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Sample records for source ct scanner

  1. NMR-CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, Katsumi; Sato, Kozo; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Sato, Masataka.

    1983-01-01

    A brief explanation is made on the imaging methods for a practical diagnostic NMR-CT scanner : A whole-body NMR-CT scanner utilizing a resistive magnet has been developed by Toshiba in cooperation with the Institute for Solid State Physics, the University of Tokyo. Typical NMR-CT images of volunteers and patients obtained in the clinical experiments using this device are presented. Detailed specifications are also shown about the practical NMR-CTs which are to be put on the market after obtaining the government approval. (author)

  2. Radiographic scanners and shutter mechanisms in CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braden, A.B.; Kuwik, J.J.; Taylor, S.K.; Covic, J.

    1981-01-01

    This patent claim relates especially to the design of a shutter mechanism in a CT scanner having a rotatable source of radiation and a series of stationary radiation detectors coplanar with the path of the source and spaced about the axis of rotation of the source, and only partially encircling the path of the source. (U.K.)

  3. Efficacy of a dynamic collimator for overranging dose reduction in a second- and third-generation dual source CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booij, Ronald; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Straten, Marcel van [Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 2240, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of the renewed dynamic collimator in a third-generation dual source CT (DSCT) scanner and to determine the improvements over the second-generation scanner. Collimator efficacy is defined as the percentage overranging dose in terms of dose-length product (DLP) that is blocked by the dynamic collimator relative to the total overranging dose in case of a static collimator. Efficacy was assessed at various pitch values and different scan lengths. The number of additional rotations due to overranging and effective scan length were calculated on the basis of reported scanning parameters. On the basis of these values, the efficacy of the collimator was calculated. The second-generation scanner showed decreased performance of the dynamic collimator at increasing pitch. Efficacy dropped to 10% at the highest pitch. For the third-generation scanner the efficacy remained above 50% at higher pitch. Noise was for some pitch values slightly higher at the edge of the imaged volume, indicating a reduced scan range to reduce the overranging dose. The improved dynamic collimator in the third-generation scanner blocks the overranging dose for more than 50% and is more capable of shielding radiation dose, especially in high pitch scan modes. (orig.)

  4. Efficacy of a dynamic collimator for overranging dose reduction in a second- and third-generation dual source CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booij, Ronald; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Straten, Marcel van

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of the renewed dynamic collimator in a third-generation dual source CT (DSCT) scanner and to determine the improvements over the second-generation scanner. Collimator efficacy is defined as the percentage overranging dose in terms of dose-length product (DLP) that is blocked by the dynamic collimator relative to the total overranging dose in case of a static collimator. Efficacy was assessed at various pitch values and different scan lengths. The number of additional rotations due to overranging and effective scan length were calculated on the basis of reported scanning parameters. On the basis of these values, the efficacy of the collimator was calculated. The second-generation scanner showed decreased performance of the dynamic collimator at increasing pitch. Efficacy dropped to 10% at the highest pitch. For the third-generation scanner the efficacy remained above 50% at higher pitch. Noise was for some pitch values slightly higher at the edge of the imaged volume, indicating a reduced scan range to reduce the overranging dose. The improved dynamic collimator in the third-generation scanner blocks the overranging dose for more than 50% and is more capable of shielding radiation dose, especially in high pitch scan modes. (orig.)

  5. Monte Carlo dose calibration in CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, V.; Subbaiah, K.V.; Thayalan, K.

    2008-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) scanner is a high radiation imaging modality compared to radiography. The dose from a CT examination can vary greatly depending on the particular CT scanner used, the area of the body examined, and the operating parameters of the scan. CT is a major contributor to collective effective dose in diagnostic radiology. Apart from the clinical benefits, the widespread use of multislice scanner is increasing radiation level to patient in comparison with conventional CT scanner. So, it becomes necessary to increase awareness about the CT scanner. (author)

  6. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierick, Manuel, E-mail: Manuel.Dierick@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Loo, Denis, E-mail: info@XRE.be [XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Masschaele, Bert [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van den Bulcke, Jan [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Acker, Joris, E-mail: Joris.VanAcker@UGent.be [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cnudde, Veerle, E-mail: Veerle.Cnudde@UGent.be [UGCT-SGIG, Department of Geology and Soil Science, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoorebeke, Luc, E-mail: Luc.VanHoorebeke@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography ( (www.ugct.ugent.be)) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kV{sub max}) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results.

  7. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierick, Manuel; Van Loo, Denis; Masschaele, Bert; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Van Acker, Joris; Cnudde, Veerle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography ( (www.ugct.ugent.be)) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kV max ) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results

  8. Quality assurance of computed tomography (CT) scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaran, A.; Sanu, K.K. . Email : a_sankaran@vsnl.com

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the present status of research work and development of various test objects, phantoms and detector/instrumentation systems for quality assurance (QA) of computed tomography (CT) scanners, carried out in advanced countries, with emphasis on similar work done in this research centre. CT scanner is a complex equipment and routine quality control procedures are essential to the maintenance of image quality with optimum patient dose. Image quality can be ensured only through correlation between prospective monitoring of system components and tests of overall performance with standard phantoms. CT examinations contribute a large share to the population dose in advanced countries. The unique dosimetry problems in CT necessitate special techniques. This article describes a comprehensive kit developed indigenously for the following QA and type approval tests as well as for research studies on image quality/dosimetry on CT scanners

