WorldWideScience

Sample records for source image display

  1. Three-dimensional display of magnetic source imaging (MSI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Takato; Yamamoto, Tomoya; Nishio, Shunji; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Fukui, Masashi; Nitta, Koichi.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic source imaging (MSI) is a relatively new, noninvasive technique for defining the relationship between brain structure and function of individual patients, and to establish comparisons from one patient to another. This is achieved by combining detailed neurophysiological data derived via magnetoencephalography (MEG) with neuroimaging data such as computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The noninvasive presurgical mapping of cortical functional somatosensory activity and the direct mapping of epilepsy-associated activity are among the neurosurgical uses that are emerging for MSI. Although the procedure provides clinically useful data, there are still limitations to two-dimensional MSI. We employ three-dimensional (3-D) MSI, superimposing MSI localizations on 3-D volumetric reconstruction of MRI. 3-D MSI enhances the visualization of the entire sensory homunculus and clearly demonstrates the spatial relationship with structural lesions. The functional localization of the epileptic focus in spatial relation to the lesion provides important clues for preoperative planning and on the epileptogenicity of the lesion. 3-D MSI improves localization of the sensory cortex and generator areas of epileptic activity. (author)

  2. Design of Programmable LED Controller with a Variable Current Source for 3D Image Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ryang Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional fluorescent light sources, as well as incandescent light sources are gradually being replaced by Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs for reducing power consumption in the image display area for multimedia application. An LED light source requires a controller with a low-power operation. In this paper, a low-power technique using adiabatic operation is applied for the implementation of LED controller with a stable constant-current, a low-power and low-heat function. From the simulation result, the power consumption of the proposed LED controller using adiabatic operation was reduced to about 87% in comparison with conventional operation with a constant VDD. The proposed circuit is expected to be an alternative LED controller which is sensitive to external conditions such as heat.

  3. Effect of spatial coherence of LED sources on image resolution in holographic displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourreza Ghoushchi, Vahid; Aas, Mehdi; Ulusoy, Erdem; Ürey, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    Holographic Displays (HDs) provide 3D images with all natural depth cues via computer generated holograms (CGHs) implemented on spatial light modulators (SLMs). HDs are coherent light processing systems based on interference and diffraction, thus they generally use laser light. However, laser

  4. Nuclear image display controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    In a nuclear imaging system the digitized x and y coordinates of gamma ray photon emission events address memory locations corresponding to the coordinates. The respective locations are incremented each time they are addressed so at the end of a selected time or event count period the locations contain digital values or raw data corresponding to the intensity of pixels comprising an image frame. The raw data for a frame is coupled to one input of an arithmetic logic unit (ALU) whose output is coupled to a display controller memory. The output of the controller memory is coupled to another ALU input with a feedback bus and is also coupled to a further signal processing circuit which includes means for converting processed data to analog video signals for television display. The ALU is selectively controlled to let raw image data pass through to the display controllor memory or alternately to add (or subtract) raw data for the last image frame developed to the raw data for preceding frames held in the display controller to thereby produce the visual effect on the television screen of an isotope flowing through anatomy

  5. IMDISP - INTERACTIVE IMAGE DISPLAY PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive Image Display Program (IMDISP) is an interactive image display utility for the IBM Personal Computer (PC, XT and AT) and compatibles. Until recently, efforts to utilize small computer systems for display and analysis of scientific data have been hampered by the lack of sufficient data storage capacity to accomodate large image arrays. Most planetary images, for example, require nearly a megabyte of storage. The recent development of the "CDROM" (Compact Disk Read-Only Memory) storage technology makes possible the storage of up to 680 megabytes of data on a single 4.72-inch disk. IMDISP was developed for use with the CDROM storage system which is currently being evaluated by the Planetary Data System. The latest disks to be produced by the Planetary Data System are a set of three disks containing all of the images of Uranus acquired by the Voyager spacecraft. The images are in both compressed and uncompressed format. IMDISP can read the uncompressed images directly, but special software is provided to decompress the compressed images, which can not be processed directly. IMDISP can also display images stored on floppy or hard disks. A digital image is a picture converted to numerical form so that it can be stored and used in a computer. The image is divided into a matrix of small regions called picture elements, or pixels. The rows and columns of pixels are called "lines" and "samples", respectively. Each pixel has a numerical value, or DN (data number) value, quantifying the darkness or brightness of the image at that spot. In total, each pixel has an address (line number, sample number) and a DN value, which is all that the computer needs for processing. DISPLAY commands allow the IMDISP user to display all or part of an image at various positions on the display screen. The user may also zoom in and out from a point on the image defined by the cursor, and may pan around the image. To enable more or all of the original image to be displayed on the

  6. Exhibition; Image display agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normazlin Ismail

    2008-01-01

    This article touches on the role of Malaysian Nuclear Agency as nuclear research institutions to promote, develop and encourage the peaceful uses of nuclear technology in its agricultural, medical, manufacturing, industrial, health and environment for the development of the country running successfully. Maturity of Malaysian Nuclear Agency in dealing with nuclear technology that are very competitive and globalization cannot be denied. On this basis Malaysian Nuclear Agency was given the responsibility to strengthen the nuclear technology in Malaysia. One way is through an exhibition featuring the research, discoveries and new technology products of the nuclear technology. Through this exhibition is to promote the nuclear technology and introduce the image of the agency in the public eye. This article also states a number of exhibits entered by the Malaysian Nuclear Agency and achievements during the last exhibition. Authors hope that the exhibition can be intensified further in the future.

  7. Nuclear Medicine Image Display. Chapter 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, H. [Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    The final step in a medical imaging procedure is to display the image(s) on a suitable display system where it is presented to the medical specialist for diagnostic interpretation. The display of hard copy images on X ray film or photographic film has largely been replaced today by soft copy image display systems with cathode ray tube (CRT) or liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors as the image rendering device. Soft copy display requires a high quality display monitor and a certain amount of image processing to optimize the image both with respect to the properties of the display device and to some psychophysiological properties of the human visual system. A soft copy display system, therefore, consists of a display workstation providing some basic image processing functions and the display monitor as the intrinsic display device. Display devices of lower quality may be used during intermediate steps of the acquisition and analysis of a patient study. Display monitors with a quality suitable for diagnostic reading by the specialist medical doctor are called primary devices, also known as diagnostic devices. Monitors with lower quality but good enough to be used for positioning, processing of studies, presentation of images in the wards, etc. are referred to as secondary devices or clinical devices. Nuclear medicine images can be adequately displayed even for diagnostic purposes on secondary devices. However, the increasing use of X ray images on which to report jointly with images from nuclear medicine studies, such as those generated by dual modality imaging, notably by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT, requires display devices capable of visualizing high resolution grey scale images at diagnostic quality, i.e. primary display devices. Both grey scale and colour display devices are used, the latter playing an important role in the display of processed nuclear medicine images and

  8. Nuclear Medicine Image Display. Chapter 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, H.

    2014-01-01

    The final step in a medical imaging procedure is to display the image(s) on a suitable display system where it is presented to the medical specialist for diagnostic interpretation. The display of hard copy images on X ray film or photographic film has largely been replaced today by soft copy image display systems with cathode ray tube (CRT) or liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors as the image rendering device. Soft copy display requires a high quality display monitor and a certain amount of image processing to optimize the image both with respect to the properties of the display device and to some psychophysiological properties of the human visual system. A soft copy display system, therefore, consists of a display workstation providing some basic image processing functions and the display monitor as the intrinsic display device. Display devices of lower quality may be used during intermediate steps of the acquisition and analysis of a patient study. Display monitors with a quality suitable for diagnostic reading by the specialist medical doctor are called primary devices, also known as diagnostic devices. Monitors with lower quality but good enough to be used for positioning, processing of studies, presentation of images in the wards, etc. are referred to as secondary devices or clinical devices. Nuclear medicine images can be adequately displayed even for diagnostic purposes on secondary devices. However, the increasing use of X ray images on which to report jointly with images from nuclear medicine studies, such as those generated by dual modality imaging, notably by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT, requires display devices capable of visualizing high resolution grey scale images at diagnostic quality, i.e. primary display devices. Both grey scale and colour display devices are used, the latter playing an important role in the display of processed nuclear medicine images and

  9. X-Windows Widget for Image Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    XvicImage is a high-performance XWindows (Motif-compliant) user interface widget for displaying images. It handles all aspects of low-level image display. The fully Motif-compliant image display widget handles the following tasks: (1) Image display, including dithering as needed (2) Zoom (3) Pan (4) Stretch (contrast enhancement, via lookup table) (5) Display of single-band or color data (6) Display of non-byte data (ints, floats) (7) Pseudocolor display (8) Full overlay support (drawing graphics on image) (9) Mouse-based panning (10) Cursor handling, shaping, and planting (disconnecting cursor from mouse) (11) Support for all user interaction events (passed to application) (12) Background loading and display of images (doesn't freeze the GUI) (13) Tiling of images.

  10. Display of nuclear medicine imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.; Kataria, S.K.; Samuel, A.M.

    2002-08-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging studies involve evaluation of a large amount of image data. Digital signal processing techniques have introduced processing algorithms that increase the information content of the display. Nuclear medicine imaging studies require interactive selection of suitable form of display and pre-display processing. Static imaging study requires pre-display processing to detect focal defects. Point operations (histogram modification) along with zoom and capability to display more than one image in one screen is essential. This album mode of display is also applicable to dynamic, MUGA and SPECT data. Isometric display or 3-D graph of the image data is helpful in some cases e.g. point spread function, flood field data. Cine display is used on a sequence of images e.g. dynamic, MUGA and SPECT imaging studies -to assess the spatial movement of tracer with time. Following methods are used at the investigator's discretion for inspection of the 3-D object. 1) Display of orthogonal projections, 2) Display of album of user selected coronal/ sagital/ transverse orthogonal slices, 3) Display of three orthogonal slices through user selected point, 4) Display of a set of orthogonal slices generated in the user-selected volume, 5) Generation and display of 3-D shaded surface. 6) Generation of volume data and display along with the 3-D shaded surface, 7) Side by side display orthogonal slices of two 3-D objects. Displaying a set of two-dimensional slices of a 3-D reconstructed object through shows all the defects but lacks the 3-D perspective. Display of shaded surface lacks the ability to show the embedded defects. Volume display -combining the 3-D surface and gray level volume data is perhaps the best form of display. This report describes these forms of display along with the theory. (author)

  11. Digital image display system for emergency room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murry, R.C.; Lane, T.J.; Miax, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a digital image display system for the emergency room (ER) in a major trauma hospital. Its objective is to reduce radiographic image delivery time to a busy ER while simultaneously providing a multimodality capability. Image storage, retrieval, and display will also be facilitated with this system. The system's backbone is a token-ring network of RISC and personal computers. The display terminals are higher- function RISC computers with 1,024 2 color or gray-scale monitors. The PCs serve as administrative terminals. Nuclear medicine, CT, MR, and digitized film images are transferred to the image display system

  12. Three-dimensional Imaging, Visualization, and Display

    CERN Document Server

    Javidi, Bahram; Son, Jung-Young

    2009-01-01

    Three-Dimensional Imaging, Visualization, and Display describes recent developments, as well as the prospects and challenges facing 3D imaging, visualization, and display systems and devices. With the rapid advances in electronics, hardware, and software, 3D imaging techniques can now be implemented with commercially available components and can be used for many applications. This volume discusses the state-of-the-art in 3D display and visualization technologies, including binocular, multi-view, holographic, and image reproduction and capture techniques. It also covers 3D optical systems, 3D display instruments, 3D imaging applications, and details several attractive methods for producing 3D moving pictures. This book integrates the background material with new advances and applications in the field, and the available online supplement will include full color videos of 3D display systems. Three-Dimensional Imaging, Visualization, and Display is suitable for electrical engineers, computer scientists, optical e...

  13. Advanced image display systems in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendler, T.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced image display systems for the fully digital diagnostic imaging departments of the future will be far more than simple replacements of the traditional film-viewing equipment. The new capabilities of very high resolution and highly dynamic displays offer a userfriendly and problem-oriented way of image interpretation. Advanced harware-, software- and human-machine interaction-concepts have been outlined. A scenario for a future way of handling and displaying images, reflecting a new image viewing paradigm in radiology is sketched which has been realized in an experimental image workstation model in the laboratory which, despite its technical complexity, offers a consistent strategy for fast and convenient interaction with image objects. The perspective of knowledge based techniques for workstation control software with object-oriented programming environments and user- and task-adaptive behavior leads to more advanced display properties and a new quality of userfriendliness. 2 refs.; 5 figs

  14. Viewpoint adaptive display of HDR images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Mantel, Claire

    2017-01-01

    In this paper viewpoint adaptive display of HDR images incorporating the effects of ambient light is presented and evaluated. LED backlight displays may render HDR images, but while at a global scale a high dynamic range may be achieved, locally the contrast is limited by the leakage of light...... through the LC elements of the display. To render high quality images, the display with backlight dimming can compute the values of the LED backlight and LC elements based on the input image, information about the viewpoint of the observer(s) and information of the ambient light. The goal is to achieve...... the best perceptual reproduction of the specified target image derived from the HDR input image in the specific viewing situation including multiple viewers, possibly having different preferences. An optimization based approach is presented. Some tests with reproduced images are also evaluated subjectively...

  15. Digital Image Processing Overview For Helmet Mounted Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, Michael J.

    1989-09-01

    Digital image processing provides a means to manipulate an image and presents a user with a variety of display formats that are not available in the analog image processing environment. When performed in real time and presented on a Helmet Mounted Display, system capability and flexibility are greatly enhanced. The information content of a display can be increased by the addition of real time insets and static windows from secondary sensor sources, near real time 3-D imaging from a single sensor can be achieved, graphical information can be added, and enhancement techniques can be employed. Such increased functionality is generating a considerable amount of interest in the military and commercial markets. This paper discusses some of these image processing techniques and their applications.

  16. Image Quality Characteristics of Handheld Display Devices for Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Liu, Peter; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers have become widespread with thousands of available software applications. Recently, handhelds are being proposed as part of medical imaging solutions, especially in emergency medicine, where immediate consultation is required. However, handheld devices differ significantly from medical workstation displays in terms of display characteristics. Moreover, the characteristics vary significantly among device types. We investigate the image quality characteristics of various handheld devices with respect to luminance response, spatial resolution, spatial noise, and reflectance. We show that the luminance characteristics of the handheld displays are different from those of workstation displays complying with grayscale standard target response suggesting that luminance calibration might be needed. Our results also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics of handhelds can surpass those of medical workstation displays particularly for recent generation devices. While a 5 mega-pixel monochrome workstation display has horizontal and vertical modulation transfer factors of 0.52 and 0.47 at the Nyquist frequency, the handheld displays released after 2011 can have values higher than 0.63 at the respective Nyquist frequencies. The noise power spectra for workstation displays are higher than 1.2×10−5 mm2 at 1 mm−1, while handheld displays have values lower than 3.7×10−6 mm2. Reflectance measurements on some of the handheld displays are consistent with measurements for workstation displays with, in some cases, low specular and diffuse reflectance coefficients. The variability of the characterization results among devices due to the different technological features indicates that image quality varies greatly among handheld display devices. PMID:24236113

  17. Four-dimensional image display for associated particle imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Headley, G.; Beyerle, A.; Durkee, R.; Hurley, P.; Tunnell, L.

    1994-01-01

    Associated particle imaging (API) is a three-dimensional neutron gamma imaging technique which provides both spatial and spectral information about an unknown. A local area network consisting of a UNIX fileserver and multiple DOS workstations has been chosen to perform the data acquisition and display functions. The data are acquired with a CAMAC system, stored in list mode, and sorted on the fileserver for display on the DOS workstations. Three of the display PCs, interacting with the fileserver, provide coordinated views as the operator ''slices'' the image. The operator has a choice of: a one-dimensional shadowgram from any side, two-dimensional shadowgrams from any side; a three-dimensional view (either perspective projection or stereoscopic). A common color scheme is used to carry energy information into the spatial images. ((orig.))

  18. Voice-activated intelligent radiologic image display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, P.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a computer-based expert computer system called Mammo-Icon, which automatically assists the radiologist's case analysis by reviewing the trigger phrase output of a commercially available voice transcription system in he domain of mammography. A commercially available PC-based voice dictation system is coupled to an expert system implemented on a microcomputer. Software employs the LISP and C computer languages. Mammo-Icon responds to the trigger phrase output of a voice dictation system with a textual discussion of the potential significance of the findings that have been described and a display of reference images that may help the radiologist to confirm a suspected diagnosis or consider additional diagnoses. This results in automatic availability of potentially useful computer-based expert advice, making such systems much more likely to be used in routine clinical practice

  19. Radiology image orientation processing for workstation display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-Fu; Hu, Kermit; Wilson, Dennis L.

    1998-06-01

    Radiology images are acquired electronically using phosphor plates that are read in Computed Radiology (CR) readers. An automated radiology image orientation processor (RIOP) for determining the orientation for chest images and for abdomen images has been devised. In addition, the chest images are differentiated as front (AP or PA) or side (Lateral). Using the processing scheme outlined, hospitals will improve the efficiency of quality assurance (QA) technicians who orient images and prepare the images for presentation to the radiologists.

  20. Low contrast detectability for color patterns variation of display images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Akio

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, the radionuclide images are acquired in digital form and displayed with false colors for signal intensity. This color scales for signal intensity have various patterns. In this study, low contrast detectability was compared the performance of gray scale cording with three color scales: the hot color scale, prism color scale and stripe color scale. SPECT images of brain phantom were displayed using four color patterns. These printed images and display images were evaluated with ROC analysis. Display images were indicated higher detectability than printed images. The hot scale and gray scale images indicated better Az of ROC than prism scale images because the prism scale images showed higher false positive rate. (author)

  1. View interpolation for medical images on autostereoscopic displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinger, S.; Ruijters, D.; Do, Q.L.; With, de P.H.N.

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for efficient rendering and transmitting views to a high-resolution autostereoscopic display for medical purposes. Displaying biomedical images on an autostereoscopic display poses different requirements than in a consumer case. For medical usage, it is essential that the

  2. Dual source CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidensticker, Peter R.; Hofmann, Lars K.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of Dual Source Computed Tomography (DSCT) in 2005 was an evolutionary leap in the field of CT imaging. Two x-ray sources operated simultaneously enable heart-rate independent temporal resolution and routine spiral dual energy imaging. The precise delivery of contrast media is a critical part of the contrast-enhanced CT procedure. This book provides an introduction to DSCT technology and to the basics of contrast media administration followed by 25 in-depth clinical scan and contrast media injection protocols. All were developed in consensus by selected physicians on the Dual Source CT Expert Panel. Each protocol is complemented by individual considerations, tricks and pitfalls, and by clinical examples from several of the world's best radiologists and cardiologists. This extensive CME-accredited manual is intended to help readers to achieve consistently high image quality, optimal patient care, and a solid starting point for the development of their own unique protocols. (orig.)

  3. Image charge relaxation in electrophoretic displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A novel improvement to a real time imaging system for use in electrostatic imaging is described. Present systems produce ten separate images per second and the image must be erased in preparation for the next exposure and image formation. The new design of electrostatic imaging chamber can take one of several forms which are discussed in detail; both organic and inorganic materials may be used as the photoconductor material in the discharging control layer and suitable examples are given. Values for the resistivity and the relaxation time of the discharging control layer are given. (U.K.)

  4. Cardiomagnetic source imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Pesola, Katja

    2000-01-01

    Magnetocardiographic (MCG) source imaging has received increasing interest in recent years. With a high enough localization accuracy of the current sources in the heart, valuable information can be provided, e.g., for the pre-ablative evaluation of arrhythmia patients. Furthermore, preliminary studies indicate that ischemic areas, i.e. areas which are suffering from lack of oxygen, and infarcted regions could be localized from multichannel MCG recordings. In this thesis, the accuracy of cardi...

  5. 3D Image Display Courses for Information Media Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaka, Kazuhisa; Yamanouchi, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional displays are used extensively in movies and games. These displays are also essential in mixed reality, where virtual and real spaces overlap. Therefore, engineers and creators should be trained to master 3D display technologies. For this reason, the Department of Information Media at the Kanagawa Institute of Technology has launched two 3D image display courses specifically designed for students who aim to become information media engineers and creators.

  6. Survey of standards for electronic image displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, William A.

    1996-02-01

    Electronic visual displays have been evolving from the 1960's basis of cathode ray tube (CRT) technology. Now, many other technologies are also available, including both flat panels and projection displays. Standards for these displays are being developed at both the national level and the international levels. Standards activity within the United States is in its infancy and is fragmented according to the inclination of each of the standards developing organizations. The latest round of flat panel display technology was primarily developed in Japan. Initially standards arose from component vendor-to-OEM customer relationships. As a result, Japanese standards for components are the best developed. The Electronics Industries Association of Japan (EIAJ) is providing their standards to the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) for adoption. On the international level, professional societies such as the human factors society (hfs) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) have completed major standards, hfs developed the first ergonomic standard hfs-100 and the ISO has developed some sections of a broader ergonomic standard ISO 9241. This paper addresses the organization of standards activity. Active organizations and their areas of focus are identified. The major standards that have been completed or are in development are described. Finally, suggestions for improving the this standards activity are proposed.

  7. The display of X-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    In order to decrease the radiation doses incurred by radiological investigation of patients, a method is developed to fix an image on a screen in a thermoluminescent phosphor and subsequently heating that phosphor by scanning the screen with a laser

  8. Study of three-dimensional image display by systemic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Tadao; Ebihara, Yoshiyuki; Unei, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Masao; Shinohe, Tooru; Wada, Yuji; Sakai, Takatsugu; Kashima, Kenji; Fujita, Yoshihiro

    1989-01-01

    A head phantom for CT was scanned at 2 mm intervals from the cervix to the vertex in an attempt to obtain a three-dimensional image display of bones and facial epidermis from an ordinary axial image. Clinically, three-dimensional images were formed at eye sockets and hip joints. With the three-dimensional image using the head phantom, the entire head could be displayed at any angle. Clinically, images were obtained that could not be attained by ordinary CT scanning, such as broken bones in eye sockets and stereoscopic structure at the bottom of a cranium. The three-dimensional image display is considered to be useful in clinical diagnosis. (author)

  9. Natural display mode for digital DICOM-conformant diagnostic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Klaus-Ruediger; Ramsby, Gale R

    2002-09-01

    The authors performed this study to investigate the verification of the contrast display properties defined by the digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) PS (picture archiving and communication system [PACS] standard) 3.14-2001 gray-scale display function standard and their dependency on display luminance range and video signal bandwidth. Contrast sensitivity and contrast linearity of DICOM-conformant displays were measured in just-noticeable differences (JNDs) on special perceptual contrast test patterns. Measurements were obtained six times at various display settings under dark room conditions. Display luminance range and video bandwidth had a significant effect on contrast perception. The perceptual promises of the standard could be established only with displays that were calibrated to a unity contrast resolution, at which the number of displayed intensity steps was equal to the number of perceivable contrast steps (JNDs). Such display conditions provide for visual perception information at the level of single-step contrast sensitivity and full-range contrast linearity. These "natural display" conditions also help minimize the Mach banding effects that otherwise reduce contrast sensitivity and contrast linearity. Most, if not all, conventionally used digital display modalities are driven with a contrast resolution larger than 1. Such conditions reduce contrast perception when compared with natural imaging conditions. The DICOM-conformant display conditions at unity contrast resolution were characterized as the "natural display" mode, and, thus, the authors a priori recommend them as being useful for making a primary diagnosis with PACS and teleradiology and as a standard for psychophysical research and performance measurements.

  10. Transmission imaging with a coded source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, W.W.; Sage, J.P.; Braun, M.; Wilson, D.T.; Barrett, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    The conventional approach to transmission imaging is to use a rotating anode x-ray tube, which provides the small, brilliant x-ray source needed to cast sharp images of acceptable intensity. Stationary anode sources, although inherently less brilliant, are more compatible with the use of large area anodes, and so they can be made more powerful than rotating anode sources. Spatial modulation of the source distribution provides a way to introduce detailed structure in the transmission images cast by large area sources, and this permits the recovery of high resolution images, in spite of the source diameter. The spatial modulation is deliberately chosen to optimize recovery of image structure; the modulation pattern is therefore called a ''code.'' A variety of codes may be used; the essential mathematical property is that the code possess a sharply peaked autocorrelation function, because this property permits the decoding of the raw image cast by th coded source. Random point arrays, non-redundant point arrays, and the Fresnel zone pattern are examples of suitable codes. This paper is restricted to the case of the Fresnel zone pattern code, which has the unique additional property of generating raw images analogous to Fresnel holograms. Because the spatial frequency of these raw images are extremely coarse compared with actual holograms, a photoreduction step onto a holographic plate is necessary before the decoded image may be displayed with the aid of coherent illumination

  11. Real-time Image Generation for Compressive Light Field Displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzstein, G; Lanman, D; Hirsch, M; Raskar, R

    2013-01-01

    With the invention of integral imaging and parallax barriers in the beginning of the 20th century, glasses-free 3D displays have become feasible. Only today—more than a century later—glasses-free 3D displays are finally emerging in the consumer market. The technologies being employed in current-generation devices, however, are fundamentally the same as what was invented 100 years ago. With rapid advances in optical fabrication, digital processing power, and computational perception, a new generation of display technology is emerging: compressive displays exploring the co-design of optical elements and computational processing while taking particular characteristics of the human visual system into account. In this paper, we discuss real-time implementation strategies for emerging compressive light field displays. We consider displays composed of multiple stacked layers of light-attenuating or polarization-rotating layers, such as LCDs. The involved image generation requires iterative tomographic image synthesis. We demonstrate that, for the case of light field display, computed tomographic light field synthesis maps well to operations included in the standard graphics pipeline, facilitating efficient GPU-based implementations with real-time framerates.

  12. Real-time transfer and display of radiography image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ximing; Wu Zhifang; Miao Jicheng

    2000-01-01

    The information process network of cobalt-60 container inspection system is a local area network based on PC. The system requires reliable transfer of radiography image between collection station and process station and the real-time display of radiography image on process station. Due to the very high data acquisition rate, in order to realize the real-time transfer and display of radiography image, 100 M Ethernet technology and network process communication technology are adopted in the system. Windows Sockets is the most common process communication technology up to now. Several kinds of process communication way under Windows Sockets technology are compared and tested. Finally the author realized 1 Mbyte/s' inerrant image transfer and real-time display with blocked datagram transfer technology

  13. Orthoscopic real-image display of digital holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, P L; Kozacki, T; Zaperty, W

    2017-10-01

    We present a practical solution for the long-standing problem of depth inversion in real-image holographic display of digital holograms. It relies on a field lens inserted in front of the spatial light modulator device addressed by a properly processed hologram. The processing algorithm accounts for pixel size and wavelength mismatch between capture and display devices in a way that prevents image deformation. Complete images of large dimensions are observable from one position with a naked eye. We demonstrate the method experimentally on a 10-cm-long 3D object using a single full-HD spatial light modulator, but it can supplement most holographic displays designed to form a real image, including circular wide angle configurations.

  14. Evaluation of display on CRT by various processing digital images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Yasuhiko; Akagi, Naoki; Ohara, Shuichi; Maeda, Tomoho; Kitazoe, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Kouji

    1986-01-01

    In this study, we digitized three sheets of thin line chart X-ray photographs altered the photographic density. By selecting the width of the photographic density at displaying the images on the CRT, We could augment the contrast of images and more easily recognize line images compared with original X-ray photos. This characteristic was clearly observed within the region of low wave length. Though the easy recognition was got by adjusting the contrast, the sharpness of line images was not in accordance with it. As mentioned above, we discussed the relation between the contrast and the sharpness of digitized images obtained with a multi-format camera. (author)

  15. Evaluation of display on CRT by various processing digital images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Yasuhiko; Akagi, Naoki; Ohara, Shuichi; Maeda, Tomoho; Kitazoe, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Kouji

    1986-12-01

    In this study, we digitized three sheets of thin line chart X-ray photographs altered the photographic density. By selecting the width of the photographic density at displaying the images on the CRT, We could augment the contrast of images and more easily recognize line images compared with original X-ray photos. This characteristic was clearly observed within the region of low wave length. Though the easy recognition was got by adjusting the contrast, the sharpness of line images was not in accordance with it. As mentioned above, we discussed the relation between the contrast and the sharpness of digitized images obtained with a multi-format camera.

  16. Toward optimal color image quality of television display

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Lindsay W.; Endrikhovski, Sergej N.; Bech, Soren; Jensen, Kaj

    1999-12-01

    A general framework and first experimental results are presented for the `OPTimal IMage Appearance' (OPTIMA) project, which aims to develop a computational model for achieving optimal color appearance of natural images on adaptive CRT television displays. To achieve this goal we considered the perceptual constraints determining quality of displayed images and how they could be quantified. The practical value of the notion of optimal image appearance was translated from the high level of the perceptual constraints into a method for setting the display's parameters at the physical level. In general, the whole framework of quality determination includes: (1) evaluation of perceived quality; (2) evaluation of the individual perceptual attributes; and (3) correlation between the physical measurements, psychometric parameters and the subjective responses. We performed a series of psychophysical experiments, with observers viewing a series of color images on a high-end consumer television display, to investigate the relationships between Overall Image Quality and four quality-related attributes: Brightness Rendering, Chromatic Rendering, Visibility of Details and Overall Naturalness. The results of the experiments presented in this paper suggest that these attributes are highly inter-correlated.

  17. Problems in the optimum display of SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielding, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    The instrumentation, computer hardware and software, and the image display system are all very important in the production of diagnostically useful SPECT images. Acquisition and processing parameters are discussed which can affect the quality of SPECT images. Regular quality control of the gamma camera and computer is important to keep the artifacts due to instrumentation to a minimum. The choice of reconstruction method will depend on the statistics in the study. The paper has shown that for high count rate studies, a high pass filter can be used to enhance the reconstructions. For lower count rate studies, pre-filtering is useful and the data can be reconstructed into thicker slices to reduce the effect of image noise. Finally, the optimum display for the images must be chosen, so that the information contained in the SPECT data can be easily perceived by the clinician. (orig.) [de

  18. Reconstruction, Processing and Display of 3D-Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, R.

    1986-01-01

    In the last few years a number of methods have been developed which can produce true 3D images, volumes of density values. We review two of these techniques (confocal microscopy and X-ray tomography) which were used in the reconstruction of some of our images. The other images came from transmission electron microscopes, gammacameras and magnetic resonance scanners. A new algorithm is suggested which uses projection onto convex sets to improve the depth resolution in the microscopy case. Since we use a TV-monitor as display device we have to project 3D volumes to 2D images. We use the following type of projections: reprojections, range images, colorcoded depth and shaded surface displays. Shaded surface displays use the surface gradient to compute the gray value in the projection. We describe how this gradient can be computed from the range image and from the original density volume. Normally we compute a whole series of projections where the volume is rotated some degrees between two projections. In a separate display session we can display these images in stereo and motion. We describe how noise reduction filters, gray value transformations, geometric manipulations, gradient filters, texture filters and binary techniques can be used to remove uninteresting points from the volume. Finally, a filter design strategy is developed which is based on the optimal basis function approach by Hummel. We show that for a large class of patterns, in images of arbitrary dimensions, the optimal basis functions are rotation-invariant operators as introduced by Danielsson in the 2D case. We also describe how the orientation of a pattern can be computed from its feature vector. (With 107 refs.) (author)

  19. Operational characteristics of pediatric radiology: Image display stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The display of diagnostic images is accomplished in the UCLA Pediatric Radiology Clinical Radiology Imaging System (CRIS) using 3 different types of digital viewing stations. These include a low resolution station with six 512 x 512 monitors, a high resolution station with three 1024 x 1024 monitors, and a very high resolution workstation with two 2048 x 2048 monitors. The display stations provide very basic image processing manipulations including zoom and scroll, contrast enhancement, and contrast reversal. The display stations are driven by a computer system which is dedicated for clinical use. During times when the clinical computer is unavailable (maintenance or system malfunction), the 512 x 512 workstation can be switched to operate from a research PACS system in the UCLA Image Processing Laboratory via a broadband communication network. Our initial clinical implementation involves digital viewing for pediatric radiology conferences. Presentation of inpatient cases use the six monitor 512 x 512 multiple viewing station. Later stages of the clinical implementation involve the use of higher resolution displays for the purpose of primary diagnosis from video displays

  20. Ultra-realistic imaging: a new beginning for display holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.; Brotherton-Ratcliffe, David

    2014-02-01

    Recent improvements in key foundation technologies are set to potentially transform the field of Display Holography. In particular new recording systems, based on recent DPSS and semiconductor lasers combined with novel recording materials and processing, have now demonstrated full-color analogue holograms of both lower noise and higher spectral accuracy. Progress in illumination technology is leading to a further major reduction in display noise and to a significant increase of the clear image depth and brightness of such holograms. So too, recent progress in 1-step Direct-Write Digital Holography (DWDH) now opens the way to the creation of High Virtual Volume Displays (HVV) - large format full-parallax DWDH reflection holograms having fundamentally larger clear image depths. In a certain fashion HVV displays can be thought of as providing a high quality full-color digital equivalent to the large-format laser-illuminated transmission holograms of the sixties and seventies. Back then, the advent of such holograms led to much optimism for display holography in the market. However, problems with laser illumination, their monochromatic analogue nature and image noise are well cited as being responsible for their failure in reality. Is there reason for believing that the latest technology improvements will make the mark this time around? This paper argues that indeed there is.

  1. Content dependent selection of image enhancement parameters for mobile displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Gyoo; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Han-Eol; Kim, Ka-Hee; Kim, Choon-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Mobile devices such as cellular phones and portable multimedia player with capability of playing terrestrial digital multimedia broadcasting (T-DMB) contents have been introduced into consumer market. In this paper, content dependent image quality enhancement method for sharpness and colorfulness and noise reduction is presented to improve perceived image quality on mobile displays. Human visual experiments are performed to analyze viewers' preference. Relationship between the objective measures and the optimal values of image control parameters are modeled by simple lookup tables based on the results of human visual experiments. Content dependent values of image control parameters are determined based on the calculated measures and predetermined lookup tables. Experimental results indicate that dynamic selection of image control parameters yields better image quality.

  2. Ventilation and perfusion display in a single image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, J.J.P. de; Botelho, M.F.R.; Pereira, A.M.S.; Rafael, J.A.S.; Pinto, A.J.; Marques, M.A.T.; Pereira, M.C.; Baganha, M.F.; Godinho, F.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of ventilation and perfusion display onto a single image is presented. From the data on regions of interest of the lungs, three-dimensional histograms are created, containing as parameters X and Y for the position of the pixels, Z for the perfusion and colour for local ventilation. The perfusion value is supplied by sets of curves having Z proportional to the local perfusion count rate. Ventilation modulates colour. Four perspective views of the histogram are simultaneously displayed to allow visualization of the entire organ. Information about the normal ranges for both ventilation and perfusion is also provided in the histograms. (orig.)

  3. High speed display algorithm for 3D medical images using Multi Layer Range Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Ryuuichi

    1993-01-01

    We propose high speed algorithm that display 3D voxel images obtained from medical imaging systems such as MRI. This algorithm convert voxel image data to 6 Multi Layer Range Image (MLRI) data, which is an augmentation of the range image data. To avoid the calculation for invisible voxels, the algorithm selects at most 3 MLRI data from 6 in accordance with the view direction. The proposed algorithm displays 256 x 256 x 256 voxel data within 0.6 seconds using 22 MIPS Workstation without a special hardware such as Graphics Engine. Real-time display will be possible on 100 MIPS class Workstation by our algorithm. (author)

  4. A virtual image chain for perceived image quality of medical display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchessoux, Cédric; Jung, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    This paper describes a virtual image chain for medical display (project VICTOR: granted in the 5th framework program by European commission). The chain starts from raw data of an image digitizer (CR, DR) or synthetic patterns and covers image enhancement (MUSICA by Agfa) and both display possibilities, hardcopy (film on viewing box) and softcopy (monitor). Key feature of the chain is a complete image wise approach. A first prototype is implemented in an object-oriented software platform. The display chain consists of several modules. Raw images are either taken from scanners (CR-DR) or from a pattern generator, in which characteristics of DR- CR systems are introduced by their MTF and their dose-dependent Poisson noise. The image undergoes image enhancement and comes to display. For soft display, color and monochrome monitors are used in the simulation. The image is down-sampled. The non-linear response of a color monitor is taken into account by the GOG or S-curve model, whereas the Standard Gray-Scale-Display-Function (DICOM) is used for monochrome display. The MTF of the monitor is applied on the image in intensity levels. For hardcopy display, the combination of film, printer, lightbox and viewing condition is modeled. The image is up-sampled and the DICOM-GSDF or a Kanamori Look-Up-Table is applied. An anisotropic model for the MTF of the printer is applied on the image in intensity levels. The density-dependent color (XYZ) of the hardcopy film is introduced by Look-Up-tables. Finally a Human Visual System Model is applied to the intensity images (XYZ in terms of cd/m2) in order to eliminate nonvisible differences. Comparison leads to visible differences, which are quantified by higher order image quality metrics. A specific image viewer is used for the visualization of the intensity image and the visual difference maps.

  5. Color image quality in projection displays: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Monica; Hardeberg, Jon Y.; Nussbaum, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Recently the use of projection displays has increased dramatically in different applications such as digital cinema, home theatre, and business and educational presentations. Even if the color image quality of these devices has improved significantly over the years, it is still a common situation for users of projection displays that the projected colors differ significantly from the intended ones. This study presented in this paper attempts to analyze the color image quality of a large set of projection display devices, particularly investigating the variations in color reproduction. As a case study, a set of 14 projectors (LCD and DLP technology) at Gjovik University College have been tested under four different conditions: dark and light room, with and without using an ICC-profile. To find out more about the importance of the illumination conditions in a room, and the degree of improvement when using an ICC-profile, the results from the measurements was processed and analyzed. Eye-One Beamer from GretagMacbeth was used to make the profiles. The color image quality was evaluated both visually and by color difference calculations. The results from the analysis indicated large visual and colorimetric differences between the projectors. Our DLP projectors have generally smaller color gamut than LCD projectors. The color gamuts of older projectors are significantly smaller than that of newer ones. The amount of ambient light reaching the screen is of great importance for the visual impression. If too much reflections and other ambient light reaches the screen, the projected image gets pale and has low contrast. When using a profile, the differences in colors between the projectors gets smaller and the colors appears more correct. For one device, the average ΔE*ab color difference when compared to a relative white reference was reduced from 22 to 11, for another from 13 to 6. Blue colors have the largest variations among the projection displays and makes them

  6. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  7. Solid models for CT/MR image display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ManKovich, N.J.; Yue, A.; Kioumehr, F.; Ammirati, M.; Turner, S.

    1991-01-01

    Medical imaging can now take wider advantage of Computer-Aided-Manufacturing through rapid prototyping technologies (RPT) such as stereolithography, laser sintering, and laminated object manufacturing to directly produce solid models of patient anatomy from processed CT and MR images. While conventional surgical planning relies on consultation with the radiologist combined with direct reading and measurement of CT and MR studies, 3-D surface and volumetric display workstations are providing a more easily interpretable view of patient anatomy. RPT can provide the surgeon with a life size model of patient anatomy constructed layer by layer with full internal detail. The authors have developed a prototype image processing and model fabrication system based on stereolithography, which provides the neurosurgeon with models of the skull base. Parallel comparison of the mode with the original thresholded CT data and with a CRT displayed surface rendering showed that both have an accuracy of >99.6 percent. The measurements on the surface rendered display proved more difficult to exactly locate and yielded a standard deviation of 2.37 percent. This paper presents an accuracy study and discusses ways of assessing the quality of neurosurgical plans when 3-D models re made available as planning tools

  8. Three-dimensional analysis and display of medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajcsy, R.

    1985-01-01

    Until recently, the most common medical images were X-rays on film analyzed by an expert, ususally a radiologist, who used, in addition to his/her visual perceptual abilities, knowledge obtained through medical studies, and experience. Today, however, with the advent of various imaging techniques, X-ray computerized axial tomographs (CAT), positron emission tomographs (PET), ultrasound tomographs, nuclear magnetic resonance tomographs (NMR), just to mention a few, the images are generated by computers and displayed on computer-controlled devices; so it is appropriate to think about more quantitative and perhaps automated ways of data analysis. Furthermore, since the data are generated by computer, it is only natural to take advantage of the computer for analysis purposes. In addition, using the computer, one can analyze more data and relate different modalities from the same subject, such as, for example, comparing the CAT images with PET images from the same subject. In the next section (The PET Scanner) the authors shall only briefly mention with appropriate references the modeling of the positron emission tomographic scanner, since this imaging technique is not as widely described in the literature as the CAT scanner. The modeling of the interpreter is not going to be mentioned, since it is a topic that by itself deserves a full paper; see, for example, Pizer [1981]. The thrust of this chapter is on modeling the organs that are being imaged and the matching techniques between the model and the data. The image data is from CAT and PET scans. Although the authors believe that their techniques are applicable to any organ of the human body, the examples are only from the brain

  9. Off-line data processing and display for computed tomographic images (EMI brain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Masaomi; Maruyama, Kiyoshi; Yano, Kesato; Takenaka, Eiichi.

    1978-01-01

    Processing and multi-format display for the CT (EMI) scan data have been tried by using an off-line small computer and an analog memory. Four or six CT images after processing are displayed on the CRT by a small computer with a 16 kilo-words core memory and an analog memory. Multi-format display of the CT image can be selected as follows; multi-slice display, continuative multi-window display, separate multi-window display, and multi-window level display. Electronic zooming for the real size viewing can give magnified CT image with one of displayed images if necessary. Image substraction, edge enhancement, smoothing, non-linear gray scale display, and synthesized image for the plane tomography reconstracted by the normal CT scan data, have been tried by the off-line data processing. A possibility for an effective application of the data base with CT image was obtained by these trials. (auth.)

  10. Firework displays as sources of particles similar to gunshot residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, Matthew; Butler, Mark; Hanson, Robert; Mohameden, Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    In light of past research being targeted to find specific particles which may be similar to gunshot residue (GSR), this project was formulated to detect any possible particulate by random particle fallout onto substrates at firework displays and to assess the impact this may have on GSR evidence. Firework residue was collected at a display site, from amongst spectators as well as from the author's hair 90min after the display. SEM-EDX analysis has detected such particulate in all three scenarios, with the firework particle population at large providing a solid ground for discrimination from GSR. Wind dispersal was found to decrease the particle population and subsequently, the latter's discriminatory power. Some particles, if treated individually were found to be indistinguishable from GSR. Findings also include residues which may mimic strontium based GSR as well as GSR which may be mixed with that from previous firings. The continuous changes made to primer and propellant compositions by manufacturers also call for greater consideration when classifying particles as originating from pyrotechnic devices. Furthermore, authorities such as police forces should be made more aware about the incidence of such particle transfer in firework related periods. Copyright © 2011 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Image Makers: Reporters or Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzello, Marion C.

    To explore how news sources are used by media to create a social image of women during key suffrage events of 1858, 1920, and 1970, the front page stories of the "New York Times" were reviewed for 1 week prior to and 1 week following each of these events: May 14, 1858, the Eighth National Women's Rights Convention in New York City;…

  12. Image quality evaluation of medical color and monochrome displays using an imaging colorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrig, Hans; Gu, Xiliang; Fan, Jiahua

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the means which permit examining the accuracy of Image Quality with respect to MTF (Modulation Transfer Function) and NPS (Noise Power Spectrum) of Color Displays and Monochrome Displays. Indications were in the past that color displays could affect the clinical performance of color displays negatively compared to monochrome displays. Now colorimeters like the PM-1423 are available which have higher sensitivity and color accuracy than the traditional cameras like CCD cameras. Reference (1) was not based on measurements made with a colorimeter. This paper focuses on the measurements of physical characteristics of the spatial resolution and noise performance of color and monochrome medical displays which were made with a colorimeter and we will after this meeting submit the data to an ROC study so we have again a paper to present at a future SPIE Conference.Specifically, Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) were evaluated and compared at different digital driving levels (DDL) between the two medical displays. This paper focuses on the measurements of physical characteristics of the spatial resolution and noise performance of color and monochrome medical displays which were made with a colorimeter and we will after this meeting submit the data to an ROC study so we have again a paper to present at a future Annual SPIE Conference. Specifically, Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) were evaluated and compared at different digital driving levels (DDL) between the two medical displays. The Imaging Colorimeter. Measurement of color image quality needs were done with an imaging colorimeter as it is shown below. Imaging colorimetry is ideally suited to FPD measurement because imaging systems capture spatial data generating millions of data points in a single measurement operation. The imaging colorimeter which was used was the PM-1423 from Radiant Imaging. It uses

  13. Psychophysical analysis of monitor display functions affecting observer diagnostic performance of CT image on liquid crystal display monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Fujita, H.; Asai, Y.; Uemura, M.; Ookura, Y.; Matsumoto, M.; Johkoh, T.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to propose suitable display functions for CT image representation on liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors by analyzing the characteristics of the monitor's typical display functions using psychophysical analysis. The luminance of the LCD monitor was adjusted to a maximum of 275 cd/m 2 and 480 cd/m 2 . Three types of postcalibrated display functions (i.e., GSDF, CIELAB, and Exponential γ 2.2) were evaluated. Luminance calculation of a new grayscale test pattern (NGTP) was done for the conversion of the digital driving level (DDL) into the CT value. The psychophysical gradient δ of display functions for the CT value was evaluated and compared via statistical analysis. The δ value of GSDF and CIE decreased exponentially; however, the δ value of Exponential γ 2.2 showed a convex curve with a peak at a specific point. There was a statistically significant difference among the δ values of the three types of display functions on the 480 cd/m 2 maximum via Kruskal Wallis test (P<0.001). The GSDF was suitable for observation of abdominal and lung CT images; however, the display function combined the Exponential γ 2.2 and the GSDF functions and was ideal for observation of brain CT images by psychophysical analysis. (orig.)

  14. A new LED light source for display cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Petersen, Paul Michael

    Abstract: We report a new LED light source suitable for illumination of gold objects. It has a variable correlated color temperature from 2760 K to 2200 K with a high color rendering index up to 97.......Abstract: We report a new LED light source suitable for illumination of gold objects. It has a variable correlated color temperature from 2760 K to 2200 K with a high color rendering index up to 97....

  15. Antibody phage display applications for nuclear medicine imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winthrop, M.D.; Denardo, G.L.; Denardo, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    Antibody-based constructs genetically engineered from genes of diverse origin provide a remarkable opportunity to develop functional molecular imaging techniques and specific molecular targeted radionuclide therapies. Phage display libraries of antibody fragment genes can be used to select antibody-based constructs that bind any chosen epitope. A large naive human antibody-based library was used to illustrate binding of antibody constructs to a variety of common and unique antigens. Antibody-based libraries from hybridoma cells, lymphocytes from immunized humans or from mice and human antibody repertoires produced in transgenic mice have also been described. Several orders of magnitude of affinity enhancement can be achieved by random or site specific mutations of the selected binding peptide domains of the scFv. Affinities (K d ) as high as 10 - 11 M (10 pM) for affinity-matured scFv have been documented. Such gene libraries thus offer an almost limitless variety of antibody-based molecular binding peptide modules that can be used in creative ways for the construction of new targeting agents for functional or molecular imaging and therapy

  16. Depth-enhanced three-dimensional-two-dimensional convertible display based on modified integral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Hyeung; Kim, Hak-Rin; Kim, Yunhee; Kim, Joohwan; Hong, Jisoo; Lee, Sin-Doo; Lee, Byoungho

    2004-12-01

    A depth-enhanced three-dimensional-two-dimensional convertible display that uses a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal based on the principle of integral imaging is proposed. In the proposed method, a lens array is located behind a transmission-type display panel to form an array of point-light sources, and a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal is electrically controlled to pass or to scatter light coming from these point-light sources. Therefore, three-dimensional-two-dimensional conversion is accomplished electrically without any mechanical movement. Moreover, the nonimaging structure of the proposed method increases the expressible depth range considerably. We explain the method of operation and present experimental results.

  17. 72-directional display having VGA resolution for high-appearance image generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Dairiki, Takeshi

    2006-02-01

    The high-density directional display, which was originally developed in order to realize a natural 3D display, is not only a 3D display but also a high-appearance display. The appearances of objects, such as glare and transparency, are the results of the reflection and the refraction of rays. The faithful reproduction of such appearances of objects is impossible using conventional 2D displays because rays diffuse on the display screen. The high-density directional display precisely controls the horizontal ray directions so that it can reproduce the appearances of objects. The fidelity of the reproduction of object appearances depends on the ray angle sampling pitch. The angle sampling pitch is determined by considering the human eye imaging system. In the present study the high-appearance display which has the resolution of 640×400 and emits rays in 72 different horizontal directions with the angle pitch of 0.38° was constructed. Two 72-directional displays were combined, each of which consisted of a high-resolution LCD panel (3,840×2,400) and a slanted lenticular sheet. Two images produced by two displays were superimposed by a half mirror. A slit array was placed at the focal plane of the lenticular sheet for each display to reduce the horizontal image crosstalk in the combined image. The impression analysis shows that the high-appearance display provides higher appearances and presence than the conventional 2D displays do.

  18. An compression algorithm for medical images and a display with the decoding function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Nakagawa, Yukihiro; Shiohara, Morito; Yoshida, Masumi

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes and efficient image compression method for medical images, a high-speed display with the decoding function. In our method, an input image is divided into blocks, and either of Discrete Cosine Transform coding (DCT) or Block Truncation Coding (BTC) is adaptively applied on each block to improve image quality. The display, we developed, receives the compressed data from the host computer and reconstruct images of good quality at high speed using four decoding microprocessors on which our algorithm is implemented in pipeline. By the experiments, our method and display were verified to be effective. (author)

  19. The Design and Evaluation of the Lighting Imaging Sensor Data Applications Display (LISDAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldi, B.; Hodanish, S.; Sharp, D.; Williams, E.; Goodman, Steven; Raghavan, R.; Matlin, A.; Weber, M.

    1998-01-01

    The design and evaluation of the Lightning Imaging Sensor Data Applications Display (LISDAD). The ultimate goal of the LISDAD system is to quantify the utility of total lightning information in short-term, severe-weather forecasting operations. To this end, scientists from NASA, NWS, and MIT organized an effort to study the relationship of lightning and severe-weather on a storm-by-storm, and even cell-by-cell basis for as many storms as possible near Melbourne, Florida. Melbourne was chosen as it offers a unique combination of high probability of severe weather and proximity to major relevant sensors - specifically: NASA's total lightning mapping system at Kennedy Space Center (the LDAR system at KSC); a NWS/NEXRAD radar (at Melbourne); and a prototype Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS, at Orlando), which obtains cloud-to-ground lightning Information from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and also uses NSSL's Severe Storm Algorithm (NSSL/SSAP) to obtain information about various storm-cell parameters. To assist in realizing this project's goal, an interactive, real-time data processing system (the LISDAD system) has been developed that supports both operational short-term weather forecasting and post facto severe-storm research. Suggestions have been drawn from the operational users (NWS/Melbourne) in the design of the data display and its salient behavior. The initial concept for the users Graphical Situation Display (GSD) was simply to overlay radar data with lightning data, but as the association between rapid upward trends in the total lightning rate and severe weather became evident, the display was significantly redesigned. The focus changed to support the display of time series of storm-parameter data and the automatic recognition of cells that display rapid changes in the total-lightning flash rate. The latter is calculated by grouping discrete LDAR radiation sources into lightning flashes using a time-space association algorithm

  20. Display of cross sectional anatomy by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinshaw, W.S.; Andrew, E.R.; Bottomley, P.A.; Holland, G.N.; Moore, W.S.; Worthington, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    High definition cross-sectional images produced by a new nuclear magnetic resonace (NMR) technique are shown. The images are a series of thin section scans in the coronal plane of the head of a rabbit. The NMR images are derived from the distribution of the density of mobile hydrogen atoms. Various tissue types can be distinguished and a clear registration of gross anatomy is demonstrated. No known hazards are associated with the technique. (author)

  1. Display of cross sectional anatomy by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, W S; Andrew, E R; Bottomley, P A; Holland, G N; Moore, W S

    1978-04-01

    High definition cross-sectional images produced by a new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique are shown. The images are a series of thin section scans in the coronal plane of the head of a rabbit. The NMR images are derived from the distribution of the density of mobile hydrogen atoms. Various tissue types can be distinguished and a clear registration of gross anatomy is demonstrated. No known hazards are associated with the technique.

  2. Retina-like sensor image coordinates transformation and display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fengmei; Cao, Nan; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-03-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera, the image acquisition, coordinates transformation and interpolation need to be realized. Both of the coordinates transformation and interpolation are computed in polar coordinate due to the sensor's particular pixels distribution. The image interpolation is based on sub-pixel interpolation and its relative weights are got in polar coordinates. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes the real-time image acquisition, coordinate transformation and interpolation.

  3. Human Visual Performance and Flat Panel Display Image Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    visible light energy can be described in electro- magnetic energy space as that portion of the electromagnetic wavelength (or frequency) domain to...temporal frequency domain much as one analyzes spatial information in the spatial frequency domain. As the content of a complex but periodic sound ...briefly with the more intepretive aspects of information display, those pertaining to information encoding and the design problems and parame- ters

  4. Three-dimensional modeler for animated images display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boubekeur, Rania

    1987-01-01

    The mv3d software allows the modeling and display of three dimensional objects in interpretative mode with animation possibility in real time. This system is intended for a graphical extension of a FORTH interpreter (implemented by CEA/IRDI/D.LETI/DEIN) in order to control a specific hardware (3.D card designed and implemented by DEIN) allowing the generation of three dimensional objects. The object description is carried out with a specific graphical language integrated in the FORTH interpreter. Objects are modeled using elementary solids called basic forms (cube, cone, cylinder...) assembled with classical geometric transformations (rotation, translation and scaling). These basic forms are approximated by plane polygonal facets further divided in triangles. Coordinates of the summits of triangles constitute the geometrical data. These are sent to the 3.D. card for processing and display. Performed processing are: geometrical transformations on display, hidden surface elimination, shading and clipping. The mv3d software is not an entire modeler but a simple, modular and extensible tool, to which other specific functions may be easily added such as: robots motion, collisions... (author) [fr

  5. Flatbed-type 3D display systems using integral imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Yuzo; Nagatani, Hiroyuki; Saishu, Tatsuo; Fukushima, Rieko; Taira, Kazuki

    2006-10-01

    We have developed prototypes of flatbed-type autostereoscopic display systems using one-dimensional integral imaging method. The integral imaging system reproduces light beams similar of those produced by a real object. Our display architecture is suitable for flatbed configurations because it has a large margin for viewing distance and angle and has continuous motion parallax. We have applied our technology to 15.4-inch displays. We realized horizontal resolution of 480 with 12 parallaxes due to adoption of mosaic pixel arrangement of the display panel. It allows viewers to see high quality autostereoscopic images. Viewing the display from angle allows the viewer to experience 3-D images that stand out several centimeters from the surface of the display. Mixed reality of virtual 3-D objects and real objects are also realized on a flatbed display. In seeking reproduction of natural 3-D images on the flatbed display, we developed proprietary software. The fast playback of the CG movie contents and real-time interaction are realized with the aid of a graphics card. Realization of the safety 3-D images to the human beings is very important. Therefore, we have measured the effects on the visual function and evaluated the biological effects. For example, the accommodation and convergence were measured at the same time. The various biological effects are also measured before and after the task of watching 3-D images. We have found that our displays show better results than those to a conventional stereoscopic display. The new technology opens up new areas of application for 3-D displays, including arcade games, e-learning, simulations of buildings and landscapes, and even 3-D menus in restaurants.

  6. Designing display primaries with currently available light sources for UHDTV wide-gamut system colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaoka, Kenichiro; Nishida, Yukihiro; Sugawara, Masayuki

    2014-08-11

    The wide-gamut system colorimetry has been standardized for ultra-high definition television (UHDTV). The chromaticities of the primaries are designed to lie on the spectral locus to cover major standard system colorimetries and real object colors. Although monochromatic light sources are required for a display to perfectly fulfill the system colorimetry, highly saturated emission colors using recent quantum dot technology may effectively achieve the wide gamut. This paper presents simulation results on the chromaticities of highly saturated non-monochromatic light sources and gamut coverage of real object colors to be considered in designing wide-gamut displays with color filters for the UHDTV.

