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Sample records for source flame atomic

  1. A new approach for the determination of sulphur in food samples by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, N; Baysal, A

    2015-02-01

    The new approach for the determination of sulphur in foods was developed, and the sulphur concentrations of various fresh and dried food samples determined using a high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometer with an air/acetylene flame. The proposed method was optimised and the validated using standard reference materials, and certified values were found to be within the 95% confidence interval. The sulphur content of foods ranged from less than the LOD to 1.5mgg(-1). The method is accurate, fast, simple and sensitive. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fast sequential determination of antimony and lead in pewter alloys using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessuy, Morgana B; de Jesus, Robson M; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    A simple method has been developed to determine antimony and lead in pewter alloy cups produced in Brazil, using fast sequential determination by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The samples were dissolved in HCl and H(2)O(2), employing a cold finger system in order to avoid analyte losses. The main resonance line of lead at 217.001 nm and a secondary line of antimony at 212.739 nm were used. The limits of detection for lead and antimony were 0.02 and 5.7 mg L(-1), respectively. The trueness of the method was established by recovery tests and comparing the results obtained by the proposed method with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The results were compared using a student's t-test and there was no significant difference at a 95% confidence interval. With the developed methods, it was possible to determine accurately antimony and lead in pewter samples. The lead concentration found in the analysed samples was around 1 mg g(-1), which means that they are not lead free; however, the content was below the maximum allowed level of 5 mg g(-1). The antimony content, which was found to be between 40 and 46 mg g(-1), is actually of greater concern, as antimony is known to be potentially toxic already at very low concentrations, although there is no legislation yet for this element.

  3. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  4. Determination of macro- and micronutrients in plant leaves by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry combining instrumental and sample preparation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Silvana R.; Gomes Neto, José A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Jones, Bradley T.

    2010-04-01

    A method for determination of B, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, P, S and Zn in plant tissues by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) is proposed. This method is based on special features of HR-CS-AAS, such as side pixel registration, wavelength integrated absorbance, and molecular absorption bands, for determining macro- and micronutrients in foliar analysis without requiring several different strategies for sample preparation and adjustment of the analytes concentration ranges. Plant samples were analyzed and results for certified materials were in agreement at a 95% confidence level (paired t-test) with reference values. Recoveries of analytes added to plant digests varied within the 82-112% interval. Relative standard deviations ( n = 12) were lower than or equal to 5.7% for all analytes in all concentration ranges.

  5. Application of high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry to reveal, evaluate and overcome certain spectral effects in Pb determination of unleaded gasoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewska, Zofia; Laskowska, Hanna; Gzylewski, Michał

    2017-06-01

    High-resolution continuum source and line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS and LS FAAS, respectively) were applied for Pb determination in unleaded aviation or automotive gasoline that was dissolved in methyl-isobutyl ketone. When using HR-CS FAAS, a structured background (BG) was registered in the vicinity of both the 217.001 nm and 283.306 nm Pb lines. In the first case, the BG, which could be attributed to absorption by the OH molecule, directly overlaps with the 217 nm line, but it is of relatively low intensity. For the 283 nm line, the structured BG occurs due to uncompensated absorption by OH molecules present in the flame. BG lines of relatively high intensity are situated at a large distance from the 283 nm line, which enables accurate analysis, not only when using simple variants of HR-CS FAAS but also for LS FAAS with a bandpass of 0.1 nm. The lines of the structured spectrum at 283 nm can have ;absorption; (maxima) or ;emission; (minima) character. The intensity of the OH spectra can significantly depend on the flame character and composition of the investigated organic solution. The best detection limit for the analytical procedure, which was 0.01 mg L- 1 for Pb in the investigated solution, could be achieved using HR-CS FAAS with the 283 nm Pb line, 5 pixels for the analyte line measurement and iterative background correction (IBC). In this case, least squares background correction (LSBC) is not recommended. However, LSBC (available as the ;permanent structures; option) would be recommended when using the 217 nm Pb line. In LS FAAS, an additional phenomenon related to the nature of the organic matrix (for example, isooctane or toluene) can play an important role. The effect is of continuous character and probably due to the simultaneous efficient correction of the continuous background (IBC) it is not observed in HR-CS FAAS. The fact that the effect does not depend on the flame character indicates that it is not radiation

  6. Fast sequential multi-element determination of major and minor elements in environmental samples and drinking waters by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Nieto, Beatriz; Gismera, Ma Jesús; Sevilla, Ma Teresa; Procopio, Jesús R

    2015-01-07

    The fast sequential multi-element determination of 11 elements present at different concentration levels in environmental samples and drinking waters has been investigated using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The main lines for Cu (324.754 nm), Zn (213.857 nm), Cd (228.802 nm), Ni (232.003 nm) and Pb (217.001 nm), main and secondary absorption lines for Mn (279.482 and 279.827 nm), Fe (248.327, 248.514 and 302.064 nm) and Ca (422.673 and 239.856 nm), secondary lines with different sensitivities for Na (589.592 and 330.237 nm) and K (769.897 and 404.414 nm) and a secondary line for Mg (202.582 nm) have been chosen to perform the analysis. A flow injection system has been used for sample introduction so sample consumption has been reduced up to less than 1 mL per element, measured in triplicate. Furthermore, the use of multiplets for Fe and the side pixel registration approach for Mg have been studied in order to reduce sensitivity and extend the linear working range. The figures of merit have been calculated and the proposed method was applied to determine these elements in a pine needles reference material (SRM 1575a), drinking and natural waters and soil extracts. Recoveries of analytes added at different concentration levels to water samples and extracts of soils were within 88-115% interval. In this way, the fast sequential multi-element determination of major and minor elements can be carried out, in triplicate, with successful results without requiring additional dilutions of samples or several different strategies for sample preparation using about 8-9 mL of sample. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. combination of flame atomic absorption spectrometry with ligandless

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    separation and flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination of trace amount of lead(II) ion. In the proposed approach 1,2-dicholorobenzene and ethanol were used as extraction .... in ethanol was added to it. The final solution was aspirated directly into the flame of AAS. The extraction scheme of Pb(II) ion is shown in.

  8. Validation of an analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Ponta, Michaela; Hategan, Raluca

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper was the validation of a new analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil after microwave assisted digestion in aqua regia. Determinations were performed on the ContrAA 300 (Analytik Jena) air-acetylene flame spectrometer equipped with xenon short-arc lamp as a continuum radiation source for all elements, double monochromator consisting of a prism pre-monocromator and an echelle grating monochromator, and charge coupled device as detector. For validation a method-performance study was conducted involving the establishment of the analytical performance of the new method (limits of detection and quantification, precision and accuracy). Moreover, the Bland and Altman statistical method was used in analyzing the agreement between the proposed assay and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry as standardized method for the multielemental determination in soil. The limits of detection in soil sample (3σ criterion) in the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry method were (mg/kg): 0.18 (Ag), 0.14 (Cd), 0.36 (Co), 0.25 (Cr), 0.09 (Cu), 1.0 (Ni), 1.4 (Pb) and 0.18 (Zn), close to those in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry: 0.12 (Ag), 0.05 (Cd), 0.15 (Co), 1.4 (Cr), 0.15 (Cu), 2.5 (Ni), 2.5 (Pb) and 0.04 (Zn). Accuracy was checked by analyzing 4 certified reference materials and a good agreement for 95% confidence interval was found in both methods, with recoveries in the range of 94-106% in atomic absorption and 97-103% in optical emission. Repeatability found by analyzing real soil samples was in the range 1.6-5.2% in atomic absorption, similar with that of 1.9-6.1% in optical emission spectrometry. The Bland and Altman method showed no statistical significant difference between the two spectrometric

  9. Theory of analytical curves in atomic fluorescence flame spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.

    An explicit expression for the intensity of atomic resonance fluorescence as a function of atomic concentration in a flame is derived under certain idealized conditions. The expression is generally valid for a pure Doppler absorption line profile as well as for a combined Doppler and collisional

  10. The Morphology of Chromium and LIF Measurement of Atomic Arsenic in Laminar Diffusion Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Young Bin [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-26

    The morphology and size distribution of chromium oxides and the concentration measurement of atomic arsenic have been studied in laminar diffusion flames. Nitrogen was added to vary flame temperatures in hydrogen flames. Ethene flames were used in order to investigate the potential for interaction between the soot aerosol that is formed in these flames and the chromium aerosol. Two sources of chromium compounds were introduced:chromium nitrate and chromium hexacarbonyl. A detailed investigation of the morphology was carried out by scanning electron microscopy(SEM). The amounts of Cr(VI) and total Cr were determined by a spectrophotometric method and by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, respectively. Also, LIF was used for the measurement of atomic arsenic, which was excited at 197.2 nm and was detected at 249.6 nm. Results showed that the morphology of the particles varied with the flame temperature and with the chromium source. The particles were characterized by porous structures, cenospheres and agglomerated dense particles when chromium nitrate solution was added to the flames. At low to moderate temperature, porous sintered cenospheric structures were formed, in some cases with a blow hole. At higher temperatures, an agglomerated cluster which was composed Cr(VI) from the undiluted H{sub 2} flame was more than 10 times larger than in the 50%H{sub 2}/50%N{sub 2} flame on a mass basis. Single point LIF measurement of atomic arsenic indicated that arsenic exist only in the low temperature, fuel rich region. (author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  11. Method development for the determination of fluorine in toothpaste via molecular absorption of aluminum mono fluoride using a high-resolution continuum source nitrous oxide/acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2012-05-30

    Fluorine was determined via the rotational molecular absorption line of aluminum mono fluoride (AlF) generated in C(2)H(2)/N(2)O flame at 227.4613 nm using a high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (HR-CS-FAAS). The effects of AlF wavelength, burner height, fuel rate (C(2)H(2)/N(2)O) and amount of Al on the accuracy, precision and sensitivity were investigated and optimized. The Al-F absorption band at 227.4613 nm was found to be the most suitable analytical line with respect to sensitivity and spectral interferences. Maximum sensitivity and a good linearity were obtained in acetylene-nitrous oxide flame at a flow rate of 210 L h(-1) and a burner height of 8mm using 3000 mg L(-1) of Al for 10-1000 mg L(-1)of F. The accuracy and precision of the method were tested by analyzing spiked samples and waste water certified reference material. The results were in good agreement with the certified and spiked amounts as well as the precision of several days during this study was satisfactory (RSD<10%). The limit of detection and characteristic concentration of the method were 5.5 mg L(-1) and 72.8 mg L(-1), respectively. Finally, the fluorine concentrations in several toothpaste samples were determined. The results found and given by the producers were not significantly different. The method was simple, fast, accurate and sensitive. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Solid-phase extraction and separation procedure for trace aluminum in water samples and its determination by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, Harun; Er, Cigdem

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, a separation/preconcentration procedure for determination of aluminum in water samples has been developed by using a new atomic absorption spectrometer concept with a high-intensity xenon short-arc lamp as continuum radiation source, a high-resolution double-echelle monochromator, and a charge-coupled device array detector. Sample solution pH, sample volume, flow rate of sample solution, volume, and concentration of eluent for solid-phase extraction of Al chelates with 4-[(dicyanomethyl)diazenyl] benzoic acid on polymeric resin (Duolite XAD-761) have been investigated. The adsorbed aluminum on resin was eluted with 5 mL of 2 mol L(-1) HNO(3) and its concentration was determined by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS). Under the optimal conditions, limit of detection obtained with HR-CS FAAS and Line Source FAAS (LS-FAAS) were 0.49 μg L(-1) and 3.91 μg L(-1), respectively. The accuracy of the procedure was confirmed by analyzing certified materials (NIST SRM 1643e, Trace elements in water) and spiked real samples. The developed procedure was successfully applied to water samples.

  13. Methane Formation by Flame-Generated Hydrogen Atoms in the Flame Ionization Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1996-01-01

    The precombustion degradation of organic compounds in the flame ionization detector has been studied (1) by heating the additives in hydrogen in a quartz capillary and analyzing the reaction products by GC and (2) by following the degradation of the additives in a hydrogen flame, by means of a thin......, and conceivably all hydrocarbons are quantitatively converted into methane at temperatures below 600 C, that is, before the proper combustion has started. The splitting of the C-C bonds is preceded by hydrogenation of double and triple bonds and aromatic rings. The reactions, no doubt, are caused by hydrogen...... atoms, which are formed in the burning hydrogen and which diffuse into the inner core of the flame. The quantitative formation of methane appears to explain the "equal per carbon" rule for the detector response of hydrocarbons, since all carbons are "exchanged" for methane molecules....

  14. Influence of atomization quality modulation on flame dynamics in a hypergolic rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Schulze

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For the numerical evaluation of the thermoacoustic stability of rocket engines often hybrid methods are applied, which separate the computation of wave propagation in the combustor from the analysis of the flame response to acoustic perturbations. Closure requires a thermoacoustic feedback model which provides the heat release fluctuation in the source term of the employed wave transport equations. The influence of the acoustic fluctuations in the combustion chamber on the heat release fluctuations from the modulation of the atomization of the propellants in a hypergolic upper stage rocket engine is studied. Numerical modeling of a single injector provides the time mean reacting flow field. A network of transfer functions representing all aspects relevant for the feedback model is presented. Analytical models for the injector admittances and for the atomization transfer functions are provided. The dynamics of evaporation and combustion are studied numerically and the numerical results are analyzed. An analytical approximation of the computed flame transfer function is combined with the analytical models for the injector and the atomization quality to derive the feedback model for the wave propagation code. The evaluation of this model on the basis of the Rayleigh index reveals the thermoacoustic driving potential originating from the fluctuating spray quality.

  15. The Use of an Air-Natural Gas Flame in Atomic Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melucci, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    Points out that excellent results are obtained using an air-natural gas flame in atomic absorption experiments rather than using an air-acetylene flame. Good results are obtained for alkali metals, copper, cadmium, and zinc but not for the alkaline earths since they form refractory oxides. (Author/JN)

  16. Continuum Source Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with a Photodiode Array Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Reshan Armedious

    The designed continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer consists of a 300W xenon arc lamp (ILC Technology), a flame (Perkin-Elmer) or graphite furnace (Perkin-Elmer, Model HGA 2200) atomizer, a 1.33M focal length high resolution monochromator with 3600 gr/mm grating (McPherson, Model 209), and a 2048-element self scanning linear photodiode array detector (Princeton Instruments, Model PDA-2048). Detector operation, data acquisition and processing was done by using a 66MHz 486 DX/2 personal computer (Gateway 2000). In stage one, the system was optimized for flame atomization. The optimum lamp current, entrance slit width and height were found to be 10A, 20 mum, and 4 mm respectively. The resulted spectral band-pass of the monochromator/PDA combination is on the order of the average atomic absorption profile half-width (0.003 -0.004 nm). The flame parameters such as observation height, air/fuel ratio, and solution uptake rate were optimized along with the detector parameters such as exposure and accumulation for the lowest possible detection limit. The system has clearly demonstrated its multi-element detection capabilities. The calculated detection limits for the present system with an air-acetylene flame is approximately one order of magnitude lower than previously reported CSAAS detection limits, and are on the same order of magnitude as those commonly observed with single element hollow cathode lamp systems. In stage two, flame atomizer was replaced by a graphite furnace atomizer. When compared to the static signal given out by flame atomizer, the graphite furnace produces transient signals. Fast response time of the PDA is well within the time scale of the transient signals produce in graphite furnace and the multi-wavelength detection allows the background correction to be performed by visual inspection. The detection limits calculated for the present system are significantly lower than those previously reported for multi-element CSAAS systems, and are on

  17. Quenching of excited rubidium (52P) atoms in flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.; Nienhuis, G.

    An alternating current photoelectric device (compare the work of Boers,(1) Hooymayers et al(2-4) and Hooymayers(5)) has been used for determining the yield factor p of resonance fluorescence for the infrared rubidium doublet (7800/7947 Å). From the p-values measured in five different hydrogen flames

  18. Determination of total mercury by vapor generation in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Poznan Technical University, Poznan (Poland)

    2008-07-01

    The analytical performance of non-chromatographic coupled hydride generation, integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame absorption spectrometry (FAAS) systems were evaluated for the determination of total mercury in environmental samples. Mercury, using formation of mercury vapors were atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design of vapor generation integrated atom trap flame atomic absorption spectrometry (VG-IAT-FAAS) hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangements was investigated. This novel approach enables to decrease the detection limit down to low pg mL{sup -1} levels. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation was 0.4 ng mL{sup -1}. For a 120 s in situ pre-concentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 750 folds for Hg, using vapor generation-atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed by RSD, was 9.3% (n = 6) for Hg. Reference and real sample materials were analyzed. The accuracy of the method was verified by the use of certified reference materials and by aqueous standard calibration technique. The measured Hg content, in reference materials, were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values, The hyphenated technique was applied for mercury determinations in coal fly ash, sewage and water.

  19. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  20. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  1. Evaluation of lithium determination in three analyzers: flame emission, flame atomic absorption spectroscopy and ion selective electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliasgharpour, Mehri; Hagani, Hamid

    2009-10-01

    Lithium carbonate salt has become an increasingly important substance in the treatment of manic depressive disorders, and its relatively narrow therapeutic range has caused laboratories to monitor the serum concentration carefully. In the present work we evaluated lithium measurement in 3 different analyzers. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; Three different analyzers including Flame Emission (FES), Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS), and Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) were used. All chemicals had a grade suitable for trace metal analysis. Within-day precision of CV was ≤ 1.5% for FES & FAAS, except for ISE (1.9% CV). Between-days precision of CV was less for FES than for FAAS and ISE (1.3% versus 2.2% & 2.3%). The percent recovery of added lithium in pooled patients' serum was higher for ISE than for FASS and FES (103.4% versus 96.2% and 94.6%). We also obtained a higher average lithium concentration for patients' serum samples (n=16) measured by ISE than for FAAS and FES (0.825±0.30 versus 0.704±0.26 & 0.735±0.19). Paired t-test results revealed a significant difference (p< 0.001) for patient sera analyzed with FAAS and ISE. We report higher results for ISE than the other two analyzers and conclude that the choice between the two flame methods for patients' serum lithium determination is arbitrary and that FES analyzer is a more attractive routine alternative for lithium determination than FAAS because of its cost and ease of performance. In addition, the results obtained by ISE are precise. However, its accuracy may depend on other interfering factors.

  2. Quantification of minerals and trace elements in raw caprine milk using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahavir; Yadav, Poonam; Garg, V K; Sharma, Anshu; Singh, Balvinder; Sharma, Himanshu

    2015-08-01

    This study reports minerals and trace elements quantification in raw caprine milk of Beetal breed, reared in Northern India and their feed, fodder & water using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry. The mineral and trace elements' concentration in the milk was in the order: K > Ca > Na > Fe > Zn > Cu. The results showed that minerals concentration in caprine milk was lesser than reference values. But trace elements concentration (Fe and Zn) was higher than reference values. Multivariate statistical techniques, viz., Pearsons' correlation, Cluster analysis (CA) and Principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to analyze the interdependences within studied variables in caprine milk. Significantly positive correlations were observed between Fe - Zn, Zn - K, Ca - Na and Ca - pH. The results of correlation matrix were further supported by Cluster analysis and Principal component analysis as primary cluster pairs were found for Ca - pH, Ca - Na and Fe - Zn in the raw milk. No correlation was found between mineral & trace elements content of the milk and feed.

  3. Direct solid sampling by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: determination of manganese in coal samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Érico M. M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A new device for the direct solid analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry was investigated as an alternative technique for the determination of trace elements in coal. The potential application of the proposed procedure for the determination of manganese was investigated. Ground coal test samples were weighed directly into polyethylene vials and carried as a dry aerosol to a slotted quartz vaporization cell placed between the flame burner and optical path. The transient signals obtained were totally integrated in 1 second. The effect of operating conditions on the analytical signal was investigated. Background signals were always low and a Mn characteristic mass of 1.9 ng was found. Results were considered satisfactory regarding to both accuracy (between 97.5 and 103.2% and precision (RSD better than 6%. The proposed system is simple and can be easily adapted to any conventional atomic absorption spectrometers allowing the analysis of more than 80 test samples in an hour.

  4. Fast sequential multi-element determination of Ca, Mg, K, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn for foliar diagnosis using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry: Feasibility of secondary lines, side pixel registration and least-squares background correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Silvana Ruella; Raposo, Jorge Luiz, Jr.; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta

    2009-06-01

    The fast sequential multi-element determination of Ca, Mg, K, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn in plant tissues by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry is proposed. For this, the main lines for Cu (324.754 nm), Fe (248.327 nm), Mn (279.482 nm) and Zn (213.857 nm) were selected, and the secondary lines for Ca (239.856 nm), Mg (202.582 nm) and K (404.414 nm) were evaluated. The side pixel registration approach was studied to reduce sensitivity and extend the linear working range for Mg by measuring at wings (202.576 nm; 202.577 nm; 202.578 nm; 202.580 nm; 202.585 nm; 202.586 nm; 202.587 nm; 202.588 nm) of the secondary line. The interference caused by NO bands on Zn at 213.857 nm was removed using the least-squares background correction. Using the main lines for Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn, secondary lines for Ca and K, and line wing at 202.588 nm for Mg, and 5 mL min - 1 sample flow-rate, calibration curves in the 0.1-0.5 mg L - 1 Cu, 0.5-4.0 mg L - 1 Fe, 0.5-4.0 mg L - 1 Mn, 0.2-1.0 mg L - 1 Zn, 10.0-100.0 mg L - 1 Ca, 5.0-40.0 mg L - 1 Mg and 50.0-250.0 mg L - 1 K ranges were consistently obtained. Accuracy and precision were evaluated after analysis of five plant standard reference materials. Results were in agreement at a 95% confidence level (paired t-test) with certified values. The proposed method was applied to digests of sugar-cane leaves and results were close to those obtained by line-source flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Recoveries of Ca, Mg, K, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn in the 89-103%, 84-107%, 87-103%, 85-105%, 92-106%, 91-114%, 96-114% intervals, respectively, were obtained. The limits of detection were 0.6 mg L - 1 Ca, 0.4 mg L - 1 Mg, 0.4 mg L - 1 K, 7.7 µg L - 1 Cu, 7.7 µg L - 1 Fe, 1.5 µg L - 1 Mn and 5.9 µg L - 1 Zn.

  5. Programmable solid state atom sources for nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; Del Corro, Pablo G.; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian A.; Lally, Richard W.; Bishop, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques.In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A document containing further information about device characterization

  6. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  7. Application of thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for investigation of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirirat, Natnicha; Tetbuntad, Kornrawee; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2017-03-01

    Thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) was applied to investigate the time-dependent absorption peak profile of various forms of silver. The thermospray flame furnace was set up with a 10-cm-long nickel tube with six holes, each 2.0 mm in diameter, to allow the flame to enter, and this nickel tube acted as a furnace. A sample of 300 μL was introduced into this furnace by use of water as a carrier at a flow rate of 0.5 mL min-1 through the ceramic capillary (0.5-mm inner diameter and 2.0-mm outer diameter), which was inserted into the front hole of the nickel tube. The system was applied to examine atomization behaviors of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with particle sizes ranging from 10 to 100 nm. The atomization rate of AgNPs was faster than that of the dissolved silver ion. With increased amount of silver, the decay time observed from the time-dependent absorption peak profile was shortened in the case of dissolved silver ion, but it was increased in the case of AgNPs. With the particle size ranging from 10 to 100 nm, the detection sensitivity was indirectly proportional to the particle size, suggesting that TS-FF-AAS may offer insights into the particle size of AgNPs provided that the concentration of the silver is known. To obtain quantitative information on AgNPs, acid dissolution of the particles was performed before TS-FF-AAS analysis, and recoveries of 80-110% were obtained.

  8. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-11-01

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy.

  9. Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, and chemical reactant sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C

    2013-11-26

    Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, chemical reactant sources, and related methods are disclosed. In one embodiment, a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor system comprising a reaction chamber, a combustion torch positioned to direct a flame into the reaction chamber, and one or more reactant feed assemblies configured to electrically energize at least one electrically conductive solid reactant structure to form a plasma and feed each electrically conductive solid reactant structure into the plasma to form at least one product is disclosed. In an additional embodiment, a chemical reactant source for a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor comprising an elongated electrically conductive reactant structure consisting essentially of at least one chemical reactant is disclosed. In further embodiments, methods of forming a chemical reactant source and methods of chemically converting at least one reactant into at least one product are disclosed.

  10. Potential of two-line atomic fluorescence for temperature imaging in turbulent indium-oxide-producing flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Münsterjohann, Bettina; Huber, Franz J. T.; Klima, Tobias C.; Holfelder, Sandra; Engel, Sascha R. [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Lehrstuhl für Technische Thermodynamik (LTT) (Germany); Miller, Joseph D. [Aerospace Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory (United States); Meyer, Terrence R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT) (Germany); Will, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.will@fau.de [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Lehrstuhl für Technische Thermodynamik (LTT) (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The applicability of two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) for temperature imaging in an indium-based flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) process is demonstrated using a single tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to generate the required excitation wavelengths consecutively. Single-shot images of the detected fluorescence signals demonstrate that the signal levels in the flame are suitable for evaluation of temperature and verify the capability and potential of the measurement technique directly during particle formation without additional indium seeding. Qualitative averaged two-dimensional temperature distributions in the FSP flame are presented, showing the influence of varying sheath gas flow rates on the resulting temperature distribution. With the addition of a second OPO and detection system, the two fluorescence signals acquired consecutively in this work could be obtained simultaneously and enable spatio-temporally resolved single-shot temperature measurements in flame synthesis processes of indium-containing nanoparticles.

  11. Manganese dioxide causes spurious gold values in flame atomic-absorption readings from HBr-Br2 digestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    False readings, apparently caused by the presence of high concentrations of manganese dioxide, have been observed in our current flame atomic-absorption procedure for the determination of gold. After a hydrobromic acid (HBr)-bromine (Br2) leach, simply heating the sample to boiling to remove excess Br2 prior to extraction with methyl-isobutyl-ketone (MIBK) eliminates these false readings. ?? 1981.

  12. Determination of some heavy metals by flame atomic absorption spectrometry before coprecipitation with neodymium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylak, Mustafa; Kizil, Nebiye

    2011-01-01

    A procedure is described for the determination of trace amounts of Cd(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Fe(III), Co(II), and Mn(II) that combines flame atomic absorption spectrometry with neodymium hydroxide coprecipitation. The influences of analytical parameters (amount of neodymium, pH of the model solutions, etc.) that affect quantitative recoveries of the analyte ions were investigated. The effects of concomitant ions were also examined. The detection limits for analytes were found in the range of 0.2-3.3 microg/L. The validation of the presented procedure was controlled by analysis of certified reference materials (National Institute of Standards and Technology 1570a spinach leaves and TMDA 54.4 fortified lake water). The applications of the procedure were performed by the analysis of water, food, and herbal plants from Turkey.

  13. Multicomutation flow system for manganese speciation by solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiasz, Anna; Sołtys, Monika; Kurys, Ewa; Domagała, Karolina; Dudek-Adamska, Danuta; Walas, Stanisław

    2017-08-01

    In the paper an application of solid phase extraction technique for speciation analysis of manganese in water samples with the use of flame atomic absorption spectrometry is presented. Two types of sorbents, activated silica gel and Dowex 1 × 4, were used respectively for simultaneously Mn2 + and MnO42 - retention and preconcentration. The whole procedure was realized in multicomutation flow system. Different conditions like: type and concentration of eluent, sample pH and loading time were tested during the study. Under appropriate conditions, it was possible to obtained enrichment factors of 20 and 16 for Mn(II) and Mn(VII), respectively. Precision of the procedure was close to 4% (measured as relative standard deviation), whereas the detection limit (3σ) was 1.4 μg·L- 1 for Mn(II) and 4.8 μg·L- 1 for Mn(VII).

  14. Design and evaluation of a continuous flow, integrated nebulizer-hydride generator for flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Murillo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the performance of a continuous flow hydride generator-nebulizer for flame atomic absorption spectrometry was carried out. Optimization of nebulizer gas flow rate, sample acid concentration, sample and tetrahydroborate uptake rates and reductant concentration, on the As and Se absorbance signals was carried out. A hydrogen-argon flame was used. An improvement of the analytical sensitivity relative to the conventional bead nebulizer used in flame AA was obtained (2 (As and 4.8 (Se µg L-1. Detection limits (3σb of 1 (As and 1.3 (Se µg L-1 were obtained. Accuracy of the method was checked by analyzing an oyster tissue reference material.

  15. Feasibility of high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry in flame and furnace for sulphur determination in petroleum products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalewska, Zofia, E-mail: zofia.kowalewska@obr.pl

    2011-07-15

    For the first time, high-resolution molecular absorption spectrometry with a high-intensity xenon lamp as radiation source has been applied for the determination of sulphur in crude oil and petroleum products. The samples were analysed as xylene solutions using vaporisation in acetylene-air flame or in an electrothermally heated graphite furnace. The sensitive rotational lines of the CS molecule, belonging to the {Delta}{nu} = 0 vibrational sequence within the electronic transition X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} {yields} A{sup 1}{Pi}, were applied. For graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry, the Pd + Mg organic modifier was selected. Strong interactions with Pd atoms enable easier decomposition of sulphur-containing compounds, likely through the temporal formation of Pd{sub x}S{sub y} molecules. At the 258.056 nm line, with the wavelength range covering central pixel {+-} 5 pixels and with application of interactive background correction, the detection limit was 14 ng in graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and 18 mg kg{sup -1} in flame molecular absorption spectrometry. Meanwhile, application of 2-points background correction found a characteristic mass of 12 ng in graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and a characteristic concentration of 104 mg kg{sup -1} in flame molecular absorption spectrometry. The range of application of the proposed methods turned out to be significantly limited by the properties of the sulphur compounds of interest. In the case of volatile sulphur compounds, which can be present in light petroleum products, severe difficulties were encountered. On the contrary, heavy oils and residues from distillation as well as crude oil could be analysed using both flame and graphite furnace vaporisation. The good accuracy of the proposed methods for these samples was confirmed by their mutual consistency and the results from analysis of reference samples (certified reference materials and home reference materials with

  16. A Sensitive Method for Cadmium Determination Using an On-line Polyurethane Foam Preconcentration System and Thermospray Flame Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TARLEY, César Ricardo Teixeira; ARRUDA, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2004-01-01

    A new sensitive and low cost method for cadmium determination at µg l-1 levels that combines an on-line preconcentration system with the thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry technique (TS-FF-AAS...

  17. Separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of gold from water samples prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Sabermahani,Fatemeh; Taher,Mohammad Ali; Bahrami, Habibe

    2016-01-01

    A preconcentration/separation procedure is presented for the solid phase extraction of trace gold(III) as its rubeanic acid (dithiooxamide) chelate on silica gel, prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The influences of analytical parameters including pH of the aqueous solution, the amount of the sorbent, time of the complex formation, ligand amount, flow rates of sample and elution solutions and the type, concentration and volume of elution solution on the quantitati...

  18. EVALUATION OF HEAVY METALS CONTENT IN EDIBLE MUSHROOMS BY MICROWAVE DIGESTION AND FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Radulescu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the heavy metal (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Mn, Zn, Fe and Cu content of the fruiting bodies (cap and stipe of four species (Amanita caesarea, Pleurotus ostreatus, Fistulina hepatica and Armillariella mellea and their substrate, collected from forest sites in Dâmboviţa County, Romania. The elements were determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS after microwave assisted digestion. From the same collecting point were taken n = 5 samples of young and mature fruiting bodies of mushrooms and their substrate. The high concentrations of lead, chrome and cadmium (Pb: 0.25 – 1.89 mg.kg-1, Cr: 0.36 – 1.94 mg.kg-1, Cd: 0.23 – 1.13 mg.kg-1 for all collected wild edible mushrooms, were determined. These data were compared with maximum level for certain contaminants in foodstuffs established by the commission of the European Committees (EC No 466/2001. A quantitative evaluation of the relationship of element uptake by mushrooms from substrate was made by calculating the accumulation coefficient (Ka. The moderately acid pH value of soil influenced the accumulation of Zn and Cd inside of the studied species. The variation of heavy metals content between edible mushrooms species is dependent upon the ability of the species to extract elements from the substrate and on the selective uptake and deposition of metals in tissue.

  19. Determination of iron in natural and mineral waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROLANDAS KAZLAUSKAS

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple methods for the determination of Fe in natural and mineral waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS are suggested. The results of the investigation of selectivity of the proposed AAS method proved that this procedure is not affected by high concentrations of other metals. The calibration graph for iron was linear at levels near the detection limit up to at least 0.10 mg ml-1. For the determination of microamounts of iron in mineral waters, an extraction AAS technique was developed. Iron was retained as Fe-8-oxyquinoline complex and extracted into chloroform. The optimal conditions for the extraction of the iron complex were determined. The AAS method was applied to the determination of Fe in mineral waters and natural waters from different areas of Lithuania. The accuracy of the developed method was sufficient and evaluated in comparison with a photometric method. The obtained results demonstrated that the procedure could be successfully applied for the analysis of water samples with satisfactory accuracy.

  20. Quenching of excited alkali atoms and related effects in flames: Part II. Measurements and discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.; Alkemade, C.T.J.

    1966-01-01

    An alternating current photoelectric device has been used for determining the yield factor p of resonance flourescence of the yellow sodium doublet and the infrared and blue potassium doublets in flames at atmospheric pressure as a function of the temperature and composition of the burnt flame

  1. Quenching of excited alkali atoms and related effects in flames: Part I. theoretical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.; Alkemade, C.T.J.

    An a.c. photoelectric detection device has been used to determine the yield factor p of resonance fluorescence of the Na(5890/96) Å and K(7665/99) Å and (4044/47) Å resonance doublets in atmospheric flames as a function of the composition and temperature of the flame. From these measurements the

  2. Combustion of Biofuel as a Renewable Energy Source in Sandia Flame Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassoulinejad-Mousavi, Seyed Moein; Mao, Yijin; Zhang, Yuwen

    Energy security and climate change are two important key causes of wide spread employment of biofuel notwithstanding of problems associated with its usage. In this research, combustion of biofuel as a renewable energy source was numerically investigated in the well-known and practical Sandia flame geometry. Combustion performance of the flame has been simulated by burning biodiesel (methyl decanoate, methyl 9-decenoate, and n-heptane) oxidation with 118 species reduced/skeletal mechanism. The open-source code OpenFoam was used for simulating turbulent biodiesel-air combustion in the cylindrical chamber using the standard k-epsilon model. To check the accuracy of numerical results, the system was initially validated with methane-air Sandia national laboratories flame D experimental results. Excellent agreements between numerical and experimental results were observed at different cross sections. After ignition, temperature distributions at different distances of axial and radial directions as well as species mass fraction were investigated. It is concluded that biofuel has the capability of implementation in the turbulent jet flame that is a step forward in promotion of sustainable energy technologies and applications.

  3. Evaluation of Serum Copper Level in Naswar (Smokeless Tobacco) Addicts Using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Asmat; Khan, Abad; Iqbal, Zafar; Khan, Ismail

    2017-10-01

    Substance abuse and its consequences are a matter of great concern in South-East Asian countries, especially Pakistan and Afghanistan. Due to contamination of Naswar with copper, or by any other physiological mechanism, there is a great chance of copper poisoning in addicts. Keeping in view the literature, there is no comparative study on serum copper levels (SCuL) in Naswar addicts. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate SCuL in this population. The current study was performed in September 2016 where a total of 75 volunteers (selected from villages near the University of Peshawar, Pakistan) were grouped as Naswar addicts (n = 45) and the control group (n = 30). The addicts were compared to controls for age, weight, BMI, FBS and creatinine clearance. For serum analysis, about 3mL of blood was collected from which the serum was separated, digested, and then evaluated for SCuL using  flame atomic absorption spectroscopy at the Department of Pharmacy and Centralized Resource Laboratory of University of Peshawar. The SCuL in addicts had a range of 2.6 to 11.1 µg/dL with a mean of 5.1 ± 2.4 µg/dL. In the healthy control group, SCuL was between 1.7 to 3.9 µg/dL with a mean of 2.6 ±0.1 µg/dL. The mean difference between the two study groups was statistically significant (P = 0.005); the duration of addiction and quantity of drug consumptions per day correlated positively with SCuL. Serum level of copper in Naswar addicts is elevated compared to the Control group. The exact cause of SCuL elevations and the mechanisms involved must be studied in large group samples.

  4. Laser excited analytical atomic and ionic fluorescence in flames, furnaces and inductively coupled plasmas—I. General considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenetto, N.; Human, H. G. C.

    Several important parameters for the analytical use of laser excited fluorescence spectrometry in flames, graphite furnaces and inductively coupled plasmas are discussed in some detail. These parameters include the laser characteristics such as peak power, pulse duration, spectral bandwidth and repetition rate, the choice of the excitation line, the optical arrangement and the detection system, this last one centred on the widespread use of the boxcar averager. It is shown that, if the ultimate sensitivity is the goal to be achieved, then the choice must be the electrothermal atomization. However, even for flames and inductively coupled plasmas, excellent results are possible provided that: (i) the laser system allows complete spectral coverage in the ultraviolet: (ii) saturation of the fluorescence signal can be approached over a large sample volume; and (iii) the gated detection parameters and the laser repetition frequency are optimized with respect to each other so as to reach the maximum signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. Application of Internal Standard Method for Several 3d-Transition Metallic Elements in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using a Multi-wavelength High-resolution Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toya, Yusuke; Itagaki, Toshiko; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    We investigated a simultaneous internal standard method in flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), in order to better the analytical precision of 3d-transition metals contained in steel materials. For this purpose, a new spectrometer system for FAAS, comprising a bright xenon lamp as the primary radiation source and a high-resolution Echelle monochromator, was employed to measure several absorption lines at a wavelength width of ca. 0.3 nm at the same time, which enables the absorbances of an analytical line and also an internal standard line to be estimated. In considering several criteria for selecting an internal standard element and the absorption line, it could be suggested that platinum-group elements: ruthenium, rhodium, or palladium, were suitable for an internal standard element to determine the 3d-transition metal elements, such as titanium, iron, and nickel, by measuring an appropriate pair of these absorption lines simultaneously. Several variances of the absorption signal, such as a variation in aspirated amounts of sample solution and a short-period drift of the primary light source, would be corrected and thus reduced, when the absorbance ratio of the analytical line to the internal standard line was measured. In Ti-Pd, Ni-Rh, and Fe-Ru systems chosen as typical test samples, the repeatability of the signal respnses was investigated with/without the internal standard method, resulting in better precision when the internal standard method was applied in the FAAS with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame rather than an air-acetylene flame.

  6. [Evaluation of uncertainty for determination of tin and its compounds in air of workplace by flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiuning; Wei, Yuan; Liu, Fangfang; Ding, Yalei

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the method for uncertainty evaluation of determination of tin and its compounds in the air of workplace by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The national occupational health standards, GBZ/T160.28-2004 and JJF1059-1999, were used to build a mathematical model of determination of tin and its compounds in the air of workplace and to calculate the components of uncertainty. In determination of tin and its compounds in the air of workplace using flame atomic absorption spectrometry, the uncertainty for the concentration of the standard solution, atomic absorption spectrophotometer, sample digestion, parallel determination, least square fitting of the calibration curve, and sample collection was 0.436%, 0.13%, 1.07%, 1.65%, 3.05%, and 2.89%, respectively. The combined uncertainty was 9.3%.The concentration of tin in the test sample was 0.132 mg/m³, and the expanded uncertainty for the measurement was 0.012 mg/m³ (K=2). The dominant uncertainty for determination of tin and its compounds in the air of workplace comes from least squares fitting of the calibration curve and sample collection. Quality control should be improved in the process of calibration curve fitting and sample collection.

  7. Differentiation and classification of beers with flame atomic spectrometry and molecular absorption spectrometry and sample preparation assisted by microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido-Milla, Dolores; Moreno-Perez, Juana M.; Hernández-Artiga, María. P.

    2000-07-01

    The characterization of beer samples has a lot of interest because their composition can affect the taste and stability of beer and consumer health. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Mg, Ca and Al. Sodium and K were determined by flame atomic emission spectrometry. A sample preparation method was developed, based on treatment with HNO 3 and H 2O 2 in a microwave oven. This has many advantages over the methods found in the literature. The combination of the results of atomic spectrometry and the spectrum obtained by molecular absorption spectrometry provides information on the inorganic and organic components of the samples. The application of chemometric techniques to chemical composition data could be extremely useful for food quality control. The metal concentrations, the molecular absorption spectrum, the pH and conductivity of each sample were subject to analysis of variance and linear discriminant analysis. Twenty-five different beer samples were used to differentiate and classify different types of beers.

  8. Determination of Copper-Based Fungicides by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Digestion Procedure with Sulfuric and Nitric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Milinović

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper-based fungicides can be effectively digested by treatment with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric and nitric acid in exactly 15 minutes for the rapid determination via copper using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. Under optimum conditions, the results of copper fungicide analysis were consistent to those obtained by the AOAC’s recommended method. Recovery values ranged from 98.63 to 103.40%. Relative standard deviation values are lower than 2%. The proposed digestion procedure applied for determination of copper ranged from 100 to 594 g Cu kg-1 in different commercial fungicideproducts.

  9. [Study on determination of eight metal elements in Hainan arecanut leaf by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-yun; Wang, Ping; Feng, Mei-li; Dong, Zhi-guo; Li, Jie

    2008-12-01

    Arecanut is a sort of palm that is important economic crop for the farmers in Hainan province of China, wherein there are many kinds of metal elements such as K, Ca, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn etc. These elements are important nutrition for the growth of arecanut. It is very valuable to study on the content of these metal elements in arecanut leaf in terms of plant nutriology of arecanut. The arecanut leaf in Wangling county, Hainan province of China was sampled by diagonal-field-sampling method. Refering to other plant sample determination by FAAS, the detailed studies are done with different digestion and determination methods. In the present paper the effects of mixed acid of HNO3-HClO4 digestion method on determining the amount of metal elements in the arecanut leaf by FAAS is reported, and another one is incineration digestion method. FAAS method was established for the determination of K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn The samples were incinerated or heated with HNO3-HClO4 (4:1). In the meantime, the optimum parameters of FAAS and effects of different digestion methods on the results were discussed. The recovery rate of standard addition is 98.36%-102.38% in the first method; RSD is 0.42%-2.328% (n=6); The recovery rate of standard addition is 99.22%-103.72% in the second method; RSD is 0.58%-1.283 (n=6). The metal amount determined by the first method is lower than the second method, the ratio is 0.9703-0.9934. The two methods are satisfied, but the latter is better. It is precise enough to common experiment to use flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry with digestion by incineration If the especially precise experiment is required, the digestion methods with mixed acid of HNO3-HClO4 may be introduced. The paper introduced methods dependable for determination of some metal elements in order to study on some nutrient effects of these metal elements in arecanut.

  10. [Speciation analysis of trace elements Cu, Fe and Zn in serum by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Chang, Yao-Ming; Gao, Shuang-Bin; Hai, Chun-Xu; Li, Jin-Sheng; Xie, Xiao-Ping

    2008-03-01

    Since biological functions of the elements are generally different, depending on their chemical forms, chemical speciation analysis is really important in metallomics research. Thus, multielement analysis and chemical speciation of the elements in serum were carried out in the present work. A hyphenated technique was developed for high-throughput speciation analysis of the copper, iron and zinc in serum by molecular biology technology and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Here, Cu, Fe and Zn in serum were classifyied as the forms of combination and non-combination. The serum protein was precipitated by 60% concentration of ethanol under hypothermy. The forms of combination of Cu, Fe and Zn in serum which combined with proteins were in precipitations, and the forms of non-combination of Cu, Fe and Zn in serum, which were free ions, were in supernatant. The total amount of Cu, Fe and Zn in serum and the amount of the forms of non-combination of Cu, Fe and Zn were analyzed by AAS. The amount of the forms of combination of Cu, Fe and Zn was obtained by calculation. The detection limit of Cu in serum by the method is around and 9.84 x 10(-3) microg x mL(-1). For Fe and Zn, the detection limit is about 2.76 x 10(-2) microg x mL(-1) and 1.06 x 10(-3) microg x mL(-1), respectively. The percentage recovery of trace elements Cu, Fe and Zn by the proposed procedure is in the range 95.0%-101.0%, 95.0%-102.0% and 95.0%-103.0%, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of trace elements Cu, Fe and Zn in the serum is in the range 1.88%-2.26%, 0.56%-1.59% and 0.34%-1.36%, respectively. Speciation of trace elements Cu, Fe and Zn in the serum of SD rat were analyzed by the method.

  11. Determination of molybdenum in plants by vortex-assisted emulsification solidified floating organic drop microextraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oviedo, Jenny A.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A., E-mail: djan@terra.com.br

    2013-08-01

    A fast and sensitive procedure for extraction and preconcentration of molybdenum in plant samples based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and discrete nebulization was developed. 8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) was used as complexing agent. The experimental conditions established were: 0.5% m v{sup −1} of 8-HQ, 60 μL of 1-undecanol as the extractant phase, 2 min vortex extraction time, centrifugation for 2 min at 2000 rpm, 10 min into an ice bath and discrete nebulization by introducing 200 μL of solution. The calibration curve was linear from 0.02 to 4.0 mg L{sup −1} with a limit of detection of 4.9 μg L{sup −1} and an enhancement factor of 67. The relative standard deviations for ten replicate measurements of 0.05 and 1.0 mg L{sup −1} Mo were 6.0 and 14.5%, respectively. The developed procedure was applied for determining molybdenum in corn samples and accuracy was proved using certified reference materials. - Highlights: ► Molybdenum was determined in plants by flame AAS. ► Flame AAS sensitivity was improved using microextraction and discrete nebulization. ► The developed procedure can be easily implemented in routine analysis. ► Green chemistry principles are followed.

  12. Lead determination at ng/mL level by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a tantalum coated slotted quartz tube atom trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, İlknur; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2015-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) still keeps its importance despite the relatively low sensitivity; because it is a simple and economical technique for determination of metals. In recent years, atom traps have been developed to increase the sensitivity of FAAS. Although the detection limit of FAAS is only at the level of µg/mL, with the use of atom traps it can reach to ng/mL. Slotted quartz tube (SQT) is one of the atom traps used to improve sensitivity. In atom trapping mode of SQT, analyte is trapped on-line in SQT for few minutes using ordinary sample aspiration, followed by the introduction of a small volume of organic solvent to effect the revolatilization and atomization of analyte species resulting in a transient signal. This system is economical, commercially available and easy to use. In this study, a sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of lead with the help of SQT atom trapping flame atomization (SQT-AT-FAAS). 574 Fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained at a sample suction rate of 3.9 mL/min for 5.0 min trapping period with respect to FAAS. Organic solvent was selected as 40 µL of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). To obtain a further sensitivity enhancement inner surface of SQT was coated with several transition metals. The best sensitivity enhancement, 1650 fold enhancement, was obtained by the Ta-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. In addition, chemical nature of Pb species trapped on quartz and Ta surface, and the chemical nature of Ta on quartz surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. Raman spectrometric results indicate that tantalum is coated on SQT surface in the form of Ta2O5. XPS studies revealed that the oxidation state of Pb in species trapped on both bare and Ta coated SQT surfaces is +2. For the accuracy check, the analyses of standard reference material were performed by use of SCP SCIENCE EnviroMAT Low (EU-L-2) and results for Pb were to be in good agreement with

  13. Sensitive determination of bismuth by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using atom trapping in a slotted quartz tube and revolatilization with organic solvent pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınç, Ersin; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Aydın, Fırat; Ataman, O. Yavuz

    2012-07-01

    Sensitivity of flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for Bi determination was improved by slotted quartz tube (SQT) that was used also for atom trapping (AT). The trapped analyte was released by aspirating a small volume of organic solvent after a reasonable analyte collection time. Sensitivity was improved by 2.9 times by SQT-FAAS and 256 times by SQT-AT-FAAS with respect to FAAS. Optimum trapping period was found to be 6.0 min (36.0 mL of solution). Limit of detection (LOD) for SQT-AT-FAAS was found to be 1.6 ng mL- 1. %RSD was calculated as 4.0% for five replicate measurements of 7.5 ng mL- 1 Bi by SQT-AT-FAAS. Accuracy of the method developed was checked by analyzing a standard reference material of simulated fresh water (NIST 1643e) and result found was in good agreement with the certified one. The method can be applied in any laboratory equipped with a flame AA spectrometer. The consumption of time and sample volume is fairly low and application is simple and easy.

  14. A preconcentration system for determination of copper and nickel in water and food samples employing flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzen, Mustafa [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Department of Chemistry, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)], E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr; Citak, Demirhan [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Ferreira, Hadla S.; Korn, Maria G.A. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Quimica, 40170-290 Salvador (Brazil); Bezerra, Marcos A. [Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, 45200-190 Jequie (Brazil)

    2009-03-15

    A separation/preconcentration procedure using solid phase extraction has been proposed for the flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper and nickel at trace level in food samples. The solid phase is Dowex Optipore SD-2 resin contained on a minicolumn, where analyte ions are sorbed as 5-methyl-4-(2-thiazolylazo) resorcinol chelates. After elution using 1 mol L{sup -1} nitric acid solution, the analytes are determinate employing flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimization step was performed using a full two-level factorial design and the variables studied were: pH, reagent concentration (RC) and amount of resin on the column (AR). Under the experimental conditions established in the optimization step, the procedure allows the determination of copper and nickel with limit of detection of 1.03 and 1.90 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively and precision of 7 and 8%, for concentrations of copper and nickel of 200 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The effect of matrix ions was also evaluated. The accuracy was confirmed by analyzing of the followings certified reference materials: NIST SRM 1515 Apple leaves and GBW 07603 Aquatic and Terrestrial Biological Products. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of copper and nickel in real samples including human hair, chicken meat, black tea and canned fish.

  15. Direct determination of Cd, Cu and Pb in wines and grape juices by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, Daniela; Neira, José Y; Nóbrega, Joaquim A

    2008-09-15

    The applicability of thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) was evaluated for direct determination of Cu, Cd and Pb in wines and grape juices. The developed procedure does not require preliminary acid digestion of the samples. The optimum conditions for determination of Cu, Cd and Pb in wines were studied and the performance was compared to those typically obtained by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). A sample volume of 150 microL was introduced into a heated nickel tube at a flow rate of 0.54 mLmin(-1) and 0.14 molL(-1) HNO(3) was used as sample carrier flowing at 2.5 mLmin(-1) for determining all analytes. The effect of ethanol concentrations on Cu, Cd and Pb absorbance signals were studied. All determinations were carried out by adopting optimized conditions and quantification was based on the standard additions method. Limits of detection (LOD) of 12.9, 1.8 and 5.3 microgL(-1) (n=14) for Cu, Cd and Pb, respectively, were obtained for wine samples (3sigma(blank)/slope, n=14). Relative standard deviations (R.S.D., %) of 2.7, 2.1 and 2.6 for Cu, Cd and Pb, were obtained (n=6) for wine samples. The values determined for grape juice samples were similar to these ones. The analytical throughput was 45 determinations h(-1) and accuracy was checked by addition-recovery experiments.

  16. The Reaction between Sodium Hydroxide and Atomic Hydrogen in Atmospheric and Flame Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Martín, J C; Seaton, C; de Miranda, M P; Plane, J M C

    2017-10-12

    We report the first direct kinetic study of the gas-phase reaction NaOH + H → Na + H2O, which is central to the chemistry of sodium in the upper atmosphere and in flames. The reaction was studied in a fast flow tube, where NaOH was observed by multiphoton ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry, yielding k(NaOH + H, 230-298 K) = (3.8 ± 0.8) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule (-1) s(-1) (at 2σ confidence level), showing no significant temperature dependence over the indicated temperature range and essentially in agreement with previous estimates of the rate constant in hydrogen-rich flames. We show, using theoretical trajectory calculations, that the unexpectedly slow, yet T-independent, rate coefficient for NaOH + H is explained by severe constraints in the angle of attack that H can make on NaOH to produce H2O. This reaction is also central to explaining Na-catalyzed flame inhibition, which has been proposed to occur via the sequence Na + OH (+ M) → NaOH followed by NaOH + H → Na + H2O, thereby effectively recombinating H and OH to H2O. RRKM calculations for the recombination of Na and OH yield k(Na + OH + N2, 300-2400 K) = 2.7 × 10(-29) (300/T)(1.2) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1), in agreement with a previous flash photolysis measurement at 653 K and Na-seeded flame studies in the 1800-2200 K range. These results therefore provide strong evidence to support the mechanism of flame inhibition by Na.

  17. Monitoring content of cadmium, calcium, copper, iron, lead, magnesium and manganese in tea leaves by electrothermal and flame atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prkić Ante

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the simplicity of tea preparation (pouring hot water onto different dried herbs and its high popularity as a beverage, monitoring and developing a screening methodology for detecting the metal content is very important. The concentrations of Cd, Ca, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mg and Mn in 11 different samples of sage (Salvia officinalis L., linden (Tilia L. and chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. purchased at local herbal pharmacy were determined using electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS and flame atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. The concentrations determined were: Cd (0.012 – 0.470 mg kg−1, Ca (5209 – 16340 mg kg−1, Cu (22.01 – 33.05 mg kg−1, Fe (114.2 – 440.3 mg kg−1, Pb (0.545 – 2.538 mg kg−1, Mg (2649 – 4325 mg kg−1 and Mn (34.00 – 189.6 mg kg−1. Principal Component Analysis (PCA was applied to identify factors (soil and climate influencing the content of the measured elements in herbal samples. The proposed methodology developed in this work was successfully applied to the detection of metals in herbal samples. The analysis showed that the content of toxic metals in herbal teas was below the maximum dose recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO.

  18. A Compact, High-Flux Cold Atom Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, James R.; Kohel, James M.; Thompson, Robert J.; Aveline, David C.; Yu, Nan; Schlippert, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The performance of cold atom experiments relying on three-dimensional magneto-optical trap techniques can be greatly enhanced by employing a highflux cold atom beam to obtain high atom loading rates while maintaining low background pressures in the UHV MOT (ultra-high vacuum magneto-optical trap) regions. Several techniques exist for generating slow beams of cold atoms. However, one of the technically simplest approaches is a two-dimensional (2D) MOT. Such an atom source typically employs at least two orthogonal trapping beams, plus an additional longitudinal "push" beam to yield maximum atomic flux. A 2D atom source was created with angled trapping collimators that not only traps atoms in two orthogonal directions, but also provides a longitudinal pushing component that eliminates the need for an additional push beam. This development reduces the overall package size, which in turn, makes the 2D trap simpler, and requires less total optical power. The atom source is more compact than a previously published effort, and has greater than an order of magnitude improved loading performance.

  19. Determination of Fe Content of Some Food Items by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS): A Guided-Inquiry Learning Experience in Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakayode, Sayo O.; King, Angela G.; Yakubu, Mamudu; Mohammed, Abdul K.; Pollard, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a guided-inquiry (GI) hands-on determination of Fe in food samples including plantains, spinach, lima beans, oatmeal, Frosted Flakes cereal (generic), tilapia fish, and chicken using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The utility of the GI experiment, which is part of an instrumental analysis laboratory course,…

  20. Separation and enrichment of gold(III) from environmental samples prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk, Hasan Basri; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Duran, Celal; Soylak, Mustafa; Elci, Latif; Tufekci, Mehmet

    2007-10-22

    A simple and accurate method was developed for separation and enrichment of trace levels of gold in environmental samples. The method is based on the adsorption of Au(III)-diethyldithiocarbamate complex on Amberlite XAD-2000 resin prior to the analysis of gold by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after elution with 1 molL(-1) HNO3 in acetone. Some parameters including nitric acid concentration, eluent type, matrix ions, sample volume, sample flow rate and adsorption capacity were investigated on the recovery of gold(III). The recovery values for gold(III) and detection limit of gold were greater than 95% and 16.6 microgL(-1), respectively. The preconcentration factor was 200. The relative standard deviation of the method was gold in some environmental samples.

  1. [Determination of trace lead in water and milk tea powder samples with organic coprecipitation-flame atomic absorption spectrometric].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-Mei; Yao, Jun-Xue; Zhao, Wen-Yan

    2013-05-01

    A method was proposed for the determination of trace lead with flame atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration of lead by rapid coprecipitation technique with PAR-Fe (III) at pH 6.0. The analytical parameters including pH, amount of iron (III), amount of reagent, the standing time of the precipitate, etc., were examined. The detection limits (DL) were found to be 18.7 microg x L(-1) for Pb (II). In analysis of lake water and the milk tea powder samples, RSD's and the standard addition recovery of this method were in the ranges of 1.03%-2.24% and 94.2%-98.3% respectively. The effect of matrix can be overcome by the method and the results are satisfyiog. The method shows good application prospect in the determination of trace lead owing to its rapidness and reproducibility.

  2. Determination of Total Boron in fertilizers by flame atomic emission spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez G., Eddy Rey; Departamento Académico de Química Analítica, Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú; Cabrera A., Flor M.; Departamento Académico de Química Analítica, Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú; Ale B., Neptali; Departamento Académico de Química Analítica, Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    An alternative analytlcal method to the spectrophotometric method AOAC 982.01 has been developed to determine total boron in organic liquid fer1ilizers using emission spectrometry with nitrous oxide-acetylene flame in a wavelength of 249,7 nm. The method could apply to boron concentrations 0f 1,0 - 2,0 % w/w. The results showed 1% deviation to the official method. Se desarrollo un método analítico alternativo al método espectrofotométrico en la AOAC 982.01 para la determinación de Boro tot...

  3. Characterization of an atomic hydrogen source for charge exchange experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutenegger, M. A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); CRESST/University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Magee, E. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Betancourt-Martinez, G. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); University of Maryland College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg, Sternwartstr. 7, 96049 Bamberg (Germany); Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We characterized the dissociation fraction of a thermal dissociation atomic hydrogen source by injecting the mixed atomic and molecular output of the source into an electron beam ion trap containing highly charged ions and recording the x-ray spectrum generated by charge exchange using a high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer. We exploit the fact that the charge exchange state-selective capture cross sections are very different for atomic and molecular hydrogen incident on the same ions, enabling a clear spectroscopic diagnostic of the neutral species.

  4. Compact magneto-optical sources of slow atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Ovchinnikov, Yuri B.

    2004-01-01

    Three different configurations of compact magneto-optical sources of slow Rb atoms(LVIS, 2D(+)-MOT and 2D-MOT) were compared with each other at fixed geometry of cooling laser beams. A precise control of the intensity balances between the four separate transverse cooling laser beams provided a total continuous flux of cold atoms from the LVIS and 2D(+)-MOT sources about 8x10^9 atoms/s at total laser power of 60 mW. The flux was measured directly from the loading rate of a 3D-MOT, placed 34 cm...