  9. A megavoltage CT scanner for radiotherapy verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.G.; Swindell, W.; Morton, E.J.; Evans, P.M.; Xiao, Z.R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have developed a system for generating megavoltage CT images immediately prior to the administration of external beam radiotherapy. The detector is based on the scanner of Simpson (Simpson et al 1982) - the major differences being a significant reduction in dose required for image formation, faster image formation and greater convenience of use in the clinical setting. Attention has been paid to the problem of ring artefacts in the images. Specifically, a Fourier-space filter has been applied to the sinogram data. After suitable detector calibration, it has been shown that the device operates close to its theoretical specification of 3 mm spatial resolution and a few percent contrast resolution. Ring artefacts continue to be a major source of image degradation. A number of clinical images are presented. (author)

  10. Inter laboratory comparison of industrial CT scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; Cantatore, Angela; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    In this report results from an intercomparison of industrial CT scanners are presented. Three audit items, similar to common industrial parts, were selected for circulation: a single polymer part with complex geometry (Item 1), a simple geometry part made of two polymers (Item 2) and a miniature...

  11. The CT scanner as a therapy machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, K.S.; Norman, A.

    1990-01-01

    Many tumors in the brain and in other tissues can be delineated precisely in images obtained with a CT scanner. After the scan is obtained the patient is taken to another room for radiation therapy and is positioned in the beam with the aid of external markers, simulators or stereotactic devices. This procedure is time consuming and subject to error when precise localization of the beam is desired. The CT scanner itself, with the addition of the collimator, is capable of delivering radiation therapy with great precision without the need for external markers. The patient can be scanned and treated on the same table, the isocenter of the beam can be placed precisely in the center of the lesion, the beam can be restricted to just those planes in which the lesion appears, several arcs can be obtained by simply tilting the gantry, and the position of the patient in the beam can be monitored continuously during therapy. The authors describe the properties of the CTX, the CT scanner modified for therapy. (author). 6 refs.; 6 figs

  12. Very low-dose (0.15 mGy) chest CT protocols using the COPDGene 2 test object and a third-generation dual-source CT scanner with corresponding third-generation iterative reconstruction software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, John D; Fuld, Matthew K; Allmendinger, Thomas; Sieren, Jered P; Chan, Kung-Sik; Guo, Junfeng; Hoffman, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of ultralow radiation dose single-energy computed tomographic (CT) acquisitions with Sn prefiltration and third-generation iterative reconstruction on density-based quantitative measures of growing interest in phenotyping pulmonary disease. The effects of both decreasing dose and different body habitus on the accuracy of the mean CT attenuation measurements and the level of image noise (SD) were evaluated using the COPDGene 2 test object, containing 8 different materials of interest ranging from air to acrylic and including various density foams. A third-generation dual-source multidetector CT scanner (Siemens SOMATOM FORCE; Siemens Healthcare AG, Erlangen, Germany) running advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) software (Siemens Healthcare AG) was used.We used normal and very large body habitus rings at dose levels varying from 1.5 to 0.15 mGy using a spectral-shaped (0.6-mm Sn) tube output of 100 kV(p). Three CT scans were obtained at each dose level using both rings. Regions of interest for each material in the test object scans were automatically extracted. The Hounsfield unit values of each material using weighted filtered back projection (WFBP) at 1.5 mGy was used as the reference value to evaluate shifts in CT attenuation at lower dose levels using either WFBP or ADMIRE. Statistical analysis included basic statistics, Welch t tests, multivariable covariant model using the F test to assess the significance of the explanatory (independent) variables on the response (dependent) variable, and CT mean attenuation, in the multivariable covariant model including reconstruction method. Multivariable regression analysis of the mean CT attenuation values showed a significant difference with decreasing dose between ADMIRE and WFBP. The ADMIRE has reduced noise and more stable CT attenuation compared with WFBP. There was a strong effect on the mean CT attenuation values of the scanned materials for ring

  13. High-picture quality industrial CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Takao; Nishide, Akihiko; Fujii, Masashi.

    1989-01-01

    Industrial X-ray-CT-scanners, which provide cross-sectional images of a tested sample without destroying it, are attracting attention as a new nondestructive inspection device. In 1982, Toshiba commenced the development of industrial CT scanners, and introduced the 'TOSCANER' -3000 and-4000 series. Now, the state of the art 'TOSCANER'-20000 series of CT systems has been developed incorporating the latest computer tomography and image processing technology, such as the T9506 image processor. One of the advantages of this system is its applicability to a wide range of X-ray energy . The 'TOSCANER'-20000 series can be utilized for inspecting castings and other materials with relatively low-transparency to X-rays, as well as ceramics, composite materials and other materials with high X-ray transparency. A further feature of the new system is its high-picture quality, with a high-spatial resolution resulting from a pixel size of 0.2x0.2(mm). (author)

  14. Verification of a CT scanner using a miniature step gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantatore, Angela; Andreasen, J.L.; Carmignato, S.

    2011-01-01

    The work deals with performance verification of a CT scanner using a 42mm miniature replica step gauge developed for optical scanner verification. Errors quantification and optimization of CT system set-up in terms of resolution and measurement accuracy are fundamental for use of CT scanning...