  7. A projection graphic display for the computer aided analysis of bubble chamber images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomos, E.

    1979-01-01

    A projection graphic display for aiding the analysis of bubble chamber photographs has been developed by the Instrumentation Group of EF Division at CERN. The display image is generated on a very high brightness cathode ray tube and projected on to the table of the scanning-measuring machines as a superposition to the image of the bubble chamber. The display can send messages to the operator and aid the measurement by indicating directly on the chamber image the tracks which are measured correctly or not. (orig.)

  8. Soft tissue segmentation and 3D display from computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, R.T.; Trivedi, S.S.; Fellingham, L.L.; Gamboa-Aldeco, A.; Hedgcock, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    Volume calculation and 3D display of human anatomy facilitate a physician's diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation. Accurate segmentation of soft tissue structures is a prerequisite for such volume calculations and 3D displays, but segmentation by hand-outlining structures is often tedious and time-consuming. In this paper, methods based on analysis of statistics of image gray level are applied to segmentation of soft tissue in medical images, with the goal of making segmentation automatic or semi-automatic. The resulting segmented images, volume calculations, and 3D displays are analyzed and compared with results based on physician-drawn outlines as well as actual volume measurements

  9. [Current situations and problems of quality control for medical imaging display systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibutani, Takayuki; Setojima, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Katsumi; Takada, Katsumi; Okuno, Teiichi; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Nakajima, Tadashi; Fujisawa, Ichiro

    2015-04-01

    Diagnostic imaging has been shifted rapidly from film to monitor diagnostic. Consequently, Japan medical imaging and radiological systems industries association (JIRA) have recommended methods of quality control (QC) for medical imaging display systems. However, in spite of its need by majority of people, executing rate is low. The purpose of this study was to validate the problem including check items about QC for medical imaging display systems. We performed acceptance test of medical imaging display monitors based on Japanese engineering standards of radiological apparatus (JESRA) X-0093*A-2005 to 2009, and performed constancy test based on JESRA X-0093*A-2010 from 2010 to 2012. Furthermore, we investigated the cause of trouble and repaired number. Medical imaging display monitors had 23 inappropriate monitors about visual estimation, and all these monitors were not criteria of JESRA about luminance uniformity. Max luminance was significantly lower year-by-year about measurement estimation, and the 29 monitors did not meet the criteria of JESRA about luminance deviation. Repaired number of medical imaging display monitors had 25, and the cause was failure liquid crystal panel. We suggested the problems about medical imaging display systems.

  10. Oscillating intensity display of soft tissue lesions in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, A.; Levin, D.N.; Beck, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    A computer-aided tissue characterization scheme is used to separate abnormal from normal tissues on the basis of their intensities on T1- and T2-weighted images. The intensity of an abnormal tissue on a T1-weighted image is then made to oscillate so that the amplitude (or frequency) of oscillation is directly proportional to the difference between the lesion's intensity and the intensities of normal tissues. The result is a ''movie'' in which the abnormal tissue churns or oscillates on the screen, drawing the attention because of the eye's sensitivity to motion

  11. Technical and radiological image quality comparison of different liquid crystal displays for radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dams FE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Francina EM Dams,2 KY Esther Leung,1 Pieter HM van der Valk,2 Marc CJM Kock,2 Jeroen Bosman,1 Sjoerd P Niehof1 1Medical Physics and Technology, 2Department of Radiology, Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Dordrecht, The Netherlands Background: To inform cost-effective decisions in purchasing new medical liquid crystal displays, we compared the image quality in displays made by three manufacturers. Methods: We recruited 19 radiologists and residents to compare the image quality of four liquid crystal displays, including 3-megapixel Barco®, Eizo®, and NEC® displays and a 6-megapixel Barco display. The evaluators were blinded to the manufacturers' names. Technical assessments were based on acceptance criteria and test patterns proposed by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. Radiological assessments were performed on images from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 18. They included X-ray images of the thorax, knee, and breast, a computed tomographic image of the thorax, and a magnetic resonance image of the brain. Image quality was scored on an analog scale (range 0–10. Statistical analysis was performed with repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results: The Barco 3-megapixel display passed all acceptance criteria. The Eizo and NEC displays passed the acceptance criteria, except for the darkest pixel value in the grayscale display function. The Barco 6-megapixel display failed criteria for the maximum luminance response and the veiling glare. Mean radiological assessment scores were 7.8±1.1 (Barco 3-megapixel, 7.8±1.2 (Eizo, 8.1±1.0 (NEC, and 8.1±1.0 (Barco 6-megapixel. No significant differences were found between displays. Conclusion: According to the tested criteria, all the displays had comparable image quality; however, there was a three-fold difference in price between the most and least expensive displays. Keywords: data display, humans, radiographic image enhancement, user-computer interface

  12. Automatic adjustment of display window (gray-level condition) for MR images using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhashi, Akinami; Nambu, Kyojiro.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a system to automatically adjust the display window width and level (WWL) for MR images using neural networks. There were three main points in the development of our system as follows: 1) We defined an index for the clarity of a displayed image, and called 'EW'. EW is a quantitative measure of the clarity of an image displayed in a certain WWL, and can be derived from the difference between gray-level with the WWL adjusted by a human expert and with a certain WWL. 2) We extracted a group of six features from a gray-level histogram of a displayed image. We designed two neural networks which are able to learn the relationship between these features and the desired output (teaching signal), 'EQ', which is normalized to 0 to 1.0 from EW. Two neural networks were used to share the patterns to be learned; one learns a variety of patterns with less accuracy, and the other learns similar patterns with accuracy. Learning was performed using a back-propagation method. As a result, the neural networks after learning are able to provide a quantitative measure, 'Q', of the clarity of images displayed in the designated WWL. 3) Using the 'Hill climbing' method, we have been able to determine the best possible WWL for a displaying image. We have tested this technique for MR brain images. The results show that this system can adjust WWL comparable to that adjusted by a human expert for the majority of test images. The neural network is effective for the automatic adjustment of the display window for MR images. We are now studying the application of this method to MR images of another regions. (author)

  13. Three-dimensional display of femoral head cartilage thickness maps from MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, R.A.; Dolecki, M.; Rubash, H.E.; Thaete, F.L.; Hernden, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of methods for three-dimensional display and analysis of the articular cartilage of the hip from MR images. Cadaveric femoral head specimens were images with three-dimensional GRASS MR imaging. Data were analyzed on a SUN workstation with original software, the ANALYZE package from Richard Robb's Biomedical Research Group at the Mayo Clinic, and SUN's Voxvu program. The articular cartilage was isolated by manually segmenting images. An original computer ray tracing method measured the cartilage thickness radially and produced movies of a rotating femoral head, displaying brightness proportional to cartilage thickness

  14. Optimal wave focusing for seismic source imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Farhad

    In both global and exploration seismology, studying seismic sources provides geophysicists with invaluable insight into the physics of earthquakes and faulting processes. One way to characterize the seismic source is to directly image it. Time-reversal (TR) focusing provides a simple and robust solution to the source imaging problem. However, for recovering a well- resolved image, TR requires a full-aperture receiver array that surrounds the source and adequately samples the wavefield. This requirement often cannot be realized in practice. In most source imaging experiments, the receiver geometry, due to the limited aperture and sparsity of the stations, does not allow adequate sampling of the source wavefield. Incomplete acquisition and imbalanced illumination of the imaging target limit the resolving power of the TR process. The main focus of this thesis is to offer an alternative approach to source imaging with the goal of mitigating the adverse effects of incomplete acquisition on the TR modeling. To this end, I propose a new method, named Backus-Gilbert (BG) source imaging, to optimally focus the wavefield onto the source position using a given receiver geometry. I first introduce BG as a method for focusing waves in acoustic media at a desired location and time. Then, by exploiting the source-receiver reciprocity of the Green function and the linearity of the problem, I show that BG focusing can be adapted and used as a source-imaging tool. Following this, I generalize the BG theory for elastic waves. Applying BG formalism for source imaging requires a model for the wave propagation properties of the earth and an estimate of the source location. Using numerical tests, I next examine the robustness and sensitivity of the proposed method with respect to errors in the earth model, uncertainty in the source location, and noise in data. The BG method can image extended sources as well as point sources. It can also retrieve the source mechanism. These features of

  15. Multi-Source Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    These collections were taken to show the advantages made available to the inter- preter. In a military operation, however, often little or no in- situ ...The large body of water labeled "W" on each image represents the Agua Hedionda lagoon. East of the lagoon the area is primarily agricultural with a...power plant located in the southeast corner of the image. West of the Agua Hedionda lagoon is Carlsbad, California. Damp ground is labelled "Dg" on the

  16. WE-D-9A-06: Open Source Monitor Calibration and Quality Control Software for Enterprise Display Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevins, N; Vanderhoek, M; Lang, S; Flynn, M [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Medical display monitor calibration and quality control present challenges to medical physicists. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate and share experiences with an open source package that allows for both initial monitor setup and routine performance evaluation. Methods: A software package, pacsDisplay, has been developed over the last decade to aid in the calibration of all monitors within the radiology group in our health system. The software is used to calibrate monitors to follow the DICOM Grayscale Standard Display Function (GSDF) via lookup tables installed on the workstation. Additional functionality facilitates periodic evaluations of both primary and secondary medical monitors to ensure satisfactory performance. This software is installed on all radiology workstations, and can also be run as a stand-alone tool from a USB disk. Recently, a database has been developed to store and centralize the monitor performance data and to provide long-term trends for compliance with internal standards and various accrediting organizations. Results: Implementation and utilization of pacsDisplay has resulted in improved monitor performance across the health system. Monitor testing is now performed at regular intervals and the software is being used across multiple imaging modalities. Monitor performance characteristics such as maximum and minimum luminance, ambient luminance and illuminance, color tracking, and GSDF conformity are loaded into a centralized database for system performance comparisons. Compliance reports for organizations such as MQSA, ACR, and TJC are generated automatically and stored in the same database. Conclusion: An open source software solution has simplified and improved the standardization of displays within our health system. This work serves as an example method for calibrating and testing monitors within an enterprise health system.

  17. WE-D-9A-06: Open Source Monitor Calibration and Quality Control Software for Enterprise Display Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevins, N; Vanderhoek, M; Lang, S; Flynn, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Medical display monitor calibration and quality control present challenges to medical physicists. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate and share experiences with an open source package that allows for both initial monitor setup and routine performance evaluation. Methods: A software package, pacsDisplay, has been developed over the last decade to aid in the calibration of all monitors within the radiology group in our health system. The software is used to calibrate monitors to follow the DICOM Grayscale Standard Display Function (GSDF) via lookup tables installed on the workstation. Additional functionality facilitates periodic evaluations of both primary and secondary medical monitors to ensure satisfactory performance. This software is installed on all radiology workstations, and can also be run as a stand-alone tool from a USB disk. Recently, a database has been developed to store and centralize the monitor performance data and to provide long-term trends for compliance with internal standards and various accrediting organizations. Results: Implementation and utilization of pacsDisplay has resulted in improved monitor performance across the health system. Monitor testing is now performed at regular intervals and the software is being used across multiple imaging modalities. Monitor performance characteristics such as maximum and minimum luminance, ambient luminance and illuminance, color tracking, and GSDF conformity are loaded into a centralized database for system performance comparisons. Compliance reports for organizations such as MQSA, ACR, and TJC are generated automatically and stored in the same database. Conclusion: An open source software solution has simplified and improved the standardization of displays within our health system. This work serves as an example method for calibrating and testing monitors within an enterprise health system

  18. Image authentication using distributed source coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yao-Chung; Varodayan, David; Girod, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel approach using distributed source coding for image authentication. The key idea is to provide a Slepian-Wolf encoded quantized image projection as authentication data. This version can be correctly decoded with the help of an authentic image as side information. Distributed source coding provides the desired robustness against legitimate variations while detecting illegitimate modification. The decoder incorporating expectation maximization algorithms can authenticate images which have undergone contrast, brightness, and affine warping adjustments. Our authentication system also offers tampering localization by using the sum-product algorithm.

  19. A compatible electrocutaneous display for functional magnetic resonance imaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, V; Cappelli, C; Vanello, N; Ricciardi, E; Scilingo, E P; Giovannetti, G; Santarelli, M F; Positano, V; Pietrini, P; Landini, L; Bicchi, A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we propose an MR (magnetic resonance) compatible electrocutaneous stimulator able to inject an electric current, variable in amplitude and frequency, into the fingertips in order to elicit tactile skin receptors (mechanoreceptors). The desired goal is to evoke specific tactile sensations selectively stimulating skin receptors by means of an electric current in place of mechanical stimuli. The field of application ranges from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tactile studies to augmented reality technology. The device here proposed is designed using safety criteria in order to comply with the threshold of voltage and current permitted by regulations. Moreover, MR safety and compatibility criteria were considered in order to perform experiments inside the MR scanner during an fMRI acquisition for functional brain activation analysis. Psychophysical laboratory tests are performed in order to define the different evoked tactile sensation. After verifying the device MR safety and compatibility on a phantom, a test on a human subject during fMRI acquisition is performed to visualize the brain areas activated by the simulated tactile sensation.

  20. Modeling the Color Image and Video Quality on Liquid Crystal Displays with Backlight Dimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korhonen, Jari; Mantel, Claire; Burini, Nino

    2013-01-01

    Objective image and video quality metrics focus mostly on the digital representation of the signal. However, the display characteristics are also essential for the overall Quality of Experience (QoE). In this paper, we use a model of a backlight dimming system for Liquid Crystal Display (LCD......) and show how the modeled image can be used as an input to quality assessment algorithms. For quality assessment, we propose an image quality metric, based on Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) computation in the CIE L*a*b* color space. The metric takes luminance reduction, color distortion and loss...

  1. Source-space ICA for MEG source imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonmohamadi, Yaqub; Jones, Richard D

    2016-02-01

    One of the most widely used approaches in electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography (MEG) source imaging is application of an inverse technique (such as dipole modelling or sLORETA) on the component extracted by independent component analysis (ICA) (sensor-space ICA + inverse technique). The advantage of this approach over an inverse technique alone is that it can identify and localize multiple concurrent sources. Among inverse techniques, the minimum-variance beamformers offer a high spatial resolution. However, in order to have both high spatial resolution of beamformer and be able to take on multiple concurrent sources, sensor-space ICA + beamformer is not an ideal combination. We propose source-space ICA for MEG as a powerful alternative approach which can provide the high spatial resolution of the beamformer and handle multiple concurrent sources. The concept of source-space ICA for MEG is to apply the beamformer first and then singular value decomposition + ICA. In this paper we have compared source-space ICA with sensor-space ICA both in simulation and real MEG. The simulations included two challenging scenarios of correlated/concurrent cluster sources. Source-space ICA provided superior performance in spatial reconstruction of source maps, even though both techniques performed equally from a temporal perspective. Real MEG from two healthy subjects with visual stimuli were also used to compare performance of sensor-space ICA and source-space ICA. We have also proposed a new variant of minimum-variance beamformer called weight-normalized linearly-constrained minimum-variance with orthonormal lead-field. As sensor-space ICA-based source reconstruction is popular in EEG and MEG imaging, and given that source-space ICA has superior spatial performance, it is expected that source-space ICA will supersede its predecessor in many applications.

  2. Parallax barrier engineering for image quality improvement in an autostereoscopic 3D display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Yoon, Ki-Hyuk; Yoon, Seon Kyu; Ju, Heongkyu

    2015-05-18

    We present a image quality improvement in a parallax barrier (PB)-based multiview autostereoscopic 3D display system under a real-time tracking of positions of a viewer's eyes. The system presented exploits a parallax barrier engineered to offer significantly improved quality of three-dimensional images for a moving viewer without an eyewear under the dynamic eye tracking. The improved image quality includes enhanced uniformity of image brightness, reduced point crosstalk, and no pseudoscopic effects. We control the relative ratio between two parameters i.e., a pixel size and the aperture of a parallax barrier slit to improve uniformity of image brightness at a viewing zone. The eye tracking that monitors positions of a viewer's eyes enables pixel data control software to turn on only pixels for view images near the viewer's eyes (the other pixels turned off), thus reducing point crosstalk. The eye tracking combined software provides right images for the respective eyes, therefore producing no pseudoscopic effects at its zone boundaries. The viewing zone can be spanned over area larger than the central viewing zone offered by a conventional PB-based multiview autostereoscopic 3D display (no eye tracking). Our 3D display system also provides multiviews for motion parallax under eye tracking. More importantly, we demonstrate substantial reduction of point crosstalk of images at the viewing zone, its level being comparable to that of a commercialized eyewear-assisted 3D display system. The multiview autostereoscopic 3D display presented can greatly resolve the point crosstalk problem, which is one of the critical factors that make it difficult for previous technologies for a multiview autostereoscopic 3D display to replace an eyewear-assisted counterpart.

  3. Speckle noise reduction on a laser projection display via a broadband green light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan Ei; Choi, Ju Won; Kang, Heejong; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Fu, Shih-Hao; Liou, Jiun-Wei; Kung, Andy H; Choi, Hee Joo; Kim, Byoung Joo; Cha, Myoungsik; Peng, Lung-Han

    2014-02-10

    A broadband green light source was demonstrated using a tandem-poled lithium niobate (TPLN) crystal. The measured wavelength and temperature bandwidth were 6.5 nm and 100 °C, respectively, spectral bandwidth was 36 times broader than the periodically poled case. Although the conversion efficiency was smaller than in the periodic case, the TPLN device had a good figure of merit owing to the extremely large bandwidth for wavelength and temperature. The developed broadband green light source exhibited speckle noise approximately one-seventh of that in the conventional approach for a laser projection display.

  4. DEIMOS – an Open Source Image Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blazek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The DEIMOS (DatabasE of Images: Open Source is created as an open-source database of images and videos for testing, verification and comparing of various image and/or video processing techniques such as enhancing, compression and reconstruction. The main advantage of DEIMOS is its orientation to various application fields – multimedia, television, security, assistive technology, biomedicine, astronomy etc. The DEIMOS is/will be created gradually step-by-step based upon the contributions of team members. The paper is describing basic parameters of DEIMOS database including application examples.

  5. Physical evaluation of color and monochrome medical displays using an imaging colorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrig, Hans; Gu, Xiliang; Fan, Jiahua

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an approach to physical evaluation of color and monochrome medical grade displays using an imaging colorimeter. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of medical display types, monochrome or color at the same maximum luminance settings, on diagnostic performance. The focus was on the measurements of physical characteristics including spatial resolution and noise performance, which we believed could affect the clinical performance. Specifically, Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) were evaluated and compared at different digital driving levels (DDL) between two EIZO displays.

  6. The relationship between ambient illumination and psychological factors in viewing of display Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanami, Takuya; Kikuchi, Ayano; Kaneko, Takashi; Hirai, Keita; Yano, Natsumi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Tsumura, Norimichi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Miyake, Yoichi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we have clarified the relationship between ambient illumination and psychological factors in viewing of display images. Psychological factors were obtained by the factor analysis with the results of the semantic differential (SD) method. In the psychological experiments, subjects evaluated the impressions of displayed images with changing ambient illuminating conditions. The illumination conditions were controlled by a fluorescent ceiling light and a color LED illumination which was located behind the display. We experimented under two kinds of conditions. One was the experiment with changing brightness of the ambient illumination. The other was the experiment with changing the colors of the background illumination. In the results of the experiment, two factors "realistic sensation, dynamism" and "comfortable," were extracted under different brightness of the ambient illumination of the display surroundings. It was shown that the "comfortable" was improved by the brightness of display surroundings. On the other hand, when the illumination color of surroundings was changed, three factors "comfortable," "realistic sensation, dynamism" and "activity" were extracted. It was also shown that the value of "comfortable" and "realistic sensation, dynamism" increased when the display surroundings were illuminated by the average color of the image contents.

  7. Reduce blurring and distortion in a projection type virtual image display using integrated small optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Yendo, Tomohiro

    2015-03-01

    Head Up Display (HUD) is being applied to automobile. HUD displays information as far virtual image on the windshield. Existing HUD usually displays planar information. If the image corresponding to scenery on the road like Augmented Reality (AR) is displayed on the HUD, driver can efficiently get the information. To actualize this, HUD covering large viewing field is needed. However existing HUD cannot cover large viewing field. Therefore we have proposed system consisting of projector and many small diameter convex lenses. However observed virtual image has blurring and distortion . In this paper, we propose two methods to reduce blurring and distortion of images. First, to reduce blurring of images, distance between each of screen and lens comprised in lens array is adjusted. We inferred from the more distant the lens from center of the array is more blurred that the cause of blurring is curvature of field of lens in the array. Second, to avoid distortion of images, each lens in the array is curved spherically. We inferred from the more distant the lens from center of the array is more distorted that the cause of distortion is incident angle of ray. We confirmed effectiveness of both methods.

  8. Open source tools for fluorescent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    As microscopy becomes increasingly automated and imaging expands in the spatial and time dimensions, quantitative analysis tools for fluorescent imaging are becoming critical to remove both bottlenecks in throughput as well as fully extract and exploit the information contained in the imaging. In recent years there has been a flurry of activity in the development of bio-image analysis tools and methods with the result that there are now many high-quality, well-documented, and well-supported open source bio-image analysis projects with large user bases that cover essentially every aspect from image capture to publication. These open source solutions are now providing a viable alternative to commercial solutions. More importantly, they are forming an interoperable and interconnected network of tools that allow data and analysis methods to be shared between many of the major projects. Just as researchers build on, transmit, and verify knowledge through publication, open source analysis methods and software are creating a foundation that can be built upon, transmitted, and verified. Here we describe many of the major projects, their capabilities, and features. We also give an overview of the current state of open source software for fluorescent microscopy analysis and the many reasons to use and develop open source methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mixed reality orthognathic surgical simulation by entity model manipulation and 3D-image display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonagayoshi, Tatsunari; Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Fushima, Kenji; Kobayashi, Masaru

    2005-12-01

    In orthognathic surgery, the framing of 3D-surgical planning that considers the balance between the front and back positions and the symmetry of the jawbone, as well as the dental occlusion of teeth, is essential. In this study, a support system for orthodontic surgery to visualize the changes in the mandible and the occlusal condition and to determine the optimum position in mandibular osteotomy has been developed. By integrating the operating portion of a tooth model that is to determine the optimum occlusal position by manipulating the entity tooth model and the 3D-CT skeletal images (3D image display portion) that are simultaneously displayed in real-time, the determination of the mandibular position and posture in which the improvement of skeletal morphology and occlusal condition is considered, is possible. The realistic operation of the entity model and the virtual 3D image display enabled the construction of a surgical simulation system that involves augmented reality.

  10. Gamma camera image acquisition, display, and processing with the personal microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, J.L.; Pratt, J.P.; Roberts, D.R.; Johnson, T.; Feyerabend, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors evaluated the potential of a microcomputer for direct acquisition, display, and processing of gamma camera images. Boards for analog-to-digital conversion and image zooming were designed, constructed, and interfaced to the Macintosh II (Apple Computer, Cupertino, Calif). Software was written for processing of single, gated, and time series images. The system was connected to gamma cameras, and its performance was compared with that of dedicated nuclear medicine computers. Data could be acquired from gamma cameras at rates exceeding 200,000 counts per second, with spatial resolution exceeding intrinsic camera resolution. Clinical analysis could be rapidly performed. This system performed better than most dedicated nuclear medicine computers with respect to speed of data acquisition and spatial resolution of images while maintaining full compatibility with the standard image display, hard-copy, and networking formats. It could replace such dedicated systems in the near future as software is refined

  11. Assessment of display performance for medical imaging systems: Executive summary of AAPM TG18 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samei, Ehsan; Badano, Aldo; Chakraborty, Dev

    2005-01-01

    Digital imaging provides an effective means to electronically acquire, archive, distribute, and view medical images. Medical imaging display stations are an integral part of these operations. Therefore, it is vitally important to assure that electronic display devices do not compromise image quality and ultimately patient care. The AAPM Task Group 18 (TG18) recently published guidelines and acceptance criteria for acceptance testing and quality control of medical display devices. This paper is an executive summary of the TG18 report. TG18 guidelines include visual, quantitative, and advanced testing methodologies for primary and secondary class display devices. The characteristics, tested in conjunction with specially designed test patterns (i.e., TG18 patterns), include reflection, geometric distortion, luminance, the spatial and angular dependencies of luminance, resolution, noise, glare, chromaticity, and display artifacts. Geometric distortions are evaluated by linear measurements of the TG18-QC test pattern, which should render distortion coefficients less than 2%/5% for primary/secondary displays, respectively. Reflection measurements include specular and diffuse reflection coefficients from which the maximum allowable ambient lighting is determined such that contrast degradation due to display reflection remains below a 20% limit and the level of ambient luminance (L amb ) does not unduly compromise luminance ratio (LR) and contrast at low luminance levels. Luminance evaluation relies on visual assessment of low contrast features in the TG18-CT and TG18-MP test patterns, or quantitative measurements at 18 distinct luminance levels of the TG18-LN test patterns. The major acceptable criteria for primary/secondary displays are maximum luminance of greater than 170/100 cd/m 2 , LR of greater than 250/100, and contrast conformance to that of the grayscale standard display function (GSDF) of better than 10%/20%, respectively. The angular response is tested to

  12. A storage and display method for radioisotope imaging using scan conversion memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Masaomi; Kobayashi, Toshio; Nakanishi, Fumiko; Suzuki, Shigeo; Miyabayashi, Hiroyasu

    1975-01-01

    The scan conversion memory (SCM) has been applied to a method for the storage and display of radioisotope images. Scan data were fed into SCM as pulse signals with X and Y axis from the scinti-scanner or the scinti-camera. The electric charge on the SCM target is directly proportional to the pulse density. A TV display was executed immediately after the recording of a radioisotope image. If necessary, a seven additive color display to the image density could be obtained by a simple color slicer, and the image could be hard-copied by a video hard-copy printer. Characteristics of the SCM were experimentally clarified as follows: the practical resolution was 700 line/TV; ten levels gray scale were discriminated on the video monitor, the uniformity, measured by an oscilloscope was less than 20%, and dead time of the pulse interval at full scale signal was 5 μ sec. In their representation, the SCM scintigrams were observed as closely resembling conventional film scintigrams. Superimposed imaging of an X-ray picture and a radioisotope image can be realized by using the SCM, for an increase in anatomical localization on reading images. The SCM scintigram can be applied rapidly and can be the viewer of radioisotope imaging. (auth.)

  13. Design of area array CCD image acquisition and display system based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Ning; Li, Tianting; Pan, Yue; Dai, Yuming

    2014-09-01

    With the development of science and technology, CCD(Charge-coupled Device) has been widely applied in various fields and plays an important role in the modern sensing system, therefore researching a real-time image acquisition and display plan based on CCD device has great significance. This paper introduces an image data acquisition and display system of area array CCD based on FPGA. Several key technical challenges and problems of the system have also been analyzed and followed solutions put forward .The FPGA works as the core processing unit in the system that controls the integral time sequence .The ICX285AL area array CCD image sensor produced by SONY Corporation has been used in the system. The FPGA works to complete the driver of the area array CCD, then analog front end (AFE) processes the signal of the CCD image, including amplification, filtering, noise elimination, CDS correlation double sampling, etc. AD9945 produced by ADI Corporation to convert analog signal to digital signal. Developed Camera Link high-speed data transmission circuit, and completed the PC-end software design of the image acquisition, and realized the real-time display of images. The result through practical testing indicates that the system in the image acquisition and control is stable and reliable, and the indicators meet the actual project requirements.

  14. System analysis of formation and perception processes of three-dimensional images in volumetric displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakov, Alexander; Sgibnev, Arthur

    2018-03-01

    One of the promising devices is currently a volumetric display. Volumetric displays capable to visualize complex three-dimensional information as nearly as possible to its natural – volume form without the use of special glasses. The invention and implementation of volumetric display technology will expand opportunities of information visualization in various spheres of human activity. The article attempts to structure and describe the interrelation of the essential characteristics of objects in the area of volumetric visualization. Also there is proposed a method of calculation of estimate total number of voxels perceived by observers during the 3D demonstration, generated using a volumetric display with a rotating screen. In the future, it is planned to expand the described technique and implement a system for estimation the quality of generated images, depending on the types of biplanes and their initial characteristics.

  15. Establishment of the method of surface shaded display for brain PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangsong; Tang Anwu; He Zuoxiang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To establish the method of surface shaded display (SSD) for brain PET imaging. Methods: The original brain PET images volume data were transferred to the personal computer by the local area network, and scaled into 256 grayscale values between 0 and 255. An appropriate threshold could be selected with three differential methods: depended on the histogram or maximum percentage of the volume data and the opposite value percentage of the lesion. The list of vertices and triangles describing the contour surface was produced with a high resolution three dimensional (3D) surface construction algorithm. Results: The final software of SSD for brain PET imaging with interactive user interface can produce 3D brain PET images which can be rotated, scaled, and saved or outputted with several image formats. Conclusion: The method of SSD for brain PET imaging can directly and integrally reflect the surface of brain cortex, and be helpful to locate lesions and display the range of lesions, but can not reflect the severity of lesions, nor can display the structure under brain cortex

  16. OSIRIX: open source multimodality image navigation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosset, Antoine; Pysher, Lance; Spadola, Luca; Ratib, Osman

    2005-04-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a completely new software platform that will allow users to efficiently and conveniently navigate through large sets of multidimensional data without the need of high-end expensive hardware or software. We also elected to develop our system on new open source software libraries allowing other institutions and developers to contribute to this project. OsiriX is a free and open-source imaging software designed manipulate and visualize large sets of medical images: http://homepage.mac.com/rossetantoine/osirix/

  17. Guide-09-1998. Quality control of darkrooms and image display devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This guide is applicable to process darkrooms relieved and receiving devices and image displays. A number of methods which require the appointed instrumentation described, some of which can be implemented in own radiology services in the country given the low complexity of themselves and others that require specific equipment and can be performed by specialized groups external to these units.

  18. Quality assessment of images displayed on LCD screen with local backlight dimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Burini, Nino; Korhonen, Jari

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a subjective experiment collecting quality assessment of images displayed on a LCD with local backlight dimming using two methodologies: absolute category ratings and paired-comparison. Some well-known objective quality metrics are then applied to the stimuli and their respect...

  19. X-33 Telemetry Best Source Selection, Processing, Display, and Simulation Model Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Darryl A.

    1998-01-01

    The X-33 program requires the use of multiple telemetry ground stations to cover the launch, ascent, transition, descent, and approach phases for the flights from Edwards AFB to landings at Dugway Proving Grounds, UT and Malmstrom AFB, MT. This paper will discuss the X-33 telemetry requirements and design, including information on fixed and mobile telemetry systems, best source selection, and support for Range Safety Officers. A best source selection system will be utilized to automatically determine the best source based on the frame synchronization status of the incoming telemetry streams. These systems will be used to select the best source at the landing sites and at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center to determine the overall best source between the launch site, intermediate sites, and landing site sources. The best source at the landing sites will be decommutated to display critical flight safety parameters for the Range Safety Officers. The overall best source will be sent to the Lockheed Martin's Operational Control Center at Edwards AFB for performance monitoring by X-33 program personnel and for monitoring of critical flight safety parameters by the primary Range Safety Officer. The real-time telemetry data (received signal strength, etc.) from each of the primary ground stations will also be compared during each nu'ssion with simulation data generated using the Dynamic Ground Station Analysis software program. An overall assessment of the accuracy of the model will occur after each mission. Acknowledgment: The work described in this paper was NASA supported through cooperative agreement NCC8-115 with Lockheed Martin Skunk Works.

  20. Source characteristics of the underwater knocking displays of a male Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, William R.; Reichmuth, Colleen; Mulsow, Jason L.

    2011-01-01

    "knocks"’ punctuated by occasional metallic "bells." The source characteristics of the knocking sounds that were regularly emitted by a male walrus raised in captivity were examined. Knocks were produced as single 20 ms pulses, or as doublets and triplets, and were typically repeated at rates of 0.8/s...... to 1.2/s. These were loud sounds with greater bandwidth than previously reported: mean source levels were 186 dB pk-pk re 1 Pa at 1 m (range 164-196) with maximum frequency >24 kHz. Production of each knock was associated with visible impulsive movement of the forehead. During rut, this walrus had...... difficulty inhibiting sound production and would often continue to emit knocks in air during haul-out and even while eating, suggesting an endogenous component to this behavior. A strong correlation between his seasonal testosterone levels and the persistence of knocking displays was confirmed. Captive...

  1. Three-dimensional display and measurement of cardiac dynamic indexes from MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, M.; Matsuo, M.; Yamasaki, K.; Banno, T.; Toriwaki, J.; Yokoi, S.; Oshita, H.

    1986-01-01

    The cardiac dynamic index, to which such variables as cardiac output, ejection fraction, and wall motion contribute, is routinely determined using various modalities such as angiography, radionuclide imaging, US, and x-ray CT. Each of these modalities, however, has some disadvantages in regard to evaluating the cardiac dynamic index. The authors have obtained precise multidirectional projection images of the heart by means of computer graphics and reformatted data of cardiac MR images obtained with cardiac gating. The contiguous coronal MR images of the heart are made at an interimage distance of 5 mm. In each section, five or six cardiac images can be obtained, depending on the systolic or diastolic phase. These images are stored in a computer, and a three-dimensional display of the heart with biocular observation and with multiplex holograms is made possible with computer graphics. Three-dimensional measurement of the cardiac index is now being attempted, including cardiac output, ejection fraction, and wall motion

  2. A simple device for the stereoscopic display of 3D CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haveri, M.; Suramo, I.; Laehde, S.; Karhula, V.; Junila, J.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a simple device for creating true 3D views of image pairs obtained at 3D CT reconstruction. The device presents the images in a slightly different angle of view for the left and the right eyes. This true 3D viewing technique was applied experimentally in the evaluation of complex acetabular fractures. Experiments were also made to determine the optimal angle between the images for each eye. The angle varied between 1 and 7 for different observers and also depended on the display field of view used. (orig.)

  3. Image size invariant visual cryptography for general access structures subject to display quality constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kai-Hui; Chiu, Pei-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Conventional visual cryptography (VC) suffers from a pixel-expansion problem, or an uncontrollable display quality problem for recovered images, and lacks a general approach to construct visual secret sharing schemes for general access structures. We propose a general and systematic approach to address these issues without sophisticated codebook design. This approach can be used for binary secret images in non-computer-aided decryption environments. To avoid pixel expansion, we design a set of column vectors to encrypt secret pixels rather than using the conventional VC-based approach. We begin by formulating a mathematic model for the VC construction problem to find the column vectors for the optimal VC construction, after which we develop a simulated-annealing-based algorithm to solve the problem. The experimental results show that the display quality of the recovered image is superior to that of previous papers.

  4. The source of display rules and their effects on primary health care professionals' well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Iñigo, David; Totterdell, Peter; Alcover, Carlos Maria; Holman, David

    2009-11-01

    Employees' perceptions of the emotional requirements of their work role are considered a necessary antecedent of emotion work. The impact of these requirements on the emotions employees display, their well-being, and their clients' satisfaction has been explored in previous research. Emotional requirements have been characterized as organizationally-based expectations (e.g., Brotheridge & Lee, 2003), formal and informal organizational rules (e.g., Cropanzano, Weiss & Elias, 2004), occupational norms (e.g., Rafaeli & Sutton, 1987; Smith & Kleinman, 1989) and job-based demands (Brotheridge & Lee, 2002). Although all these definitions assume some kind of shared source for perceptions of emotional requirements, it remains unclear to what extent these different sources contribute and to what extent the requirements are shared by different units, teams and individuals in the organization. The present study analyses the perception of emotional requirements from a survey of ninety-seven Primary Health Care teams composed of general practitioners, nurses and administrative staff (N = 1057). The relative contribution of different sources of variance (team, organizational, and occupational) to perceived emotional requirements and the effects on employees' job satisfaction and well being are examined. Results confirm the relevance of the source and show the contribution of emotional demands to prediction of emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction levels.

  5. Handbook of Visual Display Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cranton, Wayne; Fihn, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The Handbook of Visual Display Technology is a unique work offering a comprehensive description of the science, technology, economic and human interface factors associated with the displays industry. An invaluable compilation of information, the Handbook will serve as a single reference source with expert contributions from over 150 international display professionals and academic researchers. All classes of display device are covered including LCDs, reflective displays, flexible solutions and emissive devices such as OLEDs and plasma displays, with discussion of established principles, emergent technologies, and particular areas of application. The wide-ranging content also encompasses the fundamental science of light and vision, image manipulation, core materials and processing techniques, display driving and metrology.

  6. Assessment of image display of contrast enhanced T1W images with fat suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Isao; Ishizaki, Keiko; Kobayashi, Kuninori; Katou, Masanobu

    2006-01-01

    The effects of imaging conditions and measures for their improvement were examined with regard to recognition of the effects of contrast on images when T 1 -weighted imaging with selective fat suppression was applied. Luminance at the target region was examined before and after contrast imaging using phantoms assuming pre- and post-imaging conditions. A clinical examination was performed on tumors revealed by breast examination, including those surrounded by mammary gland and by fat tissue. When fat suppression was used and imaging contrast was enhanced, the luminance level of fat tumors with the same structure as the prepared phantoms appeared to be high both before and after contrast imaging, and the effects of contrast were not distinguishable. This observation is attributable to the fact that the imaging conditions before and after contrast imaging were substantially different. To make a comparison between pre- and post-contrast images, it is considered necessary to perform imaging with fixed receiver gain and to apply the same imaging method for pre- and post-contrast images by adjusting post-contrast imaging conditions to those of pre-contrast imaging. (author)

  7. Stereoscopic radiographic images with gamma source encoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strocovsky, S.G.; Otero, D

    2012-01-01

    Conventional radiography with X-ray tube has several drawbacks, as the compromise between the size of the focal spot and the fluence. The finite dimensions of the focal spot impose a limit to the spatial resolution. Gamma radiography uses gamma-ray sources which surpass in size, portability and simplicity to X-ray tubes. However, its low intrinsic fluence forces to use extended sources that also degrade the spatial resolution. In this work, we show the principles of a new radiographic technique that overcomes the limitations associated with the finite dimensions of X-ray sources, and that offers additional benefits to conventional techniques. The new technique called coding source imaging (CSI), is based on the use of extended sources, edge-encoding of radiation and differential detection. The mathematical principles and the method of images reconstruction with the new proposed technique are explained in the present work. Analytical calculations were made to determine the maximum spatial resolution and the variables on which it depends. The CSI technique was tested by means of Monte Carlo simulations with sets of spherical objects. We show that CSI has stereoscopic capabilities and it can resolve objects smaller than the source size. The CSI decoding algorithm reconstructs simultaneously four different projections from the same object, while conventional radiography produces only one projection per acquisition. Projections are located in separate image fields on the detector plane. Our results show it is possible to apply an extremely simple radiographic technique with extended sources, and get 3D information of the attenuation coefficient distribution for simple geometry objects in a single acquisition. The results are promising enough to evaluate the possibility of future research with more complex objects typical of medical diagnostic radiography and industrial gamma radiography (author)

  8. Is the iPad suitable for image display at American Board of Radiology examinations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Rachel J; Rainford, Louise A; Leong, David L; Butler, Marie-Louise; Evanoff, Michael G; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Ryan, John T

    2014-11-01

    The study aimed to determine the acceptability of the iPad 3 as a display option for American Board of Radiology (ABR) examinations. A set of 20 cases for each of nine specialties examined by the ABR was prepared. Each comprised between one and seven images and case information and had been used in previous ABR Initial Certification examinations. Examining radiologists (n = 119) at the ABR oral Initial Certification examinations reviewed sets from one or more specialties on both a 2 MP LED monitor and on the iPad 3 and rated the visibility of the salient image features for each case. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was performed to compare ratings. In addition, a thematic analysis of participants' opinions was undertaken. When all specialties were pooled, the iPad 3 ratings were significantly higher than the monitor ratings (p = 0.0217). The breast, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and nuclear medicine specialties also returned significantly higher ratings for the visibility of relevant image features for the iPad 3. Monitor ratings were significantly higher for the vascular and interventional specialty, although no images were rated unacceptably poor on the iPad in this specialty. The relevant image features were rated more visible on the iPad 3 than on the monitors overall. The iPad 3 was well accepted by a large majority of examiners and can be considered adequate for image display for examination in most or all specialties.

  9. Compact RGBY light sources with high luminance for laser display applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Katrin; Blume, Gunnar; Werner, Nils; Müller, André; Sumpf, Bernd; Pohl, Johannes; Feise, David; Ressel, Peter; Sahm, Alexander; Bege, Roland; Hofmann, Julian; Jedrzejczyk, Daniel; Tränkle, Günther

    2018-02-01

    Watt-class visible laser light with a high luminance can be created with high-power GaAs-based lasers either directly in the red spectral region or using single-pass second harmonic generation (SHG) for the colors in the blue-yellow spectral region. The concepts and results of red- and near infrared-emitting distributed Bragg reflector tapered lasers and master oscillator power amplifier systems as well as their application for SHG bench-top experiments and miniaturized modules are presented. Examples of these high-luminance light sources aiming at different applications such as flying spot display or holographic 3D cinema are discussed in more detail. The semiconductor material allows an easy adaptation of the wavelength allowing techniques such as six-primary color 3D projection or color space enhancement by adding a fourth yellow color.

  10. Image processing of x-ray left ventricular cineangiocardiograms and displays of cardiac functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiho, Shigeru; Yamada, Shigeru; Kuwahara, Michiyoshi

    1980-01-01

    Cineangiocardiography has been often used as one of the highly helpful techniques to examine the cardiac function. This paper deals with the method of tracing automatically the boundaries of the left ventricle on cineangiocardiograms, the method to evaluate and display various cardiac functions, the method to reconstruct the left ventricular cavity from biplane cineangiocardiograms and the method to display a 3-dimensional shape of the left ventricle reconstructed. Our algorithm of boundary tracing is based on a heuristic search for a local maximum of the changing rate in the gray level of cineangiocardiogram. The boundaries of endocardial margins of the left ventricle on 80 to 120 consecutive frames are automatically traced by our method. By using the detected boundaries of the left ventricle, a lot of quantitative information may be established on the cardiac function. The volume change, the wall motions and the %-shortening are displayed graphically. The motion of the boundary of the left ventricle is displayed on a CRT as a moving picture. The left ventricular cavity is reconstructed from the detected boundaries of the left ventricle on biplane cineangiocardiograms. A reconstructed image can be shown as superimposed lines or halftone planes to produce a 3-dimensional perspective. The %-shortening which shows the contractility of the regional myocardium is displayed on a silhouette of the left ventricle. We can easily recognize the abnormal area of contraction and the level and spread of abnormality from this displayed image. With the use of the system described in this paper, we can grasp the movement of the left ventricle exactly and evaluate the cardiac function quantitatively. (author)

  11. 3-D display of magnetic resonance images by use of multiplex holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshita, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Shigeki; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro; Matsuo, Michimasa.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, we study the method of generating a true 3-D image from MRI multiple slices by using the multiplex holography. The purpose in our method is to display effectively the density information distributed in the 3-D space. For making a multiplex hologram any projected image in each direction from multiple slices should be computed. We study computer processing for producing images of good quality from the viewpoint of displaying the density distribution in the 3-D space clearly and discriminating lesions from normal tissues. The following two kinds of processing are studied. (1) Projection: To generate fastly projections of good quality, the following subjects are examined. 1. Computation method of density values on a projected image from an original slice image. 2. Methods for projection of multiple slices. 3. Interpolation of slices between original neighbouring slices. 4. Composition of several sets of multiple slices in different directions. (2) Image enahancement: To enhance depth feeling of slices and density values in lesions, the following methods are studied. 1. Enhancement of depth feeling by a weighted sum of slices. 2. Slice enhancement by multiplying the particular slices by weights. 3. Lesion enhancement by thresholding. 4. Lesion enhancement by operations between images with different imaging parameters. The following are the results ; projected images of the quality good enough for constructing a multiplex hologram can be obtained by the simple method proposed in this paper, using four sets of multiple slices in four different directions. The enhancement technique mentioned above was proved to be effective for improving the understandability of 3-D information. (author)

  12. Development and clinical implementation of an enhanced display algorithm for use in networked electronic portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvel, Frank van den; Han, Ihn; Chungbin, Suzanne; Strowbridge, Amy; Tekyi-Mensah, Sam; Ragan, Don P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce and clinically validate a preprocessing algorithm that allows clinical images from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to be displayed on any computer monitor, without loss of clinical usability. The introduction of such a system frees EPI systems from the constraints of fixed viewing workstations and increases mobility of the images in a department. Methods and Materials: The preprocessing algorithm, together with its variable parameters is introduced. Clinically, the algorithm is tested using an observer study of 316 EPID images of the pelvic region in the framework of treatment of carcinoma of the cervix and endometrium. Both anterior-posterior (AP/PA) and latero-lateral (LAT) images were used. The images scored were taken from six different patients, five of whom were obese, female, and postmenopausal. The result is tentatively compared with results from other groups. The scoring system, based on the number of visible landmarks in the port, is proposed and validated. Validation was performed by having the observer panel score images with artificially induced noise levels. A comparative study was undertaken with a standard automatic window and leveling display technique. Finally, some case studies using different image sites and EPI detectors are presented. Results: The image quality for all images in this study was deemed to be clinically useful (mean score > 1). Most of the images received a score which was second highest (AP/PA landmarks ≥ 6 and LAT landmarks ≥ 5). Obesity, which has been an important factor determining the image quality, was not seen to be a factor here. Compared to standard techniques a highly significant improvement was determined with regard to clinical usefulness. The algorithm performs fast (less than 9 seconds) and needs no additional user interaction in most of the cases. The algorithm works well on both direct detection portal imagers and camera-based imagers whether analog or digital cameras

  13. Automatic segmentation and 3-dimensional display based on the knowledge of head MRI images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hidetomo; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper we present a procedure which automatically extracts soft tissues, such as subcutaneous fat, brain, and cerebral ventricle, from the multislice MRI images of head region, and displays their 3-dimensional images. Segmentation of soft tissues is done by use of an iterative thresholding. In order to select the optimum threshold value automatically, we introduce a measure to evaluate the goodness of segmentation into this procedure. When the measure satisfies given conditions, iteration of thresholding terminates, and the final result of segmentation is extracted by using the current threshold value. Since this procedure can execute segmentation and calculation of the goodness measure in each slice automatically, it remarkably decreases efforts of users. Moreover, the 3-dimensional display of the segmented tissues shows that this procedure can extract the shape of each soft tissue with reasonable precision for clinical use. (author)

  14. Modeling LCD Displays with Local Backlight Dimming for Image Quality Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korhonen, Jari; Burini, Nino; Forchhammer, Søren

    2011-01-01

    for evaluating the signal quality distortion related directly to digital signal processing, such as compression. However, the physical characteristics of the display device also pose a significant impact on the overall perception. In order to facilitate image quality assessment on modern liquid crystaldisplays...... (LCD) using light emitting diode (LED) backlight with local dimming, we present the essential considerations and guidelines for modeling the characteristics of displays with high dynamic range (HDR) and locally adjustable backlight segments. The representation of the image generated by the model can...... be assessed using the traditional objective metrics, and therefore the proposed approach is useful for assessing the performance of different backlight dimming algorithms in terms of resulting quality and power consumption in a simulated environment. We have implemented the proposed model in C++ and compared...

  15. An Evaluation and Comparison of Several Measures of Image Quality for Television Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    vehicles, buildings, or faces , or they may be artificial much as trn-bar patterns, rectangles, or sine waves. The typical objective image quality assessment...Snyder (1974b) wac able to obtain very good correlations with reaction time and correct responses for a face recognition task. Display quality was varied...recognition versus log JUDA for the target recognition study of Chapter 4, 5) graph of angle oubtended by target at recognitio , versus log JNDA for the

  16. The effect of base image window level selection on the dimensional measurement accuracy of resultant three-dimensional image displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurmis, A.P.; Hearn, T.C.; Reynolds, K.J.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of base image window level selection on direct linear measurement of knee structures displayed using new magnetic resonance (MR)-based three-dimensional reconstructed computer imaging techniques. Methods: A prospective comparative study was performed using a series of three-dimensional knee images, generated from conventional MR imaging (MRI) sections. Thirty distinct anatomical structural features were identified within the image series of which repeated measurements were compared at 10 different window grey scale levels. Results: Statistical analysis demonstrated an excellent raw correlation between measurements and suggested no significant difference between measurements made at each of the 10 window level settings (P>0.05). Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that unlike conventional MR or CT applications, grey scale window level selection at the time of imaging does not significantly affect the visual quality of resultant three-dimensional reconstructed images and hence the accuracy of subsequent direct linear measurement. The diagnostic potential of clinical progression from routine two-dimensional to advanced three-dimensional reconstructed imaging techniques may therefore be less likely to be degraded by inappropriate MR technician image windowing during the capturing of image series

  17. Synthesis method from low-coherence digital holograms for improvement of image quality in holographic display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yutaka; Nomura, Takanori

    2013-06-01

    In holographic displays, it is undesirable to observe the speckle noises with the reconstructed images. A method for improvement of reconstructed image quality by synthesizing low-coherence digital holograms is proposed. It is possible to obtain speckleless reconstruction of holograms due to low-coherence digital holography. An image sensor records low-coherence digital holograms, and the holograms are synthesized by computational calculation. Two approaches, the threshold-processing and the picking-a-peak methods, are proposed in order to reduce random noise of low-coherence digital holograms. The reconstructed image quality by the proposed methods is compared with the case of high-coherence digital holography. Quantitative evaluation is given to confirm the proposed methods. In addition, the visual evaluation by 15 people is also shown.

  18. Energy-dependent imaging in digital radiography: a review on acquisition, processing and display technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppini, G.; Maltinti, G.; Valli, G.; Baroni, M.; Buchignan, M.; Valli, G.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of energy-dependent imaging in digital radiography are analyzed paying particular attention to digital video systems. The main techniques developed in recent years for selective energy imaging are reviewed following a unified approach. Discussion about advantages and limits of energy methods is carried out by a comparative analysis of computer simulated data and experimental results as obtained by standard x-ray equipments coupled to a digital video unit. Geometric phantoms are used as test object, as also images of a chest phantom are produced. Since signal-to-noise ratio degradation is one of the major problems when dealing with selective imaging, a particular effort is made to investigate noise effects. In this perspective, an original colour encoding display of energy sequences is presented. By mapping the various energy measurements on different colour bands (typically those of an RGB TV-monitor), an increased image conspicuity is obtained without a significant noise degradation: this is ensured by the energy dependence of attenuation coefficients and by the integrating characteristics of the display device

  19. Display device combining ambient light with magnified virtual images generated in the eye path of the observer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    A display device positions an observer's eye (or eyes) to look in a particular direction (eye path). An electronically controlled image generating element in the eye path generates artificial images which are magnified to create a virtual image for the eye. The image generating element is

  20. Designing Websites for Displaying Large Data Sets and Images on Multiple Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A.; Wolf, V. G.; Garron, J.; Kirschner, M.

    2012-12-01

    The desire to build websites to analyze and display ever increasing amounts of scientific data and images pushes for web site designs which utilize large displays, and to use the display area as efficiently as possible. Yet, scientists and users of their data are increasingly wishing to access these websites in the field and on mobile devices. This results in the need to develop websites that can support a wide range of devices and screen sizes, and to optimally use whatever display area is available. Historically, designers have addressed this issue by building two websites; one for mobile devices, and one for desktop environments, resulting in increased cost, duplicity of work, and longer development times. Recent advancements in web design technology and techniques have evolved which allow for the development of a single website that dynamically adjusts to the type of device being used to browse the website (smartphone, tablet, desktop). In addition they provide the opportunity to truly optimize whatever display area is available. HTML5 and CSS3 give web designers media query statements which allow design style sheets to be aware of the size of the display being used, and to format web content differently based upon the queried response. Web elements can be rendered in a different size, position, or even removed from the display entirely, based upon the size of the display area. Using HTML5/CSS3 media queries in this manner is referred to as "Responsive Web Design" (RWD). RWD in combination with technologies such as LESS and Twitter Bootstrap allow the web designer to build web sites which not only dynamically respond to the browser display size being used, but to do so in very controlled and intelligent ways, ensuring that good layout and graphic design principles are followed while doing so. At the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Alaska Satellite Facility SAR Data Center (ASF) recently redesigned their popular Vertex application and converted it from a

  1. A Low-Cost PC-Based Image Workstation for Dynamic Interactive Display of Three-Dimensional Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, William A.; Raya, Sai P.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    1989-05-01

    A system for interactive definition, automated extraction, and dynamic interactive display of three-dimensional anatomy has been developed and implemented on a low-cost PC-based image workstation. An iconic display is used for staging predefined image sequences through specified increments of tilt and rotation over a solid viewing angle. Use of a fast processor facilitates rapid extraction and rendering of the anatomy into predefined image views. These views are formatted into a display matrix in a large image memory for rapid interactive selection and display of arbitrary spatially adjacent images within the viewing angle, thereby providing motion parallax depth cueing for efficient and accurate perception of true three-dimensional shape, size, structure, and spatial interrelationships of the imaged anatomy. The visual effect is that of holding and rotating the anatomy in the hand.

  2. Three-dimensional display of the pelvic viscera using multi-sliced MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Shigeru; Suto, Yasuzo.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate reconstruction of the pelvic structure is the most important factor to obtain desirable results after anorectal surgery. Preoperative evaluation of the anatomy is indispensable for choosing an appropriate operative method in each case. To facilitate the preoperative evaluation, three dimensional images of the pelvic structure of patients with anorectal malformations were constructed by computer graphics based upon two dimensional images obtained from MR-CT. Graphic data from MR images were transferred to a graphic work station. The anorectum, bladder and sphincter musculature were displayed three-dimensionally after segmenting these organs by (1) manually regioning the area containing the specific organ and (2) thresholding the area by the T 1 intensity level. The anatomy of each type of anomaly is easily recognized by the 3-D visualization of pelvic viscera and sphincter musculature with emphasis on position and shape of the musculature although there are some difficulties to visualize soft tissue organs. The advanced programs could show the graphic images from any desirable angle quickly enough to be helpful for the simulation of the surgery. Three-dimensional display can be very useful for better understanding of each anomaly and determining the operative method prior to surgery. (author)

  3. 7 Tesla compatible in-bore display for functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groebner, Jens; Berger, Moritz Cornelius; Umathum, Reiner; Bock, Michael; Rauschenberg, Jaane

    2013-08-01

    A liquid crystal display was modified for use inside a 7 T MR magnet. SNR measurements were performed using different imaging sequences with the monitor absent, present, or activated. fMRI with a volunteer was conducted using a visual stimulus. SNR was reduced by 3.7%/7.9% in echo planar/fast-spin echo images when the monitor was on which can be explained by the limited shielding of the coated front window (40 dB). In the fMRI experiments, activated regions in the visual cortex were clearly visible. The monitor provided excellent resolution at minor SNR reduction in EPI images, and is thus suitable for fMRI at ultra-high field.

  4. A rule-based expert system for generating control displays at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    The integration of a rule-based expert system for generating screen displays for controlling and monitoring instrumentation under the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is presented. The expert system is implemented using CLIPS, an expert system shell from the Software Technology Branch at Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. The user selects the hardware input and output to be displayed and the expert system constructs a graphical control screen appropriate for the data. Such a system provides a method for implementing a common look and feel for displays created by several different users and reduces the amount of time required to create displays for new hardware configurations. Users are able to modify the displays as needed using the EPICS display editor tool

  5. A rule-based expert system for generating control displays at the advanced photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    The integration of a rule-based expert system for generating screen displays for controlling and monitoring instrumentation under the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is presented. The expert system is implemented using CLIPS, an expert system shell from the Software Technology Branch at Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. The user selects the hardware input and output to be displayed and the expert system constructs a graphical control screen appropriate for the data. Such a system provides a method for implementing a common look and feel for displays created by several different users and reduces the amount of time required to create displays for new hardware configurations. Users are able to modify the displays as needed using the EPICS display editor tool. ((orig.))

