste acceptance procedure, the shipment and the storage or disposal (whether a certain source meets the waste acceptance criteria for disposal or not) of sources. Based on the more than 35 year old operation of the facility many experiences have been gathered regarding the technology for long-term storage of sources, the attitude of the users of sources, the evolution of the legislation and the national record keeping system. Recently a new legislation for the security of radioactive materials (including sources) was introduced, first in Central-Europe. It requires special security arrangements from the facility for transport and for storage. Due to the ongoing retrieval of radioactive waste formerly disposed of, partly containing sealed sources, there is a new challenge in the physical inventory control of historical waste. The paper would show the effect of the changes in the legislation system of record keeping or security on the users' attitude for discard of sources and on the management of the sources in the facility. The facility has a unique storage technology (shallow boreholes) in the narrow region. The sealed sources are placed into vertical pipes sunk into the surface. In the beginning, each of the sources were dropped into the pipe directly, recently they are placed in a metal tube first ensuring the retrieval. The lessons learned will be presented. There were several issues to introduce the new security arrangements (partly financially supported by US DOE) for storage and for transportation of sealed sources. These issues are addressed. In the past part of the sealed sources were disposed together with solid radioactive waste packaged in plastic bags. A

  15. Safety regulation: The lessons of workplace safety rule management for managing the regulatory burden

    OpenAIRE

    Hale, A.R.; Borys, D.; Adams, M.

    2012-01-01

    There is a strong political consensus in a number of countries that occupational safety and health regulation is stifling industrial innovation and development and is feeding a culture of damaging risk aversion and petty bureaucracy. In a number of countries this has led to proposals to repeal regulations and reduce the regulatory burden. The authors were commissioned to prepare a discussion paper on this issue by the Mercatus Center of George Mason University in Arlington, Virginia, aimed pa...

  16. Environmental radiation control and quality management system in design and operation of sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.

    2007-01-01

    New environmental regulations and radiation safety standards are being implemented almost daily to ensure radiation safety, in particular for practices causing exposures to undue radiation doses. A particular emphasis of real challenge for organizations and users of radiation sources has to be for proper radiological safety assessment and is becoming cost effectively to be prepared for auditing. Special concern for the environment is of global . nature, and hence environmental auditing has been and will continue to be an essential practice for improving the environment and for meeting the relevant regulations and standards. In general, most facilities that deal with radioactive sources undertake strict safety measures in terms of personnel radiation protection, handling procedures and security. Hence, those measures should comply with the requirements of the environmental protection standards. Accordingly, a successful quality management system must balance realities of organization and personnel in achieving quality objectives. Organizational principles are found in the technical aspects of' quality management, such as, charting, requirements, measurements, procedures, ... , etc. Human principles are found in the communication side of quality management (e.g. meetings, ,decision making, ,teams, ... , etc). The quality management must understand and balance skills needed to blend them together. Large gamma irradiators present a high potential radiation hazard to the surrounding environment, since the amount of radioactivity is of the order of (P Bq) and a very high dose rates are produced during irradiation. Application of environmental radiation control deemed by regulatory authority and a proper quality management system by the utility would serve public health and safety

  17. A Survey Of Top 10 Open Source Learning Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R. Elabnody

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Open Source LMSs are fully flexible and customizable so they can be designed in line with your schoolorganizations brand image. Open Source LMSs can also be converted to social learning platforms. You can create an online community through your LMS. This paper describes the most important features in learning management systems LMS that are critical to compare and contrast depend on your system requirements. Also represents a multiple LMS providers that are designed to use in university environment.

  18. Waste management from reprocessing: a stringent regulatory requirements for high quality conditioned residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, J. C.; Greneche, D.; Devezeaux, J. G.; Dalcorso, J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear waste production and management in France is governed by safety requirements imposed to all operators. French nuclear safety relies on two basic principles: · Responsibility of the nuclear operator, which expands to waste generated, · Safety basic objectives issued by national Safety Authority. For a long time the regulatory framework for waste production and management has been satisfactorily applied and has benefited to each actor of the process. LLW/MLW and HLW nuclear waste are currently conditioned in safe matrices or packages either likely to be disposed in surface repositories or designed with the intention to be disposed underground according to their radioactive content. France is looking into the case of VLLW and has already carried out a design for future disposal, the design being in the pipe. Other types of waste (i. e. radium bearing waste, graphite, and tritium content waste) are also considered in the whole framework of French waste management. (author)

  19. Legislative and regulatory framework on the safety of radioactive waste management in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastchiev, G.

    2000-01-01

    There are six nuclear power units in operation in Bulgaria. Over 2000 sites use sources of ionizing radiation. NPP radioactive waste is stored on-site and the institutional waste was disposed of at the Novi han repository until 1994. Bulgaria signed the Joint Convention in 1998 and is to ratify it until the end of 1999. A plan on preparation of the country for the obligations following the forthcoming ratification was developed and has been implemented. A National Strategy on SNF and RAW was developed, as well as a Comprehensive Legislative Programme in this field. Emphasis is put on the strengthening the regulatory body, improvement of the supervision and control activities. (author)

  20. Quality Management System Improves Effectiveness and Quality of Activities of Radiation Protection Regulatory Body in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastauskas, A.

    2016-01-01

    Processes of creation of quality management system (QMS) in regulatory body in radiation protection field – Radiation Protection Centre (RPC) and the benefit of this system to ensure the quality of the performance of functions are described. RPC QMS compliant with ISO 9001:2008 standard and in line with the requirements of the IAEA GSR- 3 document. It allowed achieving a new quality of works carried out by RPC. Because creation and introduction of the QMS is a continuous process, the QMS of RPC is continually renewed and new procedures are developed.

  1. The exemption of regulatory control for the management of low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M.T.; Carboneras, P.

    1993-01-01

    A high number of wastes produced in different fields of science and technology, as well as nuclear power plants, contain a significant volume of byproducts contaminated with radioisotopes, having a very low radioactive level. This kind of wastes might be managed as ordinary wastes by conventional methods or even reused. In order to carry out this procedure, a new regulation exempting these products from the regulatory control normatives would be necessary. This paper analyzes the big advantages of introducing these exemptions (costs recycling, radioactive wastes minimization) and how they follow the recommendations of ICRP, IAEA, EC and NRC

  2. Enterprise-Level Motivations, Regulatory Pressures, and Corporate Environmental Management in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shui-Yan; Li, Pansy Honying; Fryxell, Gerald E.; Lo, Carlos Wing-Hung

    2015-09-01

    This study examines the effects of internal motivations and external pressures on the integration of environmental management (EM) practices within manufacturing operations in China. The moderating role of perceptions toward the regulatory process is also considered along with comparisons between wholly Chinese-owned and foreign-owned enterprises. From a sample of 131 manufacturing companies in the Guangzhou area, it was found that the salience of fees and fines has a strong positive influence on perceptions toward the regulator (the local Environmental Protection Bureau, EPB). This also has a positive effect on perceptions toward regulations themselves for foreign-owned enterprises. Business-case motivations for EM positively shape enterprise perceptions toward regulations, whereas risk-reduction motivations have a negative effect on perceptions toward regulations in foreign-owned enterprises. Enterprise perceptions toward the regulatory process have direct effects on the integration of EM practices in wholly Chinese-owned enterprises, but in opposite directions. While positive perceptions toward regulations have positive influence, positive perceptions toward regulators (i.e., the EPB) negatively affect it. Overall, these results indicated that promoting the adoption of EM practices depends on convincing business leaders that EM practices contribute to profit making. The regulatory process can potentially promote these practices, but measures need to be taken to ensure that the regulator is not co-opted by the regulated, especially in wholly Chinese-owned enterprises.

  3. The role of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the management of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, H.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In general, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for reviewing and making licensing decisions to ensure that the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) high-level waste repository is designed, constructed, and operated without unreasonable risk to public health and safety. In implementing this responsibility, however, the commission's guidance to the staff is that, in the absence of unresolved safety concerns, the NRC regulatory program will not delay the executive branch's program as set forth in the DOE project decision schedule. The NRC role for the next several years will be to develop its licensing framework and to consult with DOE on its plans. An essential ingredient in the success of both NRC's and DOE's respective missions is the need for free and open exchange of information, which will assure us that the concerns of all parties are addressed. With regard to low-level radioactive waste, the states have the lead responsibility for disposal. The NRC also provides assistance to the states and compacts on such items as regulatory programs, site characterization, and mixed waste disposal. Another of the NRC's roles is in the management of uranium mill tailings. Currently, most of the NRC's attention is focused on ensuring adequate long-term stabilization of tailings

  4. Regulatory Perspectives on Risk Management for Lepse De-fuelling Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, Malgorzata; Gordon, Boris

    2001-01-01

    The Lepse is a ship used for the storage of spent nuclear fuel from nuclear powered ice-breakers in the Murmansk region. Much of the stored spent fuel is damaged. While the status of the vessel may be considered reasonably secure for the present, it is well understood that, at some stage, it will be necessary to remove the spent fuel from the Lepse, so that the long term safe management of the spent fuel can be assured. Plans have been developed for unloading spent fuel from the Lepse. The operations to do this will be non-standard, because of the nature of the storage facilities within the vessel and the poor state of the majority of the spent fuel. For example, specialised equipment will be required for fuel handling, and special arrangements will have to be in place to avoid or mitigate the consequences of possible accidents. Regulatory supervision of these unique operations has also to be specifically provided. Concerning nuclear safety aspects, the Federal Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of Russia (Gosatomnadzor) has developed specific regulatory documents, with support from the Scientific and Engineering Centre of Gosatornnadzor and additional support from western agencies. Other regulatory bodies are also involved, concerned with the protection of the environment and other matters

  5. Management of Spent Sealed Radioactive Sources in Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania and Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, M.; Cowley, M.; Moreton, T.; Wells, D.

    2003-01-01

    This study has been performed to consider the situation relating to the regulation and management of spent sealed radioactive sources (SSRS) in five of the Central and Eastern European (C and EE) countries that are being considered for admission to the EU, namely, Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania and Slovakia. Two previous studies have considered the situation in the current EU member states(1) and in the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Poland and Slovenia(2). The general aim of this study has been to acquire a thorough understanding of the management of SSRS in the five countries, in order to recommend improvements in management schemes and to establish whether the application of common disposal criteria would be advantageous. This report is structured in the following manner; following the Introduction (Section 1), there is a description of the current and proposed regulatory requirements in the EU, together with a summarised comparison of the regulatory systems in the five countries with EU standards (Section 2). Sections 3 to 7 are dedicated to each of the five countries. Each of these sections is similarly sub-divided to enable country-by-country and topic-by-topic comparison. In each of Sections 3 to 7 there is an overview, description of the sealed source inventory, regulations, current management practices, retrieval of unregistered (sometimes known as lost or orphan sources) SSRS, conclusions and a description of possible future technical assistance projects. In addition, there is a description in each of Sections 3 to 7 of the management of 226 Ra sources, which is receiving special attention in many countries (Table I provides a summary and comparison of the management of 226 Ra in the five countries).both country-specific and generic recommendations. A common concern in the five countries and many other countries, including the EU member states, is the problem of accidental inclusion of SSRS in consignments of scrap metal. The detection of

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives impacting environmental, health, and safety management responsibilities. the table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  7. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives impacting environmental, health, and safety management responsibilities. the table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  8. Operational and regulatory impacts of regional management on transportation of commercial low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, C.G.; Wilmot, E.L.; Shepherd, E.W.

    1981-09-01

    The 96th Congress of the United States, as part of the Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-573), instructed the Secretary of the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a report on the current US low-level waste management situation and the conditions and requirements for management on a regional basis. The Transportation Technology Center has compared the transportation requirement and regional management scenarios for commercial low-level radioactive waste in support of the DOE response to this instruction. Using 1979 low-level waste volumes shipped to commercial burial grounds and six management regions postulated by DOE, transportation requirements were estimated and compared for the two management scenarios in terms of cumulative shipping distance and transportation cost. Effects of these results on the demand for transportation services and equipment and on population risks were considered. Finally, current regulatory issues and the potential effects of regional management on regulation of low-level waste transportation were reviewed

  9. Information sources for decision making by senior managers in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Senior managers shoulder the responsibility of formulating policies that organization needs for the smooth running of their individuals establishments. The quality of decision made is also dependent on how current the sources of information utilized to make it. Much of policies formulated for national development have little ...

  10. Zotero : a free and open-source reference manager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courraud, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Zotero is a free, open-source reference management program compatible with Linux®, Mac®, and Windows® operating systems. Libraries are backed up online allowing sharing between computers and even multiple users. Zotero makes it easy to keep your reference library organised and ‘clean’. Reference...

  11. Performance Management and Sourcing Team Behaviour - Working Paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Peder Lysholm

    The purpose of this development paper is to outline the main ideas of a Ph.d.-project research proposal,which deals with the influence of Performance Management on the behaviour and decisions of Sourcing Category Team members. The background for the project is described, as well as the main theory...

  12. Storage of low-level radioactive waste and regulatory control of sealed sources in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Markkanen, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concentrated on the non nuclear low-level radioactive waste. The cornerstone for maintaining radioactive sources under control in Finland is that all practices involving sources are subject to authorization and all licensing information, including information on each individual source, are entered into a register which is continuously updated based on applications and notifications received from the licenses. Experiences during the past twenty years have shown that source-specific records of sources combined with regular inspections at the places of use have prevented efficiency losing control over sealed radioactive sources. The current capacity in the interim storage for State owned waste is not adequate for all used sealed sources and other small user waste which are currently kept in the possession of the licensees. Thus, expansion of the storage capacity and other options for taking care of the small user waste is under consideration. (N.C.)

  13. Industrial open source solutions for product life cycle management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Campos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors go through the open source for product life cycle management (PLM and the efforts done from communities such as the open source initiative. The characteristics of the open source solutions are highlighted as well. Next, the authors go through the requirements for PLM. This is an area where more attention has been given as the manufacturers are competing with the quality and life cycle costs of their products. Especially, the need of companies to try to get a strong position in providing services for their products and thus to make themselves less vulnerable to changes in the market has led to high interest in product life cycle simulation. The potential of applying semantic data management to solve these problems discussed in the light of recent developments. In addition, a basic roadmap is presented as to how the above-described problems could be tackled with open software solutions.

  14. Management of disused long lived sealed radioactive sources (LLSRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    The document provides advice the sealed source users and the national waste management organizations with the technical know-how on the management of disused and spent long lived sealed radioactive sources (LLSRS) and with the particular guidelines required for handling, conditioning for storage, and storage of these sources. The guidance is intended to assist in establishing compliance with the present standards, requirements, and adopted practices. It also provides background material for any possible technical assistance to developing countries and serves as a reference for technical staff involved with IAEA programmes on the subject. Because of the historic nature of many of the sources under this category and the lack of well developed technical procedures recognized on the international level, this publication can serve as a basis for establishing future handling and conditioning procedures. The LLSRS addressed in this publication are primarily those containing radionuclides having half-lives greater than 30 years. These sources may contain long lived alpha-emitters, mainly 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 237 Np, 241 Am, 226 Ra; beta-emitters: 14 C, and 63 Ni and could be neutron sources such as PuBe, RaBe and AmBe

  15. Transfer of technology: Management of disused radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, V.

    2001-01-01

    The number of sealed radioactive sources worldwide is estimated to be in the millions, although the existing registries indicate a much smaller number. If a source is no longer needed or has become unfit for the intended application, it is classified as spent or disused source. The activity of a disused source may still be in the order of GBq or TBq. Recognizing the risk associated with disused radioactive sources and the number of incidents and accidents with a wide range of consequences including widespread contamination and deterministic health effects, the IAEA has embarked on various activities dealing with the safe management of disused radioactive sources. These activities include publication of up-to-date technical information and guidance, development and distribution of management tools, transfer of technology and know-how through training and technical co-operation projects and direct assistance to solve specific safety and technical problems. This paper briefly describes these activities with reference to publications and projects carried out in various Member States. (author)

  16. Regulatory Infrastructure for Radiation Safety and the Security of Radioactive Sources in Sudan, Present Status, Achievements and Future Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, M.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of the use of ionizing radiation started formally in 1971 when an act has been issued by which the ministry of health was entitled to establish a Radiation Protection Technical Committee (RPTC) as a regulatory body. However, this act didn't come into effect because of the lack of regulations needed to execute the regulatory functions stated in that law. In 1972 the Sudan Atomic Energy Commission (SAEC) act was issued by which the commission was designated as a promoter for the use of nuclear technology. This law was later replaced by the 1996 act by which the Sudan Atomic Energy Corporation (SAEC) was established within the ministry of higher education and latter within the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST). The board of the corporation established a technical committee (Radiation Protection Technical Committee (RPTC)) to carry out the regulatory functions assigned to the board by the act. The 1996 act didn't repeal the 1971 act; as a result, the two conflicting and overlapping acts are still valid. In 2003 the 1996 act was cancelled and to be replaced by an Order of Establishment within a general law for corporations in the Sudan. In spite of all these mess in providing a proper legislative framework, the RPTC (MOST) managed to secure a fair control of the use of radiation in different applications within the country. In this report, the current status of regulating the use of ionizing radiation as well as major challenges is described

  17. A review of human biomonitoring data used in regulatory risk assessment under Canada's Chemicals Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidek, Angelika; Macey, Kristin; MacKinnon, Leona; Patel, Mikin; Poddalgoda, Devika; Zhang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    As a part of the Chemicals Management Plan launched in 2006, the Government of Canada is assessing and managing, where appropriate, the potential health and ecological risks associated with approximately 4300 substances under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (1999). Since that time, nearly 3000 substances have been assessed, with human biomonitoring (HBM) data playing an increasingly important role for some substances. Case studies are presented, including both inorganic and organic substances (i.e., selenium, triclosan, phthalates), which highlight the impact and overall role HBM has had in regulatory decision making in Canada for these three substances as well as criteria used in the application of HBM data in human health risk assessment. An overview of its limitations in terms of how and when HBM data can be applied, when assessing human health in a regulatory setting, is discussed as well as the role HBM data can play in priority setting. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Blue Water Footprint Management in a UK Poultry Supply Chain under Environmental Regulatory Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoum Tsolakis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chicken is the most consumed meat in the UK, accounting for 40% of meat consumption, while national production sufficiency reaches about 80%. As a farmed animal product, chicken meat is responsible for significant freshwater appropriation volumes during its production cycle. In this context, this research aims at exploring freshwater dynamics in the UK processed poultry industry. Specifically, we develop a System Dynamics model to capture the blue water footprint, as a key sustainability performance indicator of a poultry supply chain, in the case that relevant environmental and regulatory constraints are applied. The model contributes towards investigating the impact of two potential policy-making scenarios, namely, the “water penalty” and the “water tax”, on the nexus between profitability and water usage across the poultry supply chain. Responding to the regulatory constraints, the food processor either reconfigures the supply chain through rethinking desired inventory levels or implements a water management intervention. The results indicate that investing in water-friendly production technologies could offer a greater advantage to sustainable supply chains in terms of blue water efficiency and profitability, compared to employing inventory management strategies. Overall, our analysis highlights that effective policy-making and technology-driven interventions could provide potential towards ensuring economic growth and environmental sustainability of the UK poultry sector.

  19. Information Management system of the safety regulatory requirements and guidance for the Korea next generation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Y. C. [LG-EDS Systems, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. H.; Lee, H. C.; Lee, J. S. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    In order to achieve the safety of the Korea Next Generation Reactors (KNGR), the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has carried out the Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidance (SRRG) development program from 1992 such as establishment of the SRRG hierarchy, development of technical requirements and guidance, and consideration of new licensing system. The SRRG hierarchy for the KNGR was consisted of five tiers; Safety Objectives, Safety Principles, General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements and Safety Regulatory Guides. The developed SRRG have been compared the criteria in 10CFR and Reg. Guide in the U.S.A and the IAEA documents for assuring internationally acceptable level of the SRRG. To improve the efficiency and accuracy of SRRG development, the construction of database system was required in the course of development. Therefore, the Information Management System of SRRG for the KNGR has been developed which enables developers to quickly and accurately seek and systematically manage whole contexts of the SRRG, reference requirements, and current atomic energy regulation rules. Moreover, through homepage whose URL is 'http://kngr.kins.re.kr', the concerned persons and public can acquire the information related with SRRG and KNGR project, and post his/her thought to the opinion forum in the homepage.

  20. Information Management system of the safety regulatory requirements and guidance for the Korea next generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, H. C.; Lee, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    In order to achieve the safety of the Korea Next Generation Reactors (KNGR), the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has carried out the Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidance (SRRG) development program from 1992 such as establishment of the SRRG hierarchy, development of technical requirements and guidance, and consideration of new licensing system. The SRRG hierarchy for the KNGR was consisted of five tiers; Safety Objectives, Safety Principles, General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements and Safety Regulatory Guides. The developed SRRG have been compared the criteria in 10CFR and Reg. Guide in the U.S.A and the IAEA documents for assuring internationally acceptable level of the SRRG. To improve the efficiency and accuracy of SRRG development, the construction of database system was required in the course of development. Therefore, the Information Management System of SRRG for the KNGR has been developed which enables developers to quickly and accurately seek and systematically manage whole contexts of the SRRG, reference requirements, and current atomic energy regulation rules. Moreover, through homepage whose URL is 'http://kngr.kins.re.kr', the concerned persons and public can acquire the information related with SRRG and KNGR project, and post his/her thought to the opinion forum in the homepage

  1. Knowledge Management in Scientific and Technical Support Organizations for Regulatory Bodies: SEC NRS Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saulskaya, N.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear industry, similar to other high-tech industries, is based on knowledge and to a great extent depends on personnel qualification, their skills and abilities. Knowledge management processes were recognized of the utmost importance for the IAEA. The IAEA GA adopted a number of resolutions on nuclear knowledge. In this context, knowledge management is considered as an integrated, systematic approach to the process of assessment, obtaining, development, distribution, use, transfer and maintenance of knowledge related to achievement of strategic targets of organization development. KM makes it possible to learn lessons from its own experience. The report presents a long-term experience of SEC NRS in knowledge management and capacity building, which is critically important for SEC NRS as scientific and technical support organization for Rostechnadzor. KM in SEC NRS is performed through the HRM, primarily through HRD, assessment, motivation of the labor activity, and regulation of social-psychological processes. The practice of implementation of NKM through the functions of human resources management is of particular interest for embarking countries. The best practices will be reflected in the IAEA Safety Report “Knowledge Management for Regulatory Bodies and TSO”, which is currently being developed by a team of the IAEA experts. (author

  2. A Point Source of a Different Color: Identifying a Gap in United States Regulatory Policy for “Green” CSO Treatment Using Constructed Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeno F. Levy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Up to 850 billion gallons of untreated combined sewer overflow (CSO is discharged into waters of the United States each year. Recent changes in CSO management policy support green infrastructure (GI technologies as “front of the pipe” approaches to discharge mitigation by detention/reduction of urban stormwater runoff. Constructed wetlands for CSO treatment have been considered among suites of GI solutions. However, these wetlands differ fundamentally from other GI technologies in that they are “end of the pipe” treatment systems that discharge from a point source, and are therefore regulated in the U.S. under the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES. We use a comparative regulatory analysis to examine the U.S. policy framework for CSO treatment wetlands. We find in all cases that permitting authorities have used best professional judgment to determine effluent limits and compliance monitoring requirements, referencing technology and water quality-based standards originally developed for traditional “grey” treatment systems. A qualitative comparison with Europe shows less stringent regulatory requirements, perhaps due to institutionalized design parameters. We recommend that permitting authorities develop technical guidance documents for evaluation of “green” CSO treatment systems that account for their unique operational concerns and benefits with respect to sustainable development.