  15. SCT-4800T whole body X-ray CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yoshitaka; Sato, Yukio; Kuwahara, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    A whole body X-ray CT scanner, the SCT-4800T (trade name: INTELLECT series), has been developed. This system is the first CT scanner that is combined with general radiographic functions. The general radiographic functions include a patient couch with film casette and several tube support systems along with the CT scanner. This newly designed CT scanner also features a compact and light-weight gantry with a 700 mm diameter apperture and user-friendly operater's console. The SCT-4800T brings a new level of patient and operator comfort to the emergency radiology examination site. (author)

  16. Neurosurgical operating computerized tomographic scanner system. The CT scanner in the operating theater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okudera, Hiroshi; Sugita, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Kimishima, Sakae; Yoshida, Hisashi

    1988-12-01

    A neurosurgical operating computerized tomography scanner system is presented. This system has been developed for obtaining intra- and postoperative CT images in the operating room. A TCT-300 scanner (manufactured by the Toshiba Co., Tokyo) is placed in the operating room. The realization of a true intraoperative CT image requires certain improvements in the CT scanner and operating table. To adjust the axis of the co-ordinates of the motor system of the MST-7000 microsurgical operating table (manufactured by the Mizuho Ika Co., Tokyo) to the CT scanner, we have designed an interface and a precise motor system so that the computer of the CT scanner can directly control the movement of the operating table. Furthermore, a new head-fixation system has been designed for producing artifact-free intraoperative CT images. The head-pins of the head-fixation system are made of carbon-fiber bars and titanium tips. A simulation study of the total system in the operating room with the CT scanner, operating table, and head holder using a skull model yielded a degree of error similar to that in the phantom testing of the original scanner. Three patients underwent resection of a glial tumor using this system. Intraoperative CT scans taken after dural opening showed a bulging of the cortex, a shift in the central structure, and a displacement of the cortical subarachnoid spaces under the influence of gravity. With a contrast medium the edge of the surrounding brain after resection was enhanced and the residual tumor mass was demonstrated clearly. This system makes it possible to obtain a noninvasive intraoperative image in a situation where structural shifts are taking place.

  17. Manufacture of CT scanners in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachidananda; Vijaya, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    The CT Max 640 has opened up a whole new chapter in radiological imaging by its value engineering, comprehensive indigenization and of course world class quality. Salient features of the equipment are given. (author)

  18. The economic potential of CT scanners for hardwood sawmills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald G. Hodges; Walter C. Anderson; Charles W. McMillin

    1990-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that a knowledge of internal log defects prior to sawing could improve lumber value yields significantly. This study evaluated the potential economic returns from investments in computerized tomographic (CT) scanners to detect internal defects in hardwood logs at southern sawmills. The results indicate that such investments would be profitable...

  19. Dual-energy CT virtual non-calcium technique for detection of bone marrow edema in patients with vertebral fractures: A prospective feasibility study on a single- source volume CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekhoff, T., E-mail: torsten.diekhoff@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Hermann, K.G. [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Pumberger, M. [Department of Spine Surgery, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, B. [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Putzier, M.; Fuchs, M. [Department of Spine Surgery, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Objectives: Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is a recent development for detecting bone marrow edema (BME) in patients with vertebral compression fractures. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the reliability of single-source DECT in detecting vertebral BME using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Materials and methods: Nine patients with radiographic thoracic or lumbar vertebral compression fractures underwent both, DECT on a 320-row single-source scanner and 1.5 T MRI. Virtual non-calcium (VNC) images were reconstructed from the DECT volume datasets. Three blinded readers independently scored images for the presence of BME. Only vertebrae with loss of height in radiography (target vertebrae) were included in the analysis. A vertebra was counted as positive if two readers agreed on the presence of BME. Cohen’s kappa was calculated for interrater comparison. Intervertebral ratios of target and the reference vertebra were compared for CT attenuation and MR signal intensity in a reference vertebra using Spearman correlation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Results: Fourteen target vertebrae with a radiographic height loss were identified; eight of them showed BME on MRI, while DECT identified BME in 7 instances. There were no false positive virtual non-calcium images, resulting in a sensitivity of 0.88 (0.75–1.0 among all readers) and specificity of 1.0 (0.81–1.0). Interrater agreement was inferior for DECT (κ = 0.63–0.89) compared to MRI (κ = 0.9–1.0). Intervertebral ratio in VNC images strongly correlated with short-tau inversion recovery (r = 0.87) and inversely with T1 (-0.89). SNR (0.2 +/− 0.2 in VNC and 16.7 +/− 7.3 in STIR) and CNR (0.2 +/− 0.3 and 7.1 +/− 6.3) values were inferior in VNC. Conclusions: Detecting BME with single-source DECT is feasible and allows detection of vertebral compression fractures with reasonably high sensitivity and specificity

  20. Dual-energy CT virtual non-calcium technique for detection of bone marrow edema in patients with vertebral fractures: A prospective feasibility study on a single- source volume CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diekhoff, T.; Hermann, K.G.; Pumberger, M.; Hamm, B.; Putzier, M.; Fuchs, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is a recent development for detecting bone marrow edema (BME) in patients with vertebral compression fractures. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the reliability of single-source DECT in detecting vertebral BME using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Materials and methods: Nine patients with radiographic thoracic or lumbar vertebral compression fractures underwent both, DECT on a 320-row single-source scanner and 1.5 T MRI. Virtual non-calcium (VNC) images were reconstructed from the DECT volume datasets. Three blinded readers independently scored images for the presence of BME. Only vertebrae with loss of height in radiography (target vertebrae) were included in the analysis. A vertebra was counted as positive if two readers agreed on the presence of BME. Cohen’s kappa was calculated for interrater comparison. Intervertebral ratios of target and the reference vertebra were compared for CT attenuation and MR signal intensity in a reference vertebra using Spearman correlation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Results: Fourteen target vertebrae with a radiographic height loss were identified; eight of them showed BME on MRI, while DECT identified BME in 7 instances. There were no false positive virtual non-calcium images, resulting in a sensitivity of 0.88 (0.75–1.0 among all readers) and specificity of 1.0 (0.81–1.0). Interrater agreement was inferior for DECT (κ = 0.63–0.89) compared to MRI (κ = 0.9–1.0). Intervertebral ratio in VNC images strongly correlated with short-tau inversion recovery (r = 0.87) and inversely with T1 (-0.89). SNR (0.2 +/− 0.2 in VNC and 16.7 +/− 7.3 in STIR) and CNR (0.2 +/− 0.3 and 7.1 +/− 6.3) values were inferior in VNC. Conclusions: Detecting BME with single-source DECT is feasible and allows detection of vertebral compression fractures with reasonably high sensitivity and specificity