  6. A three-dimensional radiation image display on a real space image created via photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Ozawa, S.; Tanifuji, Y.; Torii, T.

    2018-03-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, Inc., went into meltdown after the occurrence of a large tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011. The radiation distribution measurements inside the FDNPS buildings are indispensable to execute decommissioning tasks in the reactor buildings. We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction method for radioactive substances using a compact Compton camera. Moreover, we succeeded in visually recognizing the position of radioactive substances in real space by the integration of 3D radiation images and the 3D photo-model created using photogrammetry.

  7. Synthesis of tumor necrosis factor α for use as a mirror-image phage display target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Mark E; Jacobsen, Michael T; Kay, Michael S

    2016-06-21

    Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) is an inflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disease. Here we describe the chemical synthesis of l-TNFα along with the mirror-image d-protein for use as a phage display target. The synthetic strategy utilized native chemical ligation and desulfurization to unite three peptide segments, followed by oxidative folding to assemble the 52 kDa homotrimeric protein. This synthesis represents the foundational step for discovering an inhibitory d-peptide with the potential to improve current anti-TNFα therapeutic strategies.

  8. The display of multiple images derived from emission computed assisted tomography (ECAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, P.C.; Davies, E.R.; Goddard, P.R.; Wilde, R.P.H.

    1983-01-01

    In emission computed assisted tomography, a technique has been developed to display the multiple sections of an organ within a single image, such that three dimensional appreciation of the organ can be obtained, whilst also preserving functional information. The technique when tested on phantoms showed no obvious deterioration in resolution and when used clinically gave satisfactory visual results. Such a method should allow easier appreciation of the extent of a lesion through an organ and thus allow dimensions to be obtained by direct measurement. (U.K.)

  9. Real-time interactive three-dimensional display of CT and MR imaging volume data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yla-Jaaski, J.; Kubler, O.; Kikinis, R.

    1987-01-01

    Real-time reconstruction of surfaces from CT and MR imaging volume data is demonstrated using a new algorithm and implementation in a parallel computer system. The display algorithm accepts noncubic 16-bit voxels directly as input. Operations such as interpolation, classification by thresholding, depth coding, simple lighting effects, and removal of parts of the volume by clipping planes are all supported on-line. An eight-processor implementation of the algorithm renders surfaces from typical CT data sets in real time to allow interactive rotation of the volume

  10. Fusion and display of 3D spect and MR images registered by a surface fitting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oghabian, M.A.; Kaboli, P.

    2002-01-01

    Since 3D medical images such as SPECT and MRI are taken under different positioning and imaging parameters, interpretation of them, as reconstructed originally, dose not provide an easy and accurate understanding of similarities and differences between them. The problem becomes more crucial where a clinician would like to map accurately region of interest from one study to the other, by which some surgical or therapeutical planning may be based. the research presented here is an investigation into the problems of the registration and display of brain images obtained by different imaging modalities. Following the introduction of an efficient method some clinical useful application of the registration and superimposition were also defined. The various widely used registration algorithms were first studied and their advantages and disadvantages of each method were evaluated. In this approach, an edge-based algorithm (called surface fitting), which are based on a least-square-distance matching, were suggested for registering of brain images. This algorithm minimizes the sum of square-distances between the two surfaces obtained from two modalities. The minimization is performed to find a set of six geometrical transformation parameters (3 shifts and 3 rotations) which indicate how one surface should be transformed in order to match with the other surface

  11. Real-time image reconstruction and display system for MRI using a high-speed personal computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haishi, T; Kose, K

    1998-09-01

    A real-time NMR image reconstruction and display system was developed using a high-speed personal computer and optimized for the 32-bit multitasking Microsoft Windows 95 operating system. The system was operated at various CPU clock frequencies by changing the motherboard clock frequency and the processor/bus frequency ratio. When the Pentium CPU was used at the 200 MHz clock frequency, the reconstruction time for one 128 x 128 pixel image was 48 ms and that for the image display on the enlarged 256 x 256 pixel window was about 8 ms. NMR imaging experiments were performed with three fast imaging sequences (FLASH, multishot EPI, and one-shot EPI) to demonstrate the ability of the real-time system. It was concluded that in most cases, high-speed PC would be the best choice for the image reconstruction and display system for real-time MRI. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  12. Tilt-effect of holograms and images displayed on a spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harm, Walter; Roider, Clemens; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2015-11-16

    We show that a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCOS-SLM) can be used to display amplitude images, or phase holograms, which change in a pre-determined way when the display is tilted, i.e. observed under different angles. This is similar to the tilt-effect (also called "latent image effect") known from various security elements ("kinegrams") on credit cards or bank notes. The effect is achieved without any specialized optical components, simply by using the large phase shifting capability of a "thick" SLM, which extends over several multiples of 2π, in combination with the angular dependence of the phase shift. For hologram projection one can use the fact that the phase of a monochromatic wave is only defined modulo 2π. Thus one can design a phase pattern extending over several multiples of 2π, which transforms at different readout angles into different 2π-wrapped phase structures, due to the angular dependence of the modulo 2π operation. These different beams then project different holograms at the respective readout angles. In amplitude modulation mode (with inserted polarizer) the intensity of each SLM pixel oscillates over several periods when tuning its control voltage. Since the oscillation period depends on the readout angle, it is possible to find a certain control voltage which produces two (or more) selectable gray levels at a corresponding number of pre-determined readout angles. This is done with all SLM pixels individually, thus constructing different images for the selected angles. We experimentally demonstrate the reconstruction of multiple (Fourier- and Fresnel-) holograms, and of different amplitude images, by readout of static diffractive patterns in a variable angular range between 0° and 60°.

  13. EEG source imaging during two Qigong meditations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Pascal L; Lehmann, Dietrich; Tei, Shisei; Tsujiuchi, Takuya; Kumano, Hiroaki; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Kochi, Kieko

    2012-08-01

    Experienced Qigong meditators who regularly perform the exercises "Thinking of Nothing" and "Qigong" were studied with multichannel EEG source imaging during their meditations. The intracerebral localization of brain electric activity during the two meditation conditions was compared using sLORETA functional EEG tomography. Differences between conditions were assessed using t statistics (corrected for multiple testing) on the normalized and log-transformed current density values of the sLORETA images. In the EEG alpha-2 frequency, 125 voxels differed significantly; all were more active during "Qigong" than "Thinking of Nothing," forming a single cluster in parietal Brodmann areas 5, 7, 31, and 40, all in the right hemisphere. In the EEG beta-1 frequency, 37 voxels differed significantly; all were more active during "Thinking of Nothing" than "Qigong," forming a single cluster in prefrontal Brodmann areas 6, 8, and 9, all in the left hemisphere. Compared to combined initial-final no-task resting, "Qigong" showed activation in posterior areas whereas "Thinking of Nothing" showed activation in anterior areas. The stronger activity of posterior (right) parietal areas during "Qigong" and anterior (left) prefrontal areas during "Thinking of Nothing" may reflect a predominance of self-reference, attention and input-centered processing in the "Qigong" meditation, and of control-centered processing in the "Thinking of Nothing" meditation.

  14. Efficient Imaging and Real-Time Display of Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy Based on Block Compressive Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gongxin; Li, Peng; Wang, Yuechao; Wang, Wenxue; Xi, Ning; Liu, Lianqing

    2014-07-01

    Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (SICM) is one kind of Scanning Probe Microscopies (SPMs), and it is widely used in imaging soft samples for many distinctive advantages. However, the scanning speed of SICM is much slower than other SPMs. Compressive sensing (CS) could improve scanning speed tremendously by breaking through the Shannon sampling theorem, but it still requires too much time in image reconstruction. Block compressive sensing can be applied to SICM imaging to further reduce the reconstruction time of sparse signals, and it has another unique application that it can achieve the function of image real-time display in SICM imaging. In this article, a new method of dividing blocks and a new matrix arithmetic operation were proposed to build the block compressive sensing model, and several experiments were carried out to verify the superiority of block compressive sensing in reducing imaging time and real-time display in SICM imaging.

  15. Head-motion-controlled video goggles: preliminary concept for an interactive laparoscopic image display (i-LID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidlen, Jeremy T; Glick, Sara; Silverman, Kenneth; Silverman, Harvey F; Luks, Francois I

    2009-08-01

    Light-weight, low-profile, and high-resolution head-mounted displays (HMDs) now allow personalized viewing, of a laparoscopic image. The advantages include unobstructed viewing, regardless of position at the operating table, and the possibility to customize the image (i.e., enhanced reality, picture-in-picture, etc.). The bright image display allows use in daylight surroundings and the low profile of the HMD provides adequate peripheral vision. Theoretic disadvantages include reliance for all on the same image capture and anticues (i.e., reality disconnect) when the projected image remains static, despite changes in head position. This can lead to discomfort and even nausea. We have developed a prototype of interactive laparoscopic image display that allows hands-free control of the displayed image by changes in spatial orientation of the operator's head. The prototype consists of an HMD, a spatial orientation device, and computer software to enable hands-free panning and zooming of a video-endoscopic image display. The spatial orientation device uses magnetic fields created by a transmitter and receiver, each containing three orthogonal coils. The transmitter coils are efficiently driven, using USB power only, by a newly developed circuit, each at a unique frequency. The HMD-mounted receiver system links to a commercially available PC-interface PCI-bus sound card (M-Audiocard Delta 44; Avid Technology, Tewksbury, MA). Analog signals at the receiver are filtered, amplified, and converted to digital signals, which are processed to control the image display. The prototype uses a proprietary static fish-eye lens and software for the distortion-free reconstitution of any portion of the captured image. Left-right and up-down motions of the head (and HMD) produce real-time panning of the displayed image. Motion of the head toward, or away from, the transmitter causes real-time zooming in or out, respectively, of the displayed image. This prototype of the interactive HMD

  16. Improvements in data display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    An analog signal processor is described in this patent for connecting a source of analog signals to a cathode ray tube display in order to extend the dynamic range of the display. This has important applications in the field of computerised X-ray tomography since significant medical information, such as tumours in soft tissue, is often represented by minimal level changes in image density. Cathode ray tube displays are limited to approximately 15 intensity levels. Thus if both strong and weak absorption of the X-rays occurs, the dynamic range of the transmitted signals will be too large to permit small variations to be examined directly on a cathode ray display. Present tomographic image reconstruction methods are capable of quantising X-ray absorption density measurements into 256 or more distinct levels and a description is given of the electronics which enables the upper and lower range of intensity levels to be independently set and continuously varied. (UK)

  17. Effects of display resolution and size on primary diagnosis of chest images using a high-resolution electronic work station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrman, C.R.; Cooperstein, L.A.; Herron, J.; Good, W.F.; Good, B.; Gur, D.; Maitz, G.; Tabor, E.; Hoy, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the acceptability of electronically displayed planar images, the authors have a high-resolution work station. This system utilizes a high-resolution film digitizer (100-micro resolution) interfaced to a mainframe computer and two high-resolution (2,048 X 2,048) display devices (Azuray). In a clinically simulated multiobserver blind study (19 cases and five observers) a prodetermined series of reading sessions is stored on magnetic disk and is transferred to the displays while the preceding set of images is being reviewed. Images can be linearly processed on the fly into 2,000 X 2,000 full resolution, 1,000 X 1,000 minified display, or 1,000 X 1,000 interpolated for full-size display. Results of the study indicate that radiologists accept but do not like significant minification (more than X2), and they rate 2,000 X 2,000 images as having better diagnostic quality than 1,000 X 1,000 images

  18. Dynamic three-dimensional display of common congenital cardiac defects from reconstruction of two-dimensional echocardiographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, K S; Lin, C C; Liu, W S; Chen, F L

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography had long been a standard diagnostic modality for congenital heart disease. Further attempts of three-dimensional reconstruction using two-dimensional echocardiographic images to visualize stereotypic structure of cardiac lesions have been successful only recently. So far only very few studies have been done to display three-dimensional anatomy of the heart through two-dimensional image acquisition because such complex procedures were involved. This study introduced a recently developed image acquisition and processing system for dynamic three-dimensional visualization of various congenital cardiac lesions. From December 1994 to April 1995, 35 cases were selected in the Echo Laboratory here from about 3000 Echo examinations completed. Each image was acquired on-line with specially designed high resolution image grazmber with EKG and respiratory gating technique. Off-line image processing using a window-architectured interactive software package includes construction of 2-D ehcocardiographic pixel to 3-D "voxel" with conversion of orthogonal to rotatory axial system, interpolation, extraction of region of interest, segmentation, shading and, finally, 3D rendering. Three-dimensional anatomy of various congenital cardiac defects was shown, including four cases with ventricular septal defects, two cases with atrial septal defects, and two cases with aortic stenosis. Dynamic reconstruction of a "beating heart" is recorded as vedio tape with video interface. The potential application of 3D display of the reconstruction from 2D echocardiographic images for the diagnosis of various congenital heart defects has been shown. The 3D display was able to improve the diagnostic ability of echocardiography, and clear-cut display of the various congenital cardiac defects and vavular stenosis could be demonstrated. Reinforcement of current techniques will expand future application of 3D display of conventional 2D images.

  19. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, Thomas Jan [Livermore, CA; Kliner, Dahv A. V. [San Ramon, CA; Sommers, Ricky [Oakley, CA; Goers, Uta-Barbara [Campbell, NY; Armstrong, Karla M [Livermore, CA

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  20. Image change detection systems, methods, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James L.; Lassahn, Gordon D.; Lancaster, Gregory D.

    2010-01-05

    Aspects of the invention relate to image change detection systems, methods, and articles of manufacture. According to one aspect, a method of identifying differences between a plurality of images is described. The method includes loading a source image and a target image into memory of a computer, constructing source and target edge images from the source and target images to enable processing of multiband images, displaying the source and target images on a display device of the computer, aligning the source and target edge images, switching displaying of the source image and the target image on the display device, to enable identification of differences between the source image and the target image.

  1. Encryption and display of multiple-image information using computer-generated holography with modified GS iterative algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dan; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Su-Juan; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a new scheme of multiple-image encryption and display based on computer-generated holography (CGH) and maximum length cellular automata (MLCA) is presented. With the scheme, the computer-generated hologram, which has the information of the three primitive images, is generated by modified Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) iterative algorithm using three different fractional orders in fractional Fourier domain firstly. Then the hologram is encrypted using MLCA mask. The ciphertext can be decrypted combined with the fractional orders and the rules of MLCA. Numerical simulations and experimental display results have been carried out to verify the validity and feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  2. Electrophysiological Source Imaging: A Noninvasive Window to Brain Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Sohrabpour, Abbas; Brown, Emery; Liu, Zhongming

    2018-06-04

    Brain activity and connectivity are distributed in the three-dimensional space and evolve in time. It is important to image brain dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. Electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) are noninvasive measurements associated with complex neural activations and interactions that encode brain functions. Electrophysiological source imaging estimates the underlying brain electrical sources from EEG and MEG measurements. It offers increasingly improved spatial resolution and intrinsically high temporal resolution for imaging large-scale brain activity and connectivity on a wide range of timescales. Integration of electrophysiological source imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging could further enhance spatiotemporal resolution and specificity to an extent that is not attainable with either technique alone. We review methodological developments in electrophysiological source imaging over the past three decades and envision its future advancement into a powerful functional neuroimaging technology for basic and clinical neuroscience applications.

  3. High-precision surface formation and the 3-D shaded display of the brain obtained from CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Noboru; Higuti, Kiyofumi; Takahashi, Yoshizo

    1986-01-01

    High-precision reconstruction of surface and 3-D shaded display of the target organ and lesions, obtained from CT images, aid in medical recognition. Firstly, this paper points out some problems of using a conventional method, in which brain surface is reconstructed from the known contour of brain slices, in 3-D shaded display of the brain in a dog. Secondly, a new high-precision technique for reconstructing complex brain surface from brain contour is proposed. The principle of the technique consists of extracting data of outline surface and fissures, smoothing of brain contour, and recomposition of the data of outline surface and fissures into a composite surface image. Finally, the validity of the method was verified by successfully reconstructing complex brain surface from the contour of dog brain slices. In addition, it was possible to cut brain surface, obtained by the newly developed technique, in any voluntary plane and to display CT values on the sections. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. A head-mounted display-based personal integrated-image monitoring system for transurethral resection of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Soichiro; Kihara, Kazunori; Takeshita, Hideki; Fujii, Yasuhisa

    2014-12-01

    The head-mounted display (HMD) is a new image monitoring system. We developed the Personal Integrated-image Monitoring System (PIM System) using the HMD (HMZ-T2, Sony Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) in combination with video splitters and multiplexers as a surgical guide system for transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). The imaging information obtained from the cystoscope, the transurethral ultrasonography (TRUS), the video camera attached to the HMD, and the patient's vital signs monitor were split and integrated by the PIM System and a composite image was displayed by the HMD using a four-split screen technique. Wearing the HMD, the lead surgeon and the assistant could simultaneously and continuously monitor the same information displayed by the HMD in an ergonomically efficient posture. Each participant could independently rearrange the images comprising the composite image depending on the engaging step. Two benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients underwent TURP performed by surgeons guided with this system. In both cases, the TURP procedure was successfully performed, and their postoperative clinical courses had no remarkable unfavorable events. During the procedure, none of the participants experienced any HMD-wear related adverse effects or reported any discomfort.

  5. Diagnostics of microdischarge-integrated plasma sources for display and materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, K; Kishimoto, Y; Kawai, S; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, O

    2005-01-01

    Two different types of microdischarge-integrated plasma sources have been operated at around the atmospheric pressure range. The discharge characteristics were diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) and microwave transmission (MT) techniques. The dynamic spatiotemporal behaviour of excited atoms was analysed using OES and LAS and the temporal behaviour of the electron density was estimated using the MT method. In Ar and Xe/Ne gases, waveforms of the MT signal followed the current waveform in the rise period and lasted longer according to the recombination losses. However, in He the waveform followed the density of metastable atoms, reflecting the production of a large amount of electrons by the Penning ionization process with impurities. The estimated peak electron density in those plasma sources is of the order of 10 12 cm -3 , and the metastable atom density can reach 10 13 cm -3 . Thus, it is suggested that these sources can be potentially applied to convenient material processing tools of large area operated stably at atmospheric pressure

  6. Presurgical mapping with magnetic source imaging. Comparisons with intraoperative findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.P.L.; Ferrari, P.; Perry, D.; Rowley, H.A.; Berger, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    We compare noninvasive preoperative mapping with magnetic source imaging to intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping. These techniques were directly compared in 17 patients who underwent preoperative and postoperative somatosensory mapping of a total of 22 comparable anatomic sites (digits, face). Our findings are presented in the context of previous studies that used magnetic source imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging as noninvasive surrogates of intraoperative mapping for the identification of sensorimotor and language-specific brain functional centers in patients with brain tumors. We found that magnetic source imaging results were reasonably concordant with intraoperative mapping findings in over 90% of cases, and that concordance could be defined as 'good' in 77% of cases. Magnetic source imaging therefore provides a viable, if coarse, identification of somatosensory areas and, consequently, can guide and reduce the time taken for intraoperative mapping procedures. (author)

  7. Comparison of source moment tensor recovered by diffraction stacking migration and source time reversal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Zhang, W.

    2017-12-01

    Diffraction stacking migration is an automatic location methods and widely used in microseismic monitoring of the hydraulic fracturing. It utilizes the stacking of thousands waveform to enhance signal-to-noise ratio of weak events. For surface monitoring, the diffraction stacking method is suffered from polarity reverse among receivers due to radiation pattern of moment source. Joint determination of location and source mechanism has been proposed to overcome the polarity problem but needs significantly increased computational calculations. As an effective method to recover source moment tensor, time reversal imaging based on wave equation can locate microseismic event by using interferometry on the image to extract source position. However, the time reversal imaging is very time consuming compared to the diffraction stacking location because of wave-equation simulation.In this study, we compare the image from diffraction stacking and time reversal imaging to check if the diffraction stacking can obtain similar moment tensor as time reversal imaging. We found that image produced by taking the largest imaging value at each point along time axis does not exhibit the radiation pattern, while with the same level of calculation efficiency, the image produced for each trial origin time can generate radiation pattern similar to time reversal imaging procedure. Thus it is potential to locate the source position by the diffraction stacking method for general moment tensor sources.

  8. Optical Imaging of Ionizing Radiation from Clinical Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Travis M; Drain, Charles Michael; Grimm, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear medicine uses ionizing radiation for both in vivo diagnosis and therapy. Ionizing radiation comes from a variety of sources, including x-rays, beam therapy, brachytherapy, and various injected radionuclides. Although PET and SPECT remain clinical mainstays, optical readouts of ionizing radiation offer numerous benefits and complement these standard techniques. Furthermore, for ionizing radiation sources that cannot be imaged using these standard techniques, optical imaging offers a unique imaging alternative. This article reviews optical imaging of both radionuclide- and beam-based ionizing radiation from high-energy photons and charged particles through mechanisms including radioluminescence, Cerenkov luminescence, and scintillation. Therapeutically, these visible photons have been combined with photodynamic therapeutic agents preclinically for increasing therapeutic response at depths difficult to reach with external light sources. Last, new microscopy methods that allow single-cell optical imaging of radionuclides are reviewed. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  9. Random laser illumination: an ideal source for biomedical polarization imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Mariana T.; Lotay, Amrit S.; Kenny, Fiona M.; Girkin, John M.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging applications increasingly require light sources with high spectral density (power over spectral bandwidth. This has led in many cases to the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers and superluminescent diodes. Although lasers and superluminescent diodes appear to be ideal light sources due to their narrow bandwidth and power, however, in the case of full-field imaging, their spatial coherence leads to coherent artefacts, such as speckle, that corrupt the image. LEDs, in contrast, have lower spatial coherence and thus seem the natural choice, but they have low spectral density. Random Lasers are an unconventional type of laser that can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence with high spectral density. These characteristics makes them potential sources for biological imaging applications where specific absorption and reflection are the characteristics required for state of the art imaging. In this work, a Random Laser (RL) is used to demonstrate speckle-free full-field imaging for polarization-dependent imaging in an epi-illumination configuration. We compare LED and RL illumination analysing the resulting images demonstrating that the RL illumination produces an imaging system with higher performance (image quality and spectral density) than that provided by LEDs.

  10. Virtual ultrasound sources in high-resolution ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    beamforming procedure for 3D ultrasound imaging. The position of the virtual source, and the created waveform are investigated with simulation, and with pulse-echo measurements. There is good agreement between the estimated wavefront and the theoretically tted one. Several examples of the use of virtual...... source elements are considered. Using SAF on data acquired for a conventional linear array imaging improves the penetration depth for the particular imaging situation from 80 to 110 mm. The independent use of virtual source elements in the elevation plane decreases the respective size of the point spread...

  11. Microlaser-based displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstedt, Robert; Fink, Charles G.; Flint, Graham W.; Hargis, David E.; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1997-07-01

    Laser Power Corporation has developed a new type of projection display, based upon microlaser technology and a novel scan architecture, which provides the foundation for bright, extremely high resolution images. A review of projection technologies is presented along with the limitations of each and the difficulties they experience in trying to generate high resolution imagery. The design of the microlaser based projector is discussed along with the advantage of this technology. High power red, green, and blue microlasers have been designed and developed specifically for use in projection displays. These sources, in combination with high resolution, high contrast modulator, produce a 24 bit color gamut, capable of supporting the full range of real world colors. The new scan architecture, which reduces the modulation rate and scan speeds required, is described. This scan architecture, along with the inherent brightness of the laser provides the fundamentals necessary to produce a 5120 by 4096 resolution display. The brightness and color uniformity of the display is excellent, allowing for tiling of the displays with far fewer artifacts than those in a traditionally tiled display. Applications for the display include simulators, command and control centers, and electronic cinema.

  12. Image quality affected by diffraction of aperture structure arrangement in transparent active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Mao-Hsiu; Jeng, Wei-de; Huang, Ting-Wei; Lo, Kuo-Lung; Ou-Yang, Mang

    2015-10-01

    Transparent display is one of the main technologies in next-generation displays, especially for augmented reality applications. An aperture structure is attached on each display pixel to partition them into transparent and black regions. However, diffraction blurs caused by the aperture structure typically degrade the transparent image when the light from a background object passes through finite aperture window. In this paper, the diffraction effect of an active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display (AMOLED) is studied. Several aperture structures have been proposed and implemented. Based on theoretical analysis and simulation, the appropriate aperture structure will effectively reduce the blur. The analysis data are also consistent with the experimental results. Compared with the various transparent aperture structure on AMOLED, diffraction width (zero energy position of diffraction pattern) of the optimize aperture structure can be reduced 63% and 31% in the x and y directions in CASE 3. Associated with a lenticular lens on the aperture structure, the improvement could reach to 77% and 54% of diffraction width in the x and y directions. Modulation transfer function and practical images are provided to evaluate the improvement of image blurs.

  13. Future prospects of imaging at spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl, M.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of state-of-the-art spallation neutron sources is a major step forward in efficient neutron production for most neutron scattering techniques. Although they provide lower time-averaged neutron flux than high flux reactor sources, advantage for different instrumental techniques can be derived from the pulsed time structure of the available flux, which can be translated into energy, respectively, wavelength resolution. Conventional neutron imaging on the other hand relies on an intense continuous beam flux and hence falls short in profiting from the new development. Nevertheless, some recently developed novel imaging techniques require and some can benefit from energy resolution. The impact of the emerging spallation sources on different imaging techniques has been investigated, ways to benefit will be identified (where possible) and prospects of future imaging instruments and possible options and layouts at a spallation neutron source will be discussed and outlined.

  14. An evolution of image source camera attribution approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanirad, Mehdi; Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Abdul; Anuar, Nor Badrul

    2016-05-01

    Camera attribution plays an important role in digital image forensics by providing the evidence and distinguishing characteristics of the origin of the digital image. It allows the forensic analyser to find the possible source camera which captured the image under investigation. However, in real-world applications, these approaches have faced many challenges due to the large set of multimedia data publicly available through photo sharing and social network sites, captured with uncontrolled conditions and undergone variety of hardware and software post-processing operations. Moreover, the legal system only accepts the forensic analysis of the digital image evidence if the applied camera attribution techniques are unbiased, reliable, nondestructive and widely accepted by the experts in the field. The aim of this paper is to investigate the evolutionary trend of image source camera attribution approaches from fundamental to practice, in particular, with the application of image processing and data mining techniques. Extracting implicit knowledge from images using intrinsic image artifacts for source camera attribution requires a structured image mining process. In this paper, we attempt to provide an introductory tutorial on the image processing pipeline, to determine the general classification of the features corresponding to different components for source camera attribution. The article also reviews techniques of the source camera attribution more comprehensively in the domain of the image forensics in conjunction with the presentation of classifying ongoing developments within the specified area. The classification of the existing source camera attribution approaches is presented based on the specific parameters, such as colour image processing pipeline, hardware- and software-related artifacts and the methods to extract such artifacts. The more recent source camera attribution approaches, which have not yet gained sufficient attention among image forensics

  15. Source position error influence on industry CT image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Peng; Li Zhipeng; Wu Haifeng

    2004-01-01

    Based on the emulational exercise, the influence of source position error on industry CT (ICT) image quality was studied and the valuable parameters were obtained for the design of ICT. The vivid container CT image was also acquired from the CT testing system. (authors)

  16. Standardizing display conditions of diffusion-weighted images using concurrent b0 images. A multi-vendor multi-institutional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Ida, Masahiro; Yamada, Kei; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Matsui, Mieko

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a practical method that uses concurrent b0 images to standardize the display conditions for diffusion-weighted images (DWI) that vary among institutions and interpreters. Using identical parameters, we obtained DWI for 12 healthy volunteers at 4 institutions using 4 MRI scanners from 3 vendors. Three operators manually set the window width for the images equal to the signal intensity of the normal-appearing thalamus on b0 images and set the window level at half and then exported the images to 8-bit gray-scale images. We calculated the mean pixel values of the brain objects in the images and examined the variation among scanners, operators, and subjects. Following our method, the DWI of the 12 subjects obtained using the 4 different scanners had nearly identical contrast and brightness. The mean pixel values of the brain on the exported images among the operators and subjects were not significantly different, but we found a slight, significant difference among the scanners. Determining DWI display conditions by using b0 images is a simple and practical method to standardize window width and level for evaluating diffusion abnormalities and decreasing variation among institutions and operators. (author)

  17. Aerial 3D display by use of a 3D-shaped screen with aerial imaging by retro-reflection (AIRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Nao; Ito, Shusei; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to realize an aerial 3D display. We design optical system that employs a projector below a retro-reflector and a 3D-shaped screen. A floating 3D image is formed with aerial imaging by retro-reflection (AIRR). Our proposed system is composed of a 3D-shaped screen, a projector, a quarter-wave retarder, a retro-reflector, and a reflective polarizer. Because AIRR forms aerial images that are plane-symmetric of the light sources regarding the reflective polarizer, the shape of the 3D screen is inverted from a desired aerial 3D image. In order to expand viewing angle, the 3D-shaped screen is surrounded by a retro-reflector. In order to separate the aerial image from reflected lights on the retro- reflector surface, the retro-reflector is tilted by 30 degrees. A projector is located below the retro-reflector at the same height of the 3D-shaped screen. The optical axis of the projector is orthogonal to the 3D-shaped screen. Scattered light on the 3D-shaped screen forms the aerial 3D image. In order to demonstrate the proposed optical design, a corner-cube-shaped screen is used for the 3D-shaped screen. Thus, the aerial 3D image is a cube that is floating above the reflective polarizer. For example, an aerial green cube is formed by projecting a calculated image on the 3D-shaped screen. The green cube image is digitally inverted in depth by our developed software. Thus, we have succeeded in forming aerial 3D image with our designed optical system.

  18. Sparse Source EEG Imaging with the Variational Garrote

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Stahlhut, Carsten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2013-01-01

    EEG imaging, the estimation of the cortical source distribution from scalp electrode measurements, poses an extremely ill-posed inverse problem. Recent work by Delorme et al. (2012) supports the hypothesis that distributed source solutions are sparse. We show that direct search for sparse solutions...

  19. New neutron imaging using pulsed sources. Characteristics of a pulsed neutron source and principle of pulsed neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Neutron beam is one of important tools to obtain the transmission image of an object. Until now, steady state neutron sources such as reactors are mainly used for this imaging purpose. Recently, it has been demonstrated that pulsed neutron imaging based on accelerator neutron sources can provide a real-space distribution of physical information of materials such as crystallographic structure, element, temperature, hydrogen bound state, magnetic field and so on, by analyzing wavelength dependent transmission spectrum, which information cannot be observed or difficult to obtain with a traditional imaging method using steady state neutrons. Here, characteristics of the pulsed neutron source and principle of the pulsed neutron imaging are explained as a basic concept of the new method. (author)

  20. More than the Verbal Stimulus Matters: Visual Attention in Language Assessment for People with Aphasia Using Multiple-Choice Image Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Sabine; Ivanova, Maria V.; Hallowell, Brooke

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Language comprehension in people with aphasia (PWA) is frequently evaluated using multiple-choice displays: PWA are asked to choose the image that best corresponds to the verbal stimulus in a display. When a nontarget image is selected, comprehension failure is assumed. However, stimulus-driven factors unrelated to linguistic…

  1. Quantitative PET Imaging with Novel HER3 Targeted Peptides Selected by Phage Display to Predict Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Independent Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin Larimer, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts General Hospital Boston...3. DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2016 – 31 July 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cancer Progression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Quantitative PET Imaging with Novel HER3...Targeted Peptides Selected by Phage Display to Predict Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Progression 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0447 5c

  2. Coded aperture imaging of alpha source spatial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebitaher, Alireza; Shutler, Paul M.E.; Springham, Stuart V.; Rawat, Rajdeep S.; Lee, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The Coded Aperture Imaging (CAI) technique has been applied with CR-39 nuclear track detectors to image alpha particle source spatial distributions. The experimental setup comprised: a 226 Ra source of alpha particles, a laser-machined CAI mask, and CR-39 detectors, arranged inside a vacuum enclosure. Three different alpha particle source shapes were synthesized by using a linear translator to move the 226 Ra source within the vacuum enclosure. The coded mask pattern used is based on a Singer Cyclic Difference Set, with 400 pixels and 57 open square holes (representing ρ = 1/7 = 14.3% open fraction). After etching of the CR-39 detectors, the area, circularity, mean optical density and positions of all candidate tracks were measured by an automated scanning system. Appropriate criteria were used to select alpha particle tracks, and a decoding algorithm applied to the (x, y) data produced the de-coded image of the source. Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) values obtained for alpha particle CAI images were found to be substantially better than those for corresponding pinhole images, although the CAI-SNR values were below the predictions of theoretical formulae. Monte Carlo simulations of CAI and pinhole imaging were performed in order to validate the theoretical SNR formulae and also our CAI decoding algorithm. There was found to be good agreement between the theoretical formulae and SNR values obtained from simulations. Possible reasons for the lower SNR obtained for the experimental CAI study are discussed.

  3. Network Distributed Data Acquisition, Storage, and Graphical Live Display Software for a Laser Ion Source at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rossel, Ralf Erik; Rothe, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    This project documentation outlines the requirements and implementation details for the measurement data recording software currently in development for the Resonance Ionisation Laser Ion Source (RILIS) at CERN. The software is capable of acquiring data from multiple laser parameter monitoring devices and associating the gathered values to represent qualitative and quantitative measurements. The measurement data is displayed graphically within the program and recorded to files for later analysis. The main application of the software is the acquisition coordination and recording of measurement data during spectroscopy experiments performed by RILIS and collaborating experiments. This document describes the design concept and detailed program implementation status at the end of July 2014 and provides an outlook to future developments in RILIS spectroscopy data acquisition.

  4. Integrated three-dimensional display of MR, CT, and PET images of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, D.N.; Herrmann, A.; Chen, G.T.Y.

    1988-01-01

    MR, CT, and PET studies depict complementary aspects of brain anatomy and function. The authors' own image-processing software and a Pixar image computer were used to create three-dimensional models of brain soft tissues from MR images, of the skull and calcifications from CT scans, and of brain metabolism from PET images. An image correlation program, based on surface fitting, was used for retrospective registration and merging of these three-dimensional models. The results are demonstrated in a video clip showing how the operator may rotate and perform electronic surgery on the integrated, multimodality three-dimensional model of each patient's brain

  5. New method for identifying features of an image on a digital video display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Michael D.

    1991-04-01

    The MetaMap process extends the concept of direct manipulation human-computer interfaces to new limits. Its specific capabilities include the correlation of discrete image elements to relevant text information and the correlation of these image features to other images as well as to program control mechanisms. The correlation is accomplished through reprogramming of both the color map and the image so that discrete image elements comprise unique sets of color indices. This process allows the correlation to be accomplished with very efficient data storage and program execution times. Image databases adapted to this process become object-oriented as a result. Very sophisticated interrelationships can be set up between images text and program control mechanisms using this process. An application of this interfacing process to the design of an interactive atlas of medical histology as well as other possible applications are described. The MetaMap process is protected by U. S. patent #4

  6. Gadgetron: An Open Source Framework for Medical Image Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Schacht; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new open source framework for medical image reconstruction called the “Gadgetron.” The framework implements a flexible system for creating streaming data processing pipelines where data pass through a series of modules or “Gadgets” from raw data to reconstructed images...... with a set of dedicated toolboxes in shared libraries for medical image reconstruction. This includes generic toolboxes for data-parallel (e.g., GPU-based) execution of compute-intensive components. The basic framework architecture is independent of medical imaging modality, but this article focuses on its...

  7. Display of cross sectional anatomy by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, W S; Andrew, E R; Bottomley, P A; Holland, G N; Moore, W S

    1995-12-01

    High definition cross-sectional images produced by a new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique are shown. The images are a series of thin section scans in the coronal plane of the head of a rabbit. The NMR images are derived from the distribution of the density of mobile hydrogen atoms. Various tissue types can be distinguished and a clear registration of gross anatomy is demonstrated. No known hazards are associated with the technique.

  8. Influential sources affecting Bangkok adolescent body image perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thianthai, Chulanee

    2006-01-01

    The study of body image-related problems in non-Western countries is still very limited. Thus, this study aims to identify the main influential sources and show how they affect the body image perceptions of Bangkok adolescents. The researcher recruited 400 Thai male and female adolescents in Bangkok, attending high school to freshmen level, ranging from 16-19 years, to participate in this study. Survey questionnaires were distributed to every student and follow-up interviews conducted with 40 students. The findings showed that there are eight main influential sources respectively ranked from the most influential to the least influential: magazines, television, peer group, familial, fashion trend, the opposite gender, self-realization and health knowledge. Similar to those studies conducted in Western countries, more than half of the total percentage was the influence of mass media and peer groups. Bangkok adolescents also internalized Western ideal beauty through these mass media channels. Alike studies conducted in the West, there was similarities in the process of how these influential sources affect Bangkok adolescent body image perception, with the exception of familial source. In conclusion, taking the approach of identifying the main influential sources and understanding how they affect adolescent body image perceptions can help prevent adolescents from having unhealthy views and taking risky measures toward their bodies. More studies conducted in non-Western countries are needed in order to build a cultural sensitive program, catered to the body image problems occurring in adolescents within that particular society.

  9. A moving image system for cardiovascular nuclear medicine. A dedicated auxiliary device for the total capacity imaging system for multiple plane dynamic colour display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iio, M.; Toyama, H.; Murata, H.; Takaoka, S.

    1981-01-01

    The recent device of the authors, the dedicated multiplane dynamic colour image display system for nuclear medicine, is discussed. This new device is a hardware-based auxiliary moving image system (AMIS) attached to the total capacity image processing system of the authors' department. The major purpose of this study is to develop the dedicated device so that cardiovascular nuclear medicine and other dynamic studies will include the ability to assess the real time delicate processing of the colour selection, edge detection, phased analysis, etc. The auxiliary system consists of the interface for image transferring, four IC refresh memories of 64x64 matrix with 10 bit count depth, a digital 20-in colour TV monitor, a control keyboard and a control panel with potentiometers. This system has five major functions for colour display: (1) A microcomputer board can select any one of 40 different colour tables preset in the colour transformation RAM. This key also provides edge detection at a certain level of the count by leaving the optional colour and setting the rest of the levels at 0 (black); (2) The arithmetic processing circuit performs the operation of the fundamental rules, permitting arithmetic processes of the two images; (3) The colour level control circuit is operated independently by four potentiometers for four refresh image memories, so that the gain and offset of the colour level can be manually and visually controlled to the satisfaction of the operator; (4) The simultaneous CRT display of the maximum four images with or without cinematic motion is possible; (5) The real time movie interval is also adjustable by hardware, and certain frames can be freezed with overlapping of the dynamic frames. Since this system of AMIS is linked with the whole capacity image processing system of the CPU size of 128kW, etc., clinical applications are not limited to cardiovascular nuclear medicine. (author)

  10. Digital hologram transformations for RGB color holographic display with independent image magnification and translation in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Piotr L; Zaperty, Weronika; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    A new framework for in-plane transformations of digital holograms (DHs) is proposed, which provides improved control over basic geometrical features of holographic images reconstructed optically in full color. The method is based on a Fourier hologram equivalent of the adaptive affine transformation technique [Opt. Express18, 8806 (2010)OPEXFF1094-408710.1364/OE.18.008806]. The solution includes four elementary geometrical transformations that can be performed independently on a full-color 3D image reconstructed from an RGB hologram: (i) transverse magnification; (ii) axial translation with minimized distortion; (iii) transverse translation; and (iv) viewing angle rotation. The independent character of transformations (i) and (ii) constitutes the main result of the work and plays a double role: (1) it simplifies synchronization of color components of the RGB image in the presence of mismatch between capture and display parameters; (2) provides improved control over position and size of the projected image, particularly the axial position, which opens new possibilities for efficient animation of holographic content. The approximate character of the operations (i) and (ii) is examined both analytically and experimentally using an RGB circular holographic display system. Additionally, a complex animation built from a single wide-aperture RGB Fourier hologram is presented to demonstrate full capabilities of the developed toolset.

  11. Computer-assisted orthognathic surgery: waferless maxillary positioning, versatility, and accuracy of an image-guided visualisation display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Max J; Mischkowski, Robert A; Dreiseidler, Timo; Thamm, Oliver C; Rothamel, Daniel; Zöller, Joachim E

    2013-12-01

    There may well be a shift towards 3-dimensional orthognathic surgery when virtual surgical planning can be applied clinically. We present a computer-assisted protocol that uses surgical navigation supplemented by an interactive image-guided visualisation display (IGVD) to transfer virtual maxillary planning precisely. The aim of this study was to analyse its accuracy and versatility in vivo. The protocol consists of maxillofacial imaging, diagnosis, planning of virtual treatment, and intraoperative surgical transfer using an IGV display. The advantage of the interactive IGV display is that the virtually planned maxilla and its real position can be completely superimposed during operation through a video graphics array (VGA) camera, thereby augmenting the surgeon's 3-dimensional perception. Sixteen adult class III patients were treated with by bimaxillary osteotomy. Seven hard tissue variables were chosen to compare (ΔT1-T0) the virtual maxillary planning (T0) with the postoperative result (T1) using 3-dimensional cephalometry. Clinically acceptable precision for the surgical planning transfer of the maxilla (orthognathic planning. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The VTTVIS line imaging spectrometer - principles, error sources, and calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, R.N.

    2002-01-01

    work describing the basic principles, potential error sources, and/or adjustment and calibration procedures. This report fulfils the need for such documentationwith special focus on the system at KVL. The PGP based system has several severe error sources, which should be removed prior any analysis......Hyperspectral imaging with a spatial resolution of a few mm2 has proved to have a great potential within crop and weed classification and also within nutrient diagnostics. A commonly used hyperspectral imaging system is based on the Prism-Grating-Prism(PGP) principles produced by Specim Ltd...... in off-axis transmission efficiencies, diffractionefficiencies, and image distortion have a significant impact on the instrument performance. Procedures removing or minimising these systematic error sources are developed and described for the system build at KVL but can be generalised to other PGP...

  13. PySE: Python Source Extractor for radio astronomical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Swinbank, John; Molenaar, Gijs; Staley, Tim; Rol, Evert; Sanders, John; Scheers, Bart; Kuiack, Mark

    2018-05-01

    PySE finds and measures sources in radio telescope images. It is run with several options, such as the detection threshold (a multiple of the local noise), grid size, and the forced clean beam fit, followed by a list of input image files in standard FITS or CASA format. From these, PySe provides a list of found sources; information such as the calculated background image, source list in different formats (e.g. text, region files importable in DS9), and other data may be saved. PySe can be integrated into a pipeline; it was originally written as part of the LOFAR Transient Detection Pipeline (TraP, ascl:1412.011).

  14. Elimination of image flicker in a fringe-field switching liquid crystal display by applying a bipolar voltage wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Won; Park, Jun-Hee; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2015-09-07

    Recently, low-frequency driving of liquid crystal display (LCD) panels to minimize power consumption has drawn much attention. In the case in which an LCD panel is driven by a fringe-field at a low frequency, the image flickering phenomenon occurs when the sign of the applied electric field is reversed. We investigated image flickering induced by the flexoelectric effect in a fringe-field switching (FFS) liquid crystal cell in terms of the transmittance difference between frames and the ripple phenomenon. Experimental results show that image flicker due to transmittance difference can be eliminated completely and that the ripple phenomena can be reduced significantly by applying a bipolar voltage wave to the FFS cell.

  15. PySE: Software for extracting sources from radio images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, D.; Garsden, H.; Spreeuw, H.; Swinbank, J. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Broderick, J. W.; Rol, E.; Law, C.; Molenaar, G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2018-04-01

    PySE is a Python software package for finding and measuring sources in radio telescope images. The software was designed to detect sources in the LOFAR telescope images, but can be used with images from other radio telescopes as well. We introduce the LOFAR Telescope, the context within which PySE was developed, the design of PySE, and describe how it is used. Detailed experiments on the validation and testing of PySE are then presented, along with results of performance testing. We discuss some of the current issues with the algorithms implemented in PySE and their interaction with LOFAR images, concluding with the current status of PySE and its future development.

  16. Photoacoustic imaging driven by an interstitial irradiation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Mitcham

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic (PA imaging has shown tremendous promise in providing valuable diagnostic and therapy-monitoring information in select clinical procedures. Many of these pursued applications, however, have been relatively superficial due to difficulties with delivering light deep into tissue. To address this limitation, this work investigates generating a PA image using an interstitial irradiation source with a clinical ultrasound (US system, which was shown to yield improved PA signal quality at distances beyond 13 mm and to provide improved spectral fidelity. Additionally, interstitially driven multi-wavelength PA imaging was able to provide accurate spectra of gold nanoshells and deoxyhemoglobin in excised prostate and liver tissue, respectively, and allowed for clear visualization of a wire at 7 cm in excised liver. This work demonstrates the potential of using a local irradiation source to extend the depth capabilities of future PA imaging techniques for minimally invasive interventional radiology procedures.

  17. Intensity correlation imaging with sunlight-like source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Tang, Zhiguo; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Hui; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Jinbin; Liu, Yanyan; Xu, Zhuo

    2018-05-01

    We show a method of intensity correlation imaging of targets illuminated by a sunlight-like source both theoretically and experimentally. With a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), we have modulated the coherence time of a thermal source up to 0.167 ns. And we carried out measurements of temporal and spatial correlations, respectively, with an intensity interferometer setup. By skillfully using the even Fourier fitting on the very sparse sampling data, the images of targets are successfully reconstructed from the low signal-noise-ratio(SNR) interference pattern by applying an iterative phase retrieval algorithm. The resulting imaging quality is as well as the one obtained by the theoretical fitting. The realization of such a case will bring this technique closer to geostationary satellite imaging illuminated by sunlight.

  18. Dose performance and image quality: Dual source CT versus single source CT in cardiac CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Min; Qi Hengtao; Wang Ximing; Wang Tao; Chen, Jiu-Hong; Liu Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dose performance and image quality of 64-slice dual source CT (DSCT) in comparison to 64-slice single source CT (SSCT) in cardiac CT angiography (CTA). Methods: 100 patients examined by DSCT and 60 patients scanned by SSCT were included in this study. Objective indices such as image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio and signal-to-noise ratio were analyzed. Subjective image quality was assessed by two cardiovascular radiologists in consensus using a four-point scale (1 = excellent to 4 = not acceptable). Estimation of effective dose was performed on the basis of dose length product (DLP). Results: At low heart rates ( 0.05), but, at high heart rates (>70 bpm), DSCT provided robust image quality (P 70 bpm), DSCT is able to provide robust diagnostic image quality at doses far below that of SSCT.

  19. System description and analysis. Part 1: Feasibility study for helicopter/VTOL wide-angle simulation image generation display system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary design for a helicopter/VSTOL wide angle simulator image generation display system is studied. The visual system is to become part of a simulator capability to support Army aviation systems research and development within the near term. As required for the Army to simulate a wide range of aircraft characteristics, versatility and ease of changing cockpit configurations were primary considerations of the study. Due to the Army's interest in low altitude flight and descents into and landing in constrained areas, particular emphasis is given to wide field of view, resolution, brightness, contrast, and color. The visual display study includes a preliminary design, demonstrated feasibility of advanced concepts, and a plan for subsequent detail design and development. Analysis and tradeoff considerations for various visual system elements are outlined and discussed.

  20. Incorporating priors for EEG source imaging and connectivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu eLei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography source imaging (ESI is a useful technique to localize the generators from a given scalp electric measurement and to investigate the temporal dynamics of the large-scale neural circuits. By introducing reasonable priors from other modalities, ESI reveals the most probable sources and communication structures at every moment in time. Here, we review the available priors from such techniques as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, functional MRI (fMRI, and positron emission tomography (PET. The modality's specific contribution is analyzed from the perspective of source reconstruction. For spatial priors, such as EEG-correlated fMRI, temporally coherent networks and resting-state fMRI are systematically introduced in the ESI. Moreover, the fiber tracking (diffusion tensor imaging, DTI and neuro-stimulation techniques (transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS are also introduced as the potential priors, which can help to draw inferences about the neuroelectric connectivity in the source space. We conclude that combining EEG source imaging with other complementary modalities is a promising approach towards the study of brain networks in cognitive and clinical neurosciences.

  1. The optimal algorithm for Multi-source RS image fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei; Huang, Shui-Guang; Li, Zeng-Shun; Shen, Hao; Li, Jun-Shuai; Wang, Peng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In order to solve the issue which the fusion rules cannot be self-adaptively adjusted by using available fusion methods according to the subsequent processing requirements of Remote Sensing (RS) image, this paper puts forward GSDA (genetic-iterative self-organizing data analysis algorithm) by integrating the merit of genetic arithmetic together with the advantage of iterative self-organizing data analysis algorithm for multi-source RS image fusion. The proposed algorithm considers the wavelet transform of the translation invariance as the model operator, also regards the contrast pyramid conversion as the observed operator. The algorithm then designs the objective function by taking use of the weighted sum of evaluation indices, and optimizes the objective function by employing GSDA so as to get a higher resolution of RS image. As discussed above, the bullet points of the text are summarized as follows.•The contribution proposes the iterative self-organizing data analysis algorithm for multi-source RS image fusion.•This article presents GSDA algorithm for the self-adaptively adjustment of the fusion rules.•This text comes up with the model operator and the observed operator as the fusion scheme of RS image based on GSDA. The proposed algorithm opens up a novel algorithmic pathway for multi-source RS image fusion by means of GSDA.

  2. Application of AI techniques to a voice-actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherley, Patrick L.; Pujol, Alfonso, Jr.; Meadow, John S.

    1990-07-01

    To provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures languages and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study an artificial intelligence (Al) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user the Al control strategy determines the user''s intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid the control strategy queries the user for additional information. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AT techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure. 1.

  3. Development of a data mining and imaging informatics display tool for a multiple sclerosis e-folder system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Margaret; Loo, Jerry; Ma, Kevin; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that damages axonal pathways through inflammation and demyelination. In order to address the need for a centralized application to manage and study MS patients, the MS e-Folder - a web-based, disease-specific electronic medical record system - was developed. The e-Folder has a PHP and MySQL based graphical user interface (GUI) that can serve as both a tool for clinician decision support and a data mining tool for researchers. This web-based GUI gives the e-Folder a user friendly interface that can be securely accessed through the internet and requires minimal software installation on the client side. The e-Folder GUI displays and queries patient medical records--including demographic data, social history, past medical history, and past MS history. In addition, DICOM format imaging data, and computer aided detection (CAD) results from a lesion load algorithm are also displayed. The GUI interface is dynamic and allows manipulation of the DICOM images, such as zoom, pan, and scrolling, and the ability to rotate 3D images. Given the complexity of clinical management and the need to bolster research in MS, the MS e-Folder system will improve patient care and provide MS researchers with a function-rich patient data hub.

  4. Application of Al techniques to a voice actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherley, P.L.; Pujol, A. Jr.; Meadow, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that to provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures, languages, and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users, research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study, an artificial intelligence (AI) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user, the AI control strategy determines the user's intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid, the control strategy queries the user for additional informaiton. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AI techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure

  5. OsiriX: an open-source software for navigating in multidimensional DICOM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosset, Antoine; Spadola, Luca; Ratib, Osman

    2004-09-01

    A multidimensional image navigation and display software was designed for display and interpretation of large sets of multidimensional and multimodality images such as combined PET-CT studies. The software is developed in Objective-C on a Macintosh platform under the MacOS X operating system using the GNUstep development environment. It also benefits from the extremely fast and optimized 3D graphic capabilities of the OpenGL graphic standard widely used for computer games optimized for taking advantage of any hardware graphic accelerator boards available. In the design of the software special attention was given to adapt the user interface to the specific and complex tasks of navigating through large sets of image data. An interactive jog-wheel device widely used in the video and movie industry was implemented to allow users to navigate in the different dimensions of an image set much faster than with a traditional mouse or on-screen cursors and sliders. The program can easily be adapted for very specific tasks that require a limited number of functions, by adding and removing tools from the program's toolbar and avoiding an overwhelming number of unnecessary tools and functions. The processing and image rendering tools of the software are based on the open-source libraries ITK and VTK. This ensures that all new developments in image processing that could emerge from other academic institutions using these libraries can be directly ported to the OsiriX program. OsiriX is provided free of charge under the GNU open-source licensing agreement at http://homepage.mac.com/rossetantoine/osirix.

  6. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Gregson, James; Wetzstein, Gordon; Raskar, Ramesh; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  7. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  8. Open source software in a practical approach for post processing of radiologic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeri, Gianluca; Mazza, Francesco Antonino; Maggi, Stefania; Aramini, Daniele; La Riccia, Luigi; Mazzoni, Giovanni; Giovagnoni, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of open source software (OSS) to process DICOM images. We selected 23 programs for Windows and 20 programs for Mac from 150 possible OSS programs including DICOM viewers and various tools (converters, DICOM header editors, etc.). The programs selected all meet the basic requirements such as free availability, stand-alone application, presence of graphical user interface, ease of installation and advanced features beyond simple display monitor. Capabilities of data import, data export, metadata, 2D viewer, 3D viewer, support platform and usability of each selected program were evaluated on a scale ranging from 1 to 10 points. Twelve programs received a score higher than or equal to eight. Among them, five obtained a score of 9: 3D Slicer, MedINRIA, MITK 3M3, VolView, VR Render; while OsiriX received 10. OsiriX appears to be the only program able to perform all the operations taken into consideration, similar to a workstation equipped with proprietary software, allowing the analysis and interpretation of images in a simple and intuitive way. OsiriX is a DICOM PACS workstation for medical imaging and software for image processing for medical research, functional imaging, 3D imaging, confocal microscopy and molecular imaging. This application is also a good tool for teaching activities because it facilitates the attainment of learning objectives among students and other specialists.

  9. Pocket Size Solid State FLASH and iPOD Drives for gigabyte storage, display and transfer of digital medical images: an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaran, A.

    2008-01-01

    The transition of radiological imaging from analog to digital was closely followed by the development of the Picture Archiving and Communication (PACS) system. Concomitantly, multidimensional imaging ( 4D and 5D, for motion and functional studies on 3D images) have presented new challenges, particularly in handling gigabyte size images from CT, MRI and PET scanners, which generate thousands of images. The storage and analysis of these images necessitate expensive image workstations. This paper highlights the recent innovations in mass storage, display and transfer of images, using miniature/pocket size solid state FLASH and iPOD drives

  10. Combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsouris, Georgios I; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part...

  11. EEG source imaging assists decoding in a face recognition task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rasmus S.; Eliasen, Anders U.; Pedersen, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    of face recognition. This task concerns the differentiation of brain responses to images of faces and scrambled faces and poses a rather difficult decoding problem at the single trial level. We implement the pipeline using spatially focused features and show that this approach is challenged and source...

  12. Advanced imaging technology using carbon nanotube x ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hae Young; Seol, Seung Kown; Kim, Jaehoon; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Kim, Jong Uk

    2008-01-01

    Recently, X ray imaging technology is a useful and leading medical diagnostic tool for healthcare professionals to diagnose disease in human body. CNTs(i.e. carbon nanotubes)are used in many applications like FED, Micro wave amplifier, X ray source, etc. because of its suitable electrical, chemical and physical properties. Specially, CNTs are well used electron emitters for x ray source. Conventionally, thermionic type of tungsten filament x ray tube is widely employed in the field of bio medical and industrial application fields. However, intrinsic problems such as, poor emission efficiency and low imaging resolution cause the limitation of use of the x ray tube. To fulfill the current market requirement specifically for medical diagnostic field, we have developed rather a portable and compact CNT based x ray source in which high imaging resolution is provided. Electron sources used in X ray tubes should be well focused to the anode target for generation of high quality x ray. In this study, Pierce type x ray generation module was tested based its simulation results using by OPERA 3D code. Pierce type module is composed of cone type electrical lens with its number of them and inner angles of them that shows different results with these parameters. And some preliminary images obtained using the CNT x ray source were obtained. The represented images are the finger bone and teeth in human body. It is clear that the trabeculation shape is observed in finger bone. To obtain the finger bone image, tube currents of 250A at 42kV tube voltage was applied. The human tooth image, however, is somewhat unclear because the supplied voltage to the tube was limited to max. 50kV in the system developed. It should be noted that normally 60∼70kV of tube voltage is supplied in dental imaging. Considering these it should be emphasized that if the tube voltage is over 60kV then clearer image is possible. In this paper, we are discussed comparing between these experiment results and

  13. Bayesian image processing of data from fuzzy pattern sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Z.; Hart, H.