  3. Waste management regulatory compliance issues related to D ampersand D activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitch, J.P.; Arnold, S.E.; Burwinkle, T.; Daugherty, D.

    1994-01-01

    The waste management activities at ORNL related to the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of radioactively contaminated buildings are divided into four categories: Operational facilities, inactive or surplus facilities, future facilities planning, and D ampersand D activities. This paper only discusses regulatory issues related to inactive or surplus facilities. Additionally, rather than attempting to address all resulting waste streams and related regulations, this paper highlights only a few of the ORNL waste streams that present key regulatory issues

  4. Knowledge Management Initiatives Used to Maintain Regulatory Expertise in Transportation and Storage of Radioactive Materials - 12177

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, Haile; Garcia-Santos, Norma; Saverot, Pierre; Day, Neil; Gambone Rodriguez, Kimberly; Cruz, Luis; Sotomayor-Rivera, Alexis; Vechioli, Lucieann; Vera, John; Pstrak, David [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop EBB-03D-02M, 6003 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1974 with the mission to license and regulate the civilian use of nuclear materials for commercial, industrial, academic, and medical uses in order to protect public health and safety, and the environment, and promote the common defense and security. Currently, approximately half (∼49%) of the workforce at the NRC has been with the Agency for less than six years. As part of the Agency's mission, the NRC has partial responsibility for the oversight of the transportation and storage of radioactive materials. The NRC has experienced a significant level of expertise leaving the Agency due to staff attrition. Factors that contribute to this attrition include retirement of the experienced nuclear workforce and mobility of staff within or outside the Agency. Several knowledge management (KM) initiatives have been implemented within the Agency, with one of them including the formation of a Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation (SFST) KM team. The team, which was formed in the fall of 2008, facilitates capturing, transferring, and documenting regulatory knowledge for staff to effectively perform their safety oversight of transportation and storage of radioactive materials, regulated under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 71 and Part 72. In terms of KM, the SFST goal is to share critical information among the staff to reduce the impact from staff's mobility and attrition. KM strategies in place to achieve this goal are: (1) development of communities of practice (CoP) (SFST Qualification Journal and the Packaging and Storing Radioactive Material) in the on-line NRC Knowledge Center (NKC); (2) implementation of a SFST seminar program where the seminars are recorded and placed in the Agency's repository, Agency-wide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS); (3) meeting of technical discipline group programs to share knowledge within specialty areas; (4

  5. Environmental regulatory update table, March 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, April 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  7. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M., Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-09-01

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (August 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  8. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlbert, L.M.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  9. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  11. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  12. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  13. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-10-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Environmental regulatory update table, July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-08-01

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (July 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  15. Q&A. Does lack of product management impact the users of open source?

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Young

    2008-01-01

    Most commercial software companies employ product managers to handle the planning and marketing of software products, whereas few open source projects have a product manager. Does lack of product management impact the users of open source?

  16. Q&A. Does lack of product management impact the users of open source?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Young

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Most commercial software companies employ product managers to handle the planning and marketing of software products, whereas few open source projects have a product manager. Does lack of product management impact the users of open source?

  17. Regulatory requirements on management of radioactive material safe transport in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, C.

    2016-01-01

    Since 1980s, the IAEA Regulation for safe transport of radioactive material was introduced into China; the regulatory system of China began with international standards, and walked towards the institutionalized. In 2003 the National People’s Congress (NPC) promulgated “the Act on the Prevention of Radioactive Pollution of the People's Republic of China”. In 2009 “Regulation for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material” (Referred to “Regulation”) was promulgated by the State Council. Subsequently, the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) began to formulate executive detailed department rules, regulations guidelines and standards. The present system of acts, regulations and standards on management of safe transport of radioactive material in China and future planning were introduced in this paper. Meanwhile, the paper described the specific administration requirements of the Regulation on classification management of radioactive materials, license management of transport packaging including design, manufacture and use, licensing management of transport activities and the provisions of illegal behaviors arising in safe transport of radioactive material. (author)

  18. Ionizing radiation sources: very diversified means, multiple applications and a changing regulatory environment. Conference proceedings; Les sources de rayonnements ionisants: des moyens tres diversifies, des applications multiples et une reglementation en evolution. Recueil des presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the conference organised by the French society of radiation protection about ionizing radiation source means, applications and regulatory environment. Twenty eight presentations (slides) are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Overview of sources - some quantitative data from the national inventory of ionizing radiation sources (Yann Billarand, IRSN); 2 - Overview of sources (Jerome Fradin, ASN); 3 - Regulatory framework (Sylvie Rodde, ASN); 4 - Alternatives to Iridium radiography - the case of pressure devices at the manufacturing stage (Henri Walaszek, Cetim; Bruno Kowalski, Welding Institute); 5 - Dosimetric stakes of medical scanner examinations (Jean-Louis Greffe, Charleroi hospital of Medical University); 6 - The removal of ionic smoke detectors (Bruno Charpentier, ASN); 7 - Joint-activity and reciprocal liabilities - Organisation of labour risk prevention in case of companies joint-activity (Paulo Pinto, DGT); 8 - Consideration of gamma-graphic testing in the organization of a unit outage activities (Jean-Gabriel Leonard, EDF); 9 - Radiological risk control at a closed and independent work field (Stephane Sartelet, Areva); 10 - Incidents and accidents status and typology (Pascale Scanff, IRSN); 11 - Regional overview of radiation protection significant events (Philippe Menechal, ASN); 12 - Incident leading to a tritium contamination in and urban area - consequences and experience feedback (Laurence Fusil, CEA); 13 - Experience feedback - loss of sealing of a calibration source (Philippe Mougnard, Areva); 14 - Blocking incident of a {sup 60}Co source (Bruno Delille, Salvarem); 15 - Triggering of gantry's alarm: status of findings (Philippe Prat, Syctom); 16 - Non-medical electric devices: regulatory changes (Sophie Dagois, IRSN; Jerome Fradin, ASN); 17 - Evaluation of the dose equivalent rate in pulsed fields: method proposed by the IRSN and implementation test (Laurent Donadille

  19. Implementation of the waste management transfer act. Requirements from a regulatory point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Dehn, Christian

    2017-01-01

    In future in Germany, the state will be responsible for financing and handling the interim and final storage of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants. With regard to interim storage, this objective is achieved with the provisions of the Waste Management Transfer Act. Regulatory implementation is based on these regulations. BGZ Gesellschaft fuer Zwischenlager mbH is responsible for interim storage on behalf of the Federal Government. Simultaneously with the transfer of interim storage facilities to BGZ a legal transfer of approval is carried out. Insofar as there is a technical, organisational or personnel conjunction with the nuclear power plant operation, which continues to exist beyond this deadline and is relevant for regulatory purposes, a regulation is made via a service contract with the BGZ. This ensures compliance with the licensing regulations. Irradiated fuel assemblies and the waste from reprocessing can be handed over to BGZ from 1 January 2019 onwards and waste with negligible heat generation can be disposed of as of the determination of their proper packaging.

  20. The U.S. regulatory framework for long-term management of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smythe, C.; Bierley, D.; Bradshaw, M.

    1995-01-01

    The US established the regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of uranium mill tailings in 1978 with the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Pub. L. 95-604). This legislation has governed the cleanup and disposal of uranium tailings at both inactive and active sites. The passage of the UMTRCA established a federal regulatory program for the cleanup and disposal of uranium mill tailings in the US. This program involves the DOE, the NRC, the EPA, various states and tribal governments, private licensees, and the general public. The DOE has completed surface remediation at 14 sites, with the remaining sites either under construction or in planning. The DOE's UMTRA Project has been very successful in dealing with public and agency demands, particularly regarding disposal site selection and transportation issues. The active sites are also being cleaned up, but at a slower pace than the inactive sites, with the first site tentatively scheduled for completion in 1996

  1. Data Bank of Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, Part 2 . Software Package of Statistical Data of Sealed Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashin, R.M.A.; Mahmoud, N.S.; Lashin, M.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Protection of human, property and the environment is the main concern considered as a principal goal to form the Egyptian Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority. That requires a lot of work, efforts, knowledge and aids for right and quick decision making. Internationally, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) developed a protection system for control and accounts the radioactive materials for the safe use and transport. Moreover, the protection system can prevent the theft of these materials or their use in terrorism. Here in, all radioactive sources shall be subjected to instructions, serious regulations and laws. In order to exercise these functions, it is necessary to accurately establish the appropriate information system to the regulatory body. This system must depend on using a modern technology to perform the work in most accurate and fullest manner in a Data Bank [1, 2]. The present work is the second part performed for the data bank, which consists of two parts: first part is concern about the open sources which executed before [3]. Second part is deal with the sealed sources. Describing here consolidated guidance help materials licenses. It also provides reviewers of such requests with the information and materials necessary to determine that the products are acceptable for licensing purposes. It provides the applicants and reviewers with information concerning how to file a request, a listing of the applicable regulations and industry standards, policies affecting evaluation and registration, administrative procedures to be followed, information on how to perform the evaluation and write a registration certificate, and the responsibilities of the registration certificate holder.

  2. The Net Enabled Waste Management Database as an international source of radioactive waste management information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csullog, G.W.; Friedrich, V.; Miaw, S.T.W.; Tonkay, D.; Petoe, A.

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA's Net Enabled Waste Management Database (NEWMDB) is an integral part of the IAEA's policies and strategy related to the collection and dissemination of information, both internal to the IAEA in support of its activities and external to the IAEA (publicly available). The paper highlights the NEWMDB's role in relation to the routine reporting of status and trends in radioactive waste management, in assessing the development and implementation of national systems for radioactive waste management, in support of a newly developed indicator of sustainable development for radioactive waste management, in support of reporting requirements for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, in support of IAEA activities related to the harmonization of waste management information at the national and international levels and in relation to the management of spent/disused sealed radioactive sources. (author)

  3. A model for managing sources of groundwater pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Steven M.

    1982-01-01

    The waste disposal capacity of a groundwater system can be maximized while maintaining water quality at specified locations by using a groundwater pollutant source management model that is based upon linear programing and numerical simulation. The decision variables of the management model are solute waste disposal rates at various facilities distributed over space. A concentration response matrix is used in the management model to describe transient solute transport and is developed using the U.S. Geological Survey solute transport simulation model. The management model was applied to a complex hypothetical groundwater system. Large-scale management models were formulated as dual linear programing problems to reduce numerical difficulties and computation time. Linear programing problems were solved using a numerically stable, available code. Optimal solutions to problems with successively longer management time horizons indicated that disposal schedules at some sites are relatively independent of the number of disposal periods. Optimal waste disposal schedules exhibited pulsing rather than constant disposal rates. Sensitivity analysis using parametric linear programing showed that a sharp reduction in total waste disposal potential occurs if disposal rates at any site are increased beyond their optimal values.

  4. Transforming public utility commissions in the new regulatory environment: Some issues and ideas for managing change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirick, D.W.; Davis, V.W.; Burns, R.E.; Jones, D.N.

    1996-07-01

    In the face of sweeping changes in utility markets and regulatory practices, public utility commissions are being forced to change in fundamental ways--to substantially transform themselves rather than to make only incremental changes in their operations. Managing this process of radical change is complicated by the fact that for the foreseeable future some portions of utility markets (e.g., water utilities) will function much as they have before. Some envision commissions in the future that are more externally focussed, that rely more on dispute resolution than adjudicatory proceedings, that concentrate on identifying and understanding competitive markets, that are more automated, and that are more likely to question old assumptions and definitions. This report identifies the considerations commissions might apply for identifying what mix of skills or fields of experise should compromise the technical staff. Factors are also identified which point towards a sectoral arrangement of staff and those factors which point toward a functional approach.

  5. Quality Management System at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husarcek, J.; Novak, S.

    2008-01-01

    The process-oriented quality management system (QMS) implemented at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in compliance with the EN ISO 9001:2001 standard is described. The history of the establishment and development of the QMS is given. The main, managerial and supporting processes with respect to defined activities are specified, and a scheme of their interactions is presented. The contents of the Quality Manual content and the structure of the system documentation are briefly described. The responsibilities for the operation and improvements of the QMS are described along with the methods applied (internal and external audits, self-assessment - Common Assessment Framework (CAF)). Examples of established quality objectives and indicators for some processes are provided. A future development of the QMS is expected in accordance with the relevant ISO Standard and IAEA recommendations and based on evaluation of the effectiveness of the critical system. (orig.)

  6. Regulatory Research of the PWR Severe Accident. Information Needs and Instrumentation for Hydrogen Control and Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gun Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Seung Dong

    2001-03-01

    The current research is concerned with generation of basic engineering data needed in the process of developing hydrogen control guidelines as part of accident management strategies for domestic nuclear power plants and formulating pertinent regulatory requirements. Major focus is placed on identification of information needs and instrumentation methods for hydrogen control and management in the primary system and in the containment, development of decision-making trees for hydrogen management and their quantification, the instrument availability under severe accident conditions, critical review of relevant hydrogen generation model and phenomena In relation to hydrogen behavior, we analyzed the severe accident related hydrogen generation in the UCN 3·4 PWR with modified hydrogen generation model. On the basis of the hydrogen mixing experiment and related GASFLOW calculation, the necessity of 3-dimensional analysis of the hydrogen mixing was investigated. We examined the hydrogen control models related to the PAR(Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner) and performed MAAP4 calculation in relation to the decision tree to estimate the capability and the role of the PAR during a severe accident

  7. Regulatory Research of the PWR Severe Accident. Information Needs and Instrumentation for Hydrogen Control and Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gun Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Seung Dong [Seoul Nat' l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    The current research is concerned with generation of basic engineering data needed in the process of developing hydrogen control guidelines as part of accident management strategies for domestic nuclear power plants and formulating pertinent regulatory requirements. Major focus is placed on identification of information needs and instrumentation methods for hydrogen control and management in the primary system and in the containment, development of decision-making trees for hydrogen management and their quantification, the instrument availability under severe accident conditions, critical review of relevant hydrogen generation model and phenomena In relation to hydrogen behavior, we analyzed the severe accident related hydrogen generation in the UCN 3{center_dot}4 PWR with modified hydrogen generation model. On the basis of the hydrogen mixing experiment and related GASFLOW calculation, the necessity of 3-dimensional analysis of the hydrogen mixing was investigated. We examined the hydrogen control models related to the PAR(Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner) and performed MAAP4 calculation in relation to the decision tree to estimate the capability and the role of the PAR during a severe accident.

  8. EU Regulatory Risk Management of Marine Biotoxins in the Marine Bivalve Mollusc Food-Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheál O’Mahony

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Food safety risk assessment in the European Union (EU recognises consumer illness that arises from marine biotoxins as a risk associated with bivalve mollusc consumption. EU food regulations contain various general food safety obligations, which should contribute significantly to managing this risk. EU food regulations additionally impose various specific obligations on both Food Business Operators and Competent Authorities in order to manage the marine biotoxin food safety risk in the bivalve mollusc food-chain. These have a particular focus on the pre-harvest component of the food-chain. A central component of these specific systems is the requirement for ongoing monitoring of phytoplankton and biotoxin concentrations in water and molluscs, respectively. This monitoring explicitly brings a potential outcome of closing production areas delineated by classification to prohibit the harvest of bivalve molluscs as food from those areas when acceptable biotoxin concentrations are exceeded. This review considers the utility of these systems, at conceptual and practical levels, and explores their contribution to an effective regulatory risk management approach.

  9. High-level waste program management: A ratepayers' and regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    The nation's electric utility regulators have joined the effort to enhance the federal project to dispose of high-level nuclear waste. Because all financial support comes from ratepayers, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC), through the mechanism of a subcommittee, seeks to investigate and monitor the federal program to provide to the Congress and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) the NARUC's unique expertise. Its views to enhance program management and improve cost control are its central contribution. While conveying no lack of confidence in the federal management, the NARUC is imparting its relevant experience derived from review of nuclear power plant construction and cost control. Recommendations are made for more cost-effective program direction and views on its management are given. Financial control, public input and cost responsibilities for disposal of defense and commercial wastes are separately identified. Needs for the DOE's heightened insight into and development of the monitored retrievable storage proposal to the Congress are described. Finally, with a warning that there exists a limit to ratepayer funding of this effort, the request is made for Congressional cost-control hearings and for expanded dialogue between the Department of Engery and financially responsible parties

  10. EU Regulatory Risk Management of Marine Biotoxins in the Marine Bivalve Mollusc Food-Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Micheál

    2018-03-10

    Food safety risk assessment in the European Union (EU) recognises consumer illness that arises from marine biotoxins as a risk associated with bivalve mollusc consumption. EU food regulations contain various general food safety obligations, which should contribute significantly to managing this risk. EU food regulations additionally impose various specific obligations on both Food Business Operators and Competent Authorities in order to manage the marine biotoxin food safety risk in the bivalve mollusc food-chain. These have a particular focus on the pre-harvest component of the food-chain. A central component of these specific systems is the requirement for ongoing monitoring of phytoplankton and biotoxin concentrations in water and molluscs, respectively. This monitoring explicitly brings a potential outcome of closing production areas delineated by classification to prohibit the harvest of bivalve molluscs as food from those areas when acceptable biotoxin concentrations are exceeded. This review considers the utility of these systems, at conceptual and practical levels, and explores their contribution to an effective regulatory risk management approach.

  11. Regulatory control of natural ionizing sources in Lithuania: Experience based on indoor radon monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastauskas, A.; Morkunas, G.

    1997-01-01

    The situation in legislation of protection against risks from natural sources of ionizing radiation in Lithuania is described. The requirements of new standards came into conflict with the real situation which has not been evaluated before implementation of these standards. On the basis of recommendations of ICRP Publication 60 and results of indoor radon survey new action levels are being established. (author)

  12. Regulatory actions to expand the offer of distributed generation from renewable energy sources in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepitone da Nóbrega, André; Cabral Carvalho, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The composition of the Brazilian electric energy matrix has undergone transformations in recent years. However, it has still maintained significant participation of renewable energy sources, in particular hydropower plants of various magnitudes. Reasons for the growth of other renewable sources of energy, such as wind and solar, include the fact that the remaining hydropower capacity is mainly located in the Amazon, which is far from centers of consumption, the necessity of diversifying the energy mix and reducing dependence on hydrologic regimes, the increase in environmental restrictions, the increase of civil construction and land costs.Wind power generation has grown most significantly in Brazil. Positive results in the latest energy auctions show that wind power generation has reached competitive pricing. Solar energy is still incipient in Brazil, despite its high potential for conversion into electric energy. This energy source in the Brazilian electric energy matrix mainly involves solar centrals and distributed generation. Biomass thermal plants, mainly the ones that use bagasse of sugar cane, also have an important role in renewable generation in Brazil.This paper aims to present an overview of the present situation and discuss the actions and the regulations to expand the offer of renewable distributed generation in Brazil, mainly from wind power, solar and biomass energy sources. (full text)

  13. Sources, classification, and disposal of radioactive wastes: History and legal and regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: (1) early definitions of different types (classes) of radioactive waste developed prior to definitions in laws and regulations; (2) sources of different classes of radioactive waste; (3) current laws and regulations addressing classification of radioactive wastes; and requirements for disposal of different waste classes. Relationship between waste classification and requirements for permanent disposal is emphasized; (4) federal and state responsibilities for radioactive wastes; and (5) distinctions between radioactive wastes produced in civilian and defense sectors

  14. Some aspects of the regulatory control of radiation sources in Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kereselidze, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The report refers to the responsibilities of the different governmental bodies in Georgia regarding radiation protection and safety of radiation sources. In particular, it explains the role and main activities that are carried out by the Nuclear and Radiation Safety Service which is subordinated to the Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resource Protection. The report emphasizes the important assistance provided by the IAEA in the improvement of the national radiation safety infrastructure. (author)

  15. Fighting organized crime through open source intelligence: regulatory strategies of the CAPER Project

    OpenAIRE

    Casanovas, Pompeu

    2014-01-01

    OSINT stands for Open Source Intelligence. The CAPER project has built an OSINT solution oriented to the prevention of organised crime. We offer in this paper an overall view of some results, embedding into the system legal and ethical issues raised by the General Data Reform Package (GDRP) in Europe. We briefly describe CAPER architecture, workflow, functionalities, modules and ontologies (European LEAs Interoperability ELIO, and Multi-Lingual Crime Ontology MCO). This paper is focused on th...

  16. Swiss regulatory use of databanks for nuclear power plant life management, surveillance and safety analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipping, Ph.; Beutler, R.; Schoen, G.; Noeggerath, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: As operational time is accumulated, the overall safety and performance of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will tend to be characterised by those areas in which structures, systems and components (SSCs) have not performed as well, or as reliably, as expected. The reasons for non-availability of equipment in NPPs due to SSC material malfunction or unsatisfactory performance, leading to events or even accidents, are varied and they must be analysed in order to obtain the root causes. Once the root causes are identified, corresponding measures can be applied in order to improve reliability and therefore safety. The root cause information obtained, if brought into user-friendly databanks (DBs), can be used to follow NPP performance trends, to check whether a repair or replacement has been effective, to focus regulatory attention and NPP surveillance on known weak-spots and to serve as an advance indicator where potential problems may arise. Using the DBs, similar occurrences of failures or problems in other NPPs can be identified and generic issues recognised early on and preventative action taken. The following describes the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate's (HSK) DB concepts for keeping track of NPP safety and lifetime management issues. Typical sources of data for the Inspectorate's DBs are, for example, the IAEA/NEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) reports, US-NRC Generic Letters, the Swiss NPP's own reports (monthly, annual and normal outage) and, more importantly, the document that these NPPs must issue to the Inspectorate whenever a reportable event takes place. Specifically, the reporting of events in the NPPs is laid down in the Inspectorate's Guideline (R-15 'Reporting Guideline Concerning The Operation of Nuclear Power Plants'). In this Guideline, reportable events are defined and the criteria for assessing the degree of importance or impact on nuclear safety are given. In this manner, a standard and consistent approach to data collection is

  17. Cross-functional Sourcing Teams – A Purchasing and Supply Management Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Peder Lysholm

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic literature review of scientific papers on cross-functional sourcing teams in top journals within Purchasing and Supply Management. The review identifies four common research topics within the field; Determining factors of sourcing team success, Performance...... management/goals of sourcing teams, Behavior and decisions in sourcing teams and Involvement of purchasing in sourcing teams. Further research on Performance Management and how to create a holistic, teams based perspective in cross-functional sourcing teams is suggested....