  5. Use of atomic hydrogen source in collision: technological challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, R. T.; Vargas, E. L.; Panchenko, D. I.; Rivas, D. A.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    Atomic hydrogen was extensively studied in the past due to its obvious fundamental aspect. Also, quite few investigations were dedicated to atomic hydrogen sources because the results of experimental investigations on systems involving H would provide very rigorous tests for theoretical models. But even if atomic hydrogen sources are currently widespread in experimental physics, their uses in experiments on collisions are still very challenging mainly due to threefold problem. First, there is the difficulty to create H in the laboratory in sufficiently large number densities. Second, there is the strain to adjust the velocities of the produced atomic hydrogens. And third, there is the toil to control the internal energies of these atomic hydrogens. We will present an outline of different techniques using atomic hydrogen sources in collisions, which could be found in the literatures, such as merged-beam technique, gas cell technique, and trap, and propose an experiment scheme using a turn-key atomic hydrogen source that experiments such as charge transfer could benefit from. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1068877.

  6. Spatial distribution of old and emerging flame retardants in Chinese forest soils: sources, trends and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qian; Nizzetto, Luca; Li, Jun; Mulder, Marie D; Sáňka, Ondřej; Lammel, Gerhard; Bing, Haijian; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Yishan; Luo, Chunling; Zhang, Gan

    2015-03-03

    The levels and distribution of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and Dechlorane Plus (DP) in soils and their dependence on environmental and anthropological factors were investigated in 159 soil samples from 30 background forested mountain sites across China. Decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) was the most abundant flame retardant (25-18,000 pg g(-1) and 5-13,000 pg g(-1) in O-horizon and A-horizon, respectively), followed by BDE 209 (nd-5900 pg g(-1) and nd-2400 pg g(-1) in O-horizon and A-horizon, respectively). FRs distributions were primarily controlled by source distribution. The distributions of most phasing-out PBDEs, DP isomers and TBPH were in fact correlated to a population density-based index used as proxy of areas with elevated usage and waste of FR containing products. High concentrations of some NBFRs were however observed in industrialized regions and FR manufacturing plants. Strongly positive correlations were observed between PBDEs and their replacement products suggesting similar emission pattern and environmental behavior. Exposure of mineral subsoils depended on precipitations driving leaching of FRs into the soil core. This was especially evident for some emerging BFRs (TBE, TBPH, and TBB etc.) possibly indicating potential for diffuse groundwater contamination.

  7. Use of factorial design and Doehlert matrix for multivariate optimisation of an on-line preconcentration system for lead determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Sergio Luis Costa; Santos, W. N. L. dos; Bezerra, Marcos de Almeida; Lemos, Valfredo Azevedo; Bosque-Sendra, Juan M.

    2003-01-01

    Texto Completo: acesso restrito. p. 443–449. A system for on-line preconcentration and determination of lead by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was proposed. It was based on the sorption of lead(II) ions on a minicolumn of polyurethane foam loaded with 2-(2-thiazolylazo)-5 dimethylaminophenol (TAM). The optimisation step was carried out using twolevel full factorial and Doehlert designs for the determination of the optimum conditions for lead preconcentration. The proposed p...

  8. Determination of trace amounts of copper in river and sea water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) after cloud-point preconcentration

    OpenAIRE

    Goudarzi,Nasser

    2007-01-01

    A new preconcentration method was proposed using the cloud point approach for copper determination. The reagent 1,5-diphenyl-benzoin (Cupron) was used as a complexing agent and Triton X-114 was added as a surfactant. After phase separation, dilution of the surfactant-rich phase was carried out using acidified methanol and the copper content was subsequently measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. After optimization of the complexation and extraction conditions, the enrichment factor...

  9. Quality assessment of trace Cd and Pb contaminants in Thai herbal medicines using ultrasound-assisted digestion prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Siriangkhawut, Watsaka; Sittichan, Patcharee; Ponhong, Kraingkrai; Chantiratikul, Piyanete

    2017-01-01

    A simple, efficient, and reliable ultrasound-assisted digestion (UAD) procedure was used for sample preparation prior to quantitative determination of trace Cd and Pb contaminants in herbal medicines using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The parameters influencing UAD such as the solvent system, sample mass, presonication time, sonication time, and digestion temperature were evaluated. The efficiency of the proposed UAD procedure was evaluated by comparing with conventional acid digesti...

  10. Determination of some heavy metals in food and environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after coprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylak, Mustafa; Aydin, Ayse

    2011-06-01

    A novel preconcentration procedure based coprecipitation of Cu(II), Co(II), Cd(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Fe(III) and Pb(II) on thulium hydroxide precipitate has been presented prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of them in environmental samples. The analytical parameters that influenced the quantitative coprecipitation of analytes including amount of thulium, pH, duration time, etc. were investigated. The effects of alkali, earth alkali, and some transition metals on the recoveries were also studied. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits (3 sigma, N=10) for the analytes were in the range of 0.1-1.6 μg/L, respectively. The validation of the presented coprecipitation method was checked by the analysis of certified reference materials (TMDA 54.4 fortified lake water and HR-1 Humber river sediment). The proposed coprecipitation method has been successfully applied for the determination of traces of copper, cobalt, cadmium, nickel, manganese, iron and lead in food and environmental samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of gold from water samples prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Sabermahani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A preconcentration/separation procedure is presented for the solid phase extraction of trace gold(III as its rubeanic acid (dithiooxamide chelate on silica gel, prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The influences of analytical parameters including pH of the aqueous solution, the amount of the sorbent, time of the complex formation, ligand amount, flow rates of sample and elution solutions and the type, concentration and volume of elution solution on the quantitative recoveries of Au(III were investigated. At pH 3.5, the maximum sorption capacity of Au3+ was 7.5 mg g−1, by column method. The linearity was maintained in the concentration range of 1.0–3.4 × 104 ng mL−1 for gold in the original solution. The preconcentration factor of 100 and relative standard deviation of ±1.7% were obtained, under optimum conditions. The limit of detection (LOD was calculated as 0.80 ng mL−1, based on 3σbl/m (n = 8 in the original solutions. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination trace amounts of gold in the water samples.

  12. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes microcolumn preconcentration and determination of gold in geological and water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Pei; Zhao, Ehong; Ding, Qiong; Du, Dan

    2008-06-01

    The potential of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the separation and preconcentration of gold has been investigated. Gold could be adsorbed quantitatively on MWNTs in the pH range of 1-6, and then eluted completely with 2 mL of 3% thiourea in 1 mol L - 1 HCl solution at a flow rate of 0.5 mL min - 1 . A new method using a microcolumn packed with MWNTs as sorbent has been developed for the preconcentration of trace amount of Au prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Parameters influencing the preconcentration of Au, such as pH of the sample, sample flow rate and volume, elution solution and interfering ions, have been examined and optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limit of this method for Au was 0.15 µg L - 1 with an enrichment factor of 75, and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D) was 3.1% at the 100 µg L - 1 Au level. The method has been applied for the determination of trace amount of Au in geological and water samples with satisfactory results.

  13. Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction of Bismuth in Various Samples and Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teslima Daşbaşı

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the determination of bismuth in various samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry is described. In this method, crystal violet was used as counter positive ion for BiCl4- complex ion, chloroform as extraction solvent, and ethanol as disperser solvent. The analytical parameters that may affect the extraction efficiency like acidity of sample, type and amount of extraction and disperser solvents, amount of ligand, and extraction time were studied in detail. The effect of interfering ions on the analyte recovery was also investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.040–1.00 mg L−1 with detection limit of 4.0 μg L−1 (n=13. The precision as relative standard deviation was 3% (n=11, 0.20 mg L−1 and the enrichment factor was 74. The developed method was applied successfully for the determination of bismuth in various water, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic samples and the certified reference material (TMDA-64 lake water.

  14. [Determination of metals in waste bag filter of steel works by microwave digestion-flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xun-An; Zhou, Yun; Liu, Jing-Yong; Wang, Jiang-Hui; Li, Lei; Ma, Xiao-Guo

    2011-09-01

    A method of microwave digestion technique-flame atomic absorption spectrometry was proposed to determine the total contents of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni in five different kinds of waste bag filters from a steel plant. The digestion effects of the six acid systems on the heavy metals digestion were studied for the first time. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method was between 1.02% and 9.35%, and the recovery rates obtained by standard addition method ranged from 87.7% to 105.6%. The results indicated that the proposed method exhibited the advantages of simplicity, speediness, accuracy and repeatability, and it was suitable for determining the metal elements of the waste bag filter. The results also showed that different digestion systems should be used according to different waste bag filters. The waste bag filter samples from different production processes had different metal elements content. The Pb and Zn were the highest in the waste bag filters, while the Cu, Ni, Cd and Cr were relatively lower. These determination results provided the scientific data for further treatment and disposal of the waste bag filter.

  15. Determination of Gold in Various Environment Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Dispersive Liquid–Liquid Microextraction Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şerife Saçmacı

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction separation/preconcentration procedure as a rapid sample-preparation technique is proposed for detection of ultra trace amounts of Au(III in various media by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using 1,5-diphenyl-1,3,5-pentanetrione as chelating agent. Carbon tetrachloride and methanol were used as extraction and dispersive solvents, respectively. Various parameters that affect the extraction efficiency such as pH, centrifugation rate and time, chelating agent concentration and sampling volume on the recovery of Au(III were investigated. Under optimum conditions, the enhancement factor of 750, relative standard deviation of 2.7 % and calibration graphs obtained in the concentration range of 0.04–5.6 μg L−1 for gold were obtained. The limit of detection was 1.1 ng L−1. The accuracy of the method was performed by analysis of the certified reference material (CDN-PGMS-10. The developed method was applied successfully to the determination of gold in the catalytic converter, anode slime, ore and seawater samples. The results show that dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction procedure is sensitive, rapid, simple and safe for the separation/preconcentration of gold from complex sample media.

  16. Flame Atomic Absorption Determination of Gold Ion in Aqueous Samples after Preconcentration Using 9-Acridinylamine Functionalized γ-Alumina Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and sensitive solid phase extraction utilizing 9-acridinylamine functionalized alumina nanoparticles was developed, and their potential use for preconcentration and subsequent determination of gold by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS was investigated. A number of parameters, namely, type, concentration, and volume of eluent, pH of the sample solution, flow rate of extraction, and volume of the sample, were evaluated. The effect of a variety of ions on preconcentration and recovery was also investigated. Gold ions were found to be recovered quantitatively at pH 3.0, with 0.1 mol L−1 thiourea in 2 mol L−1 H2SO4 as eluent. The limit of detection (LOD, defined as five times the standard deviation of the blank, was determined to be lower than 13.0 ppb. Under optimum conditions, the accuracy and precision (RSD% of the method were >98.0 and <1.5%, respectively. To gauge its ability in terms of application to real samples, the proposed method was successfully applied for determination of gold concentration in waste water samples and one soil standard material, and satisfactory results were obtained.

  17. Simultaneous preconcentration of cadmium and lead in water samples with silica gel and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongbo; Wu, Yun; Wang, Jian; Shang, Xuewei; Jiang, Xiaojun

    2013-12-01

    A new method that utilizes pretreated silica gel as an adsorbent has been developed for simultaneous preconcentration of trace Cd(II) and Pb(II) prior to the measurement by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of pH, the shaking time, the elution condition and the coexisting ions on the separation/preconcentration conditions of analytes were investigated. Under optimized conditions, the static adsorption capacity of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 45.5 and 27.1mg/g, the relative standard deviations were 3.2% and 1.7% (for n = 11), and the limits of detection obtained were 4.25 and 0.60 ng/mL, respectively. The method was validated by analyzing the certified reference materials GBW 07304a (stream sediment) and successfully applied to the analysis of various treated wastewater samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2013 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dithizone immobilized silica gel on-line preconcentration of trace copper with detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Mei; Song, Hua; Chen, Ming-Li

    2011-07-15

    A novel adsorbent-silica gel bound dithizone (H(2)Dz-SG) was prepared and used as solid-phase extraction of copper from complex matrix. The H(2)Dz-SG is investigated by means of FT-IR spectra and the SEM images, demonstrating the bonding of dithizone. The H(2)Dz-SG quantitatively adsorb copper ions, and the retained copper is afterwards collected by elution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. An on-line flow injection solid-phase extraction procedure was developed for trace copper separation and preconcentration with detection by flame atomic spectrometry. By loading 5.4 mL of sample solution, a liner range of 0.5-120 μg L(-1), an enrichment factor of 42.6, a detection limit of 0.2 μg L(-1) and a precision of 1.7% RSD at the 40 μg L(-1) level (n=11) were obtained, along with a sampling frequency of 47 h(-1). The dynamic sorption capacity of H(2)Dz-SG to Cu(2+) was 0.76 mg g(-1). The accuracy of the proposed procedure was evaluated by determination of copper in reference water sample. The potential applications of the procedure for extraction of trace copper were successfully accomplished in water samples (tap, rain, snow, sea and river). The spiking recoveries within 91-107% are achieved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction of Bismuth in Various Samples and Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Kartal, Şenol; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the determination of bismuth in various samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry is described. In this method, crystal violet was used as counter positive ion for BiCl4 − complex ion, chloroform as extraction solvent, and ethanol as disperser solvent. The analytical parameters that may affect the extraction efficiency like acidity of sample, type and amount of extraction and disperser solvents, amount of ligand, and extraction time were studied in detail. The effect of interfering ions on the analyte recovery was also investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.040–1.00 mg L−1 with detection limit of 4.0 μg L−1 (n = 13). The precision as relative standard deviation was 3% (n = 11, 0.20 mg L−1) and the enrichment factor was 74. The developed method was applied successfully for the determination of bismuth in various water, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic samples and the certified reference material (TMDA-64 lake water). PMID:26881186

  20. Determination of Trace Silver in Water Samples by Online Column Preconcentration Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Termite Digestion Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Joyce Nunes; Martendal, Edmar; Carasek, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    A new method for Ag determination in water samples using solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a flow injection system and flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. The sorbent used for Ag preconcentration and extraction was the termite digestion product. Flow and chemical variables of the system were optimized through a multivariate procedure. The factors selected were adsorbent mass, buffer type and concentration, sample pH, and sample flow rate. The detection limit and precision were 3.4 μg L−1 and 3.8% (n = 6, 15 μg L−1), respectively. The enrichment factor and the linear working range were, respectively, 21 and 10–50 μg L−1. Results for recovery tests using different water samples were between 96 and 107%. The proposed methodology was applied with success for the determination of Ag in water used to wash clothes impregnated with silver nanoparticles, supplied by a factory located in Santa Catarina, Brazil. PMID:21804766

  1. A new approach to mineralization of flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) for trace element analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, João P S; Silva, Francisco L F; Monte, Raimundo J G; Matos, Wladiana O; Lopes, Gisele S

    2017-06-01

    A new approach to the analysis of Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn in flaxseed was developed based on infrared-assisted acid digestion. Quantitation by flame atomic absorption spectrometry yields results in agreement with those arising from aggressive total decomposition using conventional microwave-assisted (MW) digestions. A full factorial design in two levels was applied to evaluate the impact of significant variables for all elements to determine optimal experimental conditions. A desirability function revealed these to be: 2.0g sample mass, 8mL of HNO3 and 8min of heating time in the IR system. Precision better than 10% (RSD) was obtained, superior to that of a combined IR-MW approach. Sample preparation based on IR-assisted digestion provides a rapid and inexpensive alternative to other conventional techniques for the analysis of complex samples and is able to accommodate relatively large masses of sample, alleviating potential homogeneity issues as well as enhancing detection power. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of cadmium by flame-atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration on silica gel modified with cupferron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortoleto Gisele G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the determination of cadmium by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS after its preconcentration onto a column containing silica gel modified with cupferron was developed. The pH, amount of adsorbent material, concentration of eluent, volume of sample and amount of Cd were optimized. The effect of several foreign ions was also investigated and showed that the retention of cadmium depended on the amounts of Zn(II and Cu(II present and that these interferences could be overcome by using a 0.05 mmol KI. An enrichment factor of up to 30 was obtained , the LOD was 0.5 µg L-1 (3sigma and the LOQ was 2.0 µg L-1 (10sigma with rsd of 1.1% (n = 10. The accuracy of the proposed method was ascertained by using certified reference material and the obtained result (3.93 ± 0.01 µg g-1 agrees with the certified value (4.15 ± 0.38 µg g-1. The determination of Cd in nail polish showed quantitative recoveries for the spiked samples. The proposed method is characterized by simplicity, efficiency and low cost.

  3. Direct analysis of Antarctic krill by slurry sampling: determination of copper, iron, manganese and zinc by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Flávia L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Slurry sampling in combination with flame atomic absorption spectrometry was employed for the direct determination of four essential trace elements, namely Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn in Antarctic krill. The effect of instrumental operating conditions and slurry sampling preparation on the analytical signal was investigated. For the determination of Cu, Fe and Zn, samples were suspended in a solution containing 2 mol L-1 HNO3. In the case of Mn, 4 mol L-1 HNO3 was necessary for the preparation of the slurry. The precision between sample replicates was better than 5%. The method was applied to the direct determination of Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn in Antarctic krill samples using aqueous reference solutions to prepare the calibration curves. The results obtained were in good agreement with those achieved by FAAS and ICP-AES after microwave-assisted wet digestion of the krill samples. The detection limits were 4.5, 1.0, 4.9 and 8.4 mug L-1 for Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe, respectively.

  4. Sensitive determination of cadmium using solidified floating organic drop microextraction-slotted quartz tube-flame atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaya, Erhan; Chormey, Dotse Selali; Bakırdere, Sezgin

    2017-09-20

    In this study, solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME) by 1-undecanol was combined with slotted quartz tube flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-FAAS) for the determination of cadmium at trace levels. Formation of a complex with 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine facilitated the extraction of cadmium from aqueous solutions. Several chemical variables were optimized in order to obtain high extraction outputs. Parameters such as concentration of the ligand, pH, and amount of buffer solution were optimized to enhance the formation of cadmium complex. The SFODME method was assisted by dispersion of extractor solvent into aqueous solutions using 2-propanol. Under the optimum extraction and instrumental conditions, the limit of detection and limit of quantitation values obtained for cadmium using the combined methods (SFODME-SQT-FAAS) were found to be 0.4 and 1.3 μg L -1 , respectively. Matrix effects on the method were also examined for tap water and wastewater, and spiked recovery results were found to be very satisfactory. Graphical Abstract SFODME-SQT-FAAS system for sensitive determination of cadmium.

  5. Graphene for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of cobalt in water samples prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukun Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new sensitive and simple method was developed for the preconcentration of trace amounts of cobalt (Co using 1-(2-pyridylazo-2-naphthol (PAN as chelating reagent prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed method is based on the utilization of a column packed with graphene as sorbent. Several effective parameters on the extraction and complex formation were selected and optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the concentration range of 5.0–240.0 μg L−1 with a detection limit of 0.36 μg L−1. The relative standard deviation for ten replicate measurements of 20.0 and 100.0 μg L−1 of Co were 3.45 and 3.18%, respectively. Comparative studies showed that graphene is superior to other adsorbents including C18 silica, graphitic carbon, and single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the extraction of Co. The proposed method was successfully applied in the analysis of four real environmental water samples. Good spiked recoveries over the range of 95.8–102.6% were obtained.

  6. PHARAO space atomic clock: new developments on the laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccoccio, Muriel; Loesel, Jacques; Coatantiec, Claude; Simon, Eric; Laurent, Philippe; Lemonde, Pierre; Maksimovic, I.; Abgrall, M.

    2017-11-01

    The PHARAO project purpose is to open the way for a new atomic clock generation in space, where laser cooling techniques and microgravity allow high frequency stability and accuracy. The French space agency, CNES is funding and managing the clock construction. The French SYRTE and LKB laboratories are scientific and technical advisers for the clock requirements and the follow-up of subsystem development in industrial companies. EADS SODERN is developing two main subsystems of the PHARAO clock: the Laser Source and the Cesium Tube where atoms are cooled, launched, selected and detected by laser beams. The Laser Source includes an optical bench and electronic devices to generate the laser beams required. This paper describes PHARAO and the role laser beams play in its principle of operation. Then we present the Laser Source design, the technologies involved, and the status of development. Lastly, we focus of a key equipment to reach the performances expected, which is the Extended Cavity Laser Diode.

  7. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium.

  8. Internal polarized deuterium target with cryogenic atomic beam source

    CERN Document Server

    Dyug, M V; Lazarenko, B A; Mishnev, S I; Nikolenko, D M; Rachek, Igor A; Shestakov, Yu V; Sadykov, R S; Toporkov, D K; Zevakov, S A; Osipov, A V; Stibunov, V N

    2002-01-01

    Description of the polarized deuterium gas target used at the VEPP-3 electron storage ring for experiments on elastic and inelastic ed scattering is given. Superconducting sextupole magnets with the pole tip magnetic field up to 4.8 T are used in atomic beam source (ABS) to focus atoms. The flux of polarized atoms injected into the storage cell was measured to be 8.2x10 sup 1 sup 6 at/s for deuterium and 7.9x10 sup 1 sup 6 at/s for hydrogen. The measured target thickness 8x10 sup 1 sup 3 at/cm sup 2 is consistent with the thickness calculated from the measured beam intensity. The effective tensor polarization of the deuterium target during the experiment was found to be P sub z sub z =0.397. Further improvements of the target and possible limitation of the beam intensity from ABS are discussed.

  9. [Determination of sulfur in plant using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Jia-xi

    2009-05-01

    A method for the analysis of sulfur (S) in plant by molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide (CS) using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer (CS AAS) with a fuel-rich air/acetylene flame has been devised. The strong CS absorption band was found around 258 nm. The half-widths of some absorption bands were of the order of picometers, the same as the common atomic absorption lines. The experimental procedure in this study provided optimized instrumental conditions (the ratio of acetylene to air, the burner height) and parameters, and researched the spectral interferences and chemical interferences. The influence of the organic solvents on the CS absorption signals and the different digestion procedures for the determination of sulfur were also investigated. The limit of detection achieved for sulfur was 14 mg x L(-1), using the CS wavelength of 257. 961 nm and a measurement time of 3 s. The accuracy and precision were verified by analysis of two plant standard reference materials. The major applications of this method have been used for the determination of sulfur in plant materials, such as leaves. Compared to the others, this method for the analysis of sulfur is rapid, easy and simple for sulfur determination in plant.

  10. [Determination of trace gold by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after separation and preconcentration with load nanometer titanium dioxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-Hua; Zhou, Fang-Qin; Jiang, Fang-Ming; Huang, Rong-Hui; Yang, Liu; Zhou, Le-Zhou

    2008-02-01

    A new method for the determination of trace gold by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) after preconcentration with p-dimethylaminobenzylidenerhodanine (DMABR) loaded with nanometer TiO2 was developed. The method is convenient, highly precise and linear in a wide range. Under dynamic condition, the optimum pH of solution, flow rate, elution conditions were obtained for preconcentration of trace gold. And the effect of interfering ions was also investigated. It was found that the studied gold could be quantitatively preconcentrated on loaded nanometer TiO2 at pH = 3.5, and the flow rate of sample solution was 0.6 mL x min(-1), and the flow rate of eluting solution with 0.1 mol x L(-1) HCl-0.5 mol x L(-1) thiourea was 0.5 mL x min(-1), sufficient for complete elution. The dynamic adsorption capacity of gold on load nanometer TiO2 was 23.19 mg x g(-1). The linear range for gold was 0-0.40 microg x mL(-1), correlation coefficient was 0. 999 3, detection limit (3sigma, n = 11) for gold was 2.34 ng x mL(-1), and the relative standard deviation was 2.9% (n = 6, c = 0.10 microg x mL(-1)), the recovery was in the range of 96.7%-101.7%. The method has been applied to the determination of trace gold in water samples with satisfactory results.

  11. Cloud Point Extraction and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometric Determination of Lead, Cadmium and Palladium in Some Food and Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Soylak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The proposed method is based on the complexation of the Pb2+, Cd2+ and Pd2+ ions with 3-(1-(1-H-Indol-3-Yl-3-phenylallyl-1H-indole (IPAI at pH 8.0 in the presence of Triton X-114. The phase separation occured when micellar solution was heated at 55 ◦C. The surfactant-rich phase, diluted to 0.5 mL via 1.0 mol L−1 nitric acid in methanol was directly introduced into the nebulizer of the flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. Influence of variables such as pH, amount of ligand and Triton X-114, heating time and temperature were evaluated and optimized. The optimized enhancement factors for Pb2+, Cd2+ and Pd2+ ions were 22, 33 and 23, respectively and the detection limit (DLs was between of 1.6–2.6 µgL−1. The relative standard deviation (RSD of each ion was found to be less than 4.6% at 100 µgL−1. In addition, the calibration graphs were linear in the range of 0.01-0.22 μg mL−1 for Cd2+ ion, 0.018-0.26 μg mL−1 for Pb2+ ion and 0.02-0.27 μg mL−1 for Pd2+ ion with the correlation coefficients in the range of 0.995–0.999.

  12. Laser source of neutral atoms for collective field particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykovskiy, Yu.A.; Mironov, V.E.; Sarantsev, V.P.; Sil' nov, S.M.; Sotnichenko, E.A.; Ter-Martirosyan, Z.A.; Shestakov, B.A.

    1984-03-01

    Laser sources for collective-field particle accelerators, of ions of almost all chemical elements, operate in deep vacuum (10/sup -8/ -10/sup -9/ torr) and in a strong alternating magnetic field (up to 20 kOe, 50 Hz). Under such conditions a laser source is required to deliver an atom flux of 10/sup 11/ -10/sup 12/ in pulses of 10-100 ms duration from a target to electron rings. Such a laser source has been designed for the collective-field heavy-ion accelerator at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research. It consists of a laser, focusing lens, and conical target of the material whose atoms are to be extracted. The equipment is laid out with the compressor tube mounted on a support inside the vacuum chamber and the laser source in front of the window on the extension of the compressor tube axis. This construction can be modified for large electron rings, with axicon optics that reshape the incoming laser beam into an annular beam for electron rings with radii longer than 8 cm or by moving the laser source from the axial location to a peripheral location relative to the compressor tube for electron rings with radii of 30-35 cm. These three variants of such a laser source were evaluated in an experimental test stand, with a Q-switched YAG:Nd/sup 3 +/ laser (wavelength lambda = 1.06 ..mu..m) emitting radiation pulses of 0.06 J energy and 10 ns duration, and with lead, aluminum, iron, or copper used as target material. The results of measurements, accurate within 20%, indicate that the laser source is most effective with lead targets and least effective with copper targets. 9 references, 9 figures.

  13. Ionic liquid ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for preconcentration of trace amounts of rhodium prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaakbari, Elaheh [Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Research Society, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi, Ali, E-mail: mostafavi.ali@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afzali, Daryoush [Environment and Nanochemistry Department, Research Institute of Environmental Science, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Science, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mineral Industries Research Center, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-30

    In this article, we consider ionic liquid based ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace amounts of rhodium from aqueous samples and show that this is a fast and reliable sample pre-treatment for the determination of rhodium ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The Rh(III) was transferred into its complex with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylamino phenol as a chelating agent, and an ultrasonic bath with the ionic liquid, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide at room temperature was used to extract the analyte. The centrifuged rhodium complex was then enriched in the form of ionic liquid droplets and prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, 300 {mu}L ethanol was added to the ionic liquid-rich phase. Finally, the influence of various parameters on the recovery of Rh(III) was optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 4.0-500.0 ng mL{sup -1}, the detection limit was 0.37 ng mL{sup -1} (3S{sub b}/m, n = 7) and the relative standard deviation was {+-}1.63% (n = 7, C = 200 ng mL{sup -1}). The results show that ionic liquid based ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry, is a rapid, simple, sensitive and efficient analytical method for the separation and determination of trace amounts of Rh(III) ions with minimum organic solvent consumption.

  14. Determination of Iron (Fe) and Calcium (Ca) in NIST SRM 1566b (Oyster tissue) using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (F-AAS) by Standard Addition Method

    OpenAIRE

    Fitri Dara; Y Susanto Ridwan

    2017-01-01

    NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM 1566b) was employed for the determination of Iron (Fe) andCalcium (Ca) as nutrients in food matrix using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (F-AAS). Thecertified value of SRM 1566b for Fe and Ca are 205.8 ± 6.8 mg/kg and 0.0838 ± 0.0020 (%) or 838 ±20 mg/kg, respectively. This certified values are based on results obtained by single primary method(Isotope Dilution Inductively Couple Plasma Mass Spectrometry) at NIST with confirmation by othermethods at ...

  15. The atomization and the flame structure in the combustion of residual fuel oils; La atomizacion y estructura de flama en la combustion de combustibles residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolado Estandia, Ramon [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1985-12-31

    In this article a research on the combustion of heavy residual fuel oils is presented. The type of flames studied were obtained by means of the burning of sprays produced by an atomizer designed and calibrated specially for the research purpose. The flame characteristics that were analyzed are its length, its luminosity, the temperature, the distribution of the droplets size and mainly the burning regime of the droplets in the flame. The experimental techniques that were used for these studies were shadow micro-photography, suction pyrometry and of total radiation, laser diffraction, 35 mm photography, and impact push. The analysis of the experimental results, together with the results of the application of a mathematical model, permitted to establish two parameters, that quantitatively related determine the burning regime of the droplets in a flame of sprays of residual heavy fuel oil. [Espanol] En este articulo se presenta una investigacion sobre la combustion de combustibles residuales pesados. El tipo de flamas estudiadas se obtuvieron mediante el quemado de sprays producidos por un atomizador disenado y calibrado especialmente para el proposito de la investigacion. Las caracteristicas de flama que se analizaron son la longitud, la luminosidad, la temperatura, la distribucion de tamano de gotas y, principalmente, el regimen de quemado de gotas en la flama. Las tecnicas experimentales que se usaron para estos estudios fueron microfotografia de sombras, pirometria de succion y de radiacion total, difraccion laser, fotografia de 35 mm y empuje de impacto. El analisis de resultados experimentales, junto con los resultados de la aplicacion de un modelo matematico, permitio establecer dos parametros, que relacionados cuantitativamente, determinan el regimen de quemado de gotas en una flama de sprays de combustible residual pesado.

  16. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Maryland Nanocenter, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); zeroK NanoTech, Montgomery Village, Maryland 20886 (United States); McClelland, J. J. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2013-07-28

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1} and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1}. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  17. Determination of sulfur in food by high resolution continuum source flame molecular absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrzycka, Elżbieta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata, E-mail: bgodlew@uwb.edu.pl

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, a fast, simple and sensitive analytical method for determination of sulfur in food and beverages by high resolution continuum source flame molecular absorption spectrometry was developed. The determination was performed via molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide, CS. Different CS rotational lines (257.959 nm, 258.033 nm, 258.055 nm), number of pixels and types of standard solution of sulfur, namely: sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, sodium sulfite, sodium sulfide, DL-cysteine, and L-cystine, were studied in terms of sensitivity, repeatability of results as well as limit of detection and limit of quantification. The best results were obtained for measurements of absorption of the CS molecule at 258.055 nm at the wavelength range covering 3 pixels and DL-cysteine in 0.2 mol L{sup −1} HNO{sub 3} solution as a calibration standard. Under optimized conditions the limit of detection and the limit of quantification achieved for sulfur were 10.9 mg L{sup −1} and 36.4 mg L{sup −1}, respectively. The repeatability of the results expressed as relative standard deviation was typically < 5%. The accuracy of the method was tested by analysis of digested biological certified reference materials (soya bean flour, corn flour and herbs) and recovery experiment for beverage samples with added known amount of sulfur standard. The recovery of analyte from such samples was in the range of 93–105% with the repeatability in the range of 4.1–5.0%. The developed method was applied for the determination of sulfur in milk (194 ± 10 mg kg{sup −1}), egg white (2188 ± 29 mg kg{sup −1}), mineral water (31.0 ± 0.9 mg L{sup −1}), white wine (260 ± 4 mg L{sup −1}) and red wine (82 ± 2 mg L{sup −1}), as well as in sample rich in ions, such as bitter mineral water (6900 ± 100 mg L{sup −1}). - Highlights: • HR-CS FMAS technique was used for sulfur measurement via molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide, CS. • Organic DL

  18. Application of dual-cloud point extraction for the trace levels of copper in serum of different viral hepatitis patients by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: A multivariate study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Salma Aslam; Kazi, Tasneem G.; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Abbasi, Abdul Rasool; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Naeemullah; Shanker, Bhawani; Arain, Mohammad Balal

    2014-12-01

    An efficient, innovative preconcentration method, dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) has been developed for the extraction and preconcentration of copper (Cu2+) in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients prior to couple with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The d-CPE procedure was based on forming complexes of elemental ions with complexing reagent 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN), and subsequent entrapping the complexes in nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114). Then the surfactant rich phase containing the metal complexes was treated with aqueous nitric acid solution, and metal ions were back extracted into the aqueous phase, as second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using conventional nebulization. The multivariate strategy was applied to estimate the optimum values of experimental variables for the recovery of Cu2+ using d-CPE. In optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection and the enrichment factor were 0.046 μg L-1 and 78, respectively. The validity and accuracy of proposed method were checked by analysis of Cu2+ in certified sample of serum (CRM) by d-CPE and conventional CPE procedure on same CRM. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cu2+ in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients and healthy controls.

  19. Application of dual-cloud point extraction for the trace levels of copper in serum of different viral hepatitis patients by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: a multivariate study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Salma Aslam; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Abbasi, Abdul Rasool; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Naeemullah; Shanker, Bhawani; Arain, Mohammad Balal

    2014-12-10

    An efficient, innovative preconcentration method, dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) has been developed for the extraction and preconcentration of copper (Cu(2+)) in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients prior to couple with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The d-CPE procedure was based on forming complexes of elemental ions with complexing reagent 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN), and subsequent entrapping the complexes in nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114). Then the surfactant rich phase containing the metal complexes was treated with aqueous nitric acid solution, and metal ions were back extracted into the aqueous phase, as second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using conventional nebulization. The multivariate strategy was applied to estimate the optimum values of experimental variables for the recovery of Cu(2+) using d-CPE. In optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection and the enrichment factor were 0.046μgL(-1) and 78, respectively. The validity and accuracy of proposed method were checked by analysis of Cu(2+) in certified sample of serum (CRM) by d-CPE and conventional CPE procedure on same CRM. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cu(2+) in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients and healthy controls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of traces of copper and zinc in honeys by the solid phase extraction pre-concentration followed by the flame atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecka, Helena; Jedryczko, Dominika; Welna, Maja; Pohl, Pawel

    2014-10-01

    A simple and fast solid phase extraction procedure was developed to pre-concentrate traces of Cu and Zn prior to their determination in honey samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The sample preparation included dissolution of honey samples and the passage (at 20 ml/min) of resulting 10% m/v solutions (100 ml) through Dowex 50W × 8-400 resin beds in order to quantitatively retain Cu and Zn and separate them from the glucose and fructose matrix. Enriched Cu and Zn traces were recovered with 5.0 ml of a 3.0 mol/l HCl solution and quantified by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure proposed was used to analyze sixty nine commercially available and freshly ripened honey samples coming from the Lower Silesia region (Poland). It enabled to measure Cu and Zn within the range of 0.01-1.42 and 0.03-15.38 μg/g, respectively, with precision better than 4%. Accuracy, assessed on the basis of the recovery test and the comparison of results with those obtained using wet digestion and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, was ranged from -4% to +6%. Detection limits of Cu and Zn achieved with this method were 5 and 7 ng/g, respectively.

  1. Determination of trace amounts of lead in mussels by flow-injection flame atomic-absorption spectrometry coupled with on-line minicolumn preconcentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yebra, M.C.; Enriquez, M.F.; Garcia, A.; Moreno-Cid, A. [Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Chemistry Faculty, Santiago Univ., Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2001-05-01

    A minicolumn packed with poly(aminophosphonic acid) chelating resin incorporated in an on-line preconcentration system for flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was used to determine ultratrace amounts of lead in mussel samples at {mu}g L{sup -1} level. The preconcentrated lead was eluted with hydrochloric acid and injected directly into the nebulizer for atomization in an air-acetylene flame for measurement. The performance characteristics of the determination of lead were: preconcentration factor 26.8 for 1 min preconcentration time, detection limit (3{sigma}) in the sample digest was 0.25 {mu}g g{sup -1} (dry weight) for a sample volume of 3.5 mL and 0.2 g sample (preconcentration time 1 min), precision (RSD) 2.3% for 25 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 2.0% for 50 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The sampling frequency was 45 h{sup -1}. The method was highly tolerant of interferences, and the results obtained for the determination of lead in a reference material testify to the applicability of the proposed procedure to the determination of lead at ultratrace level in biological materials such as mussel samples. (orig.)

  2. Environmental concentration and atmospheric deposition of halogenated flame retardants in soil from Nepal: Source apportionment and soil-air partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ishwar Chandra; Devi, Ningombam Linthoingambi; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2017-11-03

    While various investigations have been driven on polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and other flame retardants (FRs) in different framework around the world, information about contamination and fate of PBDEs and other FRs in developing countries especially in the Indian subcontinent is uncommon. Nepal being located in the Indian subcontinent, very little is known about contamination level of semi-volatile organic pollutants discharged into the environment. This motivated us to investigate the environmental fate of halogenated flame retardant (HFRs) in Nepalese condition. In this study, we investigated the concentration, fate, and sources of 9 PBDEs, 2 dechlorane plus isomers (DPs), and 6 novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs). Moreover, air-soil exchange and soil-air partitioning were also evaluated to characterize the pattern of air-soil exchange and environmental fate. In general, the concentrations of NBFRs in soil were more prevalent than PBDEs and DPs, and accounted 95% of ∑HFRs. By and large, the concentrations of NBFRs and DPs were measured high in Kathmandu, while PBDEs level exceeded in Pokhara. Principal component analysis (PCA) study suggested contributions from commercial penta-, octa-, and deca-BDEs products and de-bromination of highly brominated PBDEs as the significant source of PBDEs. Likewise, low fanti ratio suggested DPs in soil might have originated from long-range atmospheric transport from remote areas, while high levels of decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) in soil were linked with the use of wide varieties of consumer products. The estimated fugacity fraction (ff) for individual HFR was quite lower (air to the soil is overwhelming. Soil-air partitioning study revealed neither octanol-air partition coefficient (KOA) nor black carbon partition coefficient (KBC-A) is an appropriate surrogate for soil organic matter (SOM), subsequently, absorption by SOM has no or little role in the partitioning of HFRs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  3. Creation and recovery of a W(111) single atom gas field ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitters, Jason L; Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A

    2012-04-21

    Tungsten single atom tips have been prepared from a single crystal W(111) oriented wire using the chemical assisted field evaporation and etching method. Etching to a single atom tip occurs through a symmetric structure and leads to a predictable last atom unlike etching with polycrystalline tips. The single atom tip formation procedure is shown in an atom by atom removal process. Rebuilds of single atom tips occur on the same crystalline axis as the original tip such that ion emission emanates along a fixed direction for all tip rebuilds. This preparation method could be utilized and developed to prepare single atom tips for ion source development.

  4. Determination of trace amount of cadmium using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction-slotted quartz tube-flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fırat, Merve; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Fındıkoğlu, Maral Selin; Kafa, Emine Betül; Yazıcı, Elif; Yolcu, Melda; Büyükpınar, Çağdaş; Chormey, Dotse Selali; Sel, Sabriye; Turak, Fatma

    2017-03-01

    This study was performed to develop a sensitive analytical method for the determination of cadmium by slotted quartz tube-flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-FAAS) after dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). The parameters affecting the cadmium complex formation and its extraction output were optimized to obtain high extraction efficiency. These included the pH and amount of the buffer solution, and the concentration of the ligand. The DLLME method was comprehensively optimized based on the type and amount of extraction solvent, dispersive solvent and salt. The type and period of mixing needed for a more effective extraction was also investigated. In order to further improve the sensitivity for the determination of cadmium, the flame atomic absorption spectrometry was fitted with a slotted quartz tube to increase the residence time of cadmium atoms in the pathway of incident light from a hollow cathode lamp. The limits of detection and quantitation (LOD and LOQ) for the FAAS were found to be 42 and 140 μg L- 1, respectively. Under the optimum conditions, LOD and LOQ of the FAAS after DLLME were calculated as 1.3 and 4.4 μg L- 1, respectively. Combining both optimized parameters of the DLLME and SQT-FAAS gave 0.5 and 1.5 μg L- 1 as LOD and LOQ, respectively. Accuracy of the method was also checked using a wastewater certified reference material (EU-L-2), and the result was in good agreement with the certified value.

  5. A rapid method for determining tin and molybdenum in geological samples by flame atomic-absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    The proposed method uses a lithium metaborate fusion, dissolution of the fusion bead in 15% v v hydrochloric acid, extraction into a 4% solution of trioctylphosphine oxide in methyl isobutyl ketone, and aspiration into a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The limits of detection for tin and molybdenum are 1.0 and 0.5 ppm, respectively. Approximately 50 samples can be analysed per day. ?? 1985.

  6. Slurry analysis of cadmium and copper collected on 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid modified TiO{sub 2} core-Au shell nanoparticles by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunduz, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Chemistry, 34469 Maslak-Istanbul (Turkey); Akman, S., E-mail: akmans@itu.edu.tr [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Chemistry, 34469 Maslak-Istanbul (Turkey); Kahraman, M. [Yeditepe University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Genetics and Bioengineering, 34755 Kayisdagi-Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-02-15

    Separation/preconcentration of copper and cadmium using TiO{sub 2} core-Au shell nanoparticles modified with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and their slurry analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry were described. For this purpose, at first, titanium dioxide nanoparticles were coated with gold shell by reducing the chloroauric acid with sodium borohydride and then modified with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid. The characterization of modified nanoparticles was performed using ultra-violet spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. Copper and cadmium were then collected on the prepared sorbent by batch method. The solid phase loaded with the analytes was separated by centrifugation and the supernatant was removed. Finally, the precipitate was slurried and directly aspirated into the flame for the determination of analytes. Thus, elution step and its all drawbacks were eliminated. The effects of pH, amount of sorbent, slurry volume, sample volume and diverse ions on the recovery were investigated. After optimization of experimental parameters, the analytes in different certified reference materials and spiked water samples were quantitatively recovered with 5% RSD. The analytes were enriched up to 20-fold. Limits of detection (N = 10, 3{sigma}) for copper and cadmium were 0.28 and 0.15 ng mL{sup -1}, respectively.

  7. Determination of nickel in food samples by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy after preconcentration and microextraction based ionic liquids using full factorial and central composite design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Zohre; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2012-12-01

    In this research, a microextraction technique based on ionic liquids (ILs) termed in situ solvent formation microextraction (ISFME) was used for determination of nickel in solutions. 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphtol (PAN) was chosen as a complexing agent. After preconcentration, the settled IL-phase was dissolved in 50 μL of ethanol and aspirated into the flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS) using a home-made microsample introduction system. Injection of 50 μL volumes of analyte into an air-acetylene flame provided very sensitive spike-like and reproducible signals. ISFME is based on phase separation phenomenon of ionic liquids in aqueous solutions. This method is simple and rapid for extraction and preconcentration of metal ions from food samples and can be applied for the sample solutions containing very high concentrations of salt. Furthermore, this technique is much safer in comparison with the organic solvent extraction because of using ionic liquid. The effective parameters such as amount of IL, salt effect, concentration of the chelating agent and ion pairing agent were inspected by a full factorial design to identify important parameters and their interactions. Next, a central composite design was applied to obtain optimum point of the important parameters. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear over the range of 2 to 80 ng/mL. The limit of detection and relative standard deviation (n= 6) were 0.6 ng/mL and 2%, respectively. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of trace quantities of cadmium in water samples after cloud point extraction in Triton X-114 without added chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afkhami, Abbas [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: afkhami@basu.ac.ir; Madrakian, Tayyebeh [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Siampour, Hajar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-11-16

    A new micell-mediated phase separation method for preconcentration of ultra-trace quantities of cadmium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. The method is based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) of cadmium in iodide media with Triton X-114 in the absence of any chelating agent. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g., acid concentration, iodide concentration, effect of time) were studied, and the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection, linear range, preconcentration, and improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 3-300 ng mL{sup -1} of cadmium. The detection limit of the method is 1.0 ng mL{sup -1} of cadmium. The interference effect of some anions and cations was also tested. The method was applied to the determination of cadmium in tap water, waste water, and sea water samples.

  9. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of trace quantities of cadmium in water samples after cloud point extraction in Triton X-114 without added chelating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Siampour, Hajar

    2006-11-16

    A new micell-mediated phase separation method for preconcentration of ultra-trace quantities of cadmium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. The method is based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) of cadmium in iodide media with Triton X-114 in the absence of any chelating agent. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g., acid concentration, iodide concentration, effect of time) were studied, and the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection, linear range, preconcentration, and improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 3-300 ng mL(-1) of cadmium. The detection limit of the method is 1.0 ng mL(-1) of cadmium. The interference effect of some anions and cations was also tested. The method was applied to the determination of cadmium in tap water, waste water, and sea water samples.

  10. Separation/preconcentration of trace Pb(II and Cd(II with 2-mercaptobenzothiazole impregnated Amberlite XAD-1180 resin and their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şerife Tokalıoğlu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new chelating resin, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole loaded Amberlite XAD-1180 was prepared and used for separation and preconcentration of Cd(II and Pb(II ions prior to their determinations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimum pH for simultaneous retention of the elements and the best elution means for their simultaneous elution were 9.5 and 2 mol L−1 HNO3, respectively. The detection limits for Cd(II and Pb(II were 0.35 and 5.0 μg L−1, respectively. The accuracy of the method was confırmed both by analyzing the certified reference material (RM 8704 Buffalo river sediment and performing recovery studies.

  11. Selective cloud point extraction and preconcentration of trace amounts of silver as a dithizone complex prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzoori, Jamshid L.; Karim-Nezhad, Ghasem

    2003-05-19

    Dithizone (diphenylthiocarbazone) was used as a complexing agent in cloud point extraction for the first time and applied for selective preconcentration of trace amounts of silver. The analyte in the initial aqueous solution was acidified with sulfuric acid (pH<1) and Triton X-114 was added as a surfactant. After phase separation, based on the cloud point separation of the mixture, the surfactant rich phase was diluted with tetrahydrofuran (THF) and the analyte determined in the enriched solution by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. After optimization of the complexation and extraction conditions, a preconcentration factor of 43 was obtained for only 10 ml of sample. The analytical curve was linear in the range of 3-200 ng ml{sup -1} and the limit of detection was 0.56 ng ml{sup -1}. The proposed method was applied to the determination of silver in water samples.

  12. Preconcentration, Separation and Determination of lead(II) with Methyl Thymol Blue Adsorbed on Activated Carbon Using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Ghaderi, Ali R. [Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    An on-line system for preconcentration and separation of lead(II) is presented. The method is based on the complex formation of Pb(II) with adsorbed Methyl thymol blue on activated carbon. The conditions of preparing the solid phase reagent and of quantitative recovery of Pb(II) from diluted solutions, such as acidity of aqueous phase, solid phase capacity, and flow variables were studied as well as effect of potential interfering ions. After preconcentration step, the metal ions are eluted automatically by 5 ml of 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} solution and the lead ions content was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Under the optimum conditions, the lead ions in aqueous samples were separated and preconcentrated about 1000-fold by the column. The detection limit was 0.001 μg mL{sup -1}. Lead has been determined in river and tap water samples, with recovery of 98 to 102%.

  13. Evaluation of cadmium, lead, copper, iron and zinc in Turkish dietary vegetable oils and olives using electrothermal and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, O.

    2012-07-01

    The Cd, Pb, Cu, Fe and Zn contents of some edible vegetable oils (soybean, sunflower, flower, nut, corn and olive) and of olives (olive-1, black, green, black crushed with seeds and green crushed with seeds) were determined and evaluated by an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (ETAAS) using an Sc + Ir + NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} chemical modifier mixture and flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS) after microwave digestion. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of Cd, Pb and Cu in sample solutions with and without the modifier mixture were investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) for analytes found are 0.1, 0.6, 0.9, 15.0 and 12.0 {mu}g L{sup -}1 for Cd, Cu, Pb, Fe and Zn, respectively. The accuracy of the procedure proposed was confirmed by analyzing bovine liver 1577b standard reference material (SRM) and a spiked sample solution. The results of the analytes found were compared with certified and added values. The relative standard deviations of the analytes found were lower than 7% and the percent of recoveries obtained ranges from 96 to 101%. The Sc + Ir + NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} mixture proposed was applied for the determination of Cd, Pb and Cu in oils and olives. The results of analytes found in the samples were compared with international and national food quality guidelines as well as with literature values. (Author) 48 refs.

  14. Point source atom interferometry with a cloud of finite size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoth, Gregory W., E-mail: gregory.hoth@nist.gov; Pelle, Bruno; Riedl, Stefan; Kitching, John; Donley, Elizabeth A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate a two axis gyroscope by the use of light pulse atom interferometry with an expanding cloud of atoms in the regime where the cloud has expanded by 1.1–5 times its initial size during the interrogation. Rotations are measured by analyzing spatial fringe patterns in the atom population obtained by imaging the final cloud. The fringes arise from a correlation between an atom's initial velocity and its final position. This correlation is naturally created by the expansion of the cloud, but it also depends on the initial atomic distribution. We show that the frequency and contrast of these spatial fringes depend on the details of the initial distribution and develop an analytical model to explain this dependence. We also discuss several challenges that must be overcome to realize a high-performance gyroscope with this technique.

  15. Product screening for sources of halogenated flame retardants in Canadian house and office dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Golnoush [Department of Geography, University of Toronto, 100 St. George St., Toronto M5S 3G3 (Canada); Saini, Amandeep [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto M1C 1A4 (Canada); Goosey, Emma [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Toronto, 22 Russell Street, Toronto M5S 3B1 (Canada); Diamond, Miriam L., E-mail: miriam.diamond@utoronto.ca [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Toronto, 22 Russell Street, Toronto M5S 3B1 (Canada); Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2016-03-01

    Human exposure to halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their replacements, can be related to exposure to indoor dust and direct contact with HFR-containing products. This study aimed to identify electronic products that contributed to HFRs measured in indoor dust and to develop a screening method for identifying HFRs in hard polymer products. Concentrations of 10 PBDEs and 12 halogenated replacements in dust and surface wipe samples of hard polymer casings of electronic products plus Br in the surfaces of those casing measured using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) were analyzed from 35 homes and 10 offices in Toronto (ON, Canada). HFR concentrations in dust and product wipes were positively correlated. Thus, we hypothesize that electronic products with the highest HFR concentrations contribute the most to concentrations in dust, regardless of the volatility of the HFR. Abundant HFRs in dust and product wipes were PBDEs (BDE-47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 209), TDCPP, DBDPE, EH-TBB and BEHTBP. Older CRT TVs had the highest concentration of BDE-209 of all products tested. This was followed by higher concentrations of HFRs in PCs, Audio/Video (A/V) devices, small household appliances (HHAs) and flat screen TVs. The removal of HFRs from polymer surfaces using wipes supports concerns that HFRs could be transferred from these surfaces to hands as a result of direct contact with HFR-containing products. Surface wipe testing shows promise for screening additive HFRs. In comparison, the Br-content obtained using a handheld XRF analyzer did not correspond to concentrations obtained from surface wipe testing. - Highlights: • Concentrations of flame retardants in dust correlated with product surface wipes • Most abundant FRs in electronics were PBDEs, TDCPP, DBDPE, EH-TBB and BEHTBP. • Descending order of FRs in CRTs, TVs, PCs, A-V devices, and small household appliances • Product wipe testing, but not XRF, useful for non

  16. Atmospheric Deposition of Heavy Metals around the Lead and Copper-Zinc Smelters in Baia Mare, Romania, Studied by the Moss Biomonitoring Technique, Neutron Activation Analysis and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Culicov, O A; Steinnes, E; Okina, O S; Santa, Z; Todoran, R

    2002-01-01

    The mosses Pleurozium schreberi, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus were used as biomonitors to study the atmospheric deposition of heavy metals around the lead and copper-zinc smelters in Baia Mare. Samples representing the last three years' growth of moss or its green part, collected on the ground at 28 sites located 2-17 km from the source area, were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis using epithermal neutrons and by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A total of 31 elements were determined, including most of the heavy metals characteristic of emissions from this kind industry. The observed data for Pb, As, Cu, and Cd are all high compared with those observed in other regions of Europe with similar industries, but the concentrations in moss approach regional background levels at a distance of about 8 km from the main source area. Factor analysis of the data distinguishes two industrial components, one characterized by Pb, Cu, As, and Sb, and another one by Zn and Cd...

  17. Immobilized stearic acid as a new sorbent for on-line preconcentration and determination of lead by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadfarnia Shayessteh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the possibility of immobilization of stearic acid on microcrystalline naphthalene for preparation of microcolumn and evaluation of its potential for adsorption and preconcentration of trace amounts of metal ions. It was found that this sorbent has high affinity for lead. Consequently, a rapid on-line preconcentration technique for the determination of lead by Flow Injection Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry had been devised. Preconcentration was based on accumulation of analyte on immobilized stearic acid microcolumn and subsequent elution by injection of a small volume of nitric acid (250 µL of 1 mol L-1. A sample volume of 20 mL resulted in a preconcentration factor of 84, and relative standard deviations for solutions containing 40 and 200 µg L-1 were 5.1 and 1.2%, respectively. The procedure was applied to tap water, river water, sea water, apple juice, beet leaf, urine, and certified stainless steel. The accuracy was proved by performing recovery experiments, Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry measurements, and analysis of a stainless steel certified reference material.

  18. An automated flow injection system for metal determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry involving on-line fabric disk sorptive extraction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthemidis, A; Kazantzi, V; Samanidou, V; Kabir, A; Furton, K G

    2016-08-15

    A novel flow injection-fabric disk sorptive extraction (FI-FDSE) system was developed for automated determination of trace metals. The platform was based on a minicolumn packed with sol-gel coated fabric media in the form of disks, incorporated into an on-line solid-phase extraction system, coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). This configuration provides minor backpressure, resulting in high loading flow rates and shorter analytical cycles. The potentials of this technique were demonstrated for trace lead and cadmium determination in environmental water samples. The applicability of different sol-gel coated FPSE media was investigated. The on-line formed complex of metal with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) was retained onto the fabric surface and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) was used to elute the analytes prior to atomization. For 90s preconcentration time, enrichment factors of 140 and 38 and detection limits (3σ) of 1.8 and 0.4μgL(-1) were achieved for lead and cadmium determination, respectively, with a sampling frequency of 30h(-1). The accuracy of the proposed method was estimated by analyzing standard reference materials and spiked water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preconcentration of Co, Ni, Cd and Zn on naphthalene–2,4,6-trimorpholino-1,3,5-triazin adsorbent and flame atomic absorption determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAYYEBEH MADRAKIAN

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A preconcentration method was developed for the determination of trace amounts of Co, Ni, Cd and Zn by atomic absorption spectrometry. The method is based on the retention of the metal cations by naphthalene–2,4,6-trimorpholino-1,3,5-triazin adsorbent in a column. The adsorbed metals were then eluted from the column with hydrochloric acid and the Co, Ni, Cd and Zn were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimal extraction and elution conditions were studied. The effects of diverse ions on the preconcentration were also investigated. A preconcentration factor of 250 for Co(II, Ni(II and Zn(II, and 400 for Cd(II can easily be achieved. Calibration graphs were obtained and the detection limits of the method for Co(II, Ni(II, Cd(II and Zn(II were 0.51, 0.49, 0.17 and 0.10 ng mL-1, respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSD of 0.37–2.31 % for Co, 0.37–3.73 % for Ni, 2.20–2.40 % for Cd and 1.50–2.56 % for Zn were obtained. The method was also used for the simultaneous preconcentration of these elements and the method was successfully applied to their preconcentration and determination. The method was applied to the determination of Co, Ni, Cd and Zn in several real samples.

  20. Silicon halide-alkali metal flames as a source of solar grade silicon. Seventh quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, D.B.; Gould, R.K.

    1979-04-01

    This program is aimed at determining the feasibility of using high temperature reactions of alkali metals and silicon halides to produce low cost solar-grade silicon. Experiments are being performed to evaluate product separation and collection processes, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes, and determine the effects of the reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction. Prior work has demonstrated continuous separation of silicon from the byproduct alkali salt at a production rate of 0.5 kg h/sup -1/ in a graphite reactor using the reaction of Na with SiCl/sub 4/. Silicon of similar purity is obtained from Na + SiF/sub 4/ flames although yields are lower and product separation and collection are less thermochemically favored. During the current reporting period the results of heat release experiments have been used to design and construct a new type of thick-walled graphite reactor to produce larger quantities of silicon. A new reactor test facility has been constructed. Material compatibility tests have been performed for NA in contact with graphite and several coated graphites. All samples were rapidly degraded at T = 1200 K, while samples retained structural strength at 1700 K. Pyrolytic graphite coatings cracked and separated from substrates in all cases.

  1. Multi-channel tunable source for atomic sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR will establish the feasibility of developing compact, robust, integrated components suitable for atomic interferometry. AdvR's design is enabled by...

  2. Laser Source for Atomic Gravity Wave Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an Atom Interferometry-based gravity wave detector (vs Optical Interferometry). Characterize a high power laser. Use Goddard Space Flight Center Mission...

  3. Pulsed metastable atom source for low vapour-pressure metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Urena, A.; Verdasco Costales, E. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Facultad de Quimica); Saez Rabanos, V. (Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales)

    1990-03-01

    The basic design and most relevant experimental conditions of a pulsed metastable atomic-beam oven are described. The stainless steel oven is suitable for vaporising metals and salts up to around 1400 K producing intense beams of metastable alkaline-earth atoms when pulsed or continuous wave low voltage discharges are used. Several applications using atomic calcium in its {sup 3}P and {sup 1}D electronic state are reported. The beam characterisation and discharge efficiency have been measured by time-of-flight or laser-induced fluorescence techniques. In addition, a method of changing the metastable n{sup 3}P/n{sup 1}D ratio, by raising the oven temperature, is described which looks very promising for the study of electronic selectivity in reactive collision processes. Finally several spectroscopic applications for atomic and molecular beam determinations are reported. (author).