    1986-01-01

    In some radioisotopic organ image applications, a priori or supplementary source information may exist and can be characterized in terms of probability density functions P (phi) of the source elements {phi/sub j/} = phi (where phi/sub j/ (j = 1,2,..α) is the estimated average photon emission in voxel j per unit time at t = 0). For example, in cardiac imaging studies it is possible to evaluate the radioisotope concentration of the blood filling the cardiac chambers independently as a function of time by peripheral measurement. The blood concentration information in effect serves to limit amplitude uncertainty to the chamber boundary voxels and thus reduces the extent of amplitude ambiguities in the overall cardiac imaging reconstruction. The a priori or supplementary information may more generally be spatial, amplitude-dependent probability distributions P(phi), fuzzy patterns superimposed upon a background

  14. Soft-tissue segmentation and three-dimensional display with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, H.A.; Laub, G.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design a method capable of segmenting different soft-tissue types. The investigated cases were measured using fast three-dimensional (3D) sequences (FISP of fast low-angle shot) with isotropic voxel resolution of nearly 1 mm. The segmentation is based on the assumption that different tissue types are discernible by their morphologic and/or physical features. Surface reconstructions are then used to display specific tissue types from different viewing directions. This automatic procedure is applied to different head cases to represent specific tissues in 3D format. With 3D techniques, rotation of classified objects in cine format is performed for better topologic correlation and therapeutic planning

  15. Are Contemporary Media Images Which Seem to Display Women as Sexually Empowered Actually Harmful to Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Emma; Malson, Helen; Tischner, Irmgard

    2011-01-01

    There has been a shift in the depiction of women in advertising from objectifying representations of women as passive sex objects to agentic sexual representations where the women appear powerful and in control (Gill, 2007a, 2008), and there is substantial evidence that these representations have a negative impact on women's body image. However,…

  16. Negative Stimulus-Response Compatibility Observed with a Briefly Displayed Image of a Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainio, Lari

    2011-01-01

    Manual responses can be primed by viewing an image of a hand. The left-right identity of the viewed hand reflexively facilitates responses of the hand that corresponds to the identity. Previous research also suggests that when the response activation is triggered by an arrow, which is backward-masked and presented briefly, the activation manifests…

  17. Dual-source CT cardiac imaging: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Rist, Carsten; Buhmann, Sonja; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Becker, Christoph R.; Leber, Alexander W.; Ziegler, Franz von; Knez, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The relation of heart rate and image quality in the depiction of coronary arteries, heart valves and myocardium was assessed on a dual-source computed tomography system (DSCT). Coronary CT angiography was performed on a DSCT (Somatom Definition, Siemens) with high concentration contrast media (Iopromide, Ultravist 370, Schering) in 24 patients with heart rates between 44 and 92 beats per minute. Images were reconstructed over the whole cardiac cycle in 10% steps. Two readers independently assessed the image quality with regard to the diagnostic evaluation of right and left coronary artery, heart valves and left ventricular myocardium for the assessment of vessel wall changes, coronary stenoses, valve morphology and function and ventricular function on a three point grading scale. The image quality ratings at the optimal reconstruction interval were 1.24±0.42 for the right and 1.09±0.27 for the left coronary artery. A reconstruction of diagnostic systolic and diastolic images is possible for a wide range of heart rates, allowing also a functional evaluation of valves and myocardium. Dual-source CT offers very robust diagnostic image quality in a wide range of heart rates. The high temporal resolution now also makes a functional evaluation of the heart valves and myocardium possible. (orig.)

  18. Three-dimensional tomosynthetic image restoration for brachytherapy source localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persons, Timothy M.

    2001-01-01

    Tomosynthetic image reconstruction allows for the production of a virtually infinite number of slices from a finite number of projection views of a subject. If the reconstructed image volume is viewed in toto, and the three-dimensional (3D) impulse response is accurately known, then it is possible to solve the inverse problem (deconvolution) using canonical image restoration methods (such as Wiener filtering or solution by conjugate gradient least squares iteration) by extension to three dimensions in either the spatial or the frequency domains. This dissertation presents modified direct and iterative restoration methods for solving the inverse tomosynthetic imaging problem in 3D. The significant blur artifact that is common to tomosynthetic reconstructions is deconvolved by solving for the entire 3D image at once. The 3D impulse response is computed analytically using a fiducial reference schema as realized in a robust, self-calibrating solution to generalized tomosynthesis. 3D modulation transfer function analysis is used to characterize the tomosynthetic resolution of the 3D reconstructions. The relevant clinical application of these methods is 3D imaging for brachytherapy source localization. Conventional localization schemes for brachytherapy implants using orthogonal or stereoscopic projection radiographs suffer from scaling distortions and poor visibility of implanted seeds, resulting in compromised source tracking (reported errors: 2-4 mm) and dosimetric inaccuracy. 3D image reconstruction (using a well-chosen projection sampling scheme) and restoration of a prostate brachytherapy phantom is used for testing. The approaches presented in this work localize source centroids with submillimeter error in two Cartesian dimensions and just over one millimeter error in the third

  19. EVALUATION OF CHROMATICITY COORDINATES SHIFT FOR IMAGE DISPLAYED ON LIQUID CRYSTAL PANELS WITH VARIOUS PROPERTIES ON COLOR REPRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Zharinov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.We consider the problem of evaluation of chromaticity coordinates shift for image displayed on liquid crystal panels with various properties on color reproduction. A mathematical model represents the color reproduction characteristics. The spread of the color characteristics of the screens has a statistical nature. Differences of color reproduction for screens are perceived by the observer in the form of different colors and shades that are displayed on the same type of commercially available screens. Color differences are characterized by numerical measure of the difference of colors and can be mathematically compensated. The solution of accounting problem of the statistical nature of the color characteristics spread for the screens has a particular relevance to aviation instrumentation. Method. Evaluation of chromaticity coordinates shift of the image is based on the application of the Grassmann laws of color mixing.Basic data for quantitative calculation of shift are the profiles of two different liquid crystal panels defined by matrixes of scales for components of primary colors (red, green, blue. The calculation is based on solving the system of equations and calculating the color difference in the XY-plane. In general, the calculation can be performed in other color spaces: UV, Lab. The statistical nature of the spread of the color characteristics for the screens is accounted for in the proposed mathematical model based on the interval setting of coordinate values of the color gamut triangle vertices on the set of commercially available samples. Main Results. Carried outresearches result in the mathematical expressions allowing to recalculate values of chromaticity coordinates of the image displayed on various samples of liquid crystal screens. It is shown that the spread of the color characteristics of the screens follows bivariate normal distribution law with the accuracy sufficient for practice. The results of

  20. An electronically tunable ultrafast laser source applied to fluorescence imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsby, C; Lanigan, P M P; McGinty, J; Elson, D S; Requejo-Isidro, J; Munro, I; Galletly, N; McCann, F; Treanor, B; Oenfelt, B; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; French, P M W

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used widely in microscopy and macroscopic imaging applications for fields ranging from biomedicine to materials science. A critical component for any fluorescence imaging system is the excitation source. Traditionally, wide-field systems use filtered thermal or arc-generated white light sources, while point scanning confocal microscope systems require spatially coherent (point-like) laser sources. Unfortunately, the limited range of visible wavelengths available from conventional laser sources constrains the design and usefulness of fluorescent probes in confocal microscopy. A 'hands-off' laser-like source, electronically tunable across the visible spectrum, would be invaluable for fluorescence imaging and provide new opportunities, e.g. automated excitation fingerprinting and in situ measurement of excitation cross-sections. Yet more information can be obtained using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), which requires that the light source be pulsed or rapidly modulated. We show how a white light continuum, generated by injecting femtosecond optical radiation into a micro-structured optical fibre, coupled with a simple prism-based tunable filter arrangement, can fulfil all these roles as a continuously electronically tunable (435-1150 nm) visible ultrafast light source in confocal, wide-field and FLIM systems

  1. Stereoscopic-3D display design: a new paradigm with Intel Adaptive Stable Image Technology [IA-SIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sunil

    2012-03-01

    Stereoscopic-3D (S3D) proliferation on personal computers (PC) is mired by several technical and business challenges: a) viewing discomfort due to cross-talk amongst stereo images; b) high system cost; and c) restricted content availability. Users expect S3D visual quality to be better than, or at least equal to, what they are used to enjoying on 2D in terms of resolution, pixel density, color, and interactivity. Intel Adaptive Stable Image Technology (IA-SIT) is a foundational technology, successfully developed to resolve S3D system design challenges and deliver high quality 3D visualization at PC price points. Optimizations in display driver, panel timing firmware, backlight hardware, eyewear optical stack, and synch mechanism combined can help accomplish this goal. Agnostic to refresh rate, IA-SIT will scale with shrinking of display transistors and improvements in liquid crystal and LED materials. Industry could profusely benefit from the following calls to action:- 1) Adopt 'IA-SIT S3D Mode' in panel specs (via VESA) to help panel makers monetize S3D; 2) Adopt 'IA-SIT Eyewear Universal Optical Stack' and algorithm (via CEA) to help PC peripheral makers develop stylish glasses; 3) Adopt 'IA-SIT Real Time Profile' for sub-100uS latency control (via BT Sig) to extend BT into S3D; and 4) Adopt 'IA-SIT Architecture' for Monitors and TVs to monetize via PC attach.

  2. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Avi C; Campbell, Malachy T; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  3. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Avi C.; Campbell, Malachy T.; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R.; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. PMID:27141917

  4. Open source tools for standardized privacy protection of medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Chung-Yueh; Onken, Michael; Eichelberg, Marco; Kao, Tsair; Hein, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    In addition to the primary care context, medical images are often useful for research projects and community healthcare networks, so-called "secondary use". Patient privacy becomes an issue in such scenarios since the disclosure of personal health information (PHI) has to be prevented in a sharing environment. In general, most PHIs should be completely removed from the images according to the respective privacy regulations, but some basic and alleviated data is usually required for accurate image interpretation. Our objective is to utilize and enhance these specifications in order to provide reliable software implementations for de- and re-identification of medical images suitable for online and offline delivery. DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) images are de-identified by replacing PHI-specific information with values still being reasonable for imaging diagnosis and patient indexing. In this paper, this approach is evaluated based on a prototype implementation built on top of the open source framework DCMTK (DICOM Toolkit) utilizing standardized de- and re-identification mechanisms. A set of tools has been developed for DICOM de-identification that meets privacy requirements of an offline and online sharing environment and fully relies on standard-based methods.

  5. Large depth of focus dynamic micro integral imaging for optical see-through augmented reality display using a focus-tunable lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xin; Javidi, Bahram

    2018-03-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) dynamic integral-imaging (InIm)-system-based optical see-through augmented reality display with enhanced depth range of a 3D augmented image. A focus-tunable lens is adopted in the 3D display unit to relay the elemental images with various positions to the micro lens array. Based on resolution priority integral imaging, multiple lenslet image planes are generated to enhance the depth range of the 3D image. The depth range is further increased by utilizing both the real and virtual 3D imaging fields. The 3D reconstructed image and the real-world scene are overlaid using an optical see-through display for augmented reality. The proposed system can significantly enhance the depth range of a 3D reconstructed image with high image quality in the micro InIm unit. This approach provides enhanced functionality for augmented information and adjusts the vergence-accommodation conflict of a traditional augmented reality display.

  6. Seismic reflection imaging with conventional and unconventional sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiros Ugalde, Diego Alonso

    This manuscript reports the results of research using both conventional and unconventional energy sources as well as conventional and unconventional analysis to image crustal structure using reflected seismic waves. The work presented here includes the use of explosions to investigate the Taiwanese lithosphere, the use of 'noise' from railroads to investigate the shallow subsurface of the Rio Grande rift, and the use of microearthquakes to image subsurface structure near an active fault zone within the Appalachian mountains. Chapter 1 uses recordings from the land refraction and wide-angle reflection component of the Taiwan Integrated Geodynamic Research (TAIGER) project. The most prominent reflection feature imaged by these surveys is an anomalously strong reflector found in northeastern Taiwan. The goal of this chapter is to analyze the TAIGER recordings and to place the reflector into a geologic framework that fits with the modern tectonic kinematics of the region. Chapter 2 uses railroad traffic as a source for reflection profiling within the Rio Grande rift. Here the railroad recordings are treated in an analogous way to Vibroseis recordings. These results suggest that railroad noise in general can be a valuable new tool in imaging and characterizing the shallow subsurface in environmental and geotechnical studies. In chapters 3 and 4, earthquakes serve as the seismic imaging source. In these studies the methodology of Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) is borrowed from the oil and gas industry to develop reflection images. In chapter 3, a single earthquake is used to probe a small area beneath Waterboro, Maine. In chapter 4, the same method is applied to multiple earthquakes to take advantage of the increased redundancy that results from multiple events illuminating the same structure. The latter study demonstrates how dense arrays can be a powerful new tool for delineating, and monitoring temporal changes of deep structure in areas characterized by significant

  7. Gamma-ray imaging of the Quinby sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, J.; Hensley, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    The Quinby sources are alumina cylinders 7 inches in diameter and 8 inches high doped with weapons grade plutonium. We describe a computer tomography system for reconstructing three-dimensional images of these sources. Each reconstruction maps the spatial distribution of the internal [sup 241]Am gamma ray activity and is computed using an iterative, expectation-maximization algorithm with detection efficiencies based both on geometric model of the experimental setup and attenuation corrections. Constructed about a decade ago, the Quinby sources were to contain uniformly distributed material. However, for some of the sources we have found regions where the plutonium solution, tends to be concentrated. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide the basis for self-shielding corrections when analyzing differential dieaway neutron measurements

  8. Displays and simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohon, N.

    A 'simulator' is defined as a machine which imitates the behavior of a real system in a very precise manner. The major components of a simulator and their interaction are outlined in brief form, taking into account the major components of an aircraft flight simulator. Particular attention is given to the visual display portion of the simulator, the basic components of the display, their interactions, and their characteristics. Real image displays are considered along with virtual image displays, and image generators. Attention is given to an advanced simulator for pilot training, a holographic pancake window, a scan laser image generator, the construction of an infrared target simulator, and the Apollo Command Module Simulator.

  9. The utilization of dual source CT in imaging of polytrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaou, S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Radiology, 899 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z1M9 (Canada)], E-mail: savvas.nicolaou@vch.ca; Eftekhari, A.; Sedlic, T.; Hou, D.J.; Mudri, M.J.; Aldrich, John; Louis, L. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Radiology, 899 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z1M9 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Despite the growing role of imaging, trauma remains the leading cause of death in people below the age of 45 years in the western industrialized countries. Trauma has been touted as the largest epidemic in the 20th century. The advent of MDCT has been the greatest advance in trauma care in the last 25 years. However, there are still challenges in CT imaging of the polytrauma individual including time restraints, diagnostic errors, radiation dose effects and bridging the gap between anatomy and physiology. This article will analyze these challenges and provide possible solutions offered by the unique design of the dual source CT scanner.

  10. The utilization of dual source CT in imaging of polytrauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaou, S.; Eftekhari, A.; Sedlic, T.; Hou, D.J.; Mudri, M.J.; Aldrich, John; Louis, L.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the growing role of imaging, trauma remains the leading cause of death in people below the age of 45 years in the western industrialized countries. Trauma has been touted as the largest epidemic in the 20th century. The advent of MDCT has been the greatest advance in trauma care in the last 25 years. However, there are still challenges in CT imaging of the polytrauma individual including time restraints, diagnostic errors, radiation dose effects and bridging the gap between anatomy and physiology. This article will analyze these challenges and provide possible solutions offered by the unique design of the dual source CT scanner

  11. Displays in scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd-Pokropek, A.E.; Pizer, S.M.

    1977-01-01

    Displays have several functions: to transmit images, to permit interaction, to quantitate features and to provide records. The main characteristics of displays used for image transmission are their resolution, dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity. Considerations of visual acuity suggest that the display element size should be much less than the data element size, and in current practice at least 256X256 for a gamma camera image. The dynamic range for image transmission should be such that at least 64 levels of grey (or equivalent) are displayed. Scanner displays are also considered, and in particular, the requirements of a whole-body camera are examined. A number of display systems and devices are presented including a 'new' heated object colour display system. Interaction with displays is considered, including background subtraction, contrast enhancement, position indication and region-of-interest generation. Such systems lead to methods of quantitation, which imply knowledge of the expected distributions. Methods for intercomparing displays are considered. Polaroid displays, which have for so long dominated the field, are in the process of being replaced by stored image displays, now that large cheap memories exist which give an equivalent image quality. The impact of this in nuclear medicine is yet to be seen, but a major effect will be to enable true quantitation. (author)

  12. Methods and apparatus for transparent display using scattering nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Qiu, Wenjun; Zhen, Bo; Shapira, Ofer; Soljacic, Marin

    2016-05-10

    Transparent displays enable many useful applications, including heads-up displays for cars and aircraft as well as displays on eyeglasses and glass windows. Unfortunately, transparent displays made of organic light-emitting diodes are typically expensive and opaque. Heads-up displays often require fixed light sources and have limited viewing angles. And transparent displays that use frequency conversion are typically energy inefficient. Conversely, the present transparent displays operate by scattering visible light from resonant nanoparticles with narrowband scattering cross sections and small absorption cross sections. More specifically, projecting an image onto a transparent screen doped with nanoparticles that selectively scatter light at the image wavelength(s) yields an image on the screen visible to an observer. Because the nanoparticles scatter light at only certain wavelengths, the screen is practically transparent under ambient light. Exemplary transparent scattering displays can be simple, inexpensive, scalable to large sizes, viewable over wide angular ranges, energy efficient, and transparent simultaneously.

  13. New Algorithm to Enable Construction and Display of 3D Structures from Scanning Probe Microscopy Images Acquired Layer-by-Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, William Nanqiao; Wang, Shuo; Ventrici de Souza, Joao Francisco; Kuhl, Tonya L; Liu, Gang-Yu

    2018-06-11

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely known for high-resolution imaging of surface structures and nanolithography in two dimension (2D), which provides important physical insights in surface science and material science. This work reports a new algorithm to enable construction and display of layer-by-layer 3D structures from SPM images. The algorithm enables alignment of SPM images acquired during layer-by-layer deposition, removal of redundant features, and faithfully constructs the deposited 3D structures. The display uses a "see-through" strategy to enable the structure of each layer to be visible. The results demonstrate high spatial accuracy as well as algorithm versatility; users can set parameters for reconstruction and display as per image quality and research needs. To the best of our knowledge, this method represents the first report to enable SPM technology for 3D imaging construction and display. The detailed algorithm is provided to facilitate usage of the same approach in any SPM software. These new capabilities support wide applications of SPM that require 3D image reconstruction and display, such as 3D nanoprinting, and 3D additive and subtractive manufacturing and imaging.

  14. 城市DSM的快速获取及其三维显示的研究%Fast Acquiring Urban DSM Image and Displaying 3D Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤红建; 刘彤; 苏林; 刘少创; 郭冠军; 李树楷

    2001-01-01

    城市数字表面模型(DSM)作为城市的重要信息有着十分广泛的应用,机载三维成像仪可以快速获取DSM数据,而无需地面控制点。该文介绍了利用三维成像仪快速获取城市DSM图像的数据处理技术,阐述了基于城市DSM影像显示城市三维模型的原理,着重分析了显示城市DSM图像奇异表面的方法和侧面处理思想。最后通过珠海、澳门地区飞行数据的处理和三维鸟瞰显示,说明了方法的可行性。%As an important urban information, urban digital surface models(DSM) are widely used in many fields. Airborne 3D imager which is developed by the Institute of Remote Sensing Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences can acquire DSM in quasi-real-time without any ground control points. The data processing technology to acquire urban DSM by 3D imager is presented in this paper. How to display urban DSM which is different from natural surface in 3D is discussed in detail. An example of data processing and 3D displaying of urban DSM is given at the end. According to the fly test the efficiency of 3D imager is several times higher than that of traditional methods to acquire urban DSM, and the method to display urban DSM in 3D is feasible.

  15. Distributed Source Coding Techniques for Lossless Compression of Hyperspectral Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barni Mauro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of distributed source coding (DSC theory to remote sensing image compression. Although DSC exhibits a significant potential in many application fields, up till now the results obtained on real signals fall short of the theoretical bounds, and often impose additional system-level constraints. The objective of this paper is to assess the potential of DSC for lossless image compression carried out onboard a remote platform. We first provide a brief overview of DSC of correlated information sources. We then focus on onboard lossless image compression, and apply DSC techniques in order to reduce the complexity of the onboard encoder, at the expense of the decoder's, by exploiting the correlation of different bands of a hyperspectral dataset. Specifically, we propose two different compression schemes, one based on powerful binary error-correcting codes employed as source codes, and one based on simpler multilevel coset codes. The performance of both schemes is evaluated on a few AVIRIS scenes, and is compared with other state-of-the-art 2D and 3D coders. Both schemes turn out to achieve competitive compression performance, and one of them also has reduced complexity. Based on these results, we highlight the main issues that are still to be solved to further improve the performance of DSC-based remote sensing systems.

  16. Accommodating multiple illumination sources in an imaging colorimetry environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kenneth W., Jr.; Goddard, James S., Jr.; Hunt, Martin A.; Hylton, Kathy W.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Simpson, Marc L.; Richards, Roger K.; Treece, Dale A.

    2000-03-01

    Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been developing a method for measuring color quality in textile products using a tri-stimulus color camera system. Initial results of the Imaging Tristimulus Colorimeter (ITC) were reported during 1999. These results showed that the projection onto convex sets (POCS) approach to color estimation could be applied to complex printed patterns on textile products with high accuracy and repeatability. Image-based color sensors used for on-line measurement are not colorimetric by nature and require a non-linear transformation of the component colors based on the spectral properties of the incident illumination, imaging sensor, and the actual textile color. Our earlier work reports these results for a broad-band, smoothly varying D65 standard illuminant. To move the measurement to the on-line environment with continuously manufactured textile webs, the illumination source becomes problematic. The spectral content of these light sources varies substantially from the D65 standard illuminant and can greatly impact the measurement performance of the POCS system. Although absolute color measurements are difficult to make under different illumination, referential measurements to monitor color drift provide a useful indication of product quality. Modifications to the ITC system have been implemented to enable the study of different light sources. These results and the subsequent analysis of relative color measurements will be reported for textile products.

  17. High-precision surface formation method and the 3-D shaded display of the brain obtained from CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Noboru; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    Our aim is to display the precise 3-D appearance of the brain based on data provided by CT images. For this purpose, we have developed a method of precisely forming surfaces from brain contours. The method expresses the brain surface as the sum of several partial surfaces. Each partial surface is individually constructed from respective parts of brain contours. The brain surface is finally made up of a superposition of partial surfaces. Two surface formation algorithms based on this principle are presented. One expresses the brain surface as the sum of a brain outline surface and sulcus surfaces. The other expresses the brain surface as the sum of surfaces in the same part of the brain. The effectiveness of these algorithms is shown by evaluation of contours obtained from dog and human brain samples and CT images. The latter algorithm is shown to be superior for high-resolution CT images. Optional cut-away views of the brain constructed by these algorithms are also shown. (author)

  18. CMP reflection imaging via interferometry of distributed subsurface sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D.; Brown, L. D.; Quiros, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The theoretical foundations of recovering body wave energy via seismic interferometry are well established. However in practice, such recovery remains problematic. Here, synthetic seismograms computed for subsurface sources are used to evaluate the geometrical combinations of realistic ambient source and receiver distributions that result in useful recovery of virtual body waves. This study illustrates how surface receiver arrays that span a limited distribution suite of sources, can be processed to reproduce virtual shot gathers that result in CMP gathers which can be effectively stacked with traditional normal moveout corrections. To verify the feasibility of the approach in practice, seismic recordings of 50 aftershocks following the magnitude of 5.8 Virginia earthquake occurred in August, 2011 have been processed using seismic interferometry to produce seismic reflection images of the crustal structure above and beneath the aftershock cluster. Although monotonic noise proved to be problematic by significantly reducing the number of usable recordings, the edited dataset resulted in stacked seismic sections characterized by coherent reflections that resemble those seen on a nearby conventional reflection survey. In particular, "virtual" reflections at travel times of 3 to 4 seconds suggest reflector sat approximately 7 to 12 km depth that would seem to correspond to imbricate thrust structures formed during the Appalachian orogeny. The approach described here represents a promising new means of body wave imaging of 3D structure that can be applied to a wide array of geologic and energy problems. Unlike other imaging techniques using natural sources, this technique does not require precise source locations or times. It can thus exploit aftershocks too small for conventional analyses. This method can be applied to any type of microseismic cloud, whether tectonic, volcanic or man-made.

  19. Image transmission system using adaptive joint source and channel decoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiliang; Daut, David G.

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, an adaptive joint source and channel decoding method is designed to accelerate the convergence of the iterative log-dimain sum-product decoding procedure of LDPC codes as well as to improve the reconstructed image quality. Error resilience modes are used in the JPEG2000 source codec, which makes it possible to provide useful source decoded information to the channel decoder. After each iteration, a tentative decoding is made and the channel decoded bits are then sent to the JPEG2000 decoder. Due to the error resilience modes, some bits are known to be either correct or in error. The positions of these bits are then fed back to the channel decoder. The log-likelihood ratios (LLR) of these bits are then modified by a weighting factor for the next iteration. By observing the statistics of the decoding procedure, the weighting factor is designed as a function of the channel condition. That is, for lower channel SNR, a larger factor is assigned, and vice versa. Results show that the proposed joint decoding methods can greatly reduce the number of iterations, and thereby reduce the decoding delay considerably. At the same time, this method always outperforms the non-source controlled decoding method up to 5dB in terms of PSNR for various reconstructed images.

  20. Source imaging of drums in the APNEA system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensley, D.

    1995-01-01

    The APNea System is a neutron assay device utilizing both a passive mode and a differential-dieaway active mode. The total detection efficiency is not spatially uniform, even for an empty chamber, and a drum matrix in the chamber can severely distort this response. In order to achieve a response which is independent of the way the source material is distributed in a drum, an imaging procedure has been developed which treats the drum as a number of virtual (sub)volumes. Since each virtual volume of source material is weighted with the appropriate instrument parameters (detection efficiency and thermal flux), the final assay result is essentially independent of the actual distribution of the source material throughout the drum and its matrix

  1. Diffraction-enhanced imaging at the UK synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibison, M.; Cheung, K.C.; Siu, K.; Hall, C.J.; Lewis, R.A.; Hufton, A.; Wilkinson, S.J.; Rogers, K.D.; Round, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Diffraction-Enhanced Imaging (DEI) system, which shares access to Beamline 7.6 on the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS), is now in its third year of existence. The system was developed under a European Commission grant PHase Analyser SYstem (PHASY), won during the Fourth Framework. Typical applications continue to be the imaging of small biological specimens, using a beam of 12-17 keV after monochromation and up to 40 mm in width and 1-2 mm in height, although it is planned to investigate other materials as opportunity permits and time becomes available for more routine scientific use. Recent improvements have been made to the optical alignment procedure for setting up the station before imaging: a small laser device can now be set up to send a beam down the X-ray path through the four crystals, and a small photodiode, which has much better signal-to-noise characteristics than the ion chamber normally used for alignment, has been trailed successfully. A 3-D tomographic reconstruction capability has recently been developed and tested for DEI projection image sets, and will be applied to future imaging work on the SRS, in conjunction with volume visualization software. The next generation of DEI system, planned to operate at up to 60 keV on an SRS wiggler station, is in its design stage; it will feature much improved mechanics and mountings, especially for angular control, and a simplified alignment procedure to facilitate the necessary sharing of the SRS station

  2. Open-source software platform for medical image segmentation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namías, R.; D'Amato, J. P.; del Fresno, M.

    2017-11-01

    Segmenting 2D and 3D images is a crucial and challenging problem in medical image analysis. Although several image segmentation algorithms have been proposed for different applications, no universal method currently exists. Moreover, their use is usually limited when detection of complex and multiple adjacent objects of interest is needed. In addition, the continually increasing volumes of medical imaging scans require more efficient segmentation software design and highly usable applications. In this context, we present an extension of our previous segmentation framework which allows the combination of existing explicit deformable models in an efficient and transparent way, handling simultaneously different segmentation strategies and interacting with a graphic user interface (GUI). We present the object-oriented design and the general architecture which consist of two layers: the GUI at the top layer, and the processing core filters at the bottom layer. We apply the framework for segmenting different real-case medical image scenarios on public available datasets including bladder and prostate segmentation from 2D MRI, and heart segmentation in 3D CT. Our experiments on these concrete problems show that this framework facilitates complex and multi-object segmentation goals while providing a fast prototyping open-source segmentation tool.

  3. Availability of color calibration for consistent color display in medical images and optimization of reference brightness for clinical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Daiki; Suganami, Haruka; Hosoba, Minoru; Ohno, Kazuko; Emoto, Yutaka; Tabata, Yoshito; Matsui, Norihisa

    2013-03-01

    Color image consistency has not been accomplished yet except the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) Supplement 100 for implementing a color reproduction pipeline and device independent color spaces. Thus, most healthcare enterprises could not check monitor degradation routinely. To ensure color consistency in medical color imaging, monitor color calibration should be introduced. Using simple color calibration device . chromaticity of colors including typical color (Red, Green, Blue, Green and White) are measured as device independent profile connection space value called u'v' before and after calibration. In addition, clinical color images are displayed and visual differences are observed. In color calibration, monitor brightness level has to be set to quite lower value 80 cd/m2 according to sRGB standard. As Maximum brightness of most color monitors available currently for medical use have much higher brightness than 80 cd/m2, it is not seemed to be appropriate to use 80 cd/m2 level for calibration. Therefore, we propose that new brightness standard should be introduced while maintaining the color representation in clinical use. To evaluate effects of brightness to chromaticity experimentally, brightness level is changed in two monitors from 80 to 270cd/m2 and chromaticity value are compared with each brightness levels. As a result, there are no significant differences in chromaticity diagram when brightness levels are changed. In conclusion, chromaticity is close to theoretical value after color calibration. Moreover, chromaticity isn't moved when brightness is changed. The results indicate optimized reference brightness level for clinical use could be set at high brightness in current monitors .

  4. Liquid crystal display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takami, K.

    1981-01-01

    An improved liquid crystal display device is described which can display letters, numerals and other necessary patterns in the night time using a minimized amount of radioactive material. To achieve this a self-luminous light source is placed in a limited region corresponding to a specific display area. (U.K.)

  5. Cardiac magnetic source imaging based on current multipole model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Fa-Kuan; Wang Qian; Hua Ning; Lu Hong; Tang Xue-Zheng; Ma Ping

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the heart current source can be reduced into a current multipole. By adopting three linear inverse methods, the cardiac magnetic imaging is achieved in this article based on the current multipole model expanded to the first order terms. This magnetic imaging is realized in a reconstruction plane in the centre of human heart, where the current dipole array is employed to represent realistic cardiac current distribution. The current multipole as testing source generates magnetic fields in the measuring plane, serving as inputs of cardiac magnetic inverse problem. In the heart-torso model constructed by boundary element method, the current multipole magnetic field distribution is compared with that in the homogeneous infinite space, and also with the single current dipole magnetic field distribution. Then the minimum-norm least-squares (MNLS) method, the optimal weighted pseudoinverse method (OWPIM), and the optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM) are selected as the algorithms for inverse computation based on current multipole model innovatively, and the imaging effects of these three inverse methods are compared. Besides, two reconstructing parameters, residual and mean residual, are also discussed, and their trends under MNLS, OWPIM and OCLIM each as a function of SNR are obtained and compared. (general)

  6. Earthquake source studies and seismic imaging in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tape, C.; Silwal, V.

    2015-12-01

    Alaska is one of the world's most seismically and tectonically active regions. Its enhanced seismicity, including slab seismicity down to 180 km, provides opportunities (1) to characterize pervasive crustal faulting and slab deformation through the estimation of moment tensors and (2) to image subsurface structures to help understand the tectonic evolution of Alaska. Most previous studies of earthquakes and seismic imaging in Alaska have emphasized earthquake locations and body-wave travel-time tomography. In the past decade, catalogs of seismic moment tensors have been established, while seismic surface waves, active-source data, and potential field data have been used to improve models of seismic structure. We have developed moment tensor catalogs in the regions of two of the largest sedimentary basins in Alaska: Cook Inlet forearc basin, west of Anchorage, and Nenana basin, west of Fairbanks. Our moment tensor solutions near Nenana basin suggest a transtensional tectonic setting, with the basin developing in a stepover of a left-lateral strike-slip fault system. We explore the effects of seismic wave propagation from point-source and finite-source earthquake models by performing three-dimensional wavefield simulations using seismic velocity models that include major sedimentary basins. We will use our catalog of moment tensors within an adjoint-based, iterative inversion to improve the three-dimensional tomographic model of Alaska.

  7. European display scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Christopher T.

    2000-08-01

    The manufacture of Flat Panel Displays (FPDs) is dominated by Far Eastern sources, particularly in Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Displays (AMLCD) and Plasma. The United States has a very powerful capability in micro-displays. It is not well known that Europe has a very active research capability which has lead to many innovations in display technology. In addition there is a capability in display manufacturing of organic technologies as well as the licensed build of Japanese or Korean designs. Finally, Europe has a display systems capability in military products which is world class.

  8. An Image Matching Algorithm Integrating Global SRTM and Image Segmentation for Multi-Source Satellite Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Ling

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel image matching method for multi-source satellite images, which integrates global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM data and image segmentation to achieve robust and numerous correspondences. This method first generates the epipolar lines as a geometric constraint assisted by global SRTM data, after which the seed points are selected and matched. To produce more reliable matching results, a region segmentation-based matching propagation is proposed in this paper, whereby the region segmentations are extracted by image segmentation and are considered to be a spatial constraint. Moreover, a similarity measure integrating Distance, Angle and Normalized Cross-Correlation (DANCC, which considers geometric similarity and radiometric similarity, is introduced to find the optimal correspondences. Experiments using typical satellite images acquired from Resources Satellite-3 (ZY-3, Mapping Satellite-1, SPOT-5 and Google Earth demonstrated that the proposed method is able to produce reliable and accurate matching results.

  9. Low energy electron point source microscopy: beyond imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Andre; Goelzhaeuser, Armin [Physics of Supramolecular Systems and Surfaces, University of Bielefeld, Postfach 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2010-09-01

    Low energy electron point source (LEEPS) microscopy has the capability to record in-line holograms at very high magnifications with a fairly simple set-up. After the holograms are numerically reconstructed, structural features with the size of about 2 nm can be resolved. The achievement of an even higher resolution has been predicted. However, a number of obstacles are known to impede the realization of this goal, for example the presence of electric fields around the imaged object, electrostatic charging or radiation induced processes. This topical review gives an overview of the achievements as well as the difficulties in the efforts to shift the resolution limit of LEEPS microscopy towards the atomic level. A special emphasis is laid on the high sensitivity of low energy electrons to electrical fields, which limits the structural determination of the imaged objects. On the other hand, the investigation of the electrical field around objects of known structure is very useful for other tasks and LEEPS microscopy can be extended beyond the task of imaging. The determination of the electrical resistance of individual nanowires can be achieved by a proper analysis of the corresponding LEEPS micrographs. This conductivity imaging may be a very useful application for LEEPS microscopes. (topical review)

  10. Surface and volume three-dimensional displays of Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT images in stroke patients with three-head gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, W.J.; Slevin, J.T.; Schleenbaker, R.E.; Mills, B.J.; Magoun, S.L.; Ryo, U.Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates volume and surface 3D displays in Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT imaging in stroke patients. Using a triple-head gamma camera interfaced with a 64-bit supercomputer, 20 patients with stroke were studied. Each patient was imaged 30-60 minutes after an intravenous injection of 20 mCi of Tc-99m HMPAO. SPECT images as well as planar images were routinely obtained; volume and surface 3D display then proceeded, with the process requiring 5-10 minutes. Volume and surface 3D displays show the brain from all angles; thus the location and extension of lesion(s) in the brain are much easier to appreciate. While a cerebral lesion(s) was more clearly delineated by surface 3D imaging, crossed cerebellar diaschisis in seven patients was clearly exhibited with volume 3D but not with surface 3D imaging. Volume and surface 3D displays enhance continuity of structures and understanding of spatial relationships

  11. Development of the three dimensional image display program for limited cone beam X-ray CT for dental use (Ortho-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Koji; Shinoda, Koji

    2000-01-01

    We have already developed and reported a limited cone beam X-ray CT system for dental use (Ortho-CT). This system has been used clinically since 1997. In this study, we report a 3D surface display program for Ortho-CT which has been newly-developed by the authors. The 3D surface display software has been developed using visual C ++ (Microsoft Co. WA. USA) and a personal computer (Pentium 450MHz Intel Co. CA USA, Windows NT 4.0 Microsoft WA. USA). In this software, the 3D surface images are recorded as AVI files and can be displayed on the personal computer. The 3D images can be rotated and a stepwise change of the threshold voxel value for binary image formation can be automatically used. We have applied these 3D surface images to clinical studies from January 1999 to May 1999 at the Radiology section in our Dental hospital. The images can be displayed very easily in personal computers using AVI files. Thirty-five cases have been reconstructed using 3D surface images in this way. The 3D surface image is useful in the diagnosis of fractures of the mandibular head and impacted teeth. Only teeth are observed when a relative threshold voxel value is set at a high level such as about 0.37. When the threshold is changed to a lower value (about 0.3), we can observe both teeth and the surface of the bone. We have developed a 3D surface display program for personal computers. The images are useful for the diagnosis of the pathosis in the maxillofacial region. (author)

  12. Endoscopic hyperspectral imaging: light guide optimization for spectral light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Craig M.; Mayes, Samuel; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a technology used in remote sensing, food processing and documentation recovery. Recently, this approach has been applied in the medical field to spectrally interrogate regions of interest within respective substrates. In spectral imaging, a two (spatial) dimensional image is collected, at many different (spectral) wavelengths, to sample spectral signatures from different regions and/or components within a sample. Here, we report on the use of hyperspectral imaging for endoscopic applications. Colorectal cancer is the 3rd leading cancer for incidences and deaths in the US. One factor of severity is the miss rate of precancerous/flat lesions ( 65% accuracy). Integrating HSI into colonoscopy procedures could minimize misdiagnosis and unnecessary resections. We have previously reported a working prototype light source with 16 high-powered light emitting diodes (LEDs) capable of high speed cycling and imaging. In recent testing, we have found our current prototype is limited by transmission loss ( 99%) through the multi-furcated solid light guide (lightpipe) and the desired framerate (20-30 fps) could not be achieved. Here, we report on a series of experimental and modeling studies to better optimize the lightpipe and the spectral endoscopy system as a whole. The lightpipe was experimentally evaluated using an integrating sphere and spectrometer (Ocean Optics). Modeling the lightpipe was performed using Monte Carlo optical ray tracing in TracePro (Lambda Research Corp.). Results of these optimization studies will aid in manufacturing a revised prototype with the newly designed light guide and increased sensitivity. Once the desired optical output (5-10 mW) is achieved then the HIS endoscope system will be able to be implemented without adding onto the procedure time.

  13. An open source toolkit for medical imaging de-identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Carpenter, Trevor; Wardlaw, Joanna; Hemert, Jano I. van

    2010-01-01

    Medical imaging acquired for clinical purposes can have several legitimate secondary uses in research projects and teaching libraries. No commonly accepted solution for anonymising these images exists because the amount of personal data that should be preserved varies case by case. Our objective is to provide a flexible mechanism for anonymising Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data that meets the requirements for deployment in multicentre trials. We reviewed our current de-identification practices and defined the relevant use cases to extract the requirements for the de-identification process. We then used these requirements in the design and implementation of the toolkit. Finally, we tested the toolkit taking as a reference those requirements, including a multicentre deployment. The toolkit successfully anonymised DICOM data from various sources. Furthermore, it was shown that it could forward anonymous data to remote destinations, remove burned-in annotations, and add tracking information to the header. The toolkit also implements the DICOM standard confidentiality mechanism. A DICOM de-identification toolkit that facilitates the enforcement of privacy policies was developed. It is highly extensible, provides the necessary flexibility to account for different de-identification requirements and has a low adoption barrier for new users. (orig.)

  14. Three-dimensional surface display with [sup 123]I-IMP brain perfusion imaging in patients with dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomino, Yoshio; Tachibana, Hisao; Sugita, Minoru [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    1994-04-01

    We reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) surface images from SPECT data with N-isopropyl-p [[sup 123]I]-iodo-amphetamine ([sup 123]I-IMP) in 27 patients with Parkinson's disease (group 1), 16 patients with Alzheimer's disease (group 2), 9 patients with Binswanger's disease (group 3), and 11 elderly normal subjects (control group). Three-D reconstruction was performed using distance-shaded method at the threshold levels at intervals of 5% from 45% to 80%. In the control group, no perfusion defects were found in any region at threshold values below 60%, although the frontal and temporal cortices occasionally showed perfusion defects at threshold levels from 60% to 80%. In the group 1 of patients with dementia, perfusion defects were diffuse, particularly in the parietal and temporal cortices even at a threshold of 45%. The group 2 also showed diffuse perfusion defects, particularly in parietal and temporal cortices even at threshold levels as low as 45%. The primary visual cortex was less affected in this group. The demented patients in the group 1 demonstrated perfusion defects similar to those of patients in the group 2, although perfusion defects were more prominent in the group 2. In the group 3, patchy perfusion defects were found most frequently in the frontal region. Perfusion defects in the cerebellum and sensory motor cortex were more frequent in the group 3 than the other two groups, as well as the control group. The demented patients in the group 1 showed perfusion defects in the temporal and parietal cortices and demonstrated a perfusion pattern similar to those in the group 2. The patterns of brain perfusion in the group 3 were obviously different from those in the other two groups. In conclusion, 3D surface display of brain perfusion imaging may be useful for evaluating the cortical hypoperfusion regions in patients with dementia. It may also be of value in the differential diagnosis of cognitive disorders. (J.P.N.).

  15. Transparent 3D display for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Hong, Jisoo

    2012-11-01

    Two types of transparent three-dimensional display systems applicable for the augmented reality are demonstrated. One of them is a head-mounted-display-type implementation which utilizes the principle of the system adopting the concave floating lens to the virtual mode integral imaging. Such configuration has an advantage in that the threedimensional image can be displayed at sufficiently far distance resolving the accommodation conflict with the real world scene. Incorporating the convex half mirror, which shows a partial transparency, instead of the concave floating lens, makes it possible to implement the transparent three-dimensional display system. The other type is the projection-type implementation, which is more appropriate for the general use than the head-mounted-display-type implementation. Its imaging principle is based on the well-known reflection-type integral imaging. We realize the feature of transparent display by imposing the partial transparency to the array of concave mirror which is used for the screen of reflection-type integral imaging. Two types of configurations, relying on incoherent and coherent light sources, are both possible. For the incoherent configuration, we introduce the concave half mirror array, whereas the coherent one adopts the holographic optical element which replicates the functionality of the lenslet array. Though the projection-type implementation is beneficial than the head-mounted-display in principle, the present status of the technical advance of the spatial light modulator still does not provide the satisfactory visual quality of the displayed three-dimensional image. Hence we expect that the head-mounted-display-type and projection-type implementations will come up in the market in sequence.

  16. Solar active region display system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, M.; Raben, V.; Weyland, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System (SARDS) is a client-server application that automatically collects a wide range of solar data and displays it in a format easy for users to assimilate and interpret. Users can rapidly identify active regions of interest or concern from color-coded indicators that visually summarize each region's size, magnetic configuration, recent growth history, and recent flare and CME production. The active region information can be overlaid onto solar maps, multiple solar images, and solar difference images in orthographic, Mercator or cylindrical equidistant projections. Near real-time graphs display the GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, flare events, and daily F10.7 value as a function of time; color-coded indicators show current trends in soft x-ray flux, flare temperature, daily F10.7 flux, and x-ray flare occurrence. Through a separate window up to 4 real-time or static graphs can simultaneously display values of KP, AP, daily F10.7 flux, GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, GOES >10 and >100 MeV proton flux, and Thule neutron monitor count rate. Climatologic displays use color-valued cells to show F10.7 and AP values as a function of Carrington/Bartel's rotation sequences - this format allows users to detect recurrent patterns in solar and geomagnetic activity as well as variations in activity levels over multiple solar cycles. Users can customize many of the display and graph features; all displays can be printed or copied to the system's clipboard for "pasting" into other applications. The system obtains and stores space weather data and images from sources such as the NOAA Space Environment Center, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, the joint ESA/NASA SOHO spacecraft, and the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory, and can be extended to include other data series and image sources. Data and images retrieved from the system's database are converted to XML and transported from a central server using HTTP and SOAP protocols, allowing

  17. Quantitative PET Imaging with Novel HER3-Targeted Peptides Selected by Phage Display to Predict Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Independent Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin Larimer, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts General Hospital Boston...TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2016 – 19 August 2017 Selected by Phage Display to Predict Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Progression 5a...highly specific peptide that targets HER3 for prostate cancer imaging. The peptide was labeled with a PET imaging radionuclide and injected into mice

  18. Device for forming the image of a radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosswill, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    An improvement can be made to the space resolution of systems providing the image of a radiation source by means of a slit collimator. In order to do so, a lateral movement of the collimator (with its detectors) is superimposed on the movement of the collimator, in a transversal direction in relation to the transmission direction through the collimator as well as in relation to the walls defining the slits. The total amplitude of the lateral movement is at least equal to the distance between centres of a slit and the following one. In the near field operating system, the lateral movement is a rectilinear movement perpendicular to the walls of the slits. In the distance field operating systems, it is an angular movement about an axis perpendicular to the direction of transmission through the slits [fr

  19. Imaging multipole gravity anomaly sources by 3D probability tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaia, Raffaele; Patella, Domenico; Mauriello, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    We present a generalized theory of the probability tomography applied to the gravity method, assuming that any Bouguer anomaly data set can be caused by a discrete number of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octopoles. These elementary sources are used to characterize, in an as detailed as possible way and without any a priori assumption, the shape and position of the most probable minimum structure of the gravity sources compatible with the observed data set, by picking out the location of their centres and peculiar points of their boundaries related to faces, edges and vertices. A few synthetic examples using simple geometries are discussed in order to demonstrate the notably enhanced resolution power of the new approach, compared with a previous formulation that used only monopoles and dipoles. A field example related to a gravity survey carried out in the volcanic area of Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy) is presented, aimed at imaging the geometry of the minimum gravity structure down to 8 km of depth bsl

  20. Matrix kernels for MEG and EEG source localization and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, J.C.; Lewis, P.S.; Leahy, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    The most widely used model for electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) assumes a quasi-static approximation of Maxwell's equations and a piecewise homogeneous conductor model. Both models contain an incremental field element that linearly relates an incremental source element (current dipole) to the field or voltage at a distant point. The explicit form of the field element is dependent on the head modeling assumptions and sensor configuration. Proper characterization of this incremental element is crucial to the inverse problem. The field element can be partitioned into the product of a vector dependent on sensor characteristics and a matrix kernel dependent only on head modeling assumptions. We present here the matrix kernels for the general boundary element model (BEM) and for MEG spherical models. We show how these kernels are easily interchanged in a linear algebraic framework that includes sensor specifics such as orientation and gradiometer configuration. We then describe how this kernel is easily applied to ''gain'' or ''transfer'' matrices used in multiple dipole and source imaging models

  1. Digital Display Integration Project Project Online 2.0

    CERN Document Server

    Bardsley, J N

    1999-01-01

    The electronic display industry is changing in three important ways. First, the dominance of the cathode ray tube (CRT) is being challenged by the development of flat panel displays (FPDs). This will lead to the availability of displays of higher performance, albeit at greater cost. Secondly, the analog interfaces between displays that show data and the computers that generate the data are being replaced by digital connections. Finally, a high-resolution display is becoming the most expensive component in computer system for homes and small offices. It is therefore desirable that the useful lifetime of the display extend over several years and that the electronics allows the display to be used with many different image sources. Hopefully, the necessity of having three or four large CRTs in one office to accommodate different computer operating systems or communication protocols will soon disappear. Instead, we hope to see a set of flat panels that can be switched to show several independent images from multip...

  2. JAVA Stereo Display Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Karina

    2008-01-01

    This toolkit provides a common interface for displaying graphical user interface (GUI) components in stereo using either specialized stereo display hardware (e.g., liquid crystal shutter or polarized glasses) or anaglyph display (red/blue glasses) on standard workstation displays. An application using this toolkit will work without modification in either environment, allowing stereo software to reach a wider audience without sacrificing high-quality display on dedicated hardware. The toolkit is written in Java for use with the Swing GUI Toolkit and has cross-platform compatibility. It hooks into the graphics system, allowing any standard Swing component to be displayed in stereo. It uses the OpenGL graphics library to control the stereo hardware and to perform the rendering. It also supports anaglyph and special stereo hardware using the same API (application-program interface), and has the ability to simulate color stereo in anaglyph mode by combining the red band of the left image with the green/blue bands of the right image. This is a low-level toolkit that accomplishes simply the display of components (including the JadeDisplay image display component). It does not include higher-level functions such as disparity adjustment, 3D cursor, or overlays all of which can be built using this toolkit.

  3. Crosstalk evaluation in stereoscopic displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Teunissen, C.; Tu, Yan; Chen, Li; Zhang, P.; Zhang, T.; Heynderickx, I.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress in liquid-crystal display and polarization film technology has enabled several types of stereoscopic displays. Despite all progress, some image distortions still exist in these 3-D displays, of which interocular crosstalk - light leakage of the image for one eye to the other eye

  4. Operating scheme for the light-emitting diode array of a volumetric display that exhibits multiple full-color dynamic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Shiraki, Atsushi; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2017-07-01

    We designed and developed a control circuit for a three-dimensional (3-D) light-emitting diode (LED) array to be used in volumetric displays exhibiting full-color dynamic 3-D images. The circuit was implemented on a field-programmable gate array; therefore, pulse-width modulation, which requires high-speed processing, could be operated in real time. We experimentally evaluated the developed system by measuring the luminance of an LED with varying input and confirmed that the system works appropriately. In addition, we demonstrated that the volumetric display exhibits different full-color dynamic two-dimensional images in two orthogonal directions. Each of the exhibited images could be obtained only from the prescribed viewpoint. Such directional characteristics of the system are beneficial for applications, including digital signage, security systems, art, and amusement.

  5. Advanced Calibration Source for Planetary and Earth Observing Imaging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Planetary and Earth imaging requires radiometrically calibrated and stable imaging sensors.  Radiometric calibration enables the ability to remove or mitigate...

  6. Dual-source CT coronary imaging in heart transplant recipients: image quality and optimal reconstruction interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastarrika, Gorka; Arraiza, Maria; Pueyo, Jesus C.; Cecco, Carlo N. de; Ubilla, Matias; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Rabago, Gregorio

    2008-01-01

    The image quality and optimal reconstruction interval for coronary arteries in heart transplant recipients undergoing non-invasive dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography was evaluated. Twenty consecutive heart transplant recipients who underwent DSCT coronary angiography were included (19 male, one female; mean age 63.1±10.7 years). Data sets were reconstructed in 5% steps from 30% to 80% of the R-R interval. Two blinded independent observers assessed the image quality of each coronary segments using a five-point scale (from 0 = not evaluative to 4=excellent quality). A total of 289 coronary segments in 20 heart transplant recipients were evaluated. Mean heart rate during the scan was 89.1±10.4 bpm. At the best reconstruction interval, diagnostic image quality (score ≥2) was obtained in 93.4% of the coronary segments (270/289) with a mean image quality score of 3.04± 0.63. Systolic reconstruction intervals provided better image quality scores than diastolic reconstruction intervals (overall mean quality scores obtained with the systolic and diastolic reconstructions 3.03±1.06 and 2.73±1.11, respectively; P<0.001). Different systolic reconstruction intervals (35%, 40%, 45% of RR interval) did not yield to significant differences in image quality scores for the coronary segments (P=0.74). Reconstructions obtained at the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle allowed excellent diagnostic image quality coronary angiograms in heart transplant recipients undergoing DSCT coronary angiography. (orig.)

  7. Uncertainty in Earthquake Source Imaging Due to Variations in Source Time Function and Earth Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Razafindrakoto, H. N. T.

    2014-03-25

    One way to improve the accuracy and reliability of kinematic earthquake source imaging is to investigate the origin of uncertainty and to minimize their effects. The difficulties in kinematic source inversion arise from the nonlinearity of the problem, nonunique choices in the parameterization, and observational errors. We analyze particularly the uncertainty related to the choice of the source time function (STF) and the variability in Earth structure. We consider a synthetic data set generated from a spontaneous dynamic rupture calculation. Using Bayesian inference, we map the solution space of peak slip rate, rupture time, and rise time to characterize the kinematic rupture in terms of posterior density functions. Our test to investigate the effect of the choice of STF reveals that all three tested STFs (isosceles triangle, regularized Yoffe with acceleration time of 0.1 and 0.3 s) retrieve the patch of high slip and slip rate around the hypocenter. However, the use of an isosceles triangle as STF artificially accelerates the rupture to propagate faster than the target solution. It additionally generates an artificial linear correlation between rupture onset time and rise time. These appear to compensate for the dynamic source effects that are not included in the symmetric triangular STF. The exact rise time for the tested STFs is difficult to resolve due to the small amount of radiated seismic moment in the tail of STF. To highlight the effect of Earth structure variability, we perform inversions including the uncertainty in the wavespeed only, and variability in both wavespeed and layer depth. We find that little difference is noticeable between the resulting rupture model uncertainties from these two parameterizations. Both significantly broaden the posterior densities and cause faster rupture propagation particularly near the hypocenter due to the major velocity change at the depth where the fault is located.

  8. Uncertainty in Earthquake Source Imaging Due to Variations in Source Time Function and Earth Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Razafindrakoto, H. N. T.; Mai, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    One way to improve the accuracy and reliability of kinematic earthquake source imaging is to investigate the origin of uncertainty and to minimize their effects. The difficulties in kinematic source inversion arise from the nonlinearity of the problem, nonunique choices in the parameterization, and observational errors. We analyze particularly the uncertainty related to the choice of the source time function (STF) and the variability in Earth structure. We consider a synthetic data set generated from a spontaneous dynamic rupture calculation. Using Bayesian inference, we map the solution space of peak slip rate, rupture time, and rise time to characterize the kinematic rupture in terms of posterior density functions. Our test to investigate the effect of the choice of STF reveals that all three tested STFs (isosceles triangle, regularized Yoffe with acceleration time of 0.1 and 0.3 s) retrieve the patch of high slip and slip rate around the hypocenter. However, the use of an isosceles triangle as STF artificially accelerates the rupture to propagate faster than the target solution. It additionally generates an artificial linear correlation between rupture onset time and rise time. These appear to compensate for the dynamic source effects that are not included in the symmetric triangular STF. The exact rise time for the tested STFs is difficult to resolve due to the small amount of radiated seismic moment in the tail of STF. To highlight the effect of Earth structure variability, we perform inversions including the uncertainty in the wavespeed only, and variability in both wavespeed and layer depth. We find that little difference is noticeable between the resulting rupture model uncertainties from these two parameterizations. Both significantly broaden the posterior densities and cause faster rupture propagation particularly near the hypocenter due to the major velocity change at the depth where the fault is located.