  18. Safety Management in Non-Nuclear Contexts. Examples from Swedish Railway Regulatory and Company Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, Ilkka; Svensson, Ola

    2005-06-01

    studied organizations respectively. These three chapters give a detailed account of safety management from a system perspective and applications in the organizations studied, and could be read independently of each other. In the fourth chapter the report concludes with summarizing safety management in SRA and SJ by mapping the results on important concepts from the system theoretical framework, and general themes for safety management applicable across contexts are suggested. The qualitative descriptions of the organizations generated a detailed account on how safety is managed in Swedish railway operations. Examples of safety management in practice are given both from the regulatory point of view and from an organizational position close to the actual operations. The Swedish railway operations are strictly regulated and the safety goals are identifiable along the legislative documentation from the government's goals for safe operations expressed in the railway legislation, through SRA's regulations, to SJ's internal regulations. There is a high degree of coherence between SJ's and SRA's formulations of safety management and safe operations in general. Both organizations have their origin in the former national railway company, which may is partly reflected in the high degree of correspondence between the approaches towards safety. Both organizations make use of a system approach to their operations, which are clearly reflected in the highly structured organizations, with core objectives, operational responsibilities, procedures, and information feedback prerequisites sufficiently mapped on the organizational units. The report gives both detailed accounts and summaries of a number of central themes for safety management derived from the system theoretical framework, and also themes relevant for safety management in general. For example: the organizations definitions of safety management, descriptions of the organizational structures, recent processes of organizational

  19. Regulatory Technology Development Plan - Sodium Fast Reactor. Mechanistic Source Term - Metal Fuel Radionuclide Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabaskas, David; Bucknor, Matthew; Jerden, James

    2016-01-01

    The development of an accurate and defensible mechanistic source term will be vital for the future licensing efforts of metal fuel, pool-type sodium fast reactors. To assist in the creation of a comprehensive mechanistic source term, the current effort sought to estimate the release fraction of radionuclides from metal fuel pins to the primary sodium coolant during fuel pin failures at a variety of temperature conditions. These release estimates were based on the findings of an extensive literature search, which reviewed past experimentation and reactor fuel damage accidents. Data sources for each radionuclide of interest were reviewed to establish release fractions, along with possible release dependencies, and the corresponding uncertainty levels. Although the current knowledge base is substantial, and radionuclide release fractions were established for the elements deemed important for the determination of offsite consequences following a reactor accident, gaps were found pertaining to several radionuclides. First, there is uncertainty regarding the transport behavior of several radionuclides (iodine, barium, strontium, tellurium, and europium) during metal fuel irradiation to high burnup levels. The migration of these radionuclides within the fuel matrix and bond sodium region can greatly affect their release during pin failure incidents. Post-irradiation examination of existing high burnup metal fuel can likely resolve this knowledge gap. Second, data regarding the radionuclide release from molten high burnup metal fuel in sodium is sparse, which makes the assessment of radionuclide release from fuel melting accidents at high fuel burnup levels difficult. This gap could be addressed through fuel melting experimentation with samples from the existing high burnup metal fuel inventory.

  20. Regulatory Technology Development Plan - Sodium Fast Reactor. Mechanistic Source Term - Metal Fuel Radionuclide Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabaskas, David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bucknor, Matthew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jerden, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The development of an accurate and defensible mechanistic source term will be vital for the future licensing efforts of metal fuel, pool-type sodium fast reactors. To assist in the creation of a comprehensive mechanistic source term, the current effort sought to estimate the release fraction of radionuclides from metal fuel pins to the primary sodium coolant during fuel pin failures at a variety of temperature conditions. These release estimates were based on the findings of an extensive literature search, which reviewed past experimentation and reactor fuel damage accidents. Data sources for each radionuclide of interest were reviewed to establish release fractions, along with possible release dependencies, and the corresponding uncertainty levels. Although the current knowledge base is substantial, and radionuclide release fractions were established for the elements deemed important for the determination of offsite consequences following a reactor accident, gaps were found pertaining to several radionuclides. First, there is uncertainty regarding the transport behavior of several radionuclides (iodine, barium, strontium, tellurium, and europium) during metal fuel irradiation to high burnup levels. The migration of these radionuclides within the fuel matrix and bond sodium region can greatly affect their release during pin failure incidents. Post-irradiation examination of existing high burnup metal fuel can likely resolve this knowledge gap. Second, data regarding the radionuclide release from molten high burnup metal fuel in sodium is sparse, which makes the assessment of radionuclide release from fuel melting accidents at high fuel burnup levels difficult. This gap could be addressed through fuel melting experimentation with samples from the existing high burnup metal fuel inventory.

  1. Clinical nutrition managers have access to sources of empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislevy, J M; Schiller, M R; Wolf, K N; Finn, S C

    2000-09-01

    To ascertain perceived access of dietitians to power in the workplace. The conceptual framework was Kanter's theory of organizational power. The Conditions for Work Effectiveness Questionnaire was used to measure perceived access to sources of power: information, support, resources, and opportunities. Demographic data were collected to identify factors that may enhance empowerment. The questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 348 dietitians chosen from members of the Clinical Nutrition Management dietetic practice group of the American Dietetic Association. Blank questionnaires were returned by 99 (28.4%) people not working as clinical nutrition managers, which left 249 in the sample. Descriptive statistics were used to organize and summarize data. One-way analysis of variance and t tests were performed to identify differences in responses based on levels of education, work setting, and information technology skills. Usable questionnaires were received from 178 people (71.5%). On a 5-point scale, scores for access to information (mean +/- standard deviation [SD] = 3.8 +/- 0.7), opportunity (mean +/- SD = 3.6 +/- 0.7), support (mean +/- SD = 3.2 +/- 0.9), and resources (mean +/- SD = 3.1 +/- 0.8) demonstrated that clinical nutrition managers perceived themselves as having substantial access to sources of empowerment. Those having higher levels of education, working in larger hospitals, having better-developed information technology skills, and using information technology more frequently had statistically significant higher empowerment scores (P = leadership roles in today's health care settings. Their power may be enhanced by asserting more pressure to gain greater access to sources of power: support, information, resources, and opportunities.

  2. Overview of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Low-Level Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, W.P.; Bell, M.J.; Dragonette, K.S.; Adam, J.

    1979-01-01

    Environmental impacts from Table S-3 of 10 CFR Part 51 are included in individual environmental impact statements for LWR's. In response to a U.S. Court of Appeals finding of inadequate documentation to support Table S-3, ''Environmental Survey of Reprocessing and Waste Management Portions of the LWR Fuel Cycle'' (NUREG-0116) and ''Public Comments and Task Force Responses Regarding Environmental Survey of the Reprocessing and Waste Portions of the LWR Fuel Cycle'' (NUREG-0216) were published. As a result of these in-house studies, an interim rule revising Table S-3 has been published. These documents include discussions of shallow land burial of low-level waste, past experiences and sensitivity calculations estimating potential dose commitments from the groundwater migration of the wastes. An NRC task force report (NUREG-0217) examining the Federal and Agreement State programs for regulating commercial low-level waste disposal recommends increasing the federal role in low-level waste disposal. The need to investigate alternatives to shallow land burial is identified. The NRC is developing a radioactive waste management program which includes a plan for the implementation of the task force recommendations, the development of environmental impacts for low-level waste disposal, development of standards and criteria, and the establishment of a regulatory framework and licensing procedures for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste

  3. Regulatory aspects and activities in the field of radioactive waste management in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastchiev, G.

    2001-01-01

    Bulgaria uses nuclear power for electricity generation and for a variety of nuclear applications in industry, research and medicine. Six WWER type Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) went into operation at Kozloduy between 1974 and 1991. Until 1988 spent fuel was transported back to the former Soviet Union, but since then has been stored on site. Operational low level waste is stored on site, but since 1993 a volume reduction strategy using supercompaction has been employed, which has reduced stored waste volumes by a factor of four. Institutional radioactive wastes are disposed at the Novi Han near surface repository, located 35 km from Sofia. It was commissioned in 1964 and is now about half full. Siting studies have begun for a new near surface repository that would accept both institutional and NPP waste. A legislative and regulatory framework, as well as organizational and institutional arrangements, are in place. A national strategy that includes provisions for compiling a national inventory of spent fuel and radioactive waste and provisions for funding spent fuel and radioactive waste management, has been developed. The paper elaborates on the current situation regarding radioactive waste management in Bulgaria. (author)

  4. Managing risk in developing transplant immunosuppressive agents: the new regulatory environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, S; Halloran, P F; Friedewald, J

    2011-09-01

    Recent adverse experience with a number of medications after their approval, including rofecoxib, erythropoietin and rosiglitazone, has led to an increased focus on safety in drug development in the postmarketing setting. The result was implementation of new measures to address perceived deficits in the system for drug approval and postmarketing safety. The resulting legislation introduced risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) and postmarketing requirements (PMRs). Although these initiatives have the potential to improve patient outcomes, many healthcare practitioners are not yet familiar with REMS or PMRs or may have misconceptions regarding their goals and limitations. REMS is a program to manage known or potential serious risks associated with pharmaceutical products and is designed to ensure that the benefits of using a particular product outweigh the risks. Although the concepts underlying REMS and PMRs are not novel, the FDA now has legal authority to enforce such measures as part of the drug approval process. This article outlines the objectives and limitations of REMS and PMRs, with a focus on how these regulatory measures may impact the clinical specialty of transplantation. The article also briefly describes efforts to address aspects of drug safety less amenable to management through REMS and PMRs. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. Conceptual Architecture of Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khamphanchai, Warodom; Saha, Avijit; Rathinavel, Kruthika; Kuzlu, Murat; Pipattanasomporn, Manisa; Rahman, Saifur; Akyol, Bora A.; Haack, Jereme N.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a conceptual architecture of a Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS) platform. The proposed BEMOSS platform is expected to improve sensing and control of equipment in small- and medium-sized buildings, reduce energy consumption and help implement demand response (DR). It aims to offer: scalability, robustness, plug and play, open protocol, interoperability, cost-effectiveness, as well as local and remote monitoring. In this paper, four essential layers of BEMOSS software architecture -- namely User Interface, Application and Data Management, Operating System and Framework, and Connectivity layers -- are presented. A laboratory test bed to demonstrate the functionality of BEMOSS located at the Advanced Research Institute of Virginia Tech is also briefly described.

  6. Safety Management in Non-Nuclear Contexts. Examples from Swedish Railway Regulatory and Company Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, Ilkka; Svensson, Ola (Risk Analysis, Social and Decision Research Unit, Dept. of Psychology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2005-06-15

    studied organizations respectively. These three chapters give a detailed account of safety management from a system perspective and applications in the organizations studied, and could be read independently of each other. In the fourth chapter the report concludes with summarizing safety management in SRA and SJ by mapping the results on important concepts from the system theoretical framework, and general themes for safety management applicable across contexts are suggested. The qualitative descriptions of the organizations generated a detailed account on how safety is managed in Swedish railway operations. Examples of safety management in practice are given both from the regulatory point of view and from an organizational position close to the actual operations. The Swedish railway operations are strictly regulated and the safety goals are identifiable along the legislative documentation from the government's goals for safe operations expressed in the railway legislation, through SRA's regulations, to SJ's internal regulations. There is a high degree of coherence between SJ's and SRA's formulations of safety management and safe operations in general. Both organizations have their origin in the former national railway company, which may is partly reflected in the high degree of correspondence between the approaches towards safety. Both organizations make use of a system approach to their operations, which are clearly reflected in the highly structured organizations, with core objectives, operational responsibilities, procedures, and information feedback prerequisites sufficiently mapped on the organizational units. The report gives both detailed accounts and summaries of a number of central themes for safety management derived from the system theoretical framework, and also themes relevant for safety management in general. For example: the organizations definitions of safety management, descriptions of the organizational structures, recent

  7. Open source GIS for HIV/AIDS management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricketts Adam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reliable access to basic services can improve a community's resilience to HIV/AIDS. Accordingly, work is being done to upgrade the physical infrastructure in affected areas, often employing a strategy of decentralised service provision. Spatial characteristics are one of the major determinants in implementing services, even in the smaller municipal areas, and good quality spatial information is needed to inform decision making processes. However, limited funds, technical infrastructure and human resource capacity result in little or no access to spatial information for crucial infrastructure development decisions at local level. This research investigated whether it would be possible to develop a GIS for basic infrastructure planning and management at local level. Given the resource constraints of the local government context, particularly in small municipalities, it was decided that open source software should be used for the prototype system. Results The design and development of a prototype system illustrated that it is possible to develop an open source GIS system that can be used within the context of local information management. Usability tests show a high degree of usability for the system, which is important considering the heavy workload and high staff turnover that characterises local government in South Africa. Local infrastructure management stakeholders interviewed in a case study of a South African municipality see the potential for the use of GIS as a communication tool and are generally positive about the use of GIS for these purposes. They note security issues that may arise through the sharing of information, lack of skills and resource constraints as the major barriers to adoption. Conclusion The case study shows that spatial information is an identified need at local level. Open source GIS software can be used to develop a system to provide local-level stakeholders with spatial information. However, the

  8. IAEA meeting: International conference of national regulatory authorities with competence in the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englefield, Chris [UK INTERPOL Environmental Crime (Radioactive Substances) Sub-Group, Environment Agency (United Kingdom)

    2001-06-01

    deterministic risks, and to a lesser extent stochastic risks. There are other issues which should also be factored in. (ii) The accidents that attract media and other international/political attention are those with high exposures (especially if they are fatal). Many people involved in the conference would recognise other social and economic risks, in the event of sources being melted in a metals works. (iii) States which have only recently created regulatory systems, or that have very low numbers of users, tend to have a single regulatory authority to cover all uses of 'nuclear' material (e.g. Costa Rica). (iv) States which have a long history of use tend to have multiple-bodies involved in the regulation of radiation sources (e.g. the UK where there are nine or Germany where there are seventeen). (v) States with few users often manage an effective national inventory system . (vi) States with many users rarely run a national inventory system. (viii) Many states operate a national waste management/disposal system that takes control of orphaned or disused sources, when necessary, as a national service; some states have a more commercial approach. Sometimes even the latter type are prepared to 'adopt' orphaned sources and the liabilities that come with them. The recurring themes that emerged were: (i) The need for education and training of all stakeholders (users, regulators, the public, medics, judges, politicians). (ii) The need for an international communication system between regulators The paper I submitted described the UK regulatory arrangements in its first part, as operated by the environment agencies and HSE. It then went on to describe the constitution and work of the UK INTERPOL Environmental Crime (Radioactive Substances) Sub-Group. The UK paper also briefly: (i) summarised the nature and consequences of the March 2000 AVESTA accident; (ii) proposed that an 'all risks' approach be considered, as this is proving useful to the UK. The

  9. Management of disused sealed sources from nuclear gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Luiz Carlos Alves; Silva, Fabio

    2001-01-01

    In Brazil there are about 600 Radioactive Facilities that operate 3300 nuclear gauges. The management goal for these sources is minimize the waste that must be stored and disposed, through reutilization or a more efficient method of disposal conditioning. A database is being implemented in order to facilitate the organization and retrieval of information about sources stored at CDTN. Examples of the information being included are: radionuclide, activity and date (e.g. 60 Co, 1 GBq, January 14th 1988); physical and chemical form of radionuclide; producer of the source; source type including dimensions and shape; source serial number; results of tests which have been done, for example leak tests; details of the equipment, i.e. dimensions, material, etc.; measured dose rates (at the surface and at I-m distance from it); whether the source was originally conditioned as special form radioactive material; working life of the equipment, etc. It is intended to reutilize only sealed sources containing certified special form radioactive material. Sources received at CDTN with this certification will be wipe tested in a hot-cell. A special Geiger Muller detector for measuring very low level radiation will be used to detect leakage at detection levels, even lower than the established leakage limit in the CNEN-NE-5.01 Standard. If the source does not exhibit leakage and the shutter operation and shielding of the nuclear gauge is in good condition, it will made available for reuse at a cost savings to the user over the purchase of a new source. Nuclear gauges whose sources do not meet these requirements will be dismantled and the sources efficiently conditioned. The CDTN guidelines for establishing a methodology for conditioning disused sources are: Dismantling the nuclear gauges in the hot-cell; Collecting the sources in an double-lead shielded cylindrical cavity below the hot-cell, until the limit of activity or level is reached; Transferring the internal shielding with the

  10. Use of Advanced Tsunami Hazard Assessment Techniques and Tsunami Source Characterizations in U.S. and International Nuclear Regulatory Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, A. M.; Godoy, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    In response to the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, as well as the anticipation of the submission of license applications for new nuclear facilities, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) initiated a long-term research program to improve understanding of tsunami hazard levels for nuclear power plants and other coastal facilities in the United States. To undertake this effort, the US NRC organized a collaborative research program jointly undertaken with researchers at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the purpose of assessing tsunami hazard on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. This study identified and modeled both seismic and landslide tsunamigenic sources in the near- and far-field. The results from this work are now being used directly as the basis for the review of tsunami hazard at potential nuclear plant sites. This application once again shows the importance that the earth sciences can play in addressing issues of importance to society. Because the Indian Ocean Tsunami was a global event, a number of cooperative international activities have also been initiated within the nuclear community. The results of US efforts are being incorporated into updated regulatory guidance for both the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the United Nation’s International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Coordinated efforts are underway to integrate state-of-the art tsunami warning tools developed by NOAA into NRC and IAEA activities. The goal of the warning systems project is to develop automated protocols that allow scientists at these agencies to have up-to-the minute user-specific information in hand shortly after a potential tsunami has been identified by the US Tsunami Warning System. Lastly, USGS and NOAA scientists are assisting the NRC and IAEA in a special Extra-Budgetary Program (IAEA EBP) on tsunami being coordinated by the IAEA’s International Seismic Safety

  11. Comparison of electricity sources in the envrionmental management aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Eal

    2001-01-01

    National energy plan is addressing environmental issues and energy conservation has come to be regarded as an important element of environmental policy. Nuclear and coal have been selected as the major electricity sources due to the insufficient domestic energy resources, and will provide 62% of total electricity generation in Korea by 2015. According to current situation, it is necessary to compare two major electricity sources in the view of environmental management issues. Up to now, environmental impact assessment between two electricity sources has been focused on the CO 2 emission or economics. But future generation would require the environment friendliness energy policy established objectively with the comparative assessment tool of energy systems. Therefore, the environmental impacts of coal and nuclear fuel cycles are identified and quantified with the dimensionless unit concerning various environmental categories including global warming, acidification and so on. This result will be much helpful to make a decision for the long-term electricity planning and the energy mix optimization with respect to the environmental preservation in Korea

  12. Regulatory authority infrastructure for Namibia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shangula, K.

    2001-01-01

    The Republic of Namibia is participating in the International Atomic Energy Agency's Model Project for the Improvement of National Regulatory Authority Infrastructures in Member States. The paper illustrates our experience in solving problems and difficulties confronted in establishing an effective regulatory authority operating within the existing national infrastructure that should be supported by the Government. An effective regulatory authority is seen as part of the wider administrative scope of our Government through ministerial mandates given by the State from time to time, guaranteeing its independence when implementing legal provisions under statutes. Sections of the report illustrate our experience in the following areas: 1. National radiation protection policy 2. Structure of our national regulatory authority 3. Laws and regulations 4. Provisions for notification, authorization and registration 5. In-depth security measures for radiation sources and radioactive material 6. Systems for the inspection of radiation sources, radioactive materials, enforcement of legal provisions 7. Extent of the applications of radiation sources and radioactive materials in the country. The paper provides information regarding existing Government policy on radiation protection; structure and legal aspects of the national regulatory, including statutes and regulations; the extent of application and uses of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials; human resources: strengths and constraints; management practices and financing of regulatory authority; and plans for emergency recovery of orphan sources. National plans for management of disused sources, recovery of orphan sources, abnormal emergencies, communication of information to affected persons on exposure effects, and the safety training of persons using these applications are discussed. the paper provides a summary and some suggestions of the way forward for Namibia. (author)

  13. Regulatory Lessons for Internet Traffic Management from Japan, the European Union, and the United States: Toward Equity, Neutrality and Transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Harris Stevenson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As network neutrality has been one of the most contentious Internet public policy issues of the past decade, this article provides a comparative overview of events, policies, and legislation surrounding Internet traffic management practises (ITMPs (e.g., network neutrality in Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Canada. Using the frame provided by Richard Rose of “hybrid lessons”to create a policy synthesis, the paper details the telecom policy environment, Internet Service provider competition, legislative jurisdiction, remedies for ITMPs, consumer transparency, and adherence to privacy protection in each country. The analysis focuses on Canada’s first significant regulatory effort to address network neutrality, which came during the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission 2009 process on Internet traffic management. This paper presents a brief overview of the Canadian regulatory environment and the specific questions which were the subject of the CRTC review. Employing Richard Rose’s methods for comparative public policy analysis, we offer a number of regulatory “lessons” from Japan, the European Union, and the United States based on their experiences with traffic management issues. Applying these lessons to the Canadian context, we make several specific policy recommendations, among them that competition be encouraged within the Internet service provider space, that network management practises be reasonable and limited, and that ISPs provide full disclosure of network management policies and practises.