  1. Dual-energy CT virtual non-calcium technique for detection of bone marrow edema in patients with vertebral fractures: A prospective feasibility study on a single- source volume CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekhoff, T; Hermann, K G; Pumberger, M; Hamm, B; Putzier, M; Fuchs, M

    2017-02-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is a recent development for detecting bone marrow edema (BME) in patients with vertebral compression fractures. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the reliability of single-source DECT in detecting vertebral BME using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Nine patients with radiographic thoracic or lumbar vertebral compression fractures underwent both, DECT on a 320-row single-source scanner and 1.5T MRI. Virtual non-calcium (VNC) images were reconstructed from the DECT volume datasets. Three blinded readers independently scored images for the presence of BME. Only vertebrae with loss of height in radiography (target vertebrae) were included in the analysis. A vertebra was counted as positive if two readers agreed on the presence of BME. Cohen's kappa was calculated for interrater comparison. Intervertebral ratios of target and the reference vertebra were compared for CT attenuation and MR signal intensity in a reference vertebra using Spearman correlation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Fourteen target vertebrae with a radiographic height loss were identified; eight of them showed BME on MRI, while DECT identified BME in 7 instances. There were no false positive virtual non-calcium images, resulting in a sensitivity of 0.88 (0.75-1.0 among all readers) and specificity of 1.0 (0.81-1.0). Interrater agreement was inferior for DECT (κ=0.63-0.89) compared to MRI (κ=0.9-1.0). Intervertebral ratio in VNC images strongly correlated with short-tau inversion recovery (r=0.87) and inversely with T1 (-0.89). SNR (0.2+/- 0.2 in VNC and 16.7+/- 7.3 in STIR) and CNR (0.2+/- 0.3 and 7.1+/- 6.3) values were inferior in VNC. Detecting BME with single-source DECT is feasible and allows detection of vertebral compression fractures with reasonably high sensitivity and specificity. However, image quality of VNC reconstructions has to be improved to achieve better

  2. Quality control of some CT scanners in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, Ali Mohammed Ali

    2013-06-01

    This study conduced with the aim to evaluate the performance of three CT scanner in Khartoum-Sudan through extensive quality control measurements. Image quality was assessed using a CATPHAN 412 CT image quality phantom. Image quality parameters evaluated were: CT image noise, uniformity, CT number linearity, Low Contrast Resolution, High Contrast Resolution, measurements were performed in accordance with guidelines set out by the Institute of physical science and engineering in medicine (IPEM 91). Image quality parameters tested were within the apoplectic limit specified in the relevant CT guidelines. Measured slice thickness ranged between 9.66-10.5 mm for large slice and 5.25-5.88 for medium slice. The correlation coefficient (R) between the measured and the reference CT number was better than 0.99 for all CT scanners. High resolution for large slice was 7 L P/ cm and 8 L P/ cm for small slice. Low contrast resolution with 1.0% nominal level ranged between 2-3 mm diameter of disc for large slice and 4-7 mm diameter disc for small slice. The measured noise ranged between 1.4-3.4 HU for large slice and 2.92-4.08 HU for small slice. Uniformity ranged between 3.08 to 2.075 HU for large slice and 3.22 to 1.4 HU for small slice thickness. The results indicate that routine maintenance, service and calibration, as well as the frequent quality control of CT scanners play a key rote in achieving the best performance of the system. Since computed tomography (CT) contributes the most to the collective dose compared to other radiological examinations, it is a necessity for quality control and quality assurance programs to be established in each radiology department.(Author)

  3. The usefulness of the combined PET-CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kyosan

    2003-01-01

    Recently, combined PET-CT scanners that simultaneously reveal both anatomical and metabolic images within the body have been developed. The Siemens Biograph was the first PET-CT used in Japan and was installed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) at the end of March 2002. The Biograph system integrates Siemens PET (HR+) and spiral CT (SOMATOM Emotion Duo) technologies with a multimodality computer platform. The CT data obtained with PET-CT is also used for attenuation corrections of the PET images. The advantages of PET-CT for clinical use are much shorter study time for each patient, easy and precise alignment of the patient's lesion within the PET field of view, an increase in PET image quality due to the CT attenuation correction system which gives a higher spatial resolution and produces much less noise in the attenuation correction data, and an improvement in diagnostic accuracy provided by both functional and anatomic imaging. The Japanese government has not yet approved the marketing of PET-CT. We are continuing to investigate its usefulness. We expect that PET-CT will be a major diagnostic tool for oncology imaging in the near future. (authors)