  9. MEG source imaging method using fast L1 minimum-norm and its applications to signals with brain noise and human resting-state source amplitude images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Huang, Charles W; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, AnneMarie; Nichols, Sharon L; Baker, Dewleen G; Song, Tao; Harrington, Deborah L; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Heister, David; Diwakar, Mithun; Canive, Jose M; Edgar, J Christopher; Chen, Yu-Han; Ji, Zhengwei; Shen, Max; El-Gabalawy, Fady; Levy, Michael; McLay, Robert; Webb-Murphy, Jennifer; Liu, Thomas T; Drake, Angela; Lee, Roland R

    2014-01-01

    The present study developed a fast MEG source imaging technique based on Fast Vector-based Spatio-Temporal Analysis using a L1-minimum-norm (Fast-VESTAL) and then used the method to obtain the source amplitude images of resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals for different frequency bands. The Fast-VESTAL technique consists of two steps. First, L1-minimum-norm MEG source images were obtained for the dominant spatial modes of sensor-waveform covariance matrix. Next, accurate source time-courses with millisecond temporal resolution were obtained using an inverse operator constructed from the spatial source images of Step 1. Using simulations, Fast-VESTAL's performance was assessed for its 1) ability to localize multiple correlated sources; 2) ability to faithfully recover source time-courses; 3) robustness to different SNR conditions including SNR with negative dB levels; 4) capability to handle correlated brain noise; and 5) statistical maps of MEG source images. An objective pre-whitening method was also developed and integrated with Fast-VESTAL to remove correlated brain noise. Fast-VESTAL's performance was then examined in the analysis of human median-nerve MEG responses. The results demonstrated that this method easily distinguished sources in the entire somatosensory network. Next, Fast-VESTAL was applied to obtain the first whole-head MEG source-amplitude images from resting-state signals in 41 healthy control subjects, for all standard frequency bands. Comparisons between resting-state MEG sources images and known neurophysiology were provided. Additionally, in simulations and cases with MEG human responses, the results obtained from using conventional beamformer technique were compared with those from Fast-VESTAL, which highlighted the beamformer's problems of signal leaking and distorted source time-courses. © 2013.

  10. Analysis of the image of pion-emitting sources in the source center-of-mass frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yanyu; Feng, Qichun; Huo, Lei; Zhang, Jingbo; Liu, Jianli; Tang, Guixin [Harbin Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin, Heilongjiang (China); Zhang, Weining [Harbin Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin, Heilongjiang (China); Dalian University of Technology, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian, Liaoning (China)

    2017-08-15

    In this paper, we try a method to extract the image of pion-emitting source function in the center-of-mass frame of the source (CMFS). We choose identical pion pairs according to the difference of their energy and use these pion pairs to build the correlation function. The purpose is to reduce the effect of ΔEΔt, thus the corresponding imaging result can tend to the real source function. We examine the effect of this method by comparing its results with real source functions extracted from models directly. (orig.)

  11. 3D display system using monocular multiview displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Saruta, Kazuki; Takeda, Kazutoki

    2002-05-01

    A 3D head mounted display (HMD) system is useful for constructing a virtual space. The authors have researched the virtual-reality systems connected with computer networks for real-time remote control and developed a low-priced real-time 3D display for building these systems. We developed a 3D HMD system using monocular multi-view displays. The 3D displaying technique of this monocular multi-view display is based on the concept of the super multi-view proposed by Kajiki at TAO (Telecommunications Advancement Organization of Japan) in 1996. Our 3D HMD has two monocular multi-view displays (used as a visual display unit) in order to display a picture to the left eye and the right eye. The left and right images are a pair of stereoscopic images for the left and right eyes, then stereoscopic 3D images are observed.

  12. Three-dimensional display of peripheral nerves in the wrist region based on MR diffusion tensor imaging and maximum intensity projection post-processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Wen Quan, E-mail: dingwenquan1982@163.com [Department of Hand Surgery, Hand Surgery Research Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Xue Jun, E-mail: zxj0925101@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Tang, Jin Bo, E-mail: jinbotang@yahoo.com [Department of Hand Surgery, Hand Surgery Research Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Gu, Jian Hui, E-mail: gujianhuint@163.com [Department of Hand Surgery, Hand Surgery Research Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Jin, Dong Sheng, E-mail: jindongshengnj@aliyun.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Province Official Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • 3D displays of peripheral nerves can be achieved by 2 MIP post-processing methods. • The median nerves’ FA and ADC values can be accurately measured by using DTI6 data. • Adopting 6-direction DTI scan and MIP can evaluate peripheral nerves efficiently. - Abstract: Objectives: To achieve 3-dimensional (3D) display of peripheral nerves in the wrist region by using maximum intensity projection (MIP) post-processing methods to reconstruct raw images acquired by a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scan, and to explore its clinical applications. Methods: We performed DTI scans in 6 (DTI6) and 25 (DTI25) diffusion directions on 20 wrists of 10 healthy young volunteers, 6 wrists of 5 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome, 6 wrists of 6 patients with nerve lacerations, and one patient with neurofibroma. The MIP post-processing methods employed 2 types of DTI raw images: (1) single-direction and (2) T{sub 2}-weighted trace. The fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the median and ulnar nerves were measured at multiple testing sites. Two radiologists used custom evaluation scales to assess the 3D nerve imaging quality independently. Results: In both DTI6 and DTI25, nerves in the wrist region could be displayed clearly by the 2 MIP post-processing methods. The FA and ADC values were not significantly different between DTI6 and DTI25, except for the FA values of the ulnar nerves at the level of pisiform bone (p = 0.03). As to the imaging quality of each MIP post-processing method, there were no significant differences between DTI6 and DTI25 (p > 0.05). The imaging quality of single-direction MIP post-processing was better than that from T{sub 2}-weighted traces (p < 0.05) because of the higher nerve signal intensity. Conclusions: Three-dimensional displays of peripheral nerves in the wrist region can be achieved by MIP post-processing for single-direction images and T{sub 2}-weighted trace images for both DTI6 and DTI25

  13. Microseismic imaging using a source-independent full-waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-09-06

    Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate microseismic and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, waveform inversion of microseismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source location (space) and function (time). We develop a source independent FWI of microseismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with the observed and modeled data to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for source wavelet in z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also the angle gather is calculated to see if the velocity model is correct. By inverting for all the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for part of the SEG overthrust model.

  14. Microseismic imaging using a source-independent full-waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-01-01

    Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate microseismic and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, waveform inversion of microseismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source location (space) and function (time). We develop a source independent FWI of microseismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with the observed and modeled data to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for source wavelet in z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also the angle gather is calculated to see if the velocity model is correct. By inverting for all the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for part of the SEG overthrust model.

  15. Display Sharing: An Alternative Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The current Johnson Space Center (JSC) Mission Control Center (MCC) Video Transport System (VTS) provides flight controllers and management the ability to meld raw video from various sources with telemetry to improve situational awareness. However, maintaining a separate infrastructure for video delivery and integration of video content with data adds significant complexity and cost to the system. When considering alternative architectures for a VTS, the current system's ability to share specific computer displays in their entirety to other locations, such as large projector systems, flight control rooms, and back supporting rooms throughout the facilities and centers must be incorporated into any new architecture. Internet Protocol (IP)-based systems also support video delivery and integration. IP-based systems generally have an advantage in terms of cost and maintainability. Although IP-based systems are versatile, the task of sharing a computer display from one workstation to another can be time consuming for an end-user and inconvenient to administer at a system level. The objective of this paper is to present a prototype display sharing enterprise solution. Display sharing is a system which delivers image sharing across the LAN while simultaneously managing bandwidth, supporting encryption, enabling recovery and resynchronization following a loss of signal, and, minimizing latency. Additional critical elements will include image scaling support, multi -sharing, ease of initial integration and configuration, integration with desktop window managers, collaboration tools, host and recipient controls. This goal of this paper is to summarize the various elements of an IP-based display sharing system that can be used in today's control center environment.

  16. A trial fabrication of activity standard surface sources and positional standard surface sources for an imaging plate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yasushi; Hino, Yoshio; Yamada, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Mikio

    2003-01-01

    An imaging plate system can detect low level activity, but quantitative analysis is difficult because there are no adequate standard surface sources. A new fabrication method was developed for standard surface sources by printing on a sheet of paper using an ink-jet printer with inks in which a radioactive material was mixed. The fabricated standard surface sources had high uniformity, high positional resolution arbitrary shapes and a broad intensity range. The standard sources were used for measurement of surface activity as an application. (H. Yokoo)

  17. Evaluating the image quality of Closed Circuit Television magnification systems versus a head-mounted display for people with low vision. .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chern Sheng; Jan, Hvey-An; Lay, Yun-Long; Huang, Chih-Chia; Chen, Hsien-Tse

    2014-01-01

    In this research, image analysis was used to optimize the visual output of a traditional Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) magnifying system and a head-mounted display (HMD) for people with low vision. There were two purposes: (1) To determine the benefit of using an image analysis system to customize image quality for a person with low vision, and (2) to have people with low vision evaluate a traditional CCTV magnifier and an HMD, each customized to the user's needs and preferences. A CCTV system can electronically alter images by increasing the contrast, brightness, and magnification for the visually disabled when they are reading texts and pictures. The test methods was developed to evaluate and customize a magnification system for persons with low vision. The head-mounted display with CCTV was used to obtain better depth of field and a higher modulation transfer function from the video camera. By sensing the parameters of the environment (e.g., ambient light level, etc.) and collecting the user's specific characteristics, the system could make adjustments according to the user's needs, thus allowing the visually disabled to read more efficiently.

  18. Real-time calibration-free C-scan images of the eye fundus using Master Slave swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradu, Adrian; Kapinchev, Konstantin; Barnes, Fred; Garway-Heath, David F.; Rajendram, Ranjan; Keane, Pearce; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we introduced a novel Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) method, termed as Master Slave OCT (MS-OCT), specialized for delivering en-face images. This method uses principles of spectral domain interfereometry in two stages. MS-OCT operates like a time domain OCT, selecting only signals from a chosen depth only while scanning the laser beam across the eye. Time domain OCT allows real time production of an en-face image, although relatively slowly. As a major advance, the Master Slave method allows collection of signals from any number of depths, as required by the user. The tremendous advantage in terms of parallel provision of data from numerous depths could not be fully employed by using multi core processors only. The data processing required to generate images at multiple depths simultaneously is not achievable with commodity multicore processors only. We compare here the major improvement in processing and display, brought about by using graphic cards. We demonstrate images obtained with a swept source at 100 kHz (which determines an acquisition time [Ta] for a frame of 200×200 pixels2 of Ta =1.6 s). By the end of the acquired frame being scanned, using our computing capacity, 4 simultaneous en-face images could be created in T = 0.8 s. We demonstrate that by using graphic cards, 32 en-face images can be displayed in Td 0.3 s. Other faster swept source engines can be used with no difference in terms of Td. With 32 images (or more), volumes can be created for 3D display, using en-face images, as opposed to the current technology where volumes are created using cross section OCT images.

  19. Visual merchandising window display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opris (Cas. Stanila M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Window display plays a major part in the selling strategies; it does not only include the simple display of goods, nowadays it is a form of art, also having the purpose of sustaining the brand image. This article wants to reveal the tools that are essential in creating a fabulous window display. Being a window designer is not an easy job, you have to always think ahead trends, to have a sense of colour, to know how to use light to attract customers in the store after only one glance at the window. The big store window displays are theatre scenes: with expensive backgrounds, special effects and high fashion mannequins. The final role of the displays is to convince customers to enter the store and trigger the purchasing act which is the final goal of the retail activity.

  20. Enabling vendor independent photoacoustic imaging systems with asynchronous laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yixuan; Zhang, Haichong K.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2018-02-01

    Channel data acquisition, and synchronization between laser excitation and PA signal acquisition, are two fundamental hardware requirements for photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Unfortunately, however, neither is equipped by most clinical ultrasound scanners. Therefore, less economical specialized research platforms are used in general, which hinders a smooth clinical transition of PA imaging. In previous studies, we have proposed an algorithm to achieve PA imaging using ultrasound post-beamformed (USPB) RF data instead of channel data. This work focuses on enabling clinical ultrasound scanners to implement PA imaging, without requiring synchronization between the laser excitation and PA signal acquisition. Laser synchronization is inherently consisted of two aspects: frequency and phase information. We synchronize without communicating the laser and the ultrasound scanner by investigating USPB images of a point-target phantom in two steps. First, frequency information is estimated by solving a nonlinear optimization problem, under the assumption that the segmented wave-front can only be beamformed into a single spot when synchronization is achieved. Second, after making frequencies of two systems identical, phase delay is estimated by optimizing the image quality while varying phase value. The proposed method is validated through simulation, by manually adding both frequency and phase errors, then applying the proposed algorithm to correct errors and reconstruct PA images. Compared with the ground truth, simulation results indicate that the remaining errors in frequency correction and phase correction are 0.28% and 2.34%, respectively, which affirm the potential of overcoming hardware barriers on PA imaging through software solution.

  1. A simple algorithm for estimation of source-to-detector distance in Compton imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini W.; Sullivan, John P.; Tornga, Shawn R.; Brumby, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    Compton imaging is used to predict the location of gamma-emitting radiation sources. The X and Y coordinates of the source can be obtained using a back-projected image and a two-dimensional peak-finding algorithm. The emphasis of this work is to estimate the source-to-detector distance (Z). The algorithm presented uses the solid angle subtended by the reconstructed image at various source-to-detector distances. This algorithm was validated using both measured data from the prototype Compton imager (PCI) constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and simulated data of the same imager. Results show this method can be applied successfully to estimate Z, and it provides a way of determining Z without prior knowledge of the source location. This method is faster than the methods that employ maximum likelihood method because it is based on simple back projections of Compton scatter data

  2. Gamma camera display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    A gamma camera having an array of photomultipliers coupled via pulse shaping circuitry and a resistor weighting circuit to a display for forming an image of a radioactive subject is described. A linearizing circuit is coupled to the weighting circuit, the linearizing circuit including a nonlinear feedback circuit with diode coupling to the weighting circuit for linearizing the correspondence between points of the display and points of the subject. 4 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures

  3. Feasibility study on X-ray source with pinhole imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Rui; Li Junli

    2007-01-01

    In order to verify the feasibility of study on X-ray source with pinhole imaging method, and optimize the design of X-ray pinhole imaging system, an X-ray pinhole imaging equipment was set up. The change of image due to the change of the position and intensity of X-ray source was estimated with mathematical method and validated with experiment. The results show that the change of the spot position and gray of the spot is linearly related with the change of the position and intensity of X-ray source, so it is feasible to study X-ray source with pinhole imaging method in this application. The results provide some references for the design of X-ray pinhole imaging system. (authors)

  4. Population-based imaging biobanks as source of big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Heber, Sophia D; Storz, Corinna; Bamberg, Fabian

    2017-06-01

    Advances of computational sciences over the last decades have enabled the introduction of novel methodological approaches in biomedical research. Acquiring extensive and comprehensive data about a research subject and subsequently extracting significant information has opened new possibilities in gaining insight into biological and medical processes. This so-called big data approach has recently found entrance into medical imaging and numerous epidemiological studies have been implementing advanced imaging to identify imaging biomarkers that provide information about physiological processes, including normal development and aging but also on the development of pathological disease states. The purpose of this article is to present existing epidemiological imaging studies and to discuss opportunities, methodological and organizational aspects, and challenges that population imaging poses to the field of big data research.

  5. Imaging of fast-neutron sources using solid-state track-recorder pinhole radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Kaiser, B.J.; Preston, C.C.

    1983-08-01

    Pinhole imaging methods are being developed and tested for potential future use in imaging the intense neutron source of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Previously reported, extensive calibration measurements of the proton, neutron, and alpha particle response characteristics of CR-39 polymer solid state track recorders (SSTRs) are being used to interpret the results of imaging experiments using both charged particle and neutron pinhole collimators. High resolution, neutron pinhole images of a 252 Cf source have been obtained in the form of neutron induced proton recoil tracks in CR-39 polymer SSTR. These imaging experiments are described as well as their potential future applications to FMIT

  6. Analytic sensing for multi-layer spherical models with application to EEG source imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kandaswamy, Djano; Blu, Thierry; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    Source imaging maps back boundary measurements to underlying generators within the domain; e. g., retrieving the parameters of the generating dipoles from electrical potential measurements on the scalp such as in electroencephalography (EEG). Fitting such a parametric source model is non-linear in the positions of the sources and renewed interest in mathematical imaging has led to several promising approaches. One important step in these methods is the application of a sensing principle that ...

  7. Micro-seismic imaging using a source function independent full waveform inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanchen; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2018-03-01

    At the heart of micro-seismic event measurements is the task to estimate the location of the source micro-seismic events, as well as their ignition times. The accuracy of locating the sources is highly dependent on the velocity model. On the other hand, the conventional micro-seismic source locating methods require, in many cases manual picking of traveltime arrivals, which do not only lead to manual effort and human interaction, but also prone to errors. Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate and image micro-seismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source locations (space) and functions (time). We developed a source function independent full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with these observed and modeled to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for the source wavelet in Z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also, angle gathers is calculated to assess the quality of the long wavelength component of the velocity model. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for synthetic examples used here, like those corresponding to the Marmousi model and the SEG/EAGE overthrust model.

  8. Micro-seismic imaging using a source function independent full waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2018-03-26

    At the heart of micro-seismic event measurements is the task to estimate the location of the source micro-seismic events, as well as their ignition times. The accuracy of locating the sources is highly dependent on the velocity model. On the other hand, the conventional micro-seismic source locating methods require, in many cases manual picking of traveltime arrivals, which do not only lead to manual effort and human interaction, but also prone to errors. Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate and image micro-seismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source locations (space) and functions (time). We developed a source function independent full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with these observed and modeled to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for the source wavelet in Z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also, angle gathers is calculated to assess the quality of the long wavelength component of the velocity model. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for synthetic examples used here, like those corresponding to the Marmousi model and the SEG/EAGE overthrust model.

  9. Three-dimensional image display by CT data processing and clinical applications in orthopaedics and craniofacial surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonneveld, F.W.; Akkerveeken, P.F. van; Koornneef, L.

    1988-01-01

    The methods of generating three-dimensional images from two-dimensional CT data are described. Four cases are reported explaining its use in the planning of orthopaedic and craniofacial surgery. (orig.) [de

  10. Development and image quality assessment of a contrast-enhancement algorithm for display of digital chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, K.

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation presents a contrast-enhancement algorithm Artifact-Suppressed Adaptive Histogram Equalization (ASAHE). This algorithm was developed as part of a larger effort to replace the film radiographs currently used in radiology departments with digital images. Among the expected benefits of digital radiology are improved image management and greater diagnostic accuracy. Film radiographs record X-ray transmission data at high spatial resolution, and a wide dynamic range of signal. Current digital radiography systems record an image at reduced spatial resolution and with coarse sampling of the available dynamic range. These reductions have a negative impact on diagnostic accuracy. The contrast-enhancement algorithm presented in this dissertation is designed to boost diagnostic accuracy of radiologists using digital images. The ASAHE algorithm is an extension of an earlier technique called Adaptive Histogram Equalization (AHE). The AHE algorithm is unsuitable for chest radiographs because it over-enhances noise, and introduces boundary artifacts. The modifications incorporated in ASAHE suppress the artifacts and allow processing of chest radiographs. This dissertation describes the psychophysical methods used to evaluate the effects of processing algorithms on human observer performance. An experiment conducted with anthropomorphic phantoms and simulated nodules showed the ASAHE algorithm to be superior for human detection of nodules when compared to a computed radiography system's algorithm that is in current use. An experiment conducted using clinical images demonstrating pneumothoraces (partial lung collapse) indicated no difference in human observer accuracy when ASAHE images were compared to computed radiography images, but greater ease of diagnosis when ASAHE images were used. These results provide evidence to suggest that Artifact-Suppressed Adaptive Histogram Equalization can be effective in increasing diagnostic accuracy and efficiency

  11. Image quality optimization and evaluation of linearly mixed images in dual-source, dual-energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lifeng; Primak, Andrew N.; Liu Xin; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2009-01-01

    In dual-source dual-energy CT, the images reconstructed from the low- and high-energy scans (typically at 80 and 140 kV, respectively) can be mixed together to provide a single set of non-material-specific images for the purpose of routine diagnostic interpretation. Different from the material-specific information that may be obtained from the dual-energy scan data, the mixed images are created with the purpose of providing the interpreting physician a single set of images that have an appearance similar to that in single-energy images acquired at the same total radiation dose. In this work, the authors used a phantom study to evaluate the image quality of linearly mixed images in comparison to single-energy CT images, assuming the same total radiation dose and taking into account the effect of patient size and the dose partitioning between the low-and high-energy scans. The authors first developed a method to optimize the quality of the linearly mixed images such that the single-energy image quality was compared to the best-case image quality of the dual-energy mixed images. Compared to 80 kV single-energy images for the same radiation dose, the iodine CNR in dual-energy mixed images was worse for smaller phantom sizes. However, similar noise and similar or improved iodine CNR relative to 120 kV images could be achieved for dual-energy mixed images using the same total radiation dose over a wide range of patient sizes (up to 45 cm lateral thorax dimension). Thus, for adult CT practices, which primarily use 120 kV scanning, the use of dual-energy CT for the purpose of material-specific imaging can also produce a set of non-material-specific images for routine diagnostic interpretation that are of similar or improved quality relative to single-energy 120 kV scans.

  12. Study on radiation dose in the medical image data display method-focus on the DICOM standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Su [Dept. of Radio-technology, Health Welfare, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) standards are generally introduced as de facto and de jure standards in modern medical imaging devices to store and to transmit medical image information. DICOM Dose Structured Report (DICOM dose SR) is implemented to report radiation exposure information in image acquiring process. and DIOCM Modality Performed Procedure Step (DICOM MPPS) is also partly used to report this exposure with the information in its DICOM tag. This article is focused on three type of radiation exposure information of DICOM standards, 1) DICOM dose SR, 2) DICOM MPPS and 3) Radiation Exposure Monitoring(REM) profile by Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise(IHE), to study on radiation exposure reporting. Healthcare facility and its staff of medical imaging related to radiation exposure should have a deep understanding of radiation exposure, and it required a standards to enhance the quality control of medical imaging and the safety of patients and staffs. Staff member have to pay attention on radiation exposures and controlling processes from the purchasing stage of X-ray devices.

  13. Study on radiation dose in the medical image data display method-focus on the DICOM standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Su

    2015-01-01

    DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) standards are generally introduced as de facto and de jure standards in modern medical imaging devices to store and to transmit medical image information. DICOM Dose Structured Report (DICOM dose SR) is implemented to report radiation exposure information in image acquiring process. and DIOCM Modality Performed Procedure Step (DICOM MPPS) is also partly used to report this exposure with the information in its DICOM tag. This article is focused on three type of radiation exposure information of DICOM standards, 1) DICOM dose SR, 2) DICOM MPPS and 3) Radiation Exposure Monitoring(REM) profile by Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise(IHE), to study on radiation exposure reporting. Healthcare facility and its staff of medical imaging related to radiation exposure should have a deep understanding of radiation exposure, and it required a standards to enhance the quality control of medical imaging and the safety of patients and staffs. Staff member have to pay attention on radiation exposures and controlling processes from the purchasing stage of X-ray devices

  14. Fresnel zone plate imaging of a 252Cf spontaneous fission source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalker, K.T.; Hessel, K.R.

    1976-11-01

    The feasibility of coded aperture imaging for nuclear fuel motion monitoring is shown using Cf 252 spontaneous fission source. The theory of coded aperture imaging for Fresnel zone plate apertures is presented and design considerations for zone plate construction are discussed. Actual images are obtained which demonstrate a transverse resolution of 1.7 mm and a tomographic resolution of 1.5 millimeters. The capability of obtaining images through 12.7 mm of stainless steel is also shown

  15. Neutron Imaging at Compact Accelerator-Driven Neutron Sources in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Kiyanagi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutron imaging has been recognized to be very useful to investigate inside of materials and products that cannot be seen by X-ray. New imaging methods using the pulsed structure of neutron sources based on accelerators has been developed also at compact accelerator-driven neutron sources and opened new application fields in neutron imaging. The world’s first dedicated imaging instrument at pulsed neutron sources was constructed at J-PARC in Japan owing to the development of such new methods. Then, usefulness of the compact accelerator-driven neutron sources in neutron science was recognized and such facilities were newly constructed in Japan. Now, existing and new sources have been used for neutron imaging. Traditional imaging and newly developed pulsed neutron imaging such as Bragg edge transmission have been applied to various fields by using compact and large neutron facilities. Here, compact accelerator-driven neutron sources used for imaging in Japan are introduced and some of their activities are presented.

  16. Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDowell, A. A.; Warwick, T.; Anders, S.; Lamble, G.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Padmore, H.A.

    1999-01-01

    One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications

  17. Effect of stimulation by foliage plant display images on prefrontal cortex activity: a comparison with stimulation using actual foliage plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Miho; Song, Chorong; Ikei, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Natural scenes like forests and flowers evoke neurophysiological responses that can suppress anxiety and relieve stress. We examined whether images of natural objects can elicit neural responses similar to those evoked by real objects by comparing the activation of the prefrontal cortex during presentation of real foliage plants with a projected image of the same foliage plants. Oxy-hemoglobin concentrations in the prefrontal cortex were measured using time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy while the subjects viewed the real plants or a projected image of the same plants. Compared with a projected image of foliage plants, viewing the actual foliage plants significantly increased oxy-hemoglobin concentrations in the prefrontal cortex. However, using the modified semantic differential method, subjective emotional response ratings ("comfortable vs. uncomfortable" and "relaxed vs. awakening") were similar for both stimuli. The frontal cortex responded differently to presentation of actual plants compared with images of these plants even when the subjective emotional response was similar. These results may help explain the physical and mental health benefits of urban, domestic, and workplace foliage. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  18. [A preliminary research on multi-source medical image fusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yuanyuan; Li, Bin; Tian, Lianfang; Mao, Zongyuan

    2009-04-01

    Multi-modal medical image fusion has important value in clinical diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, the multi-resolution analysis of Daubechies 9/7 Biorthogonal Wavelet Transform is introduced for anatomical and functional image fusion, then a new fusion algorithm with the combination of local standard deviation and energy as texture measurement is presented. At last, a set of quantitative evaluation criteria is given. Experiments show that both anatomical and metabolism information can be obtained effectively, and both the edge and texture features can be reserved successfully. The presented algorithm is more effective than the traditional algorithms.

  19. Development of a prototype apparatus visualizing on a screen the gamma sources superimposed on the image of the vision field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbard, G.; Lemaire, J.E. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 - Marcoule (France). Dept. d`Exploitation du Retraitement et de Demantelement; Carcreff, H.; Marchand, L.; Thellier, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Reacteurs Experimentaux

    1994-12-31

    Mapping the gamma activity of irradiating zones is often an important prerequisite in dismantling nuclear facilities. The operation is necessary to define a suitable decommissioning strategy before any work begins; it is also required during the procedure to measure the residual activity wherever dose rates are too high to allow human intervention. This report summarizes the work carried out under CEC contract FIED-0055, covering a prototype imaging system designed to display radioactive sources superimposed in real time over a visible light image on a video monitor. This project was developed from an earlier off-line system. The gamma photons are collimated by a double cone system. The imaging system comprises a transparent scintillator bonded to the fiber-optic window of an ultrasensitive camera. The camera was miniaturized to meet specification requirements: with its radiological shielding, the gamma camera weighs 40 kg and is 120 mm in diameter. The processing system is compatible with a realtime camera, and small enough for use at any nuclear. The point-source angular resolution is 1.4 deg. for {sup 60} Co and 0.8 deg. for {sup 137} Cs. The dose rate sensitivity limit is approximately 0.01 mGy.h{sup -1}. Process reliability was confirmed by tests in a high-level radio-metallurgy cell at actual decommissioning site. (authors). 7 figs.

  20. Latest development of display technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hong-Yue; Yao Qiu-Xiang; Liu Pan; Zheng Zhi-Qiang; Liu Ji-Cheng; Zheng Hua-Dong; Zeng Chao; Yu Ying-Jie; Sun Tao; Zeng Zhen-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    In this review we will focus on recent progress in the field of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) display technologies. We present the current display materials and their applications, including organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), flexible OLEDs quantum dot light emitting diodes (QLEDs), active-matrix organic light emitting diodes (AMOLEDs), electronic paper (E-paper), curved displays, stereoscopic 3D displays, volumetric 3D displays, light field 3D displays, and holographic 3D displays. Conventional 2D display devices, such as liquid crystal devices (LCDs) often result in ambiguity in high-dimensional data images because of lacking true depth information. This review thus provides a detailed description of 3D display technologies. (topical review)

  1. US-CT 3D dual imaging by mutual display of the same sections for depicting minor changes in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki, E-mail: fukuhiro1962@hotmail.com [International HIFU Center, Sanmu Medical Center Hospital, Naruto 167, Sanbu-shi, Chiba 289-1326 (Japan); Ito, Ryu; Ohto, Masao; Sakamoto, Akio [International HIFU Center, Sanmu Medical Center Hospital, Naruto 167, Sanbu-shi, Chiba 289-1326 (Japan); Otsuka, Masayuki; Togawa, Akira; Miyazaki, Masaru [Department of General Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 260-0856 (Japan); Yamagata, Hitoshi [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara 324-0036 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound-computed tomography (US-CT) 3D dual imaging for the detection of small extranodular growths of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The clinical and pathological profiles of 10 patients with single nodular type HCC with extranodular growth (extranodular growth) who underwent a hepatectomy were evaluated using two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonography (US), three-dimensional (3D) US, 3D computed tomography (CT) and 3D US-CT dual images. Raw 3D data was converted to DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) data using Echo to CT (Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tokyo, Japan), and the 3D DICOM data was directly transferred to the image analysis system (ZioM900, ZIOSOFT Inc., Tokyo, Japan). By inputting the angle number (x, y, z) of the 3D CT volume data into the ZioM900, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images of the 3D CT data were displayed in a manner such that they resembled the conventional US images. Eleven extranodular growths were detected pathologically in 10 cases. 2D US was capable of depicting only 2 of the 11 extranodular growths. 3D CT was capable of depicting 4 of the 11 extranodular growths. On the other hand, 3D US was capable of depicting 10 of the 11 extranodular growths, and 3D US-CT dual images, which enable the dual analysis of the CT and US planes, revealed all 11 extranodular growths. In conclusion, US-CT 3D dual imaging may be useful for the detection of small extranodular growths.

  2. US-CT 3D dual imaging by mutual display of the same sections for depicting minor changes in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Ito, Ryu; Ohto, Masao; Sakamoto, Akio; Otsuka, Masayuki; Togawa, Akira; Miyazaki, Masaru; Yamagata, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound-computed tomography (US-CT) 3D dual imaging for the detection of small extranodular growths of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The clinical and pathological profiles of 10 patients with single nodular type HCC with extranodular growth (extranodular growth) who underwent a hepatectomy were evaluated using two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonography (US), three-dimensional (3D) US, 3D computed tomography (CT) and 3D US-CT dual images. Raw 3D data was converted to DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) data using Echo to CT (Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tokyo, Japan), and the 3D DICOM data was directly transferred to the image analysis system (ZioM900, ZIOSOFT Inc., Tokyo, Japan). By inputting the angle number (x, y, z) of the 3D CT volume data into the ZioM900, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images of the 3D CT data were displayed in a manner such that they resembled the conventional US images. Eleven extranodular growths were detected pathologically in 10 cases. 2D US was capable of depicting only 2 of the 11 extranodular growths. 3D CT was capable of depicting 4 of the 11 extranodular growths. On the other hand, 3D US was capable of depicting 10 of the 11 extranodular growths, and 3D US-CT dual images, which enable the dual analysis of the CT and US planes, revealed all 11 extranodular growths. In conclusion, US-CT 3D dual imaging may be useful for the detection of small extranodular growths

  3. Quantitative phase imaging of living cells with a swept laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shichao; Zhu, Yizheng

    2016-03-01

    Digital holographic phase microscopy is a well-established quantitative phase imaging technique. However, interference artifacts from inside the system, typically induced by elements whose optical thickness are within the source coherence length, limit the imaging quality as well as sensitivity. In this paper, a swept laser source based technique is presented. Spectra acquired at a number of wavelengths, after Fourier Transform, can be used to identify the sources of the interference artifacts. With proper tuning of the optical pathlength difference between sample and reference arms, it is possible to avoid these artifacts and achieve sensitivity below 0.3nm. Performance of the proposed technique is examined in live cell imaging.

  4. Description and validation of a combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    A model that combines image source modelling and acoustical radiosity with complex boundary con- ditions, thus including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Model (PARISM). It has been developed in order to be able...... to model both specular and diffuse reflections with complex-valued acoustical descriptions of the surfaces. This paper mainly describes the combination of the two models and the implementation of the angle dependent surface descriptions both in the image source model and in acoustical radiosity...

  5. Defocusing effects of lensless ghost imaging and ghost diffraction with partially coherent sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuang-Xi; Sheng, Wei; Bi, Yu-Bo; Luo, Chun-Ling

    2018-04-01

    The defocusing effect is inevitable and degrades the image quality in the conventional optical imaging process significantly due to the close confinement of the imaging lens. Based on classical optical coherent theory and linear algebra, we develop a unified formula to describe the defocusing effects of both lensless ghost imaging (LGI) and lensless ghost diffraction (LGD) systems with a partially coherent source. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the influence of defocusing length on the quality of LGI and LGD. We find that the defocusing effects of the test and reference paths in the LGI or LGD systems are entirely different, while the LGD system is more robust against defocusing than the LGI system. Specifically, we find that the imaging process for LGD systems can be viewed as pinhole imaging, which may find applications in ultra-short-wave band imaging without imaging lenses, e.g. x-ray diffraction and γ-ray imaging.

  6. Digital Display Integration Project Project Online 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardsley, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    The electronic display industry is changing in three important ways. First, the dominance of the cathode ray tube (CRT) is being challenged by the development of flat panel displays (FPDs). This will lead to the availability of displays of higher performance, albeit at greater cost. Secondly, the analog interfaces between displays that show data and the computers that generate the data are being replaced by digital connections. Finally, a high-resolution display is becoming the most expensive component in computer system for homes and small offices. It is therefore desirable that the useful lifetime of the display extend over several years and that the electronics allows the display to be used with many different image sources. Hopefully, the necessity of having three or four large CRTs in one office to accommodate different computer operating systems or communication protocols will soon disappear. Instead, we hope to see a set of flat panels that can be switched to show several independent images from multiple sources or a composite image from a single source. The more rapid rate of technological improvements and the higher cost of flat panel displays raise the incentive for greater planning and guidance in the acquisition and integration of high performance displays into large organizations, such as LLNL. The goal of the Digital Display Integration Project (DDIP) is to provide such support. This will be achieved through collaboration with leading suppliers of displays, communications equipment and image-processing products, and by greater exchange of information within the Laboratory. The project will start in October 1999. During the first two years (FY2000-1), the primary focus of the program will be upon: introducing displays with high information content (over 5M pixels); facilitating the transition from analog to digital interfaces; enabling data transfer from key computer platforms; incorporating optical communications to remove length restrictions on data

  7. 1975 Memorial Award Paper. Image generation and display techniques for CT scan data. Thin transverse and reconstructed coronal and sagittal planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, W V; Johnston, R J; Morton, P E; Dwyer, S J

    1975-01-01

    The various limitations to computerized axial tomographic (CT) interpretation are due in part to the 8-13 mm standard tissue plane thickness and in part to the absence of alternative planes of view, such as coronal or sagittal images. This paper describes a method for gathering multiple overlapped 8 mm transverse sections, subjecting these data to a deconvolution process, and then displaying thin (1 mm) transverse as well as reconstructed coronal and sagittal CT images. Verification of the deconvolution technique with phantom experiments is described. Application of the phantom results to human post mortem CT scan data illustrates this method's faithful reconstruction of coronal and sagittal tissue densities when correlated with actual specimen photographs of a sectioned brain. A special CT procedure, limited basal overlap scanning, is proposed for use on current first generation CT scanners without hardware modification.

  8. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  9. A method for evaluating image quality of monochrome and color displays based on luminance by use of a commercially available color digital camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokurei, Shogo, E-mail: shogo.tokurei@gmail.com, E-mail: junjim@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan and Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Hospital, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Morishita, Junji, E-mail: shogo.tokurei@gmail.com, E-mail: junjim@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to propose a method for the quantitative evaluation of image quality of both monochrome and color liquid-crystal displays (LCDs) using a commercially available color digital camera. Methods: The intensities of the unprocessed red (R), green (G), and blue (B) signals of a camera vary depending on the spectral sensitivity of the image sensor used in the camera. For consistent evaluation of image quality for both monochrome and color LCDs, the unprocessed RGB signals of the camera were converted into gray scale signals that corresponded to the luminance of the LCD. Gray scale signals for the monochrome LCD were evaluated by using only the green channel signals of the camera. For the color LCD, the RGB signals of the camera were converted into gray scale signals by employing weighting factors (WFs) for each RGB channel. A line image displayed on the color LCD was simulated on the monochrome LCD by using a software application for subpixel driving in order to verify the WF-based conversion method. Furthermore, the results obtained by different types of commercially available color cameras and a photometric camera were compared to examine the consistency of the authors’ method. Finally, image quality for both the monochrome and color LCDs was assessed by measuring modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and Wiener spectra (WS). Results: The authors’ results demonstrated that the proposed method for calibrating the spectral sensitivity of the camera resulted in a consistent and reliable evaluation of the luminance of monochrome and color LCDs. The MTFs and WS showed different characteristics for the two LCD types owing to difference in the subpixel structure. The MTF in the vertical direction of the color LCD was superior to that of the monochrome LCD, although the WS in the vertical direction of the color LCD was inferior to that of the monochrome LCD as a result of luminance fluctuations in RGB subpixels. Conclusions: The authors

  10. Functional displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis De, F.; Haentjens, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Functional Displays are directly derived from the Man-Machine Design key document: Function-Based Task Analysis. The presentation defines and describes the goals-means structure of the plant function along with applicable control volumes and parameters of interest. The purpose of the subject is to show, through an example of a preliminary design, what the main parts of a function are. (3 figs.)

  11. Display hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    To appreciate the limitations and possibilities of computer graphics it is necessary to have some acquaintance with the available technology. The aim of this chapter is to mention briefly the different display types and their 'ball-park' price ranges. It must be stressed that prices change rapidly, and so those quoted here are only intended to give an idea of the cost at the time of writing.

  12. Effect of the lead screen in the radiographic image using iridium 192 as a source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garate Rojas, M.

    1983-01-01

    It's presented the effect of the lead screen in the image obtained on an impressionable film used in industrial gammagraphy. The source used was Iridium 192 and the tests were simulated like a real inspection. (E.G.) [pt

  13. Development of Realistic Head Models for Electromagnetic Source Imaging of the Human Brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akalin, Z

    2001-01-01

    In this work, a methodology is developed to solve the forward problem of electromagnetic source imaging using realistic head models, For this purpose, first segmentation of the 3 dimensional MR head...

  14. A Fieldable-Prototype Large-Area Gamma-ray Imager for Orphan Source Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter [ORNL; Fabris, Lorenzo [ORNL; Carr, Dennis [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Collins, Jeff [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Cunningham, Mark F [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Habte Ghebretatios, Frezghi [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Marchant, William [University of California, Berkeley

    2008-01-01

    We have constructed a unique instrument for use in the search for orphan sources. The system uses gamma-ray imaging to "see through" the natural background variations that effectively limit the search range of normal devices to ~10 m. The imager is mounted in a 4.9- m-long trailer and can be towed by a large personal vehicle. Source locations are determined both in range and along the direction of travel as the vehicle moves. A fully inertial platform coupled to a Global Positioning System receiver is used to map the gamma-ray images onto overhead geospatial imagery. The resulting images provide precise source locations, allowing rapid follow-up work. The instrument simultaneously searches both sides of the street to a distance of 50 m (100-m swath) for milliCurieclass sources with near-perfect performance.

  15. Micro-seismic Imaging Using a Source Independent Waveform Inversion Method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-04-18

    Micro-seismology is attracting more and more attention in the exploration seismology community. The main goal in micro-seismic imaging is to find the source location and the ignition time in order to track the fracture expansion, which will help engineers monitor the reservoirs. Conventional imaging methods work fine in this field but there are many limitations such as manual picking, incorrect migration velocity and low signal to noise ratio (S/N). In traditional surface survey imaging, full waveform inversion (FWI) is widely used. The FWI method updates the velocity model by minimizing the misfit between the observed data and the predicted data. Using FWI to locate and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. Use the FWI technique, and overcomes the difficulties of manual pickings and incorrect velocity model for migration. However, the technique of waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces its own problems. There is significant nonlinearity due to the unknown source location (space) and function (time). We have developed a source independent FWI of micro-seismic events to simultaneously invert for the source image, source function and velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with the observed and modeled data to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. To examine the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model the extended image for source wavelet in z-axis is extracted. Also the angle gather is calculated to check the applicability of the migration velocity. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity in the synthetic experiments with both parts of the Marmousi and the SEG

  16. A novel method for detecting light source for digital images forensic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A. K.; Mitra, S. K.; Agrawal, R.

    2011-06-01

    Manipulation in image has been in practice since centuries. These manipulated images are intended to alter facts — facts of ethics, morality, politics, sex, celebrity or chaos. Image forensic science is used to detect these manipulations in a digital image. There are several standard ways to analyze an image for manipulation. Each one has some limitation. Also very rarely any method tried to capitalize on the way image was taken by the camera. We propose a new method that is based on light and its shade as light and shade are the fundamental input resources that may carry all the information of the image. The proposed method measures the direction of light source and uses the light based technique for identification of any intentional partial manipulation in the said digital image. The method is tested for known manipulated images to correctly identify the light sources. The light source of an image is measured in terms of angle. The experimental results show the robustness of the methodology.

  17. Combat vehicle crew helmet-mounted display: next generation high-resolution head-mounted display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Scott A.

    1994-06-01

    The Combat Vehicle Crew Head-Mounted Display (CVC HMD) program is an ARPA-funded, US Army Natick Research, Development, and Engineering Center monitored effort to develop a high resolution, flat panel HMD for the M1 A2 Abrams main battle tank. CVC HMD is part of the ARPA High Definition Systems (HDS) thrust to develop and integrate small (24 micrometers square pels), high resolution (1280 X 1024 X 6-bit grey scale at 60 frame/sec) active matrix electroluminescent (AMEL) and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCD) for head mounted and projection applications. The Honeywell designed CVC HMD is a next generation head-mounted display system that includes advanced flat panel image sources, advanced digital display driver electronics, high speed (> 1 Gbps) digital interconnect electronics, and light weight, high performance optical and mechanical designs. The resulting dramatic improvements in size, weight, power, and cost have already led to program spin offs for both military and commercial applications.

  18. Microfocus x-ray imaging of traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources for quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, T.; Oda, K.; Sato, Y.; Ito, H.; Masuda, S.; Yamada, T.; Matsumoto, M.; Murayama, H.; Takei, H. [Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University Kitasato 1-15-1, Minami-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan); Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Sakaecho 35-2, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0015 (Japan); Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Kanagawa Industrial Technology Center (KITC) Shimoimazumi 705-1, Ebina-shi, Kanagawa 243-0435 (Japan); Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) Komagome 2-28-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8941 (Japan); Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kitasato University Kitasato 1-15-1, Minami-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to propose a microfocus x-ray imaging technique for observing the internal structure of small radioactive sources and evaluating geometrical errors quantitatively, and to apply this technique to traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources, which were designed for positron emission tomography calibration, for the purpose of quality control of the pointlike sources. Methods: A microfocus x-ray imaging system with a focus size of 0.001 mm was used to obtain projection x-ray images and x-ray CT images of five pointlike source samples, which were manufactured during 2009-2012. The obtained projection and tomographic images were used to observe the internal structure and evaluate geometrical errors quantitatively. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the effect of possible geometrical errors on the intensity and uniformity of 0.511 MeV annihilation photon pairs emitted from the sources. Results: Geometrical errors were evaluated with sufficient precision using projection x-ray images. CT images were used for observing the internal structure intuitively. As a result, four of the five examined samples were within the tolerance to maintain the total uncertainty below {+-}0.5%, given the source radioactivity; however, one sample was found to be defective. Conclusions: This quality control procedure is crucial and offers an important basis for using the pointlike {sup 22}Na source as a basic calibration tool. The microfocus x-ray imaging approach is a promising technique for visual and quantitative evaluation of the internal geometry of small radioactive sources.

  19. A paper sheet phantom for scintigraphic planar imaging. Usefulness of pouch-laminated paper source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaki, Akihiro; Soma, Tsutomu; Murase, Kenya; Teraoka, Satomi; Murakami, Tomonori; Kojima, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2007-01-01

    In order to perform experimental measurements for evaluation of imaging device's performance, data acquisition technique, and clinical images on scintigraphic imaging, many kinds of phantoms are employed. However, since these materials are acrylic and plastic, the thickness and quality of those materials cause attenuation and scatter in itself. We developed a paper sheet phantom sealed with a pouch laminator, which can be a true radioactive source in air. In this study, the paper sheet phantom was compared to the acrylic liver phantom, with the thickness of 2 cm, which is commercially available. The results showed that although some scatter counts were contained within the image of the acrylic liver phantom, there were few scattered photons in the paper sheet phantom image. Furthermore, this laminated paper sheet phantom made handling of the source and its waste easier. If the paper sheet phantom will be designed more sophisticatedly, it becomes a useful tool for planar imaging experiments. (author)

  20. Are 1-K display systems suitable for primary diagnosis from radiographic images in picture archiving and communications systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawood, R.M.; Todd-Pokropek, A.; Highman, J.H.; Porter, A.; Craig, J.O.M.C.

    1990-01-01

    The authors of this paper performed a formal clinical evaluation of a commercially available high-resolution (1,280-line) picture archiving and communications system workstation. Diagnostic accuracy with plain radiographs was compared with that with laser-digitized images, with the use of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve methods. Four major clinical groups were studied: hand films of patients with renal osteodystrophy, chest films of patients with pneumocystis pneumonia, mammograms of patients with breast carcinoma, and skull films of patients with fractures. More than 13,000 observations were recorded

  1. Online molecular image repository and analysis system: A multicenter collaborative open-source infrastructure for molecular imaging research and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mahabubur; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2018-05-01

    Molecular imaging serves as an important tool for researchers and clinicians to visualize and investigate complex biochemical phenomena using specialized instruments; these instruments are either used individually or in combination with targeted imaging agents to obtain images related to specific diseases with high sensitivity, specificity, and signal-to-noise ratios. However, molecular imaging, which is a multidisciplinary research field, faces several challenges, including the integration of imaging informatics with bioinformatics and medical informatics, requirement of reliable and robust image analysis algorithms, effective quality control of imaging facilities, and those related to individualized disease mapping, data sharing, software architecture, and knowledge management. As a cost-effective and open-source approach to address these challenges related to molecular imaging, we develop a flexible, transparent, and secure infrastructure, named MIRA, which stands for Molecular Imaging Repository and Analysis, primarily using the Python programming language, and a MySQL relational database system deployed on a Linux server. MIRA is designed with a centralized image archiving infrastructure and information database so that a multicenter collaborative informatics platform can be built. The capability of dealing with metadata, image file format normalization, and storing and viewing different types of documents and multimedia files make MIRA considerably flexible. With features like logging, auditing, commenting, sharing, and searching, MIRA is useful as an Electronic Laboratory Notebook for effective knowledge management. In addition, the centralized approach for MIRA facilitates on-the-fly access to all its features remotely through any web browser. Furthermore, the open-source approach provides the opportunity for sustainable continued development. MIRA offers an infrastructure that can be used as cross-boundary collaborative MI research platform for the rapid

  2. Large seismic source imaging from old analogue seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Bento; Buforn, Elisa; Borges, José; Bezzeghoud, Mourad

    2017-04-01

    In this work we present a procedure to recover the ground motions by a proper digital structure, from old seismograms in analogue physical support (paper or microfilm) to study the source rupture process, by application of modern finite source inversion tools. Despite the quality that the analog data and the digitizing technologies available may have, recover the ground motions with the accurate metrics from old seismograms, is often an intricate procedure. Frequently the general parameters of the analogue instruments response that allow recover the shape of the ground motions (free periods and damping) are known, but the magnification that allow recover the metric of these motions is dubious. It is in these situations that the procedure applies. The procedure is based on assign of the moment magnitude value to the integral of the apparent Source Time Function (STF), estimated by deconvolution of a synthetic elementary seismogram from the related observed seismogram, corrected with an instrument response affected by improper magnification. Two delicate issues in the process are 1) the calculus of the synthetic elementary seismograms that must consider later phases if applied to large earthquakes (the portions of signal should be 3 or 4 times larger than the rupture time) and 2) the deconvolution to calculate the apparent STF. In present version of the procedure was used the Direct Solution Method to compute the elementary seismograms and the deconvolution was processed in time domain by an iterative algorithm that allow constrains the STF to stay positive and time limited. The method was examined using synthetic data to test the accuracy and robustness. Finally, a set of 17 real old analog seismograms from the Santa Maria (Azores) 1939 earthquake (Mw=7.1) was used in order to recover the waveforms in the required digital structure, from which by inversion allows compute the finite source rupture model (slip distribution). Acknowledgements: This work is co

  3. Localization of sources of the hyperinsulinism through the image methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abath, C.G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic insulinomas are small tumours, manifested early by the high hormonal production. Microscopic changes, like islet cell hyperplasia or nesidioblastosis, are also sources of hyperinsulinism. The pre-operative localization of the lesions is important, avoiding unnecessary or insufficient blind pancreatectomies. It is presented the experience with 26 patients with hyperinsulinism, of whom six were examined by ultrasound, nine by computed tomography, 25 by angiography and 16 by pancreatic venous sampling for hormone assay, in order to localize the lesions. Percutaneous transhepatic portal and pancreatic vein catheterization with measurement of insuline concentrations was the most reliable and sensitive method for detecting the lesions, including those non-palpable during the surgical exploration (author)

  4. Display systems for NPP control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozov, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    Main trends in development of display systems used as the means for image displaying in NPP control systems are considered. It is shown that colour display devices appear to be the most universal means for concentrated data presentation. Along with digital means the display systems provide for high-speed response, sufficient for operative control of executive mechanisms. A conclusion is drawn that further development of display systems will move towards creation of large colour fields (on reflection base or with multicolour gas-discharge elements)

  5. Projection display technology for avionics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmanash, Michael H.; Tompkins, Richard D.

    2000-08-01

    Avionics displays often require custom image sources tailored to demanding program needs. Flat panel devices are attractive for cockpit installations, however recent history has shown that it is not possible to sustain a business manufacturing custom flat panels in small volume specialty runs. As the number of suppliers willing to undertake this effort shrinks, avionics programs unable to utilize commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) flat panels are placed in serious jeopardy. Rear projection technology offers a new paradigm, enabling compact systems to be tailored to specific platform needs while using a complement of COTS components. Projection displays enable improved performance, lower cost and shorter development cycles based on inter-program commonality and the wide use of commercial components. This paper reviews the promise and challenges of projection technology and provides an overview of Kaiser Electronics' efforts in developing advanced avionics displays using this approach.

  6. Energy source perceptions and policy support: Image associations, emotional evaluations, and cognitive beliefs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes Truelove, Heather

    2012-01-01

    This paper represents the most in-depth effort conducted to date to assess affective, emotional and cognitive perceptions of coal, natural gas, nuclear, and wind energy and the relationship between these perceptions and support for the energy sources. U.S. residents, recruited from a consumer panel, completed surveys assessing image associations, emotional reactions, and cognitive beliefs about energy sources and support for increased reliance on energy sources and local siting of energy facilities. The content of images produced by participants when evaluating energy sources revealed several interesting findings. Additionally, analysis of the image evaluations, emotions, and beliefs about each energy source showed that coal and nuclear energy were viewed most negatively, with natural gas in the middle, and wind viewed most positively. Importantly, these affective, emotional, and cognitive perceptions explained significant amounts of variance in support for each of the energy sources. Implications for future researchers and policy makers are discussed. - Highlights: ► Image associations, emotions, and beliefs about energy sources were measured. ► A dual-process model of energy support was proposed and tested. ► Coal and nuclear were viewed most negatively and wind was viewed most positively. ► The cognitive-affective model predicted support for each energy source.

  7. HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THE ATLBS REGIONS: THE RADIO SOURCE COUNTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorat, K.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Saripalli, L.; Ekers, R. D., E-mail: kshitij@rri.res.in [Raman Research Institute, C. V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India)

    2013-01-01

    The Australia Telescope Low-brightness Survey (ATLBS) regions have been mosaic imaged at a radio frequency of 1.4 GHz with 6'' angular resolution and 72 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms noise. The images (centered at R.A. 00{sup h}35{sup m}00{sup s}, decl. -67 Degree-Sign 00'00'' and R.A. 00{sup h}59{sup m}17{sup s}, decl. -67 Degree-Sign 00'00'', J2000 epoch) cover 8.42 deg{sup 2} sky area and have no artifacts or imaging errors above the image thermal noise. Multi-resolution radio and optical r-band images (made using the 4 m CTIO Blanco telescope) were used to recognize multi-component sources and prepare a source list; the detection threshold was 0.38 mJy in a low-resolution radio image made with beam FWHM of 50''. Radio source counts in the flux density range 0.4-8.7 mJy are estimated, with corrections applied for noise bias, effective area correction, and resolution bias. The resolution bias is mitigated using low-resolution radio images, while effects of source confusion are removed by using high-resolution images for identifying blended sources. Below 1 mJy the ATLBS counts are systematically lower than the previous estimates. Showing no evidence for an upturn down to 0.4 mJy, they do not require any changes in the radio source population down to the limit of the survey. The work suggests that automated image analysis for counts may be dependent on the ability of the imaging to reproduce connecting emission with low surface brightness and on the ability of the algorithm to recognize sources, which may require that source finding algorithms effectively work with multi-resolution and multi-wavelength data. The work underscores the importance of using source lists-as opposed to component lists-and correcting for the noise bias in order to precisely estimate counts close to the image noise and determine the upturn at sub-mJy flux density.

  8. Free and open source software for the manipulation of digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Robert W

    2009-06-01

    Free and open source software is a type of software that is nearly as powerful as commercial software but is freely downloadable. This software can do almost everything that the expensive programs can. GIMP (gnu image manipulation program) is the free program that is comparable to Photoshop, and versions are available for Windows, Macintosh, and Linux platforms. This article briefly describes how GIMP can be installed and used to manipulate radiology images. It is no longer necessary to budget large amounts of money for high-quality software to achieve the goals of image processing and document creation because free and open source software is available for the user to download at will.

  9. Diagnostic image workstations ofr PACS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer-Ebrecht, D.; Fasel, B.; Dahm, M.; Kaupp, A.; Schilling, R.

    1990-01-01

    Image workstations will be the 'window' to the complex infrastructure of PACS with its intertwined image modalities (image sources, image data bases and image processing devices) and data processing modalities (patient data bases, departmental and hospital information systems). They will serve for user-to-system dialogues, image display and local processing of data as well as images. Their hardware and software structures have to be optimized towards an efficient throughput and processing of image data. (author). 10 refs

  10. Display technologies for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Lee, Seungjae; Jang, Changwon; Hong, Jong-Young; Li, Gang

    2018-02-01

    With the virtue of rapid progress in optics, sensors, and computer science, we are witnessing that commercial products or prototypes for augmented reality (AR) are penetrating into the consumer markets. AR is spotlighted as expected to provide much more immersive and realistic experience than ordinary displays. However, there are several barriers to be overcome for successful commercialization of AR. Here, we explore challenging and important topics for AR such as image combiners, enhancement of display performance, and focus cue reproduction. Image combiners are essential to integrate virtual images with real-world. Display performance (e.g. field of view and resolution) is important for more immersive experience and focus cue reproduction may mitigate visual fatigue caused by vergence-accommodation conflict. We also demonstrate emerging technologies to overcome these issues: index-matched anisotropic crystal lens (IMACL), retinal projection displays, and 3D display with focus cues. For image combiners, a novel optical element called IMACL provides relatively wide field of view. Retinal projection displays may enhance field of view and resolution of AR displays. Focus cues could be reconstructed via multi-layer displays and holographic displays. Experimental results of our prototypes are explained.