  14. Understanding the Effects of Users' Behaviors on Effectiveness of Different Exogenous Regulatory Common Pool Resource Management Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, K.; Dinar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Tragedy of the commons is generally recognized as one of the possible destinies for common pool resources (CPRs). To avoid the tragedy of the commons and prolonging the life of CPRs, users may show different behavioral characteristics and use different rationales for CPR planning and management. Furthermore, regulators may adopt different strategies for sustainable management of CPRs. The effectiveness of different regulatory exogenous management institutions cannot be evaluated through conventional CPR models since they assume that either users base their behavior on individual rationality and adopt a selfish behavior (Nash behavior), or that the users seek the system's optimal solution without giving priority to their own interests. Therefore, conventional models fail to reliably predict the outcome of CPR problems in which parties may have a range of behavioral characteristics, putting them somewhere in between the two types of behaviors traditionally considered. This work examines the effectiveness of different regulatory exogenous CPR management institutions through a user-based model (as opposed to a system-based model). The new modeling framework allows for consideration of sensitivity of the results to different behavioral characteristics of interacting CPR users. The suggested modeling approach is applied to a benchmark groundwater management problem. Results indicate that some well-known exogenous management institutions (e.g. taxing) are ineffective in sustainable management of CPRs in most cases. Bankruptcy-based management can be helpful, but determination of the fair level of cutbacks remains challenging under this type of institution. Furthermore, some bankruptcy rules such as the Constrained Equal Award (CEA) method are more beneficial to wealthier users, failing to establish social justice. Quota-based and CPR status-based management perform as the most promising and robust regulatory exogenous institutions in prolonging the CPR's life and

  15. Review of nuclear regulatory activities associated with safety culture and the management of safety in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhouse, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes some of the key regulatory activities which have taken place in the United Kingdom in recent years in the areas of safety culture and management of safety. It explains how the UK's nuclear licensing regime, regulated and enforced by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate, (NII), provides the framework for a viable safety management system and identifies a management of safety model which a NII Task Force has developed. It finally identifies further work which is being undertaken by the NII. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs

  16. Regulatory framework and development perspectives of the mechanism of public participation in the management of Russia’s forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Mikhaylovich Shmatkov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article dwells on the current state of the regulatory framework of the Russian Federation and the mechanism of public participation in forest management. The examples of addressing the problems of public participation in forest management in individual regions are disclosed. The article deals with the issues concerning the provision of in-interests of the local population through the voluntary forest certification system under the FSC scheme. Recommendations on improving the mechanism of public participation in solving the forest management issues are suggested

  17. Commodity hardware and open source solutions in FTU data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centioli, C.; Bracco, G.; Eccher, S.; Iannone, F.; Maslennikov, A.; Panella, M.; Vitale, V.

    2004-01-01

    Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) data management system underwent several developments in the last year, mainly due to the availability of huge amount of open source software and cheap commodity hardware. First of all, we replaced the old and expensive four SUN/SOLARIS servers running AFS (Andrew File System) fusione.it cell with three SuperServer Supermicro SC-742. Secondly Linux 2.4 OS has been installed on our new cell servers and OpenAFS 1.2.8 open source distributed file system has replaced the commercial IBM/Transarc AFS. A pioneering solution - SGI's XFS file system for Linux - has been adopted to format one terabyte of FTU storage system on which the AFS volumes are based. Benchmark tests have shown the good performances of XFS compared to the classical ext3 Linux file system. Third, the data access software has been ported to Linux, together with the interfaces to Matlab and IDL, as well as the locally developed data display utility, SHOX. Finally a new Object-Oriented Data Model (OODM) has been developed for FTU shots data to build and maintain a FTU data warehouse (DW). FTU OODM has been developed using ROOT, an object oriented data analysis framework well-known in high energy physics. Since large volumes of data are involved, a parallel data extraction process, developed in the ROOT framework, has been implemented taking advantage of the AFS distributed environment of FTU computing system

  18. Commodity hardware and open source solutions in FTU data management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centioli, C. E-mail: centioli@frascati.enea.it; Bracco, G.; Eccher, S.; Iannone, F.; Maslennikov, A.; Panella, M.; Vitale, V

    2004-06-01

    Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) data management system underwent several developments in the last year, mainly due to the availability of huge amount of open source software and cheap commodity hardware. First of all, we replaced the old and expensive four SUN/SOLARIS servers running AFS (Andrew File System) fusione.it cell with three SuperServer Supermicro SC-742. Secondly Linux 2.4 OS has been installed on our new cell servers and OpenAFS 1.2.8 open source distributed file system has replaced the commercial IBM/Transarc AFS. A pioneering solution - SGI's XFS file system for Linux - has been adopted to format one terabyte of FTU storage system on which the AFS volumes are based. Benchmark tests have shown the good performances of XFS compared to the classical ext3 Linux file system. Third, the data access software has been ported to Linux, together with the interfaces to Matlab and IDL, as well as the locally developed data display utility, SHOX. Finally a new Object-Oriented Data Model (OODM) has been developed for FTU shots data to build and maintain a FTU data warehouse (DW). FTU OODM has been developed using ROOT, an object oriented data analysis framework well-known in high energy physics. Since large volumes of data are involved, a parallel data extraction process, developed in the ROOT framework, has been implemented taking advantage of the AFS distributed environment of FTU computing system.

  19. Optimization of waste management by actions taken at source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, N.R.; Wakerley, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to collate and review information on those measures and practices adopted within nuclear facilities to optimize the management of radioactive waste at the point at which it arises. The information on which it has been based has been obtained by a review of the literature and by visits to a number of different types of facilities within the European Community. The search revealed mainly references to waste-management optimization at US LWRs, whereas the visits have tried to cover as wide a range of European facilities as practicable. There are a number of different respects in which radioactive waste can be minimized: - minimizing the amount of activity appearing in the wastes. This is best achieved by the design of process equipment; - minimizing the volume of waste with which radioactivity is associated. This is best achieved by a combination of administrative controls and equipment design; - minimizing the amount of material which for administrative or measurement reasons is considered to be radioactive. Many examples of minimization at source by means of developments in equipment and administrative controls that were encountered during our visits, or identified in the literature search, are described

  20. Optimization of waste management by actions taken at source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, N.R.; Wakerley, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to collate and review information on those measures and practices adopted within nuclear facilities to optimize the management of radioactive waste at the point of arising. The information on which it has been based has been obtained by literature review and by visits to a number of different types of facilities within the European Community. The search revealed mainly references to waste management optimization at US LWRs, whereas the visits have tried to cover as wide a range of European facilities as practicable. There are a number of different respects in which radioactive waste can be minimized: minimizing the amount of activity appearing in the wastes. This is best achieved by the design of process equipment; minimizing the volume of waste with which radioactivity is associated. This is best achieved by a combination of administrative controls and equipment design; minimizing the amount of material which for administrative or measurement reasons is considered to be radioactive. Many examples of minimization at source by means of equipment developments and administrative controls that were encountered during our visits or identified in the literature search are described. (author)

  1. Development of joint regulatory guidance on the management of higher activity radioactive wastes on nuclear licensed sites - 16095

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, Mick; Ilett, Doug; Whittall, Andy

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 the UK Government's response (1) to recommendations by its Committee on Radioactive Waste Management (CoRWM) established, in England and Wales, that geological disposal, supported by safe and secure interim storage, is the preferred route for the long-term management of higher-activity radioactive waste (i.e. that which is not suitable for near-surface disposal). It also gave the responsibility for delivering the programme for a deep geological repository to the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). The Scottish Government has a policy of long term, near site, near surface safe and secure interim storage. To support the open and transparent approach promised by Government, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the Environment Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) are developing joint guidance on the management of higher-activity radioactive waste to explain regulatory objectives in securing safe and secure interim storage and the associated management of radioactive wastes. The guidance comes in two parts: - Guidance on the regulatory process; - Technical guidance modules. The guidance promotes a cradle to grave approach to radioactive waste management and by aligning the regulatory interests of environmental and safety regulators it delivers one of the Government's 'Better Regulation' objectives. This paper describes the process by which the joint guidance was produced with particular emphasis on stakeholder engagement. It describes the key features of the guidance, including the concept of the radioactive waste management case (RWMC). Finally the problems encountered with dissemination and implementation are discussed together with measures taken by the regulators to improve these aspects. (1) : UK Government and the devolved administrations, 'Response to the Report and Recommendations from the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management (CoRWM)', (PB 12303) October 2006. www

  2. All-source Information Management and Integration for Improved Collective Intelligence Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Intelligence (ELINT) • Open Source Intelligence ( OSINT ) • Technical Intelligence (TECHINT) These intelligence disciplines produce... intelligence , measurement and signature intelligence , signals intelligence , and open - source data, in the production of intelligence . All- source intelligence ...All- Source Information Integration and Management) R&D Project 3 All- Source Intelligence

  3. Risk Management And Liability For EnvironmentalL Harm Caused By GMOS – The South African Regulatory Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Feris

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Biotechnology is still relatively new and as with any new technology, it carries some level of risk. This necessitates appropriate risk assessments and appropriate risk management. One element of risk management however, is taking into account that during the production, development, transport or release of a GMO it may cause injury to person, property or the environment, regardless of risk management procedures. This calls for the existence of a liability regime that will place some legal responsibility on the party responsible for the harm. This paper assesses the South African regulatory framework of relevance to GMOs, which is composed of a fragmented set of laws that deals with risk assessment, risk management and liability for damage to the environment. It discusses the GMO Act as the principle legislation regulation GMOs and also the recent amendment thereof and also consider other legislation such as the ECA, NEMA and NEMA Biodiversity Act in an attempt to determine whether the regulatory framework addresses risk management and liability in an effective and adequate manner. It comes to the conclusion that South Africa does not as yet have a satisfactory legal regime that provides for risk management and liability in the context of GMOs.

  4. Future directions for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's low-level waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starmer, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act envisioned that all states would be able to dispose of commercial low-level waste generated within their borders by 1986, either individually or through interstate compacts. Based on the current status of state and compact efforts, it is clear that no new disposal sites will be available by 1986 or for some period thereafter. In the short-term, there is uncertainty that the existing disposal sites will remain open after January 1, 1986, or if restrictions will apply after that time. If restrictions occur, storage, treatment or even curtailed generation may result for individual waste producers. Other uncertainties clouding implementation of the Policy Act include the final configuration of regional compacts - in the northeast in particular - clear assignment of responsibility for disposal of classes of waste, the method of disposal - shallow land burial or alternatives - that will be employed for low-level waste, and regulation of mixed wastes, wastes which have both radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous constituents. The NRC strategy for low-level waste management aims to resolve or reduce these uncertainties, and to encourage transition to a stable, national system based on timely state action. NRC will continue development of regulatory and technical guidance for disposal site licensing and build on its capabilities to address specific areas of state concern, such as alternatives to shallow land burial, and site characterization and modeling. NRC also plans to expand state and compact outreach efforts to help ensure that our technical work is properly focused. The authors will also be directly assisting those states and compacts on technical matters they confront in actual disposal site development and licensing

  5. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong Zhaopeng, E-mail: zzhong@anl.gov [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. > Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. > New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. > Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is {approx}360 kW including the fission power of {approx}260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  6. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. → Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. → New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. → Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is ∼360 kW including the fission power of ∼260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  7. Regulatory aspect of nuclear application and radioactive waste management in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Ridwan

    2002-01-01

    Experience over more than 56 years in the field of nuclear application has shown that such technology is generally safely used. Nevertheless, there have been instances, when safety systems have been circumvented and serious radiological accident have occurred, and have resulted with fatal consequences. During the last 56 years, such radiological accidents, in total, caused 101 person dead, and it is very interesting to note that this figure is more than double the dead caused by nuclear accident as the result of nuclear fuel failure, such as in nuclear power plant, in submarine or in enrichment plant, which has only 47 fatalities. The article 8 of the convention on nuclear safety, stipulates inter alia that the contracting party shall established a regulatory body separated from the promotional or the executing organization of nuclear energy. Indonesia is not operating any nuclear power. At present, it is only operating three research reactors, and some laboratories connected with this reactor, such as one nuclear fuel fabrication plant for research reactors, one experimental fuel fabrication plant for nuclear power, one isotope production facility, radiometalurgy laboratory and some other research facilities. However, in anticipation of the expansion of nuclear programme in Indonesia, and looking into the various accident in the nuclear application, the Indonesian Government has, since April 10, 1997, enacted the new act, Act No. 10/1997 on Nuclear Energy. The new Act addresses several key requirements for the successful conduct of Indonesia nuclear programme, including the establishment of both the Executing Body responsible for nuclear research and development, mining and processing nuclear fuels and materials, production of radio-isotopes and management of radioactive wastes and the independent Nuclear Energy Control Board, which has the power to regulate, to license and to inspect all facets of any activity utilizing nuclear energy. It also sets out the basic

  8. Misunderstanding the ‘‘nature’’ of co-management: a geography of regulatory science and indigenous knowledges (IK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Annette

    2013-11-01

    Governments, NGOs, and natural scientists have increased research and policy-making collaborations with Indigenous peoples for governing natural resources, including official co-management regimes. However, there is continuing dissatisfaction with such collaborations, and calls for better communication and mutual learning to create more ‘‘adaptive’’ co-management regimes. This, however, requires that both Western and Indigenous knowledge systems be equal participants in the ‘‘co-production’’ of regulatory data. In this article, I examine the power dynamics of one co-management regulatory regime, conducting a multi-sited ethnography of the practices of researching and managing one transnational migratory species, greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons frontalis), who nest where Koyukon Athabascans in Alaska, USA, practice subsistence. Analyzing the ethnographic data through the literatures of critical geography, science studies and Indigenous Studies, I describe how the practice of researching for co-management can produce conflict. ‘‘Scaling’’ the data for the co-management regime can marginalize Indigenous understandings of human– environment relations. While Enlightenment-based practices in wildlife biology avoid ‘‘anthropomorphism,’’ Indigenous Studies describes identities that operate through non-modern, deeply imbricated human–nonhuman identities that do not separate ‘‘nature’’ and ‘‘society’’ in making knowledge. Thus, misunderstanding the ‘‘nature’’ of their collaborations causes biologists and managers to measure and research the system in ways that erase how subsistence- based Indigenous groups already ‘‘manage’’ wildlife: by living through their ethical commitments to their fellow beings. At the end of the article, I discuss how managers might learn from these ontological and epistemologicaldifferences to better ‘‘co-produce’’ data for co-management.

  9. 76 FR 67370 - Federal Property Management Regulation (FPMR); Procurement Sources and Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... to agency management and personnel. List of Subjects in 41 CFR Part 101-26 Procurement sources and... MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS PART 101-26--PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAMS 0 1. The authority for 41 CFR part 101...; Docket Number 2011-017; Sequence 1] RIN 3090-AJ19 Federal Property Management Regulation (FPMR...

  10. Automated management of radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Jamil, M. F.; Basar, M. R.; Tuwaili, W. R.

    2014-01-01

    For usage of radioactive substances, any facility has to register and take license from relevant authority of the country in which such facility is operating. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the authority for managing radioactive sources and providing licenses to organizations for its usage is the National Center of Radiation Protection (NCRP). This paper describes the system that automates registration and licensing process of the National Center of Radiation Protection. To provide 24×7 accesses to all the customers of NCRP, system is developed as web-based application that provide facility to online register, request license, renew license, check request status, view historical data and reports etc. and other features are provided as Electronic Services that would be accessible to users via internet. The system also was designed to streamline and optimize internal operations of NCRP besides providing ease of access to its customers by implementing a defined workflow through which every registration and license request will be routed. In addition to manual payment option, the system would also be integrated with SADAD (online payment system) that will avoid lengthy and cumbersome procedures associated with manual payment mechanism. Using SADAD payment option license fee could be paid through internet/ATM machine or branch of any designated bank, Payment will be instantly notified to NCRP hence delay in funds transfer and verification of invoice could be avoided, SADAD integration is discussed later in the document

  11. Automated management of radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Jamil, M. F.; Basar, M. R.; Tuwaili, W. R.

    2014-09-01

    For usage of radioactive substances, any facility has to register and take license from relevant authority of the country in which such facility is operating. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the authority for managing radioactive sources and providing licenses to organizations for its usage is the National Center of Radiation Protection (NCRP). This paper describes the system that automates registration and licensing process of the National Center of Radiation Protection. To provide 24×7 accesses to all the customers of NCRP, system is developed as web-based application that provide facility to online register, request license, renew license, check request status, view historical data and reports etc. and other features are provided as Electronic Services that would be accessible to users via internet. The system also was designed to streamline and optimize internal operations of NCRP besides providing ease of access to its customers by implementing a defined workflow through which every registration and license request will be routed. In addition to manual payment option, the system would also be integrated with SADAD (online payment system) that will avoid lengthy and cumbersome procedures associated with manual payment mechanism. Using SADAD payment option license fee could be paid through internet/ATM machine or branch of any designated bank, Payment will be instantly notified to NCRP hence delay in funds transfer and verification of invoice could be avoided, SADAD integration is discussed later in the document.

  12. Automated management of radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Jamil, M. F.; Basar, M. R.; Tuwaili, W. R. [National Center for Radiation Protection, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, 11442 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-09-30

    For usage of radioactive substances, any facility has to register and take license from relevant authority of the country in which such facility is operating. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the authority for managing radioactive sources and providing licenses to organizations for its usage is the National Center of Radiation Protection (NCRP). This paper describes the system that automates registration and licensing process of the National Center of Radiation Protection. To provide 24×7 accesses to all the customers of NCRP, system is developed as web-based application that provide facility to online register, request license, renew license, check request status, view historical data and reports etc. and other features are provided as Electronic Services that would be accessible to users via internet. The system also was designed to streamline and optimize internal operations of NCRP besides providing ease of access to its customers by implementing a defined workflow through which every registration and license request will be routed. In addition to manual payment option, the system would also be integrated with SADAD (online payment system) that will avoid lengthy and cumbersome procedures associated with manual payment mechanism. Using SADAD payment option license fee could be paid through internet/ATM machine or branch of any designated bank, Payment will be instantly notified to NCRP hence delay in funds transfer and verification of invoice could be avoided, SADAD integration is discussed later in the document.

  13. Mosquito population regulation and larval source management in heterogeneous environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Smith

    Full Text Available An important question for mosquito population dynamics, mosquito-borne pathogen transmission and vector control is how mosquito populations are regulated. Here we develop simple models with heterogeneity in egg laying patterns and in the responses of larval populations to crowding in aquatic habitats. We use the models to evaluate how such heterogeneity affects mosquito population regulation and the effects of larval source management (LSM. We revisit the notion of a carrying capacity and show how heterogeneity changes our understanding of density dependence and the outcome of LSM. Crowding in and productivity of aquatic habitats is highly uneven unless egg-laying distributions are fine-tuned to match the distribution of habitats' carrying capacities. LSM reduces mosquito population density linearly with coverage if adult mosquitoes avoid laying eggs in treated habitats, but quadratically if eggs are laid in treated habitats and the effort is therefore wasted (i.e., treating 50% of habitat reduces mosquito density by approximately 75%. Unsurprisingly, targeting (i.e. treating a subset of the most productive pools gives much larger reductions for similar coverage, but with poor targeting, increasing coverage could increase adult mosquito population densities if eggs are laid in higher capacity habitats. Our analysis suggests that, in some contexts, LSM models that accounts for heterogeneity in production of adult mosquitoes provide theoretical support for pursuing mosquito-borne disease prevention through strategic and repeated application of modern larvicides.

  14. Flight crew fatigue management in a more flexible regulatory environment: an overview of the New Zealand aviation industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signal, T Leigh; Ratieta, Denise; Gander, Philippa H

    2008-04-01

    of more flexible regulatory options has not greatly changed fatigue management practices, although some operators have implemented innovative strategies. The findings suggest a need to raise the level of knowledge within the industry regarding the causes and consequences of fatigue and of processes for its management. This is further supported by the discrepancies between the responses of line pilots and managers, which raise doubts about the effectiveness of some strategies nominally being employed. The regulator and other relevant industry groups should consider how to move the industry toward a mature safety culture and solid knowledge base because these are fundamental to more flexible fatigue management regimes, as is adequate regulatory knowledge, support, and oversight.

  15. Regulatory Practices on Ageing Management and Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plants in the Ibero-American Region. Results of the FORO/IAEA Programme on Nuclear and Radiation Safety in Ibero-America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-09-01

    Although the operating lifetime of a nuclear power plant was originally anticipated to be in the range of 30-40 years, 200 of the 434 currently in operation are over 30 years old. In this context, Member States have assigned high priority to continuing the operation of nuclear power plants beyond the lifetime initially planned - while also maintaining the highest safety conditions possible. It is thus essential to encourage international cooperative efforts in the development of safety regulatory practices on ageing management and long term operation. Established in 1997, the Ibero-American Forum of Radiological and Nuclear Regulatory Agencies (FORO) aims to strengthen its members' radiological and nuclear safety regulatory organizations. Through a regional network of radiological and nuclear safety regulators, States in the Ibero-American region have worked together to strengthen radiation protection for patients, to improve safety at radiation installations, to tightten controls on radioactive sources used in medicine, agriculture and industry, and to improve safety and security at nuclear power plants. Since FORO's creation, it has cooperated with the IAEA in areas of mututal interest, and a technical programme administered by the IAEA was established in 2003 and formalized in Practical Arrangements signed in 2010. This publication presents the results of the 2009-2010 FORO/IAEA project on regulatory practices on ageing management and safety considerations for extending the operating lifetime of nuclear power plants. The purpose of the project was to provide nuclear regulators in the region with guidance on regulatory criteria, assessment, regulatory inspection and periodic safety reviews relating to ageing management and long term operation of nuclear power plants. The results are presented in a set of four reports, with guidelines for FORO members and a summary report of the project. These reports contain valuable information for the development of future

  16. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  17. Environmental regulatory update table November--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  18. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  19. Environmental sciences division: Environmental regulatory update table July 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-08-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  20. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May--June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-07-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  1. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-07-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  2. Environmental regulatory update table, March--April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Salk, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1994-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  3. Environmental Regulatory Update Table July/August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  4. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1993. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  5. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action. This table is for January/February 1992.

  7. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly wit information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  8. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, July--August 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  9. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September/October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operation and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1994-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations ad contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  11. Environmental regulatory update table, September--October 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  12. Environmental regulatory update table, July/August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  13. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Environmental regulatory update table, July/August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  15. Regulatory requirements on accident management and emergency preparedness - concept of nuclear and radiation safety during beyond-design-basis accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanke, R.

    2002-01-01

    Actual practice the and proposals for further activities in the field of Accident Management (AM) in the member countries of the Co-operation Forum of WWER regulators and in Western countries have been assessed. Further the results of the last working group on AM , the overview of interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions in various countries, IAEA reports, practice in Switzerland and Finland, were taken into consideration. From this information, the working group derived recommendations on Accident Management. The general proposals correspond to the present state of the art on AM. They do not describe the whole spectra of recommendations on AM for NPPs with WWER reactors. A basis for the implementation of an AM program is given, which could be extended in a follow-up working group. The developments and research concerning AM have to be continued. The positions of various countries with regard to the 'Interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions' are given. On the basis of the working group proposals, the WWER regulators could set regulatory requirements and support further developments of AM strategies, making use of the benefits of common features of NPPs with WWER reactors. Concerted actions in the field of AM between the WWER regulators would bundle the development of a unified concept of recommendations and speed up the implementation of AM measures in order to minimise the risks involved in nuclear power generation

  16. Management and packaging of radioactive sources (90Sr) for their transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales C, M; Roas Z, N.