  4. Diagnostic Performance of an Advanced Modeled Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm for Low-Contrast Detectability with a Third-Generation Dual-Source Multidetector CT Scanner: Potential for Radiation Dose Reduction in a Multireader Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Justin; Mileto, Achille; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effect of radiation dose reduction on low-contrast detectability by using an advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) algorithm in a contrast-detail phantom with a third-generation dual-source multidetector computed tomography (CT) scanner. A proprietary phantom with a range of low-contrast cylindrical objects, representing five contrast levels (range, 5-20 HU) and three sizes (range, 2-6 mm) was fabricated with a three-dimensional printer and imaged with a third-generation dual-source CT scanner at various radiation dose index levels (range, 0.74-5.8 mGy). Image data sets were reconstructed by using different section thicknesses (range, 0.6-5.0 mm) and reconstruction algorithms (filtered back projection [FBP] and ADMIRE with a strength range of three to five). Eleven independent readers blinded to technique and reconstruction method assessed all data sets in two reading sessions by measuring detection accuracy with a two-alternative forced choice approach (first session) and by scoring the total number of visible object groups (second session). Dose reduction potentials based on both reading sessions were estimated. Results between FBP and ADMIRE were compared by using both paired t tests and analysis of variance tests at the 95% significance level. During the first session, detection accuracy increased with increasing contrast, size, and dose index (diagnostic accuracy range, 50%-87%; interobserver variability, ±7%). When compared with FBP, ADMIRE improved detection accuracy by 5.2% on average across the investigated variables (P material is available for this article. RSNA, 2015

  5. Daily quality controls analysis of a CT scanner simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasques, Maira Milanelo; Santos, Gabriela R.; Furnari, Laura

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing technological developments, radiotherapy practices, which allow for better involvement of the tumor with the required therapeutic dose and minimize the complications of normal tissues, have become reality in several Radiotherapy services. The use of these resources in turn, was only possible due to the progress made in planning based on digital volumetric images of good quality, such as computed tomography (CT), which allow the correct delimitation of the tumor volume and critical structures. Specific tests for quality control in a CT scanner used in radiotherapy, named CT simulator, should be applied as part of the institutional Quality Assurance Program. This study presents the methodology used in the Instituto de Radiologia do Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMUSP) for daily testing of the CT scanner simulator and the results obtained throughout more than two years. The experience gained in the period conducted showed that the tests are easy to perform and can be done in a few minutes by a trained professional. Data analysis showed good reproducibility, which allowed the tests could be performed less frequently, after 16 months of data collection. (author)

  6. Systematic radiation dose optimization of abdominal dual-energy CT on a second-generation dual-source CT scanner: assessment of the accuracy of iodine uptake measurement and image quality in an in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindera, Sebastian T; Zaehringer, Caroline; D'Errico, Luigia; Schwartz, Fides; Kekelidze, Maka; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Benz, Matthias R

    2017-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of iodine quantification in a phantom study at different radiation dose levels with dual-energy dual-source CT and to evaluate image quality and radiation doses in patients undergoing a single-energy and two dual-energy abdominal CT protocols. In a phantom study, the accuracy of iodine quantification (4.5-23.5 mgI/mL) was evaluated using the manufacturer-recommended and three dose-optimized dual-energy protocols. In a patient study, 75 abdomino-pelvic CT examinations were acquired as follows: 25 CT scans with the manufacturer-recommended dual-energy protocol (protocol A); 25 CT scans with a dose-optimized dual-energy protocol (protocol B); and 25 CT scans with a single-energy CT protocol (protocol C). CTDI vol and objective noise were measured. Five readers scored each scan according to six subjective image quality parameters (noise, contrast, artifacts, visibility of small structures, sharpness, overall diagnostic confidence). In the phantom study, differences between the real and measured iodine concentrations ranged from -8.8% to 17.0% for the manufacturer-recommended protocol and from -1.6% to 20.5% for three dose-optimized protocols. In the patient study, the CTDI vol of protocol A, B, and C were 12.5 ± 1.9, 7.5 ± 1.2, and 6.5 ± 1.7 mGycm, respectively (p dual-energy and the single-energy protocol. A dose reduction of 41% is feasible for the manufacturer-recommended, abdominal dual-energy CT protocol, as it maintained the accuracy of iodine measurements and subjective image quality compared to a single-energy protocol.

  7. Evaluation of PeneloPET Simulations of Biograph PET/CT Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushab, K. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; Vicente, E.; Cal-González, J.; España, S.; Vaquero, J. J.; Jakoby, B. W.; Udías, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used in positron emission tomography (PET) for optimizing detector design, acquisition protocols, and evaluating corrections and reconstruction methods. PeneloPET is a MC code based on PENELOPE, for PET simulations which considers detector geometry, acquisition electronics and materials, and source definitions. While PeneloPET has been successfully employed and validated with small animal PET scanners, it required a proper validation with clinical PET scanners including time-of-flight (TOF) information. For this purpose, we chose the family of Biograph PET/CT scanners: the Biograph True-Point (B-TP), Biograph True-Point with TrueV (B-TPTV) and the Biograph mCT. They have similar block detectors and electronics, but a different number of rings and configuration. Some effective parameters of the simulations, such as the dead-time and the size of the reflectors in the detectors, were adjusted to reproduce the sensitivity and noise equivalent count (NEC) rate of the B-TPTV scanner. These parameters were then used to make predictions of experimental results such as sensitivity, NEC rate, spatial resolution, and scatter fraction (SF), from all the Biograph scanners and some variations of them (energy windows and additional rings of detectors). Predictions agree with the measured values for the three scanners, within 7% (sensitivity and NEC rate) and 5% (SF). The resolution obtained for the B-TPTV is slightly better (10%) than the experimental values. In conclusion, we have shown that PeneloPET is suitable for simulating and investigating clinical systems with good accuracy and short computational time, though some effort tuning of a few parameters of the scanners modeled may be needed in case that the full details of the scanners studied are not available.