  11. A compact hard X-ray source for medical imaging and biomolecular studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.B.; Green, M.A.; Kolonko, J.

    1995-01-01

    There are a large number of synchrotron light sources in the world. However, these sources are designed for physics, chemistry, and engineering studies. To our knowledge, none have been optimized for either medical imaging or biomolecular studies. There are special needs for these applications. We present here a preliminary design of a very compact source, small enough for a hospital or a biomolecular laboratory, that is suitable for these applications. (orig.)

  12. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joshua; Zhang, Tiezhi; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source–dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10–15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source–dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented. (paper)

  13. Combining inter-source seismic interferometry and source-receiver interferometry for deep local imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Arntsen, B.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.; Van der Neut, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    The virtual source method has been applied successfully to retrieve the impulse response between pairs of receivers in the subsurface. This method is further improved by an updown separation prior to the crosscorrelation to suppress the reflections from the overburden and the free surface. In a

  14. Hard X-Ray Flare Source Sizes Measured with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Pernak, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of 18 double hard X-ray sources seen at energies above 25 keV are analyzed to determine the spatial extent of the most compact structures evident in each case. The following four image reconstruction algorithms were used: Clean, Pixon, and two routines using visibilities maximum entropy and forward fit (VFF). All have been adapted for this study to optimize their ability to provide reliable estimates of the sizes of the more compact sources. The source fluxes, sizes, and morphologies obtained with each method are cross-correlated and the similarities and disagreements are discussed. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the major axes of the sources with assumed elliptical Gaussian shapes are generally well correlated between the four image reconstruction routines and vary between the RHESSI resolution limit of approximately 2" up to approximately 20" with most below 10". The FWHM of the minor axes are generally at or just above the RHESSI limit and hence should be considered as unresolved in most cases. The orientation angles of the elliptical sources are also well correlated. These results suggest that the elongated sources are generally aligned along a flare ribbon with the minor axis perpendicular to the ribbon. This is verified for the one flare in our list with coincident Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images. There is evidence for significant extra flux in many of the flares in addition to the two identified compact sources, thus rendering the VFF assumption of just two Gaussians inadequate. A more realistic approximation in many cases would be of two line sources with unresolved widths. Recommendations are given for optimizing the RHESSI imaging reconstruction process to ensure that the finest possible details of the source morphology become evident and that reliable estimates can be made of the source dimensions.

  15. Algorithms for biomagnetic source imaging with prior anatomical and physiological information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughett, Paul William [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

    1995-12-01

    This dissertation derives a new method for estimating current source amplitudes in the brain and heart from external magnetic field measurements and prior knowledge about the probable source positions and amplitudes. The minimum mean square error estimator for the linear inverse problem with statistical prior information was derived and is called the optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM). OCLIM includes as special cases the Shim-Cho weighted pseudoinverse and Wiener estimators but allows more general priors and thus reduces the reconstruction error. Efficient algorithms were developed to compute the OCLIM estimate for instantaneous or time series data. The method was tested in a simulated neuromagnetic imaging problem with five simultaneously active sources on a grid of 387 possible source locations; all five sources were resolved, even though the true sources were not exactly at the modeled source positions and the true source statistics differed from the assumed statistics.

  16. Research on multi-source image fusion technology in haze environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, GuoDong; Piao, Yan; Li, Bing

    2017-11-01

    In the haze environment, the visible image collected by a single sensor can express the details of the shape, color and texture of the target very well, but because of the haze, the sharpness is low and some of the target subjects are lost; Because of the expression of thermal radiation and strong penetration ability, infrared image collected by a single sensor can clearly express the target subject, but it will lose detail information. Therefore, the multi-source image fusion method is proposed to exploit their respective advantages. Firstly, the improved Dark Channel Prior algorithm is used to preprocess the visible haze image. Secondly, the improved SURF algorithm is used to register the infrared image and the haze-free visible image. Finally, the weighted fusion algorithm based on information complementary is used to fuse the image. Experiments show that the proposed method can improve the clarity of the visible target and highlight the occluded infrared target for target recognition.

  17. A rotating modulation imager for locating mid-range point sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowash, B.R.; Wehe, D.K.; Fessler, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rotating modulation collimators (RMC) are relatively simple indirect imaging devices that have proven useful in gamma ray astronomy (far field) and have more recently been studied for medical imaging (very near field). At the University of Michigan a RMC has been built to study the performance for homeland security applications. This research highlights the imaging performance of this system and focuses on three distinct regions in the RMC field of view that can impact the search for hidden sources. These regions are a blind zone around the axis of rotation, a two mask image zone that extends from the blind zone to the edge of the field of view, and a single mask image zone that occurs when sources fall outside the field of view of both masks. By considering the extent and impact of these zones, the size of the two mask region can be optimized for the best system performance.

  18. Efficient image enhancement using sparse source separation in the Retinex theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jongsu; Choi, Jangwon; Choe, Yoonsik

    2017-11-01

    Color constancy is the feature of the human vision system (HVS) that ensures the relative constancy of the perceived color of objects under varying illumination conditions. The Retinex theory of machine vision systems is based on the HVS. Among Retinex algorithms, the physics-based algorithms are efficient; however, they generally do not satisfy the local characteristics of the original Retinex theory because they eliminate global illumination from their optimization. We apply the sparse source separation technique to the Retinex theory to present a physics-based algorithm that satisfies the locality characteristic of the original Retinex theory. Previous Retinex algorithms have limited use in image enhancement because the total variation Retinex results in an overly enhanced image and the sparse source separation Retinex cannot completely restore the original image. In contrast, our proposed method preserves the image edge and can very nearly replicate the original image without any special operation.

  19. An update on carbon nanotube-enabled X-ray sources for biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puett, Connor; Inscoe, Christina; Hartman, Allison; Calliste, Jabari; Franceschi, Dora K; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z

    2018-01-01

    A new imaging technology has emerged that uses carbon nanotubes (CNT) as the electron emitter (cathode) for the X-ray tube. Since the performance of the CNT cathode is controlled by simple voltage manipulation, CNT-enabled X-ray sources are ideal for the repetitive imaging steps needed to capture three-dimensional information. As such, they have allowed the development of a gated micro-computed tomography (CT) scanner for small animal research as well as stationary tomosynthesis, an experimental technology for large field-of-view human imaging. The small animal CT can acquire images at specific points in the respiratory and cardiac cycles. Longitudinal imaging therefore becomes possible and has been applied to many research questions, ranging from tumor response to the noninvasive assessment of cardiac output. Digital tomosynthesis (DT) is a low-dose and low-cost human imaging tool that captures some depth information. Known as three-dimensional mammography, DT is now used clinically for breast imaging. However, the resolution of currently-approved DT is limited by the need to swing the X-ray source through space to collect a series of projection views. An array of fixed and distributed CNT-enabled sources provides the solution and has been used to construct stationary DT devices for breast, lung, and dental imaging. To date, over 100 patients have been imaged on Institutional Review Board-approved study protocols. Early experience is promising, showing an excellent conspicuity of soft-tissue features, while also highlighting technical and post-acquisition processing limitations that are guiding continued research and development. Additionally, CNT-enabled sources are being tested in miniature X-ray tubes that are capable of generating adequate photon energies and tube currents for clinical imaging. Although there are many potential applications for these small field-of-view devices, initial experience has been with an X-ray source that can be inserted into the

  20. Progress toward the development and testing of source reconstruction methods for NIF neutron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, E N; Grim, G P; Wilde, C; Wilson, D C; Morgan, G; Wilke, M; Tregillis, I; Merrill, F; Clark, D; Finch, J; Fittinghoff, D; Bower, D

    2010-10-01

    Development of analysis techniques for neutron imaging at the National Ignition Facility is an important and difficult task for the detailed understanding of high-neutron yield inertial confinement fusion implosions. Once developed, these methods must provide accurate images of the hot and cold fuels so that information about the implosion, such as symmetry and areal density, can be extracted. One method under development involves the numerical inversion of the pinhole image using knowledge of neutron transport through the pinhole aperture from Monte Carlo simulations. In this article we present results of source reconstructions based on simulated images that test the methods effectiveness with regard to pinhole misalignment.

  1. Fiji: an open-source platform for biological-image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelin, Johannes; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Frise, Erwin; Kaynig, Verena; Longair, Mark; Pietzsch, Tobias; Preibisch, Stephan; Rueden, Curtis; Saalfeld, Stephan; Schmid, Benjamin; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; White, Daniel James; Hartenstein, Volker; Eliceiri, Kevin; Tomancak, Pavel; Cardona, Albert

    2012-06-28

    Fiji is a distribution of the popular open-source software ImageJ focused on biological-image analysis. Fiji uses modern software engineering practices to combine powerful software libraries with a broad range of scripting languages to enable rapid prototyping of image-processing algorithms. Fiji facilitates the transformation of new algorithms into ImageJ plugins that can be shared with end users through an integrated update system. We propose Fiji as a platform for productive collaboration between computer science and biology research communities.

  2. Panoramic, large-screen, 3-D flight display system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Henry; Larson, Brent; Johnson, Michael; Droessler, Justin; Reinhart, William F.

    1995-01-01

    The report documents and summarizes the results of the required evaluations specified in the SOW and the design specifications for the selected display system hardware. Also included are the proposed development plan and schedule as well as the estimated rough order of magnitude (ROM) cost to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a flyable prototype research flight display system. The thrust of the effort was development of a complete understanding of the user/system requirements for a panoramic, collimated, 3-D flyable avionic display system and the translation of the requirements into an acceptable system design for fabrication and demonstration of a prototype display in the early 1997 time frame. Eleven display system design concepts were presented to NASA LaRC during the program, one of which was down-selected to a preferred display system concept. A set of preliminary display requirements was formulated. The state of the art in image source technology, 3-D methods, collimation methods, and interaction methods for a panoramic, 3-D flight display system were reviewed in depth and evaluated. Display technology improvements and risk reductions associated with maturity of the technologies for the preferred display system design concept were identified.

  3. Network, system, and status software enhancements for the autonomously managed electrical power system breadboard. Volume 4: Graphical status display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckee, James W.

    1990-01-01

    This volume (4 of 4) contains the description, structured flow charts, prints of the graphical displays, and source code to generate the displays for the AMPS graphical status system. The function of these displays is to present to the manager of the AMPS system a graphical status display with the hot boxes that allow the manager to get more detailed status on selected portions of the AMPS system. The development of the graphical displays is divided into two processes; the creation of the screen images and storage of them in files on the computer, and the running of the status program which uses the screen images.

  4. Detection of pulmonary nodules at paediatric CT: maximum intensity projections and axial source images are complementary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Arthurs, Owen J.; Tasker, Angela D.; Set, Patricia A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images might be useful in helping to differentiate small pulmonary nodules from adjacent vessels on thoracic multidetector CT (MDCT). The aim was to evaluate the benefits of axial MIP images over axial source images for the paediatric chest in an interobserver variability study. We included 46 children with extra-pulmonary solid organ malignancy who had undergone thoracic MDCT. Three radiologists independently read 2-mm axial and 10-mm MIP image datasets, recording the number of nodules, size and location, overall time taken and confidence. There were 83 nodules (249 total reads among three readers) in 46 children (mean age 10.4 ± 4.98 years, range 0.3-15.9 years; 24 boys). Consensus read was used as the reference standard. Overall, three readers recorded significantly more nodules on MIP images (228 vs. 174; P < 0.05), improving sensitivity from 67% to 77.5% (P < 0.05) but with lower positive predictive value (96% vs. 85%, P < 0.005). MIP images took significantly less time to read (71.6 ± 43.7 s vs. 92.9 ± 48.7 s; P < 0.005) but did not improve confidence levels. Using 10-mm axial MIP images for nodule detection in the paediatric chest enhances diagnostic performance, improving sensitivity and reducing reading time when compared with conventional axial thin-slice images. Axial MIP and axial source images are complementary in thoracic nodule detection. (orig.)

  5. Time Reversal Migration for Passive Sources Using a Maximum Variance Imaging Condition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H.; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    The conventional time-reversal imaging approach for micro-seismic or passive source location is based on focusing the back-propagated wavefields from each recorded trace in a source image. It suffers from strong background noise and limited acquisition aperture, which may create unexpected artifacts and cause error in the source location. To overcome such a problem, we propose a new imaging condition for microseismic imaging, which is based on comparing the amplitude variance in certain windows, and use it to suppress the artifacts as well as find the right location for passive sources. Instead of simply searching for the maximum energy point in the back-propagated wavefield, we calculate the amplitude variances over a window moving in both space and time axis to create a highly resolved passive event image. The variance operation has negligible cost compared with the forward/backward modeling operations, which reveals that the maximum variance imaging condition is efficient and effective. We test our approach numerically on a simple three-layer model and on a piece of the Marmousi model as well, both of which have shown reasonably good results.

  6. Time Reversal Migration for Passive Sources Using a Maximum Variance Imaging Condition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H.

    2017-05-26

    The conventional time-reversal imaging approach for micro-seismic or passive source location is based on focusing the back-propagated wavefields from each recorded trace in a source image. It suffers from strong background noise and limited acquisition aperture, which may create unexpected artifacts and cause error in the source location. To overcome such a problem, we propose a new imaging condition for microseismic imaging, which is based on comparing the amplitude variance in certain windows, and use it to suppress the artifacts as well as find the right location for passive sources. Instead of simply searching for the maximum energy point in the back-propagated wavefield, we calculate the amplitude variances over a window moving in both space and time axis to create a highly resolved passive event image. The variance operation has negligible cost compared with the forward/backward modeling operations, which reveals that the maximum variance imaging condition is efficient and effective. We test our approach numerically on a simple three-layer model and on a piece of the Marmousi model as well, both of which have shown reasonably good results.

  7. IQM: an extensible and portable open source application for image and signal analysis in Java.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, Philipp; Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Image and signal analysis applications are substantial in scientific research. Both open source and commercial packages provide a wide range of functions for image and signal analysis, which are sometimes supported very well by the communities in the corresponding fields. Commercial software packages have the major drawback of being expensive and having undisclosed source code, which hampers extending the functionality if there is no plugin interface or similar option available. However, both variants cannot cover all possible use cases and sometimes custom developments are unavoidable, requiring open source applications. In this paper we describe IQM, a completely free, portable and open source (GNU GPLv3) image and signal analysis application written in pure Java. IQM does not depend on any natively installed libraries and is therefore runnable out-of-the-box. Currently, a continuously growing repertoire of 50 image and 16 signal analysis algorithms is provided. The modular functional architecture based on the three-tier model is described along the most important functionality. Extensibility is achieved using operator plugins, and the development of more complex workflows is provided by a Groovy script interface to the JVM. We demonstrate IQM's image and signal processing capabilities in a proof-of-principle analysis and provide example implementations to illustrate the plugin framework and the scripting interface. IQM integrates with the popular ImageJ image processing software and is aiming at complementing functionality rather than competing with existing open source software. Machine learning can be integrated into more complex algorithms via the WEKA software package as well, enabling the development of transparent and robust methods for image and signal analysis.

  8. Blind source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, July; Perez, Sandra; Montoya, Yonatan; Botina, Deivid; Garzón, Johnson

    2015-05-01

    Blind Source Separation methods (BSS) aim for the decomposition of a given signal in its main components or source signals. Those techniques have been widely used in the literature for the analysis of biomedical images, in order to extract the main components of an organ or tissue under study. The analysis of skin images for the extraction of melanin and hemoglobin is an example of the use of BSS. This paper presents a proof of concept of the use of source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral Images. The images are acquired with an interference filter-based imaging system. The images are processed by means of two algorithms: Independent Components analysis and Non-negative Matrix Factorization. In both cases, it is possible to obtain maps that quantify the concentration of the main chromophores present in aortic tissue. Also, the algorithms allow for spectral absorbance of the main tissue components. Those spectral signatures were compared against the theoretical ones by using correlation coefficients. Those coefficients report values close to 0.9, which is a good estimator of the method's performance. Also, correlation coefficients lead to the identification of the concentration maps according to the evaluated chromophore. The results suggest that Multi/hyper-spectral systems together with image processing techniques is a potential tool for the analysis of cardiovascular tissue.

  9. Line x-ray source for diffraction enhanced imaging in clinical and industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqin

    Mammography is one type of imaging modalities that uses a low-dose x-ray or other radiation sources for examination of breasts. It plays a central role in early detection of breast cancers. The material similarity of tumor-cell and health cell, breast implants surgery and other factors, make the breast cancers hard to visualize and detect. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), first proposed and investigated by D. Chapman is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source, which produced images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. It shows dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging when applied to the same phantom. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also on the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. This imaging method may improve image quality of mammography, other medical applications, industrial radiography for non-destructive testing and x-ray computed tomography. However, the size, and cost, of a synchrotron source limits the application of the new modality to be applicable at clinical levels. This research investigates the feasibility of a designed line x-ray source to produce intensity compatible to synchrotron sources. It is composed of a 2-cm in length tungsten filament, installed on a carbon steel filament cup (backing plate), as the cathode and a stationary oxygen-free copper anode with molybdenum coating on the front surface serves as the target. Characteristic properties of the line x-ray source were computationally studied and the prototype was experimentally investigated. SIMIION code was used to computationally study the electron trajectories emanating from the filament towards the molybdenum target. A Faraday cup on the prototype device, proof-of-principle, was used to measure the distribution of electrons on the target, which compares favorably to computational results. The intensities of characteristic x-ray for molybdenum

  10. Flat panel planar optic display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veligdan, J.T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology

    1994-11-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic Display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic class sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  11. Topographic anatomy of paraclinoid carotid artery aneurysms: usefulness of MR angiographic source images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, S.; Deguchi, J.; Arai, M.; Tanaka, H.; Kawanishi, M.; Ohta, T.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for showing the topography of paraclinoid carotid artery aneurysms in 27 patients with 30 paraclinoid aneurysms undergoing conventional angiography, three-dimensional time-of-flight MRA and surgery. The anatomy shown on the axial MRA source images was consistent with that found at surgery. The neck of the aneurysm could always be identified on the source images, while it could not be analysed exactly on conventional angiography in 3 cases (10 %). The optic nerves, including those displaced by the aneurysm, were recognised in all patients. The anterior clinoid process was shown as a low-intensity rim or area contiguous with the cortical bone. The source images were of great value in understanding the topography of paraclinoid carotid artery aneurysms. (orig.). With 2 figs

  12. Phase contrast imaging using a micro focus x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-09-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging, a new technique to increase the imaging contrast for the tissues with close attenuation coefficients, has been studied since mid 1990s. This technique reveals the possibility to show the clear details of the soft tissues and tumors in small scale resolution. A compact and low cost phase contrast imaging system using a conventional x-ray source is described in this paper. Using the conventional x-ray source is of great importance, because it provides the possibility to use the method in hospitals and clinical offices. Simple materials and components are used in the setup to keep the cost in a reasonable and affordable range.Tungsten Kα1 line with the photon energy 59.3 keV was used for imaging. Some of the system design details are discussed. The method that was used to stabilize the system is introduced. A chicken thigh bone tissue sample was used for imaging followed by the image quality, image acquisition time and the potential clinical application discussion. High energy x-ray beam can be used in phase contrast imaging. Therefore the radiation dose to the patients can be greatly decreased compared to the traditional x-ray radiography.

  13. Characterization of arterial stenosis using 3D imaging: comparison between three imaging techniques (MRA, spiral CTA and 3D DSA) and four display methods (MIP, SR, MPVR, VA) in a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendib, K.; Poirier, C.; Croisille, P.; Roux, J.P.; Devel, D.; Amiel, M.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction: accurate assessment of arterial stenosis is a major public health issue for the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The number of imaging techniques and types of software for display of imaging data is increasing. Few studies that compare these different techniques are available in the literature. Materials and methods: using phantoms to reproduce the main types of arterial stenosis, the authors compared three 3D acquisition techniques (MRA, CTA, and 3D DSA) and four types of display methods (MIP, SR, MPVR, and VA). The degree, the shape, and the location of different types of stenoses were analyzed by three experienced observers during two successive readings. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility were assessed. The results of the various acquisition techniques and display methods also were compared to the digital reference data (CFAO) of the physical phantoms. Results: the degree of intra- and inter-observer reproducibility for the assessment of shape and location of the stenoses was good. Visual assessment of the degree of stenosis showed significant differences between two observers as well as in two readings by one observer. The 3D DSA was the most accurate technique for assessing the degree of stenosis. CTA provided better results than MRA. MPVR provided an accurate assessment of the degree of the stenosis. 3D DSA and CTA assessed stenosis form and localization adequately, with no significant difference; both methods appeared to be more accurate than MRA. SR provided the best information on the eccentric nature of the stenosis. The shape was very well assessed by VA and MPVR. Conclusions: even though 3D DSA is the most accurate acquisition technique for visualization, the combined use of SR and MPVR appears to be the best compromise to describe the morphology and degree of stenosis. Further improvements in automatic 3D image processing could offer a better understanding and increased possibilities for assessing arterial

  14. Imaging x-ray sources at a finite distance in coded-mask instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnarumma, Immacolata; Pacciani, Luigi; Lapshov, Igor; Evangelista, Yuri

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for the correction of beam divergence in finite distance sources imaging through coded-mask instruments. We discuss the defocusing artifacts induced by the finite distance showing two different approaches to remove such spurious effects. We applied our method to one-dimensional (1D) coded-mask systems, although it is also applicable in two-dimensional systems. We provide a detailed mathematical description of the adopted method and of the systematics introduced in the reconstructed image (e.g., the fraction of source flux collected in the reconstructed peak counts). The accuracy of this method was tested by simulating pointlike and extended sources at a finite distance with the instrumental setup of the SuperAGILE experiment, the 1D coded-mask x-ray imager onboard the AGILE (Astro-rivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero) mission. We obtained reconstructed images of good quality and high source location accuracy. Finally we show the results obtained by applying this method to real data collected during the calibration campaign of SuperAGILE. Our method was demonstrated to be a powerful tool to investigate the imaging response of the experiment, particularly the absorption due to the materials intercepting the line of sight of the instrument and the conversion between detector pixel and sky direction

  15. Rapid development of medical imaging tools with open-source libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caban, Jesus J; Joshi, Alark; Nagy, Paul

    2007-11-01

    Rapid prototyping is an important element in researching new imaging analysis techniques and developing custom medical applications. In the last ten years, the open source community and the number of open source libraries and freely available frameworks for biomedical research have grown significantly. What they offer are now considered standards in medical image analysis, computer-aided diagnosis, and medical visualization. A cursory review of the peer-reviewed literature in imaging informatics (indeed, in almost any information technology-dependent scientific discipline) indicates the current reliance on open source libraries to accelerate development and validation of processes and techniques. In this survey paper, we review and compare a few of the most successful open source libraries and frameworks for medical application development. Our dual intentions are to provide evidence that these approaches already constitute a vital and essential part of medical image analysis, diagnosis, and visualization and to motivate the reader to use open source libraries and software for rapid prototyping of medical applications and tools.

  16. Curved crystal x-ray optics for monochromatic imaging with a clinical source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingölbali, Ayhan; MacDonald, C A

    2009-04-01

    Monochromatic x-ray imaging has been shown to increase contrast and reduce dose relative to conventional broadband imaging. However, clinical sources with very narrow energy bandwidth tend to have limited intensity and field of view. In this study, focused fan beam monochromatic radiation was obtained using doubly curved monochromator crystals. While these optics have been in use for microanalysis at synchrotron facilities for some time, this work is the first investigation of the potential application of curved crystal optics to clinical sources for medical imaging. The optics could be used with a variety of clinical sources for monochromatic slot scan imaging. The intensity was assessed and the resolution of the focused beam was measured using a knife-edge technique. A simulation model was developed and comparisons to the measured resolution were performed to verify the accuracy of the simulation to predict resolution for different conventional sources. A simple geometrical calculation was also developed. The measured, simulated, and calculated resolutions agreed well. Adequate resolution and intensity for mammography were predicted for appropriate source/optic combinations.

  17. 99mTc-HYNIC-TNF analogues (WH701) derived from phage display peptide libraries for imaging TNF-receptor-positive ovarian carcinoma: Preclinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, J.S.; Wu, H.; Xiang, Y.; Xia, T.; Li, H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: In this investigation, 99m Tc-hydrazinonicotinyl-TNF analogs (WH701) was labeled using ethylenediaminediacetic acid (EDDA) as coligand(A number of TNF analogs had been selected and synthesized using random phage-display peptides library in our lab ) and Pharmacokinetics and feasibility studies were performed for its potential use as diagnostic radiopharmaceutical. Material and Methods: The peptide was radiolabeled with 99mTc using HYNIC as a bifunctional chelator and EDDA as coligand. The complexes were characterized by HPLC. The in vitro stability of the radiolabeled peptide WH701 in serum and in phosphate buffer were examined simultaneity. Biodistribution studies were conducted to determine the in vivo characteristics of the complexes. The tumor uptake and image were also conducted in HOC8 tumor-bearing nude mice. Results: The peptide analog permitted efficient incorporation of 99mTc. The preparation of 99mTc-WH701 was stable in vitro. HPLC analysis of the urine samples collected after injection of 99mTc-WH701 showed that the radioactivity elution profile and Rt of the peak were similar to those of the preparation injected. Studies in vivo suggested that the biological activity of the peptide was not compromised. The agent cleared rapidly from the blood. The labeled peptide was shown in the mouse model to localize rapidly and specifically in site of tumor. Images of diagnostic quality could be obtained within 30 min post-administration in all studies. Conclusion: The TNF analogue peptide WH701 can be radiolabeled with 99mTc by HYNIC using EDDA as coligand without loss of affinity, and the 99mTc -WH701 is not degraded in serum and shows radiochemical stability for an extended period of time in vitro. The high specific tumor uptake, rapid blood clearance, and predominantly renal excretion make 99mTc -WH701 a promising candidate for tumor imaging. This agent is worthy of further investigation

  18. MSiReader v1.0: Evolving Open-Source Mass Spectrometry Imaging Software for Targeted and Untargeted Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhart, Mark T.; Nazari, Milad; Garrard, Kenneth P.; Muddiman, David C.

    2018-01-01

    A major update to the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) software MSiReader is presented, offering a multitude of newly added features critical to MSI analyses. MSiReader is a free, open-source, and vendor-neutral software written in the MATLAB platform and is capable of analyzing most common MSI data formats. A standalone version of the software, which does not require a MATLAB license, is also distributed. The newly incorporated data analysis features expand the utility of MSiReader beyond simple visualization of molecular distributions. The MSiQuantification tool allows researchers to calculate absolute concentrations from quantification MSI experiments exclusively through MSiReader software, significantly reducing data analysis time. An image overlay feature allows the incorporation of complementary imaging modalities to be displayed with the MSI data. A polarity filter has also been incorporated into the data loading step, allowing the facile analysis of polarity switching experiments without the need for data parsing prior to loading the data file into MSiReader. A quality assurance feature to generate a mass measurement accuracy (MMA) heatmap for an analyte of interest has also been added to allow for the investigation of MMA across the imaging experiment. Most importantly, as new features have been added performance has not degraded, in fact it has been dramatically improved. These new tools and the improvements to the performance in MSiReader v1.0 enable the MSI community to evaluate their data in greater depth and in less time. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Imaging of the Coronary Venous System: Validation of Three-Dimensional Rotational Venous Angiography Against Dual-Source Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knackstedt, Christian; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Mischke, Karl; Bruners, Philipp; Schimpf, Thomas; Frechen, Dirk; Schummers, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Kelm, Malte; Schauerte, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Information on the anatomy of the cardiac venous system (CVS) is increasingly important for cardiac resynchronization therapy or percutaneous transvenous mitral valve annuloplasty. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging can further improve the understanding of the relationship of cardiac structures. This study was performed to validate the accuracy of rotational coronary sinus angiography (CSA) displaying the 3D anatomy of the CVS compared to ECG-gated, contrast-enhanced, cardiac dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). Five domestic pigs (60 kg) underwent DSCT using a standardized examination protocol. Using a standard C-arm for fluoroscopy, a rotational CSA was obtained and 3D-image reconstructions performed. Side branches were identified using both methods and enumerated. Vessel visibility was estimated for each side branch and great cardiac vein/anterior interventricular vein. Also, vessel diameters were measured at distinct landmarks, i.e., side branching. The amount of contrast medium was determined and the effective radiation exposure of both methods was calculated. There was no significant difference regarding the vessel diameter of the great cardiac vein/anterior interventricular vein or its side branches. Also, estimation of vessel visibility was not different between the two imaging modalities. Estimated radiation exposure and amount of contrast medium were lower for rotational CSA. In conclusion, a 3D reconstruction of rotational CSA images is possible. All parts of the CVS are well depicted, allowing a 3D overview of the CVS anatomy. On-site 3D visualization might improve decision making during cardiac interventions. In contrast to DSCT, rotational CSA does not demonstrate the anatomy of the mitral annulus or the course of the left circumflex artery.

  20. Subgingival calculus imaging based on swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lu, Chih-Wei; Jiang, Cho-Pei; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Yang; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2011-07-01

    We characterized and imaged dental calculus using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The refractive indices of enamel, dentin, cementum, and calculus were measured as 1.625 +/- 0.024, 1.534 +/- 0.029, 1.570 +/- 0.021, and 2.097 +/- 0.094, respectively. Dental calculus leads strong scattering properties, and thus, the region can be identified from enamel with SS-OCT imaging. An extracted human tooth with calculus is covered with gingiva tissue as an in vitro sample for tomographic imaging.

  1. Rapid calibrated high-resolution hyperspectral imaging using tunable laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lam K.; Margalith, Eli

    2009-05-01

    We present a novel hyperspectral imaging technique based on tunable laser technology. By replacing the broadband source and tunable filters of a typical NIR imaging instrument, several advantages are realized, including: high spectral resolution, highly variable field-of-views, fast scan-rates, high signal-to-noise ratio, and the ability to use optical fiber for efficient and flexible sample illumination. With this technique, high-resolution, calibrated hyperspectral images over the NIR range can be acquired in seconds. The performance of system features will be demonstrated on two example applications: detecting melamine contamination in wheat gluten and separating bovine protein from wheat protein in cattle feed.

  2. Factors affecting the repeatability of gamma camera calibration for quantitative imaging applications using a sealed source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anizan, N; Wahl, R L; Frey, E C; Wang, H; Zhou, X C

    2015-01-01

    Several applications in nuclear medicine require absolute activity quantification of single photon emission computed tomography images. Obtaining a repeatable calibration factor that converts voxel values to activity units is essential for these applications. Because source preparation and measurement of the source activity using a radionuclide activity meter are potential sources of variability, this work investigated instrumentation and acquisition factors affecting repeatability using planar acquisition of sealed sources. The calibration factor was calculated for different acquisition and geometry conditions to evaluate the effect of the source size, lateral position of the source in the camera field-of-view (FOV), source-to-camera distance (SCD), and variability over time using sealed Ba-133 sources. A small region of interest (ROI) based on the source dimensions and collimator resolution was investigated to decrease the background effect. A statistical analysis with a mixed-effects model was used to evaluate quantitatively the effect of each variable on the global calibration factor variability. A variation of 1 cm in the measurement of the SCD from the assumed distance of 17 cm led to a variation of 1–2% in the calibration factor measurement using a small disc source (0.4 cm diameter) and less than 1% with a larger rod source (2.9 cm diameter). The lateral position of the source in the FOV and the variability over time had small impacts on calibration factor variability. The residual error component was well estimated by Poisson noise. Repeatability of better than 1% in a calibration factor measurement using a planar acquisition of a sealed source can be reasonably achieved. The best reproducibility was obtained with the largest source with a count rate much higher than the average background in the ROI, and when the SCD was positioned within 5 mm of the desired position. In this case, calibration source variability was limited by the quantum

  3. Free and open-source software application for the evaluation of coronary computed tomography angiography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlich, Marcelo Souza; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes; Feijóo, Raúl A; Azevedo, Clerio F; Tura, Bernardo Rangel; Ziemer, Paulo Gustavo Portela; Blanco, Pablo Javier; Pina, Gustavo; Meira, Márcio; Souza e Silva, Nelson Albuquerque de

    2012-10-01

    The standardization of images used in Medicine in 1993 was performed using the DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) standard. Several tests use this standard and it is increasingly necessary to design software applications capable of handling this type of image; however, these software applications are not usually free and open-source, and this fact hinders their adjustment to most diverse interests. To develop and validate a free and open-source software application capable of handling DICOM coronary computed tomography angiography images. We developed and tested the ImageLab software in the evaluation of 100 tests randomly selected from a database. We carried out 600 tests divided between two observers using ImageLab and another software sold with Philips Brilliance computed tomography appliances in the evaluation of coronary lesions and plaques around the left main coronary artery (LMCA) and the anterior descending artery (ADA). To evaluate intraobserver, interobserver and intersoftware agreements, we used simple and kappa statistics agreements. The agreements observed between software applications were generally classified as substantial or almost perfect in most comparisons. The ImageLab software agreed with the Philips software in the evaluation of coronary computed tomography angiography tests, especially in patients without lesions, with lesions 70% in the ADA was lower, but this is also observed when the anatomical reference standard is used.

  4. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing

    As we inevitably step deeper and deeper into a world connected via the Internet, more and more information will be exchanged digitally. Displays are the interface between digital information and each individual. Naturally, one fundamental goal of displays is to reproduce information as realistically as possible since humans still care a lot about what happens in the real world. Human eyes are the receiving end of such information exchange; therefore it is impossible to study displays without studying the human visual system. In fact, the design of displays is rather closely coupled with what human eyes are capable of perceiving. For example, we are less interested in building displays that emit light in the invisible spectrum. This dissertation explores how we can augment displays with computation, which takes both display hardware and the human visual system into consideration. Four novel projects on display technologies are included in this dissertation: First, we propose a software-based approach to driving multiview autostereoscopic displays. Our display algorithm can dynamically assign views to hardware display zones based on multiple observers' current head positions, substantially reducing crosstalk and stereo inversion. Second, we present a dense projector array that creates a seamless 3D viewing experience for multiple viewers. We smoothly interpolate the set of viewer heights and distances on a per-vertex basis across the arrays field of view, reducing image distortion, crosstalk, and artifacts from tracking errors. Third, we propose a method for high dynamic range display calibration that takes into account the variation of the chrominance error over luminance. We propose a data structure for enabling efficient representation and querying of the calibration function, which also allows user-guided balancing between memory consumption and the amount of computation. Fourth, we present user studies that demonstrate that the ˜ 60 Hz critical flicker fusion

  5. An Optimal Image-Based Method for Identification of Acoustic Emission (AE) Sources in Plate-Like Structures Using a Lead Zirconium Titanate (PZT) Sensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes an innovative method for identifying the locations of multiple simultaneous acoustic emission (AE) events in plate-like structures from the view of image processing. By using a linear lead zirconium titanate (PZT) sensor array to record the AE wave signals, a reverse-time frequency-wavenumber (f-k) migration is employed to produce images displaying the locations of AE sources by back-propagating the AE waves. Lamb wave theory is included in the f-k migration to consider the dispersive property of the AE waves. Since the exact occurrence time of the AE events is usually unknown when recording the AE wave signals, a heuristic artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm combined with an optimal criterion using minimum Shannon entropy is used to find the image with the identified AE source locations and occurrence time that mostly approximate the actual ones. Experimental studies on an aluminum plate with AE events simulated by PZT actuators are performed to validate the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed optimal image-based AE source identification method. PMID:29466310

  6. An Optimal Image-Based Method for Identification of Acoustic Emission (AE) Sources in Plate-Like Structures Using a Lead Zirconium Titanate (PZT) Sensor Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gang; Zhou, Li

    2018-02-21

    This paper proposes an innovative method for identifying the locations of multiple simultaneous acoustic emission (AE) events in plate-like structures from the view of image processing. By using a linear lead zirconium titanate (PZT) sensor array to record the AE wave signals, a reverse-time frequency-wavenumber (f-k) migration is employed to produce images displaying the locations of AE sources by back-propagating the AE waves. Lamb wave theory is included in the f-k migration to consider the dispersive property of the AE waves. Since the exact occurrence time of the AE events is usually unknown when recording the AE wave signals, a heuristic artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm combined with an optimal criterion using minimum Shannon entropy is used to find the image with the identified AE source locations and occurrence time that mostly approximate the actual ones. Experimental studies on an aluminum plate with AE events simulated by PZT actuators are performed to validate the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed optimal image-based AE source identification method.

  7. Optical and near-infrared imaging of faint Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, IAG; Schilizzi, RT; de Bruyn, AG; Miley, GK; Rottgering, HJA; McMahon, RG; Fournon, IP

    1998-01-01

    A sample of 47 faint Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources selected from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) has been imaged in the optical and near-infrared, resulting in an identification fraction of 87 per cent. The R - I and R - K colours of the faint optical counterparts are as

  8. Probabilistic M/EEG source imaging from sparse spatio-temporal event structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Attias, Hagai T.; Wipf, David

    While MEG and EEG source imaging methods have to tackle a severely ill-posed problem their success can be stated as their ability to constrain the solutions using appropriate priors. In this paper we propose a hierarchical Bayesian model facilitating spatio-temporal patterns through the use of bo...

  9. Open source deformable image registration system for treatment planning and recurrence CT scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Brink, Carsten; Hansen, Christian Rønn

    2016-01-01

    manually contoured eight anatomical regions-of-interest (ROI) twice on pCT and once on rCT. METHODS: pCT and rCT images were deformably registered using the open source software elastix. Mean surface distance (MSD) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between contours were used for validation of DIR...

  10. A combination of the acoustic radiosity and the image source method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsouris, Georgios I.; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-01-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part...

  11. Comparing a phased combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method with other simulation tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2015-01-01

    A phased combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method (PARISM) has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflections with angle-dependent and complex-valued acoustical descriptions of the surfaces. It is of great interest to model both specular...

  12. Incorporating Open Source Data for Bayesian Classification of Urban Land Use From VHR Stereo Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Mengmeng; De Beurs, Kirsten M.; Stein, Alfred; Bijker, Wietske

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the incorporation of open source data into a Bayesian classification of urban land use from very high resolution (VHR) stereo satellite images. The adopted classification framework starts from urban land cover classification, proceeds to building-type characterization, and

  13. Application of Multi-Source Remote Sensing Image in Yunnan Province Grassland Resources Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Wen, G.; Li, D.

    2018-04-01

    Trough mastering background information of Yunnan province grassland resources utilization and ecological conditions to improves grassland elaborating management capacity, it carried out grassland resource investigation work by Yunnan province agriculture department in 2017. The traditional grassland resource investigation method is ground based investigation, which is time-consuming and inefficient, especially not suitable for large scale and hard-to-reach areas. While remote sensing is low cost, wide range and efficient, which can reflect grassland resources present situation objectively. It has become indispensable grassland monitoring technology and data sources and it has got more and more recognition and application in grassland resources monitoring research. This paper researches application of multi-source remote sensing image in Yunnan province grassland resources investigation. First of all, it extracts grassland resources thematic information and conducts field investigation through BJ-2 high space resolution image segmentation. Secondly, it classifies grassland types and evaluates grassland degradation degree through high resolution characteristics of Landsat 8 image. Thirdly, it obtained grass yield model and quality classification through high resolution and wide scanning width characteristics of MODIS images and sample investigate data. Finally, it performs grassland field qualitative analysis through UAV remote sensing image. According to project area implementation, it proves that multi-source remote sensing data can be applied to the grassland resources investigation in Yunnan province and it is indispensable method.

  14. Characterization of dynamic changes of current source localization based on spatiotemporal fMRI constrained EEG source imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thinh; Potter, Thomas; Grossman, Robert; Zhang, Yingchun

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Neuroimaging has been employed as a promising approach to advance our understanding of brain networks in both basic and clinical neuroscience. Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) represent two neuroimaging modalities with complementary features; EEG has high temporal resolution and low spatial resolution while fMRI has high spatial resolution and low temporal resolution. Multimodal EEG inverse methods have attempted to capitalize on these properties but have been subjected to localization error. The dynamic brain transition network (DBTN) approach, a spatiotemporal fMRI constrained EEG source imaging method, has recently been developed to address these issues by solving the EEG inverse problem in a Bayesian framework, utilizing fMRI priors in a spatial and temporal variant manner. This paper presents a computer simulation study to provide a detailed characterization of the spatial and temporal accuracy of the DBTN method. Approach. Synthetic EEG data were generated in a series of computer simulations, designed to represent realistic and complex brain activity at superficial and deep sources with highly dynamical activity time-courses. The source reconstruction performance of the DBTN method was tested against the fMRI-constrained minimum norm estimates algorithm (fMRIMNE). The performances of the two inverse methods were evaluated both in terms of spatial and temporal accuracy. Main results. In comparison with the commonly used fMRIMNE method, results showed that the DBTN method produces results with increased spatial and temporal accuracy. The DBTN method also demonstrated the capability to reduce crosstalk in the reconstructed cortical time-course(s) induced by neighboring regions, mitigate depth bias and improve overall localization accuracy. Significance. The improved spatiotemporal accuracy of the reconstruction allows for an improved characterization of complex neural activity. This improvement can be

  15. Demonstration of acoustic source localization in air using single pixel compressive imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jeffrey S.; Rohde, Charles A.; Guild, Matthew D.; Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2017-12-01

    Acoustic source localization often relies on large sensor arrays that can be electronically complex and have large data storage requirements to process element level data. Recently, the concept of a single-pixel-imager has garnered interest in the electromagnetics literature due to its ability to form high quality images with a single receiver paired with shaped aperture screens that allow for the collection of spatially orthogonal measurements. Here, we present a method for creating an acoustic analog to the single-pixel-imager found in electromagnetics for the purpose of source localization. Additionally, diffraction is considered to account for screen openings comparable to the acoustic wavelength. A diffraction model is presented and incorporated into the single pixel framework. In this paper, we explore the possibility of applying single pixel localization to acoustic measurements. The method is experimentally validated with laboratory measurements made in an air waveguide.

  16. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  17. Display Apple M7649Zm

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    It was Designed for the Power Mac G4. This Apple studio display gives you edge-to-edge distortion-free images. With more than 16.7 million colors and 1,280 x 1,024 dpi resolution, you view brilliant and bright images on this Apple 17-inch monitor.

  18. Image features dependant correlation-weighting function for efficient PRNU based source camera identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Mayank; Gupta, Bhupendra

    2018-04-01

    For source camera identification (SCI), photo response non-uniformity (PRNU) has been widely used as the fingerprint of the camera. The PRNU is extracted from the image by applying a de-noising filter then taking the difference between the original image and the de-noised image. However, it is observed that intensity-based features and high-frequency details (edges and texture) of the image, effect quality of the extracted PRNU. This effects correlation calculation and creates problems in SCI. For solving this problem, we propose a weighting function based on image features. We have experimentally identified image features (intensity and high-frequency contents) effect on the estimated PRNU, and then develop a weighting function which gives higher weights to image regions which give reliable PRNU and at the same point it gives comparatively less weights to the image regions which do not give reliable PRNU. Experimental results show that the proposed weighting function is able to improve the accuracy of SCI up to a great extent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectro-refractometry of individual microscopic objects using swept-source quantitative phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Hwang; Jang, Jaeduck; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-11-05

    We present a novel spectroscopic quantitative phase imaging technique with a wavelength swept-source, referred to as swept-source diffraction phase microscopy (ssDPM), for quantifying the optical dispersion of microscopic individual samples. Employing the swept-source and the principle of common-path interferometry, ssDPM measures the multispectral full-field quantitative phase imaging and spectroscopic microrefractometry of transparent microscopic samples in the visible spectrum with a wavelength range of 450-750 nm and a spectral resolution of less than 8 nm. With unprecedented precision and sensitivity, we demonstrate the quantitative spectroscopic microrefractometry of individual polystyrene beads, 30% bovine serum albumin solution, and healthy human red blood cells.

  20. Affective attitudes to face images associated with intracerebral EEG source location before face viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzagalli, D; Koenig, T; Regard, M; Lehmann, D

    1999-01-01

    We investigated whether different, personality-related affective attitudes are associated with different brain electric field (EEG) sources before any emotional challenge (stimulus exposure). A 27-channel EEG was recorded in 15 subjects during eyes-closed resting. After recording, subjects rated 32 images of human faces for affective appeal. The subjects in the first (i.e., most negative) and fourth (i.e., most positive) quartile of general affective attitude were further analyzed. The EEG data (mean=25+/-4. 8 s/subject) were subjected to frequency-domain model dipole source analysis (FFT-Dipole-Approximation), resulting in 3-dimensional intracerebral source locations and strengths for the delta-theta, alpha, and beta EEG frequency band, and for the full range (1.5-30 Hz) band. Subjects with negative attitude (compared to those with positive attitude) showed the following source locations: more inferior for all frequency bands, more anterior for the delta-theta band, more posterior and more right for the alpha, beta and 1.5-30 Hz bands. One year later, the subjects were asked to rate the face images again. The rating scores for the same face images were highly correlated for all subjects, and original and retest affective mean attitude was highly correlated across subjects. The present results show that subjects with different affective attitudes to face images had different active, cerebral, neural populations in a task-free condition prior to viewing the images. We conclude that the brain functional state which implements affective attitude towards face images as a personality feature exists without elicitors, as a continuously present, dynamic feature of brain functioning. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  1. Scanning laser beam displays based on a 2D MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesten, Maarten; Masood, Taha; Miller, Josh; Tauscher, Jason

    2010-05-01

    The combination of laser light sources and MEMS technology enables a range of display systems such as ultra small projectors for mobile devices, head-up displays for vehicles, wearable near-eye displays and projection systems for 3D imaging. Images are created by scanning red, green and blue lasers horizontally and vertically with a single two-dimensional MEMS. Due to the excellent beam quality of laser beams, the optical designs are efficient and compact. In addition, the laser illumination enables saturated display colors that are desirable for augmented reality applications where a virtual image is used. With this technology, the smallest projector engine for high volume manufacturing to date has been developed. This projector module has a height of 7 mm and a volume of 5 cc. The resolution of this projector is WVGA. No additional projection optics is required, resulting in an infinite focus depth. Unlike with micro-display projection displays, an increase in resolution will not lead to an increase in size or a decrease in efficiency. Therefore future projectors can be developed that combine a higher resolution in an even smaller and thinner form factor with increased efficiencies that will lead to lower power consumption.

  2. Beyond seismic interferometry: imaging the earth's interior with virtual sources and receivers inside the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapenaar, C. P. A.; Van der Neut, J.; Thorbecke, J.; Broggini, F.; Slob, E. C.; Snieder, R.

    2015-12-01

    Imagine one could place seismic sources and receivers at any desired position inside the earth. Since the receivers would record the full wave field (direct waves, up- and downward reflections, multiples, etc.), this would give a wealth of information about the local structures, material properties and processes in the earth's interior. Although in reality one cannot place sources and receivers anywhere inside the earth, it appears to be possible to create virtual sources and receivers at any desired position, which accurately mimics the desired situation. The underlying method involves some major steps beyond standard seismic interferometry. With seismic interferometry, virtual sources can be created at the positions of physical receivers, assuming these receivers are illuminated isotropically. Our proposed method does not need physical receivers at the positions of the virtual sources; moreover, it does not require isotropic illumination. To create virtual sources and receivers anywhere inside the earth, it suffices to record the reflection response with physical sources and receivers at the earth's surface. We do not need detailed information about the medium parameters; it suffices to have an estimate of the direct waves between the virtual-source positions and the acquisition surface. With these prerequisites, our method can create virtual sources and receivers, anywhere inside the earth, which record the full wave field. The up- and downward reflections, multiples, etc. in the virtual responses are extracted directly from the reflection response at the surface. The retrieved virtual responses form an ideal starting point for accurate seismic imaging, characterization and monitoring.

  3. Preliminary Results of Nuclear Fluorescence Imaging of Alpha and Beta Emitting Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feener, Jessica S.; Charlton, William S.

    2013-06-01

    The preliminary results from a series of nuclear fluorescence imaging experiments using a variety of radioactive sources and shielding are given. These experiments were done as part of a proof of concept to determine if nuclear fluorescence imaging could be used as a safeguards measurements tool or for nuclear warhead verification for nuclear arms control treaties such as the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty and the Fissile Material Cut-Off Treaty. An off-the-shelf Princeton Instruments charged coupled device camera system was used to image the emission of fluorescence photons from the de-excitation of nitrogen molecules in air that have been excited by ionizing radiation. The fluorescence emissions are primarily in the near ultraviolet range; between the wavelengths of 300 and 400 nm. Fluorescent imaging techniques are currently being investigated in a number of applications. A French research team has successfully demonstrated this concept for remote imaging of alpha contamination. It has also been shown that the phenomenon can be seen through translucent materials and that alpha radiation can be seen in the presence of large gamma backgrounds. Additionally, fluorescence telescopes and satellites utilize the de-excitation of nitrogen molecules to observe cosmic ray showers in the atmosphere. In cosmic ray shower detection, electrons are the main contributor to the excitation of the of nitrogen molecules in air. The experiments presented in this paper were designed to determine if the imaging system could observe beta emitting sources, differentiate between beta emitters and alpha emitting materials such as uranium oxide and uranium metal, and to further investigate the phenomenon through translucent and non-translucent materials. The initial results show that differentiation can be made between beta and alpha emitting sources and that the device can observe the phenomenon through very thin non-transparent material. Additionally, information is given on the

  4. : Light Steering Projection Systems and Attributes for HDR Displays

    KAUST Repository

    Damberg, Gerwin

    2017-06-02

    New light steering projectors in cinema form images by moving light away from dark regions into bright areas of an image. In these systems, the peak luminance of small features can far exceed full screen white luminance. In traditional projectors where light is filtered or blocked in order to give shades of gray (or colors), the peak luminance is fixed. The luminance of chromatic features benefit in the same way as white features, and chromatic image details can be reproduced at high brightness leading to a much wider overall color gamut coverage than previously possible. Projectors of this capability are desired by the creative community to aid in and enhance storytelling. Furthermore, reduced light source power requirements of light steering projectors provide additional economic and environmental benefits. While the dependency of peak luminance level on (bright) image feature size is new in the digital cinema space, display technologies with identical characteristics such as OLED, LED LCD and Plasma TVs are well established in the home. Similarly, direct view LED walls are popular in events, advertising and architectural markets. To enable consistent color reproduction across devices in today’s content production pipelines, models that describe modern projectors and display attributes need to evolve together with HDR standards and available metadata. This paper is a first step towards rethinking legacy display descriptors such as contrast, peak luminance and color primaries in light of new display technology. We first summarize recent progress in the field of light steering projectors in cinema and then, based on new projector and existing display characteristics propose the inclusion of two simple display attributes: Maximum Average Luminance and Peak (Color) Primary Luminance. We show that the proposed attributes allow a better prediction of content reproducibility on HDR displays. To validate this assertion, we test professional content on a commercial HDR

  5. Characterizing the reflectivity of handheld display devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peter; Badano, Aldo

    2014-08-01

    With increased use of handheld and tablet display devices for viewing medical images, methods for consistently measuring reflectivity of the devices are needed. In this note, the authors report on the characterization of diffuse reflections for handheld display devices including mobile phones and tablets using methods recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 18 (TG18). The authors modified the diffuse reflectance coefficient measurement method outlined in the TG18 report. The authors measured seven handheld display devices (two phones and five tablets) and three workstation displays. The device was attached to a black panel with Velcro. To study the effect of the back surface on the diffuse reflectance coefficient, the authors created Styrofoam masks with different size square openings and placed it in front of the device. Overall, for each display device, measurements of illuminance and reflected luminance on the display screen were taken. The authors measured with no mask, with masks of varying size, and with display-size masks, and calculated the corresponding diffuse reflectance coefficient. For all handhelds, the diffuse reflectance coefficient measured with no back panel were lower than measurements performed with a mask. The authors found an overall increase in reflectivity as the size of the mask decreases. For workstations displays, diffuse reflectance coefficients were higher when no back panel was used, and higher than with masks. In all cases, as luminance increased, illuminance increased, but not at the same rate. Since the size of handheld displays is smaller than that of workstation devices, the TG18 method suffers from a dependency on illumination condition. The authors show that the diffuse reflection coefficients can vary depending on the nature of the back surface of the illuminating box. The variability in the diffuse coefficient can be as large as 20% depending on the size of the mask. For all measurements

  6. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  7. An image-based search for pulsars among Fermi unassociated LAT sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frail, D. A.; Ray, P. S.; Mooley, K. P.; Hancock, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Jagannathan, P.; Ferrara, E. C.; Intema, H. T.; de Gasperin, F.; Demorest, P. B.; Stovall, K.; McKinnon, M. M.

    2018-03-01

    We describe an image-based method that uses two radio criteria, compactness, and spectral index, to identify promising pulsar candidates among Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) unassociated sources. These criteria are applied to those radio sources from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope all-sky survey at 150 MHz (TGSS ADR1) found within the error ellipses of unassociated sources from the 3FGL catalogue and a preliminary source list based on 7 yr of LAT data. After follow-up interferometric observations to identify extended or variable sources, a list of 16 compact, steep-spectrum candidates is generated. An ongoing search for pulsations in these candidates, in gamma rays and radio, has found 6 ms pulsars and one normal pulsar. A comparison of this method with existing selection criteria based on gamma-ray spectral and variability properties suggests that the pulsar discovery space using Fermi may be larger than previously thought. Radio imaging is a hitherto underutilized source selection method that can be used, as with other multiwavelength techniques, in the search for Fermi pulsars.

  8. Simulation of an IXS imaging analyzer with an extended scattering source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvorov, Alexey [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source II; Cai, Yong Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source II

    2016-09-15

    A concept of an inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectrograph with an imaging analyzer was proposed recently and discussed in a number of publications (see e.g. Ref.1). The imaging analyzer as proposed combines x-ray lenses with highly dispersive crystal optics. It allows conversion of the x-ray energy spectrum into a spatial image with very high energy resolution. However, the presented theoretical analysis of the spectrograph did not take into account details of the scattered radiation source, i.e. sample, and its impact on the spectrograph performance. Using numerical simulations we investigated the influence of the finite sample thickness, the scattering angle and the incident energy detuning on the analyzer image and the ultimate resolution.

  9. Image acquisition and analysis for beam diagnostics, applications of the Taiwan photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.Y.; Chen, J.; Cheng, Y.S.; Hsu, K.T.; Hu, K.H.; Kuo, C.H.; Wu, C.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Design and implementation of image acquisition and analysis is in proceeding for the Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) diagnostic applications. The optical system contains screen, lens, and lighting system. A CCD camera with Gigabit Ethernet interface (GigE Vision) will be a standard image acquisition device. Image acquisition will be done on EPICS IOC via PV channel and analysis the properties by using Matlab tool to evaluate the beam profile (sigma), beam size position and tilt angle et al. The EPICS IOC integrated with Matlab as a data processing system is not only could be used in image analysis but also in many types of equipment data processing applications. Progress of the project will be summarized in this report. (authors)

  10. Estimates of Imaging Times for Conventional and Synchrotron X-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kinney, J

    2003-01-01

    The following notes are to be taken as estimates of the time requirements for imaging NIF targets in three-dimensions with absorption contrast. The estimates ignore target geometry and detector inefficiency, and focus only on the statistical question of detecting compositional (structural) differences between adjacent volume elements in the presence of noise. The basic equations, from the classic reference by Grodzins, consider imaging times in terms of the required number of photons necessary to provide an image with given resolution and noise. The time estimates, therefore, have been based on the calculated x-ray fluxes from the proposed Advanced Light Source (ALS) imaging beamline, and from the calculated flux for a tungsten anode x-ray generator operated in a point focus mode.