  4. Determination of trace copper in food samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction on modified soybean hull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang Guoqiang, E-mail: xianggq@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Zhang Yingming; Jiang Xiuming; He Lijun; Fan Lu; Zhao Wenjie [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2010-07-15

    Soybean hull was chemically modified with citric acid and used as a solid phase extraction adsorbent for the determination of trace amounts of Cu{sup 2+} in food samples by flame absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effect of pH, sample flow rate and volume, elution flow rate and volume and co-existing ions on the recovery of the analyte were investigated. The results showed that Cu{sup 2+} could be adsorbed on the modified soybean hull at pH 8.0 and eluted by 2.0 mL of 1.0 mol L{sup -1} HCl. Under the optimized conditions, the adsorption capacity of modified soybean hull was found to be 18.0 mg g{sup -1} for Cu{sup 2+}. The detection limit of the proposed method was 0.8 ng mL{sup -1} for Cu{sup 2+} with an enrichment factor of 18. The analytical result for the certified reference tea sample (GBW07605) was in a good agreement with the certified value. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the determination of trace Cu{sup 2+} in dried sweet potato, lake water and milk powder, the recovery of Cu{sup 2+} for spiked samples was between 91% and 109.6%.

  5. Fast-ion-beam laser probing of ion-source energy distributions and atomic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Richard A., E-mail: rholt@uwo.ca; Rosner, S. David [University of Western Ontario, Physics and Astronomy Department (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Collinear fast-ion-beam laser spectroscopy is a very high resolution probe for measuring ion-beam energy distributions and atomic structure parameters of interest in nuclear physics, atomic physics, and astrophysics. We have used offline 10-keV beams of atomic ions and a CW laser system to study the behavior of a Penning ion source and to measure hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, atomic lifetimes, spontaneous-emission branching fractions, oscillator strengths, and absolute wavelengths of a variety of atomic species from the lanthanide and transition-metal groups.

  6. In situ emulsification microextraction using a dicationic ionic liquid followed by magnetic assisted physisorption for determination of lead prior to micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokri, Masood; Beiraghi, Asadollah [Faculty of Chemistry, Kharazmi University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seidi, Shahram, E-mail: s.seidi@kntu.ac.ir [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-19

    For the first time, a simple and efficient in situ emulsification microextraction method using a dicationic ionic liquid followed by magnetic assisted physisorption was presented to determine trace amounts of lead. In this method, 400 μL of 1.0 mol L{sup −1} lithium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide aqueous solution, Li[NTf{sub 2}], was added into the sample solution containing 100 μL of 1.0 mol L{sup −1} 1,3-(propyl-1,3-diyl) bis (3-methylimidazolium) chloride, [pbmim]Cl{sub 2}, to form a water immiscible ionic liquid, [pbmim][NTf{sub 2}]{sub 2}. This new in situ formed dicationic ionic liquid was applied as the acceptor phase to extract the lead-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (Pb-APDC) complexes from the sample solution. Subsequently, 30 mg of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were added into the sample solution to collect the fine droplets of [pbmim][NTf{sub 2}]{sub 2}, physisorptively. Finally, MNPs were eluted by acetonitrile, separated by an external magnetic field and the obtained eluent was subjected to micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for further analysis. Comparing with other microextraction methods, no special devices and centrifugation step are required. Parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as extraction time, pH, concentration of chelating agent, amount of MNPs and coexisting interferences were studied. Under the optimized conditions, this method showed high extraction recovery of 93% with low LOD of 0.7 μg L{sup −1}. Good linearity was obtained in the range of 2.5–150 μg L{sup −1} with determination coefficient (r{sup 2}) of 0.9921. Relative standard deviation (RSD%) for seven repeated measurements at the concentration of 10 μg L{sup −1} was 4.1%. Finally, this method was successfully applied for determination of lead in some water and plant samples. - Highlights: • A dicationic ionic liquid was used as the extraction solvent, for the first time. • A

  7. Occurrence and source apportionment of halogenated flame retardants in the indoor air of Nepalese cities: Implication on human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ishwar Chandra; Devi, Ningombam Linthoingmabi; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2017-07-01

    Elevated level of brominated- and chlorinated-flame retardants (FRs) have been accounted in ambient air across the globe. Despite what might be expected, restricted information is available on PBDEs and other halogenated FR contained indoor air in whole of Indian sub-continent especially in case of Nepal, sandwiched between two most populous countries i.e. India and China. It was conjectured that the level of halogenated flame retardant (HFRs) in Nepalese air would be high because they have not been liable to control in Nepal; and henceforth there is more plausibility of HFRs to be available in a diverse array of goods and consumer products. This study therefore aims to measure the occurrence, spatial distributions and sources of 15 brominated- and 2 chlorinated-FRs in indoor air from four major cities of Nepal. The overall concentrations of HFRs ranged from 16.1 to 6750 pg/m3 (median 334 pg/m3). The total concentrations of novel brominated fire retardants (NBFRs) were 20 and 100 times (13.2-6270 pg/m3) higher than PBDEs (2.2-353 pg/m3) and DPs (0.67-129 pg/m3), respectively indicating much higher usages of NBFRs in Nepal. The level of ∑PBDEs in air is identified with utilization of wide variety of consumers products and building materials containing FRs in Nepalese houses, while higher concentration of BDE-209 were subject to emission from materials containing deca-BDE formulation. Significantly higher concentrations of DBDPE than BDE-209 in air demonstrated a move to more prominent use of DBDPE as alternative to BDE-209. The lower fanti ratios suggests the DP level in this study was essentially affected by the long range atmospheric transport from remote DP source instead of commercial products. The exposure to BDE-47, -99, -153, -209 and HBB via inhalation was 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than corresponding RfD values, suggesting insignificant risk to Nepalese population. However, other modes of human exposure might still be significant in Nepal.

  8. Alternate Funding Sources for the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Swarthout, Jordan M.

    2012-09-04

    Since 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked to ensure the safe and responsible promotion of nuclear technology throughout the world. The IAEA operates at the intersection of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty’s (NPT) fourth and third articles, which guarantee Parties to the Treaty the right to peaceful uses of nuclear technology, provided those activities are placed under safeguards verified by the IAEA. However, while the IAEA has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is a concern that its resources are being stretched to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As noted by the Director General (DG) in 2008, demographics suggest that every aspect of the IAEA’s operations will be in higher demand due to increasing reliance on non-carbon-based energy and the concomitant nonproliferation, safety, and security risks that growth entails. In addition to these nuclear energy concerns, the demand for technical developmental assistance in the fields of food security, resource conservation, and human health is also predicted to increase as the rest of the world develops. Even with a 100% value-for-money rating by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and being described as an “extraordinary bargain” by the United Nations Secretary-General’s High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change, real budget growth at the Agency has been limited to zero-real growth for a better part of the last two decades. Although the 2012 regular budget (RB) received a small increase for most programs, the 2013 RB has been set at zero-real growth. As a result, the IAEA has had to defer infrastructure investments, which has hindered its ability to provide the public goods its Members seek, decreased global security and development opportunities, and functionally transformed the IAEA into a charity, dependent on extrabudgetary (EB) contributions to sustain

  9. A simple and fast method for assessment of the nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium rating of fertilizers using high-resolution continuum source atomic and molecular absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechlin, Marcos André; Fortunato, Felipe Manfroi; da Silva, Ricardo Moutinho; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta

    2014-11-01

    The determination of N, P, and K in fertilizers by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic and molecular absorption spectrometry is proposed. Under optimized conditions, measurements of the diatomic molecules NO and PO at 215.360 and 247.620 nm, respectively, and K using the wing of the alternative line at 404.722 nm allowed calibration curves to be constructed in the ranges 500-5000 mg L- 1 N (r = 0.9994), 100-2000 mg L- 1 P (r = 0.9946), and 100-2500 mg L- 1 K (r = 0.9995). Commercial fertilizers were analyzed by the proposed method and the concentrations of N, P, and K were found to be in agreement with those obtained by Kjeldahl, spectrophotometric, and flame atomic emission spectrometry methods, respectively, at a 95% confidence level (paired t-test). A phosphate rock certified reference material (CRM) was analyzed and the results for P and K were in agreement with the reference values. Recoveries from spiked CRM were in the ranges 97-105% (NO3--N), 95-103% (NH4+-N), 93-103% (urea-N), 99-108% (P), and 99-102% (K). The relative standard deviations (n = 12) for N, P, and K were 6, 4, and 2%, respectively.

  10. Use of factorial design and Doehlert matrix for multivariate optimisation of an on-line preconcentration system for lead determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, S L C; dos Santos, W N L; Bezerra, M A; Lemos, V A; Bosque-Sendra, J M

    2003-02-01

    A system for on-line preconcentration and determination of lead by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was proposed. It was based on the sorption of lead(II) ions on a minicolumn of polyurethane foam loaded with 2-(2-thiazolylazo)-5-dimethylaminophenol (TAM). The optimisation step was carried out using two-level full factorial and Doehlert designs for the determination of the optimum conditions for lead preconcentration. The proposed procedure allowed the determination of lead with a detection limit of 2.2 microg L(-1), and a precision, calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD), of 2.4 and 6.8 for a lead concentration of 50.0 and 10.0 microg L(-1), respectively. A preconcentration factor of 45 and a sampling frequency of 27 samples per hour were obtained. The recovery achieved for lead determination in the presence of several cations demonstrated that this procedure has enough selectivity for analysis of environmental samples. The validation was carried out by analysis of certified reference material. This procedure was applied to lead determination in natural food.

  11. Simultaneous coprecipitation of lead, cobalt, copper, cadmium, iron and nickel in food samples with zirconium(IV) hydroxide prior to their flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citak, Demirhan; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-09-01

    A simple and new coprecipitation procedure is developed for the determination of trace quantities of heavy metals (lead, cobalt, copper, cadmium, iron and nickel) in natural water and food samples. Analyte ions were coprecipitated by using zirconium(IV) hydroxide. The determination of metal levels was performed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The influences of analytical parameters including pH, amount of zirconium(IV), sample volume, etc. were investigated on the recoveries of analyte ions. The effects of possible matrix ions were also examined. The recoveries of the analyte ions were in the range of 95-100%. Preconcentration factor was calculated as 25. The detection limits for the analyte ions based on 3 sigma (n=21) were in the range of 0.27-2.50 microgL(-1). Relative standard deviation was found to be lower than 8%. The validation of the presented coprecipitation procedure was performed by the analysis certified reference materials (GBW 07605 Tea and LGC 6010 Hard drinking water). The procedure was successfully applied to natural waters and food samples like coffee, fish, tobacco, black and green tea.

  12. Determination of total chromium at ultratrace levels in water and soil samples by coprecipitation microsample injection system flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Elci, Latif; Khan, Muhammad Irfan; Kazi, Tasneem Gul

    2014-01-01

    A simple, robust, and novel analytical procedure was developed for determination of total chromium (Cr) by carrier element coprecipitation (CECP) coupled microsample injection system with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. For this method, Cr(III) was oxidized by Ce(SO4)2 in acidic media, and the resulting solution formed coprecipitates with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate in the presence of Ce(III). The effective parameters of the developed method have been optimized and studied in detail. The LOD and enrichment factor of CECP were 2.13 μg/L and 100 ± 2.8, respectively, with 40 mL initial volumes. The RSD values (n = 6) were 96%). The accuracy of total Cr by CECP after microwave acid digestion was checked by using a certified reference material (GBW 07309 Stream Sediment). The difference between the found and certified values was not significant (P > 0.05). The proposed method was successfully applied to natural drinking water, industrial effluent wastewater, and the exchangeable fraction of garden soil from Denizli, Turkey.

  13. Coprecipitation of trace elements with Ni2+/2-Nitroso-1-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid and their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluozlu, Ozgür Dogan; Tuzen, Mustafa; Mendil, Durali; Soylak, Mustafa

    2010-04-15

    Ni(2+)/2-Nitroso-1-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid precipitate was used for the coprecipitation of Co, Pb, Cu, Fe and Zn prior to their flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determinations in environmental samples. The precipitate could be easily dissolved with concentrated nitric acid. The recovery values for analyte ions were higher than 95%. The parameters including pH, sample volume, centrifuge time, amounts of nickel and matrix effects were optimized for the quantitative recoveries of the analytes. The relative standard deviations of cobalt, lead, copper, iron and zinc were found 4.5, 5.7, 3.8, 6.1 and 7.5%, respectively. The limit of detection was calculated as 1.05, 2.67, 1.30, 1.38, and 0.50 microg L(-1) for cobalt, lead, copper, iron and zinc. The validation of the procedure was checked by the analysis of IAEA 336 lichen and SLRS 4 Riverine water standard reference materials were analyzed with satisfactory results. The presented coprecipitation procedure was successfully applied to some environmental samples for determination of analyte ions. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination of trace amount of gold after separation and preconcentration onto ion-exchange polyethylenimine coated on Al2O3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Afzali

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The object of this work is to develop a simple and selective method for efficient extraction of Au(III ions in aqueous solution using a new solid-phase extraction sorbent. Polyethylenimine (PEI ion-exchange polymer was coated on alumina in the presence of NaNO3. The method is based on sorption of Au3+ ions on 50 mg PEI/Al2O3. A solution of 0.5 M thiourea, then 1.0 M HCl effectively eluted the gold ion and then aspirated into flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS. The influence of flow rate of sample solution and eluent, the pH effect, eluent type and sorption capacity was investigated. The effects of various diverse ions for preconcentration and separation of the gold ion were investigated. Relative standard deviation of 4.0 μg mL−1 of gold was 1.46% (n = 10. The detection limit was 26.2 ng L−1 in original solution. The method has been applied successfully for the recovery of trace amount of Au(III ions from water samples.

  15. Separation and Enrichment of Gold in Water, Geological and Environmental Samples by Solid Phase Extraction on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Prior to its Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Ali; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes the application of multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a solid sorbent for the preconcentration of gold prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination. Extraction was achieved by using a glass column (15.0 cm in length and 1.0 cm in diameter). Quantitative recoveries were obtained in the pH range of 2.5-4.0; the elution step was carried out with 5.0 ml of 1.0 mol/L HNO3 in acetone. In the ligand-free study, variables such as pH, eluent type, sample volume, flow rates, and matrix effect were examined for the optimum recovery of gold ions. The gold ions were able to be pre-concentrated by a factor of 150 and their LOD was determined to be 1.71 μg/L. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the developed method, addition-recovery tests were applied for the tap water, mineral water, and sea water samples. Gold recovery studies were implemented using a wet digestion technique for mine and soil samples taken from various media, and this method was also applied for anodic slime samples taken from the factories located in the Kayseri Industrial Zone of Turkey.

  16. On-line solid-phase separation/preconcentration for the determination of copper in urine by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saçmacı, Şerife, E-mail: sacmaci@erciyes.edu.tr; Şahan, Serkan; Şahin, Uğur; Kartal, Şenol; Ülgen, Ahmet

    2014-11-01

    A new on-line separation/preconcentration system was developed for the determination of Cu(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry in urine samples. A newly synthesized chelating resin, by anchoring eriochrome blue black R reagent to Amberlite XAD-16 resin, was used as a packing material for the selective separation/preconcentration of Cu(II) ions. The influence of the parameters on the determination of Cu(II) ions such as pH of sample solution, amount of the resin, eluent type, interfering ions and flow variables was studied. The detection limit of the method was 1.0 μg L{sup −1} while precision was 2.3% (n = 15) at 50 μg L{sup −1} Cu(II) level. The adsorption capacity of the resin was 217 μg g{sup −1} Cu(II). The accuracy of the method was proven using TMDA-64 standard lake water and synthetic urine sample. The developed method has been applied successfully to the determination of copper in urine with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • The method was applied to the urine samples taken from Wilson’s patients. • The on-line determination of copper and satisfactory results were obtained. • All processes are made automatically by the system itself in the proposed method.

  17. Preconcentration and determination of copper and cadmium ions with 1,6-bis(2-carboxy aldehyde phenoxy)butane functionalized Amberlite XAD-16 by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, Elif V; Dolak, Ibrahim; Temel, Hamdi; Ziyadanogullari, Berrin

    2011-02-15

    A new chelating resin, covalently linked 1,6-bis(2-carboxy aldehyde phenoxy)butane with the Amberlite XAD-16 was synthesized and used for preconcentration of Cu(II) and Cd(II) prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). It was characterized by elemental analyses and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). Cu(II) and Cd(II) ions were quantitatively preconcentrated on minicolumn loaded with synthesised resin at pH 4.00 and 6.00, respectively. They were eluated with 5 mL of 0.5 mol L(-1) HCl. Recoveries of Cu(II) and Cd(II) were found to be 100±2.15, 100±1.40 (N=5), the limits of detection of Cu(II) and Cd(II) in the determination by FAAS (3s, N=20) were found to be 0.33 and 1.19 μg L(-1), respectively. The effect of foreign ions on the recovery has been investigated. The proposed method has been applied for the determination of Cu(II) and Cd(II) ions to the real samples collected from Tigris river water in Diyarbakir and Elaziğ cities in Turkey. Standard addition method and analysis of the certified reference material (NCS-DC 73350) was employed to check the accuracy of the method. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. On-line preconcentration system using a microcolumn packed with Alizarin Red S-modified alumina for zinc determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Haji Shabani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and sensitive on-line flow injection system for determination of zinc with FAAS has been described. The method is based on the separation and preconcentration of zinc on a microcolumn of immobilized Alizarin Red S on alumina. The adsorbed analyte is then eluted with 250 µL of nitric acid (1 mol L-1 and is transported to flame atomic absorption spectrometer for quantification. The effect of pH, sample and eluent flow rates and presence of various cations and anions on the retention of zinc was investigated. The sorption of zinc was quantitative in the pH range of 5.5-8.5. For a sample volume of 25 mL an enrichment factor of 144 and a detection limit (3S of 0.2 µg L-1 was obtained. The precision (RSD, n=7 was 3.0% at the 20 µg L-1 level. The developed system was successfully applied to the determination of zinc in water samples, hair, urine and saliva.

  19. Determination of Iron (Fe and Calcium (Ca in NIST SRM 1566b (Oyster tissue using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (F-AAS by Standard Addition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Dara

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM 1566b was employed for the determination of Iron (Fe andCalcium (Ca as nutrients in food matrix using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (F-AAS. Thecertified value of SRM 1566b for Fe and Ca are 205.8 ± 6.8 mg/kg and 0.0838 ± 0.0020 (% or 838 ±20 mg/kg, respectively. This certified values are based on results obtained by single primary method(Isotope Dilution Inductively Couple Plasma Mass Spectrometry at NIST with confirmation by othermethods at National Metrology Institute of P.R. China. This paper proposed a method fordetermination of Fe and Ca in food matrix as recommended by AOAC official with a littlemodification. The method was commenced from the destruction of all organic matter by dry oxidationbefore analysis by standard addition. Under optimum condition, the results of the determination of Feand Ca in SRM 1566b were agreed well with the certificate value. This method would be useful forroutine analysis in food testing laboratories.

  20. A Green Analytical Method Using Ultrasound in Sample Preparation for the Flow Injection Determination of Iron, Manganese, and Zinc in Soluble Solid Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carmen Yebra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid analytical method was developed for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples. The method is based on continuous ultrasonic water dissolution of the sample (5–30 mg at room temperature followed by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. A good precision of the whole procedure (1.2–4.6% and a sample throughput of ca. 25 samples h–1 were obtained. The proposed green analytical method has been successfully applied for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid food samples (soluble cocoa and soluble coffee and pharmaceutical preparations (multivitamin tablets. The ranges of concentrations found were 21.4–25.61 μg g-1 for iron, 5.74–18.30 μg g-1 for manganese, and 33.27–57.90 μg g-1 for zinc in soluble solid food samples and 3.75–9.90 μg g-1 for iron, 0.47–5.05 μg g-1 for manganese, and 1.55–15.12 μg g-1 for zinc in multivitamin tablets. The accuracy of the proposed method was established by a comparison with the conventional wet acid digestion method using a paired t-test, indicating the absence of systematic errors.

  1. Field sample preconcentration of copper in sea water using chelating minicolumns subsequently incorporated on a flow-injection-flame atomic absorption spectrometry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yebra, M C; Carro, N; Enríquez, M F; Moreno-Cid, A; García, A

    2001-06-01

    A field flow preconcentration system for copper determination in seawater is described. Seawater samples are collected and preconcentrated in situ by passing them using a peristaltic pump through a minicolumn packed with Amberlite XAD-4 impregnated with the complexing agent 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol. Thus, copper is preconcentrated without the interference of the saline matrix. Once in the laboratory, the minicolumns loaded with copper are incorporated on a flow injection system and eluted with a small volume of a 20% (v/v) ethanolic solution of 0.5 mol L-1 hydrochloric acid into the nebuliser-burner system of a flame atomic absorption spectrometer. The analytical figures of merit for the determination of copper are as follows: detection limit (3s), 0.06 microgram L-1; precision (RSD), 1.2% for 2 micrograms L-1; enrichment factor, 30 (using 25 mL of sample and 83 microL of eluent). Analysis of certified reference materials (SLEW-3 and NASS-5) showed good agreement with the certified value. This procedure was applied to the determination of copper in seawater samples from Galicia (Spain).

  2. Optimization of cloud point extraction procedure with response surface methodology for quantification of iron by means of flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolmohammad-Zadeh Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple micelle-mediated phase separation method has been developed for the pre-concentration of trace levels of iron as a prior step to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. The method is based on the cloud point extraction (CPE of iron using non-ionic surfactant polyethyleneglycolmono-p-nonylphenylether (PONPE 7.5 without adding any chelating agent. Several variables affecting the extraction efficiency were studied and optimized utilizing central composite design (CCD and three levels full factorial design. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection (LOD, limit of quantification (LOQ and pre-concentration factor were 1.5 μg L-1, 5.0 μg L-1 and 100, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD for six replicate determinations at 50 μg L−1 Fe(III level was 1.97%. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 5-100 μg L-1, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9921. The developed method was validated by the analysis of two certified reference materials and applied successfully to the determination of trace amounts of Fe(III in water and rice samples.

  3. A dispersive liquid--liquid microextraction methodology for copper (II) in environmental samples prior to determination using microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alothman, Zeid A; Habila, Mohamed; Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    A simple, environmentally friendly, and efficient dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method combined with microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for the separation and preconcentration of Cu(II). 2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)phenol (5-Br-PADAP) was used to form a hydrophobic complex of Cu(II) ions in the aqueous phase before extraction. To extract the Cu(II)-5-Br-PADAP complex from the aqueous phase to the organic phase, 2.0 mL of acetone as a disperser solvent and 200 microL of chloroform as an extraction solvent were used. The influences of important analytical parameters, such as the pH, types and volumes of the extraction and disperser solvents, amount of chelating agent, sample volume, and matrix effects, on the microextraction procedure were evaluated and optimized. Using the optimal conditions, the LOD, LOQ, preconcentration factor, and RSD were determined to be 1.4 microg/L, 4.7 microg/L, 120, and 6.5%, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was investigated using standard addition/recovery tests. The analysis of certified reference materials produced satisfactory analytical results. The developed method was applied for the determination of Cu in real samples.

  4. A Green Analytical Method Using Ultrasound in Sample Preparation for the Flow Injection Determination of Iron, Manganese, and Zinc in Soluble Solid Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yebra, M. Carmen

    2012-01-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method was developed for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples. The method is based on continuous ultrasonic water dissolution of the sample (5–30 mg) at room temperature followed by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. A good precision of the whole procedure (1.2–4.6%) and a sample throughput of ca. 25 samples h–1 were obtained. The proposed green analytical method has been successfully applied for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid food samples (soluble cocoa and soluble coffee) and pharmaceutical preparations (multivitamin tablets). The ranges of concentrations found were 21.4–25.61 μg g−1 for iron, 5.74–18.30 μg g−1 for manganese, and 33.27–57.90 μg g−1 for zinc in soluble solid food samples and 3.75–9.90 μg g−1 for iron, 0.47–5.05 μg g−1 for manganese, and 1.55–15.12 μg g−1 for zinc in multivitamin tablets. The accuracy of the proposed method was established by a comparison with the conventional wet acid digestion method using a paired t-test, indicating the absence of systematic errors. PMID:22567553

  5. A new cloud point extraction procedure for determination of inorganic antimony species in beverages and biological samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Nail; Gürkan, Ramazan

    2015-05-15

    A new cloud-point extraction (CPE) for the determination of antimony species in biological and beverages samples has been established with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the fact that formation of the competitive ion-pairing complex of Sb(III) and Sb(V) with Victoria Pure Blue BO (VPB(+)) at pH 10. The antimony species were individually detected by FAAS. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration range for Sb(V) is 1-250 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.25 μg L(-1) and sensitive enhancement factor of 76.3 while the calibration range for Sb(III) is 10-400 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 5.15 μg L(-1) and sensitive enhancement factor of 48.3. The precision as a relative standard deviation is in range of 0.24-2.35%. The method was successfully applied to the speciative determination of antimony species in the samples. The validation was verified by analysis of certified reference materials (CRMs). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Indirect determination of the flavor enhancer maltol in foods and beverages through flame atomic absorption spectrometry after ultrasound assisted-cloud point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Nail; Gürkan, Ramazan; Orhan, Ulaş

    2017-11-15

    A simple ultrasound assisted-cloud point extraction (UA-CPE) method was developed and combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for pre-concentration and indirect determination of the flavor enhancer maltol in foods and beverages. The method is based on reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) by maltol at pH 6.5, and subsequent selective interaction of Cu(I) with bathocuproine (BCP) to form a ternary complex in presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Under the optimized conditions, pre-concentration of a 35mL sample solution allowed detection of 1.24µgL-1 maltol in a linear range of 4-230µgL-1. The method was validated by intra- and inter-day precision studies ranging from 2.1 to 3.4%, and recoveries ranged from 93.3% to 104.4% using standard addition method. After pretreatment with two different sample preparation steps assisted by ultrasound energy, the proposed method was applied successfully for determination of maltol in selected foods and beverages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of l-cystine modified zeolite for preconcentration and determination of ultra-trace levels of cadmium by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Seyyed Ahmad; Soleymanpour, Ahmad

    2016-03-04

    A very convenient, sensitive and precise solid phase extraction (SPE) system was developed for enrichment and determination of ultra-trace of cadmium ion in water and plant samples. This method was based on the retention of cadmium(II) ions by l-cystine adsorbed in Y-zeolite and carry out in a packed mini-column. The retained cadmium ions then were eluted and determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy techniques were applied for the characterization of cystine modified zeolite (CMZ). Some experimental conditions affecting the analytical performance such as pH, eluent type, concentration of sample, eluent flow rate and also the presence of interfering ions were investigated. The calibration graph was linear within the range of 0.1-7.5ngmL(-1) and limit of detection was obtained 0.04ngmL(-1) with the preconcentration factor of 400. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was obtained 1.4%, indicating the excellent reproducibility of this method. The proposed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of cadmium(II) ion in black tea, cigarette's tobacco and also various water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development a novel supramolecular solvent microextraction procedure for copper in environmental samples and its determination by microsampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2014-08-01

    A supramolecular solvent (Ss) made up of reverse micelles of 1-decanol in tetrahydrofuran (THF): water was used for the fast and selective microextraction of Cu(II) prior to its determination by microsampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Cu(II) was complexed with dimethyl dithiocarbamate (DMDC) to obtain hydrophobic complex and extracted to supramolecular solvent phase. The influences of some analytical parameters including pH, type and volume of supramolecular solvent, amount of complexing agent, ultrasonication and centrifuge time and sample volume were investigated. The effects of matrix components were also examined. The detection limit (LOD) and the quantification limit (LOQ) were 0.52µg L(-1) and 1.71µg L(-1) respectively. An preconcentration factor was obtained as 60 and the relative standard deviation was <3%. The accuracy of the developed method was evaluated by the analysis of the certified reference materials (TMDA-64.2 water, SRM 1568A Rice Flour and 8433 Corn Bran) and addition-recovery tests. The presented supramolecular solvent based liquid-liquid microextraction (SsLLME) procedure was applied to the determination of copper in food and water samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A Green Preconcentration Method for Determination of Cobalt and Lead in Fresh Surface and Waste Water Samples Prior to Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Shah, Faheem; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Khan, Sumaira; Arian, Sadaf Sadia; Brahman, Kapil Dev

    2012-01-01

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) has been used for the preconcentration and simultaneous determination of cobalt (Co) and lead (Pb) in fresh and wastewater samples. The extraction of analytes from aqueous samples was performed in the presence of 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine) as a chelating agent and Triton X-114 as a nonionic surfactant. Experiments were conducted to assess the effect of different chemical variables such as pH, amounts of reagents (oxine and Triton X-114), temperature, incubation time, and sample volume. After phase separation, based on the cloud point, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with acidic ethanol prior to its analysis by the flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The enhancement factors 70 and 50 with detection limits of 0.26 μg L−1 and 0.44 μg L−1 were obtained for Co and Pb, respectively. In order to validate the developed method, a certified reference material (SRM 1643e) was analyzed and the determined values obtained were in a good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of Co and Pb in a fresh surface and waste water sample. PMID:23227429

  10. Ultrasound-assisted extraction for the determination of Cu, Mn, Ca, and Mg in alternative oilseed crops using flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peronico, Vanessa Cruz Dias; Raposo, Jorge Luiz

    2016-04-01

    An ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure was evaluated for the multi-element determination of Cu, Mn, Ca, and Mg in alternative oilseed crops using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The best results were obtained when 0.3g of samples were used to extract the mineral content using 10 mL of a 1.40 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution for 10 min at 25 °C. The accuracy and precision of the analysis were evaluated using two oilseed reference materials, and the results were in agreement with reference values at 95% confidence level (paired t-test). The method was used to analyze five oilseed samples and the results were in agreement with those obtained using a closed-vessel microwave-assisted acid digestion system for sample preparation. The relative standard deviations were 0.52-6.13% for all of the standard and sample measurements, and the limits of detection were 666.7, 416.7, 333.4 μg g(-1), and 3.5 mg g(-1) for Cu, Mn, Ca, and Mg, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combination of flotation and flame atomic absorption spectrometry for determination, preconcentration and separation of trace amounts of metal ions in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Niknam, Khodabakhsh; Nasiri kokhdan, Syamak; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-05-01

    An efficient enrichment procedure based on the combination of flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and flotation for determination of Cd(2+), Ag(+) and Zn(2+) ions in various biological samples using new collector is studied. The influence of pH, amount of 2-(((1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)methoxy)methyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole (HBIMMHBI) as collector, sample matrix, type and amount of eluting agent, type and amount of surfactant as floating agent, ionic strength and air flow rates on the extraction efficiency were evaluated and optimized. It is ascertained that under study metal ions is preconcentrated simultaneously from matrix in the presence of 0.005 M HBIMMHBI, 0.085% (w/v) of SDS form 750 mL at pH 6.5. The floated complexes metal ions eluted quantitatively with 6 mL of 1.0 M HNO3 in methanol lead to achieve preconcentration factor of 125. The detection limits for analyte ions were in the range of 1.3-2.4 ng mL(-1), with recoveries more than 95% and relative SD lower than 4%.

  12. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop for preconcentration and determination of trace amounts of copper by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadaş, Cennet; Kara, Derya

    2017-04-01

    A novel, simple, rapid, sensitive, inexpensive and environmentally friendly dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on the solidification of a floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) was developed for the determination of copper by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). N-o-Vanillidine-2-amino-p-cresol was used as a chelating ligand and 1-undecanol was selected as an extraction solvent. The main parameters affecting the performance of DLLME-SFO, such as sample pH, volume of extraction solvent, extraction time, concentration of the chelating ligand, salt effect, centrifugation time and sample volume were investigated and optimized. The effect of interfering ions on the recovery of copper was also examined. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limit (3σ) was 0.93μgL(-1) for Cu using a sample volume of 20mL, yielding a preconcentration factor of 20. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cu in tap, river and seawater, rice flour and black tea samples as well as certified reference materials. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and application of a new chelating resin for solid phase extraction, preconcentration and determination of trace metals in some dairy samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Çankaya, Nevin; Soykan, Cengiz

    2016-11-15

    In this study, a simple and rapid solid phase extraction/preconcentration procedure was developed for determination of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) trace metals by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). A new chelating resin, poly(N-cyclohexylacrylamide-co-divinylbenzene-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (NCA-co-DVB-co-AMPS) (hereafter CDAP) was synthesized and characterized. The influences of the analytical parameters such as pH of the sample solution, type and concentration of eluent, flow rates of the sample and eluent, volume of the sample and eluent, amount of chelating resin, and interference of ions were examined. The limit of detection (LOD) of analytes were found (3s) to be in the range of 0.65-1.90μgL(-1). Preconcentration factor (PF) of 200 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of ⩽2% were achieved (n=11). The developed method was applied for determination of analytes in some dairy samples and certified reference materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel separation/preconcentration technique based on ultrasonic dispersion liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of trace cobalt by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingci Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An improved method for the determination of trace cobalt in water samples has been developed using ultrasonic dispersion liquid-liquid microextraction (US-DLLME prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS analysis. In this method, cobalt was extracted into the fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride after chelate formation with the water soluble ligand, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC. The fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride were formed and dispersed in the aqueous sample with the help of ultrasonic waves which accelerated the formation of the fine cloudy solution without using disperser solvents. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 2.5-500 μg L-1, with a detection limit of 0.8 μg L-1. The relative standard deviation (RSD for ten replicate measurements of 20 and 500 μg L-1 of cobalt were 3.3 and 2.2%. This proposed method was successfully applied to tap water, river water, and sea water, and accuracy was assessed through the analysis of certified reference water or recovery experiments. Operation simplicity, low cost, high enrichment factor, and low consumption of the extraction solvent are the main advantages of the proposed method.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v26i1.2

  15. Feasibility of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for extraction and preconcentration of Cu and Fe in red and white wine and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Tassia S.; Rosa, Francisco C.; Bizzi, Cezar A.; Dressler, Valderi L.; Flores, Erico M. M.; Duarte, Fabio A.

    2015-03-01

    A method for extraction and preconcentration of Cu and Fe in red and white wines using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS) was developed. Extraction was performed using sodium diethyldithiocarbamate as chelating agent and a mixture of 40 μL of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (extraction solvent) and 900 μL of methanol (dispersive solvent). Some parameters that influencing the extraction efficiency such as pH (2 to 5), concentration of chelating agent (0 to 2%), effect of salt addition (0 to 10%), number of washing steps (1 to 4) and centrifugation time (0 to 15 min) were studied. Accuracy was evaluated after microwave-assisted digestion in closed vessels and analytes were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Agreement with the proposed method ranged from 91 to 110 and from 89 to 113% for Cu and Fe, respectively. Calibration of F AAS instrument was performed using analyte addition method and limits of detection were 6.3 and 2.4 μg L- 1 for Cu and Fe, respectively. The proposed method was applied for the determination of Cu and Fe in five samples of red wine and three samples of white wine, with concentration ranging from 21 to 178 μg L- 1 and from 1.38 to 3.74 mg L- 1, respectively.

  16. Optimization of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the selective determination of trace amounts of palladium by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokya, Taher Ahmadzadeh [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Urmia, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farhadi, Khalil, E-mail: khalil.farhadi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Urmia, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-09-30

    A new simple and reliable method for rapid and selective extraction and determination of the trace levels of Pd{sup 2+} ion was developed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction preconcentration and flame atomic absorption spectrometry detection. In the proposed approach, thioridazine HCl (TRH) was used as a Pd{sup 2+} ion selective complexing agent. The effective parameters on the extraction recovery were studied and optimized utilizing two decent optimization methods; factorial design and central composite design (CCD). Through factorial design the best efficiency of extraction acquired using ethanol and chloroform as dispersive and extraction solvents respectively. CCD optimization resulted in 1.50 mL of dispersive solvent; 0.15 mL of extraction solvent; 0.45 mg of TRH and 250 mg of potassium chloride salt per 5 mL of sample solution. Under the optimum conditions the calibration graph was linear over the range 100-2000 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The average relative standard deviation was 0.7% for five repeated determinations. The limit of detection was 90 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The average enrichment factor and recovery reached 45.7% and 74.2% respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of palladium in the real water samples.

  17. Preconcentration of trace amounts of lead in water samples with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide coated magnetite nanoparticles and its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive and simple magnetic solid phase extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration of lead ions in environmental water samples. In the present study, lead ions form complexes with 1-(2-pyridilazo-2-naphthol reagent (PAN in basic medium, and then are quantitatively extracted to the surface of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB-coated magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs. After magnetic separation of adsorbent, the adsorbent was eluted with 0.5% (v/v HCl in methanol prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. The pH of sample, concentrations of PAN, amounts of CTAB and Fe3O4 NPs, sample volume and desorption conditions were optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.05–100 ng mL−1 with R2 = 0.9996. Detection and quantification limits of the proposed method were 0.005 and 0.05 ng mL−1, respectively. Enhancement factor of 1050 was achieved using this method to extract 1000 mL of different environmental water samples. Compared with conventional solid phase extraction methods, the advantages of this method still include easy preparation of sorbents, short times of sample pre-treatment, high extraction yield, and high breakthrough volume. It shows great analytical potential in preconcentration of lead from large volume water samples.

  18. A Green Preconcentration Method for Determination of Cobalt and Lead in Fresh Surface and Waste Water Samples Prior to Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeemullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud point extraction (CPE has been used for the preconcentration and simultaneous determination of cobalt (Co and lead (Pb in fresh and wastewater samples. The extraction of analytes from aqueous samples was performed in the presence of 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine as a chelating agent and Triton X-114 as a nonionic surfactant. Experiments were conducted to assess the effect of different chemical variables such as pH, amounts of reagents (oxine and Triton X-114, temperature, incubation time, and sample volume. After phase separation, based on the cloud point, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with acidic ethanol prior to its analysis by the flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. The enhancement factors 70 and 50 with detection limits of 0.26 μg L−1 and 0.44 μg L−1 were obtained for Co and Pb, respectively. In order to validate the developed method, a certified reference material (SRM 1643e was analyzed and the determined values obtained were in a good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of Co and Pb in a fresh surface and waste water sample.

  19. A novel solidified floating organic drop microextraction method for preconcentration and determination of copper ions by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry in water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpa Şahin Ç.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid and inexpensive solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME and flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination (FI-FAAS method for copper was developed. 3-amino-7-dimethylamino-2-methylphenazine (Neutral red, NR was used as the complexing agent. Several factors affecting the microextraction efficiency, such as, pH, NR and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS concentration, extraction time, stirring rate, and temperature were investigated and optimized. Under optimized experimental conditions an enrichment factor of 541 was obtained for 100 mL of sample solution. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.5 – 20.0 ng mL–1 and the limit of detection (3s was 0.18 ng mL–1, the limit of quantification (10s was 0.58 ng mL–1. The relative standard deviation (RSD for 10 replicate measurements of 10 ng mL–1 copper was 2.7%. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of copper in different certified reference materials (Estuarine water, Slew 3 and fortified water, TM 23.2 and real water samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  20. Rapid and simultaneous determination of essential minerals and trace elements in human milk by improved flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) with microwave digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yang; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Ming; Wang, Jue; Zhang, Xue; Gao, Wei-Yin; Huang, Jun-Fu; Fu, Wei-Ling

    2010-09-08

    A method for the simultaneous and economical determination of many trace elements in human milk is developed. Two multi-element hollow cathode lamps (HCLs) were used instead of single-element HCLs to improve the sample throughput of flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The microwave digestion of milk is optimized prior to detection, and the performance characteristics of the improved analysis method are identified. Clinical samples are detected by both FAAS and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for methodology evaluation. Results reveal that the proposed FAAS with multi-element HCLs could determine six essential minerals and trace elements within 15 min. This method provides a linear analytical range of 0.01-10 mg L(-1). For Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn, the limits of determination are 1.5, 3, 1.8, 2.2, 2.1, and 1.3 microg L(-1), respectively. The mean relative standard deviations (RSDs) of intra- and interassays are lower than 7%. Excellent operational characteristics of rapidity, simplicity, and economy make the proposed method a promising one for the quantification of trace elements in human milk in clinics of underdeveloped areas.

  1. Removal, preconcentration and determination of Ni(II from different environmental samples using modified magnetite nanoparticles prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Karimi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a simple, fast and reliable solid phase extraction (SPE method to determine Ni(II using dimethylglyoxim/sodium dodecyl sulfate-immobilized on alumina-coated magnetite nanoparticles (DMG/SDS-ACMNPs as a new adsorbent prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS is described. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the preconcentration factor, detection limit, linear range and relative standard deviation (RSD of nickel(II ions were 320 (for 800 mL of sample solution, 4.6 ng mL−1, 10.0–100.0 ng mL−1 and 1.9% (for 50.0 ng mL−1, n = 7, respectively. This method avoided the time-consuming column-passing process of loading large volume samples in traditional SPE through the rapid isolation of DMG/SDS-ACMNPs with an adscititious magnet. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine the content of Ni(II in soil, spinach, tomato, black tea, tobacco and different water samples and suitable recoveries were obtained.

  2. Peat as a natural solid-phase for copper preconcentration and determination in a multicommuted flow system coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, A.P.S. [Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adelia, 166, 09210-170 Santo Andre (Brazil); Firmino, M.A. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Escola de Engenharia, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Rua da Consolacao, 930, 01302-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nomura, C.S. [Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adelia, 166, 09210-170 Santo Andre (Brazil); Rocha, F.R.P.; Oliveira, P.V. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 748, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gaubeur, I. [Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adelia, 166, 09210-170 Santo Andre (Brazil)], E-mail: ivanise.gaubeur@ufabc.edu.br

    2009-03-23

    The physical and chemical characteristics of peat were assessed through measurement of pH, percentage of organic matter, cationic exchange capacity (CEC), elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy and quantitative analysis of metals by ICP OES. Despite the material showed to be very acid in view of the percentage of organic matter, its CEC was significant, showing potential for retention of metal ions. This characteristic was exploited by coupling a peat mini-column to a flow system based on the multicommutation approach for the in-line copper concentration prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. Cu(II) ions were adsorbed at pH 4.5 and eluted with 0.50 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3}. The influence of chemical and hydrodynamic parameters, such as sample pH, buffer concentration, eluent type and concentration, sample flow-rate and preconcentration time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a linear response was observed between 16 and 100 {mu}g L{sup -1}, with a detection limit estimated as 3 {mu}g L{sup -1} at the 99.7% confidence level and an enrichment factor of 16. The relative standard deviation was estimated as 3.3% (n = 20). The mini-column was used for at least 100 sampling cycles without significant variation in the analytical response. Recoveries from copper spiked to lake water or groundwater as well as concentrates used in hemodialysis were in the 97.3-111% range. The results obtained for copper determination in these samples agreed with those achieved by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) at the 95% confidence level.

  3. Characterization of a cryogenic beam source for atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bulleid, N E; Hendricks, R J; Sauer, B E; Hinds, E A; Tarbutt, M R

    2013-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of beam formation from a cryogenic buffer gas cell. Atoms and molecules are loaded into the cell by laser ablation of a target, and are cooled and swept out of the cell by a flow of cold helium. We study the thermalization and flow dynamics inside the cell and measure how the speed, temperature, divergence and extraction efficiency of the beam are influenced by the helium flow. We use a finite element model to simulate the flow dynamics and use the predictions of this model to interpret our experimental results.

  4. Development of Laser Light Sources for Trapping Radioactive Francium Atoms Toward Tests of Fundamental Symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Ken-ichi; Ezure, Saki; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, Takeshi; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Aiko; Itoh, Masatoshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takatoshi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Imai, Kenichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tomoya; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Yoshida, Hidetomo P.; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    We have developed laser light sources and a magneto-optical trap system for cooling and trapping radioactive francium (Fr) atoms. Because Fr is the heaviest alkali element, a Fr atom exhibits high sensitivity to symmetry violation effects such as atomic parity nonconservation (APNC) and the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). A laser cooling and trapping technique reduces the systematic errors due to the Doppler effect and the motion-induced magnetic field effect caused by the velocity of atoms. Thus, optically cooled and trapped Fr atoms are among a few promising candidates considered for APNC and eEDM measurements. Frequency stabilization of laser light is required for any stable measurement involving trapped radioactive atoms, including Fr. Since the hyperfine splitting in iodine molecules (127I2) is close to the resonance frequency of the Fr D2 line, we performed frequency modulation spectroscopy of hyperfine structures of I2.

  5. Determination of silicon in biomass and products of pyrolysis process via high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakadi, Flávio V; Prodanov, Caroline; Boschetti, Wiliam; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2018-03-01

    Thermochemical processes can convert the biomass into fuels, such as bio-oil. The biomass submitted to pyrolysis process, such as fibers, are generally rich in silicon, an element that can lead to damages in an engine when there is high concentration in a fuel. High-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) is an interesting alternative for Si determination in the products and byproducts of the pyrolysis process because, besides the flame (F) and graphite furnace (GF) atomizers, it has enhanced the application of direct analysis of solid samples (SS) within GF. This study aimed the development of methods to determine Si in biomass samples, their products and byproducts using HR-CS AAS. A high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer contrAA 700 equipped with F and GF atomizers was used throughout the study. HR-CS F AAS (λ = 251.611nm, 1 detection pixel, N2O/C2H2 flame) was used to evaluate Si content in biomass and ash, after a microwave-assisted acid digestion with HNO3 and HF. HR-CS GF AAS (Tpyr = 1400°C, Tatom = 2650°C) has evaluated Si in pyrolysis water and bio-oil at 251.611nm, and in peach pit biomass and ash at 221.174nm using SS, both wavelengths with 1 detection pixel. Rhodium (300μg) was applied as permanent modifier and 10μgPd + 6μg Mg were pipetted onto the standards/samples at each analysis. Three different biomass samples were studied: palm tree fiber, coconut fiber and peach pit, and three certified reference materials (CRM) were used to verify the accuracy of the methods. The figures of merit were LOD 0.09-20mgkg-1, and LOQ 0.3-20mgkg-1, considering all the methods. There were no significant differences between the CRM certified values and the determined ones, using a Student t-test with a confidence interval of 95% (n = 5). Si concentration ranged from 0.11-0.92% mm-1, 1.1-1.7mgkg-1, 3.3-13mgkg-1, and 0.41-1.4%mm-1, in biomass, bio-oil, pyrolysis water and ash, respectively. Si remained mostly

  6. Glow discharge sources for atomic and molecular analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Andrew Patrick

    Two types of glow discharges were used and characterized for chemical analysis. The flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) source, based on a helium glow discharge (GD), was utilized to analyze samples with molecular mass spectrometry. A second GD, operated at reduced pressure in argon, was employed to map the elemental composition of a solid surface with novel optical detection systems, enabling new applications and perspectives for GD emission spectrometry. Like many plasma-based ambient desorption-ionization sources being used around the world, the FAPA requires a supply of helium to operate effectively. With increased pressures on global helium supply and pricing, the use of an interrupted stream of helium for analysis was explored for vapor and solid samples. In addition to the mass spectra generated by the FAPA source, schlieren imaging and infrared thermography were employed to map the behavior of the source and its surroundings under the altered conditions. Additionally, a new annular microplasma variation of the FAPA source was developed and characterized. A spectroscopic imaging system that utilized an adjustable-tilt interference filter was used to map the elemental composition of a sample surface by glow discharge emission spectroscopy. This apparatus was compared to other GD imaging techniques for mapping elemental surface composition. The wide bandpass filter resulted in significant spectral interferences that could be partially overcome with chemometric data processing. Because time-resolved GD emission spectroscopy can provide fine depth-profiling measurements, a natural extension of GD imaging would be its application to three-dimensional characterization of samples. However, the simultaneous cathodic sputtering that occur across the sample results in a sampling process that is not completely predictable. These issues are frequently encountered when laterally varied samples are explored with glow discharge imaging techniques. These insights

  7. Preconcentration and determination of vanadium and molybdenum in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs by ultrasonic-thermostatic-assisted cloud point extraction coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürkan, Ramazan; Korkmaz, Sema; Altunay, Nail

    2016-08-01

    A new ultrasonic-thermostatic-assisted cloud point extraction procedure (UTA-CPE) was developed for preconcentration at the trace levels of vanadium (V) and molybdenum (Mo) in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs prior to determination via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the ion-association of stable anionic oxalate complexes of V(V) and Mo(VI) with [9-(diethylamino)benzo[a]phenoxazin-5-ylidene]azanium; sulfate (Nile blue A) at pH 4.5, and then extraction of the formed ion-association complexes into micellar phase of polyoxyethylene(7.5)nonylphenyl ether (PONPE 7.5). The UTA-CPE is greatly simplified and accelerated compared to traditional cloud point extraction (CPE). The analytical parameters optimized are solution pH, the concentrations of complexing reagents (oxalate and Nile blue A), the PONPE 7.5 concentration, electrolyte concentration, sample volume, temperature and ultrasonic power. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curves for Mo(VI) and V(V) are obtained in the concentration range of 3-340µgL(-1) and 5-250µgL(-1) with high sensitivity enhancement factors (EFs) of 145 and 115, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) for Mo(VI) and V(V) are 0.86 and 1.55µgL(-1), respectively. The proposed method demonstrated good performances such as relative standard deviations (as RSD %) (≤3.5%) and spiked recoveries (95.7-102.3%). The accuracy of the method was assessed by analysis of two standard reference materials (SRMs) and recoveries of spiked solutions. The method was successfully applied into the determination of trace amounts of Mo(VI) and V(V) in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Simultaneous determination of antimony and boron in beverage and dairy products by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after separation and pre-concentration by cloud-point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Nail; Gürkan, Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    A new cloud-point extraction (CPE) method was developed for the pre-concentration and simultaneous determination of Sb(III) and B(III) by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method was based on complexation of Sb(III) and B(III) with azomethine-H in the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) as a signal-enhancing agent, and then extraction into the micellar phase of Triton X-114. Under optimised conditions, linear calibration was obtained for Sb(III) and B(III) in the concentration ranges of 0.5-180 and 2.5-600 μg l(-1) with LODs of 0.15 and 0.75 μg l(-1), respectively. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) (25 and 100 μg l(-1) of Sb(III) and B(III), n = 6) were in a range of 2.1-3.8% and 1.9-2.3%, respectively. Recoveries of spiked samples of Sb(III) and B(III) were in the range of 98-103% and 99-102%, respectively. Measured values for Sb and B in three standard reference materials were within the 95% confidence limit of the certified values. Also, the method was used for the speciation of inorganic antimony. Sb(III), Sb(V) and total Sb were measured in the presence of excess boron before and after pre-reduction with an acidic mixture of KI-ascorbic acid. The method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of total Sb and B in selected beverage and dairy products.

  9. Preparation of modified magnetic nanoparticles as a sorbent for the preconcentration and determination of cadmium ions in food and environmental water samples prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirabi, Ali; Dalirandeh, Zeinab [Department of Chemistry, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rad, Ali Shokuhi, E-mail: a.shokuhi@qaemshahriau.ac.ir [Department of Chemical Engineering, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    A new method has been developed for the separation/preconcentration of trace level cadmium ions using diphenyl carbazone/sodium dodecyl sulfate immobilized on magnetic nanoparticle Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} as a new sorbent SPE and their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Various influencing parameters on the separation and preconcentration of trace level cadmium ions such as, pH value, amount of nanoparticles, amount of diphenyl carbazone, condition of eluting solution, the effects of matrix ions were examined. The cadmium ions can be eluted from the modified magnetic nanoparticle using 1 mol L{sup −1} HCl as a desorption reagent. The detection limit of this method for cadmium was 3.71 ng ml{sup −1} and the R.S.D. was 0.503% (n=6). The advantages of this new method include rapidity, easy preparation of sorbents and a high concentration factor. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of Cd ions at trace levels in real samples such as, green tea, rice, tobacco, carrot, lettuce, ginseng, spice, tap water, river water, sea water with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • MNPs method is economical, simple, rapid and sensitive for trace analysis of Cd. • High preconcentration factor was obtained easily through this method. • A detection limit at ng mL{sup −1} level was achieved with 100.0 mL of sample. • This method provides good repeatability and extraction efficiency in a short time.

  10. Cloud point extraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry for pre-concentration and determination of trace amounts of silver ions in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiupei; Jia, Zhihui; Yang, Xiaocui; Li, Gu; Liao, Xiangjun

    2017-03-01

    A cloud point extraction (CPE) method was used as a pre-concentration strategy prior to the determination of trace levels of silver in water by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) The pre-concentration is based on the clouding phenomena of non-ionic surfactant, triton X-114, with Ag (I)/diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) complexes in which the latter is soluble in a micellar phase composed by the former. When the temperature increases above its cloud point, the Ag (I)/DDTC complexes are extracted into the surfactant-rich phase. The factors affecting the extraction efficiency including pH of the aqueous solution, concentration of the DDTC, amount of the surfactant, incubation temperature and time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, no interference was observed for the determination of 100 ng·mL-1 Ag+ in the presence of various cations below their maximum concentrations allowed in this method, for instance, 50 μg·mL-1 for both Zn2+ and Cu2+, 80 μg·mL-1 for Pb2+, 1000 μg·mL-1 for Mn2+, and 100 μg·mL-1 for both Cd2+ and Ni2+. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 1-500 ng·mL-1 with a limit of detection (LOD) at 0.3 ng·mL-1. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver in water samples such as river water and tap water.

  11. Iron species determination by task-specific ionic liquid-based in situ solvent formation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Susan; Ashoori, Vahid

    2017-10-01

    The task-specific ionic liquid (TSIL) of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide functionalized with 8-hydroxyquinoline was used as a chelating agent and extracting solvent for dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and subsequent determination of Fe(III) by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The in situ solvent formation of TSIL using KPF6 provided the desired water-immiscible ionic liquid. The total Fe concentration could be determined after pre-oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Various factors affecting the proposed extraction procedure were optimized. The proposed analytical conditions were: sample pH 5, TSIL amount 0.3% (w/v), KPF6 amount 0.15% (w/v), anti-sticking 0.1% (w/v) and salt concentration 5% (w/v). Under optimal conditions, the linear dynamic ranges for Fe(III) and total Fe were 20-80 and 20-110 ng mL-1 , respectively, with a detection limit of 6.9 ng mL-1 for Fe(III) and relative standard deviation of 2.2%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace Fe(III) in water (underground, tap, refined water and artificial sea water) and beverage (apple, tomato, and tea) samples. The developed method offers advantages such as simplicity, ease of operation, and extraction of Fe(III) from aqueous solutions without the use of organic solvent. It was successfully applied for iron speciation in different real samples. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Qualitative and Quantitative Content Determination of Macro-Minor Elements in Bryonia Alba L. Roots using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiuk, Uliana Vladimirovna; Al Azzam, Khaldun Mohammad; Abudayeh, Zead Helmi Mahmoud; Kislichenko, Viktoria; Naddaf, Ahmad; Cholak, Irina; Yemelianova, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    To determine the elements in Bryonia alba L. roots, collected from the Crimean Peninsula region in Ukraine. Dry ashing was used as a flexible method and all elements were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) equipped with flame and graphite furnace. The average concentrations of the determined elements, expressed as mg/100 g dry weight of the sample, were as follow: 13.000 for Fe, 78.000 for Si, 88.000 for P, 7.800 for Al, 0.130 for Mn, 105.000 for Mg, 0.030 for Pb, 0.052 for Ni, 0.030 for Mo, 210.000 for Ca, 0.130 for Cu, 5.200 for Zn, 13.000 for Na, 1170.000 for K, 0.780 for Sr, 0.030 for Co, 0.010 for Cd, 0.010 for As, and 0.010 for Hg. Toxic elements such as Cd and Pb were also found but at very low concentration. Among the analyzed elements, K was the most abundant followed by Ca, Mg, P, Si, Fe, Na, and Zn, whereas Hg, As, Cd, Co, Mo, and Pb were found in low concentration. The results suggest that the roots of Bryonia alba L. plant has potential medicinal property through their high element contents present. Moreover, it showed that the AAS method is a simple, fast, and reliable for the determination of elements in plant materials. The obtained results of the current study provide justification for the usage of such fruit in daily diet for nutrition and for medicinal usage in the treatment of various diseases.

  13. Simple hollow fiber renewal liquid membrane extraction method for pre-concentration of Cd(II) in environmental samples and detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carletto, Jeferson Schneider; Luciano, Raquel Medeiros; Bedendo, Gizelle Cristina; Carasek, Eduardo

    2009-04-06

    A hollow fiber renewal liquid membrane (HFRLM) extraction method to determine cadmium (II) in water samples using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS) was developed. Ammonium O,O-diethyl dithiophosphate (DDTP) was used to complex cadmium (II) in an acid medium to obtain a neutral hydrophobic complex (ML(2)). The organic solvent introduced to the sample extracts this complex from the aqueous solution and carries it over the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane, that had their walls previously filled with the same organic solvent. The organic solvent is solubilized inside the PDMS membrane, leading to a homogeneous phase. The complex strips the lumen of the membrane where, at higher pH, the complex Cd-DDTP is broken down and cadmium (II) is released into the stripping phase. EDTA was used to complex the cadmium (II), helping to trap the analyte in the stripping phase. A multivariate procedure was used to optimize the studied variables. The optimized variables were: sample (donor phase) pH 3.25, DDTP concentration 0.05% (m/v), stripping (acceptor phase) pH 8.75, EDTA concentration 1.5x10(-2) mol L(-1), extraction temperature 40 degrees C, extraction time 40 min, a solvent mixture N-butyl acetate and hexane (60/40%, v/v) with a volume of 100 microL, and addition of ammonium sulfate to saturate the sample. The sample volume used was 20 mL and the stripping volume was 165 microL. The analyte enrichment factor was 120, limit of detection (LOD) 1.3 microg L(-1), relative standard deviation (RSD) 5.5% and the working linear range 2-30 microg L(-1).