  8. Socio-economics on computed tomography (CT) scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Ryu

    1983-01-01

    It was in 1975, only eight years ago, that a CT scanner was first introduced into Japan, which demonstrated enormous power in the early diagnosis of cephalic disease. Since then, CT has spread rapidly in spite of the initial high price of 200 million yen, and has attained 2,120 sets as of December, 1982. The rate of CT propagation in Japan is 18.5 sets per one million persons, or No. 1 in the world. However, its socio-economic investigation has only been done fragmentarily in Japan. In this report, the CT is investigated in three aspects of medical facilities, medical instrument manufacturers, and the medical fee of nation. In Japan, the CT installation has largely increased by 20 times in five years from 1977 to 1981, and has widely spread not only to medium to small scale hospitals but also to general clinics. In this report, the CT is investigated for the number in various facilities and prefectures, and the comparison of the state of use in USA and Japan. Since 1979, the products of domestic manufacturers were at advantage over foreign products in Japan, and Hitachi and Toshiba have been predominant among them. The fee for CT in Japan is only 1/5 as compared with that in the U.S. Setting extremely low fee like this may get into the danger to induce excessive inspection. The significant popularization of CT in Japan is much concerned with the features of Japanese medical care system as well as the medical technological characteristics of the CT. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. Modelling the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 64 Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A T Mohd; Rahni, A A Abd

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructing large volumetric 3D images with minimal radiation dosage exposure with reduced scanning time has been one of the main objectives in the advancement of CT development. One of its advancement is the introduction of multi-slice arc detector geometry from a cone-beam source in third generation scanners. In solving this complex geometry, apart from the known vast computations in CT image reconstruction due to large CT images, iterative reconstruction methods are preferred compared to analytic methods due to its flexibility in image reconstruction. A scanner of interest that has this type of geometry is the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 64 Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) Scanner , which has a total of 32 slices with 672 detector elements on each slice. In this paper, the scanner projection is modelled via the intersecting lengths between each ray (exhibited from the source to the detector elements) with the scanned image voxels, which are evaluated using the classical Siddon’s algorithm to generate the system matrix, H . This is a prerequisite to perform various iterative reconstruction methods, which involves solving the inverse problem arising from the linear equation: S = H· I; where S is the projections produced from the image, I. Due to the ‘cone-beam geometry’ along the z -axis, the effective field-of-view (FOV) with voxel dimensions (0.4×0.4×0.4) mm 3 is 512×512×32 voxels. The scanner model is demonstrated by reconstructing an image from simulated projections using the analytic Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) method against basic iterative image reconstruction methods. (paper)

  10. Quality assurance for CT scanners and NMR imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.L.; Howarth, W.

    1986-01-01

    Quality Assurance is an essential part of management and the application of its disciplines to the purchase and use of CT and MR scanners is particularly important. The Purchaser and User have the leading role. They must take into account the need for a precise specification which will form part of the contract placed on the Supplier, the basis of acceptance and of maintenance of the equipment. The training of staff is also important. The Scientific and Technical Branch of the DHSS has a programme of work intended to help the Purchaser and User in this role. (author)

  11. A dedicated breast-PET/CT scanner: Evaluation of basic performance characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Van Kampen, Will; Stolin, Alexander V; Gong, Wenbo; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar; Martone, Peter F; Smith, Mark F; Sarment, David; Clinthorne, Neal H; Perna, Mark

    2018-04-01

    Application of advanced imaging techniques, such as PET and x ray CT, can potentially improve detection of breast cancer. Unfortunately, both modalities have challenges in the detection of some lesions. The combination of the two techniques, however, could potentially lead to an overall improvement in diagnostic breast imaging. The purpose of this investigation is to test the basic performance of a new dedicated breast-PET/CT. The PET component consists of a rotating pair of detectors. Its performance was evaluated using the NEMA NU4-2008 protocols. The CT component utilizes a pulsed x ray source and flat panel detector mounted on the same gantry as the PET scanner. Its performance was assessed using specialized phantoms. The radiation dose to a breast during CT imaging was explored by the measurement of free-in-air kerma and air kerma measured at the center of a 16 cm-diameter PMMA cylinder. Finally, the combined capabilities of the system were demonstrated by imaging of a micro-hot-rod phantom. Overall, performance of the PET component is comparable to many pre-clinical and other dedicated breast-PET scanners. Its spatial resolution is 2.2 mm, 5 mm from the center of the scanner using images created with the single-sliced-filtered-backprojection algorithm. Peak NECR is 24.6 kcps; peak sensitivity is 1.36%; the scatter fraction is 27%. Spatial resolution of the CT scanner is 1.1 lp/mm at 10% MTF. The free-in-air kerma is 2.33 mGy, while the PMMA-air kerma is 1.24 mGy. Finally, combined imaging of a micro-hot-rod phantom illustrated the potential utility of the dual-modality images produced by the system. The basic performance characteristics of a new dedicated breast-PET/CT scanner are good, demonstrating that its performance is similar to current dedicated PET and CT scanners. The potential value of this system is the capability to produce combined duality-modality images that could improve detection of breast disease. The next stage in development of this system