  11. A tunable continuous wave (CW) and short-pulse optical source for THz brain imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakopoulos, P; Karanasiou, I; Zakynthinos, P; Uzunoglu, N; Avramopoulos, H; Pleros, N

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate recent advances toward the development of a novel 2D THz imaging system for brain imaging applications both at the macroscopic and at the bimolecular level. A frequency-synthesized THz source based on difference frequency generation between optical wavelengths is presented, utilizing supercontinuum generation in a highly nonlinear optical fiber with subsequent spectral carving by means of a fiber Fabry–Perot filter. Experimental results confirm the successful generation of THz radiation in the range of 0.2–2 THz, verifying the enhanced frequency tunability properties of the proposed system. Finally, the roadmap toward capturing functional brain information by exploiting THz imaging technologies is discussed, outlining the unique advantages offered by THz frequencies and their complementarity with existing brain imaging techniques

  12. Imaging Seismic Source Variations Using Back-Projection Methods at El Tatio Geyser Field, Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, C. L.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    During October 2012, 51 geophones and 6 broadband seismometers were deployed in an ~50x50m region surrounding a periodically erupting columnar geyser in the El Tatio Geyser Field, Chile. The dense array served as the seismic framework for a collaborative project to study the mechanics of complex hydrothermal systems. Contemporaneously, complementary geophysical measurements (including down-hole temperature and pressure, discharge rates, thermal imaging, water chemistry, and video) were also collected. Located on the western flanks of the Andes Mountains at an elevation of 4200m, El Tatio is the third largest geyser field in the world. Its non-pristine condition makes it an ideal location to perform minutely invasive geophysical studies. The El Jefe Geyser was chosen for its easily accessible conduit and extremely periodic eruption cycle (~120s). During approximately 2 weeks of continuous recording, we recorded ~2500 nighttime eruptions which lack cultural noise from tourism. With ample data, we aim to study how the source varies spatially and temporally during each phase of the geyser's eruption cycle. We are developing a new back-projection processing technique to improve source imaging for diffuse signals. Our method was previously applied to the Sierra Negra Volcano system, which also exhibits repeating harmonic and diffuse seismic sources. We back-project correlated seismic signals from the receivers back to their sources, assuming linear source to receiver paths and a known velocity model (obtained from ambient noise tomography). We apply polarization filters to isolate individual and concurrent geyser energy associated with P and S phases. We generate 4D, time-lapsed images of the geyser source field that illustrate how the source distribution changes through the eruption cycle. We compare images for pre-eruption, co-eruption, post-eruption and quiescent periods. We use our images to assess eruption mechanics in the system (i.e. top-down vs. bottom-up) and

  13. Full field image reconstruction is suitable for high-pitch dual-source computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Allmendinger, Thomas; Sedlmair, Martin; Tamm, Miriam; Reinartz, Sebastian D; Flohr, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The field of view (FOV) in high-pitch dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) is limited by the size of the second detector. The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate a full FOV image reconstruction technique for high-pitch DSCT. For reconstruction beyond the FOV of the second detector, raw data of the second system were extended to the full dimensions of the first system, using the partly existing data of the first system in combination with a very smooth transition weight function. During the weighted filtered backprojection, the data of the second system were applied with an additional weighting factor. This method was tested for different pitch values from 1.5 to 3.5 on a simulated phantom and on 25 high-pitch DSCT data sets acquired at pitch values of 1.6, 2.0, 2.5, 2.8, and 3.0. Images were reconstructed with FOV sizes of 260 × 260 and 500 × 500 mm. Image quality was assessed by 2 radiologists using a 5-point Likert scale and analyzed with repeated-measure analysis of variance. In phantom and patient data, full FOV image quality depended on pitch. Where complete projection data from both tube-detector systems were available, image quality was unaffected by pitch changes. Full FOV image quality was not compromised at pitch values of 1.6 and remained fully diagnostic up to a pitch of 2.0. At higher pitch values, there was an increasing difference in image quality between limited and full FOV images (P = 0.0097). With this new image reconstruction technique, full FOV image reconstruction can be used up to a pitch of 2.0.

  14. Imaging choroidal neovascular membrane using en face swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Magdy Moussa,1,2 Mahmoud Leila,3 Hagar Khalid1,2 1Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt; 2MEDIC Eye Center, Tanta, Egypt; 3Retina Department, Research Institute of Ophthalmology, Giza, Egypt Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCTA in delineating the morphology of choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective observational case series reviewing clinical data and fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA, swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT, and SS-OCTA images of patients with CNV and comparing the findings. The swept-source technology enables deeper penetration and superior axial resolution. The incorporated blood flow detection algorithm, optical coherence tomography angiography ratio analysis (OCTARA, enables visualization of CNV in vivo without the need for dye injection. Results: The study included 136 eyes of 105 patients. Active lesions on SS-OCTA images showed increased capillary density, extensive arborization, vascular anastomosis and looping, and peri-lesional hollow. Inactive lesions showed decreased capillary density, presence of large linear vessels, and presence of feeder vessels supplying the CNV. We detected positive correlation between SS-OCTA, FFA, and SS-OCT images in 97% of eyes. In the remaining 3%, SS-OCTA confirmed the absence of CNV, whereas FFA and SS-OCT either were inconclusive in the diagnosis of CNV or yielded false-positive results. Conclusion: SS-OCT and SS-OCTA represent a reproducible risk-free analog for FFA in imaging CNV. SS-OCTA is particularly versatile in cases where FFA and SS-OCT are inconclusive. Keywords: swept-source OCT, OCT angiography, imaging of CNV, OCTARA algorithm

  15. Simultaneous optical coherence tomography and lipofuscin autofluorescence imaging of the retina with a single broadband light source at 480nm

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Minshan; Liu, Tan; Liu, Xiaojing; Jiao, Shuliang

    2014-01-01

    We accomplished spectral domain optical coherence tomography and auto-fluorescence microscopy for imaging the retina with a single broadband light source centered at 480 nm. This technique is able to provide simultaneous structural imaging and lipofuscin molecular contrast of the retina. Since the two imaging modalities are provided by the same group of photons, their images are intrinsically registered. To test the capabilities of the technique we periodically imaged the retinas of the same ...

  16. A scanning point source for quality control of FOV uniformity in GC-PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, H.; Minear, G.; Dobrozemsky, G.; Nowotny, R.; Koenig, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: PET imaging with coincidence cameras (GC-PET) requires additional quality control procedures to check the function of coincidence circuitry and detector zoning. In particular, the uniformity response over the field of view needs special attention since it is known that coincidence counting mode may suffer from non-uniformity effects not present in single photon mode. Materials and methods: An inexpensive linear scanner with a stepper motor and a digital interface to a PC with software allowing versatile scanning modes was developed. The scanner is used with a source holder containing a Sodium-22 point source. While moving the source along the axis of rotation of the GC-PET system, a tomographic acquisition takes place. The scan covers the full axial field of view of the 2-D or 3-D scatter frame. Depending on the acquisition software, point source scanning takes place continuously while only one projection is acquired or is done in step-and-shoot mode with the number of positions equal to the number of gantry steps. Special software was developed to analyse the resulting list mode acquisition files and to produce an image of the recorded coincidence events of each head. Results: Uniformity images of coincidence events were obtained after further correction for systematic sensitivity variations caused by acquisition geometry. The resulting images are analysed visually and by calculating NEMA uniformity indices as for a planar flood field. The method has been applied successfully to two different brands of GC-PET capable gamma cameras. Conclusion: Uniformity of GC-PET can be tested quickly and accurately with a routine QC procedure, using a Sodium-22 scanning point source and an inexpensive mechanical scanning device. The method can be used for both 2-D and 3-D acquisition modes and fills an important gap in the quality control system for GC-PET

  17. dcmqi: An Open Source Library for Standardized Communication of Quantitative Image Analysis Results Using DICOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Christian; Fillion-Robin, Jean-Christophe; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Fichtinger, Gabor; Pieper, Steve; Clunie, David; Kikinis, Ron; Fedorov, Andriy

    2017-11-01

    Quantitative analysis of clinical image data is an active area of research that holds promise for precision medicine, early assessment of treatment response, and objective characterization of the disease. Interoperability, data sharing, and the ability to mine the resulting data are of increasing importance, given the explosive growth in the number of quantitative analysis methods being proposed. The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard is widely adopted for image and metadata in radiology. dcmqi (DICOM for Quantitative Imaging) is a free, open source library that implements conversion of the data stored in commonly used research formats into the standard DICOM representation. dcmqi source code is distributed under BSD-style license. It is freely available as a precompiled binary package for every major operating system, as a Docker image, and as an extension to 3D Slicer. Installation and usage instructions are provided in the GitHub repository at https://github.com/qiicr/dcmqi Cancer Res; 77(21); e87-90. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Imaging phase holdup distribution of three phase flow systems using dual source gamma ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, Rajneesh; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna; O'Sullivan, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Multiphase reaction and process systems are used in abundance in the chemical and biochemical industry. Tomography has been successfully employed to visualize the hydrodynamics of multiphase systems. Most of the tomography methods (gamma ray, x-ray and electrical capacitance and resistance) have been successfully implemented for two phase dynamic systems. However, a significant number of chemical and biochemical systems consists of dynamic three phases. Research effort directed towards the development of tomography techniques to image such dynamic system has met with partial successes for specific systems with applicability to limited operating conditions. A dual source tomography scanner has been developed that uses the 661 keV and 1332 keV photo peaks from the 137 Cs and 60 Co for imaging three phase systems. A new approach has been developed and applied that uses the polyenergetic Alternating Minimization (A-M) algorithm, developed by O'Sullivan and Benac (2007), for imaging the holdup distribution in three phases' dynamic systems. The new approach avoids the traditional post image processing approach used to determine the holdup distribution where the attenuation images of the mixed flow obtained from gamma ray photons of two different energies are used to determine the holdup of three phases. In this approach the holdup images are directly reconstructed from the gamma ray transmission data. The dual source gamma ray tomography scanner and the algorithm were validated using a three phase phantom. Based in the validation, three phase holdup studies we carried out in slurry bubble column containing gas liquid and solid phases in a dynamic state using the dual energy gamma ray tomography. The key results of the holdup distribution studies in the slurry bubble column along with the validation of the dual source gamma ray tomography system would be presented and discussed

  19. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley; Department of Radiology, University of California; Gullberg, Grant T; Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-02-15

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50percent when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25percent when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30percent, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50percent) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the

  20. THE Q/U IMAGING EXPERIMENT: POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS OF RADIO SOURCES AT 43 AND 95 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffenberger, K. M. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, P.O. Box 3064350, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States); Araujo, D.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bischoff, C.; Buder, I. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y.; Hasegawa, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kusaka, A. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Monsalve, R. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 E. Terrace Road, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Næss, S. K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Newburgh, L. B. [Dunlap Institute, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Reeves, R. [CePIA, Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción (Chile); Ruud, T. M.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K.; Gaier, T. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dickinson, C. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gundersen, J. O., E-mail: huffenbe@physics.fsu.edu [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2015-06-10

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ∼480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30–40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%–20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  1. Terahertz near-field imaging using subwavelength plasmonic apertures and a quantum cascade laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragwanath, Adam J; Freeman, Joshua R; Gallant, Andrew J; Zeitler, J Axel; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A; Chamberlain, J Martyn

    2011-07-01

    The first demonstration, to our knowledge, of near-field imaging using subwavelength plasmonic apertures with a terahertz quantum cascade laser source is presented. "Bull's-eye" apertures, featuring subwavelength circular apertures flanked by periodic annular corrugations were created using a novel fabrication method. A fivefold increase in intensity was observed for plasmonic apertures over plain apertures of the same diameter. Detailed studies of the transmitted beam profiles were undertaken for apertures with both planarized and corrugated exit facets, with the former producing spatially uniform intensity profiles and subwavelength spatial resolution. Finally, a proof-of-concept imaging experiment is presented, where an inhomogeneous pharmaceutical drug coating is investigated.

  2. Monte Carlo modeling of neutron imaging at the SINQ spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebenhaft, J.R.; Lehmann, E.H.; Pitcher, E.J.; McKinney, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    Modeling of the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ) has been used to demonstrate the neutron radiography capability of the newly released MPI-version of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. A detailed MCNPX model was developed of SINQ and its associated neutron transmission radiography (NEUTRA) facility. Preliminary validation of the model was performed by comparing the calculated and measured neutron fluxes in the NEUTRA beam line, and a simulated radiography image was generated for a sample consisting of steel tubes containing different materials. This paper describes the SINQ facility, provides details of the MCNPX model, and presents preliminary results of the neutron imaging. (authors)

  3. Color display and encryption with a plasmonic polarizing metamirror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Maowen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural colors emerge when a particular wavelength range is filtered out from a broadband light source. It is regarded as a valuable platform for color display and digital imaging due to the benefits of environmental friendliness, higher visibility, and durability. However, current devices capable of generating colors are all based on direct transmission or reflection. Material loss, thick configuration, and the lack of tunability hinder their transition to practical applications. In this paper, a novel mechanism that generates high-purity colors by photon spin restoration on ultrashallow plasmonic grating is proposed. We fabricated the sample by interference lithography and experimentally observed full color display, tunable color logo imaging, and chromatic sensing. The unique combination of high efficiency, high-purity colors, tunable chromatic display, ultrathin structure, and friendliness for fabrication makes this design an easy way to bridge the gap between theoretical investigations and daily-life applications.

  4. An open-source solution for advanced imaging flow cytometry data analysis using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Holger; Rees, Paul; Blasi, Thomas; Kamentsky, Lee; Hung, Jane; Dao, David; Carpenter, Anne E; Filby, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Imaging flow cytometry (IFC) enables the high throughput collection of morphological and spatial information from hundreds of thousands of single cells. This high content, information rich image data can in theory resolve important biological differences among complex, often heterogeneous biological samples. However, data analysis is often performed in a highly manual and subjective manner using very limited image analysis techniques in combination with conventional flow cytometry gating strategies. This approach is not scalable to the hundreds of available image-based features per cell and thus makes use of only a fraction of the spatial and morphometric information. As a result, the quality, reproducibility and rigour of results are limited by the skill, experience and ingenuity of the data analyst. Here, we describe a pipeline using open-source software that leverages the rich information in digital imagery using machine learning algorithms. Compensated and corrected raw image files (.rif) data files from an imaging flow cytometer (the proprietary .cif file format) are imported into the open-source software CellProfiler, where an image processing pipeline identifies cells and subcellular compartments allowing hundreds of morphological features to be measured. This high-dimensional data can then be analysed using cutting-edge machine learning and clustering approaches using "user-friendly" platforms such as CellProfiler Analyst. Researchers can train an automated cell classifier to recognize different cell types, cell cycle phases, drug treatment/control conditions, etc., using supervised machine learning. This workflow should enable the scientific community to leverage the full analytical power of IFC-derived data sets. It will help to reveal otherwise unappreciated populations of cells based on features that may be hidden to the human eye that include subtle measured differences in label free detection channels such as bright-field and dark-field imagery

  5. Imaging of Scattered Wavefields in Passive and Controlled-source Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2015-12-01

    Seismic waves are used to study the Earth, exploit its hydrocarbon resources, and understand its hazards. Extracting information from seismic waves about the Earth’s subsurface, however, is becoming more challenging as our questions become more complex and our demands for higher resolution increase. This dissertation introduces two new methods that use scattered waves for improving the resolution of subsurface images: natural migration of passive seismic data and convergent full-waveform inversion. In the first part of this dissertation, I describe a method where the recorded seismic data are used to image subsurface heterogeneities like fault planes. This method, denoted as natural migration of backscattered surface waves, provides higher resolution images for near-surface faults that is complementary to surface-wave tomography images. Our proposed method differ from contemporary methods in that it does not (1) require a velocity model of the earth, (2) assumes weak scattering, or (3) have a high computational cost. This method is applied to ambient noise recorded by the US-Array to map regional faults across the American continent. Natural migration can be formulated as a least-squares inversion to furtherer enhance the resolution and the quality of the fault images. This inversion is applied to ambient noise recorded in Long Beach, California to reveal a matrix of shallow subsurface faults. The second part of this dissertation describes a convergent full waveform inversion method for controlled source data. A controlled source excites waves that scatter from subsurface reflectors. The scattered waves are recorded by a large array of geophones. These recorded waves can be inverted for a high-resolution image of the subsurface by FWI, which is typically convergent for transmitted arrivals but often does not converge for deep reflected events. I propose a preconditioning approach that extends the ability of FWI to image deep parts of the velocity model, which

  6. Time domain localization technique with sparsity constraint for imaging acoustic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padois, Thomas; Doutres, Olivier; Sgard, Franck; Berry, Alain

    2017-09-01

    This paper addresses source localization technique in time domain for broadband acoustic sources. The objective is to accurately and quickly detect the position and amplitude of noise sources in workplaces in order to propose adequate noise control options and prevent workers hearing loss or safety risk. First, the generalized cross correlation associated with a spherical microphone array is used to generate an initial noise source map. Then a linear inverse problem is defined to improve this initial map. Commonly, the linear inverse problem is solved with an l2 -regularization. In this study, two sparsity constraints are used to solve the inverse problem, the orthogonal matching pursuit and the truncated Newton interior-point method. Synthetic data are used to highlight the performances of the technique. High resolution imaging is achieved for various acoustic sources configurations. Moreover, the amplitudes of the acoustic sources are correctly estimated. A comparison of computation times shows that the technique is compatible with quasi real-time generation of noise source maps. Finally, the technique is tested with real data.

  7. Analysis of monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources in imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Maximillian; Lim, Sara; Nahar, Sultana; Orban, Christopher; Pradhan, Anil

    2017-04-01

    We studied biomedical imaging and therapeutic applications of recently developed quasi-monochromatic and monochromatic X-ray sources. Using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4, we found that the quasi-monochromatic 65 keV Gaussian X-ray spectrum created by inverse Compton scattering with relatavistic electron beams were capable of producing better image contrast with less radiation compared to conventional 120 kV broadband CT scans. We also explored possible experimental detection of theoretically predicted K α resonance fluorescence in high-Z elements using the European Synchrotron Research Facility with a tungsten (Z = 74) target. In addition, we studied a newly developed quasi-monochromatic source generated by converting broadband X-rays to monochromatic K α and β X-rays with a zirconium target (Z = 40). We will further study how these K α and K β dominated spectra can be implemented in conjunction with nanoparticles for targeted therapy. Acknowledgement: Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, OH.

  8. Installation of spectrally selective imaging system in RF negative ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Nakano, H.; Osakabe, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kaneko, O.; Takeiri, Y.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.; Heinemann, B.; Geng, S.

    2016-01-01

    A spectrally selective imaging system has been installed in the RF negative ion source in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-relevant negative ion beam test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) to investigate distribution of hydrogen Balmer-α emission (H α ) close to the production surface of hydrogen negative ion. We selected a GigE vision camera coupled with an optical band-path filter, which can be controlled remotely using high speed network connection. A distribution of H α emission near the bias plate has been clearly observed. The same time trend on H α intensities measured by the imaging diagnostic and the optical emission spectroscopy is confirmed

  9. Spectroscopy for identification of plasma sources for lithography and water window imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dunne, Padraig; Liu, Luning; Lokasani, Ragava; Long, Elaine; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sheridan, Paul; Sokell, Emma; Wu, Tao; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Li, Bowen; Ohashi, Hayato; Suzuki, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    The identification of sources for applications that include nanolithography, surface patterning and high resolution imaging is the focus of a considerable activity in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or soft x-ray (SXR) spectral regions. We report on the result of a study of the spectra from laser produced plasmas of a number of medium and high Z metals undertaken in order to identify potential sources for use with available multilayer mirrors. The main focus was the study of unresolved transition arrays emitted from ions with 3d, 4d and 4f valence subshells that emit strongly in the water window (2.34-4.38 nm).and that could be used for biological imaging or cell tomography. (paper)

  10. Computed tomographic images using tube source of x rays: interior properties of the material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji; Seltzer, S. M.; Hubbell, John H.; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Akatsuka, Takao; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2002-01-01

    An image intensifier based computed tomography scanner and a tube source of x-rays are used to obtain the images of small objects, plastics, wood and soft materials in order to know the interior properties of the material. A new method is developed to estimate the degree of monochromacy, total solid angle, efficiency and geometrical effects of the measuring system and the way to produce monoenergetic radiation. The flux emitted by the x-ray tube is filtered using the appropriate filters at the chosen optimum energy and reasonable monochromacy is achieved and the images are acceptably distinct. Much attention has been focused on the imaging of small objects of weakly attenuating materials at optimum value. At optimum value it is possible to calculate the three-dimensional representation of inner and outer surfaces of the object. The image contrast between soft materials could be significantly enhanced by optimal selection of the energy of the x-rays by Monte Carlo methods. The imaging system is compact, reasonably economic, has a good contrast resolution, simple operation and routine availability and explores the use of optimizing tomography for various applications.

  11. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland); Flohr, Thomas G. [Computed Tomography CTE PA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1{+-}16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1{+-}6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56{+-}9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291{+-}65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334{+-}93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285{+-}66 HU and 268{+-}67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  12. Scaled nonuniform Fourier transform for image reconstruction in swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezgebo, Biniyam; Nagib, Karim; Fernando, Namal; Kordi, Behzad; Sherif, Sherif

    2018-02-01

    Swept Source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) is an important imaging modality for both medical and industrial diagnostic applications. A cross-sectional SS-OCT image is obtained by applying an inverse discrete Fourier transform (DFT) to axial interferograms measured in the frequency domain (k-space). This inverse DFT is typically implemented as a fast Fourier transform (FFT) that requires the data samples to be equidistant in k-space. As the frequency of light produced by a typical wavelength-swept laser is nonlinear in time, the recorded interferogram samples will not be uniformly spaced in k-space. Many image reconstruction methods have been proposed to overcome this problem. Most such methods rely on oversampling the measured interferogram then use either hardware, e.g., Mach-Zhender interferometer as a frequency clock module, or software, e.g., interpolation in k-space, to obtain equally spaced samples that are suitable for the FFT. To overcome the problem of nonuniform sampling in k-space without any need for interferogram oversampling, an earlier method demonstrated the use of the nonuniform discrete Fourier transform (NDFT) for image reconstruction in SS-OCT. In this paper, we present a more accurate method for SS-OCT image reconstruction from nonuniform samples in k-space using a scaled nonuniform Fourier transform. The result is demonstrated using SS-OCT images of Axolotl salamander eggs.

  13. Conception and data transfer analysis of an open-source digital image archive designed for radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichgraeber, U.K.M.; Lehmkuhl, L.; Harderer, A.; Emmel, D.; Ehrenstein, T.; Ricke, J.; Felix, R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Implementation of a self-designed, web-based digital image archive incorporating the existing DICOM infrastructure to assure distribution of digital pictures and reports and to optimize work flow. Assessment after three years. Materials and methods: Open-source software was used to guarantee highest reliability and cost effectiveness. In view of rapidly increasing capacity and decreasing costs of hard discs (HDs), HDs were preferred over slower and expensive magneto-optical disk (MOD) or tape storage systems. The number of installed servers increased from one to 12. By installing HDs with increased capacities, the number of servers should be kept constant. Entry and access of data were analyzed over two 4-month periods (after 1.5 and 2 years of continuous operations). Results: Our digital image archive was found to be very reliable, cost effective and suitable for its designated tasks. As judged from the measured access volume, the average utilization of the system increased by 160%. In the period from January to April 2002, the users accessed 239.8 gigabyte of the stored 873.7 gigabyte image data (27%). The volume of the stored data added 20%, mainly due to an increase in cross-section imaging. Conclusion: The challenge of developing a digital image archive with limited financial resources resulted in a practicable and expandable solution. The utilization, number of active users and volume of transferred data have increased significantly. Our concept of utilizing HDs for image storage proved to be successful. (orig.) [de

  14. Preliminary study of single contrast enhanced dual energy heart imaging using dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jin; Zhang Longjiang; Zhou Changsheng; Lu Guangming; Ma Yan; Gu Haifeng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and preliminary applications of single contrast enhanced dual energy heart imaging using dual-source CT (DSCT). Methods: Thirty patients underwent dual energy heart imaging with DSCT, of which 6 cases underwent SPECT or DSA within one week. Two experienced radiologists assessed image quality of coronary arteries and iodine map of myocardium. and correlated the coronary artery stenosis with the perfusion distribution of iodine map. Results: l00% (300/300) segments reached diagnostic standards. The mean score of image for all patients was 4.68±0.57. Mural coronary artery was present in 10 segments in S cases, atherosclerotic plaques in 32 segments in 12 cases, of which 20 segments having ≥50% stenosis, 12 segments ≤50% stenosis; dual energy CT coronary angiography was consistent with the DSA in 3 patients. 37 segmental perfusion abnormalities on iodine map were found in 15 cases, including 28 coronary blood supply segment narrow segment and 9 no coronary stenosis (including three negative segments in SPECD. Conclusion: Single contrast enhanced dual energy heart imaging can provide good coronary artery and myocardium perfusion images in the patients with appropriate heart rate, which has a potential to be used in the clinic and further studies are needed. (authors)

  15. SIproc: an open-source biomedical data processing platform for large hyperspectral images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisha, Sebastian; Chang, Shengyuan; Saki, Sam; Daeinejad, Davar; He, Ziqi; Mankar, Rupali; Mayerich, David

    2017-04-10

    There has recently been significant interest within the vibrational spectroscopy community to apply quantitative spectroscopic imaging techniques to histology and clinical diagnosis. However, many of the proposed methods require collecting spectroscopic images that have a similar region size and resolution to the corresponding histological images. Since spectroscopic images contain significantly more spectral samples than traditional histology, the resulting data sets can approach hundreds of gigabytes to terabytes in size. This makes them difficult to store and process, and the tools available to researchers for handling large spectroscopic data sets are limited. Fundamental mathematical tools, such as MATLAB, Octave, and SciPy, are extremely powerful but require that the data be stored in fast memory. This memory limitation becomes impractical for even modestly sized histological images, which can be hundreds of gigabytes in size. In this paper, we propose an open-source toolkit designed to perform out-of-core processing of hyperspectral images. By taking advantage of graphical processing unit (GPU) computing combined with adaptive data streaming, our software alleviates common workstation memory limitations while achieving better performance than existing applications.

  16. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem; Seifert, Burkhardt; Flohr, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1±16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1±6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56±9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291±65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334±93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285±66 HU and 268±67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  17. Accuracy of Dual-Energy Virtual Monochromatic CT Numbers: Comparison between the Single-Source Projection-Based and Dual-Source Image-Based Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueguchi, Takashi; Ogihara, Ryota; Yamada, Sachiko

    2018-03-21

    To investigate the accuracy of dual-energy virtual monochromatic computed tomography (CT) numbers obtained by two typical hardware and software implementations: the single-source projection-based method and the dual-source image-based method. A phantom with different tissue equivalent inserts was scanned with both single-source and dual-source scanners. A fast kVp-switching feature was used on the single-source scanner, whereas a tin filter was used on the dual-source scanner. Virtual monochromatic CT images of the phantom at energy levels of 60, 100, and 140 keV were obtained by both projection-based (on the single-source scanner) and image-based (on the dual-source scanner) methods. The accuracy of virtual monochromatic CT numbers for all inserts was assessed by comparing measured values to their corresponding true values. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the dependency of measured CT numbers on tissue attenuation, method, and their interaction. Root mean square values of systematic error over all inserts at 60, 100, and 140 keV were approximately 53, 21, and 29 Hounsfield unit (HU) with the single-source projection-based method, and 46, 7, and 6 HU with the dual-source image-based method, respectively. Linear regression analysis revealed that the interaction between the attenuation and the method had a statistically significant effect on the measured CT numbers at 100 and 140 keV. There were attenuation-, method-, and energy level-dependent systematic errors in the measured virtual monochromatic CT numbers. CT number reproducibility was comparable between the two scanners, and CT numbers had better accuracy with the dual-source image-based method at 100 and 140 keV. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Coronary artery anomalies in adults: imaging at dual source CT coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laspas, Fotios; Roussakis, Arkadios; Mourmouris, Christos; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Andreou, John

    2013-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries have an incidence of 1%, and most of these are benign. However, a small number are associated with myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. Various imaging modalities are available for coronary artery assessment. Recently, multi-detector CT has emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool for defining coronary artery anomalies. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the dual source CT appearance of congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries in adults.

  19. Auralisations with loudspeaker arrays from a phased combination of the image source method and acoustical radiosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy

    2017-01-01

    In order to create a simulation tool that is well-suited for small rooms with low diffusion and highly absorbing ceilings, a new room acoustic simulation tool has been developed that combines a phased version of the image source with acoustical radiosity and that considers the angle dependence...... impulse response, because more directional information is available with acoustical radiosity. Small rooms with absorbing surfaces are tested, because this is the room type that PARISM is particularly useful for....

  20. Auralizations with loudspeaker arrays from a phased combination of the image source method and acoustical radiosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2017-01-01

    In order to create a simulation tool that is well-suited for small rooms with low diffusion and highly absorbing ceilings, a new room acoustic simulation tool has been developed that combines a phased version of the image source with acoustical radiosity and that considers the angle dependence...... of the PARISM impulse response, because more directional information is available with acoustical radiosity. Small rooms with absorbing surfaces are tested, because this is the room type that PARISM is particularly useful for....

  1. Three-dimensional hologram display system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Frederick (Inventor); Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Bryant, Nevin (Inventor); Tsou, Peter (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a three-dimensional (3D) hologram display system. The 3D hologram display system includes a projector device for projecting an image upon a display medium to form a 3D hologram. The 3D hologram is formed such that a viewer can view the holographic image from multiple angles up to 360 degrees. Multiple display media are described, namely a spinning diffusive screen, a circular diffuser screen, and an aerogel. The spinning diffusive screen utilizes spatial light modulators to control the image such that the 3D image is displayed on the rotating screen in a time-multiplexing manner. The circular diffuser screen includes multiple, simultaneously-operated projectors to project the image onto the circular diffuser screen from a plurality of locations, thereby forming the 3D image. The aerogel can use the projection device described as applicable to either the spinning diffusive screen or the circular diffuser screen.

  2. Fast X-ray imaging at beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanis, A De; Pešić, Z D; Wagner, U; Rau, C

    2013-01-01

    The imaging branch of the dual-branch beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source has been operational since April 2012. This branch is dedicated to hard X-ray imaging (in-line phase contrast radiography and tomography, and full-field microscopy), with energies in the ranges 6-30keV. At present we aim to achieve spatial resolution of the order of 1 μm over a field of view of l-20mm 2 . This branch aims to excel at imaging experiment of fast dynamic processes, where it is of interest to have short exposure times and high frame rates. To accommodate for this, we prepared for the beamline to operate with 'pink' beam to provide higher flux, an efficient detection system, and rapid data acquisition, transfer, and saving to storage. This contributed paper describes the present situation and illustrate the author's goal for the mid-future.

  3. Fast X-ray imaging at beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fanis, A.; Pešić, Z. D.; Wagner, U.; Rau, C.

    2013-03-01

    The imaging branch of the dual-branch beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source has been operational since April 2012. This branch is dedicated to hard X-ray imaging (in-line phase contrast radiography and tomography, and full-field microscopy), with energies in the ranges 6-30keV. At present we aim to achieve spatial resolution of the order of 1 μm over a field of view of l-20mm2. This branch aims to excel at imaging experiment of fast dynamic processes, where it is of interest to have short exposure times and high frame rates. To accommodate for this, we prepared for the beamline to operate with "pink" beam to provide higher flux, an efficient detection system, and rapid data acquisition, transfer, and saving to storage. This contributed paper describes the present situation and illustrate the author's goal for the mid-future.

  4. Remote defect imaging for plate-like structures based on the scanning laser source technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Maeda, Atsuya; Nakao, Shogo

    2018-04-01

    In defect imaging with a scanning laser source technique, the use of a fixed receiver realizes stable measurements of flexural waves generated by laser at multiple rastering points. This study discussed the defect imaging by remote measurements using a laser Doppler vibrometer as a receiver. Narrow-band burst waves were generated by modulating laser pulse trains of a fiber laser to enhance signal to noise ratio in frequency domain. Averaging three images obtained at three different frequencies suppressed spurious distributions due to resonance. The experimental system equipped with these newly-devised means enabled us to visualize defects and adhesive objects in plate-like structures such as a plate with complex geometries and a branch pipe.

  5. Low-Complexity Compression Algorithm for Hyperspectral Images Based on Distributed Source Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Nian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-complexity compression algorithm for hyperspectral images based on distributed source coding (DSC is proposed in this paper. The proposed distributed compression algorithm can realize both lossless and lossy compression, which is implemented by performing scalar quantization strategy on the original hyperspectral images followed by distributed lossless compression. Multilinear regression model is introduced for distributed lossless compression in order to improve the quality of side information. Optimal quantized step is determined according to the restriction of the correct DSC decoding, which makes the proposed algorithm achieve near lossless compression. Moreover, an effective rate distortion algorithm is introduced for the proposed algorithm to achieve low bit rate. Experimental results show that the compression performance of the proposed algorithm is competitive with that of the state-of-the-art compression algorithms for hyperspectral images.

  6. Basic study on gamma- and X-ray imaging technology using miniature radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Naoki; Koroki, Kenro; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2000-01-01

    In order to visualize a concealed unlawful matter, visualization using X-ray perspective image is effective, which is actualized. However, it is insufficient by conventional X-ray perspective image to visualize matters and substances of light elements such as narcotics, plastic bombs, and so forth, especially those in a metal container. Then, this study aims at basic research on visualization of perspective image on a weapon such as pistol and so on or a light element substance in a metal container such as car by using gamma-ray with various wave-lengths from a small radiation source. In 1998 fiscal year, a photographing system consisting of an X-ray 2 and a cooled CCD camera was constructed to carry out some simple photographing experiments. By judging through this experimental results only, 57 Co can be said to be more suitable to gamma-ray source for the perspective image photographing than 137 Cs is, which will be a future subject because of supposed dependence of specimen amount, shielding panel thickness or detector. (G.K.)

  7. Interferometrically enhanced sub-terahertz picosecond imaging utilizing a miniature collapsing-field-domain source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, Sergey N.; Duan, Guoyong; Mikhnev, Valeri A.; Zemlyakov, Valery E.; Egorkin, Vladimir I.; Kalyuzhnyy, Nikolay A.; Maleev, Nikolai A.; Näpänkangas, Juha; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Kostamovaara, Juha T.

    2018-05-01

    Progress in terahertz spectroscopy and imaging is mostly associated with femtosecond laser-driven systems, while solid-state sources, mainly sub-millimetre integrated circuits, are still in an early development phase. As simple and cost-efficient an emitter as a Gunn oscillator could cause a breakthrough in the field, provided its frequency limitations could be overcome. Proposed here is an application of the recently discovered collapsing field domains effect that permits sub-THz oscillations in sub-micron semiconductor layers thanks to nanometer-scale powerfully ionizing domains arising due to negative differential mobility in extreme fields. This shifts the frequency limit by an order of magnitude relative to the conventional Gunn effect. Our first miniature picosecond pulsed sources cover the 100-200 GHz band and promise milliwatts up to ˜500 GHz. Thanks to the method of interferometrically enhanced time-domain imaging proposed here and the low single-shot jitter of ˜1 ps, our simple imaging system provides sufficient time-domain imaging contrast for fresh-tissue terahertz histology.

  8. Verification of source and collimator configuration for Gamma Knife Perfexion using panoramic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young-Bin; Prooijen, Monique van; Jaffray, David A.; Islam, Mohammad K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The new model of stereotactic radiosurgery system, Gamma Knife Perfexion, allows automatic selection of built-in collimation, eliminating the need for the time consuming manual collimator installation required with previous models. However, the configuration of sources and collimators inside the system does not permit easy access for the verification of the selected collimation. While the conventional method of exposing a film at the isocenter is useful for obtaining composite dose information, it is difficult to interpret the data in terms of the integrity of each individual source and corresponding collimation. The primary aim of this study was to develop a method of verifying the geometric configuration of the sources and collimator modules of the Gamma Knife Perfexion. In addition, the method was extended to make dose measurements and verify the accuracy of dose distributions calculated by the mathematical formalism used in the treatment planning system, Leksell Gamma Plan. Methods: A panoramic view of all of 192 cobalt sources was simultaneously acquired by exposing a radiochromic film wrapped around the surface of a cylindrical phantom. The center of the phantom was mounted at the isocenter with its axis aligned along the longitudinal axis of the couch. The sizes and shapes of the source images projected on the phantom surface were compared to those calculated based on the manufacturer's design specifications. The measured dose at various points on the film was also compared to calculations using the algorithm of the planning system. Results: The panoramic images allowed clear identification of each of the 192 sources, verifying source integrity and selected collimator sizes. Dose on the film surface is due to the primary beam as well as phantom scatter and leakage contributions. Therefore, the dose at a point away from the isocenter cannot be determined simply based on the proportionality of collimator output factors; the use of a dose computation

  9. Improved algorithm for surface display from volumetric data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobregt, S.; Schaars, H.W.G.K.; OpdeBeek, J.C.A.; Zonneveld, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    A high-resolution surface display is produced from three-dimensional datasets (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging). Unlike other voxel-based methods, this algorithm does not show a cuberille surface structure, because the surface orientation is calculated from original gray values. The applied surface shading is a function of local orientation and position of the surface and of a virtual light source, giving a realistic impression of the surface of bone and soft tissue. The projection and shading are table driven, combining variable viewpoint and illumination conditions with speed. Other options are cutplane gray-level display and surface transparency. Combined with volume scanning, this algorithm offers powerful application possibilities

  10. Testing a high-power LED based light source for hyperspectral imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomkaew, Phiwat; Mayes, Sam A.; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2017-02-01

    Our lab has worked to develop high-speed hyperspectral imaging systems that scan the fluorescence excitation spectrum for biomedical imaging applications. Hyperspectral imaging can be used in remote sensing, medical imaging, reaction analysis, and other applications. Here, we describe the development of a hyperspectral imaging system that comprised an inverted Nikon Eclipse microscope, sCMOS camera, and a custom light source that utilized a series of high-power LEDs. LED selection was performed to achieve wavelengths of 350-590 nm. To reduce scattering, LEDs with low viewing angles were selected. LEDs were surface-mount soldered and powered by an RCD. We utilized 3D printed mounting brackets to assemble all circuit components. Spectraradiometric calibration was performed using a spectrometer (QE65000, Ocean Optics) and integrating sphere (FOIS-1, Ocean Optics). Optical output and LED driving current were measured over a range of illumination intensities. A normalization algorithm was used to calibrate and optimize the intensity of the light source. The highest illumination power was at 375 nm (3300 mW/cm2), while the lowest illumination power was at 515, 525, and 590 nm (5200 mW/cm2). Comparing the intensities supplied by each LED to the intensities measured at the microscope stage, we found there was a great loss in power output. Future work will focus on using two of the same LEDs to double the power and finding more LED and/or laser diodes and chips around the range. This custom hyperspectral imaging system could be used for the detection of cancer and the identification of biomolecules.

  11. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα 1 line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample

  12. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-08-01

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα1 line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  13. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wei [BME Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G., E-mail: brankov@iit.edu [ECE Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  14. Imaging of noncarious cervical lesions by means of a fast swept source optical coherence tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Eniko T.; Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2014-01-01

    Non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL) are defined as the loss of tooth substance at the cemento-enamel junction and are caused by abrasion, erosion and/or occlusal overload. In this paper we proved that our fast swept source OCT system is a valuable tool to track the evolution of NCCL lesions in time. On several extracted bicuspids, four levels of NCCL were artificially created. After every level of induced lesion, OCT scanning was performed. B scans were acquired and 3D reconstructions were generated. The swept source OCT instrument used in this study has a central wavelength of 1050 nm, a sweeping range of 106 nm (measured at 10 dB), an average output power of 16 mW and a sweeping rate of 100 kHz. A depth resolution determined by the swept source of 12 μm in air was experimentally obtained. NCCL were measured on the B-scans as 2D images and 3D reconstructions (volumes). For quantitative evaluations of volumes, the Image J software was used. By calculating the areas of the amount of lost tissue corresponding to each difference of Bscans, the final volumes of NCCL were obtained. This swept source OCT method allows the dynamic diagnosis of NCCL in time.

  15. Pixel-based parametric source depth map for Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altabella, L.; Spinelli, A.E.; Boschi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Optical tomography represents a challenging problem in optical imaging because of the intrinsically ill-posed inverse problem due to photon diffusion. Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) for optical photons produced in tissues by several radionuclides (i.e.: 32P, 18F, 90Y), has been investigated using both 3D multispectral approach and multiviews methods. Difficult in convergence of 3D algorithms can discourage to use this technique to have information of depth and intensity of source. For these reasons, we developed a faster 2D corrected approach based on multispectral acquisitions, to obtain source depth and its intensity using a pixel-based fitting of source intensity. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data were used to develop and validate the method to obtain the parametric map of source depth. With this approach we obtain parametric source depth maps with a precision between 3% and 7% for MC simulation and 5–6% for experimental data. Using this method we are able to obtain reliable information about the source depth of Cerenkov luminescence with a simple and flexible procedure

  16. The first VLBI image of an infrared-faint radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Tingay, S.; Mao, M. Y.; Phillips, C. J.; Hotan, A. W.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.

  17. Tracking brachytherapy sources using emission imaging with one flat panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haijun; Bowsher, James; Das, Shiva; Yin Fangfang

    2009-01-01

    This work proposes to use the radiation from brachytherapy sources to track their dwell positions in three-dimensional (3D) space. The prototype device uses a single flat panel detector and a BB tray. The BBs are arranged in a defined pattern. The shadow of the BBs on the flat panel is analyzed to derive the 3D coordinates of the illumination source, i.e., the dwell position of the brachytherapy source. A kilovoltage x-ray source located 3.3 m away was used to align the center BB with the center pixel on the flat panel detector. For a test plan of 11 dwell positions, with an Ir-192 high dose rate unit, one projection was taken for each dwell point, and locations of the BB shadows were manually identified on the projection images. The 3D coordinates for the 11 dwell positions were reconstructed based on two BBs. The distances between dwell points were compared with the expected values. The average difference was 0.07 cm with a standard deviation of 0.15 cm. With automated BB shadow recognition in the future, this technique possesses the potential of tracking the 3D trajectory and the dwell times of a brachytherapy source in real time, enabling real time source position verification.

  18. DeepInfer: open-source deep learning deployment toolkit for image-guided therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Pesteie, Mehran; Hetherington, Jorden; Behringer, Peter A.; Kapur, Tina; Wells, William M.; Rohling, Robert; Fedorov, Andriy; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2017-03-01

    Deep learning models have outperformed some of the previous state-of-the-art approaches in medical image analysis. Instead of using hand-engineered features, deep models attempt to automatically extract hierarchical representations at multiple levels of abstraction from the data. Therefore, deep models are usually considered to be more flexible and robust solutions for image analysis problems compared to conventional computer vision models. They have demonstrated significant improvements in computer-aided diagnosis and automatic medical image analysis applied to such tasks as image segmentation, classification and registration. However, deploying deep learning models often has a steep learning curve and requires detailed knowledge of various software packages. Thus, many deep models have not been integrated into the clinical research work ows causing a gap between the state-of-the-art machine learning in medical applications and evaluation in clinical research procedures. In this paper, we propose "DeepInfer" - an open-source toolkit for developing and deploying deep learning models within the 3D Slicer medical image analysis platform. Utilizing a repository of task-specific models, DeepInfer allows clinical researchers and biomedical engineers to deploy a trained model selected from the public registry, and apply it to new data without the need for software development or configuration. As two practical use cases, we demonstrate the application of DeepInfer in prostate segmentation for targeted MRI-guided biopsy and identification of the target plane in 3D ultrasound for spinal injections.

  19. Current use of imaging and electromagnetic source localization procedures in epilepsy surgery centers across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouthaan, Brian E; Rados, Matea; Barsi, Péter; Boon, Paul; Carmichael, David W; Carrette, Evelien; Craiu, Dana; Cross, J Helen; Diehl, Beate; Dimova, Petia; Fabo, Daniel; Francione, Stefano; Gaskin, Vladislav; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Grigoreva, Elena; Guekht, Alla; Hirsch, Edouard; Hecimovic, Hrvoje; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Jung, Julien; Kalviainen, Reetta; Kelemen, Anna; Kimiskidis, Vasilios; Kobulashvili, Teia; Krsek, Pavel; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Larsson, Pål G; Leitinger, Markus; Lossius, Morten I; Luzin, Roman; Malmgren, Kristina; Mameniskiene, Ruta; Marusic, Petr; Metin, Baris; Özkara, Cigdem; Pecina, Hrvoje; Quesada, Carlos M; Rugg-Gunn, Fergus; Rydenhag, Bertil; Ryvlin, Philippe; Scholly, Julia; Seeck, Margitta; Staack, Anke M; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Stepanov, Valentin; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Trinka, Eugen; Uzan, Mustafa; Vogt, Viola L; Vos, Sjoerd B; Vulliémoz, Serge; Huiskamp, Geertjan; Leijten, Frans S S; Van Eijsden, Pieter; Braun, Kees P J

    2016-05-01

    In 2014 the European Union-funded E-PILEPSY project was launched to improve awareness of, and accessibility to, epilepsy surgery across Europe. We aimed to investigate the current use of neuroimaging, electromagnetic source localization, and imaging postprocessing procedures in participating centers. A survey on the clinical use of imaging, electromagnetic source localization, and postprocessing methods in epilepsy surgery candidates was distributed among the 25 centers of the consortium. A descriptive analysis was performed, and results were compared to existing guidelines and recommendations. Response rate was 96%. Standard epilepsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols are acquired at 3 Tesla by 15 centers and at 1.5 Tesla by 9 centers. Three centers perform 3T MRI only if indicated. Twenty-six different MRI sequences were reported. Six centers follow all guideline-recommended MRI sequences with the proposed slice orientation and slice thickness or voxel size. Additional sequences are used by 22 centers. MRI postprocessing methods are used in 16 centers. Interictal positron emission tomography (PET) is available in 22 centers; all using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Seventeen centers perform PET postprocessing. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is used by 19 centers, of which 15 perform postprocessing. Four centers perform neither PET nor SPECT in children. Seven centers apply magnetoencephalography (MEG) source localization, and nine apply electroencephalography (EEG) source localization. Fourteen combinations of inverse methods and volume conduction models are used. We report a large variation in the presurgical diagnostic workup among epilepsy surgery centers across Europe. This diversity underscores the need for high-quality systematic reviews, evidence-based recommendations, and harmonization of available diagnostic presurgical methods. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Potential benefit of a simultaneous, side-by-side display of contrast MDCT and echocardiography over routine sequential imaging for assessment of adult congenital heart disease: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oe, Hiroki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Miyoshi, Toru; Osawa, Kazuhiro; Akagi, Teiji; Kanazawa, Susumu; Ito, Hiroshi

    2018-06-18

    Management of adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients requires understanding of its complex morphology and functional features. An innovative imaging technique has been developed to display a virtual multi-planar reconstruction obtained from contrast-enhanced multidetector-computed tomography (MDCT) corresponding to the same cross-sectional image from transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). The aim of this study is to assess the usefulness of this imaging technology in ACHD patients. This study consisted of 46 consecutive patients (30 women; mean age, 52±18 years old) with ACHD who had undergone contrast MDCT. All patients underwent TTE within a week of MDCT. An experienced sonographer who did not know the results of MDCT conducted a diagnosis using TTE and, then, using the new imaging technology. We studied whether this imaging technology provided additional or unexpected findings or makes more accurate diagnosis. In this imaging technology, MDCT cross-section provides higher-resolution image to the deep compared to corresponding TTE image. Depending on the MDCT section which can be arbitrarily set under the echo guide, we can diagnose unexpected or incremental lesions or more accurately assess the severity of the lesion in 27 patients (59%) compared to TTE study alone. This imaging technology was useful in the following situations: CONCLUSIONS: This integrated imaging technology provides incremental role over TTE in complex anatomy, and allows functional information in ACHD patients. Copyright © 2018 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advances in Mineral Dust Source Composition Measurement with Imaging Spectroscopy at the Salton Sea, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. O.; Realmuto, V. J.; Thompson, D. R.; Mahowald, N. M.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Clark, R. N.; Swayze, G. A.; Okin, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust emitted from the Earth's surface is a principal contributor to direct radiative forcing over the arid regions, where shifts in climate have a significant impact on agriculture, precipitation, and desert encroachment around the globe. Dust particles contribute to both positive and negative forcing, depending on the composition of the particles. Particle composition is a function of the surface mineralogy of dust source regions, but poor knowledge of surface mineralogy on regional to global scales limits the skill of Earth System models to predict shifts in regional climate around the globe. Earth System models include the source, emission, transport and deposition phases of the dust cycle. In addition to direct radiative forcing contributions, mineral dust impacts include indirect radiative forcing, modification of the albedo and melting rates of snow and ice, kinetics of tropospheric photochemistry, formation and deposition of acidic aerosols, supply of nutrients to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and impact on human health and safety. We demonstrate the ability to map mineral dust source composition in the Salton Sea dust source region with imaging spectroscopy measurements acquired as part of the NASA HyspIRI preparatory airborne campaign. These new spectroscopically derived compositional measurements provide a six orders of magnitude improvement over current atlases for this dust source region and provide a pathfinder example for a remote measurement approach to address this critical dust composition gap for global Earth System models.

  2. A technique to consider mismatches between fMRI and EEG/MEG sources for fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging: a preliminary simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2006-01-01

    fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging can be a powerful tool in studying human brain functions with enhanced spatial and temporal resolutions. Recent studies on the combination of fMRI and EEG/MEG have suggested that fMRI prior information could be readily implemented by simply imposing different weighting factors to cortical sources overlapping with the fMRI activations. It has been also reported, however, that such a hard constraint may cause severe distortions or elimination of meaningful EEG/MEG sources when there are distinct mismatches between the fMRI activations and the EEG/MEG sources. If one wants to obtain the actual EEG/MEG source locations and uses the fMRI prior information as just an auxiliary tool to enhance focality of the distributed EEG/MEG sources, it is reasonable to weaken the strength of fMRI constraint when severe mismatches between fMRI and EEG/MEG sources are observed. The present study suggests an efficient technique to automatically adjust the strength of fMRI constraint according to the mismatch level. The use of the proposed technique rarely affects the results of conventional fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging if no major mismatch between the two modalities is detected; while the new results become similar to those of typical EEG/MEG source imaging without fMRI constraint if the mismatch level is significant. A preliminary simulation study using realistic EEG signals demonstrated that the proposed technique can be a promising tool to selectively apply fMRI prior information to EEG/MEG source imaging

  3. Anser EMT: the first open-source electromagnetic tracking platform for image-guided interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Herman Alexander; Franz, Alfred Michael; O'Donoghue, Kilian; Seitel, Alexander; Trauzettel, Fabian; Maier-Hein, Lena; Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig

    2017-06-01

    Electromagnetic tracking is the gold standard for instrument tracking and navigation in the clinical setting without line of sight. Whilst clinical platforms exist for interventional bronchoscopy and neurosurgical navigation, the limited flexibility and high costs of electromagnetic tracking (EMT) systems for research investigations mitigate against a better understanding of the technology's characterisation and limitations. The Anser project provides an open-source implementation for EMT with particular application to image-guided interventions. This work provides implementation schematics for our previously reported EMT system which relies on low-cost acquisition and demodulation techniques using both National Instruments and Arduino hardware alongside MATLAB support code. The system performance is objectively compared to other commercial tracking platforms using the Hummel assessment protocol. Positional accuracy of 1.14 mm and angular rotation accuracy of [Formula: see text] are reported. Like other EMT platforms, Anser is susceptible to tracking errors due to eddy current and ferromagnetic distortion. The system is compatible with commercially available EMT sensors as well as the Open Network Interface for image-guided therapy (OpenIGTLink) for easy communication with visualisation and medical imaging toolkits such as MITK and 3D Slicer. By providing an open-source platform for research investigations, we believe that novel and collaborative approaches can overcome the limitations of current EMT technology.

  4. Self characterization of a coded aperture array for neutron source imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volegov, P. L., E-mail: volegov@lanl.gov; Danly, C. R.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Fittinghoff, D. N. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the stagnation stage of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Since the neutron source is small (∼100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, triangular tapers machined in gold foils. These gold foils are stacked to form an array of 20 apertures for pinhole imaging and three apertures for penumbral imaging. These apertures must be precisely aligned to accurately place the field of view of each aperture at the design location, or the location of the field of view for each aperture must be measured. In this paper we present a new technique that has been developed for the measurement and characterization of the precise location of each aperture in the array. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments at NIF.

  5. Computerized tomography using high resolution X-ray imaging system with a microfocus source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaprazny, Z.; Korytar, D.; Konopka, P.; Ac, V.; Bielecki, J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there is an effort to image an internal structure of an object by using not only conventional 2D X-ray radiography but also using high resolution 3D tomography which is based on reconstruction of multiple 2D projections at various angular positions of the object. We have previously reported [1] the development and basic parameters of a high resolution x-ray imaging system with a microfocus source. We report the recent progress using this high resolution X-ray laboratory system in this work. These first findings show that our system is particularly suitable for light weight and nonmetallic objects such as biological objects, plastics, wood, paper, etc. where phase contrast helps to increase the visibility of the finest structures of the object. Phase-contrast X-ray Computerized Tomography is of our special interest because it is an emerging imaging technique that can be implemented at third generation synchrotron radiation sources and also in laboratory conditions using a microfocus X-ray tube or beam conditioning optics. (authors)

  6. High speed imaging of dynamic processes with a switched source x-ray CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, William M; Lionheart, William R B; Morton, Edward J; Cunningham, Mike; Luggar, Russell D

    2015-01-01

    Conventional x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners are limited in their scanning speed by the mechanical constraints of their rotating gantries and as such do not provide the necessary temporal resolution for imaging of fast-moving dynamic processes, such as moving fluid flows. The Real Time Tomography (RTT) system is a family of fast cone beam CT scanners which instead use multiple fixed discrete sources and complete rings of detectors in an offset geometry. We demonstrate the potential of this system for use in the imaging of such high speed dynamic processes and give results using simulated and real experimental data. The unusual scanning geometry results in some challenges in image reconstruction, which are overcome using algebraic iterative reconstruction techniques and explicit regularisation. Through the use of a simple temporal regularisation term and by optimising the source firing pattern, we show that temporal resolution of the system may be increased at the expense of spatial resolution, which may be advantageous in some situations. Results are given showing temporal resolution of approximately 500 µs with simulated data and 3 ms with real experimental data. (paper)

  7. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher P; Brenner, Ceri M; Stitt, Camilla A; Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R; Mirfayzi, Seyed R; Wilson, Lucy A; Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad; Allott, Ric; Butler, Nicholas M H; Clarke, Robert J; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Higginson, Adam; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos; Jowsey, John; McKenna, Paul; Neely, David; Kar, Satya; Scott, Thomas B

    2016-11-15

    A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500keV), with a source size of <0.5mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30cm(2) scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Development and validation of a combined phased acoustical radiosity and image source model for predicting sound fields in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2015-01-01

    A model, combining acoustical radiosity and the image source method, including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method (PARISM), and it has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse...... radiosity by regarding the model as being stochastic. Three methods of implementation are proposed and investigated, and finally, recommendations are made for their use. Validation of the image source method is done by comparison with finite element simulations of a rectangular room with a porous absorber...