  14. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of heavy metals in aqueous solution and surface water preceded by co-precipitation procedure with copper(II) 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipeaiyeda, Ayodele Rotimi; Ayoade, Abisayo Ruth

    2017-12-01

    Co-precipitation procedure has widely been employed for preconcentration and separation of metal ions from the matrices of environmental samples. This is simply due to its simplicity, low consumption of separating solvent and short duration for analysis. Various organic ligands have been used for this purpose. However, there is dearth of information on the application of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) as ligand and Cu(II) as carrier element. The use of Cu(II) is desirable because there is no contamination and background adsorption interference. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use 8-HQ in the presence of Cu(II) for coprecipitation of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Ni(II) and Pb(II) from standard solutions and surface water prior to their determinations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effects of pH, sample volume, amount of 8-HQ and Cu(II) and interfering ions on the recoveries of metal ions from standard solutions were monitored using FAAS. The water samples were treated with 8-HQ under the optimum experimental conditions and metal concentrations were determined by FAAS. The metal concentrations in water samples not treated with 8-HQ were also determined. The optimum recovery values for metal ions were higher than 85.0%. The concentrations (mg/L) of Co(II), Ni(II), Cr(III), and Pb(II) in water samples treated with 8-HQ were 0.014 ± 0.002, 0.03 ± 0.01, 0.04 ± 0.02 and 0.05 ± 0.02, respectively. These concentrations and those obtained without coprecipitation technique were significantly different. Coprecipitation procedure using 8-HQ as ligand and Cu(II) as carrier element enhanced the preconcentration and separation of metal ions from the matrix of water sample.

  15. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of heavy metals in aqueous solution and surface water preceded by co-precipitation procedure with copper(II) 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipeaiyeda, Ayodele Rotimi; Ayoade, Abisayo Ruth

    2017-07-01

    Co-precipitation procedure has widely been employed for preconcentration and separation of metal ions from the matrices of environmental samples. This is simply due to its simplicity, low consumption of separating solvent and short duration for analysis. Various organic ligands have been used for this purpose. However, there is dearth of information on the application of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) as ligand and Cu(II) as carrier element. The use of Cu(II) is desirable because there is no contamination and background adsorption interference. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use 8-HQ in the presence of Cu(II) for coprecipitation of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Ni(II) and Pb(II) from standard solutions and surface water prior to their determinations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effects of pH, sample volume, amount of 8-HQ and Cu(II) and interfering ions on the recoveries of metal ions from standard solutions were monitored using FAAS. The water samples were treated with 8-HQ under the optimum experimental conditions and metal concentrations were determined by FAAS. The metal concentrations in water samples not treated with 8-HQ were also determined. The optimum recovery values for metal ions were higher than 85.0%. The concentrations (mg/L) of Co(II), Ni(II), Cr(III), and Pb(II) in water samples treated with 8-HQ were 0.014 ± 0.002, 0.03 ± 0.01, 0.04 ± 0.02 and 0.05 ± 0.02, respectively. These concentrations and those obtained without coprecipitation technique were significantly different. Coprecipitation procedure using 8-HQ as ligand and Cu(II) as carrier element enhanced the preconcentration and separation of metal ions from the matrix of water sample.

  16. Fast determination of trace elements in organic fertilizers using a cup-horn reactor for ultrasound-assisted extraction and fast sequential flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Leonel Silva; Vieira, Heulla Pereira; Windmöller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2014-02-01

    A fast and accurate method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction in a cup-horn sonoreactor was developed to determine the total content of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in organic fertilizers by fast sequential flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FS FAAS). Multivariate optimization was used to establish the optimal conditions for the extraction procedure. An aliquot containing approximately 120 mg of the sample was added to a 500 µL volume of an acid mixture (HNO3/HCl/HF, 5:3:3, v/v/v). After a few minutes, 500 µL of deionized water was added and eight samples were simultaneously sonicated for 10 min at 50% amplitude, allowing a sample throughput of 32 extractions per hour. The performance of the method was evaluated with a certified reference material of sewage sludge (CRM 029). The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation, ranged from 0.58% to 5.6%. The recoveries of analytes were found to 100%, 109%, 96%, 92%, 101%, 104% and 102% for Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, respectively. The linearity, limit of detection and limit of quantification were calculated and the values obtained were adequate for the quality control of organic fertilizers. The method was applied to the analysis of several commercial organic fertilizers and organic wastes used as fertilizers, and the results were compared with those obtained using the microwave digestion procedure. A good agreement was found between the results obtained by microwave and ultrasound procedures with recoveries ranging from 80.4% to 117%. Two organic waste samples were not in accordance with the Brazilian legislation regarding the acceptable levels of contaminants. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Quality assessment of trace Cd and Pb contaminants in Thai herbal medicines using ultrasound-assisted digestion prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watsaka Siriangkhawut

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A simple, efficient, and reliable ultrasound-assisted digestion (UAD procedure was used for sample preparation prior to quantitative determination of trace Cd and Pb contaminants in herbal medicines using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The parameters influencing UAD such as the solvent system, sample mass, presonication time, sonication time, and digestion temperature were evaluated. The efficiency of the proposed UAD procedure was evaluated by comparing with conventional acid digestion (CAD procedure. Under the optimum conditions, linear calibration graphs in a range of 2–250 μg/L for Cd, and 50–1000 μg/L for Pb were obtained with detection limits of 0.56 μg/L and 10.7 μg/L for Cd and Pb, respectively. The limit of quantification for Cd and Pb were 1.87 μg/L and 40.3 μg/L, respectively. The repeatability for analysis of 10 μg/L for Cd and 100 μg/L for Pb was 2.3% and 2.6%, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by rice flour certified reference materials. The proposed method was successfully applied for analysis of trace Cd and Pb in samples of various types of medicinal plant and traditional medicine consumed in Thailand. Most herbal medicine samples were not contaminated with Cd or Pb. The contaminant levels for both metals were still lower than the maximum permissible levels of elements in medicinal plant materials and finished herbal products sets by the Ministry of Public Health of Thailand. The exception was the high level of Cd contamination found in two samples of processed medicinal plants.

  18. Cloud point extraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry for pre-concentration and determination of trace amounts of silver ions in water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiupei Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A cloud point extraction (CPE method was used as a pre-concentration strategy prior to the determination of trace levels of silver in water by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS The pre-concentration is based on the clouding phenomena of non-ionic surfactant, triton X-114, with Ag (I/diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC complexes in which the latter is soluble in a micellar phase composed by the former. When the temperature increases above its cloud point, the Ag (I/DDTC complexes are extracted into the surfactant-rich phase. The factors affecting the extraction efficiency including pH of the aqueous solution, concentration of the DDTC, amount of the surfactant, incubation temperature and time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, no interference was observed for the determination of 100 ng·mL−1 Ag+ in the presence of various cations below their maximum concentrations allowed in this method, for instance, 50 μg·mL−1 for both Zn2+ and Cu2+, 80 μg·mL−1 for Pb2+, 1000 μg·mL−1 for Mn2+, and 100 μg·mL−1 for both Cd2+ and Ni2+. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 1–500 ng·mL−1 with a limit of detection (LOD at 0.3 ng·mL−1. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver in water samples such as river water and tap water.

  19. Crosslinked poly (4-vinylpyridine-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) used for preconcentration of Cd(II) and its determination by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarley, César Ricardo Teixeira; Farias, Natália Cristina Botteon; Lima, Giovana de Fátima; de Oliveira, Fernanda Midori; Bonfílio, Rudy; Dragunski, Douglas Cardoso; Clausen, Débora Nobile; Segatelli, Mariana Gava

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to synthesize crosslinked poly(4-vinylpyridine-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) and evaluate its feasibility for highly sensitive and selective determination of Cd in water samples by using flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The crosslinked polymer, prepared by bulk polymerization, was characterized by FTIR spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The flow injection solid-phase method was based on preconcentration of 20.0 mL of sample through 100 mg of the polymer packed into a minicolumn at pH 8.25 using a flow rate of 6.0 mL/min, followed by elution with 1.0 M HNO3. The sample solution parameters influencing the preconcentration behavior of Cd ions, such as pH, buffer concentration, and flow rate, were simultaneously studied and optimized using a Doehlert matrix. Values of 0.10 microg/L, 2.0-210 microg/L, 32.3, 18/h, 9.7/min, and 0.62 mL were obtained for LOD, linear range, preconcentration factor, sample throughput, concentration efficiency, and consumption index, respectively. The effect of the presence of the inorganic cations Pb(II), U(IV), Co(II), Hg(II), Cu(II), As(II), Mg(II), Sb(III), Ni(II), Th(IV), Ba(II), and Ca(II) on the method was studied, and the preconcentration of Cd was observed to have no interference. The accuracy of the method was assessed by analysis of natural water samples using addition and recovery tests and inductively coupled plasma/MS as a reference technique, as well as by analysis of a standard reference material of trace elements in water.

  20. Determination of nickel in blood and serum samples of oropharyngeal cancer patients consumed smokeless tobacco products by cloud point extraction coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Arain, Jamshed Bashir; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Atif Gul; Nasreen, Syeda; Brahman, Kapil Dev

    2014-10-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a significant public health issue in the world. The incidence of oropharyngeal cancer has been increased among people who have habit of chewing smokeless tobacco (SLT) in Pakistan. The aim of present study was to evaluate the concentration of nickel (Ni) in biological samples (whole blood, serum) of oral (n = 95) and pharyngeal (n = 84) male cancer patients. For comparison purposes, the biological samples of healthy age-matched referents (n = 150), who consumed and did not consumed SLT products, were also analyzed for Ni levels. As the Ni level is very low in biological samples, a preconcentration procedure has been developed, prior to analysis of analyte by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The Ni in acid-digested biological samples was complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithio carbamate (APDC), and a resulted complex was extracted in a surfactant Triton X-114. Acidic ethanol was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by FAAS. The chemical variables, such as pH, amounts of reagents (APDC, Triton X-114), temperature, incubation time, and sample volume were optimized. The resulted data indicated that concentration of Ni was higher in blood and serum samples of cancer patients as compared to that of referents who have or have not consumed different SLT products (p = 0.012-0.001). It was also observed that healthy referents who consumed SLT products have two to threefold higher levels of Ni in both biological samples as compared to those who were not chewing SLT products (p < 0.01).

  1. Feasibility of dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction for extraction and preconcentration of Cu and Fe in red and white wine and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Tassia S.; Rosa, Francisco C.; Bizzi, Cezar A.; Dressler, Valderi L.; Flores, Erico M.M.; Duarte, Fabio A., E-mail: fabioand@gmail.com

    2015-03-01

    A method for extraction and preconcentration of Cu and Fe in red and white wines using dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction (DLLME) and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS) was developed. Extraction was performed using sodium diethyldithiocarbamate as chelating agent and a mixture of 40 μL of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (extraction solvent) and 900 μL of methanol (dispersive solvent). Some parameters that influencing the extraction efficiency such as pH (2 to 5), concentration of chelating agent (0 to 2%), effect of salt addition (0 to 10%), number of washing steps (1 to 4) and centrifugation time (0 to 15 min) were studied. Accuracy was evaluated after microwave-assisted digestion in closed vessels and analytes were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Agreement with the proposed method ranged from 91 to 110 and from 89 to 113% for Cu and Fe, respectively. Calibration of F AAS instrument was performed using analyte addition method and limits of detection were 6.3 and 2.4 μg L{sup −1} for Cu and Fe, respectively. The proposed method was applied for the determination of Cu and Fe in five samples of red wine and three samples of white wine, with concentration ranging from 21 to 178 μg L{sup −1} and from 1.38 to 3.74 mg L{sup −1}, respectively. - Highlights: • Determination of Cu and Fe in wine using DLLME and F AAS • High preconcentration factors and low LODs were achieved. • Alternative method for the determination of Cu and Fe in wine for routine analysis.

  2. Effects of Iron Concentration Level in Extracting Solutions from Contaminated Soils on the Determination of Zinc by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Two Background Correctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Waterlot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc and iron concentrations were determined after digestion, water, and three-step sequential extractions of contaminated soils. Analyses were carried out using flame absorption spectrometry with two background correctors: a deuterium lamp used as the continuum light source (D2 method and the high-speed self-reversal method (HSSR method. Regarding the preliminary results obtained with synthetic solutions, the D2 method often emerged as an unsuitable configuration for compensating iron spectral interferences. In contrast, the HSSR method appeared as a convenient and powerful configuration and was tested for the determination of zinc in contaminated soils containing high amounts of iron. Simple, fast, and interference-free method, the HSSR method allows zinc determination at the ppb level in the presence of large amounts of iron with high stability, sensitivity, and reproducibility of results. Therefore, the HSSR method is described here as a promising approach for monitoring zinc concentrations in various iron-containing samples without any pretreatment.

  3. Development of a Supersonic Atomic Oxygen Nozzle Beam Source for Crossed Beam Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibener, S. J.; Buss, R. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    A high pressure, supersonic, radio frequency discharge nozzle beam source was developed for the production of intense beams of ground state oxygen atoms. An efficient impedance matching scheme was devised for coupling the radio frequency power to the plasma as a function of both gas pressure and composition. Techniques for localizing the discharge directly behind the orifice of a water-cooled quartz nozzle were also developed. The above combine to yield an atomic oxygen beam source which produces high molecular dissociation in oxygen seeded rare gas mixtures at total pressures up to 200 torr: 80 to 90% dissociation for oxygen/argon mixtures and 60 to 70% for oxygen/helium mixtures. Atomic oxygen intensities are found to be greater than 10{sup 17} atom sr{sup -1} sec{sup -1}. A brief discussion of the reaction dynamics of 0 + IC1 ..-->.. I0 + C1 is also presented.

  4. Flame Length

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Flame length was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The tool...

  5. Evaluation of cadmium, lead, copper, iron and zinc in Turkish dietary vegetable oils and olives using electrothermal and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acar, Orhan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cd, Pb, Cu, Fe and Zn contents of some edible vegetable oils (soybean, sunflower, flower, nut, corn and olive and of olives (olive-1, black, green, black crushed with seeds and green crushed with seeds were determined and evaluated by an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (ETAAS using an Sc + Ir + NH4H2PO4 chemical modifier mixture and flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS after microwave digestion. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of Cd, Pb and Cu in sample solutions with and without the modifier mixture were investigated. The limits of detection (LOD for analytes found are 0.1, 0.6, 0.9, 15.0 and 12.0 μg L–1 for Cd, Cu, Pb, Fe and Zn, respectively. The accuracy of the procedure proposed was confirmed by analyzing bovine liver 1577b standard reference material (SRM and a spiked sample solution. The results of the analytes found were compared with certified and added values. The relative standard deviations of the analytes found were lower than 7% and the percent of recoveries obtained ranges from 96 to 101%. The Sc + Ir + NH4H2PO4 mixture proposed was applied for the determination of Cd, Pb and Cu in oils and olives. The results of analytes found in the samples were compared with international and national food quality guidelines as well as with literature values.

    Se han determinado los metales Cd, Cu, Pb, Fe y Zn en aceites vegetales comestibles (soja, girasol, flores, nueces, maíz y aceite de oliva y aceitunas (aceitunas-1, negra, verde, negra machacadas con semillas y verde machacadas con semillas mediante espectrometría de absorción atómica electrotérmica (ETAAS utilizando como modificador químico la mezcla Sc + Ir + NH4H2PO4 y mediante espectrometría de absorción atómica de llama (FAAS tras digestión con microondas. Se estudiaron las temperaturas de pirólisis y atomización para Cd

  6. Testing sub-gravitational forces on atoms from a miniature, in-vacuum source mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Matthew; Haslinger, Philipp; Xu, Victoria; Hamilton, Paul; Upadhye, Amol; Elder, Benjamin; Khoury, Justin; Mueller, Holger

    2017-04-01

    In this talk, I will discuss our recent measurement of the gravitational attraction between cesium atoms in free fall and a centimeter-sized source mass using atom interferometry. Placing the source mass in vacuum provides sensitivity to a wide class of ``fifth force'' type interactions whose effects would otherwise be suppressed beyond detectability in regions of high matter density. Examples include so-called chameleon and symmetron fields, proposed as dark energy candidates. Our measurement tightens constraints on such theories by over two orders of magnitude.

  7. Application of three-variables Doehlert matrix for optimisation of an on-line pre-concentration system for zinc determination in natural water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Walter N. L. dos; Santos, Carla M. C.; Ferreira, Sergio Luis Costa

    2003-01-01

    Texto completo: acesso restrito. p. 211-221 This article describes an on-line pre-concentration system for zinc determination in environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS).It was based on the sorption of zinc(II) ions in a minicolumn of polyurethane foam loaded with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR).The optimisation step was carried out using twolevel full factorial and a Doehlert design.Thr ee variables (sampling flow rate, buffer concentration and pH) were...

  8. A novel lead imprinted polymer as the selective solid phase for extraction and trace detection of lead ions by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry: Synthesis, characterization and analytical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homeira Ebrahimzadeh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel ion imprinted polymer as the selective solid phase combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS was applied for preconcentration and determination of lead in real samples. In the first step, Pb(II-IIP was synthesized by copolymerization of 2-vinyl pyridine as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker, 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile as the initiator that imprinted with Pb(II as the template ion, 2-amino pyridine as the ligand. Subsequently, the imprinted Pb(II was completely removed by leaching the dried and powdered imprinted polymer with HCl (2 mol L−1. This polymer was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectrometer. The effect of different variables on the extraction efficiency such as type and volume of eluent for extraction, solution’s pH for adsorption, sorption and desorption times was evaluated. Under the optimum conditions: type of eluent, HCl (2 mol L−1; volume of eluent, 5 mL; solution’s pH for sorption, 5; sorption time, 90 min; desorption time, 125 min and breakthrough volume of 750 mL were obtained. Preconcentration factor of the method was about 150. The limit of detection was obtained 0.75 μg L−1 and a dynamic linear range (DLR of 3–150 μg L−1 was found. The maximum sorption retention capacity of Pb(II ions on the imprinted polymer was 85.6 mg g−1. The prepared ion-imprinted polymer particles have an increased selectivity toward Pb(II ions over a range of competing metal ions with the same charge and similar ionic radius. Performance of the present method was evaluated for extraction and determination of Pb(II in water samples at microgram per liter concentration and satisfactory results were obtained (RSD = 2.7%.

  9. Separation and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of total chromium and chromium (III) in phosphate rock used for production of fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Amjad H; Al-Degs, Yahya S; Sweileh, Jamal A; Said, Adi J

    2013-11-15

    Due to the commercial value of phosphate rock (PR) as a fertilizer precursor, it is necessary to investigate its heavy metals content. Chromium (Cr) may present as Cr(III) or Cr(VI) in PR; but quantitative differentiation between them is not an easy task. This is due to possible interconversion of Cr species during the digestion/leaching process. In this work, ultrasound digestion (USD) of PR was optimized (300 mg PR, 4.0 mL of 4.0 mol L(-1) nitric acid, 15 min sonication) for the sake of leaching Cr species prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Using multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) as adsorbent, solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to separate Cr(III) from the digestate at pH 9, while total Cr was estimated after reducing Cr(VI) into Cr(III). The optimum USD/SPE method gave LOQ and LOD of Cr(III) of 0.96 mg kg(-1) and 0.288 mg kg(-1), respectively. The method sensitivity was 1.44×10(-3) AU kg mg(-1) within the studied Cr concentration range (5-400 mg kg(-1)). The USD/SPE method was validated by analyzing lake sediments LKSD-4 certified reference material, and by comparison with classical digestion method (CD). Application of USD/SPE on Jordanian PR samples gave total Cr rang 29.1-122.0 mg kg(-1) (±1.4-6.3), while Cr(III) ranged between 23.8 and 101.7 mg kg(-1) (±1.3-5.5). AFPC Rock Check Program samples gave total Cr range 238.9-394.7 mg kg(-1) (±11.5-24.1), while Cr(III) ranged between 202.4 and 335.8 mg kg(-1) (±11.4-18.3). These results were very close to the results obtained by the CD method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A solid phase extraction procedure for the determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in food and water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet; Kartal, Şenol

    2015-05-01

    A relatively rapid, accurate and precise solid phase extraction method is presented for the determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) in various food and water samples. Quantitation is carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the retention of the trace metal ions on Dowex Marathon C, a strong acid cation exchange resin. Some important parameters affecting the analytical performance of the method such as pH, flow rate and volume of the sample solution; type, concentration, volume, flow rate of the eluent; and matrix effects on the retention of the metal ions were investigated. Common coexisting ions did not interfere on the separation and determination of the analytes. The detection limits (3 σb) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were found as 0.13 and 0.18 μg L(-1), respectively, while the limit of quantification values (10 σb) were computed as 0.43 and 0.60 μg L(-1) for the same sequence of the analytes. The precision (as relative standard deviation was lower than 4% at 5 μg L(-1) Cd(II) and 10 μg L(-1) Pb(II) levels, and the preconcentration factor was found to be 250. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was verified by analysing the certified reference materials, SPS-WW2 Batch 108 wastewater level 2 and INCT-TL-1 tea leaves, with the satisfactory results. In addition, for the accuracy of the method the recovery studies (⩾ 95%) were carried out. The method was applied to the determination of the analytes in the various natural waters (lake water, tap water, waste water with boric acid, waste water with H2SO4) and food samples (pomegranate flower, organic pear, radish leaf, lamb meat, etc.), and good results were obtained. While the food samples almost do not contain cadmium, they have included lead at low levels of 0.13-1.12 μg g(-1). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ion Imprinted Polymer for Preconcentration and Determination of Ultra-Trace Cadmium, Employing Flow Injection Analysis with Thermo Spray Flame Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Lago, Ayla Campos; Marchioni, Camila; Mendes, Tássia Venga; Wisniewski, Célio; Fadini, Pedro Sergio; Luccas, Pedro Orival

    2016-11-01

    This work proposes a preconcentration method using an ion imprinted polymer (IIP) for determination of cadmium, in several samples, employing a mini-column filled with the polymer coupled into a flow injection analysis system with detection by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (FIA-TS-FF-AAS). The polymer was synthesized via bulk using methacrylic acid and vinylimidazole as a functional monomer. For the FIA system initial assessment, the variables: pH, eluent concentration and buffer concentration were studied, employing a 23 full factorial design. To obtain the optimum values for each significant variable, a Doehlert matrix was employed. After the optimization conditions as: pH 5.8, eluent (HNO3) concentration of 0.48 mol L-1 and buffer concentration of 0.01 mol L-1, were adopted. The proposed method showed a linear response in the range of 0.081-10.0 μg L-1, limits detection and quantification of 0.024 and 0.081 μg L-1, respectively; preconcentration factor of 165, consumptive index of 0.06 mL, concentration efficiency 132 min-1, and frequency of readings equal to 26 readings h-1 The accuracy was checked by analysis of certified reference materials for trace metals and recovery tests. The obtained results were in agreement with 95% confidence level (t-test). The method was adequate to apply in samples of: jewelry (earrings) (2.38 ± 0.28 μg kg-1), black tea (1.09 ± 0.15 μg kg-1), green tea (3.85 ± 0.13 μg kg-1), cigarette tobacco (38.27 ± 0.22 μg kg-1), and hair (0.35 ± 0.02 μg kg-1). © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. A simple and fast method for assessment of the nitrogen–phosphorus–potassium rating of fertilizers using high-resolution continuum source atomic and molecular absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechlin, Marcos André; Fortunato, Felipe Manfroi; Moutinho da Silva, Ricardo; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta, E-mail: anchieta@iq.unesp.br

    2014-11-01

    The determination of N, P, and K in fertilizers by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic and molecular absorption spectrometry is proposed. Under optimized conditions, measurements of the diatomic molecules NO and PO at 215.360 and 247.620 nm, respectively, and K using the wing of the alternative line at 404.722 nm allowed calibration curves to be constructed in the ranges 500–5000 mg L{sup −1} N (r = 0.9994), 100–2000 mg L{sup −1} P (r = 0.9946), and 100–2500 mg L{sup −1} K (r = 0.9995). Commercial fertilizers were analyzed by the proposed method and the concentrations of N, P, and K were found to be in agreement with those obtained by Kjeldahl, spectrophotometric, and flame atomic emission spectrometry methods, respectively, at a 95% confidence level (paired t-test). A phosphate rock certified reference material (CRM) was analyzed and the results for P and K were in agreement with the reference values. Recoveries from spiked CRM were in the ranges 97–105% (NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N), 95–103% (NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N), 93–103% (urea-N), 99–108% (P), and 99–102% (K). The relative standard deviations (n = 12) for N, P, and K were 6, 4, and 2%, respectively. - Highlights: • A single technique is proposed to analyze NPK fertilizer. • HR-CS FAAS is proposed for the first time for N, P and K determination in fertilizers. • The method employs the same sample preparation and dilution for the three analytes. • Addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} allows analysis of fertilizers with different nitrogen species. • Proposal provides advantages over traditional methods in terms of cost and time.

  13. Interfacing transitions of different alkali atoms and telecom bands using one narrowband photon pair source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schunk, Gerhard; Vogl, Ulrich; Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    wavelength-tuning mechanisms that allow a coarse tuning to either the cesium or rubidium wavelength, with subsequent continuous fine-tuning to the desired transition. As a demonstration of the functionality of the source, we performed a heralded single-photon measurement of the atomic decay. We present......Quantum information technology strongly relies on the coupling of optical photons with narrowband quantum systems, such as quantum dots, color centers, and atomic systems. This coupling requires matching the optical wavelength and bandwidth to the desired system, which presents a considerable...... problem for most available sources of quantum light. Here we demonstrate the coupling of alkali dipole transitions with a tunable source of photon pairs. Our source is based on spontaneous parametric downconversion in a triply resonant whispering gallery mode resonator. For this, we have developed novel...

  14. Error sources in atomic force microscopy for dimensional measurements: Taxonomy and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinello, F.; Voltan, A.; Savio, E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aimed at identifying the error sources that occur in dimensional measurements performed using atomic force microscopy. In particular, a set of characterization techniques for errors quantification is presented. The discussion on error sources is organized in four main categories......: scanning system, tip-surface interaction, environment, and data processing. The discussed errors include scaling effects, squareness errors, hysteresis, creep, tip convolution, and thermal drift. A mathematical model of the measurement system is eventually described, as a reference basis for errors...

  15. Structure of diffusion flames from a vertical burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Dan Jimenez; Jack D. Cohen; Isaac C. Grenfell; Cyle Wold

    2010-01-01

    Non-steady and turbulent flames are commonly observed to produce flame contacts with adjacent fuels during fire spread in a wide range of fuel bed depths. A stationary gas-fired burner (flame wall) was developed to begin study of flame edge variability along an analagous vertical fuel source. This flame wall is surrogate for a combustion interface at the edge of a deep...

  16. Evaluation of solid sampling for determination of Mo, Ni, Co, and V in soil by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babos, Diego Victor; Barros, Ariane Isis; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Neto, José Anchieta Gomes

    2017-04-01

    New methods are proposed for the determination of Mo, Ni, Co, and V in soils using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with direct solid sampling. Cobalt and V were simultaneously determined, and different analytical lines of Ni and V were monitored to adjust sensitivity for each sample. Accuracy was checked by means of soil certified reference materials, and also by flame atomic absorption spectrometry as comparative technique. The results for Mo, Ni, Co, and V found by proposed methods were in agreement with certified values and with those obtained by the comparative technique at 95% confidence level. The concentrations found in different soil samples were in the ranges 0.19-1.84 mg kg- 1 (Mo), 9.2-22.7 mg kg- 1 (Ni), 1.1-10.7 mg kg- 1 (Co), and 35.6-426.1 mg kg- 1 (V). The relative standard deviations were in the ranges 3.2-10% (Mo), 2.8-9.8% (Ni), 4.0-9.2% (Co), and 1.2-8.0% (V). The limits of quantification for Mo, Ni, Co, and V were 0.027, 0.071, 0.15, and 1.43 ng, respectively.

  17. Flames in vortices & tulip-flame inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, J. W.

    This article summarises two areas of research regarding the propagation of flames in flows which involve significant fluid-dynamical motion [1]-[3]. The major difference between the two is that in the first study the fluid motion is present before the arrival of any flame and remains unaffected by the flame [1, 2] while, in the second study it is the flame that is responsible for all of the fluid dynamical effects [3]. It is currently very difficult to study flame-motion in which the medium is both highly disturbed before the arrival of a flame and is further influenced by the passage of the flame.

  18. Temporal interference with frequency-controllable long photons from independent cold atomic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Peng; Gu, Zhenjie; Wen, Rong; Zhang, Weiping; Chen, J. F.

    2018-01-01

    The interference of single photons from independent sources is an essential tool in quantum information processing. However, the interfering of photons with long temporal states in a time-resolved manner has rarely been studied. This is because without transmitting spectral filters or coupling to a cavity mode single photons generated in traditional nonlinear crystals suffer from a short temporal profile below 1 ns. With spectral correlation maintained in the biphotons generated from spontaneous four-wave mixing process in cold atom clouds, here we demonstrate the temporal interference of two frequency-tunable long photons from two independent cold atomic sources. We observe and analyze the interference of frequency-mismatched photons, where the phenomenon of the quantum beat at megahertz separation is displayed. Our paper provides more details for the quantum beat of two independent narrow-band single photons, which may find potential application in frequency-encoded photonic qubits in quantum information processing.

  19. Testing sub-gravitational forces on atoms from a miniature in-vacuum source mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Matt; Haslinger, Philipp; Xu, Victoria; Hamilton, Paul; Upadhye, Amol; Elder, Benjamin; Khoury, Justin; Müller, Holger

    2017-10-01

    Traditional gravity measurements use bulk masses to both source and probe gravitational fields. Matter-wave interferometers enable the use of probe masses as small as neutrons, atoms and molecular clusters, but still require fields generated by masses ranging from hundreds of kilograms to the entire Earth. Shrinking the sources would enable versatile configurations, improve positioning accuracy, enable tests for beyond-standard-model (`fifth') forces, and allow observation of non-classical effects of gravity. Here we detect the gravitational force between freely falling caesium atoms and an in-vacuum, miniature (centimetre-sized, 0.19 kg) source mass using atom interferometry. Sensitivity down to gravitational strength forces accesses the natural scale for a wide class of cosmologically motivated scalar field models of modified gravity and dark energy. We improve the limits on two such models, chameleons and symmetrons, by over two orders of magnitude. We expect further tests of dark energy theories, and measurements of Newton's gravitational constant and the gravitational Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  20. Low-resolution continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: steps into practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katskov, Dmitri

    2015-03-01

    The theory and practical problems of continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SMET AAS) are discussed by the example of direct analysis of underground water. The experimental methodology is based on pulse vaporization of the sample in a fast heated graphite tube and measurement of transient absorption of continuum spectrum radiation from D2 and Xe lamps within 200-400 nm wavelengths range with a low resolution spectral instrument and linear charge-coupled device. The setup permits the acquisition of 200 spectra during 1 s atomization pulse. Respective data matrix absorbance vs wavelength/time is employed for the quantification of elements in the sample. The calculation algorithm developed includes broad band and continuum background correction, linearization of function absorbance vs. concentration of atomic vapor and integration of thus modified absorbance at the resonance lines of the elements to be determined. Practical application shows that the method can be employed for the direct simultaneous determination of about 20 elements above microgram per liter level within 3-5 orders of the magnitude concentration range. The investigated sources of measurement errors are mainly associated with the atomization and vapor transportation problems, which are aggravated for the simultaneous release of major and minor sample constituents. Respective corrections concerning the selection of analytical lines, optimal sampling volume, matrix modification and cleaning of the atomizer have been introduced in the SMET AAS analytical technology. Under the optimized experimental conditions the calibration curves in Log-Log coordinates for all the investigated analytes in the single or multi-element reference solutions are approximated by the first order equations. The use of these equations as permanent characteristics of the setup enables instant quantification of Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Ni in the underground water

  1. An all-solid-state laser source at 671 nm for cold atom experiments with lithium

    CERN Document Server

    Eismann, Ulrich; Canalias, Carlota; Zukauskas, Andrius; Trénec, Gérard; Vigué, Jacques; Chevy, Frédéric; Salomon, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    We present an all solid-state narrow line-width laser source emitting $670\\,\\mathrm{mW}$ output power at $671\\,\\mathrm{nm}$ delivered in a diffraction-limited beam. The source is based on a frequency-doubled diode-end-pumped ring laser operating on the ${^4F}_{3/2} \\rightarrow {^4I}_{13/2}$ transition in Nd:YVO$_4$. By using periodically-poled potassium titanyl phosphate (ppKTP) in an external build-up cavity, doubling efficiencies of up to 86% are obtained. Tunability of the source over $100\\,\\rm GHz$ is accomplished. We demonstrate the suitability of this robust frequency-stabilized light source for laser cooling of lithium atoms. Finally a simplified design based on intra-cavity doubling is described and first results are presented.

  2. Spatial Multiplexing of Atom-Photon Entanglement Sources using Feedforward Control and Switching Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Long; Xu, Zhongxiao; Chen, Lirong; Ge, Wei; Yuan, Haoxiang; Wen, Yafei; Wang, Shengzhi; Li, Shujing; Wang, Hai

    2017-09-01

    The light-matter quantum interface that can create quantum correlations or entanglement between a photon and one atomic collective excitation is a fundamental building block for a quantum repeater. The intrinsic limit is that the probability of preparing such nonclassical atom-photon correlations has to be kept low in order to suppress multiexcitation. To enhance this probability without introducing multiexcitation errors, a promising scheme is to apply multimode memories to the interface. Significant progress has been made in temporal, spectral, and spatial multiplexing memories, but the enhanced probability for generating the entangled atom-photon pair has not been experimentally realized. Here, by using six spin-wave-photon entanglement sources, a switching network, and feedforward control, we build a multiplexed light-matter interface and then demonstrate a ˜sixfold (˜fourfold ) probability increase in generating entangled atom-photon (photon-photon) pairs. The measured compositive Bell parameter for the multiplexed interface is 2.49 ±0.03 combined with a memory lifetime of up to ˜51 μ s .

  3. A=225 implantation for $^{221}$Fr source for TRIUMF atom trap

    CERN Multimedia

    The FrPNC Collaboration is mounting an atom trap for parity violation experiments and precision spectroscopy on francium atoms at TRIUMF's ISAC facility. We would like to use ISOLDE's capability of simultaneously implanting A=225 (while another experiment runs online) to make a long-lived source feeding $^{221}$Fr for tests of the trap. $^{225}$Ra $\\beta$-decays to $^{225}$Ac, which then $\\alpha$-decays, producing 100 keV $^{221}$Fr t$_{1/2}$= 4.8 minute recoils. The implanted A=225 source would be shipped to TRIUMF, where it would be held for several minutes at a time a few mm from the same yttrium foil that normally receives the ISAC beam. SRIM calculations imply that 20% of the $^{221}$Fr will be implanted in a 1 cm diameter spot on the yttrium. Then the yttrium foil is moved to the trap and heated to release the Fr atoms, just as in normal ISAC online operation. A test implantation will be done at 10$^{7}$/sec production for 1 day, testing whether carbon cracking on the implantation foil in the mass separ...

  4. Combined discrete nebulization and microextraction process for molybdenum determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS); Avaliacao da combinacao da nebulizacao discreta e processos de microextracao aplicados a determinacao de molibdenio por espectrometria de absorcao atomica com chama (FAAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oviedo, Jenny A.; Jesus, Amanda M.D. de; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Pereira-Filho, Edenir R., E-mail: erpf@ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2014-04-15

    Simple and sensitive procedures for the extraction/preconcentration of molybdenum based on vortex-assisted solidified floating organic drop microextraction (VA-SFODME) and cloud point combined with flame absorption atomic spectrometry (FAAS) and discrete nebulization were developed. The influence of the discrete nebulization on the sensitivity of the molybdenum preconcentration processes was studied. An injection volume of 200 μ resulted in a lower relative standard deviation with both preconcentration procedures. Enrichment factors of 31 and 67 and limits of detection of 25 and 5 μ L{sup -1} were obtained for cloud point and VA-SFODME, respectively. The developed procedures were applied to the determination of Mo in mineral water and multivitamin samples. (author)

  5. Development of an in situ solvent formation microextraction and preconcentration method based on ionic liquids for the determination of trace cobalt (II in water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Jamali

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple in situ solvent formation microextraction (ISFME methodology based on the application of ionic liquid (IL as an extractant solvent and sodium hexafluorophosphate (NaPF6 as an ion-pairing agent was proposed for the preconcentration of the trace levels of cobalt ions. In this method cobalt was complexed with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo-5-diethylaminophenol (5-Br-PADAP and extracted into an ionic liquid phase. After phase separation, the enriched analyte in the final solution is determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. Some effective factors that influence the microextraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection and the enrichment factor were 0.97 μg L−1 and 50, respectively. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D. was obtained as 2.4%. The proposed method was assessed through the analysis of certified reference water and recovery experiments.

  6. Determination of Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy or Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry after On-line Preconcentration and Solvent Extraction by Flow Injection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoli; Gerotto; Marchiori; Mariconti; Palonta; Troncon

    1996-11-01

    The concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in natural and sea waters are too low to be directly determined with by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Specific sample preparations are requested that make possible the determination of these analytes by preconcentration or extraction. These techniques are affected by severe problems of sample contamination. In this work Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) or by atomic absorption spectrometry, in fresh and seawater samples, after on-line preconcentration and following solvent elution with a flow injection system. Bonded silica with octadecyl functional group C18, packed in a microcolumn of 100-μl capacity, was used to collect diethyldithiocarbamate complexes of the heavy metals in aqueous solutions. The metals are complexed with a chelating agent, adsorbed on the C18 column, and eluted with methanol directly in the flow injection system. The methanolic stream can be addressed to FAAS for direct determination of Cu, Ni, and Zn, or collected in a vial for successive analysis by GFAAS. The eluted samples can be also dried in a vacuum container and restored to a little volume with concentrated HNO3 and Milli-Q water for analysis by ICP-MS or GFAAS.

  7. Informal proposal for an Atomic Physics Facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.

    1986-01-01

    An Atomic Physics Facility (APF) for experiments that will use radiation from a superconducting wiggler on the NSLS X-13 port is described. The scientific justification for the APF is given and the elements of the facility are discussed. It is shown that it will be possible to conduct a uniquely varied set of experiments that can probe most aspects of atomic physics. A major component of the proposal is a heavy-ion storage ring capable of containing ions with energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon. The ring can be filled with heavy ions produced at the BNL MP Tandem Laboratory or from independent ion-source systems. A preliminary cost estimate for the facility is presented.

  8. Interacting sources for high-precision atom interferometry - a theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posso Trujillo, Katerine; Ahlers, Holger; Schubert, Christian; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst; Gaaloul, Naceur

    2014-05-01

    We theoretically study the possibilities to use binary quantum mixtures as sources for high-precision atom interferometers with interferometry times ranging over several seconds. Such schemes are of timely interest in the context of inertial navigation or fundamental physics laws tests. The mixture expansion dynamics are solved by integrating a set of two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations. In order to satisfy the severe requirements of a precise differential interferometer, a common delta-kick cooling stage is applied to the two ensembles simultaneously to induce ultra-slow expansion (~ 50 pk regime). Other systematic effects are analysed and mitigation strategies identified. To illustrate this study, we consider the case of three mixtures of 87Rb/85Rb, 87Rb/39Kand87Rb/41K widely used in atom interferometry measurements. The advantages and drawbacks of every pair are highlighted and discussed. K. Posso-Trujillo. thanks the German Academic Exchange Service - DAAD (research grant No. A/10/74250).

  9. Diagnosing the accretion flow in ultraluminous X-ray sources using soft X-ray atomic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, M.J.; Walton, D.J.; Fabian, A.; Roberts, T.P.; Heil, L.; Pinto, C.; Anderson, G.; Sutton, A.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of unambiguous detections of atomic features in the X-ray spectra of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) has proven a hindrance in diagnosing the nature of the accretion flow. The possible association of spectral residuals at soft energies with atomic features seen in absorption and/or

  10. Critical review of soil contamination by polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs); concentrations, sources and congener profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Thomas J; Ball, Andrew S; Clarke, Bradley O

    2017-11-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been used in a broad array of polymeric materials such as plastics, foams, resins and adhesives to inhibit the spread of fires since the 1970s. The widespread environmental contamination and well documented toxic effects of PBDEs have led to bans and voluntary withdrawals in many jurisdictions. Replacement novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) have, however, exhibited many of the same toxic characteristics as PBDEs and appear to share similar environmental fate. This paper presents a critical review of the scientific literature regarding PBDE and NBFR contamination of surface soils internationally, with the secondary objective of identifying probable pollution sources. An evaluation of NBFR distribution in soil was also conducted to assess the suitability of the newer compounds as replacements for PBDEs, with respect to their land contamination potential. Principle production of PBDEs and NBFRs and their consequent use in secondary polymer manufacture appear to be processes with strong potential to contaminate surrounding soils. Evidence suggests that PBDEs and NBFRs are also released from flame retarded products during disposal via landfill, dumping, incineration and recycling. While the land application of sewage sludge represents another major pathway of soil contamination it is not considered in this review as it is extensively covered elsewhere. Both PBDEs and NBFRs were commonly detected at background locations including Antarctica and northern polar regions. PBDE congener profiles in soil were broadly representative of the major constituents in Penta-, Octa- and Deca-BDE commercial mixtures and related to predicted market place demand. BDE-209 dominated soil profiles, followed by BDE-99 and BDE-47. Although further research is required to gain baseline data on NBFRs in soil, the current state of scientific literature suggests that NBFRs pose a similar risk to land contamination as PBDEs. Copyright © 2017

  11. Repetitively pulsed SPER laser using transitions in Cd atoms. [Segmented plasma source of metal vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollonov, V.V.; Sirotkin, A.A. (Institut Obshchei Fiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    1989-08-01

    The repetitively pulsed operation of a laser with a segmented plasma source of metal vapor using transitions in Cd I atoms (at wavelengths of 1.43 and 3.955 microns) is reported. The mean power of laser radiation at the pump pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz amounted to 36 and 20 mW for 1.43 and 3.955 microns, respectively. Mechanisms which limit the maximum pulse repetition rate are considered, and ways to enhance the laser output energy characteristics are proposed. 7 refs.

  12. Arc plasma generator of atomic driver for steady-state negative ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A A; Belchenko, Yu I; Davydenko, V I; Ivanov, I A; Kolmogorov, V V; Listopad, A A; Mishagin, V V; Putvinsky, S V; Shulzhenko, G I; Smirnov, A

    2014-02-01

    The paper reviews the results of development of steady-state arc-discharge plasma generator with directly heated LaB6 cathode. This arc-discharge plasma generator produces a plasma jet which is to be converted into an atomic one after recombination on a metallic plate. The plate is electrically biased relative to the plasma in order to control the atom energies. Such an intensive jet of hydrogen atoms can be used in negative ion sources for effective production of negative ions on a cesiated surface of plasma grid. All elements of the plasma generator have an augmented water cooling to operate in long pulse mode or in steady state. The thermo-mechanical stresses and deformations of the most critical elements of the plasma generator were determined by simulations. Magnetic field inside the discharge chamber was optimized to reduce the local power loads. The first tests of the steady-state arc plasma generator prototype have performed in long-pulse mode.

  13. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. J.; Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Twedt, K. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Wilson, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future. PMID:27239245

  14. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, J. J.; Wilson, T. M. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Schwarzkopf, A. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); zeroK NanoTech, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20878 (United States); Twedt, K. A. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Maryland Nanocenter, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga{sup +} liquid metal ion source. In this review, we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future.

  15. Brominated flame retardants and polychlorinated biphenyls in human breast milk from several locations in India: potential contaminant sources in a municipal dumping site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Subramanian, Annamalai; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated the status of contamination of organohalogen compounds (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and brominated flame retardant (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in human milk samples from several locations in India. The levels of OCs were significantly higher in the milk of mothers living in and near municipal dumping site than other locations indicating that the open dumping sites for municipal wastes act as potential sources of these contaminants in India. The PCB concentrations observed in this study tended to decrease compared to those in the matched locations reported previously, probably due to the restriction of technical PCB usage in India. PBDE levels in human milk were two to three folds lower than those of PCBs in all the sampling locations investigated. Congener profiles of PCBs and PBDEs were different between samples from the dumping site mothers and general populations in other areas suggesting the presence of region-specific sources and pathways. HBCDs were detected in human milk from only two sites, with much lower concentrations and detection frequencies compared to PCBs and PBDEs. When hazard quotients (HQs) of PCBs and PBDEs were estimated for infant health risk, the HQs in some milk samples from the dumping site exceeded the threshold value (HQ>1) of PCBs, indicating the potential risk for infants in the specific site. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Xenon gas field ion source from a single-atom tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Chiao; Lin, Chun-Yueh; Chang, Wei-Tse; Li, Po-Chang; Fu, Tsu-Yi; Chang, Chia-Seng; Tsong, T. T.; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2017-06-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) systems have become powerful diagnostic and modification tools for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Gas field ion sources (GFISs) built from atomic-size emitters offer the highest brightness among all ion sources and thus can improve the spatial resolution of FIB systems. Here we show that the Ir/W(111) single-atom tip (SAT) can emit high-brightness Xe+ ion beams with a high current stability. The ion emission current versus extraction voltage was analyzed from 150 K up to 309 K. The optimal emitter temperature for maximum Xe+ ion emission was ˜150 K and the reduced brightness at the Xe gas pressure of 1 × 10-4 torr is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that of a Ga liquid metal ion source, and four to five orders of magnitude higher than that of a Xe inductively coupled plasma ion source. Most surprisingly, the SAT emitter remained stable even when operated at 309 K. Even though the ion current decreased with increasing temperature, the current at room temperature (RT) could still reach over 1 pA when the gas pressure was higher than 1 × 10-3 torr, indicating the feasibility of RT-Xe-GFIS for application to FIB systems. The operation temperature of Xe-SAT-GFIS is considerably higher than the cryogenic temperature required for the helium ion microscope (HIM), which offers great technical advantages because only simple or no cooling schemes can be adopted. Thus, Xe-GFIS-FIB would be easy to implement and may become a powerful tool for nanoscale milling and secondary ion mass spectroscopy.

  17. Multivariate optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction for determination of Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn in vegetable oils by high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alex S N; Dantas, Alailson F; Lima, Daniel C; Ferreira, Sérgio L C; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2015-10-15

    An assisted liquid-liquid extraction of copper, iron, nickel and zinc from vegetable oil samples with subsequent determination by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) was optimized by applying a full factorial design in two levels and the response surface methodology, Box-Behnken. The effects of the acid concentration and the amplitude, cycle and time of sonication on the extraction of the analytes, as well as their interactions, were assessed. In the selected condition (sonication amplitude = 66%, sonication time = 79 s, sonication cycle = 74%), using 0.5 mol L(-1) HCl as the extractant, the limits of quantification were 0.14, 0.20, 0.21 and 0.04 μg g(-1) for Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn, respectively, with R.S.D. ranging from 1.4% to 3.6%. The proposed method was applied for the determination of the analytes in soybean, canola and sunflower oils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Preliminary study of atomic emission spectrometry of Ti (H) plasma produced by vacuum arc ion source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chun-Feng; Wu, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-Fu; Lu, Biao; Wen, Zhong-Wei

    2014-03-01

    In order to study the discharge process of vacuum arc ion source, make a detail description of the discharge plasma, and lay the foundation for further research on ion source, atomic emission spectrometry was used to diagnose the parameters of plasma produced by vaccum arc ion source. In the present paper, two kinds of analysis method for the emission spectra data collected by a spectrometer were developed. Those were based in the stark broadening of spectral lines and Saba-Boltzmann equation. Using those two methods, the electron temperature, electron number density and the ion temperature of the plasma can be determined. The emission spectroscopy data used in this paper was collected from the plasma produced by a vacuum are ion source whose cathode was made by Ti material (which adsorbed hydrogen during storage procedure). Both of the two methods were used to diagnose the plasma parameters and judge the thermal motion state of the plasma. Otherwise, the validity of the diagnostic results by the two methods were analyzed and compared. In addition, the affection from laboratory background radiation during the spectral acquisition process was discussed.

  19. Levels and sources of brominated flame retardants in human hair from urban, e-waste, and rural areas in South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Jing [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Laboratory for Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Luo Xiaojun, E-mail: luoxiaoj@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yuan Jiangang [State Key Laboratory for Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Wang Jing [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang Yutao [State Key Laboratory for Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Chen Shenjun; Mai Bixian [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yang Zhongyi, E-mail: adsyzy@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Human hair and indoor dust from urban, e-waste, and rural areas in south China were collected and analyzed for brominated flame retardants (BFRs). BFRs concentrations in hair from occupational e-waste recycling workers were higher than those from non-occupational exposed residents in other sampling areas. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) are two major BFRs in hair samples. The PBDE congener profiles in hair from the e-waste area are different from those from urban and rural areas with relatively higher contribution of lower brominated congeners. DBDPE, instead of BDE209, has become the major BFR in non-e-waste recycling areas. Significant correlations were found between hair level and dust level for DBDPE and BTBPE but not for PBDEs. The different PBDE congener profiles between dust and hair may suggest that exogenous exposure to the PBDE adsorbed on dust is not a major source of hair PBDEs. - Highlights: > In this study we examine BFRs in human hair and indoor dust from the South China. > We find that the composition of BFR in the e-waste area is different from other areas. > DBDPE, instead of BDE209, has become the major BFR in non-e-waste recycling areas. > The PBDE congener pattern in hair is different from those in indoor dust. > In this study we conclude that exogenous exposure to the PBDE is not a major source of hair PBDEs. - BFR levels in hair from different areas in South China were determined and endogenous pathway was found to be the major source of hair BFRs.

  20. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Farnsworth, Paul B., E-mail: paul_farnsworth@byu.edu [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s {sup 3}S{sub 1} metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.011 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.97 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges.

  1. An open source/real-time atomic force microscope architecture to perform customizable force spectroscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materassi, Donatello; Baschieri, Paolo; Tiribilli, Bruno; Zuccheri, Giampaolo; Samorì, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    We describe the realization of an atomic force microscope architecture designed to perform customizable experiments in a flexible and automatic way. Novel technological contributions are given by the software implementation platform (RTAI-LINUX), which is free and open source, and from a functional point of view, by the implementation of hard real-time control algorithms. Some other technical solutions such as a new way to estimate the optical lever constant are described as well. The adoption of this architecture provides many degrees of freedom in the device behavior and, furthermore, allows one to obtain a flexible experimental instrument at a relatively low cost. In particular, we show how such a system has been employed to obtain measures in sophisticated single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments [Fernandez and Li, Science 303, 1674 (2004)]. Experimental results on proteins already studied using the same methodologies are provided in order to show the reliability of the measure system.

  2. Visualization of ionic wind in laminar jet flames

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Daegeun

    2017-07-03

    Electric field, when it is applied to hydrocarbon flames, generates ionic wind due to the electric body force on charge carrying species. Ionic wind has been shown to influence soot emission, propagation speed, and stability of flames; however, a detailed behavior of ionic wind and its effects on flames is still not clear. Here, we investigated the dynamic behaviors of flames and ionic wind in the presence of direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) electric fields in nonpremixed and premixed jet flames with a jet nozzle placed between two parallel electrodes. We observed a skewed flame toward a lower potential electrode with DC and lower frequency AC (e.g., 10Hz) and a steady flame with higher frequencies AC (1000Hz), while we found that the ionic wind blew toward both the anode and cathode regardless of flame type (nonpremixed or premixed) or the source of the electric field (DC and AC).

  3. Experiment and Simulation of Autoignition in Jet Flames and its Relevance to Flame Stabilization and Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Noman, Saeed M.

    2016-06-01

    Autoignition characteristics of pre-vaporized iso-octane, primary reference fuels, gasolines, and dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated experimentally in a coflow with elevated temperature of air. With the coflow air at relatively low initial temperatures below autoignition temperature Tauto, an external ignition source was required to stabilize the flame. Non-autoignited lifted flames had tribrachial edge structures and their liftoff heights correlated well with the jet velocity scaled by the stoichiometric laminar burning velocity, indicating the importance of the edge propagation speed on flame stabilization balanced with local flow velocity. At high initial temperatures over Tauto, the autoignited flames were stabilized without requiring an external ignition source. The autoignited lifted flames exhibited either tribrachial edge structures or Mild combustion behaviors depending on the level of fuel dilution. For the iso-octane and n-heptane fuels, two distinct transition behaviors were observed in the autoignition regime from a nozzle-attached flame to a lifted tribrachial-edge flame and then a sudden transition to lifted Mild combustion as the jet velocity increased at a certain fuel dilution level. The liftoff data of the autoignited flames with tribrachial edges were analyzed based on calculated ignition delay times for the pre-vaporized fuels. Analysis of the experimental data suggested that ignition delay time may be much less sensitive to initial temperature under atmospheric pressure conditions as compared with predictions. For the gasoline fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACEs), and primary reference fuels (PRFs), autoignited liftoff data were correlated with Research Octane Number and Cetane Number. For the DME fuel, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of formaldehyde (CH2O) and CH* chemiluminescence were visualized qualitatively. In the autoignition regime for both tribrachial structure and mild combustion, formaldehyde were found

  4. Imaging many-body Coulomb interactions and ultrafast photoionization and diffraction with cold atom electron and ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Robert; Speirs, Rory; Murphy, Dene; Torrance, Joshua; Thompson, Daniel; Sparkes, Benjamin; McCulloch, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The CAEIS cold-atom electron/ion source, based on photoionisation of laser cooled atoms, provides a powerful tool for investigating fundamental physical processes. The very low temperature of the ions has allowed us to image intra-beam Coulomb effects with unprecedented detail. With ultrafast laser excitation and streak detection we can probe competing ionization processes, particularly via Rydberg states, including sequential excitation, multiphoton excitation, resonance-enhanced multiphoton excitation and two-color multiphoton excitation. Knowledge from these studies has enabled ultrafast single-shot diffractive electron imaging with atomic resolution using a CAEIS.

  5. Speciation of four selenium compounds using high performance liquid chromatography with on-line detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    1997-01-01

    An analytical method for the speciation of selenomethionine, selenocystine, selenite and selenate by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with atomic spectrometric detection is presented. An organic polymeric strong anion exchange column was used as the stationary phase in combination...... of 1300 W. The limit of detection achieved under these conditions was 1 mu g L-1 (100 mu L injections). The HPLC-ICP-MS system was used for selenium speciation of selenite and selenate in aqueous solutions during a BCR certification exercise and for selenium speciation in the certified reference material...

  6. Determination of Pb(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Co(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry in food and water samples after preconcentration by coprecipitation with Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufekci, Mehmet; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Elvan, Hamide; Ozdes, Duygu; Soylak, Mustafa; Duran, Celal

    2013-02-01

    A new, simple, and rapid separation and preconcentration procedure, for determination of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions in environmental real samples, has been developed. The method is based on the combination of coprecipitation of analyte ions by the aid of the Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate-(Mo(VI)-DDTC) precipitate and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations. The effects of experimental conditions like pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of DDTC and Mo(VI), standing time, centrifugation rate and time, sample volume, etc. and also the influences of some foreign ions were investigated in detail on the quantitative recoveries of the analyte ions. The preconcentration factors were found to be 150 for Pb(II), Zn(II) and Co(II), and 200 for Cd(II) ions. The detection limits were in the range of 0.1-2.2 μg L(-1) while the relative standard deviations were found to be lower than 5 % for the studied analyte ions. The accuracy of the method was checked by spiked/recovery tests and the analysis of certified reference material (CRM TMDW-500 Drinking Water). The procedure was successfully applied to seawater and stream water as liquid samples and baby food and dried eggplant as solid samples in order to determine the levels of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions.

  7. Speciation of Tl(III and Tl(I in hair samples by dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Z. Mohammadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet was successfully used as a sample preparation method prior to flame atomic absorption determination of trace amounts of Tl(III and Tl(I in hair samples. In the proposed method, 1-(2-pyridylazo-2-naphthol, 1-dodecanol and ethanol were used as chelating agent, extraction and dispersive solvent, respectively. Several factors that may be affected in the extraction process, such as type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH, salting out effect, ionic strength and extraction time were studied. Under the optimal conditions, linearity was maintained between 6.0 and 900.0 ng mL−1 for Tl(III. The relative standard deviation for seven replicate determinations of 0.2 μg mL−1 Tl(III was 2.5%. The detection limit based on 3Sb for Tl(III in the original solution was 2.1 ng mL−1. The proposed method has been applied for the determination of trace amounts of thallium in hair samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  8. Use of Doehlert and constrained mixture designs in the development of a photo-oxidation procedure using UV radiation/H₂O₂ for decomposition of landfill leachate samples and determination of metals by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Marcos A; Souza, Antônio D S; Oliveira, Rafael V; Oliveira, Djalma M; Cardoso, Luiz A M; Sousa Filho, Hélio R

    2015-03-01

    This work proposes the use of photo-oxidation degradation with UV radiation/H2O2 as sample treatment for the determination of Fe, Zn, Mn, Ni and Co in municipal solid waste landfill leachate by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Three variables (pH, irradiation time and buffer concentration) were optimized using Doehlert design and the proportions of mixture components submitted to UV radiation (leachate sample, buffer solution and H2O2 30%, v/v) were optimized using a constrained mixture design. Using the experimental conditions established, this procedure allows limits of detection of 0.075, 0.025, 0.010, 0.075 and 0.041 µg mL-1, and the precision levels expressed as relative standard (%RSD, 0.5 µg mL-1) were 3.6, 1.8, 1.3, 3.3 and 1.7%, for Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni and Co respectively. Recovery tests were carried out for evaluation of the procedure accuracy and recoveries were between 92 and 106% for the studied metals. This procedure has been applied for the analysis of the landfill leachate collected in Jequié, a city of the southwestern region of the State of Bahia, Brazil. The results were compared with those obtained by acid digestion. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on paired t-test at 95% confidence level.

  9. Use of Doehlert and constrained mixture designs in the development of a photo-oxidation procedure using UV radiation/H2O2 for decomposition of landfill leachate samples and determination of metals by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A. Bezerra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes the use of photo-oxidation degradation with UV radiation/H2O2 as sample treatment for the determination of Fe, Zn, Mn, Ni and Co in municipal solid waste landfill leachate by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. Three variables (pH, irradiation time and buffer concentration were optimized using Doehlert design and the proportions of mixture components submitted to UV radiation (leachate sample, buffer solution and H2O2 30%, v/v were optimized using a constrained mixture design. Using the experimental conditions established, this procedure allows limits of detection of 0.075, 0.025, 0.010, 0.075 and 0.041 µg mL-1, and the precision levels expressed as relative standard (%RSD, 0.5 µg mL-1 were 3.6, 1.8, 1.3, 3.3 and 1.7%, for Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni and Co respectively. Recovery tests were carried out for evaluation of the procedure accuracy and recoveries were between 92 and 106% for the studied metals. This procedure has been applied for the analysis of the landfill leachate collected in Jequié, a city of the southwestern region of the State of Bahia, Brazil. The results were compared with those obtained by acid digestion. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on paired t-test at 95% confidence level.