    2000-09-01

    This work describes the different activities that were carried out in relation to the identification of five sources of 90 Sr and the administrative administrations in the face of the regulatory authority of the country, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CONEA), for the transfer of the sources toward its final destination. The preparation of the package and the documentation presented before the CONEA were in agreement to that settled down in the Regulation for the safe transport of radioactive materials (IAEA)

  17. Open Source and Proprietary Project Management Tools for SMEs.

    OpenAIRE

    Veronika Abramova; Francisco Pires; Jorge Bernardino

    2017-01-01

    The dimensional growth and increasing difficulty in project management promoted the development of different tools that serve to facilitate project management and track project schedule, resources and overall progress. These tools offer a variety of features, from task and time management, up to integrated CRM (Customer Relationship Management) and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) modules. Currently, a large number of project management software is available, to assist project team during t...

  18. Analysis of the reasons of recently some radioactive source accidents and suggestions for management countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Yongjie; Feng Youcai; Song Chenxiu; Gao Huibin; Xing Jinsong; Pang Xinxin; Wang Xiaoqing; Wei Hong

    2007-01-01

    The article introduces recently some radioactive source accidents in China, and analyses the reasons of the accidents. Some important issues existed in the process of implementing new regulation were summarized, and some suggestions for managing radioactive sources are made. (authors)

  19. California State Implementation Plan; Butte County Air Quality Management District; New Source Review (NSR) Permitting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is proposing to approve a revision to the Butte County Air Quality Management District (BCAQMD) portion of the California SIP concerning the District's New Source Review (NSR) permitting program for new and modified sources of air pollution.

  20. Regulatory challenges in the management of aging of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelo, C.; Mendoza, C.; Mas, E.; Conde, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses two major pathways by which a regulatory body, and in particular the CSN, may participate in the acquisition of the necessary knowledge on mechanisms of aging of nuclear structural materials: to participate in forums to share operational experience and R and R project, both nationally and internationally. It notes the importance of this participation to carry out its regulatory function based on the knowledge acquired and the unique challenge of transferring that knowledge to rules and guidelines for their application. The article discusses various R and D projects in which the CSN participates directly. It calls for the presence of regulatory bodies in R and D project funded by the EU and the transfer of the results of such projects to codes, standards or guidelines for feasible implementation. (Author)

  1. Selection and Management of Open Source Software in Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Vimal Kumar, V.

    2007-01-01

    Open source software was a revolutionary concept among computer programmers and users. To a certain extent open source solutions could provide an alternative solution to costly commercial software. Open source software is, software that users have the ability to run, copy, distribute, study, change, share and improve for any purpose. Open source library software’s does not need the initial cost of commercial software and enables libraries to have greater control over their working environmen...

  2. Records Management Handbook; Source Data Automation Equipment Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Service (GSA), Washington, DC. Office of Records Management.

    A detailed guide to selecting appropriate source data automation equipment is presented. Source data automation equipment is used to prepare data for electronic data processing or computerized recordkeeping. The guide contains specifications, performance data cost, and pictures of the major types of machines used in source data automation.…

  3. Radioactive waste management in sealed sources laboratory production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Gilberto

    2001-01-01

    The laboratory of sealed sources production, of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, was created in 1983 and since then, has produced radioactive sources for industry and engineering in general, having specialization in assembly of radiation sources for non destructive testings, by gammagraphy, with Iridium-192, that represents 98% of the production of laboratory and 2% with the Cobalt-60, used in nuclear gages. The aim of this work, is to quantify and qualify the radioactive wastes generated annually, taking into account, the average of radioactive sources produced, that are approximately 220 sources per year

  4. Radiation exposure management over a decade in sealed sources fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, Nitin V.; Swaminathan, N.; Singh, P.; Sreenivas, V.; Bairwa, S.M.; Rath, D.P.; Patil, B.N.; Sastry, K.V.S.

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive sealed sources find innumerable applications in medical and industrial applications. 60 Co teletherapy sources are used for the treatment of cancer. In brachytherapy; 137 Cs and 192 Ir are used. Industrial sources using 60 Co, 137 Cs find applications in nucleonic gauges, tracer studies etc. 60 Co and 192 Ir sources are used in radiography also. In addition, 60 Co is widely used in irradiator facilities. Board of Isotopes and Radiation Technology (BRIT) has committed in supply of these sealed sources to various hospitals and industrial institutions in India. Annually, PetaBq (PBq) level of above mentioned isotopes are handled remotely in hot cells, RLG, BARC. This paper brings out a detailed account on the radiological surveillance provided during the fabrication of these sources implementing ALARA. The decrease in collective dose per activity handled is the outcome of improved operation practices which were carried out at various stages of source fabrication. (author)

  5. 78 FR 18947 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Tilefish Fishery Management Plan; Regulatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... during the current fishing year for failure to pay the cost recovery fee, rather than not renewing the... an IFQ cost recovery fee as described in paragraph (h)(4) of this section; or any other failure to... Plan; Regulatory Amendment, Corrections, and Clarifications AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...

  6. The technological safety in facilities that manage radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizcano, D.

    2014-10-01

    The sealed radioactive sources are used inside a wide range of applications in the medicine, industry and investigation around the world. These sources can contain a great radionuclides variety, exhibiting a wide spectrum of activities and radiological half lives. This way, we can find pattern sources of radionuclides as Americium-241, Plutonium-238, Plutonium-239, Thorium-228 and Thorium-230, etc., with some activity of kBq in research laboratories, Iridium-192 and Cesium-137 sources used in brachytherapy with GBq activities, until sources with P Bq activities in industrial irradiators of Cobalt-60 and Cesium-137. This document approach the physical safety that entities like the IAEA recommends for the facilities that contain sealed sources, especially the measures that are taking in the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) and others government facilities. (Author)

  7. Management of disused sealed sources from the nuclear industry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xuanlin

    2002-01-01

    Since the founding of the nuclear industry in China, more than 8000 disused sealed sources accumulated of which more than 1800 are Radium sources. Most of these sources were produced during the period 1960-1980. The disused radioactive sources are temporarily stored in a user's interim store. A project to manage these disused sealed sources is under way which includes inventory investigation, inspection, collection, transportation and long-term storage. (author)

  8. Bacterial source tracking guides management of boat head waste in a coastal resort area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Michael A; Haltom, Mary I; Song, Bongkeun; Tavares, Mary E; Dellies, Stephen P

    2010-12-01

    Fecal contamination of water bodies causes a public health problem and economic loss. To control such contamination management actions need to be guided by sound science. From 2007-2009 a study was undertaken to determine the sources of fecal bacteria contamination to the marine waters adjoining the Town of Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, USA. The research effort included sampling for fecal coliform and Enterococcus bacteria, sampling for optical brighteners, dye studies, and use of molecular bacterial source tracking techniques including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and terminal restriction fragment polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting of the Bacteroides-Prevotella group. Of the 96 samples collected from nine locations during the study, the water contact standard for Enterococcus was exceeded on 13 occasions. The T-RFLP fingerprint analyses demonstrated that the most widespread source of fecal contamination was human, occurring in 38% of the samples, with secondary ruminant and avian sources also detected. Optical brightener concentrations were low, reflecting a lack of sewage line leakage or spills. A lack of sewer leaks and lack of septic systems in the town pointed toward discharge from boat heads into the marine waters as the major cause of fecal contamination; this was supported by dye studies. Based on these data, the Town initiated action to have the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency declare the coastal waters (out to 3 nautical miles), the nearby Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway and its tributaries a no-discharge zone (NDZ) to alleviate the human fecal pollution. The Town garnered supporting resolutions from other local communities who jointly petitioned the North Carolina Department of Environmental and Natural Resources. This State regulatory agency supported the local government resolutions and sent an application for an NDZ to the EPA in April 2009. The EPA concurred, and in February 2010 the coastal waters of New Hanover County, NC, became the

  9. Information Source Characteristics and Environmental Scanning by Academic Library Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalhavaeji, Fahimeh; Farhadpoor, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article examines characteristics of the external environment of library and information centres of Islamic Azad University in Iran, focusing on perceived environmental uncertainty and perceived source accessibility and quality, and their impacts on the amount of scanning and the frequency of information source use. Methods: This…

  10. Categorization of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The objective of this report is to develop a categorization scheme for radiation sources that could be relevant to decisions both in a retrospective application to bring sources under control and in a prospective sense to guide the application of the regulatory infrastructure. The Action Plan envisages that the preparation of guidance on national strategies and programmes for the detection and location of orphan sources and their subsequent management should commence after the categorization of sources has been carried out. In the prospective application of the system of notification, registration, and licensing, the categorization is relevant to prioritize a regulatory authority's resources and training activities; to guide the degree of detail necessary for a safety assessment; and to serve as a measure of the intensity of effort which a regulatory authority should apply to the safety and security of a particular type of source

  11. The Status Quo of Ontology Learning from Unstructured Knowledge Sources for Knowledge Management

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuermann , Andreas; Obermann , Jens

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In the global race for competitive advantage Knowledge Management gains increasing importance for companies. The purposeful and systematic creation, maintenance, and transfer of unstructured knowledge sources demands for advanced Information Technology. Ontologies constitute a basic ingredient of Knowledge Management; thus, ontology learning from unstructured knowledge sources is of particular interest since it bears the potential to bring significant advantages for Kn...

  12. Fuel utilization experience in Bohunice NPP and regulatory requirements for implementation of progressive fuel management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patenyi, V [Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Bratislava (Slovakia); Darilek, P; Majercik, J [Vyskumny Ustav Jadrovych Elektrarni, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1994-12-31

    The experience gained in fuel utilization and the basic requirements for fuel licensing in the Slovak NPPs is described. The original project of WWER-440 reactors supposes 3-year fuel cycle with cycle length of about 320 full power days (FPD). Since 1984 it was reduced to 290 FPD. Based on the experience of other countries, a 4-year fuel cycle utilization started in 1987. It is illustrated with data from the Bohunice NPP units. Among 504 fuel assemblies left for the fourth burnup cycle no leakage was observed. The mean burnup achieved in the different units varied from 33.1 to 38.5 Mwd/kg U. The new fuel assemblies used are different from the recent ones in construction, thermohydraulics, water-uranium ratio, enrichment and material design. To meet the safety criteria, regulatory requirements for exploitation of new fuel in WWER-440 were formulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Slovak Republic. 1 tab., 5 refs.

  13. Engineering assessment and feasibility study of Chattanooga Shale as a future source of uranium. [Environmental, socioeconomic, regulatory impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    This volume characterizes the major baseline environmental features of the Chattanooga Shale study and projects the effects which may accrue from implementation of a large scale development to recover uranium from the shale. Environmental, socioeconomic, and regulatory impacts are covered. The prototype project is located in Dekalb County in Tennessee. (DLC)

  14. Improvement of the effectiveness of regulatory management; Mejoramiento de la efectividad de la gestion reguladora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The project ARCAL LXVI has as its objective strengthening the national capabilities of the regulatory authorities to achieve an adequate level of radiation safety by training their staff in the implementation of the safety guidelines developed by a prior TC regional project under the framework of the ARCAL Programme and to measure its effectiveness. Detailed program of activities for the years 2001/2002 is presented at this meeting.

  15. Strategy in Regulatory Decision-Making for Management of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Segec, A; Keller-Stanislawski, B; Vermeer, N S

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) has been observed after the use of several medicines, including monoclonal antibodies. As these drugs play important roles in the therapeutic armamentarium, it is important to address the challenges that this severe adverse reaction poses to the safe...... use of medicines. Considering the need for consistent outcomes of regulatory decisions, the European Medicines Agency Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) used PML as an example to develop a systematic approach to labeling and risk minimization....

  16. Model Regulations for the Use of Radiation Sources and for the Management of the Associated Radioactive Waste. Supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 1, Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety, requires that governments establish laws and statutes to make provisions for an effective governmental, legal and regulatory framework for safety. The framework for safety includes the establishment of a regulatory body. The regulatory body has the authority and responsibility for promulgating regulations, and for preparing their implementation. This publication provides advice on an appropriate set of regulations covering all aspects of the use of radiation sources and the safe management of the associated radioactive waste. The regulations provide the framework for the regulatory requirements and conditions to be incorporated into individual authorizations for the use of radiation sources in industry, medical facilities, research and education and agriculture. The regulations also establish criteria to be used for assessing compliance. This publication allows States to appraise the adequacy of their existing regulations and regulatory guides, and can be used as a reference for those States developing regulations for the first time. The regulations set out in this publication will need to be adapted to take account of local conditions, technical resources and the scale of facilities and activities in the State. The set of regulations in this publication is based on the requirements established in the IAEA safety standards series, in particular in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 3 (Interim), Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards, in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 5, Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, and in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSR-5, Disposal of Radioactive Waste. They are also derived from the Code of Conduct of the Safety and Security of Radiation Sources and the Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources. This publication allows States to appraise the

  17. Model Regulations for the Use of Radiation Sources and for the Management of the Associated Radioactive Waste. Supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 1, Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety, requires that governments establish laws and statutes to make provisions for an effective governmental, legal and regulatory framework for safety. The framework for safety includes the establishment of a regulatory body. The regulatory body has the authority and responsibility for promulgating regulations, and for preparing their implementation. This publication provides advice on an appropriate set of regulations covering all aspects of the use of radiation sources and the safe management of the associated radioactive waste. The regulations provide the framework for the regulatory requirements and conditions to be incorporated into individual authorizations for the use of radiation sources in industry, medical facilities, research and education and agriculture. The regulations also establish criteria to be used for assessing compliance. This publication allows States to appraise the adequacy of their existing regulations and regulatory guides, and can be used as a reference for those States developing regulations for the first time. The regulations set out in this publication will need to be adapted to take account of local conditions, technical resources and the scale of facilities and activities in the State. The set of regulations in this publication is based on the requirements established in the IAEA safety standards series, in particular in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 3 (Interim), Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards, in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 5, Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, and in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSR-5, Disposal of Radioactive Waste. They are also derived from the Code of Conduct of the Safety and Security of Radiation Sources and the Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources. This publication allows States to appraise the

  18. Quantifying greenhouse gas sources and sinks in managed wetland systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen M Ogle; Patrick Hunt; Carl Trettin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides methodologies and guidance for reporting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and sinks at the entity scale for managed wetland systems. More specifically, it focuses on methods for managed palustrine wetlands.1 Section 4.1 provides an overview of wetland systems and resulting GHG emissions, system boundaries and temporal scale, a summary of the...

  19. Open source R&D - an anomaly in innovation management?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses innovations based on the principle of open source or non-proprietary knowledge. Viewed through the lens of private property theory, such agency appears to be a true anomaly. However, by a further turn of the theoretical kaleidoscope, we will show that there may be perfectly...... justifiable reasons for not regarding open source innovations as anomalies. The paper has identified three generic cases of open source innovation, which is an offspring of contemporary theory made possible by combining elements of the model of private agency with those of the model of collective agency...

  20. Manager's Discretionary Power and Comparability of Financial Reports: An Analysis of the Regulatory Transition Process in Brazilian Accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Mussoi Ribeiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to directly evaluate the impact of the accounting regulatory flexibility movement on the comparability of financial reports. The country chosen for the analysis was Brazil, because it was one of the few countries in the world where a process of regulatory change from a completely rule-based standard with a strong link to tax accounting (Lopes, 2011 to a principle-based standard with greater need for decision by managers who prepare the financial reports took place. To measure comparability, the accounting function similarity model developed by DeFranco, Kothari and Verdi (2011 was used. The companies analyzed were all listed ones with full data for the period concerned having, at least, a pair company within the same economic activity sector. To obtain the research results, we adopted a panel data model where the years 2005 to 2012 were compared to the year 2004. The results obtained prove that, on average, there was no significant decrease in the comparability level within country during the regulatory transition period in Brazil. On the contrary, there was an increase in genuine comparability in the year 2012 when compared to 2004. In the model adjusted by stepwise, the years 2011 and 2012 had a significantly higher average comparability when compared to 2004. The results found corroborate other researches addressing the quality of accounting information (Collins, Pasewark, & Riley, 2012; Psaros & Trotman, 2004; Agoglia, Doupnik, & Tsakumis, 2011 and prove the superiority of the principle-based standard also over the comparability of financial reports. The main conclusion of this research is that increasing manager's discretionary power through flexibility of accounting standards does not decrease the comparability of financial reports.

  1. The actuality and discussion for the data management of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yaoyun; Huang Chaoyun; Wang Xiaofeng; Chen Dongliang; Fu Jie

    2008-01-01

    Large amounts of data and information in radiation safety license permits, supervision and inspection have been accumulated in China. Data management of radiation sources is an important aspect of radiation sources security. This paper introduces the main elements, tache and actuality of data management, the strengths and weaknesses of RAIS system in use. This paper analyzes and discusses the approach of establishing radiation sources monitoring information system network. (authors)

  2. National Management Measures to Control Nonpoint Source Pollution from Forestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report helps forest owners protect lakes and streams from polluted runoff that can result from forestry activities. The report will also help states to implement their nonpoint source control programs.

  3. Development of Legal and Regulatory Framework for Radioactive Waste Management Safety in the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, E.

    2016-01-01

    Key RW management challenges in Russian Federation: - Full-scale implementation of legislation for radioactive waste management including administrative arrangements; - Transition from RW storage to RW conditioning and final disposal; - Construction of RW disposal facilities for accumulated waste; - Safety of waste management in connection with decommissioning and remediation activity; - Nuclear legacy liability: balanced approach to RW classification and management options in terms of “exceptional” and “retrievable” waste categories

  4. An annotated bibliography of invasive tree pathogens Sirococcus clavigignenti-juglandacearum, Phytophthora alni, and Phytophthora quercina and a regulatory policy and management practices for invasive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.M. Seeland; M.E. Ostry; R. Venette; J. Juzwik

    2006-01-01

    Provides a database of selected literature pertaining to the prevention, early detection and rapid response, control and management, and rehabilitation and restoration related to three invasive fungal pathogens of forest trees. Literature addressing regulatory policy and management practices for invasive species is also included.

  5. Regulatory body contribution to the development of an integrated radioactive waste management system in the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konecny, L.; Burclova, J.

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear energy is a very important part of electricity production in the Slovak Republic. Slovakia currently operates 6 nuclear units in two sites and their share on total power production is about 55%. Original soviet design of NPPs operated in Slovakia was based on storage strategy of non-treated solid waste and evaporated liquid waste until decommissioning of the plant. A new approach to the waste management at the end of the 1980s resulted in a strategy to install technologies able to transform in principle all radioactive waste into a form suitable for disposal. The technological part of radioactive waste management was supported in the late 1990s by respective legislation namely by a new act on peaceful use of nuclear energy and by regulation on radioactive waste and spent fuel management. Thus the basis for an integrated radioactive waste management system was created and technical short and long term solutions for the management of all kinds of radioactive waste were prepared. A comprehensive combination of individual components such as legal framework, regulation, overall organization, technology etc. in a single functional system is required for an effective and safe waste management system. Although the waste management system in the Slovak Republic is influenced by historical, socio-political, economic and other factors, a strong regulatory body is one of the key elements of an integrated approach to a generic national system for management of all types of wastes. UJD SR which was appointed as the central state authority for nuclear safety supervision took great effort in its legislative, licensing, assessment and inspection activities with the aim to support this integrated approach. (author)

  6. Regulatory authority information system RAIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, P.; Mrabit, K.; Miaw, S.

    2000-01-01

    In this lecture the principles of the regulatory authority information system (RAIS) are presented. RAIS is a tool currently being developed by the IAEA for the Regulatory Authorities. It is a part of a set of supporting actions designed to assist member states in achieving the objectives of the Model project on radiation and waste safety infrastructure. RAIS is a tool that provides the management of the Regulatory Authority with the key information needed for the planning and implementation of activities and to ensure confidence that resources are optimally used. The RAIS contains five modules: Inventory of installations and radiation sources; Authorization process; Inspection and follow-up actions; Information on personal dosimetry; Assessment of effectiveness by means of performance indicators

  7. Hazardous waste management system--Environmental Protection Agency. Notice of regulatory reform actions; request for comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-13

    In response to Executive Order 12291 and the President's Task Force on Regulatory Relief, the Environmental Protection Agency is reviewing and reassessing the hazardous waste regulations developed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A variety of activities are underway that will simplify procedures and reduce paperwork, modify existing regulations to make them more workable and cost effective, and control new wastes and new processes. The purpose of this notice is to inform the public of these activities and invite comments on the general approaches being taken.

  8. A Story of Three Bank-Regulatory Legal Systems: Contract, Financial Management Regulation and Fiduciary Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Frankel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available How should banks be regulated to avoid their failure? Banks must control the risks they take with depositors' money. If depositors lose their trust in their banks, and demand their money, the banks will fail. This article describes three legal bank regulatory systems: Contract with depositors (U.S.; a mix of contract and trust law, but going towards trust (Japan and a full trust-fiduciary law regulating banks (Israel. The article concludes that bank regulation, which limits the banks' risks and conflicts of interest, helps create trustworthy banks that serve their country best.

  9. Strategy in Regulatory Decision-Making for Management of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segec, A; Keller-Stanislawski, B; Vermeer, N S; Macchiarulo, C; Straus, S M; Hidalgo-Simon, A; De Bruin, M L

    2015-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) has been observed after the use of several medicines, including monoclonal antibodies. As these drugs play important roles in the therapeutic armamentarium, it is important to address the challenges that this severe adverse reaction poses to the safe use of medicines. Considering the need for consistent outcomes of regulatory decisions, the European Medicines Agency Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) used PML as an example to develop a systematic approach to labeling and risk minimization. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  10. Management of spent sealed sources: The Philippine experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdezco, E.M.; Salom, D.S.; Dela Cruz, J.M.; Soriano, V.N.