  12. Portable CT scanners for use on live trees and standing columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, M.; Tsao, J.W.; Yamada, H.; Nakamura, H.; Kogure, J.; Kawamura, H.; Isono, E.; Maeda, Y.; Matsumoto, S.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a technique to reconstruct a crosssection of a test object from multiple projections obtained using e.g. x-rays. A large number of medical CT scanners and a few industrial CT scanners have been used. Most of these scanners are fixed installations. In contrast, we developed portable CT scanners for nondestructive testing of live trees and standing building columns in field environment. The resolution of these scanners is high enough to reveal details of annual rings of trees and timbers. The scanners have been useful in a wide range of applications. This paper presents two types of scanners with small and large apertures, a system for quick look of reconstruction and a few examples of applications

  13. Methods for CT automatic exposure control protocol translation between scanner platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Sarah E; Seibert, J Anthony; Lamba, Ramit; Boone, John M

    2014-03-01

    An imaging facility with a diverse fleet of CT scanners faces considerable challenges when propagating CT protocols with consistent image quality and patient dose across scanner makes and models. Although some protocol parameters can comfortably remain constant among scanners (eg, tube voltage, gantry rotation time), the automatic exposure control (AEC) parameter, which selects the overall mA level during tube current modulation, is difficult to match among scanners, especially from different CT manufacturers. Objective methods for converting tube current modulation protocols among CT scanners were developed. Three CT scanners were investigated, a GE LightSpeed 16 scanner, a GE VCT scanner, and a Siemens Definition AS+ scanner. Translation of the AEC parameters such as noise index and quality reference mAs across CT scanners was specifically investigated. A variable-diameter poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom was imaged on the 3 scanners using a range of AEC parameters for each scanner. The phantom consisted of 5 cylindrical sections with diameters of 13, 16, 20, 25, and 32 cm. The protocol translation scheme was based on matching either the volumetric CT dose index or image noise (in Hounsfield units) between two different CT scanners. A series of analytic fit functions, corresponding to different patient sizes (phantom diameters), were developed from the measured CT data. These functions relate the AEC metric of the reference scanner, the GE LightSpeed 16 in this case, to the AEC metric of a secondary scanner. When translating protocols between different models of CT scanners (from the GE LightSpeed 16 reference scanner to the GE VCT system), the translation functions were linear. However, a power-law function was necessary to convert the AEC functions of the GE LightSpeed 16 reference scanner to the Siemens Definition AS+ secondary scanner, because of differences in the AEC functionality designed by these two companies. Protocol translation on the basis of

  14. Dual source CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidensticker, Peter R.; Hofmann, Lars K.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of Dual Source Computed Tomography (DSCT) in 2005 was an evolutionary leap in the field of CT imaging. Two x-ray sources operated simultaneously enable heart-rate independent temporal resolution and routine spiral dual energy imaging. The precise delivery of contrast media is a critical part of the contrast-enhanced CT procedure. This book provides an introduction to DSCT technology and to the basics of contrast media administration followed by 25 in-depth clinical scan and contrast media injection protocols. All were developed in consensus by selected physicians on the Dual Source CT Expert Panel. Each protocol is complemented by individual considerations, tricks and pitfalls, and by clinical examples from several of the world's best radiologists and cardiologists. This extensive CME-accredited manual is intended to help readers to achieve consistently high image quality, optimal patient care, and a solid starting point for the development of their own unique protocols. (orig.)

  15. Clinical applications of the imatron fast CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, W.

    1986-01-01

    Utilizing three imaging modes, Cine CT has proven satisfactory in the assessment of left ventricular mass and function including ejection fractions and abnormalities of wall motion. It is helpful in documenting pericardial constrictions, as well as in assessing intracavitary tumors and thrombi. In the lungs, it is used to document AV fistulae and to evaluate the vascularity of mediastinal masses and to exclude invasion or major thoracic vessels. It can be used, as in the conventional scanner, for needle directed lung and chest well biopsies. It is frequently used in a airway studies to differentiate fixed from physiologic constrictions and to assess tracheomalacia and bronchopulmonary dysplasias. It can be used to plan radiation ports in the treatment of breast carcinoma. In the abdomen, successful applications include its use in the assessment of renal blood flow and the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as in screening of possible aortic aneurysms. In orthopedics, Cine CT is used to evaluate patellofermoral tracking in subluxations of the patella and used to evaluate subluxations and dislocations of the radio-ulnar joint. Cine CT by virtue of its speed and satisfactory spatial resolution is a significant imaging modality for evaluating the beating heart. Other applications include the evaluation of aortic aneurysms and dissections, para-aortic mass lesions, airway obstructions and patellar tracking and forearm subluxations