  10. Ligandless surfactant mediated solid phase extraction combined with Fe₃O₄ nano-particle for the preconcentration and determination of cadmium and lead in water and soil samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: multivariate strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbani, N; Soylak, M

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, a microextraction technique combining Fe3O4 nano-particle with surfactant mediated solid phase extraction ((SM-SPE)) was successfully developed for the preconcentration/separation of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water and soil samples. The analytes were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effective variables such as the amount of adsorbent (NPs), the pH, concentration of non-ionic (TX-114) and centrifugation time (min) were investigated by Plackett-Burman (PBD) design. The important variables were further optimized by central composite design (CCD). Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits (LODs) of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 0.15 and 0.74 µg/L, respectively. The validation of the proposed procedure was checked by the analysis of certified reference materials of TMDA 53.3 fortified water and GBW07425 soil. The method was successfully applied for the determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water and soil samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Modified Activated Carbon Prepared from Acorn Shells as a New Solid-Phase Extraction Sorbent for the Preconcentration and Determination of Trace Amounts of Nickel in Food Samples Prior to Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Bahram

    2017-03-01

    A new solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent was introduced based on acidic-modified (AM) activated carbon (AC) prepared from acorn shells of native oak trees in Kurdistan. Hydrochloric acid (15%, w/w) and nitric acid (32.5%, w/w) were used to condition and modify AC. The IR spectra of AC and AM-AC showed that AM lead to the formation of increasing numbers of acidic functional groups on AM-AC. AM-AC was used in the SPE method for the extraction and preconcentration of Ni+2 prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination at ng/mL levels in model and real food samples. Effective parameters of the SPE procedure, such as the pH of the solutions, sorbent dosage, extraction time, sample volume, type of eluent, and matrix ions, were considered and optimized. An enrichment factor of 140 was obtained. The calibration curve was linear with an R2 of 0.997 in the concentration range of 1-220 ng/mL. The RSD was 5.67% (for n = 7), the LOD was 0.352 ng/mL, and relative recoveries in vegetable samples ranged from 96.7 to 103.7%.

  12. Simultaneous Preconcentration of Copper and Cadmium by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Using N,N'-Bis (2-Hydroxy-5-Bromo-Benzyl)1,2 Diaminopropane and Their Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Osman; Karadaş, Cennet; Kara, Derya

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the simultaneous preconcentration of copper and cadmium based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction as a prior step to their determination using flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. Carbon tetrachloride and N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-5-bromo-benzyl)1,2 diaminopropane were used as the extraction solvent and chelating ligand, respectively. Some parameters that influence the extraction efficiency-e.g., sample pH, volume of extraction solvent (carbon tetrachloride), concentration of the chelating ligand, effect of salt addition, and sample volume-were investigated and optimized. With a preconcentration factor of 10, the LODs (3σ) for Cd and Cu were 0.69 and 1.98 μg/L, respectively. The accuracy of the developed method was evaluated by analyzing SLRS-5 river water and SRM 1573a tomato leaves certified reference materials. Results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method was successfully applied to river water, seawater, and black tea samples. Good spike recoveries, varying within the range of 97.5 to 116.9%, confirmed the good performance of the method in real sample analysis.

  13. Biosorption using chitosan thiourea polymer as an extraction and preconcentration technique for copper prior to its determination in environmental and food samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: Synthesis, characterization and analytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saidi, H M

    2016-12-01

    The present work describes the synthesis and use of the chitosan thiourea polymer (CT polymer) as a novel biosorbent for copper preconcentration prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). CT polymer submitted in the present study was synthesized by the direct reaction between chitosan isolated from penaeus monodon chitin and ammonium thiocyanate, then the chemical structure and morphology of polymer were investigated by spectroscopic measurements, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results of SEM and XRD show that the prepared CT polymer has rough and hard surface with pores and nanofibers structure in the α-form. The height equivalent to the theoretical plates (HETP), the plates number (N), LOD and LOQ of CT polymer packed column were calculated to be 0.10±0.04mm, 100±2.02, 0.3μgL(-1)and 0.99μgL(-1), respectively. The developed column was employed in combination with FAAS for the analysis of copper in a certified reference material (NRCC-SLRS-4 Riverine water), potato, tea, and rice. Furthermore, the structure of the copper complex with CT polymer was proven with the aid of different spectroscopic and magnetic measurements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of lead at trace levels in mussel and sea water samples using vortex assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction-slotted quartz tube-flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erarpat, Sezin; Özzeybek, Gözde; Chormey, Dotse Selali; Bakırdere, Sezgin

    2017-12-01

    In this study, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and slotted quartz tube (SQT) were coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) to increase the sensitivity of lead. Conditions such as the formation of the lead-dithizone complex, efficiency of the DLLME method and the output of the SQT were systematically optimized to improve the detection limit for the analyte. The conventional FAAS system was improved upon by about 3.0 times with SQT-FAAS, 32 times with DLLME-FAAS and 142 times with DLLME-SQT-FAAS. The method was applicable over a wide linear range (10-500 μg L -1 ). The limit of detection (LOD) determined by DLLME-SQT-FAAS for seawater and mussel were 2.7 μg L -1 and 270 μg kg -1 , respectively. The percent recoveries obtained for mussel and seawater samples (spiked at 20 and 50 μg L -1 ) were 95-96% and 98-110%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Flow injection analysis-flame atomic absorption spectrometry system for indirect determination of sulfite after on-line reduction of solid-phase manganese (IV) dioxide reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare-Dorabei, Rouholah; Boroun, Shokoufeh; Noroozifar, Meissam

    2018-02-01

    A new and simple flow injection method followed by atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for indirect determination of sulfite. The proposed method is based on the oxidation of sulfite to sulphate ion using solid-phase manganese dioxide (30% W/W suspended on silica gel beads) reactor. MnO2 will be reduced to Mn(II) by sample injection in to the column under acidic carrier stream of HNO3 (pH 2) with flow rate of 3.5mLmin-1 at room temperature. Absorption measurement of Mn(II) which is proportional to the concentration of sulfite in the sample was carried out by atomic absorption spectrometry. The calibration curve was linear up to 25mgL-1 with a detection limit (DL) of 0.08mgL-1 for 400µL injection sample volume. The presented method is efficient toward sulfite determination in sugar and water samples with a relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 1.2% and a sampling rate of about 60h-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of effective atomic numbers, effective electrons numbers, total atomic cross-sections and buildup factor of some compounds for different radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levet, A.; Özdemir, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The photon interaction parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, effective electron density, buildup factor have been measured for Fe(NO3)3, V4O2, NaCO3·H2O, C6H5FeO7·H2O and CuCI compounds using 137Ba, 157Gd and 241Am γ-rays sources in stable geometry. The mass attenuation coefficients have been determined experimentally via Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EDXRF) system and theoretically by using WinXCom computer program. Then, effective atomic numbers, Zeff, and electron densities, Neff, have been calculated by using the mass attenuation coefficients. The obtained values of effective atomic numbers have been compared with the ones calculated according to a different approach proposed by Hine and the calculated ones from theory. Also, photon buildup factors were obtained by changing collimator diameters in the different photon energies. We observed that the buildup factor increased as the collimator diameter increased for all sources used.

  17. Tunable dual-frequency laser source for coherent population trapping cesium atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, F. A.; Georges, P.; Lucas-Leclin, G.; Baili, G.; Morvan, L.; Dolfi, D.; Holleville, D.; Guerandel, S.; Sagnes, I.

    2017-11-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) has been demonstrated as an interesting technique for miniature atomic frequency references [1,2] and quantum information. It is based on the coupling of the two hyperfine ground states of an alkali atom - namely cesium (133Cs) for atomic clocks - through excitation to a common atomic level by two phase-coherent laser fields nearly resonant with the atomic transitions. The frequency difference between the two laser fields is tuned at the atomic frequency splitting in the microwave range, equal to 9.192 GHz for 133Cs atoms. Outputs powers in the mW range and narrow-linewidth emission (<500 kHz) are required for the two laser beams.

  18. Occurrence, composition, source, and regional distribution of halogenated flame retardants and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxin/dibenzofuran in the soils of Guiyu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengjun; Tao, Bu; Zhou, Zhiguang; Fan, Shuang; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Aimin; Dong, Shuping; Yuan, Jingli; Li, Hong; Chen, Jiping; Huang, Yeru

    2017-09-01

    Guiyu, China, is well-known for the crude disposal of electronic waste (EW) and severe persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Therefore, in this study, the occurrence, composition, and source of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl (BB153), some novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), Dechlorane Plus (DP) and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) in farmland soils covering Guiyu were studied. In EW disposal area soils, PBDEs were the most abundant FRs, with concentrations of 13-1014 ng g(-1). The primary PBDE sources were technical Penta- and Deca-BDE mixtures in northern and southern Guiyu, respectively. The levels of BB153 were relatively low, possibly because it has been banned in the 1970s. The concentrations of hexabromobenzene (HBB) were 0.048-3.3 ng g(-1), while pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB) was almost not detected in the soils. Two alternatives to commercial PBDEs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), were the primary NBFRs, with concentrations of 1.8-153 ng g(-1) and 0.43-15 ng g(-1), respectively. DP was another primary FR, with concentrations of 0.57-146 ng g(-1). Moreover, syn-DP and anti-DP isomers were not stereoselectively decomposed during the EW disposal process and were therefore present in their original fractions in the soils. The levels of PBDD/Fs in EW disposal area soils were 2.5-17 pg TEQ g(-1). 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpBDF and OBDF were the dominant congeners, mainly derived from processing, pyrolysis and combustion of BFRs. The regional distribution of pollutants was shown to be related to the disposal manner of EW, with their open thermal disposal tending to release more highly brominated compounds such as BDE209, DBDPE, and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpBDF. Additionally, some riverbank sites were heavily polluted because of nearby point sources, downwind Simapu (SMP) town without EW disposal activity was also contaminated by these pollutants

  19. Bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers: An effective adsorbent for solid phase extraction and slurry sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of cadmium and lead in water, hair, food and cigarette samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Erkan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Ocsoy, Ismail [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Nanotechnology Research Center (ERNAM), Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Ozdemir, Nalan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa, E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey)

    2016-02-04

    Herein, the synthesis of bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers (BSA-NFs) through the building blocks of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and copper(II) ions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and their use as adsorbent for cadmium and lead ions are reported. The BSA-NFs, for the first time, were efficiently utilized as novel adsorbent for solid phase extraction (SPE) of cadmium and lead ions in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. The method is based on the separation and pre-concentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by BSA-NFs prior to determination by slurry analysis via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The analytes were adsorbed on BSA-NFs under the vortex mixing and then the ion-loaded slurry was separated and directly introduced into the flame AAS nebulizer by using a hand-made micro sample introduction system to eliminate a number of drawbacks. The effects of analytical key parameters, such as pH, amount of BSA-NFs, vortexing time, sample volume, and matrix effect of foreign ions on adsorbing of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were systematically investigated and optimized. The limits of detection (LODs) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were calculated as 0.37 μg L{sup −1} and 8.8 μg L{sup −1}, respectively. The relative standard deviation percentages (RSDs) (N = 5) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 7.2%, and 5.0%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed procedure was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified Water, TMDA-70 Fortified Water, SPS-WW2 Waste Water, NCSDC-73349 Bush Branches and Leaves) and by addition/recovery analysis. The quantitative recoveries were obtained for the analysis of certified reference materials and addition/recovery tests. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of cadmium and lead in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. - Highlights: • The synthesis of bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers is reported. • The nanoflowers were utilized for solid phase microextraction of

  20. Bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers: An effective adsorbent for solid phase extraction and slurry sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of cadmium and lead in water, hair, food and cigarette samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Ocsoy, Ismail; Ozdemir, Nalan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-02-04

    Herein, the synthesis of bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers (BSA-NFs) through the building blocks of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and copper(II) ions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and their use as adsorbent for cadmium and lead ions are reported. The BSA-NFs, for the first time, were efficiently utilized as novel adsorbent for solid phase extraction (SPE) of cadmium and lead ions in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. The method is based on the separation and pre-concentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by BSA-NFs prior to determination by slurry analysis via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The analytes were adsorbed on BSA-NFs under the vortex mixing and then the ion-loaded slurry was separated and directly introduced into the flame AAS nebulizer by using a hand-made micro sample introduction system to eliminate a number of drawbacks. The effects of analytical key parameters, such as pH, amount of BSA-NFs, vortexing time, sample volume, and matrix effect of foreign ions on adsorbing of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were systematically investigated and optimized. The limits of detection (LODs) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were calculated as 0.37 μg L(-)(1) and 8.8 μg L(-)(1), respectively. The relative standard deviation percentages (RSDs) (N = 5) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 7.2%, and 5.0%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed procedure was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified Water, TMDA-70 Fortified Water, SPS-WW2 Waste Water, NCSDC-73349 Bush Branches and Leaves) and by addition/recovery analysis. The quantitative recoveries were obtained for the analysis of certified reference materials and addition/recovery tests. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of cadmium and lead in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Flame structure of methane inverse diffusion flame

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents high speed images of OH-PLIF at 10. kHz simultaneously with 2D PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements collected along the entire length of an inverse diffusion flame with circumferentially arranged methane fuel jets. For a fixed fuel flow rate, the central air jet Re was varied, leading to four air to fuel velocity ratios, namely Vr = 20.7, 29, 37.4 and 49.8. A double flame structure could be observed composed of a lower fuel entrainment region and an upper mixing and intense combustion region. The entrainment region was enveloped by an early OH layer, and then merged through a very thin OH neck to an annular OH layer located at the shear layer of the air jet. The two branches of this annular OH layer broaden as they moved downstream and eventfully merged together. Three types of events were observed common to all flames: breaks, closures and growing kernels. In upstream regions of the flames, the breaks were counterbalanced by flame closures. These breaks in OH signal were found to occur at locations where locally high velocity flows were impinging on the flame. As the Vr increased to 37.4, the OH layers became discontinuous over the downstream region of the flame, and these regions of low or no OH moved upstream. With further increases in Vr, these OH pockets act as flame kernels, growing as they moved downstream, and became the main mechanism for flame re-ignition. Along the flame length, the direction of the two dimensional principle compressive strain rate axis exhibited a preferred orientation of approximately 45° with respect to the flow direction. Moreover, the OH zones were associated with elongated regions of high vorticity. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  2. Thermal properties of flame retardant cotton fabric grafted by dimethyl methacryloyloxyethyl phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Tie-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal properties of flame retardant cotton fabric grafted by dimethyl methacryloy-loxyethyl phosphate were investigated by the atom transfer radical polymerization method. Thermal gravimetric analysis was used to explore the thermal decomposition mode of flamed retardant cotton fabric. The weight loss rate of the flamed retardant cotton was bigger than that of the control cotton fabric, and a more final residual char of flamed retardant cotton was also observed. Flammability tests were used to study the flame retardance property of the flame retardant cotton fabric. The results showed that flamed retardant cotton fabric with 16.8% of weight gain could keep good flame retardance. Scanning electron microscope pictures were applied to investigate the morphology of residual char of the flame retardant samples.

  3. An atomic beam source for fast loading of a magneto-optical trap under high vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, P.D.; Hilliard, Andrew; Grünzweig, T.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a directional atomic beam created using an alkali metal dispenser and a nozzle. By applying a high current (15 A) pulse to the dispenser at room temperature we can rapidly heat it to a temperature at which it starts dispensing, avoiding the need for preheating. The atomic beam produced...

  4. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  5. Doehlert matrix for optimisation of procedure for determination of nickel in saline oil-refinery effluents by use of flame atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by cloud-point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Marcos de A; Conceição, André L B; Ferreira, Sérgio L C

    2004-02-01

    This paper proposes a preconcentration procedure for determination of nickel in saline aqueous waste samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). It is based on cloud-point extraction of nickel(II) ions as 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethilaminophenol (Br-PADAP) complexes using octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) as surfactant. The optimisation step was performed using a four-variable Doehlert design, involving the factors centrifugation time (CT) of system after addition of surfactant, solution pH, methanol volume (MV) added at micellar phase, and buffer concentration (BC). The analytical response used was absorbance, after volume correction. Using the established experimental conditions in the optimisation step the procedure enables nickel determination with a detection limit (3 delta/ S) of 0.2 microg L(-1), quantification limit (10 delta/ S) of 0.7 microg L(-1), and precision, calculated as relative standard deviation ( RSD) of 4.7 ( n=8) and 3.5% ( n=8) for nickel concentration of 1 and 5 microg L(-1), respectively. The preconcentration factor, determined from the ratio of the slopes of the analytical curves with and without preconcentration, is 74. The recovery achieved for nickel determination in the presence of several cations demonstrated that this procedure could be applied for analysis of water samples. The robustness was checked by using saturated fractional factorial designs, centred on the established experimental conditions in the optimisation step. The results of these tests demonstrated that the variables centrifugation time and buffer concentration are robust for modification by 10% and that solution pH and methanol volume are robust for 5%. Accuracy was evaluated by using the certified material reference SLEW-3 estuarine water for trace metals. The procedure was used for determination of nickel in saline effluents from oil refinery samples. Recovery results (95-104%) indicate that the procedure has satisfactory accuracy for

  6. Effective atomic number estimation using kV-MV dual-energy source in LINAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Dousatsu; Haga, Akihiro; Kida, Satoshi; Imae, Toshikazu; Takenaka, Shigeharu; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2017-07-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) imaging can measure the effective atomic number (EAN) as well as the electron density, and thus its adoption may improve dose calculations in brachytherapy and external photon/particle therapy. An expanded energy gap in dual-energy sources is expected to yield more accurate EAN estimations than conventional DECT systems, which typically span less than 100kV. The aim of this paper is to assess a larger energy gap DECT by using a linear accelerator (LINAC) radiotherapy system with a kV X-ray imaging device, which are combined to provide X-rays in both the kV- and MV-energy ranges. Traditionally, the EAN is determined by parameterising the Hounsfield Unit; however, this is difficult in a kV-MV DECT due to different uncertainties in the reconstructed attenuation coefficient at each end of the energy spectrum. To overcome this problem, we included a new calibration step to produce the most likely linear attenuation coefficients, based upon the X-ray spectrum. To determine the X-ray spectrum, Monte Carlo calculations using GEANT4 were performed. Then the images were calibrated using information from eight inserts of known materials in a CIRS phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA). Agreement between the estimated and empirical EANs in these inserts was within 11%. Validation was subsequently performed with the CatPhan500 phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem). The estimated EAN for seven inserts agreed with the empirical values to within 3%. Accordingly, it can be concluded that, given properly reconstructed images based upon a well-determined X-ray spectrum, kV-MV DECT provides an excellent prediction for the EAN. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cool Flame Quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Cool flame quenching distances are generally presumed to be larger than those associated with hot flames, because the quenching distance scales with the inverse of the flame propagation speed, and cool flame propagation speeds are often times slower than those associated with hot flames. To date, this presumption has never been put to a rigorous test, because unstirred, non-isothermal cool flame studies on Earth are complicated by natural convection. Moreover, the critical Peclet number (Pe) for quenching of cool flames has never been established and may not be the same as that associated with wall quenching due to conduction heat loss in hot flames, Pe approx. = 40-60. The objectives of this ground-based study are to: (1) better understand the role of conduction heat loss and species diffusion on cool flame quenching (i.e., Lewis number effects), (2) determine cool flame quenching distances (i.e, critical Peclet number, Pe) for different experimental parameters and vessel surface pretreatments, and (3) understand the mechanisms that govern the quenching distances in premixtures that support cool flames as well as hot flames induced by spark-ignition. Objective (3) poses a unique fire safety hazard if conditions exist where cool flame quenching distances are smaller than those associated with hot flames. For example, a significant, yet unexplored risk, can occur if a multi-stage ignition (a cool flame that transitions to a hot flame) occurs in a vessel size that is smaller than that associated with the hot quenching distance. To accomplish the above objectives, a variety of hydrocarbon-air mixtures will be tested in a static reactor at elevated temperature in the laboratory (1g). In addition, reactions with chemical induction times that are sufficiently short will be tested aboard NASA's KC-135 microgravity (mu-g) aircraft. The mu-g results will be compared to a numerical model that includes species diffusion, heat conduction, and a skeletal kinetic mechanism

  8. ARC: An open-source library for calculating properties of alkali Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šibalić, N.; Pritchard, J. D.; Adams, C. S.; Weatherill, K. J.

    2017-11-01

    We present an object-oriented Python library for the computation of properties of highly-excited Rydberg states of alkali atoms. These include single-body effects such as dipole matrix elements, excited-state lifetimes (radiative and black-body limited) and Stark maps of atoms in external electric fields, as well as two-atom interaction potentials accounting for dipole and quadrupole coupling effects valid at both long and short range for arbitrary placement of the atomic dipoles. The package is cross-referenced to precise measurements of atomic energy levels and features extensive documentation to facilitate rapid upgrade or expansion by users. This library has direct application in the field of quantum information and quantum optics which exploit the strong Rydberg dipolar interactions for two-qubit gates, robust atom-light interfaces and simulating quantum many-body physics, as well as the field of metrology using Rydberg atoms as precise microwave electrometers. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/hm5n8w628c.1 Licensing provisions: BSD-3-Clause Programming language: Python 2.7 or 3.5, with C extension External Routines: NumPy [1], SciPy [1], Matplotlib [2] Nature of problem: Calculating atomic properties of alkali atoms including lifetimes, energies, Stark shifts and dipole-dipole interaction strengths using matrix elements evaluated from radial wavefunctions. Solution method: Numerical integration of radial Schrödinger equation to obtain atomic wavefunctions, which are then used to evaluate dipole matrix elements. Properties are calculated using second order perturbation theory or exact diagonalisation of the interaction Hamiltonian, yielding results valid even at large external fields or small interatomic separation. Restrictions: External electric field fixed to be parallel to quantisation axis. Supplementary material: Detailed documentation (.html), and Jupyter notebook with examples and benchmarking runs (.html and .ipynb). [1] T.E. Oliphant

  9. Spatial distribution and implications to sources of halogenated flame retardants in riverine sediments of Taizhou, an intense e-waste recycling area in eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shanshan; Fu, Jie; He, Huan; Fu, Jianjie; Tang, Qiaozhi; Dong, Minfeng; Pan, Yongqiang; Li, An; Liu, Weiping; Zhang, Limin

    2017-10-01

    Concentrations and spatial distribution pattern of organohalogen flame retardants were investigated in the riverine surface sediments from Taizhou, an intensive e-waste recycling region in China. The analytes were syn- and anti- Dechlorane Plus (DP), Dechloranes 602, 603, and 604, a DP monoadduct, two dechlorinated DPs and 8 congeners of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The concentrations of Σ 8 PBDEs, ΣDP, ΣDec600s, and ΣDP-degradates ranged from recycling facilities. Such patterns were largely shared by Dec602 and dechlorinated DP, although their concentration levels were much lower. These major flame retardants significantly correlate with each other, and cluster together in the loading plot of principle component analysis. In contrast, most non-deca PBDE congeners do not correlate with DPs. Dec604 stood out having distinctly different spatial distribution pattern, which could be linked to historical use of mirex. Organic matter content of the sediment was not the dominant factor in determining the spatial pattern of pollution by halogenated flame retardants in the rivers of this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Front roughening of flames in discrete media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Fredric; Mi, XiaoCheng; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2017-07-01

    The morphology of flame fronts propagating in reactive systems composed of randomly positioned, pointlike sources is studied. The solution of the temperature field and the initiation of new sources is implemented using the superposition of the Green's function for the diffusion equation, eliminating the need to use finite-difference approximations. The heat released from triggered sources diffuses outward from each source, activating new sources and enabling a mechanism of flame propagation. Systems of 40 000 sources in a 200 ×200 two-dimensional domain were tracked using computer simulations, and statistical ensembles of 120 realizations of each system were averaged to determine the statistical properties of the flame fronts. The reactive system of sources is parameterized by two nondimensional values: the heat release time (normalized by interparticle diffusion time) and the ignition temperature (normalized by adiabatic flame temperature). These two parameters were systematically varied for different simulations to investigate their influence on front propagation. For sufficiently fast heat release and low ignition temperature, the front roughness [defined as the root mean square deviation of the ignition temperature contour from the average flame position] grew following a power-law dependence that was in excellent agreement with the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class (β =1 /3 ). As the reaction time was increased, lower values of the roughening exponent were observed, and at a sufficiently great value of reaction time, reversion to a steady, constant-width thermal flame was observed that matched the solution from classical combustion theory. Deviation away from KPZ scaling was also observed as the ignition temperature was increased. The features of this system that permit it to exhibit both KPZ and non-KPZ scaling are discussed.

  11. Turbulence-flame interactions in DNS of a laboratory high Karlovitz premixed turbulent jet flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiou; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a laboratory premixed turbulent jet flame was performed to study turbulence-flame interactions. The turbulent flame features moderate Reynolds number and high Karlovitz number (Ka). The orientations of the flame normal vector n, the vorticity vector ω and the principal strain rate eigenvectors ei are examined. The in-plane and out-of-plane angles are introduced to quantify the vector orientations, which also measure the flame geometry and the vortical structures. A general observation is that the distributions of these angles are more isotropic downstream as the flame and the flow become more developed. The out-of-plane angle of the flame normal vector, β, is a key parameter in developing the correction of 2D measurements to estimate the corresponding 3D quantities. The DNS results show that the correction factor is unity at the inlet and approaches its theoretical value of an isotropic distribution downstream. The alignment characteristics of n, ω and ei, which reflect the interactions of turbulence and flame, are also studied. Similar to a passive scalar gradient in non-reacting flows, the flame normal has a tendency to align with the most compressive strain rate, e3, in the flame, indicating that turbulence contributes to the production of scalar gradient. The vorticity dynamics are examined via the vortex stretching term, which was found to be the predominant source of vorticity generation balanced by dissipation, in the enstrophy transport equation. It is found that although the vorticity preferentially aligns with the intermediate strain rate, e2, the contribution of the most extensive strain rate, e1, to vortex stretching is comparable with that of the intermediate strain rate, e2. This is because the eigenvalue of the most extensive strain rate, λ1, is always large and positive. It is confirmed that the vorticity vector is preferentially positioned along the flame tangential plane, contributing

  12. Atomic fluorescence method for determination of concentration of alkali metal vapor using a laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budkin, L.A.; Okhotnikov, O.G.; Pak, G.T.; Pikhtelev, A.I.; Puzanov, S.L.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental investigation into the temperature dependence of the cesium vapor concentration has been carried out within the 20-80 deg C temperature range on the base of the atomic fluorescence method with the use of a semiconductor laser. The relation allowing one to study the alkali metal atomic concentration as a function of the vapor temperature and also the method sensitivity as a function of the laser intensity has been derived using the balance equations. A good agreement of the experimental results with estimated ones has been obtained. The method sensitivity has been found to grow with the laser intensity.

  13. Combination of flame atomic absorption spectrometry with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The accuracy was checked by analyzing a certified reference material from the National Institute of Standard and Technology, Trace elements in water (NIST CRM 1643e). KEY WORDS: Dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction, Lead determination, Preconcentration, Ligandless, Water analysis. Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2013 ...

  14. optimization of flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unesco

    cost-effective and routine analysis, who can not afford the expensive methods such as ICP-MS,. ICP-AES, ICP-OES etc. The study finally suggests the implications of the findings to chemical education. [AJCE, 2(3) .... findings of this study in teaching-learning program, because our optimized method is a rapid, cost-effective, ...

  15. Measurement and Modeling of Particle Radiation in Coal Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäckström, Daniel; Johansson, Robert; Andersson, Klas Jerker

    2014-01-01

    This work aims at developing a methodology that can provide information of in-flame particle radiation in industrial-scale flames. The method is based on a combination of experimental and modeling work. The experiments have been performed in the high-temperature zone of a 77 kWth swirling lignite...... properties. The in-flame particle radiation was measured with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer connected to a water-cooled probe via fiber optics. In the cross-section of the flame investigated, the particles were found to be the dominating source of radiation. Apart from giving information...

  16. Unsteady Flame Embedding

    KAUST Repository

    El-Asrag, Hossam A.

    2011-01-01

    Direct simulation of all the length and time scales relevant to practical combustion processes is computationally prohibitive. When combustion processes are driven by reaction and transport phenomena occurring at the unresolved scales of a numerical simulation, one must introduce a dynamic subgrid model that accounts for the multiscale nature of the problem using information available on a resolvable grid. Here, we discuss a model that captures unsteady flow-flame interactions- including extinction, re-ignition, and history effects-via embedded simulations at the subgrid level. The model efficiently accounts for subgrid flame structure and incorporates detailed chemistry and transport, allowing more accurate prediction of the stretch effect and the heat release. In this chapter we first review the work done in the past thirty years to develop the flame embedding concept. Next we present a formulation for the same concept that is compatible with Large Eddy Simulation in the flamelet regimes. The unsteady flame embedding approach (UFE) treats the flame as an ensemble of locally one-dimensional flames, similar to the flamelet approach. However, a set of elemental one-dimensional flames is used to describe the turbulent flame structure directly at the subgrid level. The calculations employ a one-dimensional unsteady flame model that incorporates unsteady strain rate, curvature, and mixture boundary conditions imposed by the resolved scales. The model is used for closure of the subgrid terms in the context of large eddy simulation. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) data from a flame-vortex interaction problem is used for comparison. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011.

  17. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-15

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the

  18. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry - An analytical and diagnostic tool for trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welz, Bernhard [Instituto de Quimica, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario de Ondina, 40170-290 Salvador - BA (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis - SC (Brazil)], E-mail: w.bernardo@terra.com.br; Borges, Daniel L.G.; Lepri, Fabio G. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis - SC (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre - RS (Brazil); Heitmann, Uwe [ISAS - Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department of Interface Spectroscopy, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    The literature about applications of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) with electrothermal atomization is reviewed. The historic development of HR-CS AAS is briefly summarized and the main advantages of this technique, mainly the 'visibility' of the spectral environment around the analytical line at high resolution and the unequaled simultaneous background correction are discussed. Simultaneous multielement CS AAS has been realized only in a very limited number of cases. The direct analysis of solid samples appears to have gained a lot from the special features of HR-CS AAS, and the examples from the literature suggest that calibration can be carried out against aqueous standards. Low-temperature losses of nickel and vanadyl porphyrins could be detected and avoided in the analysis of crude oil due to the superior background correction system. The visibility of the spectral environment around the analytical line revealed that the absorbance signal measured for phosphorus at the 213.6 nm non-resonance line without a modifier is mostly due to the PO molecule, and not to atomic phosphorus. The future possibility to apply high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption for the determination of non-metals is discussed.

  19. Aspects of the mechanism of the flame ionization detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1999-01-01

    The development of flame ionization detection (FID) took place on an empirical basis without a clear understanding of the mechanism. The study of flames by MS showed that the all-important ion was the formylium ion CHO+. The pre-combustion degradation was thought to be a pyrolytic degradation...... and hydrogenation at the high temperatures obtained close to the combustion zone. Using a capillary probe inside the flame it was recently shown that a degradation of all hydrocarbons to methane takes place at low temperatures by the reaction of hydrogen atoms which are generated in the burning hydrogen...

  20. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme.

  1. Atomic Hydrogen Properties of AGN Host Galaxies: HI in 16 NUclei of GAlaxies (NUGA) Sources

    OpenAIRE

    S. de Haan; Schinnerer, E.; Mundell, C. G.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.

    2007-01-01

    We present a comprehensive spectroscopic imaging survey of the distribution and kinematics of atomic hydrogen (HI) in 16 nearby spiral galaxies hosting low luminosity AGN, observed with high spectral and spatial resolution (resolution: ~20 arcsec, 5 km/s) using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). The sample contains a range of nuclear types, ranging from Seyfert to star-forming nuclei and was originally selected for the NUclei of GAlaxies project (NUGA) - a spectrally and spatially resolved inte...

  2. A simple velocity-tunable pulsed atomic source of slow metastable argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillandier-Loize, T.; Aljunid, S. A.; Correia, F.; Fabre, N.; Perales, F.; Tualle, J. M.; Baudon, J.; Ducloy, M.; Dutier, G.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed beam of metastable argon atoms having a low tunable velocity (10 to 150 m s-1) is produced with a very substantial brightness (9  ×  108Ar* s-1 sr-1). The present original experimental configuration leads to a variable velocity dispersion that can be smaller than the standard Brownian one. This behaviour, analysed using Monte Carlo simulations, exhibits momentum stretching (heating) or narrowing (cooling) entirely due to a subtle combination of Doppler and Zeeman effects.

  3. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z. G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue CO2 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smokepoint conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smokepoint conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  4. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue C02 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smoke-point conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smoke-point conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous-flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  5. Photolysis of metal oxides as a source of atoms in planetary exospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiev, R. R.; Berezhnoy, A. A.; Sidorenko, A. D.; Merzlikin, B. S.; Cherepanov, V. N.

    2017-10-01

    The cross sections of photolysis of LiO, NaO, KO, MgO, and CaO molecules have been calculated by the use of quantum chemistry methods. The maximal values for photolysis cross sections of alkali metal monoxides have the order of 10-17 cm2, and for alkaline earth metal monoxides these values are less on 1-2 orders of the magnitude. The lifetimes of photolysis at 1 astronomical unit are estimated as 5, 3, 60, 70, and 3,000 s for LiO, NaO, KO, MgO, and CaO, respectively. Typical kinetic energies of main peaks of photolysis-generated metal atoms are determined. Impact-produced LiO, NaO, KO, and MgO molecules are destroyed in the lunar and Hermean exospheres almost completely during the first ballistic flight while CaO molecule is more stable against destruction by photolysis. Photolysis-generated metal atoms in planetary exospheres can be detected by performing high-resolution spectral observations of velocity distribution of exospheric metal atoms.

  6. Passive sampling survey of polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants in indoor and outdoor air in Ottawa, Canada: implications for sources and exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilford, Bryony H; Harner, Tom; Zhu, Jiping; Shoeib, Mahiba; Jones, Kevin C

    2004-10-15

    The polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants in plastics of soft furnishings, TV sets and computers, and insulation in the indoor environment. The penta-BDEs--now banned in most parts of Europe but still used in North America--are additive flame retardants that may be released to the indoor environment via volatilization or as dusts. In this study, to investigate general population PBDE exposure, air was sampled in 74 randomly selected homes in Ottawa, Canada and at seven outdoor sites during the winter of 2002--3, using polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers. The passive sampling rate (2.5 m3 day(-1)) was determined through a pilot study employing active and passive samplers side-by-side at selected indoor locations. Indoor air concentrations of PBDEs were log-normally distributed with a geometric mean of 120 pg m(-3) and a median of 100 pg m(-3), approximately 50 times higher than the range of outdoor air concentrations (<0.1-4.4 pg m(-3)). The maximum daily human exposure via the inhalation pathway based on median PBDE levels found in this survey was estimated to be 1.9 ng day(-1) (female) and 2.0 ng day(-1) (male), representing 4.1% (f) and 4.4% (m) of overall daily intake.

  7. An Experimental Insight into the Smoldering-Flaming Transition Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Poorva Shrivastava; Chakshu Baweja; Herambraj Nalawade; A. Vinoth Kumar; Vikram Ramanan; Vinayak Malhotra

    2017-01-01

    Transitional phenomena of smoldering combustion over thin solid fuels are investigated. An experimental setup was upraised and implications of both smoldering and flaming external heat sources are estimated. Incense sticks were used as potential fuel and external smoldering heat source along with a fixed candle flame. The role of key controlling parameters, namely, separation distance and number of external heat sources in horizontal and vertical direction, was extensively examined. The surfa...

  8. Microphysics of Astrophysical Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursi, L. J.; Zingale, M.; Caceres, A.; Calder, A. C.; Timmes, F. X.; Truran, J. W.; Rosner, R.; Lamb, D. Q.; Brown, E.; Ricker, P.; Fryxell, B.; Olson, K.; Riley, K.; Siegel, A.; Vladimirova, N.

    2003-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to begin with a deflagration phase, where burning occurs as a subsonic flame which accelerates and possibly undergoes a transition to a supersonic detonation. Both the acceleration and possible transition will depend on the microphysics of astrophysical flames, and their interaction with a turbulent flow in degenerate material. Here we present recent progress in studying the interactions of astrophysical flames and curvature and strain at the FLASH center; in particular, we discuss quantitative measurements of the effects of strain on burning rate of these flames, and implications for instability growth and quenching. This work was supported by the DOE ASCI/Alliances program at the University of Chicago under grant No. B341495 and the Scientific through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program of the DOE, grant number DE-FC02-01ER41176 to the Supernova Science Center/UCSC.

  9. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  10. Determination of silicon and aluminum in silicon carbide nanocrystals by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Bencs, László; Beke, Dávid; Gali, Adam

    2016-01-15

    The determination of Al contaminant and the main component Si in silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with the size-distribution of 1-8nm dispersed in an aqueous solution was developed using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS). The vaporization/atomization processes were investigated in a transversally heated graphite atomizer by evaporating solution samples of Al and Si preserved in various media (HCl, HNO3). For Si, the best results were obtained by applying a mixture of 5µg Pd plus 5µg Mg, whereas for Al, 10µg Mg (each as nitrate solution) was dispensed with the samples, but the results obtained without modifier were found to be better. This way a maximum pyrolysis temperature of 1200°C for Si and 1300°C for Al could be used, and the optimum (compromise) atomization temperature was 2400°C for both analytes. The Si and Al contents of different sized SiC nanocrystals, dispersed in aqueous solutions, were determined against aqueous (external) calibration standards. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibrations were found to be 0.9963 for Si and 0.9991 for Al. The upper limit of the linear calibration range was 2mg/l Si and 0.25mg/l Al. The limit of detection was 3µg/l for Si and 0.5µg/l for Al. The characteristic mass (m0) was calculated to be 389pg Si and 6.4pg Al. The Si and Al content in the solution samples were found to be in the range of 1.0-1.7mg/l and 0.1-0.25mg/l, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Analyzing Capabilities of Commercial and Open-Source Routers to Implement Atomic BGP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cvjetić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes implementations of BGP protocol on commercial and open-source routers and presents how some existing BGP extensions and routing table isolation mechanisms may be used to solve issues found in standard BGP implementation.

  12. A Space Experiment to Measure the Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers and Demonstrate a Technique to Identify Sources of Silicone Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Baney-Barton, Elyse; Sechkar, Edward A.; Hunt, Patricia K.; Willoughby, Alan; Bemer, Meagan; Hope, Stephanie; Koo, Julie; Kaminski, Carolyn; hide

    1999-01-01

    A low Earth orbital space experiment entitled, "Polymers Erosion And Contamination Experiment", (PEACE) has been designed as a Get-Away Special (GAS Can) experiment to be accommodated as a Shuttle in-bay environmental exposure experiment. The first objective is to measure the atomic oxygen erosion yields of approximately 40 different polymeric materials by mass loss and erosion measurements using atomic force microscopy. The second objective is to evaluate the capability of identifying sources of silicone contamination through the use of a pin-hole contamination camera which utilizes environmental atomic oxygen to produce a contaminant source image on an optical substrate.

  13. Atmospheric-pressure solution-cathode glow discharge: A versatile ion source for atomic and molecular mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Andrew J. [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47405 (United States); Williams, Kelsey L. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44242 (United States); Hieftje, Gary M. [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47405 (United States); Shelley, Jacob T., E-mail: shellj@rpi.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44242 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 12180 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    An atmospheric-pressure solution-cathode glow discharge (SCGD) has been evaluated as an ion source for atomic, molecular, and ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The SCGD consists of a direct-current plasma, supported in the ambient air in the absence of gas flows, and sustained upon the surface of a flowing liquid cathode. Analytes introduced in the flowing liquid, as an ambient gas, or as a solid held near the plasma are vaporized and ionized by interactions within or near the discharge. Introduction of acidic solutions containing metal salts produced bare elemental ions as well as H{sub 2}O, OH{sup −} and NO{sub 3}{sup −} adducts. Detection limits for these elemental species ranged from 0.1 to 4 ppb, working curves spanned more than 4 orders of linear dynamic range, and precision varied between 5 and 16% relative standard deviation. Small organic molecules were also efficiently ionized from solution, and both the intact molecular ion and fragments were observed in the resulting SCGD mass spectra. Fragmentation of molecular species was found to be tunable; high discharge currents led to harder ionization, while low discharge currents produced stronger molecular-ion signals. Ambient gases and solids, desorbed by the plasma from a glass probe, were also readily ionized by the SCGD. Indeed, strong analyte signals were obtained from solid samples placed at least 2 cm from the plasma. These findings indicate that the SCGD might be useful also for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Combined with earlier results that showed the SCGD is useful for ionization of labile biomolecules, the results here indicate that the SCGD is a highly versatile ion source capable of providing both elemental and molecular mass-spectral information. - Highlights: • Solution-cathode glow discharge used as an ionization source for mass spectrometry. • SCGD-MS can provide atomic as well as intact molecular mass spectra. • Atomic limits of detection range

  14. Microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge for the determination of mercury by atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenli; Chan, George C-Y; Ray, Steven J; Zhang, Xinrong; Hieftje, Gary M

    2008-11-15

    A low-power, atmospheric-pressure microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been developed for use in atomic emission spectrometry. The small plasma (0.6 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm) is generated within a glass cell by using electrodes that do not contact the plasma. Powered by an inexpensive ozone generator, the discharge ignites spontaneously, can be easily sustained in Ar or He at gas flow rates ranging from 5 to 200 mL min(-1), and requires less than 1 W of power. The effect of operating parameters such as plasma gas identity, plasma gas flow rate, and residual water vapor on the DBD source performance has been investigated. The plasma can be operated without removal of residual water vapor, permitting it to be directly coupled with cold vapor generation sample introduction. The spectral background of the source is quite clean in the range from 200 to 260 nm with low continuum and structured components. The DBD source has been applied to the determination of Hg by continuous-flow, cold vapor generation and offers detection limits from 14 (He-DBD) to 43 pg mL(-1) (Ar-DBD) without removal of the residual moisture. The use of flow injection with the He-DBD permits measurement of Hg with a 7.2 pg limit of detection, and with repetitive injections having an RSD of <2% for a 10 ng mL(-1) standard.

  15. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  16. Ion trajectories in atom probe field ion microscopy and gas field ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Castilho, C M C

    1999-01-01

    Trajectories of positive ions produced in a region close to a structured surface, modelled by spherical or spheroidal protrusions and kept at a positive electric potential with respect to a distant screen or detector are calculated. The results are discussed in comparison with similar practical situations produced by field ionization and field evaporation or desorption, such as those occurring in gas field ion sources, field ion microscopy and field desorption spectroscopy. (author)

  17. In-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes: From atomic physics to nuclear structure

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, S

    2014-01-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source RILIS [1] at the CERN-ISOLDE on-line radioactive ion beam facility is essential for ion beam production for the majority of experiments, but it is also powerful tool for laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes. A series of experiments on in-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes [2, 3] revealed the nuclear ground state properties of 191;211;216;218Po. However, limitations caused by the isobaric background of surface-ionized francium isotopes hindered the study of several neutron rich polonium isotopes. The development of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) [4] and finally its integration at ISOLDE has led to a dramatic suppression of surface ions. Meanwhile, the RILIS laser spectroscopy capabilities have advanced tremendously. Widely tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers were installed to complement the established dye laser system. Along with a new data acquisition system [5], this more versatile laser setup enabled rst ever laser spectroscopy of the radioact...

  18. Simultaneous determination of rhodium and ruthenium by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrzycka-Szelewa, Elżbieta; Lulewicz, Marta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2017-07-01

    In the present paper a fast, simple and sensitive analytical method for simultaneous determination of rhodium and ruthenium by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) was developed. Among six pairs of absorption atomic lines of Rh and Ru, which are close enough to enable their simultaneous detection, two pairs were selected for further studies. Best results were obtained for measurements of the resonance line of rhodium at 343.489 nm and the adjacent secondary line of ruthenium at 343.674 nm (23% intensity of this line). For evaluated lines, the absorbance values were obtained using three pixels. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1200 °C and 2600 °C, respectively. Under these conditions the limits of detection achieved for Rh and Ru were found to be 1.0 μg L- 1 and 1.9 μg L- 1, respectively. The characteristic mass was 12.9 pg for Rh and 71.7 pg for Ru. Repeatability of the results expressed as a relative standard deviation was typically below 6%. The trueness of the method was confirmed by analysis of the certified reference material - platinum ore (SARM 76). The recovery of Rh and Ru from the platinum ore was 93.0 ± 4.6% and 90.1 ± 2.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the direct simultaneous determination of trace amounts of rhodium and ruthenium in spiked river water, road runoff, and municipal sewage. Separation of interfering matrix on cation exchange resin was required before analysis of road dust and tunnel dust (CW-7) by HR-CS GFAAS.

  19. Reconstructed 3D flame structures in noise-controlled swirl-stabilized combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Mamoru; Inoue, Shohei; Shimura, Masayasu; Taka, Shohei; Choi, Gyung-Min; Miyauchi, Toshio

    2008-09-01

    Flame structures of turbulent premixed flames in a noise-controlled, swirl-stabilized combustor are investigated to clarify the mechanism of combustion noise reduction by the secondary fuel injection. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is conducted for several cases with different secondary fuel injection, and 3D flame structure is reconstructed from PLIF results on multiple planes. The secondary fuel injection suppresses the fluctuation of high-temperature gas in the recirculation zone and reduces Reynolds stress and entropy terms in the acoustic sound source. In the flame zone, effects of the injection frequency are discussed by introducing mean progress variable. The flame brush is very wide for the no control case, whereas it becomes thin and is confined to a narrow space for the secondary fuel injection cases. The investigated combustor gives minimum sound level at a relevant fuel injection frequency, which is very low compared with the natural acoustic mode of the combustor. The flame brush becomes very thin, and self-induced oscillations of the flame brush disappear at this relevant frequency. The oscillation of the flame brush represents large-scale fluctuation of the mean heat release rate. The relations between characteristics of flame brush and combustion noise are discussed by introducing instantaneous and dynamical effects of flame front on the entropy term of the sound source. The secondary fuel injection works for the control of the entropy term in the sound source because the thin flame brush represents suppression of the instantaneous and dynamical effects.

  20. Nonpremixed flame in a counterflow under electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Daegeun

    2016-05-08

    Electrically assisted combustion has been studied in order to control or improve flame characteristics, and emphasizing efficiency and emission regulation. Many phenomenological observations have been reported on the positive impact of electric fields on flame, however there is a lack of detailed physical mechanisms for interpreting these. To clarify the effects of electric fields on flame, I have investigated flame structure, soot formation, and flow field with ionic wind electrical current responses in nonpremixed counterflow flames. The effects of direct current (DC) electric field on flame movement and flow field was also demonstrated in premixed Bunsen flames. When a DC electric field was applied to a lower nozzle, the flames moved toward the cathode side due to Lorentz force action on the positive ions, soot particles simultaneously disappeared completely and laser diagnostics was used to identify the results from the soot particles. To understand the effects of an electric field on flames, flow visualization was performed by Mie scattering to check the ionic wind effect, which is considered to play an important role in electric field assisted combustion. Results showed a bidirectional ionic wind, with a double-stagnant flow configuration, which blew from the flame (ionic source) toward both the cathode and the anode. This implies that the electric field affects strain rate and the axial location of stoichiometry, important factors in maintaining nonpremixed counterflow flames; thus, soot formation of the counterflow flame can also be affected by the electric field. In a test of premixed Bunsen flames having parallel electrodes, flame movement toward the cathode and bidirectional ionic wind were observed. Using PIV measurement it was found that a created radial velocity caused by positive ions (i.e. toward a cathode), was much faster than the velocity toward the anode. Even in a study of alternating current (AC) electric fields, bidirectional ionic wind could

  1. An Experimental Insight into the Smoldering-Flaming Transition Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poorva Shrivastava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional phenomena of smoldering combustion over thin solid fuels are investigated. An experimental setup was upraised and implications of both smoldering and flaming external heat sources are estimated. Incense sticks were used as potential fuel and external smoldering heat source along with a fixed candle flame. The role of key controlling parameters, namely, separation distance and number of external heat sources in horizontal and vertical direction, was extensively examined. The surfacing issues of enclosure effect and the external heat sources orientation are addressed. The study primarily aims at understanding the feasibility and spontaneity of transition owing to external heat sources (both flaming and smoldering. Forward heat transfer significantly deviates qualitatively and quantitatively with varying separation distance in both directions. Number of external heat sources intensifies the transition phenomenon in smoldering combustion. With practical considerations, external heat sources arrangement and orientation have substantial effect on the combustion process.

  2. Flaming on YouTube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, Peter J.; Heuvelman, A.; Verleur, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this explorative study, flaming on YouTube was studied using surveys of YouTube users. Flaming is defined as displaying hostility by insulting, swearing or using otherwise offensive language. Three general conclusions were drawn. First, although many users said that they themselves do not flame,

  3. "Magic Eraser" Flame Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Arthur M.; Davies, Malonne I.; Landis, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Cleaning erasers are used to support methanol-fueled flame tests. This safe demonstration technique requires only small quantities of materials, provides clean colors for up to 45 seconds, and can be used in the classroom or the auditorium. (Contains 1 note.)

  4. Flame interactions and burning characteristics of two live leaf samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent M. Pickett; Carl Isackson; Rebecca Wunder; Thomas H. Fletcher; Bret W. Butler; David R. Weise

    2009-01-01

    Combustion experiments were performed over a flat-flame burner that provided the heat source for multiple leaf samples. Interactions of the combustion behavior between two leaf samples were studied. Two leaves were placed in the path of the flat-flame burner, with the top leaf 2.5 cm above the bottom leaf. Local gas and particle temperatures, as well as local oxygen...

  5. VISIONS: Remote Observations of a Spatially-Structured Filamentary Source of Energetic Neutral Atoms near the Polar Cap Boundary During an Auroral Substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Chornay, D.; Clemmons, J.; Keller, J. W.; Klenzing, J.; Kujawski, J.; McLain, J.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Zettergren, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report initial results from the VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm (VISIONS) rocket that flew through and near several regions of enhanced auroral activity and also sensed regions of ion outflow both remotely and directly. The observed neutral atom fluxes were largest at the lower energies and generally higher in the auroral zone than in the polar cap. In this paper, we focus on data from the latter half of the VISIONS trajectory when the rocket traversed the polar cap region. During this period, many of the energetic neutral atom spectra show a peak at 100 electronvolts. Spectra with peaks around 100 electronvolts are also observed in the Electrostatic Ion Analyzer (EIA) data consistent with these ions comprising the source population for the energetic neutral atoms. The EIA observations of this low energy population extend only over a few tens of kilometers. Furthermore, the directionality of the arriving energetic neutral atoms is consistent with either this spatially localized source of energetic ions extending from as low as about 300 kilometers up to above 600 kilometers or a larger source of energetic ions to the southwest.

  6. Testing Premixed Turbulent Combustion Models by Studying Flame Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei N. Lipatnikov

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available First, the following universal feature of premixed turbulent flame dynamics is highlighted: During an early stage of flame development, the burning velocity grows much faster than the mean flame brush thickness, because the two processes are controlled by the small-scale and large-scale turbulent eddies, respectively. Second, this feature of developing flames is exploited in order to test a number of different models of premixed turbulent combustion by theoretically and numerically studying an interaction of an initially laminar, planar, one-dimensional flame with a statistically stationary, planar, one-dimensional, and spatially uniform turbulent flow not affected by combustion. To test as many models as possible in a simple and unified manner, various combustion models are divided into three generalized groups: (i algebraic models, which invoke an algebraic expression for the mean rate of product creation, (ii gradient models, which involve a gradient-type source term in a balance equation for the mean combustion progress variable, and (iii two-equation models, which deal not only with a balance equation for the mean combustion progress variable but also with either a balance equation for the flame surface density or a balance equation for the mean scalar dissipation rate. Analytical and numerical results reported in the paper indicate that solely the gradient models are able to yield substantially different growth rates of the turbulent burning velocity and the mean flame brush thickness.

  7. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  8. Antimony: a flame fighter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintzer, Niki E.; Guberman, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Antimony is a brittle, silvery-white semimetal that conducts heat poorly. The chemical compound antimony trioxide (Sb2O3) is widely used in plastics, rubbers, paints, and textiles, including industrial safety suits and some children’s clothing, to make them resistant to the spread of flames. Also, sodium antimonate (NaSbO3) is used during manufacturing of high-quality glass, which is found in cellular phones.

  9. Electric Fields for Flame Extinguishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    ethylene-air and methane-air flames, the application of a DC field of 0.5 kV/cm increased the burning velocity by close to a factor of two. Salamandra and...flame surface area and thus the velocity, but Jaggers and von Engel also saw physical perturbations in flame fronts with no electric field. Salamandra ...Conductivity in Propane-Air Flames by Using Rydberg State Stark Spectroscopy," Proc. Combustion Inst., Fall (1990). 12. Salamandra , G.D., and Mairov, N.I

  10. Flame Resistant Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Solimide manufactured by Imi-Tech Corporation, is a lightweight fire resistant material produced under a manufacturing process that allows it to be uniformly foamed. Can be produced in a variety of densities and structural configurations and remains resilient under exposure to temperatures ranging from minus 300 to plus 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Is resistant to open flame and generates virtually no smoke or toxic by-products. Used in aircraft for its superior damping characteristics, lighter weight and fire barrier properties, it's also applicable to ships and surface transportation systems such as transit cars, trains, buses and automobiles.

  11. Initial evaluation and comparison of plasma damage to atomic layer carbon materials using conventional and low T{sub e} plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Chang, Josephine; Farmer, Damon B.; Engel, Michael; Neumayer, Deborah; Han, Shu-Jen; Engelmann, Sebastian U., E-mail: suengelm@us.ibm.com; Joseph, Eric A. [IBM, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Boris, David R.; Hernández, Sandra C.; Walton, Scott G. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lock, Evgeniya H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The ability to achieve atomic layer precision is the utmost goal in the implementation of atomic layer etch technology. Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are single atomic layers of carbon with unique properties and, as such, represent the ultimate candidates to study the ability to process with atomic layer precision and assess impact of plasma damage to atomic layer materials. In this work, the authors use these materials to evaluate the atomic layer processing capabilities of electron beam generated plasmas. First, the authors evaluate damage to semiconducting CNTs when exposed to beam-generated plasmas and compare these results against the results using typical plasma used in semiconductor processing. The authors find that the beam generated plasma resulted in significantly lower current degradation in comparison to typical plasmas. Next, the authors evaluated the use of electron beam generated plasmas to process graphene-based devices by functionalizing graphene with fluorine, nitrogen, or oxygen to facilitate atomic layer deposition (ALD). The authors found that all adsorbed species resulted in successful ALD with varying impact on the transconductance of the graphene. Furthermore, the authors compare the ability of both beam generated plasma as well as a conventional low ion energy inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to remove silicon nitride (SiN) deposited on top of the graphene films. Our results indicate that, while both systems can remove SiN, an increase in the D/G ratio from 0.08 for unprocessed graphene to 0.22 to 0.26 for the beam generated plasma, while the ICP yielded values from 0.52 to 1.78. Generally, while some plasma-induced damage was seen for both plasma sources, a much wider process window as well as far less damage to CNTs and graphene was observed when using electron beam generated plasmas.

  12. Setup and proof of principle of SAPIS (Stored Atoms Polarized Ion Source), a novel source of polarized H{sup -}/D{sup -} ions; Aufbau und Funktionsnachweis von SAPIS (Stored Atoms Polarized Ion Source), einer neuartigen Quelle polarisierter H{sup -}/D{sup -}-Ionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmerich, R.

    2007-02-14

    The objective of this work was the setup and the proof-of-principle of a new type of negative polarized hydrogen or deuterium ion source, which is based on the charge-exchange reaction (vector)H{sup 0}+Cs{sup 0}{yields}(vector)H{sup -}+Cs{sup +}, as for instance the Colliding-Beams-Source (CBS) at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY in Juelich. In contrast to the CBS, the use of a storage cell for the charge-exchange region promises an increase in H{sup -} current by at least an order of magnitude without considerable polarization losses. For these purposes, a new laboratory was equipped and both a polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source and an intense neutral cesium-beam source have been build-on. A Lambshift polarimeter, which allows the measurement of the nuclear polarization of the atomic as well as ionic beams, was completed with the construction of a new spin-filter. After commissioning and optimizing each of these sources, a storage cell was developed and installed in the charge-exchange region with a magnetic field. Additionally, components for the extraction, detection and analysis of the negative ion beam were installed. Following the decisive proof of principle, investigation of the properties of the storage cell, especially as to H recombination and depolarisation, was begun. Furthermore, a number of software programs was developed for the control and monitoring of different components of the sources as well as a universal measuring software for the complete installation, including the measurement and calculation of the beam polarization. At the same time, the remote control system of the Cologne source of polarized ions LASCO at the FN tandem accelerator was completely modernized. (orig.)

  13. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  14. Determination of trace amounts of selenium in minerals and rocks by flame less atomic-absorption spectrometry; Determinacion de selinio en minerales y rocas por espectrometria de absorcion atomica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduan, F. A.; Capdevilla, C.

    1980-07-01

    The determination of trace amounts of selenium In silicate rocks and feldspar by solvent extraction and graphite furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry has been stu- died. Sodium diethyl-ditio carbamate and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate have been tried as chelating agents. The best results are achieved when selenium is extracted Into carbon tetrachloride as the sodium diethyldithiocarbamate complex. The method allows to detect 0,75 ppm of selenium in the sample. Recoveries are about 100%. (Author) 7 refs.

  15. FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, Andrew M; Butcher, Thomas; Troost, Henry

    2003-02-04

    The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion

  16. Turbulent Flame Speed and Self Similarity of Expanding Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Zhu, Delin; Law, Chung

    2011-11-01

    In this study we present experimental turbulent flame speed data measured in constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames, propagating in nearly homogenous isotropic turbulence, in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. The cold flow is characterized by high speed particle image velocimetry while the flame propagation rate is obtained by tracking high speed Schlieren images of unity Lewis number methane-air flames over wide ranges of pressure and turbulence intensity. It is found that the normalized turbulent flame speed as a function of the average radius scales as a turbulent Reynolds number to the one-half power, where the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property, thus showing self-similar propagation. Utilizing this dependence it is found that the turbulent flame speeds from expanding flames and those from Bunsen geometries can be scaled by a single parameter: the turbulent Reynolds number utilizing recent theoretical results obtained by spectral closure of the G equation, after correcting for gas expansion effects.