    2000-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Services (RPS) provide nuclear services to all authorized users of radiation and radioactive materials in the country, including the operation and maintenance of the only centralized facility for the management, treatment and interim storage of conditioned low level radioactive wastes. Two basic waste treatment and conditioning options, adopted by the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) Centralized Waste Management Facility for the types and volume of waste arising in the country, are outlined. International activities within the framework of an IAEA project on a regional demonstration of predisposal waste management methods and procedures for the East Asia Pacific region are described. Information is provided on siting studies and related research and development activities for a waste repository facility. (author)

  11. Coordination among industry, academic society and regulatory body in the research on aging management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, Hiroki; Osaki, Toru; Kanno, Masanori; Miyano, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Many activities for the coordinated research on aging management are reviewed, and examples of fruitful results are introduced according to the technical strategy map. Industry-Academia-Government exchanging system of the information each other on aging management was established for autonomy, diversity, collaboration. To clarify the concept of the role of industry, government and academia to address aging management without duplication algorithm is for the overall coordination of industrial and academic information and response issues, technological strategy map for aging management formulated. (author)

  12. Leadership and Safety Management: Regulatory Initiatives for Enhancing Nuclear Safety in the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, C.H.; Park, Y.W.; Choi, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    Since the construction of the first nuclear power plant (NPP) in the Republic of Korea in 1978, a high level of nuclear safety has continued to be maintained. This has been the important basis on which the continuous construction of NPPs has been possible in the country. To date, regulatory initiatives, leaderships and strategies adopting well harmonized regulatory systems and practices of advanced countries have contributed to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of safety regulation and further enhancing nuclear safety. The outcomes have resulted in a high level of safety and performance of Korean NPPs, attributing largely to the safety promotion policy. Recently, with the support of the Korean Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST), the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) established the International Nuclear Safety School and created a Nuclear Safety Master's Degree Programme. Further, it developed multilateral and bilateral cooperation with other agencies to promote global nuclear safety, with the aim of providing knowledge and training to new entrant countries in establishing the safety infrastructure necessary for ensuring an acceptable level of nuclear safety. (author)

  13. Implementation of a laboratory information management system for environmental regulatory analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, W.A.; Aiken, H.B.; Spatz, T.L.; Miles, W.F.; Griffin, J.C.

    1993-09-07

    The Savannah River Technology Center created a second instance of its ORACLE based PEN LIMS to support site Environmental Restoration projects. The first instance of the database had been optimized for R&D support and did not implement rigorous sample tracking, verification, and holding times needed to support regulatory commitments. Much of the R&D instance was transferable such as the work control functions for backlog reports, work assignment sheets, and hazard communication support. A major enhancement of the regulatory LIMS was the addition of features to support a {open_quotes}standardized{close_quotes} electronic data format for environmental data reporting. The electronic format, called {open_quotes}AN92{close_quotes}, was developed by the site environmental monitoring organization and applies to both onsite and offsite environmental analytical contracts. This format incorporates EPA CLP data validation codes as well as details holding time and analytical result reporting requirements. The authors support this format by using special SQL queries to the database. The data is then automatically transferred to the environmental databases for trending and geological mapping.

  14. A Summary of Best Management Practices for Nonpoint Source Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    and concrete block material, and structures and systems for soil stabilization including erosion checks, revetments , retaining structures, and...industrial storage areas, and coal/ slag piles. Rural NPS pollution includes runoff from Some of the above sources plus runoff from agriculture...water quality. The effectiveness of detention ponds is reduced, however, when maintenance is neglected. Common problems include blocked outlets

  15. An Am-Be neutron source Accident and its management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Guang; Wang Xinyong; Wu Zhenghan

    1988-01-01

    An 241 Am-Be neutron source for inaustrial use was lost in a county of Guangdong Province in April, 1982. A school boy picked up and brought it to his home. The source was broken and 10 people were contaminated with radioactive substance. The boy (X) received the highest external irradiation, with chest dose of 0.12 Sv and hand dose of 0.32 Sv. His brother (Y) incurred the heaviest internal contamination by 241 Am, about 3.3 x 10 3 Bq. Decorporation was carried out in four persons including Y, and the excretion of 241 Am in stools and urine was increased significantly. With the medical examination performed upon these persons one and half years after the accident, no positive findings induced by radiation were found except the increase of chromosomal aberration rate in lymphocytes

  16. Energy Sources Management and Future Automotive Technologies: Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Mariasiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the environmental impact created through the introduction of introducing new technologies in transportation domain. New electric vehicles are considered zero-emission vehicles (ZEV. However, electricity produced in power plants is still predominantly based on fossil fuel usage (required for recharge electric vehicle batteries and thus directly affects the quantity of pollutant emissions and greenhouse gases (CO2, NOx and SOx. Given the structure of EU-wide energy sources used for electricity generation, the potential pollutant emissions stemming from these energy sources, related to energy consumption of an electric vehicle, was determined under the projected environmental impact of specific market penetration of electric vehicles. In addition to the overall impact at the EU level, were identified the countries for which the use of electric vehicles is (or not feasible in terms of reaching the lower values ​​of future emissions compared to the present and future European standards.

  17. REGIONAL DRAINWATER MANAGEMENT: SOURCE CONTROL, AGROFORESTRY, AND EVAPORATION PONDS

    OpenAIRE

    Posnikoff, Judith F.; Knapp, Keith C.

    1996-01-01

    Source control is one way to address salinity and drainage problems in irrigated agriculture, and reuse of drainage flows on salt-tolerant crops or trees in agroforestry production is another. A regional model of agricultural production with drainwater reuse and disposal is developed. Deep percolation flows are controlled through choice of crop areas, irrigation systems, and applied-water quantities. Crop drainwater may by reused in agroforestry production, and residual emissions are disposed...

  18. The Effects of Environmental Management Systems on Source Separation in the Work and Home Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris von Borgstede

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Measures that challenge the generation of waste are needed to address the global problem of the increasing volumes of waste that are generated in both private homes and workplaces. Source separation at the workplace is commonly implemented by environmental management systems (EMS. In the present study, the relationship between source separation at work and at home was investigated. A questionnaire that maps psychological and behavioural predictors of source separation was distributed to employees at different workplaces. The results show that respondents with awareness of EMS report higher levels of source separation at work, stronger environmental concern, personal and social norms, and perceive source separation to be less difficult. Furthermore, the results support the notion that after the adoption of EMS at the workplace, source separation at work spills over into source separation in the household. The potential implications for environmental management systems are discussed.

  19. Regulatory and management requirements for investigation-derived waste generated during environmental investigations and cleanups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clary, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental cleanup efforts often result in the generation of waste materials, such as soil samples, drill cuttings, decontamination water, drilling muds, personal protective equipment, and disposable sampling equipment. The management of associated with site characterization and remediation issues is a complicated issue at many CERCLA/RCRA facilities throughout the country, primarily because of the federal hazardous waste regulations. The hazardous waste regulations were intended to apply to the active generation of hazardous waste at industrial facilities and do not often make sense when applied to sites con by poor disposal practices of the past. In order to manage investigation derived waste in a more rational, logical manner, EPA issued guidance on the management of investigation-derived waste (IDW) at Superfund sites in January, 1992. The basic intent of the EPA guidance is to provide Superfund Site Managers with options for handling, managing, and disposing of IDW. The second part of this paper provides a detailed analysis of current IDW practices at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and Superfund sites across the nation. Some sites, particularly the DOE facilities, with more complicated on-going cleanup efforts have developed site-specific written procedures for managing IDW, often incorporating risk assessment. In come cases, these site-specific policies are going farther than the current EPA and Colorado policies in terms of conservatively managing IDW

  20. Bringing plant-based veterinary vaccines to market: Managing regulatory and commercial hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Doshi, Ketan; Dussault, Marike; Hall, J Christopher; Holbrook, Larry; Jones, Ginny; Kaldis, Angelo; Klima, Cassidy L; Macdonald, Phil; McAllister, Tim; McLean, Michael D; Potter, Andrew; Richman, Alex; Shearer, Heather; Yarosh, Oksana; Yoo, Han Sang; Topp, Edward; Menassa, Rima

    2015-12-01

    The production of recombinant vaccines in plants may help to reduce the burden of veterinary diseases, which cause major economic losses and in some cases can affect human health. While there is abundant research in this area, a knowledge gap exists between the ability to create and evaluate plant-based products in the laboratory, and the ability to take these products on a path to commercialization. The current report, arising from a workshop sponsored by an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Co-operative Research Programme, addresses this gap by providing guidance in planning for the commercialization of plant-made vaccines for animal use. It includes relevant information on developing business plans, assessing market opportunities, manufacturing scale-up, financing, protecting and using intellectual property, and regulatory approval with a focus on Canadian regulations. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Securing classification and regulatory approval for deepwater projects: management challenges in a global environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feijo, Luiz P.; Burton, Gareth C. [American Bureau of Shipping (ABS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    As the offshore industry continues to develop and move into increasingly deeper waters, technological boundaries are being pushed to new limits. Along with these advances, the design, fabrication and installation of deepwater oil and gas projects has become an increasingly global endeavor. After providing an overview of the history and role of Classification Societies, this paper reviews the challenges of securing classification and regulatory approval in a global environment. Operational, procedural and technological changes which one Classification Society; the American Bureau of Shipping, known as ABS, has implemented to address these challenges are presented. The result of the changes has been a more customized service aiming at faster and more streamlined classification approval process. (author)

  2. Institutional barriers to DSM (demand side management): Reviewing the regulatory bargain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, W.M.

    1990-09-01

    The paper discusses traditional arguments for utility regulation in the context of the current utility environment. It reviews several DSM delivery options using a matrix of key financial considerations for utilities and consumers. The strengths and weaknesses of each option are discussed and an assessment of current prospects for DSM implementation is provided. The premise of the paper is that adoption of DSM by utilities and consumers has lagged because of technical and behavioral uncertainties. In addition, regulatory practices and DSM delivery mechanisms have not provided adequate means to extract the benefits of DSM and allocate the risks in a way that offers clear advantages over generating options. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of the potential for value of service approaches to resolve these problems.

  3. Project management with regulatory constraints: Return to service of San Onofre Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosmer, J.

    1986-01-01

    Station acceptance of the RTS work was completed in early November, 1984. The unit completed a successful integrated leak rate test, hot function test, and 200 hour warranty run in December, 1984 six weeks ahead of the CPUC mandate. Capital expenditures, although greater than the initial forecast, were two million dollars less than the 37.5 million dollar CPUC cap. The unit has run essentially trouble-free at current rated power until the current 1985 outage. Strategies and lessons learned that contributed to a successful RTS (e.g., all regulatory and economic constraints were met) included the use of numerous brainstorm sessions between SCE, Bechtel, and other consultants; innovative state of the art technical criterion (e.g., realistic versus overly conservative engineering); and budget and schedule contingencies consistent with the known and unknown risks

  4. Strategical Approaches and Regulatory Infrastructure for Radioactive Waste Management in the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozdyalouskaya, L.

    2016-01-01

    Three major types of RW, each requiring special consideration: • Institutional RW buried and disposed for long-term storage at the national centralized RW management facility Ekores; • Waste generated in the process of clean-up activity in the Chernobyl contaminated areas; and • RW to be generated during operation of the first Belorussian NPP after its commissioning in 2018. The paper presents strategic approaches exercised for managing the RW in past and expected developments and options for RW management in Belarus in future

  5. Aviation Management Perception of Biofuel as an Alternative Fuel Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marticek, Michael

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore lived experiences and perceptions from a population of 75 aviation managers in various locations in Pennsylvania about the use of aviation biofuel and how it will impact the aviation industry. The primary research question for this study focused on the impact of biofuel on the airline industry and how management believes biofuel can contribute to the reduction of fossil fuel. Grounded in the conceptual framework of sustainability, interview data collected from 27 airline and fueling leaders were analyzed for like terms, coded, and reduced to 3 themes. Data were organized and prioritized based on frequency of mention. The findings represented themes of (a) flight planning tools, (b) production, and (c) costs that are associated with aviation fuel. The results confirmed findings addressed in the literature review, specifically that aviation biofuel will transform the airline industry through lower cost and production. These findings have broad applicability for all management personnel in the aviation industry. Implications for social change and improved business environments could be realized with a cleaner environment, reduced fuel emissions, and improved air quality.

  6. Analyzing the impact of carbon regulatory mechanisms on supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this research is developing a toolset for designing and managing cost : efficient and environmentally friendly supply chains for perishable products. : The models we propose minimize transportation and inventory holding costs in the ...

  7. Implementing of a system of industrial regulatory management in the Almaraz and Trillo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yague, F.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plants are complex facilities, which in addition to nuclear safety standards, apply a large number of general industrial regulations. they refer to issues such as design, construction, in-service inspection and decommissioning in various technical areas, affecting numerous equipment. Almaraz-Trillo NPP, has decided to address systematically the fulfilment of such regulations, by implementing a Management System of Industrial Regulation, aimed at continuous improvement and integrated in the organization ser of management mechanisms. (Author)

  8. Organization and implementation of a national regulatory infrastructure governing protection against ionizing radiation and the safety of radiation sources. Interim report for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    A number of IAEA Member States are undertaking to strengthen their radiation protection and safety infrastructures in order to facilitate the adoption of the requirements established in the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Standards). In this connection, the IAEA has developed a technical co-operation programme (Model Project on Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure) to improve radiation protection and safety infrastructures in 51 Member States, taking into account national profiles and needs of the individual participating, countries. The present report deals with the elements of a regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection and safety and intends to facilitate the, implementation of the Basic Safety Standards in practice. It takes into account the proposals in an earlier report, IAEA-TECDOC-663, but it has been expanded to include enabling legislation and modified to be more attuned to infrastructure issues related to implementation of the Standards. The orientation is toward infrastructures concerned with protection and safety for radiation sources used in medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education rather than infrastructures for protection and safety for complex nuclear facilities. It also discusses options for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of the infrastructure in accordance with the size and scope of radiation practices and available regulatory resources within a country

  9. The design of radioactive source tracking management system based on RFID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongjun; Zhou Jianliang

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a solution of safety and security management system of radioactive source in storage and use by employing advanced RFID technology and computer database technology. And make some suggestions for further improvement. (authors)

  10. Integration of Heterogeneous Information Sources into a Knowledge Resource Management System for Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demidova, Elena; Ternier, Stefaan; Olmedilla, Daniel; Duval, Erik; Dicerto, Michele; Stefanov, Krassen; Sacristán, Naiara

    2007-01-01

    Demidova, E., Ternier, S., Olmedilla, D., Duval, E., Dicerto, M., Stefanov, K., et al. (2007). Integration of Heterogeneous Information Sources into a Knowledge Resource Management System for Lifelong. TENCompetence Workshop on Service Oriented Approaches and Lifelong Competence Development

  11. VisTrails is an open-source scientific workflow and provenance management system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthombeni, Thabo DM

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available VisTrails is an open-source scientific workflow and provenance management system that provides support for simulations, data exploration and visualization. Whereas workflows have been traditionally used to automate repetitive tasks, for applications...

  12. Agricultural phosphorus and water quality: sources, transport and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. SHARPLEY

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater eutrophication is usually controlled by inputs of phosphorus (P. To identify critical sources of P export from agricultural catchments we investigated hydrological and chemical factors controlling P export from a mixed land use (30% wooded, 50% cultivated, 20% pasture 39.5-ha catchment in east-central Pennsylvania, USA. Mehlich-3 extractable soil P, determined on a 30-m grid over the catchment, ranged from 7 to 788 mg kg-1. Generally, soils in wooded areas had low Mehlich-3 P (

  13. Sources of motivation, interpersonal conflict management styles, and leadership effectiveness: a structural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuto, John E; Xu, Ye

    2006-02-01

    126 leaders and 624 employees were sampled to test the relationship between sources of motivation and conflict management styles of leaders and how these variables influence effectiveness of leadership. Five sources of motivation measured by the Motivation Sources Inventory were tested-intrinsic process, instrumental, self-concept external, self-concept internal, and goal internalization. These sources of work motivation were associated with Rahim's modes of interpersonal conflict management-dominating, avoiding, obliging, complying, and integrating-and to perceived leadership effectiveness. A structural equation model tested leaders' conflict management styles and leadership effectiveness based upon different sources of work motivation. The model explained variance for obliging (65%), dominating (79%), avoiding (76%), and compromising (68%), but explained little variance for integrating (7%). The model explained only 28% of the variance in leader effectiveness.

  14. Knowledge management in the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority; La gestion del conocimiento en la Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chahab, Martin [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-07-01

    In 2006, the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority has initiated a regulatory knowledge management process to face the loss of knowledge resulting from retiring experts, the generation gap, and the existing need to train new human resources. A number of projects have been started together with the technical assistance of the National Public Administration Institute to preserve knowledge and render it explicit for the coming generations. These projects include 'The History of the Expert's Learning Process' in which the majority of the most critical experts have been interviewed so far. The results of this project help envision a training structure and prospective projects. An Internet Site has also been created on the Intranet in order to render knowledge explicit and facilitate the tools for knowledge management initiatives. Furthermore, ARN's knowledge map project has also been started. (author) [Spanish] La Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), es un Organismo Autarquico de la Administracion Publica Nacional de la Republica Argentina. La puesta en marcha de la gestion del conocimiento en este Organismo responde a la necesidad de no perder los conocimientos de la institucion en el marco del problema del retiro de un numero importante de expertos y de la falta de transmision de sus conocimientos a la nueva generacion. Esta actividad se pone en marcha a traves de programas especificos como entrevistas a expertos retirados y en actividad, la confeccion de un mapa del conocimiento, la identificacion de los conocimientos tacitos y explicitos para su transmision intergeneracional, entre otros, e implica supeditar la estructura tradicional y los procedimientos ya establecidos a los resultados de la misma para cumplir con la mision y vision institucional. Se presentan los objetivos y las caracteristicas del Plan Estrategico de la Institucion, los resultados hasta ahora alcanzados y los desafios a afrontar. (autor)

  15. Management of the quality in medical applications with sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano F, A.K.; Araiza M, E.

    2003-01-01

    In this work a model of Quality management based on the ISO 9001:2000 that it includes the application of some established approaches by the IAEA 50-C/SG-Q standard is proposed, so that the different focuses from both standards are joined and achieved: the client satisfaction and certification of the quality system, and structure behavior, components and systems at secure form with a minimum of accidents. This model incorporates a program of radiological protection that emphasizes the installation of a safety culture, (Author)

  16. B Plant source aggregate area management study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington state is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 100 Areas (Figure 1--1). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989, included the 200 Areas of the Hanford KLSite on the National Priorities List (NPL), included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of Feasibility Study (FS) process for characterizing the nature and extent of contamination, assessing risks to human health and the environment, and selection of remedial actions. This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AIMS) for the B Plant Aggregate Area located in the 200 Areas. The study provides the basis for initiating RI/FS under CERCLA or under the Resource which contain reactor fuel processing and waste management Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS). This report also integrates RCRA treatment, storage or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations

  17. Managing intermittent sources of electricity: the prospects opened by research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Beyond the difficult question of foreseeing the additional cost of placing one kWh of electricity on the grid - a cost that must be kept as low as possible to improve the technology for harnessing and converting energy - the growing share of electricity from renewable energy sources in national consumption (initially in replacement of fossil fuels) raises questions for research. How to limit the factors that make most of these forms of energy intermittent? One solution involves developing local or centralized storage capacities that are technically and economically efficient. Another proposal has to do with introducing information technology in electricity grids and electric appliances in order to reverse the currently prevailing rationale so that demand adjusts to supply, and not the reverse, in proportions that, though probably limited, are indispensable

  18. Dynamic energy management employing renewable energy sources in IP over DWDM networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xin; Phillips, Chris; Wang, Jiayuan

    2013-01-01

    management framework employing renewable energy sources in IP over DWDM core networks. The main concept is to combine infrastructure sleeping and virtual router migration to improve the network energy efficiency. By using the energy source information provided by the smart grid, the nodes that are powered...

  19. Wheat seed system in Ethiopia: Farmers' varietal perception, seed sources, and seed management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bishaw, Z.; Struik, P.C.; Gastel, van A.J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge and information on farmers' perception and its influence on adoption of modern wheat varieties, awareness and source of new wheat production technology, wheat seed sources, and on-farm seed-management practices remain sporadic in Ethiopia. This study was conducted to understand the

  20. Open-Source Learning Management Systems: A Predictive Model for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, S. Williams

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of pedagogical, technical, and institutional profile factors in an institution of higher education's decision to select an open-source learning management system (LMS). Drawing on the results of previous research that measured patterns of deployment of open-source software (OSS) in US higher education and…

  1. Teacher Views on School Administrators' Organizational Power Sources and Their Change Management Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argon, Türkan; Dilekçi, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine school administrators' organizational power sources and change management behaviours based on Bolu central district primary and secondary school teachers' views. The study conducted with relational screening model reached 286 teachers. School Administrators' Organizational Power Sources Scale and Change Management…

  2. The status quo, problems and improvements pertaining to radiation source management in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jiaqi

    1998-01-01

    Early in 1930s, radiation sources were used in medicine in China, and since then their application has been widely extended in a variety of fields. This paper presents a brief outline of the status quo, problems on management for radiation sources, and some relevant improvements as recommended by author are also included in it. (author)

  3. Managing carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning: Current practices in the Western United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by 15 electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without federal climate regulation in the US, the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of US electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

  4. Improving the Clinical Pharmacologic Assessment of Abuse Potential: Part 1: Regulatory Context and Risk Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Edward M

    2018-02-01

    This article brings to the attention of drug developers the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) recent final Guidance to Industry on Assessment of Abuse Potential and provides practical suggestions about compliance with the Guidance. The Guidance areas are reviewed, analyzed, and placed in the context of current scientific knowledge and best practices to mitigate regulatory risk. The Guidance provides substantial new detail on what needs to be done at all stages of drug development for central nervous system-active drugs. However, because many psychopharmacologic agents have unique preclinical and clinical features, the plan for each agent needs to be not only carefully prepared but also reviewed and approved by the FDA. Examples are provided where assumptions about interpretation of the Guidance can delay development. If the expertise and experience needed for assessing abuse potential during drug development do not exist within a company, external preclinical and clinical expert should be involved. Consultation with the FDA is encouraged and important because the specific requirements for each drug will vary.

  5. Management of source and drinking-water quality in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, J A

    2005-01-01

    Drinking-water quality in both urban and rural areas of Pakistan is not being managed properly. Results of various investigations provide evidence that most of the drinking-water supplies are faecally contaminated. At places groundwater quality is deteriorating due to the naturally occurring subsoil contaminants or to anthropogenic activities. The poor bacteriological quality of drinking-water has frequently resulted in high incidence of waterborne diseases while subsoil contaminants have caused other ailments to consumers. This paper presents a detailed review of drinking-water quality in the country and the consequent health impacts. It identifies various factors contributing to poor water quality and proposes key actions required to ensure safe drinking-water supplies to consumers.

  6. Endangered Butterflies as a Model System for Managing Source Sink Dynamics on Department of Defense Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    used three species of endangered butterflies as a model system to rigorously investigate the source-sink dynamics of species being managed on military...lands. Butterflies have numerous advantages as models for source-sink dynamics , including rapid generation times and relatively limited dispersal, but...they are subject to the same processes that determine source-sink dynamics of longer-lived, more vagile taxa.1.2 Technical Approach: For two of our

  7. Challenges for Knowledge Management in the Context of IT Global Sourcing Models Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Perechuda , Kazimierz; Sobińska , Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Part 2: Models and Functioning of Knowledge Management; International audience; The article gives a literature overview of the current challenges connected with the implementation of the newest IT sourcing models. In the dynamic environment, organizations are required to build their competitive advantage not only on their own resources, but also on resources commissioned from external providers, accessed through various forms of sourcing, including the sourcing of IT services. This paper pres...