  9. Hydrogeophysical imaging of deposit heterogeneity and groundwater chemistry changes during DNAPL source zone bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J E; Wilkinson, P B; Wealthall, G P; Loke, M H; Dearden, R; Wilson, R; Allen, D; Ogilvy, R D

    2010-10-21

    Robust characterization and monitoring of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones is essential for designing effective remediation strategies, and for assessing the efficacy of treatment. In this study high-resolution cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was evaluated as a means of monitoring a field-scale in-situ bioremediation experiment, in which emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) electron donor was injected into a trichloroethene source zone. Baseline ERT scans delineated the geometry of the interface between the contaminated alluvial aquifer and the underlying mudstone bedrock, and also the extent of drilling-induced physical heterogeneity. Time-lapse ERT images revealed major preferential flow pathways in the source and plume zones, which were corroborated by multiple lines of evidence, including geochemical monitoring and hydraulic testing using high density multilevel sampler arrays within the geophysical imaging planes. These pathways were shown to control the spatial distribution of the injected EVO, and a bicarbonate buffer introduced into the cell for pH control. Resistivity signatures were observed within the preferential flow pathways that were consistent with elevated chloride levels, providing tentative evidence from ERT of the biodegradation of chlorinated solvents. Copyright © 2010 S. Yamamoto. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental validation of a kilovoltage x-ray source model for computing imaging dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.poirier@cancercare.mb.ca [CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Kouznetsov, Alexei; Koger, Brandon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Tambasco, Mauro, E-mail: mtambasco@mail.sdsu.edu [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, California 92182-1233 and Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To introduce and validate a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source model and characterization method to compute absorbed dose accrued from kV x-rays. Methods: The authors propose a simplified virtual point source model and characterization method for a kV x-ray source. The source is modeled by: (1) characterizing the spatial spectral and fluence distributions of the photons at a plane at the isocenter, and (2) creating a virtual point source from which photons are generated to yield the derived spatial spectral and fluence distribution at isocenter of an imaging system. The spatial photon distribution is determined by in-air relative dose measurements along the transverse (x) and radial (y) directions. The spectrum is characterized using transverse axis half-value layer measurements and the nominal peak potential (kVp). This source modeling approach is used to characterize a Varian{sup ®} on-board-imager (OBI{sup ®}) for four default cone-beam CT beam qualities: beams using a half bowtie filter (HBT) with 110 and 125 kVp, and a full bowtie filter (FBT) with 100 and 125 kVp. The source model and characterization method was validated by comparing dose computed by the authors’ inhouse software (kVDoseCalc) to relative dose measurements in a homogeneous and a heterogeneous block phantom comprised of tissue, bone, and lung-equivalent materials. Results: The characterized beam qualities and spatial photon distributions are comparable to reported values in the literature. Agreement between computed and measured percent depth-dose curves is ⩽2% in the homogeneous block phantom and ⩽2.5% in the heterogeneous block phantom. Transverse axis profiles taken at depths of 2 and 6 cm in the homogeneous block phantom show an agreement within 4%. All transverse axis dose profiles in water, in bone, and lung-equivalent materials for beams using a HBT, have an agreement within 5%. Measured profiles of FBT beams in bone and lung-equivalent materials were higher than their

  11. Phase-contrast imaging and tomography at 60 keV using a conventional x-ray tube source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donath, Tilman; Bunk, Oliver; Groot, Waldemar; Bednarzik, Martin; Gruenzweig, Christian; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Hempel, Eckhard; Popescu, Stefan; Hoheisel, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Phase-contrast imaging at laboratory-based x-ray sources using grating interferometers has been developed over the last few years for x-ray energies of up to 28 keV. Here, we show first phase-contrast projection and tomographic images recorded at significantly higher x-ray energies, produced by an x-ray tube source operated at 100 kV acceleration voltage. We find our measured tomographic phase images in good agreement with tabulated data. The extension of phase-contrast imaging to this significantly higher x-ray energy opens up many applications of the technique in medicine and industrial nondestructive testing.

  12. Color speckle in laser displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    At the beginning of this century, lighting technology has been shifted from discharge lamps, fluorescent lamps and electric bulbs to solid-state lighting. Current solid-state lighting is based on the light emitting diodes (LED) technology, but the laser lighting technology is developing rapidly, such as, laser cinema projectors, laser TVs, laser head-up displays, laser head mounted displays, and laser headlamps for motor vehicles. One of the main issues of laser displays is the reduction of speckle noise1). For the monochromatic laser light, speckle is random interference pattern on the image plane (retina for human observer). For laser displays, RGB (red-green-blue) lasers form speckle patterns independently, which results in random distribution of chromaticity, called color speckle2).

  13. Image quality analysis to reduce dental artifacts in head and neck imaging with dual-source computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelsen, D.; Werner, M.K.; Thomas, C.; Tsiflikas, I.; Reimann, A.; Claussen, C.D.; Heuschmid, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Koitschev, A. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohrenheilkunde

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: Important oropharyngeal structures can be superimposed by metallic artifacts due to dental implants. The aim of this study was to compare the image quality of multiplanar reconstructions and an angulated spiral in dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) of the neck. Materials and Methods: Sixty-two patients were included for neck imaging with DSCT. MPRs from an axial dataset and an additional short spiral parallel to the mouth floor were acquired. Leading anatomical structures were then evaluated with respect to the extent to which they were affected by dental artifacts using a visual scale, ranging from 1 (least artifacts) to 4 (most artifacts). Results: In MPR, 87.1 % of anatomical structures had significant artifacts (3.12 {+-} 0.86), while in angulated slices leading anatomical structures of the oropharynx showed negligible artifacts (1.28 {+-} 0.46). The diagnostic growth due to primarily angulated slices concerning artifact severity was significant (p < 0.01). Conclusion: MPRs are not capable of reducing dental artifacts sufficiently. In patients with dental artifacts overlying the anatomical structures of the oropharynx, an additional short angulated spiral parallel to the floor of the mouth is recommended and should be applied for daily routine. As a result of the static gantry design of DSCT, the use of a flexible head holder is essential. (orig.)

  14. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  15. Imaging C. elegans embryos using an epifluorescent microscope and open source software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Koen J C; Chan, Raymond C

    2011-03-24

    Cellular processes, such as chromosome assembly, segregation and cytokinesis,are inherently dynamic. Time-lapse imaging of living cells, using fluorescent-labeled reporter proteins or differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy, allows for the examination of the temporal progression of these dynamic events which is otherwise inferred from analysis of fixed samples(1,2). Moreover, the study of the developmental regulations of cellular processes necessitates conducting time-lapse experiments on an intact organism during development. The Caenorhabiditis elegans embryo is light-transparent and has a rapid, invariant developmental program with a known cell lineage(3), thus providing an ideal experiment model for studying questions in cell biology(4,5)and development(6-9). C. elegans is amendable to genetic manipulation by forward genetics (based on random mutagenesis(10,11)) and reverse genetics to target specific genes (based on RNAi-mediated interference and targeted mutagenesis(12-15)). In addition, transgenic animals can be readily created to express fluorescently tagged proteins or reporters(16,17). These traits combine to make it easy to identify the genetic pathways regulating fundamental cellular and developmental processes in vivo(18-21). In this protocol we present methods for live imaging of C. elegans embryos using DIC optics or GFP fluorescence on a compound epifluorescent microscope. We demonstrate the ease with which readily available microscopes, typically used for fixed sample imaging, can also be applied for time-lapse analysis using open-source software to automate the imaging process.

  16. X-ray phase contrast imaging: From synchrotrons to conventional sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivo, A.; Castelli, E.

    2014-01-01

    Phase-based approaches can revolutionize X-ray imaging and remove its main limitation: poor image contrast arising from low attenuation differences. They exploit the unit decrement of the real part of the refractive index, typically 1000 times larger than the imaginary part driving attenuation. This increases the contrast of all details, and enables the detection of features classically considered 'X-ray invisible'. Following pioneering experiments dating back to the mid-sixties, X-ray phase contrast imaging 'exploded' in the mid-nineties, when third generation synchrotron sources became more widely available. Applications were proposed in fields as diverse as material science, palaeontology, biology, food science, cultural heritage preservation, and many others. Among these applications, medicine has been constantly considered the most important; among medical applications, mammography is arguably the one that attracted most attention. Applications to mammography were pioneered by the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) group in Trieste, which was already active in the area through a combination of innovative ways to do imaging at synchrotrons and development of novel X-ray detectors. This pioneering phase led to the only clinical experience of phase contrast mammography on human patients, and spawned a number of ideas as to how these advances could be translated into clinical practice.

  17. EpiTools: An Open-Source Image Analysis Toolkit for Quantifying Epithelial Growth Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Davide; Hoppe, Andreas; Restrepo, Simon; Gatti, Lorenzo; Tournier, Alexander L; Tapon, Nicolas; Basler, Konrad; Mao, Yanlan

    2016-01-11

    Epithelia grow and undergo extensive rearrangements to achieve their final size and shape. Imaging the dynamics of tissue growth and morphogenesis is now possible with advances in time-lapse microscopy, but a true understanding of their complexities is limited by automated image analysis tools to extract quantitative data. To overcome such limitations, we have designed a new open-source image analysis toolkit called EpiTools. It provides user-friendly graphical user interfaces for accurately segmenting and tracking the contours of cell membrane signals obtained from 4D confocal imaging. It is designed for a broad audience, especially biologists with no computer-science background. Quantitative data extraction is integrated into a larger bioimaging platform, Icy, to increase the visibility and usability of our tools. We demonstrate the usefulness of EpiTools by analyzing Drosophila wing imaginal disc growth, revealing previously overlooked properties of this dynamic tissue, such as the patterns of cellular rearrangements. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Crystal and source characterization for the Crystal Backlighter Imager capability at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauland, C. M.; Hall, G. N.; Buscho, J. G.; Hibbard, R.; McCarville, T. J.; Lowe-Webb, R.; Ayers, S. L.; Kalantar, D.; Kohut, T.; Kemp, G. E.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Landen, O. L.; Brewster, T. N.; Piston, K.

    2017-10-01

    The Crystal Backlighter Imager (CBI) is a very narrow bandwidth ( 10 eV) x-ray radiography system that uses Bragg reflection from a spherically-curved crystal at near normal incidence. This diagnostic has the capability to image late in an ICF implosion because it only requires the brightness of the backlighter to be larger than the capsule self-emission in that narrow bandwidth. While the limited bandwidth is advantageous for this reason, it also requires that the effective energy of the backlighter atomic line is known to 1 eV accuracy for proper crystal alignment. Any Doppler shift in the line energy must be understood for the imaging system to work. The work presented details characterization experiments done at the Jupiter Laser Facility with a Si (8 6 2) crystal that will be used with a Selenium backlighter in the NIF CBI diagnostic. We used the spherically-bent crystals to image a small ( 200 µm) He α source generated by the Janus laser on a Se foil. Scanning Bragg angles over multiple shots allowed us to map out the spectral line intensity distribution for optimal alignment in NIF. A subsequent Doppler shift measurement using CBI on NIF will also be presented with complementary HYDRA modeling for both experiments. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by General Atomics under Contract DE-NA0001808.

  19. a Semi-Empirical Topographic Correction Model for Multi-Source Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Sa; Tian, Xinpeng; Liu, Qiang; Wen, Jianguang; Ma, Yushuang; Song, Zhenwei

    2018-04-01

    Topographic correction of surface reflectance in rugged terrain areas is the prerequisite for the quantitative application of remote sensing in mountainous areas. Physics-based radiative transfer model can be applied to correct the topographic effect and accurately retrieve the reflectance of the slope surface from high quality satellite image such as Landsat8 OLI. However, as more and more images data available from various of sensors, some times we can not get the accurate sensor calibration parameters and atmosphere conditions which are needed in the physics-based topographic correction model. This paper proposed a semi-empirical atmosphere and topographic corrction model for muti-source satellite images without accurate calibration parameters.Based on this model we can get the topographic corrected surface reflectance from DN data, and we tested and verified this model with image data from Chinese satellite HJ and GF. The result shows that the correlation factor was reduced almost 85 % for near infrared bands and the classification overall accuracy of classification increased 14 % after correction for HJ. The reflectance difference of slope face the sun and face away the sun have reduced after correction.

  20. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Dezhong; He Bin

    2003-01-01

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping

  1. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Dezhong [School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu City, 610054, Sichuan Province (China); He Bin [The University of Illinois at Chicago, IL (United States)

    2003-11-07

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping.

  2. Design and evaluation of an imaging spectrophotometer incorporating a uniform light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S D; Brown, R B; Crowe, T G

    2012-03-01

    Accounting for light that is diffusely scattered from a surface is one of the practical challenges in reflectance measurement. Integrating spheres are commonly used for this purpose in point measurements of reflectance and transmittance. This solution is not directly applicable to a spectral imaging application for which diffuse reflectance measurements are desired. In this paper, an imaging spectrophotometer design is presented that employs a uniform light source to provide diffuse illumination. This creates the inverse measurement geometry to the directional illumination/diffuse reflectance mode typically used for point measurements. The final system had a spectral range between 400 and 1000 nm with a 5.2 nm resolution, a field of view of approximately 0.5 m by 0.5 m, and millimeter spatial resolution. Testing results indicate illumination uniformity typically exceeding 95% and reflectance precision better than 1.7%.

  3. Development of a fluorescent x-ray source for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyofuku, F.; Tokumori, K.; Nishimura, K.; Saito, T.; Takeda, T.; Itai, Y.; Hyodo, K.; Ando, M.; Endo, M.; Naito, H.; Uyama, C.

    1995-02-01

    A fluorescent x-ray source for medical imaging, such as K-edge subtraction angiography and monochromatic x-ray CT, has been developed. Using a 6.5 GeV accumulation ring in Tsukuba, fluorescent x rays, which range from about 30 to 70 keV are generated by irradiating several target materials. Measurements have been made of output intensities and energy spectra for different target angles and extraction angles. The intensities of fluorescent x rays at a 30 mA beam current are on the order of 1-3×106 photons/mm2/s at 30 cm from the local spot where the incident beam is collimated to 1 mm2. A phantom which contains three different contrast media (iodine, barium, gadolinium) was used for the K-edge energy subtraction, and element selective CT images were obtained.

  4. Laser plasmas as x-ray sources for lithographic imaging of submicron structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijkerk, F.; van Dorssen, G.E.; van der Wiel, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Laser radiation can be used efficiently to generate x-rays for lithographic imaging of submicron patterns, e.g., for VLSI device fabrication. Due to their short wavelength and high average power, excimer lasers show much potential for this application. Results are presented of scaling studies for high repetition rate excimer laser application, using the frequency doubled output of a low repetition rate Nd:YAG/Glass laser. Spectral and spatial characteristics of x-ray emission of the laser plasma are shown. The power density in the laser focus was 3 x 10 12 W/cm 2 . With this source Si x-ray masks with submicron Au absorber profiles are imaged into high sensitivity x-ray photoresist. For the exposures 80 laser shots sufficed to yield high quality submicron structures. Extrapolation of the results to a high power excimer laser reduces the exposure time of the photoresists to several seconds, enabling a wafer throughput at an industrial level

  5. Combined fluorescence and phase contrast imaging at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornberger, B.; Feser, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Vogt, S.; Legnini, D.; Paterson, D.; Rehak, P.; DeGeronimo, G.; Palmer, B.M.; Experimental Facilities Division; State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook Univ.; BNL; Univ. of Vermont

    2006-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence microprobes excel at detecting and quantifying trace metals in biological and environmental science samples, but typically do not detect low Z elements such as carbon and nitrogen. Therefore, it is hard to put the trace metals into context with their natural environment. We are implementing phase contrast capabilities with a segmented detector into several microprobes at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to address this problem. Qualitative differential phase contrast images from a modified soft x-ray detector already provide very useful information for general users. We are also implementing a quantitative method to recover the absolute phase shift by Fourier filtering detector images. New detectors are under development which are optimized for the signal levels present at the APS. In this paper, we concentrate on fundamental signal to noise considerations comparing absorption and differential phase contrast

  6. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Christopher P., E-mail: cj0810@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Brenner, Ceri M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Stitt, Camilla A. [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Mirfayzi, Seyed R. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Wilson, Lucy A. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Allott, Ric [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Butler, Nicholas M.H. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Clarke, Robert J.; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Higginson, Adam [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Murphy, Christopher [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Notley, Margaret [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Jowsey, John [Ground Floor North B582, Sellafield Ltd, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • X-ray generation was achieved via laser interaction with a tantalum thin foil target. • Picosecond X-ray pulse from a sub-mm spot generated high resolution images. • MeV X-ray emission is possible, permitting analysis of full scale waste containers. • In parallel neutron emission of 10{sup 7}–10{sup 9} neutrons per steradian per pulse was attained. • Development of a 10 Hz diode pumped laser system for waste monitoring is envisioned. - Abstract: A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28 mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500 keV), with a source size of <0.5 mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30 cm{sup 2} scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10 Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned.

  7. Real-time earthquake source imaging: An offline test for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Rongjiang; Zschau, Jochen; Parolai, Stefano; Dahm, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    In recent decades, great efforts have been expended in real-time seismology aiming at earthquake and tsunami early warning. One of the most important issues is the real-time assessment of earthquake rupture processes using near-field seismogeodetic networks. Currently, earthquake early warning systems are mostly based on the rapid estimate of P-wave magnitude, which contains generally large uncertainties and the known saturation problem. In the case of the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake, JMA (Japan Meteorological Agency) released the first warning of the event with M7.2 after 25 s. The following updates of the magnitude even decreased to M6.3-6.6. Finally, the magnitude estimate stabilized at M8.1 after about two minutes. This led consequently to the underestimated tsunami heights. By using the newly developed Iterative Deconvolution and Stacking (IDS) method for automatic source imaging, we demonstrate an offline test for the real-time analysis of the strong-motion and GPS seismograms of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. The results show that we had been theoretically able to image the complex rupture process of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake automatically soon after or even during the rupture process. In general, what had happened on the fault could be robustly imaged with a time delay of about 30 s by using either the strong-motion (KiK-net) or the GPS (GEONET) real-time data. This implies that the new real-time source imaging technique is helpful to reduce false and missing warnings, and therefore should play an important role in future tsunami early warning and earthquake rapid response systems.

  8. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Christopher P.; Brenner, Ceri M.; Stitt, Camilla A.; Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R.; Mirfayzi, Seyed R.; Wilson, Lucy A.; Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad; Allott, Ric; Butler, Nicholas M.H.; Clarke, Robert J.; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Higginson, Adam; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos; Jowsey, John

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • X-ray generation was achieved via laser interaction with a tantalum thin foil target. • Picosecond X-ray pulse from a sub-mm spot generated high resolution images. • MeV X-ray emission is possible, permitting analysis of full scale waste containers. • In parallel neutron emission of 10"7–10"9 neutrons per steradian per pulse was attained. • Development of a 10 Hz diode pumped laser system for waste monitoring is envisioned. - Abstract: A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28 mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500 keV), with a source size of <0.5 mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30 cm"2 scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10 Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned.

  9. Open Source software and social networks: Disruptive alternatives for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratib, Osman; Rosset, Antoine; Heuberger, Joris

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades several major changes in computer and communication technology have pushed the limits of imaging informatics and PACS beyond the traditional system architecture providing new perspectives and innovative approach to a traditionally conservative medical community. Disruptive technologies such as the world-wide-web, wireless networking, Open Source software and recent emergence of cyber communities and social networks have imposed an accelerated pace and major quantum leaps in the progress of computer and technology infrastructure applicable to medical imaging applications. Methods: This paper reviews the impact and potential benefits of two major trends in consumer market software development and how they will influence the future of medical imaging informatics. Open Source software is emerging as an attractive and cost effective alternative to traditional commercial software developments and collaborative social networks provide a new model of communication that is better suited to the needs of the medical community. Observations: Evidence shows that successful Open Source software tools have penetrated the medical market and have proven to be more robust and cost effective than their commercial counterparts. Developed by developers that are themselves part of the user community, these tools are usually better adapted to the user's need and are more robust than traditional software programs being developed and tested by a large number of contributing users. This context allows a much faster and more appropriate development and evolution of the software platforms. Similarly, communication technology has opened up to the general public in a way that has changed the social behavior and habits adding a new dimension to the way people communicate and interact with each other. The new paradigms have also slowly penetrated the professional market and ultimately the medical community. Secure social networks allowing groups of people to easily communicate

  10. Open Source software and social networks: Disruptive alternatives for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratib, Osman, E-mail: osman.ratib@hcuge.ch [Department of Medical Imaging and Information Sciences, University Hospital of Geneva, 24, rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Rosset, Antoine; Heuberger, Joris [Department of Medical Imaging and Information Sciences, University Hospital of Geneva, 24, rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1205 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-05-15

    In recent decades several major changes in computer and communication technology have pushed the limits of imaging informatics and PACS beyond the traditional system architecture providing new perspectives and innovative approach to a traditionally conservative medical community. Disruptive technologies such as the world-wide-web, wireless networking, Open Source software and recent emergence of cyber communities and social networks have imposed an accelerated pace and major quantum leaps in the progress of computer and technology infrastructure applicable to medical imaging applications. Methods: This paper reviews the impact and potential benefits of two major trends in consumer market software development and how they will influence the future of medical imaging informatics. Open Source software is emerging as an attractive and cost effective alternative to traditional commercial software developments and collaborative social networks provide a new model of communication that is better suited to the needs of the medical community. Observations: Evidence shows that successful Open Source software tools have penetrated the medical market and have proven to be more robust and cost effective than their commercial counterparts. Developed by developers that are themselves part of the user community, these tools are usually better adapted to the user's need and are more robust than traditional software programs being developed and tested by a large number of contributing users. This context allows a much faster and more appropriate development and evolution of the software platforms. Similarly, communication technology has opened up to the general public in a way that has changed the social behavior and habits adding a new dimension to the way people communicate and interact with each other. The new paradigms have also slowly penetrated the professional market and ultimately the medical community. Secure social networks allowing groups of people to easily

  11. Open Source software and social networks: disruptive alternatives for medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman; Rosset, Antoine; Heuberger, Joris

    2011-05-01

    In recent decades several major changes in computer and communication technology have pushed the limits of imaging informatics and PACS beyond the traditional system architecture providing new perspectives and innovative approach to a traditionally conservative medical community. Disruptive technologies such as the world-wide-web, wireless networking, Open Source software and recent emergence of cyber communities and social networks have imposed an accelerated pace and major quantum leaps in the progress of computer and technology infrastructure applicable to medical imaging applications. This paper reviews the impact and potential benefits of two major trends in consumer market software development and how they will influence the future of medical imaging informatics. Open Source software is emerging as an attractive and cost effective alternative to traditional commercial software developments and collaborative social networks provide a new model of communication that is better suited to the needs of the medical community. Evidence shows that successful Open Source software tools have penetrated the medical market and have proven to be more robust and cost effective than their commercial counterparts. Developed by developers that are themselves part of the user community, these tools are usually better adapted to the user's need and are more robust than traditional software programs being developed and tested by a large number of contributing users. This context allows a much faster and more appropriate development and evolution of the software platforms. Similarly, communication technology has opened up to the general public in a way that has changed the social behavior and habits adding a new dimension to the way people communicate and interact with each other. The new paradigms have also slowly penetrated the professional market and ultimately the medical community. Secure social networks allowing groups of people to easily communicate and exchange information

  12. Source detection at 100 meter standoff with a time-encoded imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.; Brubaker, E.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Monterial, M.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we present the design, characterization, and testing of a laboratory prototype radiological search and localization system. The system, based on time-encoded imaging, uses the attenuation signature of neutrons in time, induced by the geometrical layout and motion of the system. We have demonstrated the ability to detect a ~1 mCi 252 Cf radiological source at 100 m standoff with 90% detection efficiency and 10% false positives against background in 12 min. As a result, this same detection efficiency is met at 15 s for a 40 m standoff, and 1.2 s for a 20 m standoff.

  13. Smartphones Get Emotional: Mind Reading Images and Reconstructing the Neural Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Kai; Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz

    2011-01-01

    components across subjects we are able to remove artifacts and identify common sources of synchronous brain activity, consistent with earlier ndings based on conventional EEG equipment. Applying a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the neural sources not only facilitates dierentiation of emotional responses...... but may also provide an intuitive interface for interacting with a 3D rendered model of brain activity. Integrating a wireless EEG set with a smartphone thus offers completely new opportunities for modeling the mental state of users as well as providing a basis for novel bio-feedback applications.......Combining a 14 channel neuroheadset with a smartphone to capture and process brain imaging data, we demonstrate the ability to distinguish among emotional responses re ected in dierent scalp potentials when viewing pleasant and unpleasant pictures compared to neutral content. Clustering independent...

  14. Identification of radiation induced dark current sources in pinned photodiode CMOS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goiffon, V.; Virmontois, C.; Magnan, P.; Cervantes, P.; Place, S.; Estribeau, M.; Martin-Gonthier, P.; Gaillardin, M.; Girard, S.; Paillet, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of Total Ionizing Dose (TID) induced dark current sources in Pinned Photodiodes (PPD) CMOS Image Sensors based on pixel design variations. The influence of several layout parameters is studied. Only one parameter is changed at a time enabling the direct evaluation of its contribution to the observed device degradation. By this approach, the origin of radiation induced dark current in PPD is localized on the pixel layout. The PPD peripheral shallow trench isolation does not seem to play a role in the degradation. The PPD area and a transfer gate contribution independent of the pixel dimensions appear to be the main sources of the TID induced dark current increase. This study also demonstrates that applying a negative voltage on the transfer gate during integration strongly reduces the radiation induced dark current. (authors)

  15. Broadband upconversion imaging around 4 μm using an all-fiber supercontinuum source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huot, Laurent; Moselund, Peter M.; Leick, Lasse; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    We present a novel mid-infrared imaging system born from the combination of an all-fiber mid-IR supercontinuum source developed at NKT with ultra-sensitive upconversion detection technology from DTU Fotonik. The source delivers 100 mW of average power and its spectrum extends up to 4.5 μm. The infrared signal is passed through a sample and then focused into a bulk AgGaS2 crystal and subsequently mixed with a synchronous mixing signal at 1550 nm extracted from the pump laser of the supercontinuum. Through sum frequency generation, an upconverted signal ranging from 1030 nm to 1155 nm is generated and acquired using an InGaAs camera.

  16. Imaging the Sources and Full Extent of the Sodium Tail of the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Wilson, Jody; Mendillo, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Observations of sodium emission from Mercury can be used to describe the spatial and temporal patterns of sources and sinks in the planet s surface-boundary-exosphere. We report on new data sets that provide the highest spatial resolution of source regions at polar latitudes, as well as the extraordinary length of a tail of escaping Na atoms. The tail s extent of approx.1.5 degrees (nearly 1400 Mercury radii) is driven by radiation pressure effects upon Na atoms sputtered from the surface in the previous approx.5 hours. Wide-angle filtered-imaging instruments are thus capable of studying the time history of sputtering processes of sodium and other species at Mercury from ground-based observatories in concert with upcoming satellite missions to the planet. Plasma tails produced by photo-ionization of Na and other gases in Mercury s neutral tails may be observable by in-situ instruments.

  17. IR Image upconversion using band-limited ASE illumination fiber sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, H; Torregrosa, A J; Capmany, J

    2016-04-18

    We study the field-of-view (FOV) of an upconversion imaging system that employs an Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) fiber source to illuminate a transmission target. As an intermediate case between narrowband laser and thermal illumination, an ASE fiber source allows for higher spectral intensity than thermal illumination and still keeps a broad wavelength spectrum to take advantage of an increased non-collinear phase-matching angle acceptance that enlarges the FOV of the upconversion system when compared to using narrowband laser illumination. A model is presented to predict the angular acceptance of the upconverter in terms of focusing and ASE spectral width and allocation. The model is experimentally checked in case of 1550-630 nm upconversion.

  18. Reliability of MEG source imaging of anterior temporal spikes: analysis of an intracranially characterized spike focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennberg, Richard; Cheyne, Douglas

    2014-05-01

    To assess the reliability of MEG source imaging (MSI) of anterior temporal spikes through detailed analysis of the localization and orientation of source solutions obtained for a large number of spikes that were separately confirmed by intracranial EEG to be focally generated within a single, well-characterized spike focus. MSI was performed on 64 identical right anterior temporal spikes from an anterolateral temporal neocortical spike focus. The effects of different volume conductors (sphere and realistic head model), removal of noise with low frequency filters (LFFs) and averaging multiple spikes were assessed in terms of the reliability of the source solutions. MSI of single spikes resulted in scattered dipole source solutions that showed reasonable reliability for localization at the lobar level, but only for solutions with a goodness-of-fit exceeding 80% using a LFF of 3 Hz. Reliability at a finer level of intralobar localization was limited. Spike averaging significantly improved the reliability of source solutions and averaging 8 or more spikes reduced dependency on goodness-of-fit and data filtering. MSI performed on topographically identical individual spikes from an intracranially defined classical anterior temporal lobe spike focus was limited by low reliability (i.e., scattered source solutions) in terms of fine, sublobar localization within the ipsilateral temporal lobe. Spike averaging significantly improved reliability. MSI performed on individual anterior temporal spikes is limited by low reliability. Reduction of background noise through spike averaging significantly improves the reliability of MSI solutions. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY ON PREFLARE CORONAL NONTHERMAL SOURCES ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2002 JULY 23 FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Ayumi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shimojo, Masumi; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Masuda, Satoshi; Krucker, Saem

    2009-01-01

    We present a detailed examination on the coronal nonthermal emissions during the preflare phase of the X4.8 flare that occurred on 2002 July 23. The microwave (17 GHz and 34 GHz) data obtained with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, at Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory and the hard X-ray (HXR) data taken with RHESSI obviously showed nonthermal sources that are located above the flare loops during the preflare phase. We performed imaging spectroscopic analyses on the nonthermal emission sources both in microwaves and in HXRs, and confirmed that electrons are accelerated from several tens of keV to more than 1 MeV even in this phase. If we assume the thin-target model for the HXR emission source, the derived electron spectral indices (∼4.7) is the same value as that from microwaves (∼4.7) within the observational uncertainties, which implies that the distribution of the accelerated electrons follows a single power law. The number density of the microwave-emitting electrons is, however, larger than that of the HXR-emitting electrons, unless we assume low-ambient plasma density of about 1.0 x 10 9 cm -3 for the HXR-emitting region. If we adopt the thick-target model for the HXR emission source, on the other hand, the electron spectral index (∼6.7) is much different, while the gap of the number density of the accelerated electrons is somewhat reduced.

  20. The completeness condition and source orbits for exact image reconstruction in 3D cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xiping; Kang Kejun

    1997-01-01

    The completeness condition for exact image reconstruction in 3D cone-beam CT are carefully analyzed in theory, and discussions about some source orbits which fulfill the completeness condition are followed

  1. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source - part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W.; Chapman, Dean; Adams, Gregg; Renier, Michel; Suortti, Pekka; Thomlinson, William

    2015-03-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility provides synchrotron-specific imaging and radiation therapy capabilities [1-4]. We describe here the Insertion Device (ID) beamline 05ID-2 with the beam terminated in the SOE-1 (Secondary Optical Enclosure) experimental hutch. This endstation is designed for imaging and therapy research primarily in animals ranging in size from mice to humans to horses, as well as tissue specimens including plants. Core research programs include human and animal reproduction, cancer imaging and therapy, spinal cord injury and repair, cardiovascular and lung imaging and disease, bone and cartilage growth and deterioration, mammography, developmental biology, gene expression research as well as the introduction of new imaging methods. The source for the ID beamline is a multi-pole superconducting 4.3 T wiggler [5]. The high field gives a critical energy over 20 keV. The high critical energy presents shielding challenges and great care must be taken to assess shielding requirements [6-9]. The optics in the POE-1 and POE-3 hutches [4,10] prepare a monochromatic beam that is 22 cm wide in the last experimental hutch SOE-1. The double crystal bent-Laue or Bragg monochromator, or the single-crystal K-edge subtraction (KES) monochromator provide an energy range appropriate for imaging studies in animals (20-100+ keV). SOE-1 (excluding the basement structure 4 m below the experimental floor) is 6 m wide, 5 m tall and 10 m long with a removable back wall to accommodate installation and removal of the Large Animal Positioning System (LAPS) capable of positioning and manipulating animals as large as a horse [11]. This end-station also includes a unique detector positioner with a vertical travel range of 4.9 m which is required for the KES imaging angle range of +12.3° to -7.3°. The detector positioner also includes moveable shielding integrated with the safety shutters. An update on the status of the other two end-stations at BMIT, described

  2. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source – part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W.; Chapman, Dean; Adams, Gregg; Renier, Michel; Suortti, Pekka; Thomlinson, William

    2015-01-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility provides synchrotron-specific imaging and radiation therapy capabilities [1–4]. We describe here the Insertion Device (ID) beamline 05ID-2 with the beam terminated in the SOE-1 (Secondary Optical Enclosure) experimental hutch. This endstation is designed for imaging and therapy research primarily in animals ranging in size from mice to humans to horses, as well as tissue specimens including plants. Core research programs include human and animal reproduction, cancer imaging and therapy, spinal cord injury and repair, cardiovascular and lung imaging and disease, bone and cartilage growth and deterioration, mammography, developmental biology, gene expression research as well as the introduction of new imaging methods. The source for the ID beamline is a multi-pole superconducting 4.3 T wiggler [5]. The high field gives a critical energy over 20 keV. The high critical energy presents shielding challenges and great care must be taken to assess shielding requirements [6–9]. The optics in the POE-1 and POE-3 hutches [4,10] prepare a monochromatic beam that is 22 cm wide in the last experimental hutch SOE-1. The double crystal bent-Laue or Bragg monochromator, or the single-crystal K-edge subtraction (KES) monochromator provide an energy range appropriate for imaging studies in animals (20–100+ keV). SOE-1 (excluding the basement structure 4 m below the experimental floor) is 6 m wide, 5 m tall and 10 m long with a removable back wall to accommodate installation and removal of the Large Animal Positioning System (LAPS) capable of positioning and manipulating animals as large as a horse [11]. This end-station also includes a unique detector positioner with a vertical travel range of 4.9 m which is required for the KES imaging angle range of +12.3° to –7.3°. The detector positioner also includes moveable shielding integrated with the safety shutters. An update on the status of the other two end-stations at BMIT

  3. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source – part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W., E-mail: bmit@lightsource.ca [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chapman, Dean [Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Adams, Gregg [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Renier, Michel [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Suortti, Pekka [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland); Thomlinson, William [Department of Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-03-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility provides synchrotron-specific imaging and radiation therapy capabilities [1–4]. We describe here the Insertion Device (ID) beamline 05ID-2 with the beam terminated in the SOE-1 (Secondary Optical Enclosure) experimental hutch. This endstation is designed for imaging and therapy research primarily in animals ranging in size from mice to humans to horses, as well as tissue specimens including plants. Core research programs include human and animal reproduction, cancer imaging and therapy, spinal cord injury and repair, cardiovascular and lung imaging and disease, bone and cartilage growth and deterioration, mammography, developmental biology, gene expression research as well as the introduction of new imaging methods. The source for the ID beamline is a multi-pole superconducting 4.3 T wiggler [5]. The high field gives a critical energy over 20 keV. The high critical energy presents shielding challenges and great care must be taken to assess shielding requirements [6–9]. The optics in the POE-1 and POE-3 hutches [4,10] prepare a monochromatic beam that is 22 cm wide in the last experimental hutch SOE-1. The double crystal bent-Laue or Bragg monochromator, or the single-crystal K-edge subtraction (KES) monochromator provide an energy range appropriate for imaging studies in animals (20–100+ keV). SOE-1 (excluding the basement structure 4 m below the experimental floor) is 6 m wide, 5 m tall and 10 m long with a removable back wall to accommodate installation and removal of the Large Animal Positioning System (LAPS) capable of positioning and manipulating animals as large as a horse [11]. This end-station also includes a unique detector positioner with a vertical travel range of 4.9 m which is required for the KES imaging angle range of +12.3° to –7.3°. The detector positioner also includes moveable shielding integrated with the safety shutters. An update on the status of the other two end-stations at BMIT

  4. Electrical source imaging of interictal spikes using multiple sparse volumetric priors for presurgical epileptogenic focus localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Strobbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical source imaging of interictal spikes observed in EEG recordings of patients with refractory epilepsy provides useful information to localize the epileptogenic focus during the presurgical evaluation. However, the selection of the time points or time epochs of the spikes in order to estimate the origin of the activity remains a challenge. In this study, we consider a Bayesian EEG source imaging technique for distributed sources, i.e. the multiple volumetric sparse priors (MSVP approach. The approach allows to estimate the time courses of the intensity of the sources corresponding with a specific time epoch of the spike. Based on presurgical averaged interictal spikes in six patients who were successfully treated with surgery, we estimated the time courses of the source intensities for three different time epochs: (i an epoch starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending at 50% of the spike peak during the rising phase of the spike, (ii an epoch starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending at the spike peak and (iii an epoch containing the full spike time period starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending 230 ms after the spike peak. To identify the primary source of the spike activity, the source with the maximum energy from 50 ms before the spike peak till 50% of the spike peak was subsequently selected for each of the time windows. For comparison, the activity at the spike peaks and at 50% of the peaks was localized using the LORETA inversion technique and an ECD approach. Both patient-specific spherical forward models and patient-specific 5-layered finite difference models were considered to evaluate the influence of the forward model. Based on the resected zones in each of the patients, extracted from post-operative MR images, we compared the distances to the resection border of the estimated activity. Using the spherical models, the distances to the resection border for the MSVP approach and each of the different time

  5. Invisible Display in Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prichystal, Jan Phuklin; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bladt, Henrik Henriksen

    2005-01-01

    Bang & Olufsen a/s has been working with ideas for invisible integration of displays in metal surfaces. Invisible integration of information displays traditionally has been possible by placing displays behind transparent or semitransparent materials such as plastic or glass. The wish for an integ......Bang & Olufsen a/s has been working with ideas for invisible integration of displays in metal surfaces. Invisible integration of information displays traditionally has been possible by placing displays behind transparent or semitransparent materials such as plastic or glass. The wish...... for an integrated display in a metal surface is often ruled by design and functionality of a product. The integration of displays in metal surfaces requires metal removal in order to clear the area of the display to some extent. The idea behind an invisible display in Aluminum concerns the processing of a metal...

  6. The Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit: challenges and advances : 10 years of open-source development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolden, Marco; Zelzer, Sascha; Seitel, Alexander; Wald, Diana; Müller, Michael; Franz, Alfred M; Maleike, Daniel; Fangerau, Markus; Baumhauer, Matthias; Maier-Hein, Lena; Maier-Hein, Klaus H; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Wolf, Ivo

    2013-07-01

    The Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit (MITK) has been available as open-source software for almost 10 years now. In this period the requirements of software systems in the medical image processing domain have become increasingly complex. The aim of this paper is to show how MITK evolved into a software system that is able to cover all steps of a clinical workflow including data retrieval, image analysis, diagnosis, treatment planning, intervention support, and treatment control. MITK provides modularization and extensibility on different levels. In addition to the original toolkit, a module system, micro services for small, system-wide features, a service-oriented architecture based on the Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGi) standard, and an extensible and configurable application framework allow MITK to be used, extended and deployed as needed. A refined software process was implemented to deliver high-quality software, ease the fulfillment of regulatory requirements, and enable teamwork in mixed-competence teams. MITK has been applied by a worldwide community and integrated into a variety of solutions, either at the toolkit level or as an application framework with custom extensions. The MITK Workbench has been released as a highly extensible and customizable end-user application. Optional support for tool tracking, image-guided therapy, diffusion imaging as well as various external packages (e.g. CTK, DCMTK, OpenCV, SOFA, Python) is available. MITK has also been used in several FDA/CE-certified applications, which demonstrates the high-quality software and rigorous development process. MITK provides a versatile platform with a high degree of modularization and interoperability and is well suited to meet the challenging tasks of today's and tomorrow's clinically motivated research.

  7. Characterization of sildenafil citrate tablets of different sources by near infrared chemical imaging and chemometric tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Guilherme P; Lozano, Valeria A; Rocha, Werickson F C; Romão, Wanderson; Ortiz, Rafael S; Poppi, Ronei J

    2013-11-01

    The chemical imaging technique by near infrared spectroscopy was applied for characterization of formulations in tablets of sildenafil citrate of six different sources. Five formulations were provided by Brazilian Federal Police and correspond to several trademarks of prohibited marketing and one was an authentic sample of Viagra. In a first step of the study, multivariate curve resolution was properly chosen for the estimation of the distribution map of concentration of the active ingredient in tablets of different sources, where the chemical composition of all excipients constituents was not truly known. In such cases, it is very difficult to establish an appropriate calibration technique, so that only the information of sildenafil is considered independently of the excipients. This determination was possible only by reaching the second-order advantage, where the analyte quantification can be performed in the presence of unknown interferences. In a second step, the normalized histograms of images from active ingredient were grouped according to their similarities by hierarchical cluster analysis. Finally it was possible to recognize the patterns of distribution maps of concentration of sildenafil citrate, distinguishing the true formulation of Viagra. This concept can be used to improve the knowledge of industrial products and processes, as well as, for characterization of counterfeit drugs. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Development of a hemispherical rotational modulation collimator system for imaging spatial distribution of radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, M.; Lee, S.; Kim, G.; Kim, H. S.; Rho, J.; Ok, J. G.

    2017-12-01

    Detecting and mapping the spatial distribution of radioactive materials is of great importance for environmental and security issues. We design and present a novel hemispherical rotational modulation collimator (H-RMC) system which can visualize the location of the radiation source by collecting signals from incident rays that go through collimator masks. The H-RMC system comprises a servo motor-controlled rotating module and a hollow heavy-metallic hemisphere with slits/slats equally spaced with the same angle subtended from the main axis. In addition, we also designed an auxiliary instrument to test the imaging performance of the H-RMC system, comprising a high-precision x- and y-axis staging station on which one can mount radiation sources of various shapes. We fabricated the H-RMC system which can be operated in a fully-automated fashion through the computer-based controller, and verify the accuracy and reproducibility of the system by measuring the rotational and linear positions with respect to the programmed values. Our H-RMC system may provide a pivotal tool for spatial radiation imaging with high reliability and accuracy.

  9. Exploring three faint source detections methods for aperture synthesis radio images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracaula, M.; Torrent, A.; Masias, M.; Lladó, X.; Freixenet, J.; Martí, J.; Sánchez-Sutil, J. R.; Muñoz-Arjonilla, A. J.; Paredes, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Wide-field radio interferometric images often contain a large population of faint compact sources. Due to their low intensity/noise ratio, these objects can be easily missed by automated detection methods, which have been classically based on thresholding techniques after local noise estimation. The aim of this paper is to present and analyse the performance of several alternative or complementary techniques to thresholding. We compare three different algorithms to increase the detection rate of faint objects. The first technique consists of combining wavelet decomposition with local thresholding. The second technique is based on the structural behaviour of the neighbourhood of each pixel. Finally, the third algorithm uses local features extracted from a bank of filters and a boosting classifier to perform the detections. The methods' performances are evaluated using simulations and radio mosaics from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We show that the new methods perform better than well-known state of the art methods such as SEXTRACTOR, SAD and DUCHAMP at detecting faint sources of radio interferometric images.

  10. An advanced boundary element method (BEM) implementation for the forward problem of electromagnetic source imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akalin-Acar, Zeynep; Gencer, Nevzat G

    2004-01-01

    The forward problem of electromagnetic source imaging has two components: a numerical model to solve the related integral equations and a model of the head geometry. This study is on the boundary element method (BEM) implementation for numerical solutions and realistic head modelling. The use of second-order (quadratic) isoparametric elements and the recursive integration technique increase the accuracy in the solutions. Two new formulations are developed for the calculation of the transfer matrices to obtain the potential and magnetic field patterns using realistic head models. The formulations incorporate the use of the isolated problem approach for increased accuracy in solutions. If a personal computer is used for computations, each transfer matrix is calculated in 2.2 h. After this pre-computation period, solutions for arbitrary source configurations can be obtained in milliseconds for a realistic head model. A hybrid algorithm that uses snakes, morphological operations, region growing and thresholding is used for segmentation. The scalp, skull, grey matter, white matter and eyes are segmented from the multimodal magnetic resonance images and meshes for the corresponding surfaces are created. A mesh generation algorithm is developed for modelling the intersecting tissue compartments, such as eyes. To obtain more accurate results quadratic elements are used in the realistic meshes. The resultant BEM implementation provides more accurate forward problem solutions and more efficient calculations. Thus it can be the firm basis of the future inverse problem solutions

  11. Near infrared spectral imaging of explosives using a tunable laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klunder, G L; Margalith, E; Nguyen, L K

    2010-03-26

    Diffuse reflectance near infrared hyperspectral imaging is an important analytical tool for a wide variety of industries, including agriculture consumer products, chemical and pharmaceutical development and production. Using this technique as a method for the standoff detection of explosive particles is presented and discussed. The detection of the particles is based on the diffuse reflectance of light from the particle in the near infrared wavelength range where CH, NH, OH vibrational overtones and combination bands are prominent. The imaging system is a NIR focal plane array camera with a tunable OPO/laser system as the illumination source. The OPO is programmed to scan over a wide spectral range in the NIR and the camera is synchronized to record the light reflected from the target for each wavelength. The spectral resolution of this system is significantly higher than that of hyperspectral systems that incorporate filters or dispersive elements. The data acquisition is very fast and the entire hyperspectral cube can be collected in seconds. A comparison of data collected with the OPO system to data obtained with a broadband light source with LCTF filters is presented.

  12. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  13. Monocular display unit for 3D display with correct depth perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Hosomi, Takashi

    2009-11-01

    A study of virtual-reality system has been popular and its technology has been applied to medical engineering, educational engineering, a CAD/CAM system and so on. The 3D imaging display system has two types in the presentation method; one is a 3-D display system using a special glasses and the other is the monitor system requiring no special glasses. A liquid crystal display (LCD) recently comes into common use. It is possible for this display unit to provide the same size of displaying area as the image screen on the panel. A display system requiring no special glasses is useful for a 3D TV monitor, but this system has demerit such that the size of a monitor restricts the visual field for displaying images. Thus the conventional display can show only one screen, but it is impossible to enlarge the size of a screen, for example twice. To enlarge the display area, the authors have developed an enlarging method of display area using a mirror. Our extension method enables the observers to show the virtual image plane and to enlarge a screen area twice. In the developed display unit, we made use of an image separating technique using polarized glasses, a parallax barrier or a lenticular lens screen for 3D imaging. The mirror can generate the virtual image plane and it enlarges a screen area twice. Meanwhile the 3D display system using special glasses can also display virtual images over a wide area. In this paper, we present a monocular 3D vision system with accommodation mechanism, which is useful function for perceiving depth.

  14. Detection of Point Sources on Two-Dimensional Images Based on Peaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Barreiro

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the detection of point sources in two-dimensional astronomical images. The detection scheme we propose is based on peak statistics. We discuss the example of the detection of far galaxies in cosmic microwave background experiments throughout the paper, although the method we present is totally general and can be used in many other fields of data analysis. We consider sources with a Gaussian profile—that is, a fair approximation of the profile of a point source convolved with the detector beam in microwave experiments—on a background modeled by a homogeneous and isotropic Gaussian random field characterized by a scale-free power spectrum. Point sources are enhanced with respect to the background by means of linear filters. After filtering, we identify local maxima and apply our detection scheme, a Neyman-Pearson detector that defines our region of acceptance based on the a priori pdf of the sources and the ratio of number densities. We study the different performances of some linear filters that have been used in this context in the literature: the Mexican hat wavelet, the matched filter, and the scale-adaptive filter. We consider as well an extension to two dimensions of the biparametric scale-adaptive filter (BSAF. The BSAF depends on two parameters which are determined by maximizing the number density of real detections while fixing the number density of spurious detections. For our detection criterion the BSAF outperforms the other filters in the interesting case of white noise.

  15. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutet, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

  16. Longitudinal study of arteriogenesis with swept source optical coherence tomography and hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Kristin M.; Patil, Chetan A.; Nelson, Christopher E.; McCormack, Devin R.; Madonna, Megan C.; Duvall, Craig L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic disease of the extremities that leads to high rates of myocardial infarction and stroke, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life. PAD is especially prevalent in diabetic patients, and is commonly modeled by hind limb ischemia in mice to study collateral vessel development and test novel therapies. Current techniques used to assess recovery cannot obtain quantitative, physiological data non-invasively. Here, we have applied hyperspectral imaging and swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) to study longitudinal changes in blood oxygenation and vascular morphology, respectively, intravitally in the diabetic mouse hind limb ischemia model. Additionally, recommended ranges for controlling physiological variability in blood oxygenation with respect to respiration rate and body core temperature were determined from a control animal experiment. In the longitudinal study with diabetic mice, hyperspectral imaging data revealed the dynamics of blood oxygenation recovery distally in the ischemic footpad. In diabetic mice, there is an early increase in oxygenation that is not sustained in the long term. Quantitative analysis of vascular morphology obtained from Hessian-filtered speckle variance OCT volumes revealed temporal dynamics in vascular density, total vessel length, and vessel diameter distribution in the adductor muscle of the ischemic limb. The combination of hyperspectral imaging and speckle variance OCT enabled acquisition of novel functional and morphological endpoints from individual animals, and provides a more robust platform for future preclinical evaluations of novel therapies for PAD.

  17. Characterization of Crystallographic Structures Using Bragg-Edge Neutron Imaging at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Song

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, wavelength-dependent neutron radiography, also known as Bragg-edge imaging, has been employed as a non-destructive bulk characterization method due to its sensitivity to coherent elastic neutron scattering that is associated with crystalline structures. Several analysis approaches have been developed to quantitatively determine crystalline orientation, lattice strain, and phase distribution. In this study, we report a systematic investigation of the crystal structures of metallic materials (such as selected textureless powder samples and additively manufactured (AM Inconel 718 samples, using Bragg-edge imaging at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS. Firstly, we have implemented a phenomenological Gaussian-based fitting in a Python-based computer called iBeatles. Secondly, we have developed a model-based approach to analyze Bragg-edge transmission spectra, which allows quantitative determination of the crystallographic attributes. Moreover, neutron diffraction measurements were carried out to validate the Bragg-edge analytical methods. These results demonstrate that the microstructural complexity (in this case, texture plays a key role in determining the crystallographic parameters (lattice constant or interplanar spacing, which implies that the Bragg-edge image analysis methods must be carefully selected based on the material structures.

  18. Advanced neutron imaging methods with a potential to benefit from pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl, M.; Kardjilov, N.; Hilger, A.; Penumadu, D.; Manke, I.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade neutron imaging has seen significant improvements in instrumentation, detection and spatial resolution. Additionally, a variety of new applications and methods have been explored. As a consequence of an outstanding development nowadays various techniques of neutron imaging go far beyond a two- and three-dimensional mapping of the attenuation coefficients for a broad range of samples. Neutron imaging has become sensitive to neutron scattering in the small angle scattering range as well as with respect to Bragg scattering. Corresponding methods potentially provide spatially resolved and volumetric data revealing microstructural inhomogeneities, texture variations, crystalline phase distributions and even strains in bulk samples. Other techniques allow for the detection of refractive index distribution through phase sensitive measurements and the utilization of polarized neutrons enables radiographic and tomographic investigations of magnetic fields and properties as well as electrical currents within massive samples. All these advanced methods utilize or depend on wavelength dependent signals, and are hence suited to profit significantly from pulsed neutron sources as will be discussed.

  19. Virtual source reflection imaging of the Socorro Magma Body, New Mexico, using a dense seismic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, T. S.; Worthington, L. L.; Schmandt, B.; Hansen, S. M.; Bilek, S. L.; Aster, R. C.; Ranasinghe, N. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Socorro Magma Body (SMB) is one of the largest known actively inflating continental magmatic intrusions. Previous studies have relied on sparse instrument coverage to determine its spatial extent, depth, and seismic signature, which characterized the body as a thin sill with a surface at 19 km below the Earth's surface. However, over the last two decades, InSAR and magneto-telluric (MT) studies have shed new light on the SMB and invigorated the scientific debate of the spatial distribution and uplift rate of the SMB. We return to seismic imaging of the SMB with the Sevilleta Array, a 12-day deployment of approximately 800 vertical component, 10-Hz geophones north of Socorro, New Mexico above and around the estimated northern half of the SMB. Teleseismic virtual source reflection profiling (TVR) employs the free surface reflection off of a teleseismic P as a virtual source in dense arrays, and has been used successfully to image basin structure and the Moho in multiple tectonic environments. The Sevilleta Array recorded 62 teleseismic events greater than M5. Applying TVR to the data collected by the Sevilleta Array, we present stacks from four events that produced the with high signal-to-noise ratios and simple source-time functions: the February 11, 2015 M6.7 in northern Argentina, the February 19, 2015 M5.4 in Kamchatka, Russia, and the February 21, 2015 M5.1 and February 22, 2015 M5.5 in western Colombia. Preliminary results suggest eastward-dipping reflectors at approximately 5 km depth near the Sierra Ladrones range in the northwestern corner of the array. Further analysis will focus on creating profiles across the area of maximum SMB uplift and constraining basin geometry.

  20. Progressive Image Transmission Based on Joint Source-Channel Decoding Using Adaptive Sum-Product Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Daut

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A joint source-channel decoding method is designed to accelerate the iterative log-domain sum-product decoding procedure of LDPC codes as well as to improve the reconstructed image quality. Error resilience modes are used in the JPEG2000 source codec making it possible to provide useful source decoded information to the channel decoder. After each iteration, a tentative decoding is made and the channel decoded bits are then sent to the JPEG2000 decoder. The positions of bits belonging to error-free coding passes are then fed back to the channel decoder. The log-likelihood ratios (LLRs of these bits are then modified by a weighting factor for the next iteration. By observing the statistics of the decoding procedure, the weighting factor is designed as a function of the channel condition. Results show that the proposed joint decoding methods can greatly reduce the number of iterations, and thereby reduce the decoding delay considerably. At the same time, this method always outperforms the nonsource controlled decoding method by up to 3 dB in terms of PSNR.

  1. Progressive Image Transmission Based on Joint Source-Channel Decoding Using Adaptive Sum-Product Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Weiliang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A joint source-channel decoding method is designed to accelerate the iterative log-domain sum-product decoding procedure of LDPC codes as well as to improve the reconstructed image quality. Error resilience modes are used in the JPEG2000 source codec making it possible to provide useful source decoded information to the channel decoder. After each iteration, a tentative decoding is made and the channel decoded bits are then sent to the JPEG2000 decoder. The positions of bits belonging to error-free coding passes are then fed back to the channel decoder. The log-likelihood ratios (LLRs of these bits are then modified by a weighting factor for the next iteration. By observing the statistics of the decoding procedure, the weighting factor is designed as a function of the channel condition. Results show that the proposed joint decoding methods can greatly reduce the number of iterations, and thereby reduce the decoding delay considerably. At the same time, this method always outperforms the nonsource controlled decoding method by up to 3 dB in terms of PSNR.

  2. Handbook of display technology

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, Joseph A

    1992-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive review of technical and commercial aspects of display technology. It provides design engineers with the information needed to select proper technology for new products. The book focuses on flat, thin displays such as light-emitting diodes, plasma display panels, and liquid crystal displays, but it also includes material on cathode ray tubes. Displays include a large number of products from televisions, auto dashboards, radios, and household appliances, to gasoline pumps, heart monitors, microwave ovens, and more.For more information on display tech

  3. Three-Dimensional Cataract Crystalline Lens Imaging With Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Alberto; Benito, Antonio; Manzanera, Silvestre; Mompeán, Juan; Cañizares, Belén; Martínez, David; Marín, Jose María; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Artal, Pablo

    2018-02-01

    To image, describe, and characterize different features visible in the crystalline lens of older adults with and without cataract when imaged three-dimensionally with a swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. We used a new SS-OCT laboratory prototype designed to enhance the visualization of the crystalline lens and imaged the entire anterior segment of both eyes in two groups of participants: patients scheduled to undergo cataract surgery, n = 17, age range 36 to 91 years old, and volunteers without visual complains, n = 14, age range 20 to 81 years old. Pre-cataract surgery patients were also clinically graded according to the Lens Opacification Classification System III. The three-dimensional location and shape of the visible opacities were compared with the clinical grading. Hypo- and hyperreflective features were visible in the lens of all pre-cataract surgery patients and in some of the older adults in the volunteer group. When the clinical examination revealed cortical or subcapsular cataracts, hyperreflective features were visible either in the cortex parallel to the surfaces of the lens or in the posterior pole. Other type of opacities that appeared as hyporeflective localized features were identified in the cortex of the lens. The OCT signal in the nucleus of the crystalline lens correlated with the nuclear cataract clinical grade. A dedicated OCT is a useful tool to study in vivo the subtle opacities in the cataractous crystalline lens, revealing its position and size three-dimensionally. The use of these images allows obtaining more detailed information on the age-related changes leading to cataract.

  4. Technical Note: PLASTIMATCH MABS, an open source tool for automatic image segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaffino, Paolo; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Raudaschl, Patrik; Fritscher, Karl; Sharp, Gregory C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multiatlas based segmentation is largely used in many clinical and research applications. Due to its good performances, it has recently been included in some commercial platforms for radiotherapy planning and surgery guidance. Anyway, to date, a software with no