  17. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6-4.3%), repeatability (4-9%), reproducibility (9-11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as straightforward

  18. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia, E-mail: e.vasileva-veleva@iaea.org

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6–4.3%), repeatability (4–9%), reproducibility (9–11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as

  19. High power laser source for atom cooling based on reliable telecoms technology with all fibre frequency stabilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Thomas; Farries, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Cold atom interferometers are emerging as important tools for metrology. Designed into gravimeters they can measure extremely small changes in the local gravitational field strength and be used for underground surveying to detect buried utilities, mineshafts and sinkholes prior to civil works. To create a cold atom interferometer narrow linewidth, frequency stabilised lasers are required to cool the atoms and to setup and measure the atom interferometer. These lasers are commonly either GaAs diodes, Ti Sapphire lasers or frequency doubled InGaAsP diodes and fibre lasers. The InGaAsP DFB lasers are attractive because they are very reliable, mass-produced, frequency controlled by injection current and simply amplified to high powers with fibre amplifiers. In this paper a laser system suitable for Rb atom cooling, based on a 1560nm DFB laser and erbium doped fibre amplifier, is described. The laser output is frequency doubled with fibre coupled periodically poled LiNbO3 to a wavelength of 780nm. The output power exceeds 1 W at 780nm. The laser is stabilised at 1560nm against a fibre Bragg resonator that is passively temperature compensated. Frequency tuning over a range of 1 GHz is achieved by locking the laser to sidebands of the resonator that are generated by a phase modulator. This laser design is attractive for field deployable rugged systems because it uses all fibre coupled components with long term proven reliability.

  20. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Sehat, Ali Akbari; Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L(-1) for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31-355 μg L(-1) for Mn(II) and 0.34-380 μg L(-1) for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of CO{sub 2} dissolved in a diesel fuel on the jet flame characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Jin; Huang Zhen; Qiao Xinqi; Hou Yuchun [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China). Research Institute of Internal Combustion Engine

    2008-03-15

    This paper is concerned with an experimental study of the jet diffusion flame characteristics of fuel containing CO{sub 2}. Using diesel fuel containing dissolved CO{sub 2} gas, experiments were performed under atmospheric conditions with a diesel hole-type nozzle of 0.19 mm orifice diameter at constant injection pressure. In this study, four different CO{sub 2} mass fraction in diesel fuel such as 3.13%, 7.18%, 12.33% and 17.82% were used to study the effect of CO{sub 2} concentration on the jet flame characteristics. Jet flame characteristics were measured by direct photography, meanwhile the image colorimetry is used to assess the qualitative features of jet flame temperature. Experimental results show that the CO{sub 2} gas dilution effect and the atomization effect have a great influence on the flame structure and average temperature. When the injection pressure of diesel fuel increased from 4 MPa to 6 MPa, the low temperature flame length increased from 18.4 cm to 21.7 cm and the full temperature flame length decreased from 147.6 cm to 134.7 cm. With the increase of CO{sub 2} gas dissolved in the diesel fuel, the jet flame full length decreased for the jet atomization being improved greatly meanwhile the low temperature flame length increased for the CO{sub 2} gas dilution effect; with the increase of CO{sub 2} gas dissolved in the diesel fuel, the average temperature of flame increases firstly and then falls. Experimental results validate that higher injection pressure will improve jet atomization and then increased the flame average temperature. 27 refs., 13 figs.

  2. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    Analytical treatment of premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations describing quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds, and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by the gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are ide...

  3. Flame spraying of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Zeek, D.P. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Couch, K.W.; Benson, D.M. [Protech Laboratory Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Kirk, S.M. [3M Co., St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Statistical design-of-experiment studies of the thermal spraying of polymer powders are presented. Studies of the subsonic combustion (i.e., Flame) process were conducted in order to determine the quality and economics of polyester and urethane coatings. Thermally sprayed polymer coatings are of interest to several industries for anticorrosion applications, including the chemical, automotive, and aircraft industries. In this study, the coating design has been optimized for a site-specific application using Taguchi-type fractional-factorial experiments. Optimized coating designs are presented for the two powder systems. A substantial range of thermal processing conditions and their effect on the resultant polymer coatings is presented. The coatings were characterized by optical metallography, hardness testing, tensile testing, and compositional analysis. Characterization of the coatings yielded the thickness, bond strength, Knoop microhardness, roughness, deposition efficiency, and porosity. Confirmation testing was accomplished to verify the coating designs.

  4. Electrical Aspects of Impinging Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Chien

    This dissertation examines the use of electric fields as one mechanism for controlling combustion as flames are partially extinguished when impinging on nearby surfaces. Electrical aspects of flames, specifically, the production of chemi-ions in hydrocarbon flames and the use of convective flows driven by these ions, have been investigated in a wide range of applications in prior work but despite this fairly comprehensive effort to study electrical aspects of combustion, relatively little research has focused on electrical phenomena near flame extinguishment, nor for flames near impingement surfaces. Electrical impinging flames have complex properties under global influences of ion-driven winds and flow field disturbances from the impingement surface. Challenges of measurements when an electric field is applied in the system have limited an understanding of changes to the flame behavior and species concentrations caused by the field. This research initially characterizes the ability of high voltage power supplies to respond on sufficiently short time scales to permit real time electrical flame actuation. The study then characterizes the influence of an electric field on the impinging flame shape, ion current and flow field of the thermal plume associated with the flame. The more significant further examinations can be separated into two parts: 1) the potential for using electric fields to control the release of carbon monoxide (CO) from surface-impinging flames, and 2) an investigation of controlling electrically the heat transfer to a plate on which the flame impinges. Carbon monoxide (CO) results from the incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels and, while CO can be desirable in some syngas processes, it is usually a dangerous emission from forest fires, gas heaters, gas stoves, or furnaces where insufficient oxygen in the core reaction does not fully oxidize the fuel to carbon dioxide and water. Determining how carbon monoxide is released and how heat transfer

  5. Bismuth as a general internal standard for lead in atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechlin, Marcos A; Fortunato, Felipe M; Ferreira, Edilene C; Gomes Neto, José A; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Donati, George L; Jones, Bradley T

    2014-06-11

    Bismuth was evaluated as internal standard for Pb determination by line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (LS FAAS), high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) and line source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (LS GFAAS). Analysis of samples containing different matrices indicated close relationship between Pb and Bi absorbances. Correlation coefficients of calibration curves built up by plotting A(Pb)/A(Bi)versus Pb concentration were higher than 0.9953 (FAAS) and higher than 0.9993 (GFAAS). Recoveries of Pb improved from 52-118% (without IS) to 97-109% (IS, LS FAAS); 74-231% (without IS) to 96-109% (IS, HR-CS FAAS); and 36-125% (without IS) to 96-110% (IS, LS GFAAS). The relative standard deviations (n=12) were reduced from 0.6-9.2% (without IS) to 0.3-4.3% (IS, LS FAAS); 0.7-7.7% (without IS) to 0.1-4.0% (IS, HR-CS FAAS); and 2.1-13% (without IS) to 0.4-5.9% (IS, LS GFAAS). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Separation of seven arsenic compounds by high performance liquid chromatography with on-line detection by hydrogen-argon flame atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S. H.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Pritzl, G.

    1992-01-01

    the HPLC column to the nebulizer of the atomic absorption spectrometer. Arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate (MMA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA) were separated from each other and from the co-injected cationic arsenic compounds, arsenobetaine (AsB), arsenocholine (AsC) and the tetramethylarsonium ion (TMAs...... of mixtures of arsenic standards into the HPLC system were: arsenite, As(III) 1.1; arsenate, As(V) 1.4; MMA 1.4; DMA 0.7; AsB 0.3; AsC 0.5; and the TMAs 0.4. The HPLC-AAS system was used for the analysis of arsenic species in aqueous extracts of soil samples from a polluted land site. Only arsenate was found...

  7. Separation of seven arsenic compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography with on-line detection by hydrogen–argon flame atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S. H.; Larsen, E. H.; Pritzl, G.

    1992-01-01

    the HPLC column to the nebulizer of the atomic absorption spectrometer. Arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate (MMA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA) were separated from each other and from the co-injected cationic arsenic compounds, arsenobetaine (AsB), arsenocholine (AsC) and the tetramethylarsonium ion (TMAs...... of mixtures of arsenic standards into the HPLC system were: arsenite, As(III) 1.1; arsenate, As(V) 1.4; MMA 1.4; DMA 0.7; AsB 0.3; AsC 0.5; and the TMAs 0.4. The HPLC-AAS system was used for the analysis of arsenic species in aqueous extracts of soil samples from a polluted land site. Only arsenate was found...

  8. Dynamic Characterization of Candle Flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvojit Ghosh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work focuses on studying the flickering of a candle placed in a hollow cylindrical glass tube. Variations in flame area and intensity have been studied as the oscillating parameters of the flame with a camera and a Photomultiplier tube (PMT, and results have been found to be indicative of the presence of some well defined peaks in the amplitude spectrum of the flame intensity. Tests have been carried out with a range of candle diameters for the same glass tube giving similar results. Fluctuations in fractal dimension of the flame structure have also been studied in the course of the work. The time series data generated by processing camera images and also the PMT voltage output has been studied for existence of periodicity in the signal recorded. The correlation dimension has been determined for a number of experiments to characterize the dynamics of the signal.

  9. Numerical and experimental studies of ethanol flames and autoignition theory for higher alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Priyank

    In order to enhance the fuel efficiency of an engine and to control pollutant formation, an improved understanding of the combustion chemistry of the fuels at a fundamental level is paramount. This knowledge can be gained by developing detailed reaction mechanisms of the fuels for various combustion processes and by studying combustion analytically employing reduced-chemistry descriptions. There is a need for small detailed reaction mechanisms for alkane and alcohol fuels with reduced uncertainties in their combustion chemistry that are computationally cheaper in multidimensional CFD calculations. Detailed mechanisms are the starting points in identifying reduced-chemistry descriptions of combustion processes to study problems analytically. This research includes numerical, experimental and analytical studies. The first part of the dissertation consists of numerical and experimental studies of ethanol flames. Although ethanol has gained popularity as a possible low-pollution source of renewable energy, significant uncertainties remain in its combustion chemistry. To begin to address ethanol combustion, first a relatively small detailed reaction mechanism, commonly known as the San Diego Mech, is developed for the combustion of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, methane, methanol, ethane, ethylene, and acetylene, in air or oxygen-inert mixtures. This mechanism is tested for autoignition, premixed-flame burning velocities, and structures and extinction of diffusion flames and of partially premixed flames of many of these fuels. The reduction in uncertainties in the combustion chemistry can best be achieved by consistently updating a reaction mechanism with reaction rate data for the elementary steps based on newer studies in literature and by testing it against as many experimental conditions as available. The results of such a testing for abovementioned fuels are reported here along with the modifications of reaction-rate parameters of the most important

  10. Regularization modeling for large-eddy simulation of diffusion flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.; Wesseling, P.; Oñate, E.; Périaux, J.

    We analyze the evolution of a diffusion flame in a turbulent mixing layer using large-eddy simulation. The large-eddy simulation includes Leray regularization of the convective transport and approximate inverse filtering to represent the chemical source terms. The Leray model is compared to the more

  11. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  12. Autoignition characteristics of laminar lifted jet flames of pre-vaporized iso-octane in heated coflow air

    KAUST Repository

    Alnoman, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The stabilization characteristics of laminar non-premixed jet flames of pre-vaporized iso-octane, one of the primary reference fuels for octane rating, have been studied experimentally in heated coflow air. Non-autoignited and autoignited lifted flames were analyzed. With the coflow air at relatively low initial temperatures below 940 K, an external ignition source was required to stabilize the flame. These lifted flames had tribrachial edge structures and their liftoff heights correlated well with the jet velocity scaled by stoichiometric laminar burning velocity, indicating the importance of the edge propagation speed on flame stabilization. At high initial temperatures over 940 K, the autoignited flames were stabilized without requiring an external ignition source. These autoignited lifted flames exhibited either tribrachial edge structures or mild combustion behaviors depending on the level of fuel dilution. Two distinct transition behaviors were observed in the autoignition regime from a nozzle-attached flame to a lifted tribrachial-edge flame and then to lifted mild combustion as the jet velocity increased at a certain fuel dilution level. The liftoff data of the autoignited flames with tribrachial edges were analyzed based on calculated ignition delay times. Analysis of the experimental data suggested that ignition delay time may be much less sensitive to initial temperature under atmospheric pressure conditions as compared with predictions. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Exposure to flame retardant chemicals on commercial airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Joseph G; Stapleton, Heather M; Vallarino, Jose; McNeely, Eileen; McClean, Michael D; Harrad, Stuart J; Rauert, Cassandra B; Spengler, John D

    2013-02-16

    Flame retardant chemicals are used in materials on airplanes to slow the propagation of fire. These chemicals migrate from their source products and can be found in the dust of airplanes, creating the potential for exposure. To characterize exposure to flame retardant chemicals in airplane dust, we collected dust samples from locations inside 19 commercial airplanes parked overnight at airport gates. In addition, hand-wipe samples were also collected from 9 flight attendants and 1 passenger who had just taken a cross-country (USA) flight. The samples were analyzed for a suite of flame retardant chemicals. To identify the possible sources for the brominated flame retardants, we used a portable XRF analyzer to quantify bromine concentrations in materials inside the airplanes. A wide range of flame retardant compounds were detected in 100% of the dust samples collected from airplanes, including BDEs 47, 99, 153, 183 and 209, tris(1,3-dichloro-isopropyl)phosphate (TDCPP), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromo-phthalate (TBPH). Airplane dust contained elevated concentrations of BDE 209 (GM: 500 ug/g; range: 2,600 ug/g) relative to other indoor environments, such as residential and commercial buildings, and the hands of participants after a cross-country flight contained elevated BDE 209 concentrations relative to the general population. TDCPP, a known carcinogen that was removed from use in children's pajamas in the 1970's although still used today in other consumer products, was detected on 100% of airplanes in concentrations similar to those found in residential and commercial locations. This study adds to the limited body of knowledge regarding exposure to flame retardants on commercial aircraft, an environment long hypothesized to be at risk for maximum exposures due to strict flame retardant standards for aircraft materials. Our findings indicate that flame retardants are widely used in many airplane components and all airplane types, as

  14. Mechanistic aspects of ionic reactions in flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Carlsen, L.

    1993-01-01

    Some fundamentals of the ion chemistry of flames are summarized. Mechanistic aspects of ionic reactions in flames have been studied using a VG PlasmaQuad, the ICP-system being substituted by a simple quartz burner. Simple hydrocarbon flames as well as sulfur-containing flames have been investigated....... The simple hydrocarbon flames are dominated by a series of hydrocarbonic ions and, to a minor extent, protonated oxo-compounds. The introduction of sulfur to the flames leads to significant changes in the ion composition, as sulfur-containing species become dominant. The ability of the technique to study...

  15. Atomic Clocks Research - An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-15

    magnet. Since atomic deflection in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is inversely proportional to the square of the atomic speed, the atomic velocity...purifier and controlled leak; an atomic source (i.e., the dissociator under 39 study); a dipole electromagnetic with pole pieces shaped to produce an...34Relaxation Magnetique d’Atomes de Rubidium sur des Parois Paraffines," J. Phys. (Paris) 24, 379 (1963). 21. S. Wexler, "Deposition of Atomic Beams

  16. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcone, Roger

    2008-07-15

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  17. Micro-sampling method based on high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for calcium determination in blood and mitochondrial suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Nieto, Beatriz; Gismera, Mª Jesús; Sevilla, Mª Teresa; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Procopio, Jesús R

    2017-08-01

    A micro-sampling and straightforward method based on high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) was developed to determine extracellular and intracellular Ca in samples of interest in clinical and biomedical analysis. Solid sampling platforms were used to introduce the micro-samples into the graphite furnace atomizer. The secondary absorption line for Ca, located at 239.856nm, was selected to carry out the measurements. Experimental parameters such as pyrolysis and atomization temperatures and the amount of sample introduced for the measurements were optimized. Calibration was performed using aqueous standards and the approach to measure at the wings of the absorption lines was employed for the expansion of the linear response range. The limit of detection was of 0.02mgL-1 Ca (0.39ng Ca) and the upper limit of linear range was increased up to 8.0mgL-1 Ca (160ng Ca). The proposed method was used to determine Ca in mitochondrial suspensions and whole blood samples with successful results. Adequate recoveries (within 91-107%) were obtained in the tests performed for validation purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. On forms of the Coulomb approximation as a useful source of atomic data for the spectroscopy of astrophysical and fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, J. D.

    2017-03-01

    The Coulomb approximation (CA) has long been regarded as a useful tool for rapid estimates of line strengths, absorption oscillator strengths, and spontaneous transition probabilities of the lighter multi-electron atoms and ions, in situations where large quantities of atomic data are required for the analysis of spectroscopic measurements from a variety of plasma sources, in particular interesting stellar objects (e.g. white dwarf stars) and magnetically confined fusion plasmas. This applies especially in cases where the plasma is spatially inhomogeneous, and produces several ionisation stages of the same impurity element, emitting copious radiation in bound-bound transitions from cascade processes following charge-exchange recombination. While more advanced theoretical methods are routinely used by the specialist, the CA provides a very convenient method of checking atomic data chosen by the experimentalist from extensive compilations through the internet, or by the use of machine codes provided by others. The origins, advantages and shortcomings of the method are described and discussed, as well as convenient modifications thereof, which may readily be implemented for these purposes. Particular attention is paid to the choice of electron coupling of states in which the optical electron has a large orbital angular momentum ({\\ell }≥slant 3). The text is illustrated by numerous examples of application to spectra of practical interest from astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  19. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, Master coverage of "atom" features used as a source to generate several derivative layers for the Sheriff RMS and E-911 map rolls. Cover is painstakingly maintained interactively by GIS staff. All atom boundaries are snapped to the road centerline cover, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset current as of 2008. Master coverage of "atom" features used as a source to generate several derivative layers for the...

  20. Role of the outer-edge flame on flame extinction in nitrogen-diluted non-premixed counterflow flames with finite burner diameters

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Yong Ho

    2013-03-01

    This study of nitrogen-diluted non-premixed counterflow flames with finite burner diameters investigates the important role of the outer-edge flame on flame extinction through experimental and numerical analyses. It explores flame stability diagrams mapping the flame extinction response of nitrogen-diluted non-premixed counterflow flames to varying global strain rates in terms of burner diameter, burner gap, and velocity ratio. A critical nitrogen mole fraction exists beyond which the flame cannot be sustained; the critical nitrogen mole fraction versus global strain rate curves have C-shapes for various burner diameters, burner gaps, and velocity ratios. At sufficiently high strain-rate flames, these curves collapse into one curve; therefore, the flames follow the one-dimensional flame response of a typical diffusion flame. Low strain-rate flames are significantly affected by radial conductive heat loss, and therefore flame length. Three flame extinction modes are identified: flame extinction through shrinkage of the outer-edge flame with or without oscillations at the outer-edge flame prior to the extinction, and flame extinction through a flame hole at the flame center. The extinction modes are significantly affected by the behavior of the outer-edge flame. Detailed explanations are provided based on the measured flame-surface temperature and numerical evaluation of the fractional contribution of each term in the energy equation. Radial conductive heat loss at the flame edge to ambience is the main mechanism of extinction through shrinkage of the outer-edge flame in low strain-rate flames. Reduction of the burner diameter can extend the flame extinction mode by shrinking the outer-edge flame in higher strain-rate flames. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Flame Retardants Used in Flexible Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partnership project on flame retardants in furniture seeks to update the health and environmental profiles of flame-retardant chemicals that meet fire safety standards for upholstered consumer products with polyurethane foam

  2. Flame Synthesis Used to Create Metal-Catalyzed Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.

    2001-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are highly ordered carbon structures of nanoscale dimensions. They may be thought of as hollow cylinders whose walls are formed by single atomic layers of graphite. Such cylinders may be composed of many nested, concentric atomic layers of carbon or only a single layer, the latter forming a single-walled carbon nanotube. This article reports unique results using a flame for their synthesis. Only recently were carbon nanotubes discovered within an arc discharge and recognized as fullerene derivatives. Today metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are of great interest for many reasons. They can be used as supports for the metal catalysts like those found in catalytic converters. Open-ended nanotubes are highly desirable because they can be filled by other elements, metals or gases, for battery and fuel cell applications. Because of their highly crystalline structure, they are significantly stronger than the commercial carbon fibers that are currently available (10 times as strong as steel but possessing one-sixth of the weight). This property makes them highly desirable for strengthening polymer and ceramic composite materials. Current methods of synthesizing carbon nanotubes include thermal pyrolysis of organometallics, laser ablation of metal targets within hydrocarbon atmospheres at high temperatures, and arc discharges. Each of these methods is costly, and it is unclear if they can be scaled for the commercial synthesis of carbon nanotubes. In contrast, flame synthesis is an economical means of bulk synthesis of a variety of aerosol materials such as carbon black. Flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes could potentially realize an economy of scale that would enable their use in common structural materials such as car-body panels. The top figure is a transmission electron micrograph of a multiwalled carbon nanotube. The image shows a cross section of the atomic structure of the nanotube. The dark lines are individual atomic layer planes of

  3. Physical and Chemical Processes in Turbulent Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    used a constant-pressure, fan -stirred combustion chamber to investigate the propagation of a spherically expanding flame (Fig. 1.1). Chambers based...radius, closer to the fans . However during flame expansion, the mean radial flow adjacent to the flame is radially outward in nature shown by the...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0136 Physical and Chemical Processes in Turbulent Flames Chung Law TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Final Report 06/23/2015

  4. Acoustic power measurements of oscillating flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic power of an oscillating flame is measured. A turbulent premixed propane/air flame is situated near a pressure antinode of a standing wave in a laboratory combustion chamber. This standing wave is generated by a piston. The fluctuating heat release of the flame will supply acoustic power

  5. Hysteresis and transition in swirling nonpremixed flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tummers, M.J.; Hübner, A.W.; van Veen, E.H.; Hanjalic, K.; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2009-01-01

    Strongly swirling nonpremixed flames are known to exhibit a hysteresis when transiting from an attached long, sooty, yellow flame to a short lifted blue flame, and vice versa. The upward transition (by increasing the air and fuel flow rates) corresponds to a vortex breakdown, i.e. an abrupt change

  6. Environmental Considerations for Flame Resistant Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtually all common textiles will ignite and burn. There are mandatory and voluntary cigarette and open-flame ignition regulations to address unreasonable fire risks associated with textile products that require them to be treated with and/or contain flame retardant chemicals to make them flame res...

  7. 30 CFR 14.20 - Flame resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flame resistance. 14.20 Section 14.20 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF... § 14.20 Flame resistance. Conveyor belts for use in underground coal mines must be flame-resistant and...

  8. Strontium flame-emission determination in powder samples of rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmanova, N.G.; Pogrebnyak, Yu.F. (AN SSSR, Ulan-ude. Geologicheskij Inst.)

    1981-01-01

    A direct method of emission analysis of powder samples of rocks for Sr content with an aid of ''graphite capsule-flame'' atomizer is suggested. Silicate and carbonate rocks serve as objects for the study. It is established that the maximum emission signal is observed at summary flow rate of gases of the combustible mixture (acetylene-air) of 360 l/hr and when a slightly reducing flame is applied. According to the results of 10 parallel determinations of Sr the variation coefficients, varying from 8 to 15%, are calculated. The absolute limit of strontium determination in the mixtures analyzed constitutes 5.0x10/sup -9/ g. It has been found according to the trebled value of the standard deviation of the minimum recorded signal.

  9. Experimental characterization of methane inverse diffusion flame

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2014-06-26

    This article presents 10-kHz images of OH-PLIF simultaneously with 2-D PIV measurements in an inverse methane diffusion flame. Under a constant fuel flow rate, the central air jet Re was varied, leading to air to fuel velocity ratio, Vr, to vary from 8.3 to 66.5. Starting from Vr = 20.7, the flame is commonly characterized by three distinct zones. The length of the lower fuel entrainment region is inversely proportional to Vr. The flames investigated resemble a string shear layer confining this zone, and converging into the second distinct region, the flame neck zone. The third region is the rest of the flame, which spreads in a jet-like manner. The inverse diffusion flames exhibit varying degrees of partial premixing, depending upon on the velocity ratio Vr, and this region of partial premixing evolves into a well-mixed reaction zone along the flame centerline. The OH distribution correlated with the changes in the mean characteristics of the flow through reduction in the local Reynolds number due to heat release. The existence of a flame suppresses or laminarizes the turbulence at early axial locations and promotes fluctuations at the flame tip for flames with Vr < 49.8. In addition, the flame jet width can be correlated to the OH distribution. In upstream regions of the flames, the breaks in OH are counterbalanced by flame closures and are governed by edge flame propagation. These local extinctions were found to occur at locations where large flow structures were impinging on the flame and are associated with a locally higher strain rate or correlated to the local high strain rates at the flame hole edges without this flow impinging. Another contributor to re-ignition was found to be growing flame kernels. As the flames approach global blow-off, these kernels become the main mechanism for re-ignition further downstream of the flames. At low Vr, laminarization within the early regions of the flame provides an effective shield, preventing the jet flow from

  10. Laser-Plasma Acceleration with FLAME and ILIL Ultraintense Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Pathak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of radiation and electron sources based on laser-plasma acceleration for biomedical and nuclear applications, using both the table top TW laser at ILIL and the 220 TW FLAME laser system at LNF. We use the ILIL laser to produce wakefield electrons in a self-focusing dominated regime in a mm scale gas-jet to generate large, uniform beams of MeV electrons for electron radiography and radiobiology applications. This acceleration regime is described in detail and key parameters are given to establish reproducible and reliable operation of this source. We use the FLAME laser to drive laser-plasma acceleration in a cm-scale gas target to obtain stable production of >100 MeV range electrons to drive a Thomson scattering ɣ-ray source for nuclear applications.

  11. Atomic data for integrated tokamak modelling – Fermi-shuttle type ionization as a possible source of high energy electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tőkési K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ionization of Ar by 15 keV N+ ion is studied theoretically. The energy distributions of the ejected electrons as a function of the scattering angle were calculated using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. We identify the signature of the Fermi-shuttle type ionization in the double differential cross sections which should be a possible source of the high energy electrons in the plasma. Our classical calculation also describes the previously measured data with high accuracy.

  12. The VLT FLAMES Tarantula Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, C.; Taylor, W.; Sana, H.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Bagnoli, T.; Bastian, N.; Bestenlehner, J.; Bonanos, A.; Bressert, E.; Brott, I.; Campbell, M.; Cantiello, M.; Carraro, G.; Clark, S.; Costa, E.; Crowther, P.; de Koter, A.; de Mink, S.; Doran, E.; Dufton, P.; Dunstall, P.; Garcia, M.; Gieles, M.; Gräfener, G.; Herrero, A.; Howarth, I.; Izzard, R.; Köhler, K.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Markova, N.; Najarro, P.; Puls, J.; Ramirez, O.; Sabín-Sanjulián, C.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Smartt, S.; Stroud, V.; van Loon, J.; Vink, J.S.; Walborn, N.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce the VLT FLAMES Tarantula Survey, an ESO Large Programme from which we have obtained optical spectroscopy of over 800 massive stars in the spectacular 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. A key feature is the use of multi-epoch observations to provide strong constraints on

  13. Cars Spectroscopy of Propellant Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Propellant Flames," Fast Reactions in Energetic Systems, D. Capellos and R. F. Walker, ed., Reidel, Boston, MA, 1981, pp 473-434. 2. L. E. Harris and M. E...Beardell Y. Carignon J. Fendell K, Aron E. Petro DRStfC-LCE-(D), R. Walker P. Marinkas C. Capellos S. Buluou F. Gilbert Dover, tU 07801 Afmtnistrator

  14. Theory of Colored Flame Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-03-20

    cal/mole, UnO electron volt per molecule is equivalent to 23.US3 kilocalories per gram mole. At ++ ~2000Oý, it is estimatted that molecules with a...because halides stimulate alkali metal compound folaltion, the halogens must be classed as negativo enhancement agents in flames containing alkali

  15. Indoor organophosphate and polybrominated flame retardants in Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, I; Onuki, A; Seto, H

    2007-02-01

    In Japan, organophosphate and polybrominated flame retardants are used in building materials and electric appliances to protect them from fire hazards. In this study, to identify the emission sources of these flame retardants to indoor air, the migration rates (flux) of organophosphate and polybrominated flame retardants from building materials and electrical appliances to solid extraction disks that were placed in contact with the interior surfaces were measured. In addition to the migration test, indoor air and outdoor air concentrations of these flame retardants were investigated. With regard to building materials in a newly built house, triethylphosphate (TEP) and tributylphosphate (TBP) were detected in the wall and ceiling coverings, and tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate (TBEP) was detected in the wooden flooring cleaned with a floor polish agent. With regard to electrical appliances, triphenylphosphate (TPHP) was predominantly detected in computer monitors and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) in television (TV) sets, with the highest median levels. Among the polybrominated compounds, only 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) was detected from a few old TV sets manufactured before 1995. In an indoor and outdoor air survey, nine organophosphates and nine polybrominated flame retardants were detected from indoor air. In outdoor air, only four organophosphate flame retardants were detected. The maximum level of indoor organophosphate compounds was 1260 ng/m(3) with tris(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) phosphate (TCPP), and that of polybrominated compounds was 29.5 ng/m(3) with hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD). Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) was not detected in this study, although it has the largest demand among flame retardants in Japan. The results of the migration test and the indoor air survey revealed that in indoor air, organophosphate compounds were more predominant than polybrominated compounds in Tokyo. Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) and polybrominated

  16. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the direct determination of arsenic in fish oil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Éderson R; de Almeida, Tarcísio S; Borges, Daniel L G; Carasek, Eduardo; Welz, Bernhard; Feldmann, Jörg; Campo Menoyo, Javier Del

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) has been applied for the development of a method for the determination of total As in fish oil samples using direct analysis. The method does not use any sample pretreatment, besides dilution with 1-propanole, in order to decrease the oil viscosity. The stability and sensitivity of As were evaluated using ruthenium and iridium as permanent chemical modifiers and palladium added in solution over the sample. The best results were obtained with ruthenium as the permanent modifier and palladium in solution added to samples and standard solutions. Under these conditions, aqueous standard solutions could be used for calibration for the fish oil samples diluted with 1-propanole. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1400 °C and 2300 °C, respectively, and the limit of detection and characteristic mass were 30 pg and 43 pg, respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method have been evaluated using microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples with subsequent determination by HR-CS GF AAS and ICP-MS; the results were in agreement (95% confidence level) with those of the proposed method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigating effects of sample pretreatment on protein stability using size-exclusion chromatography and high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Tobias; El Deeb, Sami; Hahne, Thomas; El-Hady, Deia Abd; AlBishri, Hassan M; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-09-01

    In this study, size-exclusion chromatography and high-resolution atomic absorption spectrometry methods have been developed and evaluated to test the stability of proteins during sample pretreatment. This especially includes different storage conditions but also adsorption before or even during the chromatographic process. For the development of the size exclusion method, a Biosep S3000 5 μm column was used for investigating a series of representative model proteins, namely bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, monoclonal immunoglobulin G antibody, and myoglobin. Ambient temperature storage was found to be harmful to all model proteins, whereas short-term storage up to 14 days could be done in an ordinary refrigerator. Freezing the protein solutions was always complicated and had to be evaluated for each protein in the corresponding solvent. To keep the proteins in their native state a gentle freezing temperature should be chosen, hence liquid nitrogen should be avoided. Furthermore, a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry method was developed to observe the adsorption of proteins on container material and chromatographic columns. Adsorption to any container led to a sample loss and lowered the recovery rates. During the pretreatment and high-performance size-exclusion chromatography, adsorption caused sample losses of up to 33%. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Evaluation of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for direct determination of chromium in medicinal plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgilio, Alex; Nobrega, Joaquim A. [Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Sao Carlos, Post Office Box 676, 13560-970, Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil); Rego, Jardes F. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, Post Office Box 355, 14801-970, Araraquara-SP (Brazil); Neto, Jose A. Gomes, E-mail: anchieta@iq.unesp.br [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, Post Office Box 355, 14801-970, Araraquara-SP (Brazil)

    2012-12-01

    A method for Cr determination in medicinal plants using direct solid sampling graphite furnace high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. Modifiers were dispensable. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1500 Degree-Sign C and 2400 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Slopes of calibration curves (50-750 pg Cr, R{sup 2} > 0.999) using aqueous and solid standards coincides in 96%, indicated feasibility of aqueous calibration for solid sampling of medicinal plants. Accuracy was checked by analysis of four plant certified reference materials. Results were in agreement at 95% confidence level with certified and non-certified values. Ten samples of medicinal plants were analyzed and Cr contents were in the 1.3-17.7 {mu}g g{sup -1} Cr range. The highest RSD (n = 5) was 15.4% for the sample Melissa officinalis containing 13.9 {+-} 2.1 {mu}g g{sup -1} Cr. The limit of detection was 3.3 ng g{sup -1} Cr. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct solid sampling is first time employed for Cr in plant materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calibration curves with liquids and solids are coincident. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microanalysis of plants for Cr is validated by reference materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed HR-CS GF AAS method is environmental friendly.

  19. Development of a compact thermal lithium atom beam source for measurements of electron velocity distribution function anisotropy in electron cyclotron resonance plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, T; Shikama, T; Nagamizo, S; Fujii, K; Zushi, H; Uchida, M; Iwamae, A; Tanaka, H; Maekawa, T; Hasuo, M

    2013-07-01

    The anisotropy of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasmas can be deduced from the polarization of emissions induced by anisotropic electron-impact excitation. In this paper, we develop a compact thermal lithium atom beam source for spatially resolved measurements of the EVDF anisotropy in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas. The beam system is designed such that the ejected beam has a slab shape, and the beam direction is variable. The divergence and flux of the beam are evaluated by experiments and calculations. The developed beam system is installed in an ECR plasma device with a cusp magnetic field, and the LiI 2s-2p emission (670.8 nm) is observed in low-pressure helium plasma. The two-dimensional distributions of the degree and direction of the polarization in the LiI emission are measured by a polarization imaging system. The evaluated polarization distribution suggests the spatial variation of the EVDF anisotropy.

  20. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First-Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree-Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double-zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6-31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean-field methods.

  1. Carbon beam extraction with 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Oh, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Sun-Chan

    2014-02-01

    A 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been made to produce C(4+) beam for using a carbon therapy facility and recently tested at KAERI. Highly charged carbon ions have been successfully extracted. When using only CO2 gas, the beam current of C(4+) was almost 14 μA at 15 kV extraction voltage. To get higher current of the C(4+) beam, while optimizing confinement magnetic field configuration (e.g., axial strengths at minimum and extraction side), gas-mixing (CO2/He), and biased disk were introduced. When the gas mixing ratio of the CO2/He gas is 1:8 at an operational pressure of 5 × 10(-7) mbar and the disk was biased to -150 V relative to the ion source body, the highest current of the C(4+) beam was achieved to be 50 μA, more than three times higher than previously observed only with CO2 gas. Some details on the operating conditions of the ECRIS were discussed.

  2. A flame particle tracking analysis of turbulence–chemistry interaction in hydrogen–air premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Uranakara, Harshavardhana A.

    2015-11-21

    Interactions of turbulence, molecular transport, and energy transport, coupled with chemistry play a crucial role in the evolution of flame surface geometry, propagation, annihilation, and local extinction/re-ignition characteristics of intensely turbulent premixed flames. This study seeks to understand how these interactions affect flame surface annihilation of lean hydrogen–air premixed turbulent flames. Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are conducted at different parametric conditions with a detailed reaction mechanism and transport properties for hydrogen–air flames. Flame particle tracking (FPT) technique is used to follow specific flame surface segments. An analytical expression for the local displacement flame speed (Sd) of a temperature isosurface is considered, and the contributions of transport, chemistry, and kinematics on the displacement flame speed at different turbulence-flame interaction conditions are identified. In general, the displacement flame speed for the flame particles is found to increase with time for all conditions considered. This is because, eventually all flame surfaces and their resident flame particles approach annihilation by reactant island formation at the end of stretching and folding processes induced by turbulence. Statistics of principal curvature evolving in time, obtained using FPT, suggest that these islands are ellipsoidal on average enclosing fresh reactants. Further examinations show that the increase in Sd is caused by the increased negative curvature of the flame surface and eventual homogenization of temperature gradients as these reactant islands shrink due to flame propagation and turbulent mixing. Finally, the evolution of the normalized, averaged, displacement flame speed vs. stretch Karlovitz number are found to collapse on a narrow band, suggesting that a unified description of flame speed dependence on stretch rate may be possible in the Lagrangian description.

  3. Determination of trace amounts of zinc by flame atomic absorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zinc ions were separated by solid phase extraction onto modified natural analcime zeolite loaded with 2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridyl)pyrazine (TPPZ). Extraction efficiency and the influence of sample matrix, flow rate, pH, and type and minimum amount of stripping eluent were investigated. Solutions of zinc ions were passed ...

  4. combination of flame atomic absorption spectrometry with ligandless

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    The high efficiency of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction to carry out the determination of trace amounts of lead in complex ... KEY WORDS: Dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction, Lead determination, Preconcentration, Ligandless,. Water analysis .... Mineral water samples were acquired from a local market. The only ...

  5. Determination of metals in pepper by flame atomic absorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The metal (zinc, copper, chromium, iron, manganese and cobalt) contents of Capsicum annum, Capsicum chinens and Capsicum frutescens pepper samples (harvested from an abandoned waste dump site in Gbarantoru in Bayelsa State) were determined and compared with WHO permissible levels. The pepper samples ...

  6. X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane-Oxygen Shear Coaxial Flames (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous tracking of both propellants in gas phase flames to measure mixture fraction • Requires upgrades to beamline • Improvements to technique...but showed it is feasible with upgrades to the beamline • Built infrastructure to make flame measurements possible at APS – Significantly decreases...funds (CSIRF). • A portion of this research was performed at the 7-BM beamline of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Use of the

  7. Mechanism of Candle Flame Oscillation: Detection of Descending Flow above the Candle Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Yuko; Otaka, Koki; Zuiki, Hiroyuki; Miike, Hidetoshi; Osa, Atsushi

    2017-07-01

    When several candles are bundled together, the size of the combined candle flame oscillates. We carried out observational experiments to understand the mechanism of this oscillation. These were optical imaging, shadow graph imaging, temperature imaging around the oscillating candle flame, and image analysis to obtain the quantitative velocity distribution of the air flow above the candle flame. The experiments detected the descending air flow to the candle flame from the upper area, and showed that the descending air flow is involved with the candle flame oscillation. According to the results, we propose a new mechanism of the candle flame oscillation using the analogy of the cumulonimbus cloud in meteorology.

  8. Finite amplitude wave interaction with premixed laminar flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Mohamad; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2014-11-01

    The physics underlying combustion instability is an active area of research because of its detrimental impact in many combustion devices, such as turbines, jet engines, and liquid rocket engines. Pressure waves, ranging from acoustic waves to strong shocks, are potential sources of these disturbances. Literature on flame-disturbance interactions are primarily focused on either acoustics or strong shock wave interactions, with little information about the wide spectrum of behaviors that may exist between these two extremes. For example, the interaction between a flame and a finite amplitude compression wave is not well characterized. This phenomenon is difficult to study numerically due to the wide range of scales that need to be captured, requiring powerful and efficient numerical techniques. In this work, the interaction of a perturbed laminar premixed flame with a finite amplitude compression wave is investigated using the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method (PAWCM). This method optimally solves the fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations while capturing the essential scales. The results show that depending on the amplitude and duration of a finite amplitude disturbance, the interaction between these waves and premixed flames can produce a broad range of responses.

  9. A PAH growth mechanism and synergistic effect on PAH formation in counterflow diffusion flames

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2013-09-01

    A reaction mechanism having molecular growth up to benzene for hydrocarbon fuels with up to four carbon-atoms was extended to include the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) up to coronene (C24H12). The new mechanism was tested for ethylene premixed flames at low (20torr) and atmospheric pressures by comparing experimentally observed species concentrations with those of the computed ones for small chemical species and PAHs. As compared to several existing mechanisms in the literature, the newly developed mechanism showed an appreciable improvement in the predicted profiles of PAHs. The new mechanism was also used to simulate PAH formation in counterflow diffusion flames of ethylene to study the effects of mixing propane and benzene in the fuel stream. In the ethylene-propane flames, existing experimental results showed a synergistic effect in PAH concentrations, i.e. PAH concentrations first increased and then decreased with increasing propane mixing. This PAH behavior was successfully captured by the new mechanism. The synergistic effect was predicted to be more pronounced for larger PAH molecules as compared to the smaller ones, which is in agreement with experimental observations. In the experimental study in which the fuel stream of ethylene-propane flames was doped with benzene, a synergistic effect was mitigated for benzene, but was observed for large PAHs. This effect was also predicted in the computed PAH profiles for these flames. To explain these responses of PAHs in the flames of mixture fuels, a pathway analysis has been conducted, which show that several resonantly stabilized species as well as C4H4 and H atom contribute to the enhanced synergistic behaviors of larger PAHs as compared to the small ones in the flames of mixture fuels. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  10. Recent Developments in Organophosphorus Flame Retardants Containing P-C Bond and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Wendels

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus compounds containing P-C bonds are increasingly developed as flame retardant additives due to their excellent thermal and hydrolytic stability and ease of synthesis. The latest development (since 2010 in organophosphorus flame retardants containing P-C bonds summarized in this review. In this review, we have broadly classified such phosphorus compounds based on the carbon unit linked to the phosphorus atom i.e., could be a part of either an aliphatic or an aromatic unit. We have only considered those published literature where a P-C bond was created as a part of synthetic strategy to make either an intermediate or a final organophosphorus compound with an aim to use it as a flame retardant. General synthetic strategies to create P-C bonds are briefly discussed. Most popular synthetic strategies used for developing P-C containing phosphorus based flame retardants include Michael addition, Michaelis–Arbuzov, Friedels–Crafts and Grignard reactions. In general, most flame retardant derivatives discussed in this review have been prepared via a one- to two-step synthetic strategy with relatively high yields greater than 80%. Specific examples of P-C containing flame retardants synthesized via suitable synthetic strategy and their applications on various polymer systems are described in detail. Aliphatic phosphorus compounds being liquids or low melting solids are generally applied in polymers via coatings (cellulose or are incorporated in the bulk of the polymers (epoxy, polyurethanes during their polymerization as reactive or non-reactive additives. Substituents on the P atoms and the chemistry of the polymer matrix greatly influence the flame retardant behavior of these compounds (condensed phase vs. the gas phase. Recently, aromatic DOPO based phosphinate flame retardants have been developed with relatively higher thermal stabilities (>250 °C. Such compounds have potential as flame retardants for high temperature processable

  11. Recent Developments in Organophosphorus Flame Retardants Containing P-C Bond and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendels, Sophie; Chavez, Thiebault; Bonnet, Martin; Gaan, Sabyasachi

    2017-01-01

    Organophosphorus compounds containing P-C bonds are increasingly developed as flame retardant additives due to their excellent thermal and hydrolytic stability and ease of synthesis. The latest development (since 2010) in organophosphorus flame retardants containing P-C bonds summarized in this review. In this review, we have broadly classified such phosphorus compounds based on the carbon unit linked to the phosphorus atom i.e., could be a part of either an aliphatic or an aromatic unit. We have only considered those published literature where a P-C bond was created as a part of synthetic strategy to make either an intermediate or a final organophosphorus compound with an aim to use it as a flame retardant. General synthetic strategies to create P-C bonds are briefly discussed. Most popular synthetic strategies used for developing P-C containing phosphorus based flame retardants include Michael addition, Michaelis–Arbuzov, Friedels–Crafts and Grignard reactions. In general, most flame retardant derivatives discussed in this review have been prepared via a one- to two-step synthetic strategy with relatively high yields greater than 80%. Specific examples of P-C containing flame retardants synthesized via suitable synthetic strategy and their applications on various polymer systems are described in detail. Aliphatic phosphorus compounds being liquids or low melting solids are generally applied in polymers via coatings (cellulose) or are incorporated in the bulk of the polymers (epoxy, polyurethanes) during their polymerization as reactive or non-reactive additives. Substituents on the P atoms and the chemistry of the polymer matrix greatly influence the flame retardant behavior of these compounds (condensed phase vs. the gas phase). Recently, aromatic DOPO based phosphinate flame retardants have been developed with relatively higher thermal stabilities (>250 °C). Such compounds have potential as flame retardants for high temperature processable polymers such as

  12. Recent Developments in Organophosphorus Flame Retardants Containing P-C Bond and Their Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendels, Sophie; Chavez, Thiebault; Bonnet, Martin; Salmeia, Khalifah A; Gaan, Sabyasachi

    2017-07-11

    Organophosphorus compounds containing P-C bonds are increasingly developed as flame retardant additives due to their excellent thermal and hydrolytic stability and ease of synthesis. The latest development (since 2010) in organophosphorus flame retardants containing P-C bonds summarized in this review. In this review, we have broadly classified such phosphorus compounds based on the carbon unit linked to the phosphorus atom i.e., could be a part of either an aliphatic or an aromatic unit. We have only considered those published literature where a P-C bond was created as a part of synthetic strategy to make either an intermediate or a final organophosphorus compound with an aim to use it as a flame retardant. General synthetic strategies to create P-C bonds are briefly discussed. Most popular synthetic strategies used for developing P-C containing phosphorus based flame retardants include Michael addition, Michaelis-Arbuzov, Friedels-Crafts and Grignard reactions. In general, most flame retardant derivatives discussed in this review have been prepared via a one- to two-step synthetic strategy with relatively high yields greater than 80%. Specific examples of P-C containing flame retardants synthesized via suitable synthetic strategy and their applications on various polymer systems are described in detail. Aliphatic phosphorus compounds being liquids or low melting solids are generally applied in polymers via coatings (cellulose) or are incorporated in the bulk of the polymers (epoxy, polyurethanes) during their polymerization as reactive or non-reactive additives. Substituents on the P atoms and the chemistry of the polymer matrix greatly influence the flame retardant behavior of these compounds (condensed phase vs. the gas phase). Recently, aromatic DOPO based phosphinate flame retardants have been developed with relatively higher thermal stabilities (>250 °C). Such compounds have potential as flame retardants for high temperature processable polymers such as

  13. Simultaneous determination of Cd and Fe in grain products using direct solid sampling and high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Lisia M G; Araujo, Rennan G O; Welz, Bernhard; Jacob, Silvana do C; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Becker-Ross, Helmut

    2009-04-30

    Cadmium and iron are antagonistic elements in the sense that they produce different effects in the human body. Both elements have to be determined routinely in grain products, cadmium because of its toxicity, and iron because all grain products, according to Brazilian law, have to contain a minimum of 42 mg kg(-1) Fe to combat anemia. A routine screening method has been developed for the quasi simultaneous determination of cadmium and iron using high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sampling. The primary absorption line at 228.802 nm has been used for Cd, and an adjacent secondary line at 228.726 nm for the determination of Fe. Various chemical modifiers have been investigated, and a mixture of tungsten and iridium, applied as a permanent modifier, showed the best performance; it stabilized Cd up to a pyrolysis temperature of 700 degrees C and did not over-stabilize Fe. Two atomization temperatures were used sequentially, 1700 degrees C for Cd and 2600 degrees C for Fe, because of their significantly different volatilities. The characteristic masses obtained were 0.9 pg for Cd and 1.2 ng for Fe. The limits of detection (3 sigma, n=10) were 0.6 microg kg(-1) for Cd and 0.5 mg kg(-1) for Fe. The relative standard deviation ranged from 3 to 7% for Cd and from 4 to 13% for Fe, which is satisfactory for the purpose. The accuracy of the method was confirmed by the analysis of three certified reference materials; the results were in agreement with the certified values at a 95% confidence interval. The Cd content in the investigated grain products was between 0.9 and 10.5 microg kg(-1), but most of them did not contain the required minimum amount of iron.

  14. Determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter collected on glass fiber filters using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Rennan G.O., E-mail: rgoa01@terra.com.br [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica Ambiental, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Campus Sao Cristovao, 49.100-000, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Vignola, Fabiola; Castilho, Ivan N.B. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G.; Welz, Bernhard [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Smichowski, Patricia [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ferreira, Sergio L.C. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-290, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker-Ross, Helmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V., Department Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    A study has been undertaken to assess the capability of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter (APM) collected on glass fiber filters using direct solid sampling. The main Hg absorption line at 253.652 nm was used for all determinations. The certified reference material NIST SRM 1648 (Urban Particulate Matter) was used to check the accuracy of the method, and good agreement was obtained between published and determined values. The characteristic mass was 22 pg Hg. The limit of detection (3{sigma}), based on ten atomizations of an unexposed filter, was 40 ng g{sup -1}, corresponding to 0.12 ng m{sup -3} in the air for a typical air volume of 1440 m{sup 3} collected within 24 h. The limit of quantification was 150 ng g{sup -1}, equivalent to 0.41 ng m{sup -3} in the air. The repeatability of measurements was better than 17% RSD (n = 5). Mercury concentrations found in filter samples loaded with APM collected in Buenos Aires, Argentina, were between < 40 ng g{sup -1} and 381 {+-} 24 ng g{sup -1}. These values correspond to a mercury concentration in the air between < 0.12 ng m{sup -3} and 1.47 {+-} 0.09 ng m{sup -3}. The proposed procedure was found to be simple, fast and reliable, and suitable as a screening procedure for the determination of mercury in APM samples.

  15. Direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and solid sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Arlene S; Brandao, Geovani C; Matos, Geraldo D; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2015-11-01

    The present work proposed an analytical method for the direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing the high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry combined with the solid sample analysis (SS-HR-CS ET AAS). Sample masses up to 2.0mg were directly weighted on a solid sampling platform and introduced into the graphite tube. In order to minimize the formation of carbonaceous residues and to improve the contact of the modifier solution with the solid sample, a volume of 10 µL of a solution containing 6% (v/v) H2O2, 20% (v/v) ethanol and 1% (v/v) HNO3 was added. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures established were 1600 and 2400 °C, respectively, using magnesium as chemical modifier. The calibration technique was evaluated by comparing the slopes of calibration curves established using aqueous and solid standards. This test revealed that chromium can be determined employing the external calibration technique using aqueous standards. Under these conditions, the method developed allows the direct determination of chromium with limit of quantification of 11.5 ng g(-1), precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) in the range of 4.0-17.9% (n=3) and a characteristic mass of 1.2 pg of chromium. The accuracy was confirmed by analysis of a certified reference material of tomato leaves furnished by National Institute of Standards and Technology. The method proposed was applied for the determination of chromium in five different infant formula samples. The chromium content found varied in the range of 33.9-58.1 ng g(-1) (n=3). These samples were also analyzed employing ICP-MS. A statistical test demonstrated that there is no significant difference between the results found by two methods. The chromium concentrations achieved are lower than the maximum limit permissible for chromium in foods by Brazilian Legislation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Spray formation of biodiesel-water in air-assisted atomizer using Schlieren photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirnordin, S. H.; Khalid, A.; Sapit, A.; Salleh, H.; Razali, A.; Fawzi, M.

    2016-11-01

    Biodiesels are attractive renewable energy sources, particularly for industrial boiler and burner operators. However, biodiesels produce higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions compared with diesel. Although water-emulsified fuels can lower NOx emissions by reducing flame temperature, its influence on atomization needs to be investigated further. This study investigates the effects of water on spray formation in air-assisted atomizers. The Schlieren method was used to capture the spray images in terms of tip penetration, spray angle, and spray area. The experiment used palm oil biodiesel at different blending ratios (B5, B10, and B15) and water contents (0vol%-15vol%). Results show that water content in the fuel increases the spray penetration and area but reduces the spray angle because of the changes in fuel properties. Therefore, biodiesel-water application is applicable to burner systems.

  17. Heat and mass transfer in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Heat- and mass-transfer processes in turbulent diffusion flames are discussed, considering turbulent mixing and the structure of single-phase flames, drop processes in spray flames, and nonluminous and luminous flame radiation. Interactions between turbulence and other phenomena are emphasized, concentrating on past work of the author and his associates. The conserved-scalar formalism, along with the laminar-flamelet approximation, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the structure of gas flames, with modest levels of empiricism. Extending this approach to spray flames has highlighted the importance of drop/turbulence interactions; e.g., turbulent dispersion of drops, modification of turbulence by drops, etc. Stochastic methods being developed to treat these phenomena are yielding encouraging results.

  18. Transitional Gas Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Alammar, Khalid; Gollahalli, S. R.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Drop tower experiments were performed to identify buoyancy effects in transitional hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry was utilized to optically visualize the flame and to measure oxygen concentration in the laminar portion of the flame. Test conditions consisted of atmospheric pressure flames burning in quiescent air. Fuel from a 0.3mm inside diameter tube injector was issued at jet exit Reynolds numbers (Re) of 1300 to 1700. Helium mole percentage in the fuel was varied from 0 to 40%. Significant effects of buoyancy were observed in near field of the flame even-though the fuel jets were momentum-dominated. Results show an increase of breakpoint length in microgravity. Data suggest that transitional flames in earth-gravity at Re<1300 might become laminar in microgravity.

  19. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate......Membranes consisting of one or more metal oxides can be synthesized by flame pyrolysis. The general principle behind flame pyrolysis is the decomposition and oxidation of evaporated organo-metallic precursors in a flame, thereby forming metal oxide monomers. Because of the extreme supersaturation...... created in the flame, the monomers will nucleate homogeneously and agglomerate to form aggregates of large ensembles of monomers. The aggregates will then sinter together to form single particles. If the flame temperature and the residence time are sufficiently high, the formed oxide particles...

  20. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  1. Advances in Turbulent Combustion Dynamics Simulations in Bluff-Body Stabilized Flames-Body Stabilized Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    improved Linear Eddy Model approach is applied to predict the flame properties inside the Volvo rig and it is shown to over-predict the flame...work, the improved Linear Eddy Model approach is applied to predict the flame properties inside the Volvo rig and it is shown to over-predict the flame...39 4.1 Volvo Rig Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 4.2 Simulation Description

  2. Copper(I) Bromide: An Alternative Emitter for Blue-Colored Flame Pyrotechnics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juknelevicius, Dominykas; Karvinen, Eero; Klapötke, Thomas M; Kubilius, Rytis; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Rusan, Magdalena

    2015-10-19

    Copper(I) bromide was evaluated as an alternative emitter for blue flame pyrotechnic compositions. CuBr and CuCl emission spectra were recorded from a butane torch flame and compared. Cu(BrO3 )2 was synthesized and used in pyrotechnic compositions as an oxidizer and the source for the generation of CuBr species. Pyrotechnic compositions, which contained copper and potassium bromates as oxidizers, were optimized for the generation of blue flames. The experimental data, including emission spectra of the flames, chromaticity coordinates, burning rates, luminous intensities, and sensitivity tests, were analyzed and compared. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Pole solutions for flame front propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Kupervasser, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with solving mathematically the unsteady flame propagation equations. New original mathematical methods for solving complex non-linear equations and investigating their properties are presented. Pole solutions for flame front propagation are developed. Premixed flames and filtration combustion have remarkable properties: the complex nonlinear integro-differential equations for these problems have exact analytical solutions described by the motion of poles in a complex plane. Instead of complex equations, a finite set of ordinary differential equations is applied. These solutions help to investigate analytically and numerically properties of the flame front propagation equations.

  4. Investigation of spectral interferences in the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Aline R. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker, Emilene M.; François, Luciane L.; Jesus, Alexandre de [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Dessuy, Morgana B., E-mail: mbdessuy@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Andrade, Jailson B. de [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, spectral interferences on the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples were investigated using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry at the main analytical lines: 217.001 and 283.306 nm. For these investigations, samples were introduced into the furnace as slurry together with a mixture of Pd and Mg as chemical modifier. Spectral interferences were observed for some samples at both analytical lines. In order to verify whether a wet digestion procedure would avoid these interferences, a reference method for wet digestion of fertilizers was employed as an alternative sample preparation procedure. However, the same interferences were also observed in the digested samples. In order to identify and eliminate the fine-structured background using a least-squares background correction, reference spectra were generated using the combination of different species. The use of the latter technique allowed the elimination of spectral interferences for most of the investigated samples, making possible the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples free of interferences. The best results were found using a reference spectrum of NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at 217.001 nm, and a mixture of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + Ca and HNO{sub 3} + Ca at the 283.306 nm line. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using a certified reference material “Trace Elements in Multi-Nutrient Fertilizer”. Similar results were obtained using line source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction, indicating that the latter technique was also capable to correct the spectral interferences, at least in part. - Highlights: • Spectral interferences on the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone. • The analytical lines at 217.001 nm and 283.306 nm using HR-CS GF AAS. • Various combinations of compounds were used to create reference spectra. • LSBC

  5. THE SYNERGISTIC EFFECT OF HYBRID FLAME RETARDANTS ON PYROLYSIS BEHAVIOUR OF HYBRID COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. ALBDIRY

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to comprehensively understand the polymeric composite behavior under direct fire sources. The synergistic effects of hybrid flame retardant material on inhabiting the pyrolysis of hybrid reinforced fibers, woven roving (0°- 45° carbon and kevlar (50/50 wt/wt, and an araldite resin composites were studied. The composites were synthesised and coated primarily by zinc borate (2ZnO.3B2O3.3.5H2O and modified by antimony trioxide (Sb2O3 with different amounts (10-30 wt% of flame retardant materials. In the experiments, the composite samples were exposed to a direct flame source generated by oxyacetylene flame (~3000ºC at variable exposure distances of 10-20 mm. The synergic flame retardants role of antimony trioxide and zinc borate on the composite surface noticeably improves the flame resistance of the composite which is attributed to forming a protective mass and heat barrier on the composite surface and increasing the melt viscosity.

  6. Flame Retardation Modification of Paper-Based PVC Wallcoverings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Hui; Yang, Haiyang; Xiao, He; Cao, Shilin; Huang, Liulian; Chen, Lihui; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The flame-retarded paper-based polyvinyl chloride (PVC) wallcoverings were successfully prepared, using plant fiber paper as base material and adding inorganic flame retardants and flame-retarded plasticizer as additives...

  7. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Sources Fondation Pablo Iglesias. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Archives privées de Manuel ArijaArchives extérieuresArchives FNJS de EspañaPrensa Archives Générales de l’Administration. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Opposition au franquismeSig. 653 Sig TOP 82/68.103-68.602.Índice de las cartas colectivas, Relaciones, Cartas al Ministro de Información de Marzo de 1965. c.662. Sources cinématographiques Filmothèque Nationale d’Espagne.NO.DO. N° 1157C. 08/03/1965.aguirre Javier, Blanco vertical....