  8. Legislation and water management of water source areas of São Paulo Metropolitan Region, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Gregolin Grisotto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the history of occupation in the water source areas in São Paulo Metropolitan Region (hereinafter SPMR and the evolution of the legislation related to this issue, from the point of view of the environmental and water management. A descriptive methodology was used, with searches into bibliographical and documental materials, in order to present the main laws for the protection of the water supply areas of SPMR and environmental and water management. It was possible to observe some progress in the premises of the both legislation and the format proposed for the management of the water source areas. However, such progress is limited due to the lack of a more effective mechanism for metropolitan management. The construction of the metropolitan management in SPMR would enlarge the capacity of integration between municipalities and sectors. The integration between the management of water and the land use management showed to be fundamental for the protection of the water sources. The new law for protection of the water sources, State Law nº 9.866/97, is decentralized and participative, focusing on non-structural actions and integrated management. However, the effective implementation of the law still depends on the harmonization of sectoral public policies, extensive coordination and cooperation among municipalities and the progress in the degree of the commitment of the governments.

  9. Proceedings of the international conference on hazardous waste sources, effects and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The publication has been set up as a textbook for training course dealing with hazardous waste sources, effects and management. Vol.1: (1)national policy; (2)waste management; (3)environment; (4)health hazards; vol.2: (1)monitoring and characterization; (2) migration; (3)storage and disposal; (4)treatment radioactive; vol.3: (1) Treatment; (2) recycling

  10. Proceedings of the international conference on hazardous waste sources, effects and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The publication has been set up as a textbook for training course dealing with hazardous waste sources, effects and management. Vol.1: (1)national policy; (2)waste management; (3)environment; (4)health hazards; vol.2: (1)monitoring and characterization; (2) migration; (3)storage and disposal; (4)treatment radioactive; vol.3: (1) Treatment; (2) recycling.

  11. Tactics at the category level of purchasing and supply management: sourcing levers, contingencies and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesping, Frank

    2015-01-01

    For the ‘front-line’ purchasing agent, it is obvious that not all categories of products and supplier relationships should be managed in the same way. Rather, in a modern category management approach, firms group similar products into ‘sourcing categories’ forming coherent supply markets (e.g.,

  12. A Self-Regulatory Approach to Classroom Management: Empowering Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, M. Kay; MacDonald, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Development of motivation and self-regulated learning skills can take classroom management beyond the role of maintaining order in the classroom to empower students and teachers for lifetime learning. The authors describe self-regulated learning, student strategies, and the classroom structure that supports motivation and self-regulation.

  13. Nuclear power plant decommissioning and radioactive waste management in the U.K.. A regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.M.

    1993-01-01

    Effective control of the decommissioning and radioactive waste management of nuclear power plant in United Kingdom are introduced. The Government established the legislative framework and national strategy, operators provided the necessary skills and equipment for implementation, and the regulators used the legislative controls to ensure a safe system of work is achieved and maintained

  14. Cash Management, Revenue Sources and Cost Effective Methods of Revenue Collection at Local Government Level

    OpenAIRE

    Mustapha Gimba Kumshe; Kagu Bukar

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this paper was to focus on the elements, objectives, goals and importance of cash management; and also to examine the sources of revenue and cost effective collections for local governments. The elements of cash management are identified as establishing bank relations, preparing cash flow statements, estimating collection receipts and analyzing cash flow and preparing a budget. Amongst the objectives of cash management is to ensure availability of cash resources at all t...

  15. Systematic management of sealed source and nucleonic counting system in field service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadi Mustapha; Mohd Fitri Abdul Rahman; Jaafar Abdullah

    2005-01-01

    PAT group have received a lot of service from the oil and gas plant. All the services use sealed source and nucleonic counting system. This paper described the detail of management before going to the field service. This management is important to make sure the job is smoothly done and safe to the radiation worker and public. Furthermore this management in line with the regulation from LPTA. (Author)

  16. Open source identity management patterns and practices using OpenAM 10.x

    CERN Document Server

    Kenning, Waylon

    2013-01-01

    This is a Packt Mini in a tutorial format that provides multiple examples on Identity Management using OpenAM 10.x.Open Source Identity Management Patterns and Practices Using OpenAM 10.x is great for developers and architects who are new to Identity Management, and who want a brief overview of what's possible and how to quickly implement a prototype. It's assumed that you've had experience with web applications and some knowledge of Apache and Tomcat.

  17. Nitrogen in the environment: sources, problems, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, R F; Hatfield, J L

    2001-10-30

    Nitrogen (N) is applied worldwide to produce food. It is in the atmosphere, soil, and water and is essential to all life. N for agriculture includes fertilizer, biologically fixed, manure, recycled crop residue, and soil-mineralized N. Presently, fertilizer N is a major source of N, and animal manure N is inefficiently used. Potential environmental impacts of N excreted by humans are increasing rapidly with increasing world populations. Where needed, N must be efficiently used because N can be transported immense distances and transformed into soluble and/or gaseous forms that pollute water resources and cause greenhouse effects. Unfortunately, increased amounts of gaseous N enter the environment as N2O to cause greenhouse warming and as NH3 to shift ecological balances of natural ecosystems. Large amounts of N are displaced with eroding sediments in surface waters. Soluble N in runoff or leachate water enters streams, rivers, and groundwater. High-nitrate drinking water can cause methemoglobinemia, while nitrosamines are associated with various human cancers. We describe the benefits, but also how N in the wrong form or place results in harmful effects on humans and animals, as well as to ecological and environmental systems.

  18. Nitrogen in the Environment: Sources, Problems, and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Follett

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is applied worldwide to produce food. It is in the atmosphere, soil, and water and is essential to all life. N for agriculture includes fertilizer, biologically fixed, manure, recycled crop residue, and soil-mineralized N. Presently, fertilizer N is a major source of N, and animal manure N is inefficiently used. Potential environmental impacts of N excreted by humans are increasing rapidly with increasing world populations. Where needed, N must be efficiently used because N can be transported immense distances and transformed into soluble and/or gaseous forms that pollute water resources and cause greenhouse effects. Unfortunately, increased amounts of gaseous N enter the environment as N2O to cause greenhouse warming and as NH3 to shift ecological balances of natural ecosystems. Large amounts of N are displaced with eroding sediments in surface waters. Soluble N in runoff or leachate water enters streams, rivers, and groundwater. High-nitrate drinking water can cause methemoglobinemia, while nitrosamines are associated with various human cancers. We describe the benefits, but also how N in the wrong form or place results in harmful effects on humans and animals, as well as to ecological and environmental systems.

  19. Sources and management of hazardous waste in Papua New Guinea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K. [Univ. of Papua New Guinea (Papua New Guinea)

    1996-12-31

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) has considerable mineral wealth, especially in gold and copper. Large-scale mining takes place, and these activities are the source of most of PNG`s hazardous waste. Most people live in small farming communities throughout the region. Those living adjacent to mining areas have experienced some negative impacts from river ecosystem damage and erosion of their lands. Industry is centered mainly in urban areas and Generates waste composed of various products. Agricultural products, pesticide residues, and chemicals used for preserving timber and other forestry products also produce hazardous waste. Most municipal waste comes from domestic and commercial premises; it consists mainly of combustibles, noncombustibles, and other wastes. Hospitals generate pathogenic organisms, radioactive materials, and chemical and pharmaceutical laboratory waste. Little is known about the actual treatment of waste before disposal in PNG. Traditional low-cost waste disposal methods are usually practiced, such as use of landfills; storage in surface impoundments; and disposal in public sewers, rivers, and the sea. Indiscriminate burning of domestic waste in backyards is also commonly practiced in urban and rural areas. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. Tactics at the category level of purchasing and supply management: sourcing levers, contingencies and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Hesping, Frank

    2015-01-01

    For the ‘front-line’ purchasing agent, it is obvious that not all categories of products and supplier relationships should be managed in the same way. Rather, in a modern category management approach, firms group similar products into ‘sourcing categories’ forming coherent supply markets (e.g., ‘metal sheets’, ‘leather’, ‘displays’, ‘cables’, etc.). Thus, to achieve cost reduction targets, a tailored mix of tactical sourcing levers for each sourcing category may be required. The fundamental q...

  1. Lessons Learned from Characterization, Performance Assessment, and EPA Regulatory Review of the 1996 Actinide Source Term for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, K.W.; Moore, R.C.; Nowak, E.J.; Papenguth, H.W.; Jow, H.

    1999-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility for the permanent disposal of transuranic waste from defense activities. In 1996, the DOE submitted the Title 40 CFR Part 191 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The CCA included a probabilistic performance assessment (PA) conducted by Sandia National Laboratories to establish compliance with the quantitative release limits defined in 40 CFR 191.13. An experimental program to collect data relevant to the actinide source term began around 1989, which eventually supported the 1996 CCA PA actinide source term model. The actinide source term provided an estimate of mobile dissolved and colloidal Pu, Am, U, Th, and Np concentrations in their stable oxidation states, and accounted for effects of uncertainty in the chemistry of brines in waste disposal areas. The experimental program and the actinide source term included in the CCA PA underwent EPA review lasting more than 1 year. Experiments were initially conducted to develop data relevant to the wide range of potential future conditions in waste disposal areas. Interim, preliminary performance assessments and actinide source term models provided insight allowing refinement of experiments and models. Expert peer review provided additional feedback and confidence in the evolving experimental program. By 1995, the chemical database and PA predictions of WIPP performance were considered reliable enough to support the decision to add an MgO backfill to waste rooms to control chemical conditions and reduce uncertainty in actinide concentrations, especially for Pu and Am. Important lessons learned through the characterization, PA modeling, and regulatory review of the actinide source term are (1) experimental characterization and PA should evolve together, with neither activity completely dominating the other, (2) the understanding of physical processes

  2. T Plant source aggregate area management study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989, included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980. Inclusion on the NPL initiates the Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) process for characterizing the nature and extent of contamination, assessing risks to human health and the environment, and selection of remedial actions. This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the T Plant Aggregate Area located in the 200 Areas. The study provides the basis for initiating RI/FS under CERCLA or under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS). This report also integrates RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations

  3. Z Plant source aggregate area management study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State is or into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989, included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980. Inclusion on the NPL initiates the Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) process for characterizing the nature and extent of contamination, assessing risks to human health and the environment, and selection of remedial actions. This report presents the insults of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the Z Plant Aggregate Area located m the 200 Areas. The study provides the basis for initiating RIIFS under CERCLA or under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS). This report also integrates RCRA treatment, storage, or disposed (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations

  4. U Plant source aggregate area management study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989, included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980. Inclusion on the NPL initiates the Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) process for characterizing the nature and extent of contamination, assessing risks to human health and the environment, and selection of remedial actions. This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the U Plant Aggregate Area located in the 200 Areas. The study provides the basis for initiating RI/FS under CERCLA or under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS). This report also integrates RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations

  5. Power generation, energy management and environmental source book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    1992-01-01

    The 14th World Energy Engineering Congress (WEEC) and the companion World Environmental Engineering Congress, October 23-25, 1991, Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, reflect the myriad of forces impacting on our industry. Energy conservation is once again in vogue. To reflect how the industry is changing, the Association of Energy Engineers (AEE) conducted its 1991 member survey. Fifty-six percent of the 762 responses revealed that energy awareness has increased over the last year. Purchasing activities for energy products will be brisk in the next twelve months: 78% plan to upgrade controls for efficiency improvement, 72% plan to install lighting efficiency products, and 63% plan to add or install energy management systems. Issues causing these energy conversation activities as well as solution are presented in this report. This year's WEEC prepares attendees for the energy and environmental challenges ahead. This current, document is a comprehensive up-to-the-minute reference. Based on the WEEC, it includes the latest methodologies used to improve efficiency and lower operating costs, plus new factors such as indoor air quality. CFC reduction and emission control technologies which must be addressed to stay competitive in the 1990s. For fourteen years, the World Energy Engineering Congress has provided the essential forum for industry. The sharing of information is important to the continued growth of the energy engineering profession. The 100 papers in this reference are abstracted and entered individually into EDB

  6. Study and Analysis of an Intelligent Microgrid Energy Management Solution with Distributed Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaminathan Ganesan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a robust energy management solution which will facilitate the optimum and economic control of energy flows throughout a microgrid network is proposed. The increased penetration of renewable energy sources is highly intermittent in nature; the proposed solution demonstrates highly efficient energy management. This study enables precise management of power flows by forecasting of renewable energy generation, estimating the availability of energy at storage batteries, and invoking the appropriate mode of operation, based on the load demand to achieve efficient and economic operation. The predefined mode of operation is derived out of an expert rule set and schedules the load and distributed energy sources along with utility grid.

  7. Managing the risks of legacy radioactive sources from a security perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Mark; Murray, Allan

    2008-01-01

    The safety and security risk posed by highly radioactive, long-lived sources at the end of their normal use has not been consistently well-managed in previous decades. The Brazilian Cs-137 accident in 1986 and the Thailand Co-60 accident in 2000 are prime examples of the consequences that ensue from the loss of control of highly dangerous sources after their normal use. With the new international emphasis on security of radioactive sources throughout their life cycle, there is now further incentive to address the management of risks posed by legacy, highly dangerous radioactive sources. The ANSTO South-East Asia Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) Project has identified, and is addressing, a number of legacy situations that have arisen as a result of inadequate management practices in the past. Specific examples are provided of these legacy situations and the lessons learned for managing the consequent safety and security risk, and for future complete life-cycle management of highly radioactive sources. (author)

  8. Sources and types of information on self-care symptom management strategies for HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regis R. Marie Modeste

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been reported that South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV worldwide, with more women being infected than men. Women living with HIV have been documented as experiencing various symptoms related to HIV and use various strategies to manage these symptoms. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the sources and types of information regarding self-care symptom management strategies received by women living with HIV. Method: The study was conducted at an HIV clinic in an urban area of KwaZulu-Natal. Individual in-depth interviews were completed with 11 women who were living with HIV,exploring the sources of information received on how they manage the HIV- (and/or AIDS- related symptoms they experienced as well as the types of information received. The collecteddata were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The participants identified various sources, which mainly included groups of people who provided them with information on how to manage their HIV-related symptoms, namely healthcare providers, their personal networks and the community. The different sources offered different types of information, including the use of medication, complementary treatments and self-comforting activities. Conclusion: The study highlights that participants used multiple sources to get information about how to manage the experienced symptoms related to HIV, namely, healthcare providers, family and friends as well as themselves. It is to be noted that each source provided a preferred type of information.

  9. Status of the Japan's regulatory policy on radioactive waste management. Cleanup and recycling issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Daiji

    1995-01-01

    Wastes from nuclear facilities are very diversified concerning that have different levels of radioactivity and include different kinds of radioactive materials. Besides some of those waste is not assumed as radioactive waste. The basic policy of the radioactive waste management is taking that diversity into full account for appropriate separate management of different types of radioactive waste and treatment and disposal of each type in a rational manner, including recycling. From the point, the disposal methods are considered or under consideration to that waste, (1) from nuclear reactor facility, (2) from nuclear fuel cycle facility--HLW, waste contaminated TRU nuclides, or contaminated uranium, (3) from RI utilization or research institute, and (4) from decommissioning of nuclear facility. Now in Japan, regulation framework for some kind of LLW from reactor facility, including waste from decommissioning of reactor is established. (J.P.N.)

  10. The regulatory role of the state strategic management in the development of the regional entrepreneurial sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukhneva Nina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The system of state strategic management (SGSO today is an Outpost of the state, exercising the functions of strategic management, development and predicates, and conducting an evaluation of the effectiveness and quality of the planned trajectories of economic development of the regions, regions and the state as a whole. It SGSW today is designed to ensure that the nationally oriented domestic policies that contribute to progressive and bold actions of the Russian Federation on the world stage. SHSU today is to create conditions for the development of science, research training, new knowledge-based economy. SHSU should form a system of state orders, which is of fundamental importance for the development of strategic projects in the field of medicine and health, agriculture, defense industry, etc. And, most importantly, SHSU needs today and support the process of re-industrialization of the country, technical re-equipment of all areas of production and management. In the new knowledge economy SHSU performs the role of the intellectual and information center regulation and strategic planning of development of the entire socio-economic sphere of the society centre to ensure the development of a database of fundamental and applied research, development, centre, guaranteeing the protection of copyright and introduction of innovative products, including new technical and technological solutions.

  11. Requirement Management between Regulatory Framework and Dismantling Activities for Decommissioning of a Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.S.; Jin, H.G.; Hong, Y.J.; Choi, J.W.; Park, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The decommissioning and environmental remediation (D&ER) projects require stepwise long-term research and development (R&D) such as a shutdown, transition, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities, radioactive waste management, and site restoration. During each step of the D&ER projects, a significant amount of information and knowledge such as experimental data, databases, design drawings, technical reports, guidelines, operation manuals, and modeling and simulation reports are produced. Knowledge based on experiences by staff members participating in each step of the D&ER project are also very important. Such knowledge based on experiences may disappear with the retirement of staff members if there are no effective and systematic approaches for its acquisition and storage. Therefore, to perform the D&ER project successfully, it is necessary to preserve written theses and experiences systematically. The integrated knowledge management system (KMS) for the D&ER projects have never been developed. Therefore, the establishment of an integrated KMS is necessary for the effective performance of D&ER projects. This study introduces a decommissioning procedure requirement management system as a part of the KMS related to the D&ER projects. (author

  12. Reduction of Radioactive Waste Through the Reuse and Recycle Policy of the Sealed Radioactive Sources Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Marpaung

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, the utilization of sealed source for medical, industrial and research purposes has shown an accelerating increase. This situation will lead to increases in the amount of sealed radioactive. During its use, a sealed radioactive waste will eventually become either a spent sealed source or disused sealed radioactive source (DSRS, due to certain factors. The reduction of the amount of radioactive waste can be executed through the application of reuse and recycle of sealed source. The reuse and recycle policy for spent and disused sealed sources are not already specified yet. The reuse of spent sealed sources can be applied only for the sources which had been used in the medical field for radiotherapy, namely the reuse of a teletherapy Co-60 source in a calibration facility. The recycle of a spent sealed source can be performed for radioactive sources with relatively high activities and long half-lives; however, the recycling activity may only be performed by the manufacturer. To avoid legal conflicts, in the amendment to the Government Regulation No.27 Year 2002 on Management of Radioactive Waste, there will be a recommendation for a new scheme in the management of radioactive waste to facilitate the application of the principles of reduce, reuse, and recycle

  13. Reduction of Radioactive Waste Through the Reuse and Recycle Policy of the Sealed Radioactive Sources Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marpaung, T.

    2012-01-01

    In the past few years, the utilization of sealed source for medical, industrial and research purposes has shown an accelerating increase. This situation will lead to increases in the amount of sealed radioactive. During its use, a sealed radioactive waste will eventually become either a spent sealed source or disused sealed radioactive source (DSRS), due to certain factors. The reduction of the amount of radioactive waste can be executed through the application of reuse and recycle of sealed source. The reuse and recycle policy for spent and disused sealed sources are not already specified yet. The reuse of spent sealed sources can be applied only for the sources which had been used in the medical field for radiotherapy, namely the reuse of a teletherapy Co-60 source in a calibration facility. The recycle of a spent sealed source can be performed for radioactive sources with relatively high activities and long half-lives; however, the recycling activity may only be performed by the manufacturer. To avoid legal conflicts, in the amendment to the Government Regulation No.27 Year 2002 on Management of Radioactive Waste, there will be a recommendation for a new scheme in the management of radioactive waste to facilitate the application of the principles of reduce, reuse, and recycle (author)

  14. Facility specialists and inspectorate staff of the nuclear regulatory authority training in the field of management systems in compliance with the latest IAEA standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapralov, E.; Kapralov, Y.; Kozlov, V.; Filimonov, G.

    2007-01-01

    A problem of reducing a human factor negative influence reduction upon nuclear safety should be solved on the whole at the expense of introducing integrated management systems with a comprehensive application of regulatory control, training and inspections. This paper covers FSUE VO Safety and Training and Methodical Center of Nuclear and Radiation Safety approach towards training matters, which is one of the key factors in implementing quality and safety management systems. (author)

  15. Implementation of the quality management system in the regulatory body (Peruvian Institute for Nuclear Energy, Lima, Peru)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, E.

    2013-01-01

    One of the functions of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN), Lima, Peru is the control of sources of ionizing radiation. For this, they have the Oficina Tecnica de la Autoridad Nacional (OTAN) which has the necessary infrastructure to issue technical standards, conducting inspections, issuing authorizations and punish according to the existing legislation. OTAN has decided to address this issue and is taking into account the IAEA recommendations, especially the Safety Requirements GS-R-3: Management System facilities and activities and offering advice on the establishment and improvement of integrated management systems, including safety requirements that are not in the ISO 9001 standard and are also considered the requirements of technological safety, security, quality, economic, environmental and health. The working plan is detailed and the activities that are carried out after the scientific visit to a regulator organ, which has experience in the execution of a Quality Management System, consequence of a work initiated for more than four decades ago

  16. Regulatory inspection practices for radioactive and non-radioactive waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Amitava

    2017-01-01

    Management of nuclear waste plays an important role in the nuclear energy programme of the country. India has adopted the Closed Fuel Cycle option, where the spent nuclear fuel is treated as a material of resource and the nuclear waste is wealth. Closed fuel cycle aims at recovery and recycle of valuable nuclear materials in to reactors as fuel and also separation of useful radio isotopes for the use in health care, agriculture and industry. India has taken a lead role in the waste management activities and has reached a level of maturity over a period of more than forty decades. The nuclear waste management primarily comprises of waste characterization, segregation, conditioning, treatment, immobilization of radionuclides in stable and solid matrices and interim retrievable storage of conditioned solid waste under surveillance. The waste generated in a nuclear facility is in the form of liquid and solid, and it's classification depends on the content of radioactivity. The liquid waste is characterized as Low level (LLW), Intermediate level (ILW) and High Level (HLW). The LLW is relatively large in volume and much lesser radioactive. The LLW is subjected to chemical precipitation using various chemicals based on the radionuclides present, followed by filtration, settling, ion exchange and cement fixation. The conditioning and treatment processes of ILW uses ion exchange, alkali hydrolysis for spent solvent, phase separation and immobilization in cement matrix. The High Level Waste (HLW), generated during spent fuel reprocessing and containing more than 99 percent of the total radioactivity is first subjected to volume reduction/concentration by evaporation and then vitrified in a meIter using borosilicate glass. Presently, Joule Heated Ceramic Meter is used in India for Vitrification process. Vitrified waste products (VWP) are stored for interim period in a multibarrier, air cooled facility under surveillance

  17. Development of regulatory guide for review of aging management of the operating NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Tae Myung; Lee, Jae Kyung [Cheongju Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ryul [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    This is the final report of the second year study. Based on the first year study, proposal of revised guidelines, analysis of revised or newly issued IAEA safety guides and reference guidelines of developed countries, and proposal of detailed guidelines of aging management in PSR have been performed in the second year study. The summary of results in the study so far can be summarized as below, overall view on PSR and idea of effective domestic application were leaded through additional investigation and comparison of legal basis, experiences and current status of PSR implementation among the countries having operating NPPs including Korea. Strategies of adequate application of PSR are roughly reevaluated and totally reestablished in summary from the analysis in factor by factor basis of PSR implementation experience in foreign countries and background of IAEA guidelines. Models and draft framework of PSR report in the first year study were summarized and reevaluated, and structure and outline options of PSR guidelines for judging the PSR report are newly proposed with comparison of their strengths and weaknesses based on the first year study. Among the opt ions, guidelines framework equivalent to the PSR report was picked up as the best. For the judgement of aging management, the most appropriate one was chosen for the detailed judgement of aging management review in our PSR being based on the Standard Review Plan for License Renewal (SRP-LR) in United States considering potential future usage in the judgement for continued operation of old NPP at the time of expiration of its design life. A draft PSR guidelines is prepared and attached by revision of basic guidelines issued in 2000, considering the issues discussed for the draft revision of IAEA PSR guide, the draft IAEA document about 'experience of PSR implementation of member states', and the characteristics of Hungarian PSR Guidelines.