  8. Model flames in the Boussinesq limit: The effects of feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova, N.; Rosner, R.

    2003-06-01

    We have studied the fully nonlinear behavior of premixed flames in a gravitationally stratified medium, subject to the Boussinesq approximation. The key results include the establishment of criteria for when such flames propagate as simple planar flames, elucidation of scaling laws for the effective flame speed, and a study of the stability properties of these flames. The simplicity of some of our scaling results suggests that analytical work may further advance our understandings of buoyant flames.

  9. Fast arsenic speciation in water by on-site solid phase extraction and high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihucz, Victor G.; Bencs, László; Koncz, Kornél; Tatár, Enikő; Weiszburg, Tamás; Záray, Gyula

    2017-02-01

    A method of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS), combined with on-site separation/solid phase extraction (SPE) has been developed for the speciation of inorganic As (iAs) in geothermal and drinking water samples. The HR-CS-GFAAS calibration curves were linear up to 200 μg/L As, but using second order polynomial fitting, accurate calibration could be performed up to 500 μg/L. It has been demonstrated that sample pH should not be higher than 8 for an accurate speciation of As(V) with a recovery of ≈ 95%. Geothermal water had fairly high salt content (≈ 2200 mg/L) due to the presence of chlorides and sulfates at mg/L levels. Therefore, a two-fold dilution of these types of samples before SPE is recommended, especially, for total As determinations, when the As concentration is as high as 400 μg/L. For drinking water, sampled from public wells with records of As concentrations higher than the 10 μg/L in the past, the reduction of As contamination below the WHO's health limit value could be observed. However, the electrical conductivity was close to 2500 μS/cm, i.e., the guideline limit for drinking water, which was due to their higher chloride content. The proposed fit-for-purpose SPE-HR-CS-GFAAS method could be a candidate for screening drinking water quality.

  10. Determination of Chlorine in Milk via Molecular Absorption of SrCl Using High-Resolution Continuum Source Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-07-20

    Total chlorine in milk was determined via the molecular absorption of diatomic strontium monochloride at 635.862 nm using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of coating the graphite furnace, using different modifiers, amount of molecule-forming element, and different calibrants were investigated and optimized. Chlorine concentrations in milk samples were determined in a Zr-coated graphite furnace using 25 μg of Sr as the molecule-forming reagent and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C and a molecule-forming temperature of 2300 °C. Linearity was maintained up to 500 μg mL(-1) of Cl. The method was tested by analyzing a certified reference wastewater. The results were in the uncertainty limits of the certified value. The limit of detection of the method was 1.76 μg mL(-1). The chlorine concentrations in various cow milk samples taken from the market were found in the range of 588-1472 mg L(-1).

  11. Determination of macro and trace elements in multivitamin dietary supplements by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with slurry sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    In this research, three different commercially available multivitamin dietary supplements were analyzed by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) with slurry sampling. The concentrations of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Se were determined and compared to the amounts stated by producers. The safety of multivitamin dietary supplements depends on various factors including the manufacturing process and the purity and origins of the raw ingredients. For this reason, this research determined concentrations of several toxic elements (As, Cd, and Pb). Microwave-assisted high pressure Teflon bomb digestion was used to determine total amounts of elements in samples. Samples were prepared as slurries at a concentration of 0.1% (m/v) for macro elements (Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Se) and at a concentration of % (m/v) for trace elements (As, Cd, and Pb) in acidic media (3M HNO3). The influence of acid concentration, Triton X-100 addition, sonication time, and sonication power on absorbance was investigated. The accuracy of this method was validated by analyses of NRCC LUTS-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas), NRCC DORM-1 (Dogfish Muscle), NRCC DOLT-2 (Dogfish Liver), NBS SRM 1570 (Spinach Leaves) and NBS SRM 1573 (Tomato Leaves) certified reference materials. The measured elements contents in these reference materials (except NRCC DOLT-2) were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for gold determination in geological samples after preconcentration onto carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Mróz, Agnieszka; Dąbrowska, Marzena; Olszański, Piotr

    2017-06-01

    A novelty method for the determination of gold in geological samples by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS HR CS GF AAS) after solid-phase extraction onto modified carbon nanotubes (CNT) was described. The methodology developed is based on solid phase extraction of Au(III) ions from digested samples to eliminate strong interference caused by iron compounds and problems related to inhomogeneities of the samples. The use of aqueous or solid standard for calibration was studied and the slope of calibration curve was the same for both of these modes. This statement indicates the possibility to perform the calibration of the method using aqueous standard solutions. Under optimum conditions the absolute detection limit for gold was equal to 2.24 · 10- 6 μg g- 1 while the adsorption capacity of modified carbon nanotubes was 264 mg g- 1. The proposed procedure was validated by the application of certified reference materials (CRMs) with different content of gold and different matrix, the results were in good agreement with certified values. The method was successfully applied for separation and determination of gold ions in complex geological samples, with precision generally better than 8%.

  13. Flame dynamics of a meso-scale heat recirculating combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayan, V.; Gupta, A.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The dynamics of premixed propane-air flame in a meso-scale ceramic combustor has been examined here. The flame characteristics in the combustor were examined by measuring the acoustic emissions and preheat temperatures together with high-speed cinematography. For the small-scale combustor, the volume to surface area ratio is small and hence the walls have significant effect on the global flame structure, flame location and flame dynamics. In addition to the flame-wall thermal coupling there is a coupling between flame and acoustics in the case of confined flames. Flame-wall thermal interactions lead to low frequency flame fluctuations ({proportional_to}100 Hz) depending upon the thermal response of the wall. However, the flame-acoustic interactions can result in a wide range of flame fluctuations ranging from few hundred Hz to few kHz. Wall temperature distribution is one of the factors that control the amount of reactant preheating which in turn effects the location of flame stabilization. Acoustic emission signals and high-speed flame imaging confirmed that for the present case flame-acoustic interactions have more significant effect on flame dynamics. Based on the acoustic emissions, five different flame regimes have been identified; whistling/harmonic mode, rich instability mode, lean instability mode, silent mode and pulsating flame mode. (author)

  14. Tulip flames: changes in shape of premixed flames propagating in closed tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Sawyer, R. F.

    The experimental results that are the subject of this communication provide high-speed schlieren images of the closed-tube flame shape that has come to be known as the tulip flame. The schlieren images, along with in-chamber pressure records, help demonstrate the effects of chamber length, equivalence ratio, and igniter geometry on formation of the tulip flame. The pressure/time records show distinct features which correlate with flame shape changes during the transition to tulip. The measurements indicate that the basic tulip flame formation is a robust phenomenon that depends on little except the overall geometry of the combustion vessel.

  15. Quantificação laboratorial de cobre sérico por espectrofotometria Vis comparável à espectrometria de absorção atômica com chama Laboratorial quantification of serum copper by Vis spectrophotometry in comparison to flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Moro

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O cobre é um nutriente essencial para os humanos, e a manutenção dos seus níveis é importante, uma vez que seu metabolismo está envolvido com estresse oxidativo e patologias, como a Doença de Wilson. Neste trabalho, um método de espectrofotometria visível (espectrofotometria Vis foi validado, aplicado em indivíduos jovens e comparado com espectrometria de absorção atômica com chama (EAA-chama. MÉTODOS: Concentrações séricas de cobre foram medidas por EAA-chama e por espectrofotometria Vis, através da reação de cobre com batocuproína, l = 484 nm. Curvas analíticas em solução aquosa e com adição de padrão foram efetuadas para verificar linearidade, recuperação e precisão do método espectrofotométrico. Amostras de sangue de 12 indivíduos (média de idade 22 anos foram analisadas por ambos os métodos e comparadas entre si. Os resultados foram expressos em média ± desvio-padrão. RESULTADOS: As curvas com adição de padrão e aquosa (n = 5 apresentaram coeficientes de regressão superiores a 0,99 e de variação inter e intradia inferiores a 15%. Os valores de cobre sérico encontrados para o método espectrofotométrico foram 1,17 ± 0,39 e 0,73 ± 0,14 mg/l para mulheres e homens, respectivamente. Para EAA-chama foram encontrados 1,13 ± 0,43 e 0,59 ± 0,13 mg/l para mulheres e homens, respectivamente. Os resultados mostraram correlação de Pearson significativa (r = 0,946; p BACKGROUND: Copper is an essential nutrient for humans and maintenance of its adequate levels is important, since its metabolism is involved with oxidative stress and patolologies, such as Wilson's disease. In this work, a visible spectrophotometric method was validated, applied in young subjects and compared to flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS in serum copper levels determination. METHODS: Serum copper concentrations were measured by FAAS and by spectrophotometry, through copper reaction with bathocuproine, l = 484

  16. Impact of flame-wall interaction on premixed flame dynamics and transfer function characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the response of a perforated-plate stabilized laminar methane-air premixed flame to imposed inlet velocity perturbations. A flame model using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism is applied and heat exchange between the burner plate and the gas mixture is incorporated. Linear transfer functions, for low mean inlet velocity oscillations, are analyzed for different equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, plate thermal conductivity and distance between adjacent holes. The oscillations of the heat exchange rate at the top of the burner surface plays a critical role in driving the growth of the perturbations over a wide range of conditions, including resonance. The flame response to the perturbations at its base takes the form of consumption speed oscillations in this region. Flame stand-off distance increases/decreases when the flame-wall interaction strengthens/weakens, impacting the overall dynamics of the heat release. The convective lag between the perturbations and the flame base response govern the phase of heat release rate oscillations. There is an additional convective lag between the perturbations at the flame base and the flame tip which has a weaker impact on the heat release rate oscillations. At higher frequencies, the flame-wall interaction is weaker and the heat release oscillations are driven by the flame area oscillations. The response of the flame to higher amplitude oscillations are used to gain further insight into the mechanisms. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  17. Simulations of flame generated particles

    KAUST Repository

    Patterson, Robert

    2016-01-05

    The nonlinear structure of the equations describing the evolution of a population of coagulating particles in a flame make the use of stochastic particle methods attractive for numerical purposes. I will present an analysis of the stochastic fluctuations inherent in these numerical methods leading to an efficient sampling technique for steady-state problems. I will also give some examples where stochastic particle methods have been used to explore the effect of uncertain parameters in soot formation models. In conclusion I will try to indicate some of the issues in optimising these methods for the study of uncertain model parameters.

  18. Biodegradation of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijers, S.L.; Parsons, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants account for about 21% of the total production of flame retardants and many of these have been identified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. Nevertheless, debromination of these chemicals under anaerobic conditions is well established, although this can increase

  19. Flame retardant cotton based highloft nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flame retardancy has been a serious bottleneck to develop cotton blended very high specific volume bulky High loft fabrics. Alternately, newer approach to produce flame retardant cotton blended High loft fabrics must be employed that retain soft feel characteristics desirable of furnishings. Hence, ...

  20. Flame retardant cotton barrier nonwovens for mattresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    According to regulation CPSC 16 CFR 1633, every new residential mattress sold in the United States since July 2007 must resist ignition by open flame. An environmentally benign “green”, inexpensive way to meet this regulation is to use a low-cost flame retardant (FR) barrier fabric. In this study, a...

  1. Chemical processes in the HNF flame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ermolin, N.E.; Zarko, V.E.; Keizers, H.L.J.

    2006-01-01

    Results of modeling the HNF flame structure are presented. From an analysis of literature data on the thermal decomposition and combustion of HNF, it is concluded that the dissociative vaporization of HNF proceeds via the route HNFliq → (N2H4)g + (HC(NO 2)3)g. The flame structure is modeled using a

  2. Solid sampling determination of magnesium in lithium niobate crystals by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Laczai, Nikoletta; Hajdara, Ivett; Bencs, László

    2016-12-01

    The vaporization/atomization processes of Mg in high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS) were investigated by evaporating solid (powder) samples of lithium niobate (LiNbO3) optical single crystals doped with various amounts of Mg in a transversally heated graphite atomizer (THGA). Optimal analytical conditions were attained by using the Mg I 215.4353 nm secondary spectral line. An optimal pyrolysis temperature of 1500 °C was found for Mg, while the compromise atomization temperature in THGAs (2400 °C) was applied for analyte vaporization. The calibration was performed against solid (powered) lithium niobate crystal standards. The standards were prepared with exactly known Mg content via solid state fusion of the oxide components of the matrix and analyte. The correlation coefficient (R value) of the linear calibration was not worse than 0.9992. The calibration curves were linear in the dopant concentration range of interest (0.74-7.25 mg/g Mg), when dosing 3-10 mg of the powder samples into the graphite sample insertion boats. The Mg content of the studied 19 samples was in the range of 1.69-4.13 mg/g. The precision of the method was better than 6.3%. The accuracy of the results was verified by means of flame atomic absorption spectrometry with solution sample introduction after digestion of several crystal samples.

  3. Quenching processes in flame-vortex interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingale, M.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Timmes, F. X.; Dursi, L. J.; Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Lamb, D. Q.; MacNeice, P.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P. M.; Rosner, R.; Truran, J. W.; Tufo, H. M.

    2001-10-01

    We show direct numerical simulations of flame-vortex interactions in order to understand quenching of thermonuclear flames. The key question is-can a thermonuclear flame be quenched? If not, the deflagration-detonation transition mechanisms that demand a finely tuned preconditioned region in the interior of a white dwarf are unlikely to work. In these simulations, we pass a steady-state laminar flame through a vortex pair. The vortex pair represents the most severe strain the flame front will encounter inside the white dwarf. We perform a parameter study, varying the speed and size of the vortex pair, in order to understand the quenching process. No quenching is observed in any of the calculations performed to date. .

  4. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  5. Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  6. Influence of hydrophobic substance on enhancing washing durability of water soluble flame-retardant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jindasuwan, Sunisa, E-mail: sunisaj@gmail.com [Department of Industrial Chemistry, Faculty of Applied Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok, 10800 (Thailand); Sukmanee, Nattinee; Supanpong, Chanida [Department of Industrial Chemistry, Faculty of Applied Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok, 10800 (Thailand); Suwan, Mantana; Nimittrakoolchai, On-uma [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Rd., Klong Luang, Pathumthani, 12120 (Thailand); Supothina, Sitthisuntorn, E-mail: sitthis@mtec.or.th [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Rd., Klong Luang, Pathumthani, 12120 (Thailand)

    2013-06-15

    Flame-retardant textiles are used in many consumer products. Among halogen-free flame retardant substances, inorganic flame retardants are mainly based on phosphorus, antimony, aluminum and boron-containing compounds. These coatings are soluble in water and therefore are not subjected to washing. In this study, washing durability of the inorganic flame retardant has been improved by incorporation of the hydrophobic substance to the coating. Composition of the coating which is the flame-retardant, monoammonium phosphate (MAP), and the hydrophobic substances, poly(methylhydrogen siloxane) (PMHS) and poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS)), were varied to find the optimum coating solution. The results of SEM and TGA analysis, as well as the burning and washing tests, revealed that the coating solution consisting of MAP:PMHS:PDMS = 5:2:1 wt.% was the optimum condition. It showed the increased residue on the TGA profile compared to the uncoated sample, and self-extinguish after removal of the ignition source. The flame-retardant property can be maintained after washing, making it feasible for variety of applications.

  7. Influence of hydrophobic substance on enhancing washing durability of water soluble flame-retardant coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindasuwan, Sunisa; Sukmanee, Nattinee; Supanpong, Chanida; Suwan, Mantana; Nimittrakoolchai, On-uma; Supothina, Sitthisuntorn

    2013-06-01

    Flame-retardant textiles are used in many consumer products. Among halogen-free flame retardant substances, inorganic flame retardants are mainly based on phosphorus, antimony, aluminum and boron-containing compounds. These coatings are soluble in water and therefore are not subjected to washing. In this study, washing durability of the inorganic flame retardant has been improved by incorporation of the hydrophobic substance to the coating. Composition of the coating which is the flame-retardant, monoammonium phosphate (MAP), and the hydrophobic substances, poly(methylhydrogen siloxane) (PMHS) and poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS)), were varied to find the optimum coating solution. The results of SEM and TGA analysis, as well as the burning and washing tests, revealed that the coating solution consisting of MAP:PMHS:PDMS = 5:2:1 wt.% was the optimum condition. It showed the increased residue on the TGA profile compared to the uncoated sample, and self-extinguish after removal of the ignition source. The flame-retardant property can be maintained after washing, making it feasible for variety of applications.

  8. Multipoint ignition by flame dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rychter, T.J.

    1989-03-01

    In conventional piston engines exothermic chemical reactions occur in flames that are tightly localized in space. This is a cause of many problems encountered in engine combustion, such as knock and cycle-to-cycle variability. An alternative to the classical combustion process based on the propagation of the flame can be the initiation of exothermic reactions by a set of ignition centers causing multipoint initiation of combustion. This can be achieved by spreading the chemically active hot gases through the combustion chamber. In practice this has been done by combustion-product recirculation or by the use of jets. Numerous investigations have been reported on the combustion system in which a jet of chemically active hot gases is dynamically introduced into the main combustion chamber causing multipoint ignition of a premixed charge. The jet has been generated either by burning a rich mixture in a large prechamber, in a small torch cell, or by the discharge of a relatively large amount of electrical energy in a small cavity to produce a jet of plasma. A way to reduce significantly the energy to generate the plasma jet has been proposed and has proved to be especially advantageous fur burning mixtures near their flammability limits.

  9. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  10. Single-step processing of copper-doped titania nanomaterials in a flame aerosol reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahu Manoranjan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Synthesis and characterization of long wavelength visible-light absorption Cu-doped TiO2 nanomaterials with well-controlled properties such as size, composition, morphology, and crystal phase have been demonstrated in a single-step flame aerosol reactor. This has been feasible by a detailed understanding of the formation and growth of nanoparticles in the high-temperature flame region. The important process parameters controlled were: molar feed ratios of precursors, temperature, and residence time in the high-temperature flame region. The ability to vary the crystal phase of the doped nanomaterials while keeping the primary particle size constant has been demonstrated. Results indicate that increasing the copper dopant concentration promotes an anatase to rutile phase transformation, decreased crystalline nature and primary particle size, and better suspension stability. Annealing the Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles increased the crystalline nature and changed the morphology from spherical to hexagonal structure. Measurements indicate a band gap narrowing by 0.8 eV (2.51 eV was achieved at 15-wt.% copper dopant concentration compared to pristine TiO2 (3.31 eV synthesized under the same flame conditions. The change in the crystal phase, size, and band gap is attributed to replacement of titanium atoms by copper atoms in the TiO2 crystal.

  11. Quantitative C2H2 measurements in sooty flames using mid-infrared polarization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z. W.; Li, Z. S.; Li, B.; Alwahabi, Z. T.; Aldén, M.

    2010-10-01

    Quantitative measurements of acetylene (C2H2) molecules as a combustion intermediate species in a series of rich premixed C2H4/air flames were non-intrusively performed, spatially resolved, using mid-infrared polarization spectroscopy (IRPS), by probing its fundamental ro-vibrational transitions. The flat sooty C2H4/air premixed flames with different equivalence ratios varying from 1.25 to 2.50 were produced on a 6 cm diameter porous-plug McKenna type burner at atmospheric pressure, and all measurements were performed at a height of 8.5 mm above the burner surface. IRPS excitation scans in different flame conditions were performed and rotational line-resolved spectra were recorded. Spectral features of acetylene molecules were readily recognized in the spectral ranges selected, with special attention to avoid the spectral interference from the large amount of coexisting hot water and other hydrocarbon molecules. On-line calibration of the optical system was performed in a laminar C2H2/N2 gas flow at ambient conditions. Using the flame temperatures measured by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy in a previous work, C2H2 mole fractions in different flames were evaluated with collision effects and spectral overlap between molecular line and laser source being analyzed and taken into account. C2H2 IRPS signals in two different buffering gases, N2 and CO2, had been investigated in a tube furnace in order to estimate the spectral overlap coefficients and collision effects at different temperatures. The soot-volume fractions (SVF) in the studied flames were measured using a He-Ne laser-extinction method, and no obvious degrading of the IRPS technique due to the sooty environment has been observed in the flame with SVF up to ˜2×10-7. With the increase of flame equivalence ratios not only the SVF but also the C2H2 mole fractions increased.

  12. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Archives Archivo Histórico del Estado de Jalisco Fondo Gobernación, Asunto Pasaportes y Salvoconductos : G-8-877/9773-9775 G-8-878/9774, 9776, 9777 et 9781 G-8-879/9782-9788 G-8-880/9789-9798 G-8-881-882/9803 G-8-882/9804-9805 G-8-883/9806-9811 G-8-884/9813 G-8-885/9817-9820 G-8-886/9822-9825 G-8-887/9826-9830 G-8-888/9835 G-8-889-890/9837 G-8-889/9839 Sources imprimées Livres et chroniques O’Farrill Romulo, (2004) Reseña histórica estadística y comercial de México y sus estados, directorio g...

  13. Ultrasound-assisted single-drop microextraction for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oils using high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Jorge S.; Anunciação, Taiana A.; Brandão, Geovani C.; Dantas, Alailson F.; Lemos, Valfredo A.; Teixeira, Leonardo S. G.

    2015-05-01

    This work presents an ultrasound-assisted single-drop microextraction procedure for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oils using high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Some initial tests showed that the best extraction efficiency was obtained when using ultrasound instead of mechanical agitation, indicating that acoustic cavitation improved the extraction process. Nitric, hydrochloric and acetic acids were evaluated for use in the extraction process, and HNO3 gave the best results. A two-level full-factorial design was applied to investigate the best conditions for the extraction of Cd from the oil samples. The influences of the sonication amplitude, time and temperature of the extraction were evaluated. The results of the design revealed that all of the variables had a significant effect on the experimental results. Afterward, a Box-Behnken design was applied to determine the optimum conditions for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oil samples. According to a multivariate study, the optimum conditions were as follows: sonication amplitude of 60%, extraction time of 15 min, extraction temperature of 46 °C and 0.1 mol L- 1 HNO3 as the extractor solution. Under optimized conditions, the developed method allows for the determination of Cd in oil samples with a limit of quantification of 7.0 ng kg- 1. Addition and recovery experiments were performed in vegetable oil samples to evaluate the accuracy of the method, and the recoveries obtained varied from 90% to 115%. The samples were also analyzed after the acid digestion procedure, and the paired t-test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences from the proposed method.

  14. Ultrasound-assisted single-drop microextraction for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oils using high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Jorge S.; Anunciação, Taiana A. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitário de Ondina, Salvador, Bahia 40170-280 (Brazil); Brandão, Geovani C. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitário de Ondina, Salvador, Bahia 40170-280 (Brazil); INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitário de Ondina, Salvador, Bahia 40170-280 (Brazil); Dantas, Alailson F. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitário de Ondina, Salvador, Bahia 40170-280 (Brazil); Lemos, Valfredo A. [Laboratório de Química Analítica (LQA), Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, Campus de Jequié, Jequié, Bahia 45506-191 (Brazil); and others

    2015-05-01

    This work presents an ultrasound-assisted single-drop microextraction procedure for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oils using high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Some initial tests showed that the best extraction efficiency was obtained when using ultrasound instead of mechanical agitation, indicating that acoustic cavitation improved the extraction process. Nitric, hydrochloric and acetic acids were evaluated for use in the extraction process, and HNO{sub 3} gave the best results. A two-level full-factorial design was applied to investigate the best conditions for the extraction of Cd from the oil samples. The influences of the sonication amplitude, time and temperature of the extraction were evaluated. The results of the design revealed that all of the variables had a significant effect on the experimental results. Afterward, a Box–Behnken design was applied to determine the optimum conditions for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oil samples. According to a multivariate study, the optimum conditions were as follows: sonication amplitude of 60%, extraction time of 15 min, extraction temperature of 46 °C and 0.1 mol L{sup −1} HNO{sub 3} as the extractor solution. Under optimized conditions, the developed method allows for the determination of Cd in oil samples with a limit of quantification of 7.0 ng kg{sup −1}. Addition and recovery experiments were performed in vegetable oil samples to evaluate the accuracy of the method, and the recoveries obtained varied from 90% to 115%. The samples were also analyzed after the acid digestion procedure, and the paired t-test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences from the proposed method. - Highlights: • The determination of cadmium in vegetable oils was developed using UA-SDME. • HR-CS ET-AAS was employed as a detection technique with direct drop sampling. • The procedure allowed for a reduction in the consumption of reagents and

  15. Speciation analysis of volatile and non-volatile vanadium compounds in Brazilian crude oils using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepri, Fabio G. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: welz@qmc.ufsc.br; Borges, Daniel L.G. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, Alessandra F. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Heitmann, Uwe [ISAS - Institute of Analytical Sciences, Department Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-02-03

    A method is proposed that makes possible determining total and 'thermally stable' vanadium in crude oil without prior separation, and to calculate 'volatile' vanadium by difference. The volatile fraction is believed to be largely vanadyl porphyrine complexes. The method is based on the unsurpassed background correction capability of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS), which allows pyrolysis temperatures as low as 300 deg. C to be used. The samples were prepared as oil-in-water emulsions, and aqueous standards emulsified in the same way were used for calibration. Total vanadium has been determined using a pyrolysis temperature of 400 deg. C, and 'thermally stable' vanadium using a pyrolysis temperature of 800 deg. C. The content of total vanadium in 12 Brazilian crude oil samples was found to be between less than 0.04 and about 30 mg kg{sup -1}. The volatile fraction was between 5 and 51% of the total content, and there was no correlation between the total and the volatile vanadium content. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.04 and 0.12 mg kg{sup -1} of V in crude oil, respectively, based on a mass of 2 g of oil in 10 mL of emulsion. The precision was better than 4% at the 3 mg kg{sup -1} level and better than 1.5% at the 30 mg kg{sup -1} level of V in crude oil.

  16. Simultaneous determination of V, Ni and Fe in fuel fly ash using solid sampling high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas Valdivia, A; Vereda Alonso, E; López Guerrero, M M; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J; Cano Pavón, J M; García de Torres, A

    2018-03-01

    A green and simple method has been proposed in this work for the simultaneous determination of V, Ni and Fe in fuel ash samples by solid sampling high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS HR CS GFAAS). The application of fast programs in combination with direct solid sampling allows eliminating pretreatment steps, involving minimal manipulation of sample. Iridium treated platforms were applied throughout the present study, enabling the use of aqueous standards for calibration. Correlation coefficients for the calibration curves were typically better than 0.9931. The concentrations found in the fuel ash samples analysed ranged from 0.66% to 4.2% for V, 0.23-0.7% for Ni and 0.10-0.60% for Fe. Precision (%RSD) were 5.2%, 10.0% and 9.8% for V, Ni and Fe, respectively, obtained as the average of the %RSD of six replicates of each fuel ash sample. The optimum conditions established were applied to the determination of the target analytes in fuel ash samples. In order to test the accuracy and applicability of the proposed method in the analysis of samples, five ash samples from the combustion of fuel in power stations, were analysed. The method accuracy was evaluated by comparing the results obtained using the proposed method with the results obtained by ICP OES previous acid digestion. The results showed good agreement between them. The goal of this work has been to develop a fast and simple methodology that permits the use of aqueous standards for straightforward calibration and the simultaneous determination of V, Ni and Fe in fuel ash samples by direct SS HR CS GFAAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of Pb (Lead), Cd (Cadmium), Cr (Chromium), Cu (Copper), and Ni (Nickel) in Chinese tea with high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wen-Si; Ren, Ting; Zhao, Li-Jiao

    2016-01-01

    The contents of lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, and nickel were determined in 25 tea samples from China, including green, yellow, white, oolong, black, Pu'er, and jasmine tea products, using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The methods used for sample preparation, digestion, and quantificational analysis were established, generating satisfactory analytical precisions (represented by relative standard deviations ranging from 0.6% to 2.5%) and recoveries (98.91-101.32%). The lead contents in tea leaves were 0.48-10.57 mg/kg, and 80% of these values were below the maximum values stated by the guidelines in China. The contents of cadmium and chromium ranged from 0.01 mg/kg to 0.39 mg/kg and from 0.27 mg/kg to 2.45 mg/kg, respectively, remaining in compliance with the limits stipulated by China's Ministry of Agriculture. The copper contents were 7.73-63.71 mg/kg; only 64% of these values complied with the standards stipulated by the Ministry of Agriculture. The nickel contents ranged from 2.70 mg/kg to 13.41 mg/kg. Consequently, more attention must be paid to the risks of heavy metal contamination in tea. The quantitative method established in this work lays a foundation for preventing heavy metal toxicity in human from drinking tea and will help establish regulations to control the contents of heavy metals in tea. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Determination of Pb (Lead, Cd (Cadmium, Cr (Chromium, Cu (Copper, and Ni (Nickel in Chinese tea with high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Si Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The contents of lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, and nickel were determined in 25 tea samples from China, including green, yellow, white, oolong, black, Pu'er, and jasmine tea products, using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The methods used for sample preparation, digestion, and quantificational analysis were established, generating satisfactory analytical precisions (represented by relative standard deviations ranging from 0.6% to 2.5% and recoveries (98.91–101.32%. The lead contents in tea leaves were 0.48–10.57 mg/kg, and 80% of these values were below the maximum values stated by the guidelines in China. The contents of cadmium and chromium ranged from 0.01 mg/kg to 0.39 mg/kg and from 0.27 mg/kg to 2.45 mg/kg, respectively, remaining in compliance with the limits stipulated by China's Ministry of Agriculture. The copper contents were 7.73–63.71 mg/kg; only 64% of these values complied with the standards stipulated by the Ministry of Agriculture. The nickel contents ranged from 2.70 mg/kg to 13.41 mg/kg. Consequently, more attention must be paid to the risks of heavy metal contamination in tea. The quantitative method established in this work lays a foundation for preventing heavy metal toxicity in human from drinking tea and will help establish regulations to control the contents of heavy metals in tea.

  19. The Effects of Flame Structure on Extinction of CH4-O2-N2 Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, S. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The effects of flame structure on the extinction limits of CH4-O2-N2 counterflow diffusion flames were investigated experimentally and numerically by varying the stoichiometric mixture fraction Z(sub st), Z(sub st) was varied by varying free-stream concentrations, while the adiabatic flame temperature T(sub ad) was held fixed by maintaining a fixed amount of nitrogen at the flame. Z(sub st) was varied between 0.055 (methane-air flame) and 0.78 (diluted- methane-oxygen flame). The experimental results yielded an extinction strain rate K(sub ext) of 375/s for the methane-air flame, increasing monotonically to 1042/s for the diluted-methane-oxygen flame. Numerical results with a 58-step Cl mechanism yielded 494/s and 1488/s, respectively. The increase in K(sub ext) with Z(sub st) for a fixed T(sub ad) is explained by the shift in the O2 profile toward the region of maximum temperature and the subsequent increase in rates for chain-branching reactions. The flame temperature at extinction reached a minimum at Z(sub st) = 0.65, where it was 200 C lower than that of the methane-air flame. This significant increase in resistance to extinction is seen to correspond to the condition in which the OH and O production zones are centered on the location of maximum temperature.

  20. Flame Structure and Chemiluminescence Emissions of Inverse Diffusion Flames under Sinusoidally Driven Plasma Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia De Giorgi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of nitric oxides (NOx in aircraft engines and in gas turbines by lean combustion is of great interest in the design of novel combustion systems. However, the stabilization of the flame under lean conditions is a main issue. In this context, the present work investigates the effects of sinusoidal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD on a lean inverse diffusive methane/air flame in a Bunsen-type burner under different actuation conditions. The flame appearance was investigated with fixed methane loading (mass flux, but with varying inner airflow rate. High-speed flame imaging was done by using an intensified (charge-coupled device CCD camera equipped with different optical filters in order to selectively record signals from the chemiluminescent species OH*, CH*, or CO2* to evaluate the flame behavior in presence of plasma actuation. The electrical power consumption was less than 33 W. It was evident that the plasma flame enhancement was significantly influenced by the plasma discharges, particularly at high inner airflow rates. The flame structure changes drastically when the dissipated plasma power increases. The flame area decreases due to the enhancement of mixing and chemical reactions that lead to a more anchored flame on the quartz exit with a reduction of the flame length.

  1. Scaling of turbulent flame speed for expanding flames with Markstein diffusion considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Law, Chung K.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we clarify the role of Markstein diffusivity, which is the product of the planar laminar flame speed and the Markstein length, on the turbulent flame speed and its scaling, based on experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames. Turbulent flame propagation data are presented for premixed flames of mixtures of hydrogen, methane, ethylene, n-butane, and dimethyl ether with air, in near-isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. For each individual fuel-air mixture presented in this work and the recently published iso-octane data from Leeds, normalized turbulent flame speed data of individual fuel-air mixtures approximately follow a ReT,f0.5 scaling, for which the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property of the turbulence Reynolds number. At a given ReT,f, it is experimentally observed that the normalized turbulent flame speed decreases with increasing Markstein number, which could be explained by considering Markstein diffusivity as the leading dissipation mechanism for the large wave number flame surface fluctuations. Consequently, by replacing thermal diffusivity with the Markstein diffusivity in the turbulence Reynolds number definition above, it is found that normalized turbulent flame speeds could be scaled by ReT,M0.5 irrespective of the fuel, equivalence ratio, pressure, and turbulence intensity for positive Markstein number flames.

  2. Flame Retardant Fibers for Human Space Exploration - Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orndoff, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has led in the development of unique flame retardant fibers for human spaceflight since the beginning of the Apollo program. After the Apollo 1 fire which killed Command Pilot Virgil I 'Gus' Grissom, Senior Pilot Edward H. White II, and Pilot Roger B. Chaffee from cardiac arrest on January 27, 1967, the accident investigators found severe third degree burns and melted spacesuits on the astronauts bodies. NASA immediately initiated an extensive research program aimed at developing flame retardant and flame resistant fibers for the enriched oxygen atmosphere of the Apollo crew cabin. Fibers are flame retardant when they have been modified by chemical and thermal treatments. Fibers are flame resistant when they are made of inherently flame resistant materials (i.e. glass, ceramic, highly aromatic polymers). Immediately after this tragic accident, NASA funded extensive research in specifically developing flame retardant fibers and fabrics. The early developmental efforts for human spaceflight were for the outer layer of the Apollo spacesuit. It was imperative that non-flammable fabrics be used in a 100% oxygen environment. Owens-Corning thus developed the Beta fiber that was immediately used in the Apollo program and later in the Space Shuttle program. Aside from the urgent need for protective fabrics for the spacesuit, NASA also needed flame retardant fabrics for both clothing and equipment inside the spacecraft. From the mid-1960s to the early 1980's, NASA contracted with many companies to develop inherently flame retardant fibers and flame retardant finishes for existing fibers. Fluorocarbons and aromatic polyamides were the polymers of great interest for the development of new inherently flame retardant fibers for enriched oxygen environments. These enriched environments varied for different space programs. For example, the Apollo program requirements were for materials that would not support combustion in a

  3. Subfilter Scale Combustion Modelling for Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazian, Nasim

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is a powerful computational tool for modelling turbulent combustion processes. However, for reactive flows, LES is still under significant development. In particular, for turbulent premixed flames, a considerable complication of LES is that the flame thickness is generally much smaller than the LES filter width such that the flame front and chemical reactions cannot be resolved on the grid. Accurate and robust subfilter-scale (SFS) models of the unresolved turbulence-chemistry interactions are therefore required and studies are needed to evaluate and improve them. In this thesis, a detailed comparison and evaluation of five different SFS models for turbulence- chemistry interactions in LES of premixed flames is presented. These approaches include both flamelet- and non-flamelet-based models, coupled with simple or tabulated chemistry. The mod- elling approaches considered herein are: algebraic- and transport-equation variants of the flame surface density (FSD) model, the presumed conditional moment (PCM) with flame prolongation of intrinsic low-dimensional manifold (FPI) tabulated chemistry, or PCM-FPI approach, evaluated with two different presumed probability density function (PDF) models; and conditional source-term estimation (CSE) approach. The predicted LES solutions are compared to the existing laboratory-scale experimental observation of Bunsen-type turbulent premixed methane-air flames, corresponding to lean and stoichiometric conditions lying from the upper limit of the flamelet regime to well within the thin reaction zones regime of the standard regimes diagram. Direct comparison of different SFS approaches allows investigation of stability and performance of the models, while the weaknesses and strengths of each approach are identified. Evaluation of algebraic and transported FSD models highlights the importance of non-equilibrium transport in turbulent premixed flames. The effect of the PDF type for the reaction progress

  4. Automatic flame tracking technique for atrium fire from video images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Lu, Puyi; Fong, Naikong; Chow, Wanki; Wong, Lingtim; Xu, Dianguo

    2005-02-01

    Smoke control is one of the important aspects in atrium fire. For an efficient smoke control strategy, it is very important to identify the smoke and fire source in a very short period of time. However, traditional methods such as point type detectors are not effective for smoke and fire detection in large space such as atrium. Therefore, video smoke and fire detection systems are proposed. For the development of the system, automatic extraction and tracking of flame are two important problems needed to be solved. Based on entropy theory, region growing and Otsu method, a new automatic integrated algorithm, which is used to track flame from video images, is proposed in this paper. It can successfully identify flames from different environment, different background and in different form. The experimental results show that this integrated algorithm has stronger robustness and wider adaptability. In addition, because of the low computational demand of this algorithm, it is also possible to be used as part of a robust, real-time smoke and fire detection system.

  5. Stochastic algorithms for the analysis of numerical flame simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-04-26

    Recent progress in simulation methodologies and high-performance parallel computers have made it is possible to perform detailed simulations of multidimensional reacting flow phenomena using comprehensive kinetics mechanisms. As simulations become larger and more complex, it becomes increasingly difficult to extract useful information from the numerical solution, particularly regarding the interactions of the chemical reaction and diffusion processes. In this paper we present a new diagnostic tool for analysis of numerical simulations of reacting flow. Our approach is based on recasting an Eulerian flow solution in a Lagrangian frame. Unlike a conventional Lagrangian view point that follows the evolution of a volume of the fluid, we instead follow specific chemical elements, e.g., carbon, nitrogen, etc., as they move through the system . From this perspective an ''atom'' is part of some molecule of a species that is transported through the domain by advection and diffusion. Reactions cause the atom to shift from one chemical host species to another and the subsequent transport of the atom is given by the movement of the new species. We represent these processes using a stochastic particle formulation that treats advection deterministically and models diffusion and chemistry as stochastic processes. In this paper, we discuss the numerical issues in detail and demonstrate that an ensemble of stochastic trajectories can accurately capture key features of the continuum solution. The capabilities of this diagnostic are then demonstrated by applications to study the modulation of carbon chemistry during a vortex-flame interaction, and the role of cyano chemistry in rm NO{sub x} production for a steady diffusion flame.

  6. Effects of Non-Equilibrium Plasmas on Low-Pressure, Premixed Flames. Part 1: CH* Chemiluminescence, Temperature, and OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-16

    with Low-Temperature Plasma: Kinetic Mechanism and Experimental Verification, High Energy Chemistry 2009 43(3), 213 9. Ombrello, T., Won, S.H., Ju, Y... chemistry . Qualitative imaging of CH* chemiluminescence indicates that during plasma discharge, the luminous flame zone is shifted upstream towards...lower-temperature kinetics including O atom, H atom and OH formation kinetics and temperature rise due to the presence of the low-temperature, non

  7. Thermonuclear Quenching in Flame-Vortex Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingale, M.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Timmes, F. X.; Dursi, L. J.; Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P.; Rosner, R.; Truran, J. W.; Tufo, H.; MacNeice, P.

    2000-12-01

    A Type Ia supernova begins as a flame, deep in the interior of a white dwarf. At some point, the burning may undergo a deflagration-detonation transition (DDT). Some mechanisms for this transition require a preconditioned region in the star. As the flame propagates down the temperature gradient, the speed increases, and the transition to a detonation may occur (see Khokhlov et al. 1997; Niemeyer & Woosley 1997). For this to happen, the region must be free of any temperature fluctuations -- any burning must be quenched. We show direct numerical simulations of flame-vortex interactions in order to understand quenching of thermonuclear flames. The key question is -- can a thermonuclear flame be quenched? If not, the DDT mechanisms that demand the finely tuned preconditioned region are unlikely to work. In these simulations, we pass a steady-state laminar flame through a vortex pair. The vortex pair represents the most severe strain the flame front will encounter inside the white dwarf. We perform a parameter study, varying the speed and size of the vortex pair, in order to understand the quenching process. These simulations were carried out with the FLASH Code. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Grant No. B341495 to the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. These calculations were performed on the Nirvana Cluster at Los Alamos National Laboratory

  8. Flame Color as a Lean Blowout Predictor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra R. Chaudhari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The study characterizes the behavior of a premixed swirl stabilized dump plane combustor flame near its lean blow-out (LBO limit in terms of CH* chemiluminiscence intensity and observable flame color variations for a wide range of equivalence ratio, flow rates and degree of premixing (characterized by premixing length, Lfuel. LPG and pure methane are used as fuel. We propose a novel LBO prediction strategy based solely on the flame color. It is observed that as the flame approaches LBO, its color changes from reddish to blue. This observation is found to be valid for different levels of fuel-air premixing achieved by changing the available mixing length of the air and the fuel upstream of the dump plane although the flame dynamics were significantly different. Based on this observation, the ratio of the intensities of red and blue components of the flame as captured by a color CCD camera was used as a metric for detecting the proximity of the flame to LBO. Tests were carried out for a wide range of air flow rates and using LPG and CH4 as fuel. For all the operating conditions and both fuels tested, this ratio was found to monotonically decrease as LBO was approached. Moreover, the value of this ratio was within a small range close to LBO for all the cases investigated. This makes the ratio suitable as a metric for LBO detection at all levels of premixing.

  9. The dilution effect on the extinction of wall diffusion flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiti Nadjib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic process of the interaction between a turbulent jet diffusion methane flame and a lateral wall was experimentally studied. The evolution of the flame temperature field with the Nitrogen dilution of the methane jet flame was examined. The interaction between the diffusion flame and the lateral wall was investigated for different distance between the wall and the central axes of the jet flame. The dilution is found to play the central role in the flame extinction process. The flame response as the lateral wall approaches from infinity and the increasing of the dilution rate make the flame extinction more rapid than the flame without dilution, when the nitrogen dilution rate increase the flame temperature decrease.

  10. Flame Speed and Self-Similar Propagation of Expanding Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Zhu, Delin; Law, Chung K.

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we present turbulent flame speeds and their scaling from experimental measurements on constant-pressure, unity Lewis number expanding turbulent flames, propagating in nearly homogeneous isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. It is found that the normalized turbulent flame speed as a function of the average radius scales as a turbulent Reynolds number to the one-half power, where the average radius is the length scale and the thermal diffusivity is the transport property, thus showing self-similar propagation. Utilizing this dependence it is found that the turbulent flame speeds from the present expanding flames and those from the Bunsen geometry in the literature can be unified by a turbulent Reynolds number based on flame length scales using recent theoretical results obtained by spectral closure of the transformed G equation.

  11. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  12. Synthesis of Nano-Particles in Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue

    flame burner and a premixed burner with a precursor jet. The experimental setups and results are shown and discussed in detail. Alumina powder with specific surface area between 45 m2/g and 190 m2/g was obtained.Temperature and flow fields of the flame processes are analysed by numerical simulations...... (Computational Fluid Dynamics) where the fundamental equation for flow, heat- and mass transfer are solved numerically in computational domains similar to the real systems.A model describing the particle dynamics in the flame is coupled with the flow-field information in order to compute effluent particle...

  13. Flaming alcoholic drinks: flirting with danger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Alethea; Frew, Quentin; Yousif, Ali; Ueckermann, Nicola; Dziewulksi, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol-related burn injuries carry significant mortality and morbidity rates. Flaming alcoholic beverages served in trendy bars and clubs are becoming increasingly popular. The dangers associated with an ignited alcoholic drink are often underestimated by party goers whose risk assessment ability is already impaired by heavy alcohol consumption. The authors present two cases demonstrating the varied severity of burn injuries associated with flaming alcoholic drinks, and their clinical management. Consumption of flaming alcoholic drinks poses potential risks for burn injuries. Further support is required to enable national and local agencies to implement effective interventions in drinking environments.

  14. Systems and methods for controlling flame instability

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2016-07-21

    A system (62) for controlling flame instability comprising: a nozzle (66) coupled to a fuel supply line (70), an insulation housing (74) coupled to the nozzle, a combustor (78) coupled to the nozzle via the insulation housing, where the combustor is grounded (80), a pressure sensor (82) coupled to the combustor and configured to detect pressure in the combustor, and an instability controlling assembly coupled to the pressure sensor and to an alternating current power supply (86), where, the instability controlling assembly can control flame instability of a flame in the system based on pressure detected by the pressure sensor.

  15. Flame tolerant secondary fuel nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Wu, Chunyang; Zuo, Baifang; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2015-02-24

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a plurality of primary nozzles configured to diffuse or premix fuel into an air flow through the combustor; and a secondary nozzle configured to premix fuel with the air flow. Each premixing nozzle includes a center body, at least one vane, a burner tube provided around the center body, at least two cooling passages, a fuel cooling passage to cool surfaces of the center body and the at least one vane, and an air cooling passage to cool a wall of the burner tube. The cooling passages prevent the walls of the center body, the vane(s), and the burner tube from overheating during flame holding events.

  16. Assessment of a flame surface density-based subgrid turbulent combustion model for nonpremixed flames of wood pyrolysis gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Pakdee, Watit; Mahalingam, Shankar

    2004-10-01

    A flame surface density (FSD) model for closing the unresolved reaction source terms is developed and implemented in a large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent nonpremixed flame of wood pyrolysis gas and air. In this model, the filtered reaction rate ω¯α of species α is estimated as the product of the consumption rate per unit surface area mα and the filtered FSD Σ¯. This approach is attractive since it decouples the complex chemical problem (mα) from the description of the turbulence combustion interaction (Σ¯). A simplified computational methodology is derived for filtered FSD Σ¯, which is approximated as the product of the conditional filtered gradient of mixture fraction and the filtered probability density function. Two models for flamelet consumption rate mα are proposed to consider the effect of filtered scalar dissipation rate. The performance of these models is assessed by direct numerical simulation (DNS) database where a laminar diffusion flame interacts with a decaying homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow field. The chemistry is modeled by a four-step reduced mechanism that describes the oxidization process of gaseous fuel released from high temperature pyrolysis of wood occurring in a wildland fire. Two-dimensional (2D) and 3D LES computations based on the FSD models are conducted for the same conditions as the DNS. The comparative assessments confirm the applicability of the proposed FSD model to describe the filtered reaction rate and the time evolution of temperature and species concentration in the turbulent nonpremixed flame.

  17. Direct numerical simulations of non-premixed ethylene-air flames: Local flame extinction criterion

    KAUST Repository

    Lecoustre, Vivien R.

    2014-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of ethylene/air diffusion flame extinctions in decaying two-dimensional turbulence were performed. A Damköhler-number-based flame extinction criterion as provided by classical large activation energy asymptotic (AEA) theory is assessed for its validity in predicting flame extinction and compared to one based on Chemical Explosive Mode Analysis (CEMA) of the detailed chemistry. The DNS code solves compressible flow conservation equations using high order finite difference and explicit time integration schemes. The ethylene/air chemistry is simulated with a reduced mechanism that is generated based on the directed relation graph (DRG) based methods along with stiffness removal. The numerical configuration is an ethylene fuel strip embedded in ambient air and exposed to a prescribed decaying turbulent flow field. The emphasis of this study is on the several flame extinction events observed in contrived parametric simulations. A modified viscosity and changing pressure (MVCP) scheme was adopted in order to artificially manipulate the probability of flame extinction. Using MVCP, pressure was changed from the baseline case of 1 atm to 0.1 and 10 atm. In the high pressure MVCP case, the simulated flame is extinction-free, whereas in the low pressure MVCP case, the simulated flame features frequent extinction events and is close to global extinction. Results show that, despite its relative simplicity and provided that the global flame activation temperature is correctly calibrated, the AEA-based flame extinction criterion can accurately predict the simulated flame extinction events. It is also found that the AEA-based criterion provides predictions of flame extinction that are consistent with those provided by a CEMA-based criterion. This study supports the validity of a simple Damköhler-number-based criterion to predict flame extinction in engineering-level CFD models. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  18. Model Flames in the Boussinesq Limit: The Effects of Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimirova, N.; Rosner, R.

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the fully nonlinear behavior of pre-mixed flames in a gravitationally stratified medium, subject to the Boussinesq approximation. Key results include the establishment of criterion for when such flames propagate as simple planar flames; elucidation of scaling laws for the effective flame speed; and a study of the stability properties of these flames. The simplicity of some of our scalings results suggests that analytical work may further advance our understandings of buoyant f...

  19. Flame retardant and hydrophobic properties of novel sol-gel derived phytic acid/silica hybrid organic-inorganic coatings for silk fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xian-Wei; Liang, Cheng-Xi; Guan, Jin-Ping; Yang, Xu-Hong; Tang, Ren-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    In this work, a novel phosphorus-rich hybrid organic-inorganic silica coating for improving the flame retardancy of silk fabric was prepared using naturally occurring phytic acid as phosphorus precursor and catalyst for the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. In addition, three silane coupling agents, namely 3-aminopropyldimethoxymethylsilane, 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane and 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, were added in the hybrid sol as cross-linkers with the aim of developing hydrophobic coatings and improving the washing durability of the treated silk fabric. The condensation degree of the hybrid sol was characterized by solid-state 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The flammability and thermal degradation properties of the treated silk fabrics were determined in terms of limiting oxygen index, vertical burning, pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry and thermogravimetric analyses. The surface morphology and hydrophobicity of the treated silk fabrics were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and water contact angle tests. The flammability tests revealed that the silicon sol could endow silk fabric with excellent flame retardancy when doped with phytic acid, and the treated silk fabrics self-extinguished immediately when the ignition source was removed. The silk fabrics treated with the modified hybrid sols exhibited hydrophobic surface and also better durability to washing.

  20. Triple flame structure and dynamics at the stabilization point of a lifted jet diffusion flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najm, H.N.; Milne, R.B. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Devine, K.D.; Kempka, S.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-03-01

    A coupled Lagrangian-Eulerian low-Mach-number numerical scheme is developed, using the vortex method for the momentum equations, and a finite difference approach with adaptive mesh refinement for the scalar conservation equations. The scheme is used to study the structure and dynamics of a forced lifted buoyant planar jet flame. Outer buoyant structures, driven by baroclinic vorticity generation, are observed. The flame base is found to stabilize in a region where flow velocities are sufficiently small to allow its existence. A triple flame is observed at the flame base, a result of premixing of fuel and oxidizer upstream of the ignition point. The structure and dynamics of the triple flame, and its modulation by jet vortex structures, are studied. The spatial extent of the triple flame is small, such that it fits wholly within the rounded flame base temperature field. The dilatation rate field outlines the edge of the hot fluid at the flame base. Neither the temperature field nor the dilatation rate field seem appropriate for experimental measurement of the triple flame in this flow.

  1. determination of vanadium in foods by atomic absorption spectrometry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents an assessment of the level of vanadium in foods (Plantain, Musa spp; Yam, Discorea rotundata; and Maize, Zea mays) from ten popular market places in Lagos metropolis, Nigeria. Total acid leaching digestion method was employed and determination was by Flame Atomic Absorption ...

  2. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  3. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  4. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  5. Marine sediments monitoring studies for trace elements with the application of fast temperature programs and solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Mandjukov, Petko; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the determination of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Co and Cr in marine sediment samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) and direct solid sample analysis has been developed. The application of fast programs in combination with direct solid sampling allows to eliminate the drying and pretreatment steps, however makes impossible the use of liquid standards for calibration. Iridium treated platforms were applied throughout the present study. Calibration technique based on the use of solid certified reference materials (marine sediments) similar to the nature of the analyzed sample and statistics of regression analysis were applied to the real sediment samples. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signals. The ISO-17025 requirements and Eurachem guidelines were followed in the validation of the proposed analytical procedure. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration, linearity, working range, trueness, repeatability reproducibility, limits of detection and quantification and expanded uncertainty (k = 2) for all investigated elements were assessed. Two different approaches for the estimation of measurement uncertainty were applied and obtained results compared. The major contributors to the combined uncertainty of the analyte mass fraction were found to be the homogeneity of the samples and the microbalance precision. The influence of sample particle sizes on the total combined uncertainty was also evaluated. Traceability to SI system of units of the obtained by the proposed analytical procedure results was demonstrated. Additionally, validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison of the obtained results with independent method e.g. ICP-MS with external calibration. The use of solid sampling HR CS AAS for the determination of trace elements in marine sediment matrix gives significant advantages

  6. Brominated Flame Retardants and Perfluorinated Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) belong to a large class of chemicals known as organohalogens. It is believed that both BFRs and PFCs saved lives by reducing flammability of materials commonly used and bactericidal (biocidal) properties. Thes...

  7. Nanocellular foam with solid flame retardant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang; Kelly-Rowley, Anne M.; Bunker, Shana P.; Costeux, Stephane

    2017-11-21

    Prepare nanofoam by (a) providing an aqueous solution of a flame retardant dissolved in an aqueous solvent, wherein the flame retardant is a solid at 23.degree. C. and 101 kiloPascals pressure when in neat form; (b) providing a fluid polymer composition selected from a solution of polymer dissolved in a water-miscible solvent or a latex of polymer particles in a continuous aqueous phase; (c) mixing the aqueous solution of flame retardant with the fluid polymer composition to form a mixture; (d) removing water and, if present, solvent from the mixture to produce a polymeric composition having less than 74 weight-percent flame retardant based on total polymeric composition weight; (e) compound the polymeric composition with a matrix polymer to form a matrix polymer composition; and (f) foam the matrix polymer composition into nanofoam having a porosity of at least 60 percent.

  8. Determination of flame temperature using laser induced fluorescence (LIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Lina Augusta Martins Ramos da [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Barreta, Gilberto; Carinhana Junior, Dermeval; Toledo, Antonio Osny de [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Laser Induced Fluorescence, LIF, is one of the most used techniques in combustion diagnostics. The excitation method is based on the spontaneous spectrum from atoms or molecules that were excited by laser radiation. In general, intermediated combustion species, as OH and CH radicals, are used as temperature probes. Usually, several rotational levels are used by tuning the laser afterwards across the corresponding absorption transitions. The emission spectrum is detected in a convenient spectral range. The accuracy of measurements depends on the laser linewidth, the delay between the laser excitation and spectra detection and, mainly, the spectral interval of laser excitation. In this work, OH LIF spectra from stoichiometric LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) flames were obtained using a tuned laser with a spectral range set from 282 nm up to 283 nm. This corresponds to the rotation levels of the 0-1 vibration band of OH radical. The laser energy was ca. 0.2 mJ. The emission spectrum was collected in the spectral range of the 305-310 nm, which corresponds to the region of the 0-0 band. The temperature was determined by the Boltzmann method. This is based on the measurement of the relative peak intensities of the emission spectrum. A plot of natural logarithm of line intensities versus energy level returns a straight line, whose slope is the inverse of the rotational temperature. The flame temperature was ca. 2300 K. This value is consistent with previous results obtained in our laboratory. (author)

  9. Pollution of Lake Mjoesa by brominated flame retardants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlabach, M.; Gundersen, H.; Mariussen, E. [NILU, Kjeller (Norway); Fjeld, E.; Breivik, E. [NIVA, Oslo (Norway); Kjellberg, G. [NIVA, Hamar (Norway)

    2004-09-15

    The worldwide use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) is extensive and there are significant release of these components to the environment. The last twenty years the levels of the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) in biota have increased, and in some areas the levels are comparable or even higher to what is reported for the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). This study was focused on the pollution of PBDEs in Lake Mjoesa, where unusually high concentrations have been found in fish. The objective of this part of the survey was to make a broader documentation of the PBDE levels in sediments and fish, and to localize areas with point sources of PBDEs.

  10. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  11. Rapid catalyst-free flame synthesis of α-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} micro/nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchan-Merchan, Wilson; Farmahini Farahani, Moien, E-mail: wmerchan-merchan@ou.edu

    2013-07-15

    We report the ultra-rapid synthesis of Nb oxide nano/micron sized rods using a flame method; the single-step process is achieved in less than a few minutes. The synthesis is performed using 1-mm diameter Nb probes (metal source) inserted in the oxygen-rich part of an counter-flow methane/acetylene oxy-flame. The niobium oxide structures can grow nearly instantaneously in a white layer of material surrounding the surface of the Nb probe. The Nb oxide layer is composed of individual and coalesced micro/nanorods that are rapidly formed on the surface of the Nb wire. The grown crystals forming the metal oxide layer grow through a basal growth mechanism due to the constant flow of oxygen and oxygen radicals from the flame onto the surface of the niobium probe. The morphology of the grown Nb oxide structures strongly depends on the flame position (temperature and chemical species). X-Ray Diffraction analysis reveals that the micro/nanorods forming the layer are composed of monoclinic α-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Niobium oxide crystals were grown on the surface of Nb probes using the flame method. • We report the flame as an ultra-rapid process for the growth of Nb oxide structures. • In the flame method the growth of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} structures is achieved in only a few minutes.

  12. Electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead in urine: results of an interlaboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Slavin, Walter

    1999-05-01

    Results of an interlaboratory study are reported for the determination of lead in urine. Two levels of a lyophilized material containing biologically-bound lead were prepared using pooled urine obtained from lead-poisoned children undergoing the CaNa 2EDTA mobilization test. The materials were circulated to a group of reference laboratories that participate in the `New York State Proficiency Testing Program for Blood Lead'. Results of the initial round-robin gave all-method consensus target values of 145±22 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 17 and 449±43 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 20. The interlaboratory exercise was repeated some 5 years later and consensus target values were re-calculated using the grand mean (excluding outliers) of results reported by laboratories using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The re-calculated target values were 139±10 μg/l (S.D.) and 433±12 μg/l (S.D.). The urine reference materials were also analyzed for lead by several laboratories using other instrumental techniques including isotope dilution (ID), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), flame atomic absorption with extraction, ICP-atomic emission spectrometry, ID-gas chromatography MS and flow injection-hydride generation AAS, thus providing a rich source of analytical data with which to characterize them. The materials were also used in a long-term validation study of an ETAAS method developed originally for blood lead determinations that has since been used unmodified for the determination of lead in urine also. Recently, urine lead method performance has been tracked in a proficiency testing program specifically for this analysis. In addition, a number of commercial control materials have been analyzed and evaluated.

  13. Characterization of flame radiosity in shrubland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel G. Cruz; Bret W. Butler; Domingos X. Viegas; Pedro Palheiro

    2011-01-01

    The present study is aimed at quantifying the flame radiosity vertical profile and gas temperature in moderate to high intensity spreading fires in shrubland fuels. We report on the results from 11 experimental fires conducted over a range of fire rate of spread and frontal fire intensity varying respectively between 0.04-0.35ms-1 and 468-14,973kWm-1. Flame radiosity,...

  14. Physical and Chemical Processing in Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT...have experimentally acquired such chemistry-affected data as the ignition criteria and laminar flame speeds of fuel-air mixtures, which are...Chaos, A. Kazakov, Z. Zhao, F. L. Dryer , Int. J. Chem. Kinetics 39, 399–414 (2007) M. Lawes, M. P. Ormsby, C. G.W. Sheppard, R. Woolley, Combust. Flame

  15. Structure of Unsteady Partially Premixed Flames and the Existence of State Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Aggarwal

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examine the structure and existence of state relationships in unsteady partially premixed flames (PPFs subjected to buoyancy-induced and external perturbations. A detailed numerical model is employed to simulate the steady and unsteady two-dimensional PPFs established using a slot burner under normal and zero-gravity conditions. The coflow velocity is parametrically varied. The methane-air chemistry is modeled using a fairly detailed mechanism that contains 81 elementary reactions and 24 species. Validation of the computational model is provided through comparisons of predictions with nonintrusive measurements. The combustion proceeds in two reaction zones, one a rich premixed zone and the other a nonpremixed zone. These reaction zones are spatially separated, but involve strong interactions between them due to thermochemistry and scalar transport. The fuel is mostly consumed in the premixed zone to produce CO and H2, which are transported to and consumed in the nonpremixed zone. The nonpremixed zone in turn provides heat and H-atoms to the premixed zone. For the range of conditions investigated, the zero-g partially premixed flames exhibit a stable behavior and a remarkably strong resistance to perturbations. In contrast, the corresponding normal-gravity flames exhibit oscillatory behavior at low coflow velocities but a stable behavior at high coflow velocities, and the behavior can be explained in terms of a global and convective instabilities. The effects of coflow and gravity on the flames are characterized through a parameter VR, defined as the ratio of coflow velocity to jet velocity. For VR ≤ 1 (low coflow velocity regime, the structures of both 0- and 1-g flames are strongly sensitive to changes in VR, while they are only mildly affected by coflow in the high coflow velocity regime (VR > 1. In addition, the spatio-temporal characteristics of the 0- and 1-g flames are markedly different in the first regime, but are

  16. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  17. Sensing flame structure by process tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Shi; Zhou, Wanting; Qi, Xin; Lei, Jing; Mu, Huaiping

    2016-06-28

    Non-intrusive visualization of the structure of flames can offer us many advantages in studying the reaction mechanisms of combustion and observing special distributions of the parameters required for the development of equipment such as jet engines and gas turbines. Process tomography is a relatively new technique for such a task, but is useful owing to its fast speed and capability of detecting signals related to ionizations caused by chemical reactions and thermal effects. Electric capacitance tomography (ECT) is one of the process tomographic techniques. ECT usually comprises a sensor array of electrodes that detect permittivity variations in the measuring zone, a data-logging device and a computer that controls data acquisition and carries out image reconstruction. There have been studies on ECT imaging of flames; however, ECT has not been exploited sufficiently to reveal the inner structure of the flames. In this study, a sensor with planar electrodes is created, and the associated three-dimensional sensitivity map is generated by the finite-element method to detect flame structure. A series of experiments are carried out covering a range of feed rates of fuel and air. Data are collected by the ECT sensor and hardware. The results of the ECT reconstruction show good agreement with actual features, and the structure of the flame is found. This opens up a new route for the study of flames. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Conical quarl swirl stabilized non-premixed flames: flame and flow field interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2017-09-19

    The flame-flow field interaction is studied in non-premixed methane swirl flames stabilized in quartz quarl via simultaneous measurements of the flow field using a stereo PIV and OH-PLIF at 5 KHz repetition rate. Under the same swirl intensity, two flames with different fuel jet velocity were investigated. The time-averaged flow field shows a unique flow pattern at the quarl exit, where two recirculation vortices are formed; a strong recirculation zone formed far from the quarl exit and a larger recirculation zone extending inside the quarl. However, the instantaneous images show that, the flow pattern near the quarl exit plays a vital role in the spatial location and structure of the reaction zone. In the low fuel jet velocity flame, a pair of vortical structures, located precisely at the corners of the quarl exit, cause the flame to roll up into the central region of low speed flow, where the flame sheet then tracks the axial velocity fluctuations. The vorticity field reveals a vortical structure surrounding the reaction zones, which reside on a layer of low compressive strain adjacent to that vortical structure. In the high fuel jet velocity flame, initially a laminar flame sheet resides at the inner shear layer of the main jet, along the interface between incoming fresh gas and high temperature recirculating gas. Further downstream, vortex breakdown alters the flame sheet path toward the central flame region. The lower reaction zones show good correlation to the regions of maximum vorticity and track the regions of low compressive strain associated with the inner shear layer of the jet flow. In both flames the reactions zones conform the passage of the large structure while remaining inside the low speed regions or at the inner shear layer.

  19. Flame Synthesis Of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes And Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wal, Randy L. Vander; Berger, Gordon M.; Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    produce CNTs at prohibitive costs, around $500 per gram. Moreover these approaches do not possess demonstrated scalability. In contrast to these approaches, flame synthesis can be a very energy efficient, low-cost process [3]; a portion of the fuel serves as the heating source while the remainder serves as reactant. Moreover, flame systems are geometrically versatile as illustrated by innumerable boiler and furnace designs. Addressing scalability, flame systems are commercially used for producing megatonnage quantities of carbon black [4]. Although it presents a complex chemically reacting flow, a flame also offers many variables for control, e.g. temperature, chemical environment and residence times [5]. Despite these advantages, there are challenges to scaling flame synthesis as well.

  20. Preparation of Flame Retardant Modified with Titanate for Asphalt Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the compatibility between flame retardant and asphalt is a difficult task due to the complex nature of the materials. This study explores a low dosage compound flame retardant and seeks to improve the compatibility between flame retardants and asphalt. An orthogonal experiment was designed taking magnesium hydroxide, ammonium polyphosphate, and melamine as factors. The oil absorption and activation index were tested to determine the effect of titanate on the flame retardant additive. The pavement performance test was conducted to evaluate the effect of the flame retardant additive. Oxygen index test was conducted to confirm the effect of flame retardant on flame ability of asphalt binder. The results of this study showed that the new composite flame retardant is more effective in improving the compatibility between flame retardant and asphalt and reducing the limiting oxygen index of asphalt binder tested in this study.

  1. Stochastic algorithms for the analysis of numerical flame simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2001-12-14

    Recent progress in simulation methodologies and new, high-performance parallel architectures have made it is possible to perform detailed simulations of multidimensional combustion phenomena using comprehensive kinetics mechanisms. However, as simulation complexity increases, it becomes increasingly difficult to extract detailed quantitative information about the flame from the numerical solution, particularly regarding the details of chemical processes. In this paper we present a new diagnostic tool for analysis of numerical simulations of combustion phenomena. Our approach is based on recasting an Eulerian flow solution in a Lagrangian frame. Unlike a conventional Lagrangian viewpoint in which we follow the evolution of a volume of the fluid, we instead follow specific chemical elements, e.g., carbon, nitrogen, etc., as they move through the system. From this perspective an ''atom'' is part of some molecule that is transported through the domain by advection and diffusion. Reactions ca use the atom to shift from one species to another with the subsequent transport given by the movement of the new species. We represent these processes using a stochastic particle formulation that treats advection deterministically and models diffusion as a suitable random-walk process. Within this probabilistic framework, reactions can be viewed as a Markov process transforming molecule to molecule with given probabilities. In this paper, we discuss the numerical issues in more detail and demonstrate that an ensemble of stochastic trajectories can accurately capture key features of the continuum solution. We also illustrate how the method can be applied to studying the role of cyanochemistry on NOx production in a diffusion flame.

  2. Autoignition and flame stabilisation processes in turbulent non-premixed hot coflow flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenhof, E.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines stabilisation processes in turbulent non-premixed jet flames, created by injecting gaseous fuel into a co-flowing stream of hot, low-oxygen combustion products. Being able to predict whether and how a flame achieves stable and reliable combustion is a matter of great

  3. A, a Brominated Flame Retardant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Takeshita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA, a brominated flame retardant, has been found to exacerbate pneumonia in respiratory syncytial virus- (RSV- infected mice. We examined the effect of Brazilian propolis (AF-08 on the exacerbation of RSV infection by TBBPA exposure in mice. Mice were fed a powdered diet mixed with 1% TBBPA alone, 0.02% AF-08 alone, or 1% TBBPA and 0.02% AF-08 for four weeks and then intranasally infected with RSV. TBBPA exposure increased the pulmonary virus titer and level of IFN-γ, a representative marker of pneumonia due to RSV infection, in the lungs of infected mice without toxicity. AF-08 was significantly effective in reducing the virus titers and IFN-γ level increased by TBBPA exposure. Also, AF-08 significantly reduced proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6 levels in the lungs of RSV-infected mice with TBBPA exposure, but Th2 cytokine (IL-4 and IL-10 levels were not evidently increased. Neither TBBPA exposure nor AF-08 treatment affected the anti-RSV antibody production in RSV-infected mice. In flow cytometry analysis, AF-08 seemed to be effective in reducing the ratio of pulmonary CD8a+ cells in RSV-infected mice with TBBPA exposure. TBBPA and AF-08 did not exhibit anti-RSV activity in vitro. Thus, AF-08 probably ameliorated pneumonia exacerbated by TBBPA exposure in RSV-infected mice by limiting excess cellular immune responses.

  4. Flame Quenching Dynamics of High Velocity Flames in Rectangular Cross-section Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Mahuthannan, Ariff Magdoom

    2017-01-05

    Understanding flame quenching for different conditions is necessary to develop safety devices like flame arrestors. In practical applications, the speed of a deflagration in the lab-fixed reference frame will be a strong function of the geometry through which the deflagration propagates. This study reports on the effect of the flame speed, at the entrance of a quenching section, on the quenching distance. A 2D rectangular channel joining two main spherical vessels is considered for studying this effect. Two different velocity regimes are investigated and referred to as configurations A, and B. For configuration A, the velocity of the flame is 20 m/s, while it is about 100 m/s for configuration B. Methane-air stoichiometric mixtures at 1 bar and 298 K are used. Simultaneous dynamic pressure measurements along with schlieren imaging are used to analyze the quenching of the flame. Risk assessment of re-ignition is also reported and analyzed.

  5. Numerical and Experimental Study on Negative Buoyance Induced Vortices in N-Butane Jet Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2015-07-26

    Near nozzle flow field in flickering n-butane diffusion jet flames was investigated with a special focus on transient flow patterns of negative buoyance induced vortices. The flow structures were obtained through Mie scattering imaging with seed particles in a fuel stream using continuous-wave (CW) Argon-ion laser. Velocity fields were also quantified with particle mage velocimetry (PIV) system having kHz repetition rate. The results showed that the dynamic motion of negative buoyance induced vortices near the nozzle exit was coupled strongly with a flame flickering instability. Typically during the flame flickering, the negative buoyant vortices oscillated at the flickering frequency. The vortices were distorted by the flickering motion and exhibited complicated transient vortical patterns, such as tilting and stretching. Numerical simulations were also implemented based on an open source C++ package, LaminarSMOKE, for further validations.

  6. Atomic interferometry; Interferometrie atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudon, J.; Robert, J. [Paris-13 Univ., 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2004-07-01

    Since the theoretical works of L. De Broglie (1924) and the famous experiment of Davisson and Germer (1927), we know that a wave is linked with any particle of mass m by the relation {lambda} = h/(mv), where {lambda} is the wavelength, v the particle velocity and h is the Planck constant. The basic principle of the interferometry of any material particle, atom, molecule or aggregate is simple: using a simple incident wave, several mutually consistent waves (with well-defined relative phases) are generated and controllable phase-shifts are introduced between them in order to generate a wave which is the sum of the previous waves. An interference figure is obtained which consists in a succession of dark and bright fringes. The atomic interferometry is based on the same principle but involves different techniques, different wave equations, but also different beams, sources and correlations which are described in this book. Because of the small possible wavelengths and the wide range of possible atomic interactions, atomic interferometers can be used in many domains from the sub-micron lithography to the construction of sensors like: inertial sensors, gravity-meters, accelerometers, gyro-meters etc. The first chapter is a preliminary study of the space and time diffraction of atoms. The next chapters is devoted to the description of slit, light separation and polarization interferometers, and the last chapter treats of the properties of Bose-Einstein condensates which are interesting in atomic interferometry. (J.S.)

  7. Cars temperature measurements in sooting, laminar diffusion flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedeker, L. R.; Dobbs, G. M.

    1984-07-01

    Temperature distributions have been measured in axisymmetric ethylene-air diffusion flames using high spatial resolution coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. As ethylene flow increased and the flame approached a smoke-point condition, the temperatures attained in the upper part of the flame were reduced by about 300K below the maximum radial temperatures low in the flame. Addition of diluent N2 to ethylene caused a reduction in temperature low in the flame but increased temperature higher in the flame. Maximum temperatures attained in all ethylene flames were between 0.84 and 0.89 of respective adiabatic flame temperatures (AFT). The upper temperature of the near-smoke-point flame was only 0.76 of AFT. Results are compared with the generalized flame front model of Mitchell. MIE scattering measurements are also discussed. Brief studies with propane and a nonsooting, CO flame are reported; maximum axial and radial temperatures were between 0.84 and 0.87 of AFT. Results indicate the importance of thermal loss from soot radiation, radial transport processes and fuel pyrolysis. Nonluminous radiation and finite reaction rates are other possible factors. The upper luminous part of the highly sooting ethylene flame is likely above the primary flame front and is a soot burnout zone.

  8. Launch Pad Flame Trench Refractory Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Bucherl, Cori; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark; Perusich, Steve; Whitten, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The launch complexes at NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are critical support facilities for the successful launch of space-based vehicles. These facilities include a flame trench that bisects the pad at ground level. This trench includes a flame deflector system that consists of an inverted, V-shaped steel structure covered with a high temperature concrete material five inches thick that extends across the center of the flame trench. One side of the "V11 receives and deflects the flames from the orbiter main engines; the opposite side deflects the flames from the solid rocket boosters. There are also two movable deflectors at the top of the trench to provide additional protection to shuttle hardware from the solid rocket booster flames. These facilities are over 40 years old and are experiencing constant deterioration from launch heat/blast effects and environmental exposure. The refractory material currently used in launch pad flame deflectors has become susceptible to failure, resulting in large sections of the material breaking away from the steel base structure and creating high-speed projectiles during launch. These projectiles jeopardize the safety of the launch complex, crew, and vehicle. Post launch inspections have revealed that the number and frequency of repairs, as well as the area and size of the damage, is increasing with the number of launches. The Space Shuttle Program has accepted the extensive ground processing costs for post launch repair of damaged areas and investigations of future launch related failures for the remainder of the program. There currently are no long term solutions available for Constellation Program ground operations to address the poor performance and subsequent failures of the refractory materials. Over the last three years, significant liberation of refractory material in the flame trench and fire bricks along the adjacent trench walls following Space Shuttle launches have resulted in extensive investigations of

  9. On Soot Inception in Nonpremixed Flames and the Effects of Flame Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B. H.; Liu, S.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, Suleyman (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A simplified three-step model of soot inception has been employed with high activation energy asymptotics to study soot inception in nonpremixed counterflow systems with emphasis on understanding the effects of hydrodynamics and transport. The resulting scheme yields three zones: (1) a fuel oxidation zone wherein the fuel and oxidizer react to form product as well as a radical R, (e.g., H), (2) a soot/precursor formation zone where the radical R reacts with fuel to form "soot/precursor" S, and (3) a soot/precursor consumption zone where S reacts with the oxidizer to form product. The kinetic scheme, although greatly simplified, allows the coupling between soot inception and flame structure to be assessed. The results yield flame temperature, flame location, and a soot/precursor index S(sub I) as functions of Damkohler number for S formation. The soot/precursor index indicates the amount of S at the boundary of the formation region. The flame temperature indirectly indicates the total amount of S integrated over the formation region because as S is formed less heat release is available. The results show that unlike oxidation reactions, an extinction turning-point behavior does not exist for soot. Instead, the total amount of S slowly decreases with decreasing Damkohler number (increasing strain rate), which is consistent with counterflow flame experiments. When the Lewis number of the radical is decreased from unity, the total S reduces due to reduced residence time for the radical in the soot formation region. Similarly, when the Lewis number of the soot/precursor is increased from unity the amount of S increases for all Damkohler numbers. In addition to studying fuel-air (low stoichiometric mixture fraction) flames, the air-side nitrogen was substituted into the fuel, yielding diluted fuel-oxygen (high stoichiometric mixture fraction) flames with the same flame temperature as the fuel - air flames. The relative flame locations were different however, and

  10. Chaotic radiation/turbulence interactions in flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menguec, M.P.; McDonough, J.M.

    1998-11-01

    In this paper, the authors present a review of their recent efforts to model chaotic radiation-turbulence interactions in flames. The main focus is to characterize soot volume fraction fluctuations in turbulent diffusion flames, as they strongly contribute to these interaction. The approach is based on the hypothesis that the fluctuations of properties in turbulent flames are deterministic in nature, rather than random. The authors first discuss the theoretical details and then they briefly outline the experiments conducted to measure the scattered light signals from fluctuating soot particles along the axis of an ethylene-air diffusion flame. They compare the power spectra and time series obtained from experiments against the ad-hoc and rigorous models derived using a series of logistic maps. These logistic maps can be used in simulation of the fluctuations in these type of flames, without extensive computational effort or sacrifice of physical detail. Availability of accurate models of these kinds allows investigation of radiation-turbulence interactions at a more fundamental level than it was previously possible.

  11. Characteristics of diffusion flames with accelerated motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Bo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to present an experiment to study the characteristics of a laminar diffusion flame under acceleration. A Bunsen burner (nozzle diameter 8 mm, using liquefied petroleum gas as its fuel, was ignited under acceleration. The temperature field and the diffusion flame angle of inclination were visualised with the assistance of the visual display technology incorporated in MATLAB™. Results show that the 2-d temperature field under different accelerations matched the variation in average temperatures: they both experience three variations at different time and velocity stages. The greater acceleration has a faster change in average temperature with time, due to the accumulation of combustion heat: the smaller acceleration has a higher average temperature at the same speed. No matter what acceleration was used, in time, the flame angle of inclination increased, but the growth rate decreased until an angle of 90°: this could be explained by analysis of the force distribution within the flame. It is also found that, initially, the growth rate of angle with velocity under the greater acceleration was always smaller than that at lower accelerations; it was also different in flames with uniform velocity fire conditions.

  12. Beam steering effects in turbulent high pressure flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmerling, B.; Kaeppeli, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The propagation of a laser beam through a flame is influenced by variations of the optical density. Especially in turbulent high pressure flames this may seriously limit the use of laser diagnostic methods. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  13. Effects of the Burner Diameter on the Flame Structure and Extinction Limit of Counterflow Non-Premixed Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Bo Oh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiments and numerical simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of the burner diameter on the flame structure and extinction limit of counterflow non-premixed methane flames in normal gravity and microgravity. Experiments were performed for counterflow flames with a large inner diameter (d of 50 mm in normal gravity to compare the extinction limits with those obtained by previous studies where a small burner (d < 25 mm was used. Two-dimensional (2D simulations were performed to clarify the flame structure and extinction limits of counterflow non-premixed flame with a three-step global reaction mechanism. One-dimensional (1D simulations were also performed with the same three-step global reaction mechanism to provide reference data for the 2D simulation and experiment. For microgravity, the effect of the burner diameter on the flame location at the centerline was negligible at both high (ag = 50 s−1 and low (ag = 10 s−1 strain rates. However, a small burner flame (d = 15 mm in microgravity showed large differences in the maximum flame temperature and the flame size in radial direction compared to a large burner flame (d = 50 mm at low strain rate. In addition, for normal gravity, a small burner flame (d = 23.4 mm showed differences in the flame thickness, flame location, local strain rate, and maximum heat release rate compared to a large burner flame (d = 50 mm at low strain rate. Counterflow non-premixed flames with low and high strain rates that were established in a large burner were approximated by 1D simulation for normal gravity and microgravity. However, a counterflow non-premixed flame with a low strain rate in a small burner could not be approximated by 1D simulation for normal gravity due to buoyancy effects. The 2D simulations of the extinction limits correlated well with experiments for small and large burner flames. For microgravity, the extinction limit of a small burner flame (d = 15 mm was much lower than that

  14. Flame emission spectroscopy measurement of a steam blast and air blast burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozsa Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Control and online monitoring of combustion have become critical to meet the increasingly strict pollutant emission standards. For such a purpose, optical sensing methods, like flame emission spectrometry, seem to be the most feasible technique. Spectrometry is capable to provide information about the local equivalence ratio inside the flame through the chemiluminescence intensity ratio measurement of various radicals. In the present study, a 15 kW atmospheric burner was analyzed utilizing standard diesel fuel. Its plain jet type atomizer was operated with both air and steam atomizing mediums. Up to now, injection of steam into the reaction zone has attracted less scientific attention contrary to its practical importance. Spatial plots of OH*, CH*, and C2* excited radicals were analyzed at 0.35, 0.7, and 1 bar atomization gauge pressures, utilizing both atomizing mediums. The C2* was found to decrease strongly with increasing steam addition. The OH*/CH* and OH*/C2* chemiluminescence intensity ratios along the axis showed a divergent behavior in all the analyzed cases. Nevertheless, CH*/C2* chemiluminescence intensity ratio decreased only slightly, showing low sensitivity to the position of the spectrometer. The findings may be directly applied in steady operating combustion systems, i. e., gas turbines, boilers, and furnaces.

  15. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  16. The Transition to Turbulence of Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Elizabeth P.; Rosner, R.

    2011-01-01

    Part of the uncertainty surrounding the explosion mechanism of Type 1A supernovae is the extent to which the turbulence created by the flame front can speed the flame up. A premixed flame moving against a sufficiently strong gravitational field becomes deformed and creates vorticity. If gravity is strong enough, this vorticity is shed and deposited behind the flame front. We have completed some two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of this shedding process for various values of the gravitational force. If gravity is weak enough, the flame front remains flat and no vorticity is created. If gravity is slightly stronger, the flame front becomes cusped and creates vorticity; long vortices attach to the flame front and extend behind it. For even larger values of gravity, the far end of these vortices becomes unstable and sheds more vortices. For simulations with increased gravity, the position of the shedding instability moves closer to the flame front. Next, the vortex shedding disturbs the flame front, causing the flame to pulsate. These pulsations lose their left/right symmetry and the period of oscillation doubles. For even higher values of gravity, an additional frequency is introduced into the system as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability begins to dominate over burning. Eventually, the pulsations of the flame become quite complex and the interaction between the flame front and the vortices can't be simply described. We have measured the subsequent wrinkling of the flame front by computing its fractal dimension and the energy spectra behind the flame front. Measurements of the fractal dimension suggest that it saturates, implying that any additional speed up of the flame must be due to large-scale stretching or disruption of the flame front. Our simulations were performed at NERSC which is supported by the Department of Energy.

  17. Effectiveness of Flame Retardants in TufFoam.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelow, Alexis Elizabeth [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Nissen, April [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Massey, Lee Taylor [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Whinnery, LeRoy L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-12-01

    An investigation of polyurethane foam filled with known flame retardant fillers including hydroxides, melamine, phosphate-containing compounds, and melamine phosphates was carried out to produce a low-cost material with high flame retardant efficiency. The impact of flame retardant fillers on the physical properties such a s composite foam density, glass transition temperature, storage modulus, and thermal expansion of composite foams was investigated with the goal of synthesizing a robust rigid foam with excellent flame retardant properties.

  18. On stability of premixed flames in stagnation - Point flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivashinsky, G. I.; Law, C. K.; Joulin, G.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative description of flame stabilization in stagnation-point flow is proposed. Asymptotic and stability analyses are made for a flame model where the density of the gas is assumed to be constant and the reaction zone is assumed to be narrow and concentrated over the flame front. It is shown that, if blowing is sufficiently strong, the corrugations disappear and a plane flame results. The phenomena cannot be fully described by means of classical linear stability analysis.

  19. Acoustically Forced Coaxial Hydrogen / Liquid Oxygen Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-15

    in a dramatic reduction in the fibrous na- ture of the surface, as expected, due to evaporation pro - Figure 3. An instant in time of PAN and PN...attached flame to inner lip of the GH2 exit. No local flame extinction was observed regardless of the acoustic forcing amplitude. It has been...experi- mentally observed when the strain rates associated with acoustic forcing is high enough [22], local extinction of the flame and the flame holding

  20. Structure formation in atom lithography using geometric collimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, T.; Beardmore, J.P.; Fabrie, C.G.C.H.M.; van Lieshout, J.P.; Notermans, R.P.M.J.W.; Sang, R.T.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.; Van Leeuwen, K.A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Atom lithography uses standing wave light fields as arrays of lenses to focus neutral atom beams into line patterns on a substrate. Laser cooled atom beams are commonly used, but an atom beam source with a small opening placed at a large distance from a substrate creates atom beams which are locally

  1. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2015-10-20

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model\\'s predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  2. Pdf prediction of supersonic hydrogen flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifler, P.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid method for the prediction of supersonic turbulent flows with combustion is developed consisting of a second order closure for the velocity field and a multi-scalar pdf method for the local thermodynamic state. It is shown that for non-premixed flames and chemical equilibrium mixture fraction, the logarithm of the (dimensionless) density, internal energy per unit mass and the divergence of the velocity have several advantages over other sets of scalars. The closure model is applied to a supersonic non-premixed flame burning hydrogen with air supplied by a supersonic coflow and the results are compared with a limited set of experimental data.

  3. Computatonal and experimental study of laminar flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smooke, M.D.; Long, M.B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research has centered on an investigation of the effects of complex chemistry and detailed transport on the structure and extinction of hydrocarbon flames in counterflow, cylindrical and coflowing axisymmetric configurations. The authors have pursued both computational and experimental aspects of the research in parallel. The computational work has focused on the application of accurate and efficient numerical methods for the solution of the one and two-dimensional nonlinear boundary value problems describing the various reacting systems. Detailed experimental measurements were performed on axisymmetric coflow flames using two-dimensional imaging techniques. In particular, spontaneous Raman scattering and laser induced fluorescence were used to measure the temperature, major and minor species profiles.

  4. Brominated flame retardants: occurrence, dietary intake and risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter-Sorkina R de; Bakker MI; Wolterink G; Zeijlmaker MJ; SIR

    2006-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants have entered the human food chain. For the time being the occurrence of these chemicals in Dutch food does not pose a human health risk. However, this might easily change at increasing contents of flame retardants in Dutch food. The monitoring of brominated flame

  5. Phosphorus flame retardants: Properties, production, environmental occurrence, toxicity and analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, I.; de Boer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Since the ban on some brominated flame retardants (BFRs), phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs), which were responsible for 20% of the flame retardant (FR) consumption in 2006 in Europe, are often proposed as alternatives for BFRs. PFRs can be divided in three main groups, inorganic, organic and

  6. 30 CFR 75.600-1 - Approved cables; flame resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved cables; flame resistance. 75.600-1 Section 75.600-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... cables; flame resistance. Cables shall be accepted or approved by MSHA as flame resistant. ...

  7. FLAME DENITRATION AND REDUCTION OF URANIUM NITRATE TO URANIUM DIOXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, W.H.; Roehrs, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.

    1962-06-26

    A process is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution to uranium dioxide. The process comprises spraying fine droplets of aqueous uranyl nitrate solution into a hightemperature hydrocarbon flame, said flame being deficient in oxygen approximately 30%, retaining the feed in the flame for a sufficient length of time to reduce the nitrate to the dioxide, and recovering uranium dioxide. (AEC)

  8. Stabilization and structure of N-heptane flame on CWJ-spray burner with kHZ SPIV and OH-PLIF

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Morkous S.

    2015-08-31

    A curved wall-jet (CWJ) burner was employed to stabilize turbulent spray flames that utilized a Coanda effect by supplying air as annular-inward jet over a curved surface, surrounding an axisymmetric solid cone fuel spray. The stabilization characteristics and structure of n-heptane/air turbulent flames were investigated with varying fuel and air flow rates and the position of pressure atomizer (L). High-speed planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals delineated reaction zone contours and simultaneously stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) quantified the flow field features, involving turbulent mixing within spray, ambient air entrainment and flame-turbulence interaction. High turbulent rms velocities were generated within the recirculation zone, which improved the flame stabilization. OH fluorescence signals revealed a double flame structure near the stabilization edge of lifted flame that consisted of inner partially premixed flame and outer diffusion flame front. The inner reaction zone is highly wrinkled and folded due to significant turbulent mixing between the annular-air jet and the fuel vapor generated from droplets along the contact interface of this air jet with the fuel spray. Larger droplets, having higher momentum are able to penetrate the inner reaction zone and then vaporized in the low-speed hot region bounded by these reaction zones; this supports the outer diffusion flame. Frequent local extinctions in the inner reaction zone were observed at low air flow rate. As flow rate increases, the inner zone is more resistant to local extinction despite of its high wrinkling and corrugation degree. However, the outer reaction zone exhibits stable and mildly wrinkled features irrespective of air flow rate. The liftoff height increases with the air mass flow rate but decreases with L.

  9. Atomic Power

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atomic Power. By Denis Taylor: Dr. Taylor was formerly Chief UNESCO Advisor at the University. College, Nairobi, Kenya and is now Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Uni- versity of ... method of producing radioactive isotopes, which are materials .... the sealing and the pressure balancing, all can be carried out ...

  10. An LMS Programming Scheme and Floating-Gate Technology Enabled Trimmer-Less and Low Voltage Flame Detection Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Rojas, Juan Carlos; Gomez-Castañeda, Felipe; Moreno-Cadenas, Jose Antonio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a Least Mean Square (LMS) programming scheme is used to set the offset voltage of two operational amplifiers that were built using floating-gate transistors, enabling a 0.95 VRMS trimmer-less flame detection sensor. The programming scheme is capable of setting the offset voltage over a wide range of values by means of electron injection. The flame detection sensor consists of two programmable offset operational amplifiers; the first amplifier serves as a 26 μV offset voltage follower, whereas the second amplifier acts as a programmable trimmer-less voltage comparator. Both amplifiers form the proposed sensor, whose principle of functionality is based on the detection of the electrical changes produced by the flame ionization. The experimental results show that it is possible to measure the presence of a flame accurately after programming the amplifiers with a maximum of 35 LMS-algorithm iterations. Current commercial flame detectors are mainly used in absorption refrigerators and large industrial gas heaters, where a high voltage AC source and several mechanical trimmings are used in order to accurately measure the presence of the flame. PMID:28613250

  11. An LMS Programming Scheme and Floating-Gate Technology Enabled Trimmer-Less and Low Voltage Flame Detection Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Rojas, Juan Carlos; Gomez-Castañeda, Felipe; Moreno-Cadenas, Jose Antonio

    2017-06-14

    In this paper, a Least Mean Square (LMS) programming scheme is used to set the offset voltage of two operational amplifiers that were built using floating-gate transistors, enabling a 0.95 VRMS trimmer-less flame detection sensor. The programming scheme is capable of setting the offset voltage over a wide range of values by means of electron injection. The flame detection sensor consists of two programmable offset operational amplifiers; the first amplifier serves as a 26 μV offset voltage follower, whereas the second amplifier acts as a programmable trimmer-less voltage comparator. Both amplifiers form the proposed sensor, whose principle of functionality is based on the detection of the electrical changes produced by the flame ionization. The experimental results show that it is possible to measure the presence of a flame accurately after programming the amplifiers with a maximum of 35 LMS-algorithm iterations. Current commercial flame detectors are mainly used in absorption refrigerators and large industrial gas heaters, where a high voltage AC source and several mechanical trimmings are used in order to accurately measure the presence of the flame.

  12. Effect of multiphase radiation on coal combustion in a pulverized coal jet flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bifen; Roy, Somesh P.; Zhao, Xinyu; Modest, Michael F.

    2017-08-01

    The accurate modeling of coal combustion requires detailed radiative heat transfer models for both gaseous combustion products and solid coal particles. A multiphase Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) radiation solver is developed in this work to simulate a laboratory-scale pulverized coal flame. The MCRT solver considers radiative interactions between coal particles and three major combustion products (CO2, H2O, and CO). A line-by-line spectral database for the gas phase and a size-dependent nongray correlation for the solid phase are employed to account for the nongray effects. The flame structure is significantly altered by considering nongray radiation and the lift-off height of the flame increases by approximately 35%, compared to the simulation without radiation. Radiation is also found to affect the evolution of coal particles considerably as it takes over as the dominant mode of heat transfer for medium-to-large coal particles downstream of the flame. To investigate the respective effects of spectral models for the gas and solid phases, a Planck-mean-based gray gas model and a size-independent gray particle model are applied in a frozen-field analysis of a steady-state snapshot of the flame. The gray gas approximation considerably underestimates the radiative source terms for both the gas phase and the solid phase. The gray coal approximation also leads to under-prediction of the particle emission and absorption. However, the level of under-prediction is not as significant as that resulting from the employment of the gray gas model. Finally, the effect of the spectral property of ash on radiation is also investigated and found to be insignificant for the present target flame.

  13. Autoignited and non-autoignited lifted flames of pre-vaporized n-heptane in coflow jets at elevated temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Sangkyu

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of laminar lifted flames of pre-vaporized n-heptane in coflow jets were investigated under both non-autoignited and autoignited conditions by varying the initial temperature. The fuel tested was n-heptane considering the importance as a primary reference fuel for gasoline and its low temperature ignition behavior at relatively low pressure. The results showed that the lifted flame edge in the non-autoignited regime had a tribrachial structure with lean and rich premixed flame wings together with a trailing diffusion flame. The liftoff heights correlated reasonably well with the fuel jet velocity scaled by the stoichiometric laminar burning velocity regardless of the initial temperature and the nitrogen dilution. The liftoff velocity multiplied by the buoyancy-induced velocity and the blowout velocity scaled by the mole fraction of the fuel correlated well with the stoichiometric laminar burning velocity. When the initial temperature was above 900. K, flames were autoignited without any external ignition source. Autoignited lifted flames with both tribrachial edges and mild combustion characteristics were observed. The correlation of the liftoff height with the calculated adiabatic ignition delay time was weak, unlike in cases with gaseous fuels of C1-C4 hydrocarbons in which the liftoff height of the autoignited flames correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time. When the mole fraction of the fuel was small, mild combustion behaviors were exhibited with edge flames without distinct tribrachial structures. The liftoff height was correlated with the fuel jet velocity scaled by the initial fuel mass fraction, while the dependence on the ignition delay time was weak when compared with the gaseous fuels. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  14. The identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for the resonance ionization laser ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Goodacre, T Day; Fedorovc, D; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Molkanov, P; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Seiffert, C

    2015-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 14 newly observed autoionizing states. This work increases the range of ISOLDE-RILIS ionized beams to 32 chemical elements. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized. A link to the complete version of this document will be added here following publication:

  15. Novel yellow colored flame compositions with superior spectral performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Sadek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of colored flames is the primary purpose of military signaling, projectile tracing, and illuminating devices. Certain elements and compounds when heated to high temperature have the unique property of emitting lines or narrow bands in the visible region (380–780 nm. This study, reports on the development of novel yellow colored flame compositions with enhanced spectral performance in terms of luminous intensity, and color quality to standard Russian yellow tracer. The light intensity and the imprint spectra of developed yellow flares were measured using digital luxmeter and UV–Vis. spectrometer respectively. The main giving of this study is that the light intensity, and color quality of Russian yellow tracer were improved by 287%, and 170% respectively. This was accomplished by means of optimizing the ratio of novel binder to color source using aluminum metal fuel. Aluminum-based formulations were found to maximize the formation of yellow reactive emitting specimens, and to eliminate any interfering incandescent emission resulted from MgO. Quantification of yellow color emitting specimens in the combustion gaseous products was achieved using chemical equilibrium thermodynamic code named ICT (Institute of Chemical Technology in Germany, Virgin 2008; in an attempt to judge the light quality. This improvement in yellow flare performance established the rule that the emission intensity increases as the reaction temperature increases. In the meantime upper limit of temperature was avoided to maximize the color quality.

  16. Economical Alternatives for High Sensitivity in Atomic Spectrometry Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yavuz Ataman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly used analytical tools for determination of elements at trace levels are atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, inductively coupled plasma, optical emission and mass spectrometry (ICP-OES and ICP-MS and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS. Although sensitive plasma techniques are becoming predominant in most of the western laboratories, AAS keeps its importance in developing countries. Simple and inexpensive ways of enhancing sensitivity will be described for laboratories equipped with only a flame AA spectrometer. Although there are many chemical preconcentration procedures to improve sensitivity of flame AAS, only some atom trapping techniques will be included here. One kind of atom trapping device is a slotted quartz tube (SQT used for in situ preconcentration of analyte species followed by a rapid revolatilization cycle to obtain an enhanced signal. These devices provide limits of detection at a level of µg L-1. Another kind of atom trapping involves use of vapor generation technique and quartz or tungsten atom trapping surfaces. The analytical steps consist of the generation of volatile species, usually by hydride formation using NaBH4, trapping these species at the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and finally re-volatilizing analyte species by rapid heating of trap. These species are transported using a carrier gas to an externally heated quartz tube as commonly used in hydride generation AAS systems; a transient signal is formed and measured. These traps have limits of detection in the order of ng L-1.

  17. Sooting Characteristics and Modeling in Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2013-11-01

    Soot formation is one of the most complex phenomena in combustion science and an understanding of the underlying physico-chemical mechanisms is important. This work adopted both experimental and numerical approaches to study soot formation in laminar counterfl ow diffusion flames. As polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the precursors of soot particles, a detailed gas-phase chemical mechanism describing PAH growth upto coronene for fuels with 1 to 4 carbon atoms was validated against laminar premixed and counter- flow diffusion fl ames. Built upon this gas-phase mechanism, a soot model was then developed to describe soot inception and surface growth. This soot model was sub- sequently used to study fuel mixing effect on soot formation in counterfl ow diffusion flames. Simulation results showed that compared to the baseline case of the ethylene flame, the doping of 5% (by volume) propane or ethane in ethylene tends to increase the soot volume fraction and number density while keeping the average soot size almost unchanged. These results are in agreement with experimental observations. Laser light extinction/scattering as well as laser induced fluorescence techniques were used to study the effect of strain rate on soot and PAH formation in counterfl ow diffusion ames. The results showed that as strain rate increased both soot volume fraction and PAH concentrations decreased. The concentrations of larger PAH were more sensitive to strain rate compared to smaller ones. The effect of CO2 addition on soot formation was also studied using similar experimental techniques. Soot loading was reduced with CO2 dilution. Subsequent numerical modeling studies were able to reproduce the experimental trend. In addition, the chemical effect of CO2 addition was analyzed using numerical data. Critical conditions for the onset of soot were systematically studied in counterfl ow diffusion ames for various gaseous hydrocarbon fuels and at different strain rates. A sooting

  18. Radiative Structures of Lycopodium-Air Flames in Low Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlad, A. L.; Tangirala, V.; Ross, H.; Facca, L.

    1989-01-01

    Initially uniform clouds of fuel particulates in air sustain processes which may lead to particle cloud nonuniformities. In low gravity, flame-induced Kundt's Tube phenomena are observed to form regular patterns of nonuniform particle concentrations. Irregular patterns of particle concentrations also are observed to result from selected nonuniform mixing processes. Low gravity flame propagation for each of these classes of particle cloud flames has been found to depend importantly on the flame-generated infrared radiative fields. The spatial structures of these radiative fields are described. Application is made for the observed clases of lycopodium-air flames.

  19. Ionic Mechanisms of Carbon Formation in Flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    is that of Street and Thonas 1 1. These au- the burner temperature and burner and chimney thors used an apparatus in which a flow of heated dimensions...slitlctuies would overlap; It is classital mythology [hat prcmixed and dif. the molecules with greatest deviation from the fusion flames have different

  20. Radical recombinations in acetylene-air flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, P.J.Th.; Alkemade, C.T.J.

    In this paper an analysis is given of the behaviour of excess radical concentrations, H, OH and O as a function of height above the reaction zone in premixed acetylene-air flames at 2–200° to 2400°K and 1 atmosphere pressure. The intensity was measured of the Li resonance line which is related to

  1. Numerical study of one swirling flame

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yang; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Yin, Chungen

    This paper presents numerical study of one of Sydney swirl flames. Good agreements gained between numerical results and the experimental data. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and large eddy simulation (LES) methods show different flow patterns in isothermal and reacting case. The influence...

  2. Navigation with Atom Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    stability of the design and will be measured at a future time. Angle random walk can be calculated from first principles from the shot-noise limited...interferometer cannot distinguish between the two sources of phase shifts. We describe a design for a dual atom interferometer to simultaneously...stability. This paper is organized as follows: we first describe the basic building blocks of the interferometer: beam splitters and mirrors. We then

  3. The Influence of Spatial Discreteness on the Thermo-Diffusive Instability of Flame Propagation with Infinite Lewis Number

    CERN Document Server

    Mi, XiaoCheng; Goroshin, Samuel; Bergthorson, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of flame propagation in systems with infinite Lewis number and spatially discretized sources of heat release is examined, which is applicable to the combustion of suspensions of fuel particles in air. The system is analyzed numerically using a one-dimensional heat equation with a source term for the reaction progress variable, which is specified to have zero diffusivity, and the model reveals a spectrum of flame-propagation regimes. For the case of a switch-type reaction rate and homogeneous media (continuous regime), the flame propagates steadily at a velocity in agreement with analytical solutions. As the sources are spatially concentrated into {\\delta}-function-like sources, propagation approaches the discrete regime with a fixed period between ignition of the sources, for which an analytic solution is also available for validation. When the source term is governed by an Arrhenius rate and the activation energy is increased beyond the stability boundary, the flame begins to exhibit a long-wave...

  4. Flame speeds and curvature of premixed, spherically expanding flames advecting in a turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Dan; Ochs, Bradley; Ranjan, Devesh; Menon, Suresh

    2016-11-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Georgia Institute of Technology to study sub- and supersonic combustion, which is based on classical flame bomb studies but incorporates a mean flow, allowing for a wider variety of turbulent conditions and the inclusion of effects like compressibility, while supporting shear-free spherical flames. Homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is generated via an active vane grid. Methane-air flame kernels advecting with the mean flow are generated using Laser Induced Breakdown ignition. The facility is accessing the thin reaction zone regime with uRMS' /SL0 = 6 . 9 - 22 , L11 /δF = 44 - 68 and Reλ = 190 - 550 . The flame kernels are probed with OH-Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). To validate the facility, results at Ū = 30 m/s are compared to existing data using a scaling derived from a spectral closure of the G-equation. This indicates the reacting flow remains Galilean invariant under the given conditions. The differences between global and local turbulent consumption speeds derived from OH-PLIF results are discussed with a focus on modeling efforts. The curvature of flame wrinkles is evaluated to examine the impact of different turbulent scales on flame development. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under basic research Grant FA9550-15-1-0512 (Project monitor: Dr. Chiping Li).

  5. Flame exposure time on Langmuir probe degradation, ion density, and thermionic emission for flame temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, S J; Salvador, P R; Xu, K G

    2017-11-01

    The paper examines the effect of exposure time of Langmuir probes in an atmospheric premixed methane-air flame. The effects of probe size and material composition on current measurements were investigated, with molybdenum and tungsten probe tips ranging in diameter from 0.0508 to 0.1651 mm. Repeated prolonged exposures to the flame, with five runs of 60 s, resulted in gradual probe degradations (-6% to -62% area loss) which affected the measurements. Due to long flame exposures, two ion saturation currents were observed, resulting in significantly different ion densities ranging from 1.16 × 1016 to 2.71 × 1019 m-3. The difference between the saturation currents is caused by thermionic emissions from the probe tip. As thermionic emission is temperature dependent, the flame temperature could thus be estimated from the change in current. The flame temperatures calculated from the difference in saturation currents (1734-1887 K) were compared to those from a conventional thermocouple (1580-1908 K). Temperature measurements obtained from tungsten probes placed in rich flames yielded the highest percent error (9.66%-18.70%) due to smaller emission current densities at lower temperatures. The molybdenum probe yielded an accurate temperature value with only 1.29% error. Molybdenum also demonstrated very low probe degradation in comparison to the tungsten probe tips (area reductions of 6% vs. 58%, respectively). The results also show that very little exposure time (probe tip.

  6. Analysis of Flame Extinguishment and Height in Low Frequency Acoustically Excited Methane Jet Diffusion Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Ruowen; Kang, Ruxue; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Zhiyang; Zhi, Youran

    2018-01-01

    The exploration of microgravity conditions in space is increasing and existing fire extinguishing technology is often inadequate for fire safety in this special environment. As a result, improving the efficiency of portable extinguishers is of growing importance. In this work, a visual study of the effects on methane jet diffusion flames by low frequency sound waves is conducted to assess the extinguishing ability of sound waves. With a small-scale sound wave extinguishing bench, the extinguishing ability of certain frequencies of sound waves are identified, and the response of the flame height is observed and analyzed. Results show that the flame structure changes with disturbance due to low frequency sound waves of 60-100 Hz, and quenches at effective frequencies in the range of 60-90 Hz. In this range, 60 Hz is considered to be the quick extinguishing frequency, while 70-90 Hz is the stable extinguishing frequency range. For a fixed frequency, the flame height decreases with sound pressure level (SPL). The flame height exhibits the greatest sensitivity to the 60 Hz acoustic waves, and the least to the 100 Hz acoustic waves. The flame height decreases almost identically with disturbance by 70-90 Hz acoustic waves.

  7. Laminar Flame Speeds of Gasoline Surrogates Measured with the Flat Flame Method

    KAUST Repository

    Liao, Y.-H.

    2016-01-27

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. The adiabatic, laminar flame speeds of gasoline surrogates at atmospheric pressure over a range of equivalence ratios of = 0.8-1.3 and unburned gas temperatures of 298-400 K are measured with the flat flame method, which produces a one-dimensional flat flame free of stretch. Surrogates used in the current work are the primary reference fuels (PRFs, mixtures of n-heptane and isooctane), the toluene reference fuels (TRFs, mixtures of toluene and PRFs), and the ethanol reference fuels (ERFs, mixtures of ethanol and PRFs). In general, there is good agreement between the present work and the literature data for single-component fuel and PRF mixtures. Surrogates of TRF mixtures are found to exhibit comparable flame speeds to a real gasoline, while there is discrepancy observed between isooctane and gasoline. Moreover, the laminar flame speeds of TRF mixtures with similar fractions of n-heptane are found to be insensitive to the quantity of toluene in the mixture. Mixtures of ERFs exhibit comparable flame speeds to those of TRFs with similar mole fractions of n-heptane and isooctane.

  8. Atomic arias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  9. Atomic rivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  10. Effects of Swirl on Strongly-Pulsed Turbulent Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Y.-H.; Hermanson, J. C.

    2009-11-01

    The dynamics of large-scale structures in strongly-pulsed, swirling, turbulent jet diffusion flames were examined experimentally. The combustor used a combination of axial and tangentially-injected air to produce a range of swirl numbers. Gaseous ethylene fuel was injected through a 2 mm diameter nozzle on the combustor centerline with a jet-on Reynolds number of 5000. The flames were fully-modulated, with the fuel flow completely shut off between pulses. High-speed imaging of the flame luminosity was employed to examine the flame dimensions and the celerity of the large-scale flame structures. The flames were found to be approximately 15-20% shorter when swirl was imposed, depending on the injection time. The more compact flames in swirl appear to be due to the presence of recirculation inside the flames. For longer injection times, the celerity of the flame structures generally decreases as the swirl intensity increases. This is evidently due to the reversed velocity in the recirculation zone. For shorter injection times, the flame celerity has an increasing trend with increased swirl intensity due to flames being closer to the fuel nozzle at burnout.

  11. Kerosene wick lamp flame deformation in gradient magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, A.; Moghiman, M.

    2014-03-01

    The behavior of a kerosene wick lamp flame in the presence of non-uniform DC magnetic fields has been investigated and the results of this experimental study are presented. It has long been recognized that magnetic fields can influence the behavior of diffusion flames as a result of the paramagnetic and diamagnetic properties of the constituent gases. Using an electromagnet consisting of two coils and cores to generate a horizontal magnetic field, a non-uniform upward increasing and decreasing magnetic field was applied to a kerosene wick lamp flame. The experimental results show that the influence of DC gradient magnetic field on diffusion flame structure deformation depends on the flame position in the increasing or decreasing magnetic field, the flame situation relative to the maximum of the absolute value of the gradient and the quantity of the gradient magnetic field. It was also observed that both flame front area and flame height decrease in the positive and negative gradient field below the maximum of the absolute value of the gradient. Also, increasing the absolute of the gradient of the square magnetic induction in the positive and negative gradient field above the maximum of the absolute value of the gradient cause to elongate the flame and increase in the flame front area and then the flame height and front area decrease.

  12. Laser-saturated fluorescence measurements in laminar sooting diffusion flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Changlie

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is known to be one of the most important intermediate species in the combustion processes. The hydroxyl radical has also been considered a dominant oxidizer of soot particles in flames. In this investigation the hydroxyl concentration profiles in sooting diffusion flames were measured by the laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) method. The temperature distributions in the flames were measured by the two-line LSF technique and by thermocouple. In the sooting region the OH fluorescence was too weak to make accurate temperature measurements. The hydroxyl fluorescence profiles for all four flames presented herein show that the OH fluorescence intensities peaked near the flame front. The OH fluorescence intensity dropped sharply toward the dark region of the flame and continued declining to the sooting region. The OH fluorescence profiles also indicate that the OH fluorescence decreased with increasing height in the flames for all flames investigated. Varying the oxidizer composition resulted in a corresponding variation in the maximum OH concentration and the flame temperature. Furthermore, it appears that the maximum OH concentration for each flame increased with increasing flame temperature.

  13. Measurements of soot formation and hydroxyl concentration in near critical equivalence ratio premixed ethylene flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inbody, Michael Andrew

    1993-01-01

    The testing and development of existing global and detailed chemical kinetic models for soot formation requires measurements of soot and radical concentrations in flames. A clearer understanding of soot particle inception relies upon the evaluation and refinement of these models in comparison with such measurements. We present measurements of soot formation and hydroxyl (OH) concentration in sequences of flat premixed atmospheric-pressure C2H4/O2/N2 flames and 80-torr C2H4/O2 flames for a unique range of equivalence ratios bracketting the critical equivalence ratio (phi(sub c)) and extending to more heavily sooting conditions. Soot volume fraction and number density profiles are measured using a laser scattering-extinction apparatus capable of resolving a 0.1 percent absorption. Hydroxyl number density profiles are measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) with broadband detection. Temperature profiles are obtained from Rayleigh scattering measurements. The relative volume fraction and number density profiles of the richer sooting flames exhibit the expected trends in soot formation. In near-phi(sub c) visibility sooting flames, particle scattering and extinction are not detected, but an LIF signal due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) can be detected upon excitation with an argon-ion laser. A linear correlation between the argon-ion LIF and the soot volume fraction implies a common mechanistic source for the growth of PAH's and soot particles. The peak OH number density in both the atmospheric and 80-torr flames declines with increasing equivalence ratio, but the profile shape remains unchanged in the transition to sooting, implying that the primary reaction pathways for OH remain unchanged over this transition. Chemical kinetic modeling is demonstrated by comparing predictions using two current reaction mechanisms with the atmospheric flame data. The measured and predicted OH number density profiles show good agreement. The predicted benzene

  14. Leading-Edge Velocities and Lifted Methane Jet Flame Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current interest exists in understanding reaction-zone dynamics and mechanisms with respect to how they counterpropagate against incoming reactants. Images of flame position and flow-field morphology are presented from flame chemiluminescence and particle image velocimetry (PIV measurements. In the present study, PIV experiments were carried out to measure the methane jet lifted-flame flow-field velocities in the vicinity of the flame leading edge. Specifically, velocity fields within the high-temperature zone were examined in detail, which complements previous studies, whose prime focus is the flow-field upstream of the high-temperature boundary. PIV data is used not only to determine the velocities, but, along with chemiluminescence images, to also indicate the approximate location of the reaction zone (further supported by/through the leading-edge flame velocity distributions. The velocity results indirectly support the concept that the flame is anchored primarily through the mechanism of partially premixed flame propagation.

  15. Behaviors of tribrachial edge flames and their interactions in a triple-port burner

    KAUST Repository

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-05-01

    In a triple-port burner, various non-premixed flames have been observed previously. Especially for the case with two lifted flames, such configuration could be suitable in studying interaction between two tribrachial flames. In the present study, the flame characteristics have been investigated numerically by adopting a reduced kinetic mechanism in the triple-port burner. Four different types of flame configurations, including two attached flames, inner lifted/outer attached flames, inner attached/outer lifted flames, and twin lifted flames, were successfully simulated depending on the flow conditions. The representative edge propagation speed of a single lifted flame or an upstream lifted flame in the case of twin lifted flames increased as the liftoff height became higher. In the twin lifted flames, the inner lifted flame was affected appreciably when the other flame was located further upstream such that the lifted flame located further downstream encountered the axial velocity acceleration induced by the gas expansion from the lifted flame located upstream, while thermal effects were not observed since the temperature of the incoming flow toward the lifted flame was not affected. A unique flip-flop behavior between the inner and outer flames, observed experimentally previously, was successfully captured in the simulation such that the inner lifted flame became attached to the nozzle as the liftoff height of the outer lifted flame grew higher with an increase in the outer air velocity.

  16. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, J A

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear beta decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left...

  17. Fast and direct screening of copper in micro-volumes of distilled alcoholic beverages by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajtony, Zsolt; Laczai, Nikoletta; Dravecz, Gabriella; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Marosi, Áron; Marlok, Bence; Streli, Christina; Bencs, László

    2016-12-15

    HR-CS-GFAAS methods were developed for the fast determination of Cu in domestic and commercially available Hungarian distilled alcoholic beverages (called pálinka), in order to decide if their Cu content exceeds the permissible limit, as legislated by the WHO. Some microliters of samples were directly dispensed into the atomizer. Graphite furnace heating programs, effects/amounts of the Pd modifier, alternative wavelengths (e.g., Cu I 249.2146nm), external calibration and internal standardization methods were studied. Applying a fast graphite furnace heating program without any chemical modifier, the Cu content of a sample could be quantitated within 1.5min. The detection limit of the method is 0.03mg/L. Calibration curves are linear up to 10-15mg/L Cu. Spike-recoveries ranged from 89% to 119% with an average of 100.9±8.5%. Internal calibration could be applied with the assistance of Cr, Fe, and/or Rh standards. The accuracy of the GFAAS results was verified by TXRF analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Detailed Multidimensional Simulations of the Structure and Dynamics of Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, G.; Kailasanath, K.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical simulations in which the various physical and chemical processes can be independently controlled can significantly advance our understanding of the structure, stability, dynamics and extinction of flames. Therefore, our approach has been to use detailed time-dependent, multidimensional, multispecies numerical models to perform carefully designed computational experiments of flames on Earth and in microgravity environments. Some of these computational experiments are complementary to physical experiments performed under the Microgravity Program while others provide a fundamental understanding that cannot be obtained from physical experiments alone. In this report, we provide a brief summary of our recent research highlighting the contributions since the previous microgravity combustion workshop. There are a number of mechanisms that can cause flame instabilities and result in the formation of dynamic multidimensional structures. In the past, we have used numerical simulations to show that it is the thermo-diffusive instability rather than an instability due to preferential diffusion that is the dominant mechanism for the formation of cellular flames in lean hydrogen-air mixtures. Other studies have explored the role of gravity on flame dynamics and extinguishment, multi-step kinetics and radiative losses on flame instabilities in rich hydrogen-air flames, and heat losses on burner-stabilized flames in microgravity. The recent emphasis of our work has been on exploring flame-vortex interactions and further investigating the structure and dynamics of lean hydrogen-air flames in microgravity. These topics are briefly discussed after a brief discussion of our computational approach for solving these problems.

  19. Atomic Beam Merging and Suppression of Alkali Contaminants in Multi Body High Power Targets: Design and Test of Target and Ion Source Prototypes at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Bouquerel, Elian J A; Lettry, J; Stora, T

    2009-01-01

    The next generation of high power ISOL-facilities will deliver intense and pure radioactive ion beams. Two key issues of developments mandatory for the forthcoming generation of ISOL target-ion source units are assessed and demonstrated in this thesis. The design and production of target and ion-source prototypes is described and dedicated measurements at ISOLDE-CERN of their radioisotope yields are analyzed. The purity of short lived or rare radioisotopes suffer from isobaric contaminants, notably alkalis which are highly volatile and easily ionized elements. Therefore, relying on their chemical nature, temperature controlled transfer lines were equipped with a tube of quartz that aimed at trapping these unwanted elements before they reached the ion source. The successful application yields high alkali-suppression factors for several elements (ie: 80, 82mRb, 126, 142Cs, 8Li, 46K, 25Na, 114In, 77Ga, 95, 96Sr) for quartz temperatures between 300ºC and 1100ºC. The enthalpies of adsorption on quartz were measu...

  20. Early structure of LPG partially premixed conically stabilized flames

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental investigation of LPG partially premixed turbulent flames stabilized within a conical nozzle burner under constant degree of partial premixing. The stability limits and mean flame structure are presented based on the mean gas temperature and the concentration of CO, O 2, NO, and HC at the flame early region of reaction. The investigation covered the influence of the nozzle cone angle, the jet exit velocity and the jet equivalence ratio. The stability results show that the flames with cone are more stable than those without cone. For conical stabilized flames, the stability results exhibit three different sensitivity regions between the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The inflame measurements prove that the flame stability could be attributed to the triple flame structure at the flame leading edge. The data show that the triple flame structure is influenced by cone angle, the jet velocity and the equivalence ratio. The flame is believed to be controlled by the recirculation flow inside the cone. Increasing the cone angle induced higher air entrainment to the reaction zone as depicted by a higher O 2 concentration within the flame leading edge. Increasing the jet velocity to a certain limit enhances the intensity of combustion at the flame leading edge, while excessive increase in jet velocity reduces this intensity. At a fixed jet velocity the higher the equivalence ratio, the higher the amount of fuel diffused and engulfed to the reaction zone, the more delay of the combustion completion and the higher the emission concentrations of the flame. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.