  18. Management of Spent Sealed Radioactive Sources in Central and Eastern Europe (Czech Rep., Estonia, Hungary, Poland and Slovenia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, M.J.; Moreton, A.D.; Wells, D.A.

    2001-04-01

    This study has been performed to consider the situation relating to the regulation and management of spent sealed radioactive sources (SSRS) in five central and Eastern European (C and EE) countries currently being considered for admission to the EU: the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Poland and Slovenia. The general aim of this study has been to acquire a thorough understanding of the management of SSRS in these five countries, in order to recommend improvements in management schemes and to establish whether the application of common disposal criteria would be advantageous. This report is structured in the following manner; following the Introduction (Section 1), there is description of current and proposed regulatory requirements in the EU, together with a summarised comparison of the regulatory systems in C and EE countries with EU standards in Section 2. Sections 3 to 7 are dedicated to the situation in each of the five countries. Each of these sections is similarly sub-divided to enable country-by-country and topic-by-topic comparison. In each of Sections 3 to 7 there is an overview, description of the sealed source inventory, regulations, current management practices, retrieval of unregistered SSRS, conclusions and a description of possible future technical assistance projects. Section 8 brings together a summary of the situation in each country, with conclusions and both country-specific and generic recommendations. A common concern in the five countries and also in existing EU member states is the problem of accidental inclusion of SSRS in consignments of scrap-metal. The detection of radioactive material at entrances to scrap metal facilities and at national borders has therefore received considerable attention in recent years. Practical issues regarding the detection of SSRS in scrap metal are described in Appendix A. None of the five countries considered in this report have any plans to develop regional disposal facilities and no specific common

  19. IT Management Model for Financial Report Issuance and Regulatory and Legal Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rogério Poggio Moreira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of information systems for financial report issuance must be adherent to the demands of the law and regulations that regulate the financial market. In order to perform this task, organizations need to implement control in the Information Technology (IT area to maintain their systems´ conformity to laws and regulations. In the development of this work, it was found, through a state-of-art study, that there are no proposals contemplating the solution of this problem in its totality. In order to achieve this goal, in this paper it is presented a model for Information Technology management constituted by COBIT, ITIL and BPM management good practices, together with SOA and XBRL Technologies. This model is composed by 03 layers that aim at structuring the organization IT and business processes, besides defining a process for implementing SOA and integrating its Web services with XBRL language. One can expect this work to contribute to companies to decrease the negative impact coming from the lack of conformity with laws and regulations, through the creation of a corporative and IT environment that is flexible and more adaptable to changes, which may occur in legal demands, as well as improving the quality and reliability of financial report issuance.

  20. Laypeoples' preferred sources of health information on the emergency management of tooth avulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sane, Mona; Bourisly, Nibal; Almulla, Taghreed; Andersson, Lars

    2011-12-01

    When planning nationwide information campaigns on the emergency management of tooth avulsion, the populations' preference to different modes of information delivery should be taken into consideration. We currently lack information on that. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess laypeoples' preferred sources of information on the emergency management of tooth avulsion. This was a joint study undertaken by experts in media and experts in dental traumatology. Interview-assisted questionnaires were conducted on a sample of 579 adults from Kuwait. Subjects were asked to choose their three preferred sources of information on the emergency management of tooth avulsion. Subjects' responses and sociodemographic data were registered. The data were descriptively analyzed, and a chi-square test was used to assess the relation of the subjects' preferences to their registered demographics. The Internet, health care professionals, and TV were the three most preferred sources of information on the emergency management of tooth avulsion across all groups, regardless of the sociodemographic characteristics. Younger adults, singles and subjects with higher education significantly preferred the Internet. Older adults preferred TV. Family was a preferred source in geographic districts populated with extended families, while friends were a preferred source in geographic districts populated by expatriates. Younger people and those with higher education can be effectively targeted through the Internet, while it is more effective to target older people through TV. Information, on tooth avulsion management, given by health care professionals is preferred across all population segments. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Survey by senior NRC management to obtain veiwpoints on the safety impact of regulatory activities from representative utilities operating and constructing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    A survey of licensee staff members representing the several organizational elements in different licensee corporate and plant staffs was conducted by senior NRC management to obtain licensee views on the potential safety consequences and impact of NRC regulatory activities. The comments received addressed the full scope of NRC activities and the negative impact of agency actions on licensee resources, staff performance, planning and scheduling, and organizational effectiveness. The findings of the survey is that the pace and nature of regulatory actions have created a potential safety problem which deserves further evaluation by the agency

  2. Low-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear reactors. Volume 3. Bibliographic abstracts of significant source references. Part 2. Bibliography for treatment, storage, disposal and transportation regulatory constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolley, R.L.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1986-05-01

    The overall task of this program was to provide an assessment of currently available technology for treating commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), to initiate development of a methodology for choosing one technology for a given application, and to identify research needed to improve current treatment techniques and decision methodology. The resulting report is issued in four volumes. Volume 3 of this series is a collection of abstracts of most of the reference documents used for this study. Because of the large volume of literature, the abstracts have been printed in two separate parts. Federal, state, and local regulations affect the decision process for selecting technology applications. Regulations may favor a particular technology and may prevent application of others. Volume 3, part 2 presents abstracts of the regulatory constraint documents that relate to all phases of LLRW management (e.g., treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal).

  3. Optimal energy efficiency policies and regulatory demand-side management tests: How well do they match?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Under conventional models, subsidizing energy efficiency requires electricity to be priced below marginal cost. Its benefits increase when electricity prices increase to finance the subsidy. With high prices, subsidies are counterproductive unless consumers fail to make efficiency investments when private benefits exceed costs. If the gain from adopting efficiency is only reduced electricity spending, capping revenues from energy sales may induce a utility to substitute efficiency for generation when the former is less costly. This goes beyond standard 'decoupling' of distribution revenues from sales, requiring complex energy price regulation. The models' results are used to evaluate tests in the 2002 California Standard Practice Manual for assessing demand-side management programs. Its 'Ratepayer Impact Measure' test best conforms to the condition that electricity price is too low. Its 'Total Resource Cost' and 'Societal Cost' tests resemble the condition for expanded decoupling. No test incorporates optimality conditions apart from consumer choice failure.

  4. Application of international recommendations and guidance on low level radioactive waste management and remediation of contaminated land at the national level: Experience of regulatory support in Northwest Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, M.; Smith, G.M.; Kerrigan, E

    2005-01-01

    This paper notes the developments in international recommendations on radioactive waste management and remediation of contaminated land and considers their implementation in the context of the Norwegian Plan of Action to improve nuclear safety in North West Russia. Summary information is provided on projects to implement waste management activities (so-called Industrial Projects) and on projects to support regulatory supervision of waste management activities (so-called Regulatory Support Projects). The links between international recommendations and national practice are discussed and it is concluded that, in practice, the details of national standards differ both among themselves and, in some respects, from the recommendations of the ICRP and IAEA. Examples of further potential collaboration projects are listed. While separate responsibilities among organisations have to clear and maintained, combined involvement of operators and regulators is recognised as a prioritised area in future cooperation between NRPA and Russia. (author)

  5. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  6. International regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    Among international regulatory activities we find resolutions adopted by the IAEA general conference (2003), through European Union we find proposals for directives on nuclear safety and radioactive waste management, new regulation on the application of EURATOM safeguards, control of high activity sealed radioactive sources, recommendation on the protection and information of the public with regard to the continued contamination of certain wild food products following the Chernobyl accident, proposals for decisions authorizing the Member states to sign and ratify the Protocol to amend the Paris convention, p)proposals for a directive on environment liability with regard to the prevention and remedying of environmental damage, proposal of a regulation on the law applicable to non-contractual obligation. (N.C.)

  7. Supply risk management functions of sourcing intermediaries – an investigation of the clothing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Mette; Ellegaard, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to uncover how buying companies use sourcing intermediaries to manage supply risks in global sourcing. Design/methodology/approach: We carry out an explorative qualitative study of the clothing industry, interviewing key respondents that occupy different...... intermediary types, characterised by the set of functions they handle. Research limitations/implications: By analysing a limited set of in-depth interviews in one industry we have traded off broader analytical generalization for in-depth exploration and theory building. Therefore, future research should test...... by identifying the supply risk management functions that sourcing intermediaries carry out for buying companies. We also contribute by uncovering different types of sourcing intermediaries, determined by the collection of functions handled....

  8. Non point source pollution modelling in the watershed managed by Integrated Conctructed Wetlands: A GIS approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Vyavahare, Nilesh

    2008-01-01

    The non-point source pollution has been recognised as main cause of eutrophication in Ireland (EPA Ireland, 2001). Integrated Constructed Wetland (ICW) is a management practice adopted in Annestown stream watershed, located in the south county of Waterford in Ireland, used to cleanse farmyard runoff. Present study forms the annual pollution budget for the Annestown stream watershed. The amount of pollution from non-point sources flowing into the stream was simulated by using GIS techniques; u...

  9. A THEORETICAL MODEL OF SUPPORTING OPEN SOURCE FRONT END INNOVATION THROUGH IDEA MANAGEMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth

    2013-01-01

    to overcome these various challenges companies are looking for new models to support FEI. This theoretical paper explores in what way idea management may be applied as a tool in facilitation of front end innovation and how this facilitation may be captured in a conceptual model. First, I show through...... a literature study, how idea management and front end innovation are related and how they may support each other. Secondly, I present a theoretical model of how idea management may be applied in support of the open source front end of new product innovations. Thirdly, I present different venues of further...... exploration of active facilitation of open source front end innovation through idea management....

  10. Regulatory controls on the hydrogeological characterization of a mixed waste disposal site, Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebelmann, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Following the detection of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in the groundwater beneath the SDA in the summer of 1987, hydrogeological characterization of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The waste site, the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), is the subject of a RCRA Corrective Action Program. Regulatory requirements for the Corrective Action Program dictate a phased approach to evaluation of the SDA. In the first phase of the program, the SDA is the subject of a RCRA Facility Investigation (RIF), which will obtain information to fully characterize the physical properties of the site, determine the nature and extent of contamination, and identify pathways for migration of contaminants. If the need for corrective measures is identified during the RIF, a Corrective Measures Study (CMS) will be performed as second phase. Information generated during the RIF will be used to aid in the selection and implementation of appropriate corrective measures to correct the release. Following the CMS, the final phase is the implementation of the selected corrective measures. 4 refs., 1 fig

  11. Development of the regulatory guide on the management of aging for the operating NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Tae Myung; Lee, Jae Kyung; Byeon, Chang Soo; Kim, Hyo Soo; Kim, Young Ryul; Eun, Hui Kwang

    2000-03-01

    this is the first final report, and it includes the analysis of PSR regulation status for the operating NPP of foreign countries and thus established scope and method of Korean PSR. The detailed requirements of aging management, as one of the most important factors, is planned to be dealt in the second final report, The result of study so far can be summarized as below, The necessity and feasibility of domestic PSR application is confirmed through the investigation, comparison and review of PSR implementation and regulation status in foreign countries, And, detailed analysis of vaseline guidelines of IAEA performed to establish a skeleton of desirable safety review guideline for Korean NPP. Our own objectives, scope and strategy of review for PWR are roughly set up form factor by factor analysis of PSR implementation experience in foreign countries and background of IAEA guidelines. The essential elements of review for each PSR safety factors are classified and proposed. For efficient review of proposed safety factors and elements, three different option of framework for PSR guidelines are proposed and compared. Through analysis of strength safety factors and elements, three different options of framework for PSR guidelines are proposed and compared. Through analysis of strength and weakness of the three optional frameworks proposed for Korean PSR guideline, the third one is recommended as the best for both owner and regulator. By maintaining the current framework of SAR at maximum and, at the same time, referring the basic concept of IAEA PSR guide, the detailed contents and its review elements are chosen. The standards on the aging was proposed preliminarily for the application of aging evaluation in PSR

  12. Development of the regulatory guide on the management of aging for the operating NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Tae Myung; Lee, Jae Kyung; Byeon, Chang Soo; Kim, Hyo Soo [Chungju Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ryul; Eun, Hui Kwang [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    this is the first final report, and it includes the analysis of PSR regulation status for the operating NPP of foreign countries and thus established scope and method of Korean PSR. The detailed requirements of aging management, as one of the most important factors, is planned to be dealt in the second final report, The result of study so far can be summarized as below, The necessity and feasibility of domestic PSR application is confirmed through the investigation, comparison and review of PSR implementation and regulation status in foreign countries, And, detailed analysis of vaseline guidelines of IAEA performed to establish a skeleton of desirable safety review guideline for Korean NPP. Our own objectives, scope and strategy of review for PWR are roughly set up form factor by factor analysis of PSR implementation experience in foreign countries and background of IAEA guidelines. The essential elements of review for each PSR safety factors are classified and proposed. For efficient review of proposed safety factors and elements, three different option of framework for PSR guidelines are proposed and compared. Through analysis of strength safety factors and elements, three different options of framework for PSR guidelines are proposed and compared. Through analysis of strength and weakness of the three optional frameworks proposed for Korean PSR guideline, the third one is recommended as the best for both owner and regulator. By maintaining the current framework of SAR at maximum and, at the same time, referring the basic concept of IAEA PSR guide, the detailed contents and its review elements are chosen. The standards on the aging was proposed preliminarily for the application of aging evaluation in PSR.

  13. FREEWAT: FREE and open source software tools for WATer resource management

    OpenAIRE

    Rossetto, Rudy; Borsi, Iacopo; Foglia, Laura

    2015-01-01

    FREEWAT is an HORIZON 2020 project financed by the EU Commission under the call WATER INNOVATION: BOOSTING ITS VALUE FOR EUROPE. FREEWAT main result will be an open source and public domain GIS integrated modelling environment for the simulation of water quantity and quality in surface water and groundwater with an integrated water management and planning module. FREEWAT aims at promoting water resource management by simplifying the application of the Water Framework Directive and other EU wa...

  14. Activities of the international atomic energy agency on management of disused radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilmos Friedrich; Miaw, S.T.W.

    2001-01-01

    The agency has implemented various activities on management of disused sealed sources for developing countries. The main types of activities are the following: 1. collection, review and publication of up-to-date information and guidance, conference and workshop proceedings; 2. developing and distributing management tools; 3. transfer of technology and know-how through training and other technical co-operation projects; 4. direct assistance to solve specific safety and technical problems

  15. Technical Evaluation Report 25: Open Source Software: Two learning management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Depow

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This report is the second in a two-part series about open source (OSS and free software (FS systems in online education. These are rapidly emerging as alternatives to costly proprietary learning management systems (LMS and content management systems (CMS. This report reviews two LMS systems and one CMS system, all developed on the OSS/ FS principle and available to users free of charge.

  16. Open source GIS based tools to improve hydrochemical water resources management in EU H2020 FREEWAT platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Rotman; Velasco, Violeta; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Nardi, Albert; Marazuela, Miguel A.; Rossetto, Rudy; Borsi, Iacopo; Foglia, Laura; Cannata, Massimiliano; De Filippis, Giovanna

    2017-04-01

    Due to the general increase of water scarcity (Steduto et al., 2012), water quantity and quality must be well known to ensure a proper access to water resources in compliance with local and regional directives. This circumstance can be supported by tools which facilitate process of data management and its analysis. Such analyses have to provide research/professionals, policy makers and users with the ability to improve the management of the water resources with standard regulatory guidelines. Compliance with the established standard regulatory guidelines (with a special focus on requirement deriving from the GWD) should have an effective monitoring, evaluation, and interpretation of a large number of physical and chemical parameters. These amounts of datasets have to be assessed and interpreted: (i) integrating data from different sources and gathered with different data access techniques and formats; (ii) managing data with varying temporal and spatial extent; (iii) integrating groundwater quality information with other relevant information such as further hydrogeological data (Velasco et al., 2014) and pre-processing these data generally for the realization of groundwater models. In this context, the Hydrochemical Analysis Tools, akvaGIS Tools, has been implemented within the H2020 FREEWAT project; which aims to manage water resources by modelling water resource management in an open source GIS platform (QGIS desktop). The main goal of AkvaGIS Tools is to improve water quality analysis through different capabilities to improve the case study conceptual model managing all data related into its geospatial database (implemented in Spatialite) and a set of tools for improving the harmonization, integration, standardization, visualization and interpretation of the hydrochemical data. To achieve that, different commands cover a wide range of methodologies for querying, interpreting, and comparing groundwater quality data and facilitate the pre-processing analysis for

  17. DUV light source availability improvement via further enhancement of gas management technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Daniel J.; O'Brien, Kevin; Brown, Daniel J. W.

    2011-04-01

    The continuous evolution of the semiconductor market necessitates ever-increasing improvements in DUV light source uptime as defined in the SEMI E10 standard. Cymer is developing technologies to exceed current and projected light source availability requirements via significant reduction in light source downtime. As an example, consider discharge chamber gas management functions which comprise a sizable portion of DUV light source downtime. Cymer's recent introduction of Gas Lifetime Extension (GLXTM) as a productivity improvement technology for its DUV lithography light sources has demonstrated noteworthy reduction in downtime. This has been achieved by reducing the frequency of full gas replenishment events from once per 100 million pulses to as low as once per 2 billion pulses. Cymer has continued to develop relevant technologies that target further reduction in downtime associated with light source gas management functions. Cymer's current subject is the development of technologies to reduce downtime associated with gas state optimization (e.g. total chamber gas pressure) and gas life duration. Current gas state optimization involves execution of a manual procedure at regular intervals throughout the lifetime of light source core components. Cymer aims to introduce a product enhancement - iGLXTM - that eliminates the need for the manual procedure and, further, achieves 4 billion pulse gas lives. Projections of uptime on DUV light sources indicate that downtime associated with gas management will be reduced by 70% when compared with GLX2. In addition to reducing downtime, iGLX reduces DUV light source cost of operation by constraining gas usage. Usage of fluorine rich Halogen gas mix has been reduced by 20% over GLX2.

  18. The UK's Surplus Source Disposal Programme: successful management of a national radioactive legacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Clive; Burns, Philip; Wakerley, Malcolm; Watson, Isabelle; Cook, Marianne; Moloney, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Between 2004 and 2009, the Surplus Source Disposal Programme (SSDP) arranged and subsidised the safe disposal or recycling of more than 11 000 unwanted radioactive items containing in total more than 8.5 x 10 14 Bq of activity, from some 500 sites throughout the United Kingdom. Sources were removed principally from universities, schools and colleges, museums, and hospitals. SSDP was funded by the UK Government and managed by the Environment Agency. The programme was delivered at a total cost of Pounds 7.14 million, nearly Pounds 2 million less than its initial budget. This was a big success for health and safety, the environment, business and the public purse. Current legislative requirements under the High Activity Sealed Sources Directive, which came into effect during 2005, will prevent a build-up of high activity surplus sources in future. Continuing vigilance may be needed to avoid a build-up of lower activity disused sources. (note)

  19. The UK's Surplus Source Disposal Programme: successful management of a national radioactive legacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Clive [Environment Agency, Block 1, Government Buildings, Burghill Road, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol BS10 6BF (United Kingdom); Burns, Philip [Formerly of the Environment Agency, Olton Court, 10 Warwick Road, Solihull B92 7HX (United Kingdom); Wakerley, Malcolm [Formerly of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Ergon House, 17 Smith Square, London SW1P 3JR (United Kingdom); Watson, Isabelle [Scottish Environment Protection Agency, 5 Redwood Crescent, Peel Park, East Kilbride G74 5PP (United Kingdom); Cook, Marianne [Scottish Government, Victoria Quay, Edinburgh EH6 6QQ (United Kingdom); Moloney, Barry [Safeguard International (now EnergySolutions), B168, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QT (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Between 2004 and 2009, the Surplus Source Disposal Programme (SSDP) arranged and subsidised the safe disposal or recycling of more than 11 000 unwanted radioactive items containing in total more than 8.5 x 10{sup 14} Bq of activity, from some 500 sites throughout the United Kingdom. Sources were removed principally from universities, schools and colleges, museums, and hospitals. SSDP was funded by the UK Government and managed by the Environment Agency. The programme was delivered at a total cost of Pounds 7.14 million, nearly Pounds 2 million less than its initial budget. This was a big success for health and safety, the environment, business and the public purse. Current legislative requirements under the High Activity Sealed Sources Directive, which came into effect during 2005, will prevent a build-up of high activity surplus sources in future. Continuing vigilance may be needed to avoid a build-up of lower activity disused sources. (note)

  20. An open-source job management framework for parameter-space exploration: OACIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Y.; Uchitane, T.; Ito, N.

    2017-11-01

    We present an open-source software framework for parameter-space exporation, named OACIS, which is useful to manage vast amount of simulation jobs and results in a systematic way. Recent development of high-performance computers enabled us to explore parameter spaces comprehensively, however, in such cases, manual management of the workflow is practically impossible. OACIS is developed aiming at reducing the cost of these repetitive tasks when conducting simulations by automating job submissions and data management. In this article, an overview of OACIS as well as a getting started guide are presented.