  16. Upper limits of the photon fluence rate on CT detectors: Case study on a commercial scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Mats, E-mail: mats.persson@mi.physics.kth.se; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm SE-10691 (Sweden); Bujila, Robert; Nowik, Patrik; Andersson, Henrik [Unit of X-ray Physics, Section of Imaging Physics Solna, Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-17176 (Sweden); Kull, Love [Medical Radiation Physics, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå SE-97180 (Sweden); Andersson, Jonas [Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umeå University, Umeå SE-90185 (Sweden)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The highest photon fluence rate that a computed tomography (CT) detector must be able to measure is an important parameter. The authors calculate the maximum transmitted fluence rate in a commercial CT scanner as a function of patient size for standard head, chest, and abdomen protocols. Methods: The authors scanned an anthropomorphic phantom (Kyoto Kagaku PBU-60) with the reference CT protocols provided by AAPM on a GE LightSpeed VCT scanner and noted the tube current applied with the tube current modulation (TCM) system. By rescaling this tube current using published measurements on the tube current modulation of a GE scanner [N. Keat, “CT scanner automatic exposure control systems,” MHRA Evaluation Report 05016, ImPACT, London, UK, 2005], the authors could estimate the tube current that these protocols would have resulted in for other patient sizes. An ECG gated chest protocol was also simulated. Using measured dose rate profiles along the bowtie filters, the authors simulated imaging of anonymized patient images with a range of sizes on a GE VCT scanner and calculated the maximum transmitted fluence rate. In addition, the 99th and the 95th percentiles of the transmitted fluence rate distribution behind the patient are calculated and the effect of omitting projection lines passing just below the skin line is investigated. Results: The highest transmitted fluence rates on the detector for the AAPM reference protocols with centered patients are found for head images and for intermediate-sized chest images, both with a maximum of 3.4 ⋅ 10{sup 8} mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, at 949 mm distance from the source. Miscentering the head by 50 mm downward increases the maximum transmitted fluence rate to 5.7 ⋅ 10{sup 8} mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. The ECG gated chest protocol gives fluence rates up to 2.3 ⋅ 10{sup 8} − 3.6 ⋅ 10{sup 8} mm{sup −2} s{sup −1} depending on miscentering. Conclusions: The fluence rate on a CT detector reaches 3 ⋅ 10{sup 8

  17. Patient doses in chest CT examinations: Comparison of various CT scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božović Predrag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from study on patient exposure level in chest CT examinations. CT scanners used in this study were various Siemens and General Electric (GE models. Data on patient doses were collected for adult and pediatric patients. Doses measured for adult patients were lower then those determined as Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL for Europe, while doses for pediatric patients were similar to those found in published data. As for the manufactures, slightly higher doses were measured on GE devices, both for adult and pediatric patients.

  18. Technical principles of dual source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersilka, Martin; Bruder, Herbert; Krauss, Bernhard; Stierstorfer, Karl; Flohr, Thomas G.

    2008-01-01

    During the past years, multi-detector row CT (MDCT) has evolved into clinical practice with a rapid increase of the number of detector slices. Today's 64 slice CT systems allow whole-body examinations with sub-millimeter resolution in short scan times. As an alternative to adding even more detector slices, we describe the system concept and design of a CT scanner with two X-ray tubes and two detectors (mounted on a CT gantry with a mechanical offset of 90 deg.) that has the potential to overcome limitations of conventional MDCT systems, such as temporal resolution for cardiac imaging. A dual source CT (DSCT) scanner provides temporal resolution equivalent to a quarter of the gantry rotation time, independent of the patient's heart rate (83 ms at 0.33 s rotation time). In addition to the benefits for cardiac scanning, it allows to go beyond conventional CT imaging by obtaining dual energy information if the two tubes are operated at different voltages. Furthermore, we discuss how both acquisition systems can be used to add the power reserve of two X-ray tubes for long scan ranges and obese patients. Finally, future advances of DSCT are highlighted

  19. The development of a mobile CT-scanner gantry for use in the operating room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okudera, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Koike, Jouji; Harada, Takanobu; Kanemaru, Kei

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of a mobile CT-scanner gantry which uses a gantry platter. This system has been developed for use in the operating room. We designed a small lift to move the gantry unit of the scanner: the gantry carrier. The scanner gantry is fixed to the gantry carrier. A phantom test with a digitalized operating table worked well in the laboratory, and operating-room use showed that there was no deterioration in image quality. The mobile gantry system has been developed to increase the efficiency of the operating CT-scanner system. This system enables us to obtain CT images during surgery of immediately after surgery in the operating room, i.e., in cases that are not transferable to the radiological department. The operability is basically the same as that of a conventional mobile X-ray unit. Theoretically, this unit could be used with any CT scanner and in any operating room. (author)

  20. SU-E-T-70: Commissioning a Multislice CT Scanner for X-Ray CT Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, H [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Australia); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Hilts, M [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Australia); BC Cancer Agency, Kelowna, BC (Australia); Jirasek, A [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission a multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). Methods: Commissioning was performed for a 16-slice CT scanner using images acquired through a 1L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine for comparison purposes. The variability in CT number associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background image subtraction technique. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by comparing image noise and uniformity to that of the single slice machine. The consistency in CT number across slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also evaluated. Finally, the variability in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load was measured for the multislice scanner and compared to the tube load effects observed on the single slice machine. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in CT number across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image quality for the multislice machine was found to be comparable to that of the single slice scanner. Further study showed CT number was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thickness examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Conclusion: A multislice CT scanner has been commissioning for CT PGD, allowing images of an entire dose distribution to be acquired in a matter of minutes. Funding support provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering

  1. Performance characteristics of 3D GSO PET/CT scanner (Philips GEMINI PET/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Byeong Il; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2004-01-01

    Philips GEMINI is a newly introduced whole-body GSO PET/CT scanner. In this study, performance of the scanner including spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, noise equivalent count ratio (NECR) was measured utilizing NEMA NU2-2001 standard protocol and compared with performance of LSO, BGO crystal scanner. GEMINI is composed of the Philips ALLEGRO PET and MX8000 D multi-slice CT scanners. The PET scanner has 28 detector segments which have an array of 29 by 22 GSO crystals (4*6*20 mm), covering axial FOV of 18 cm. PET data to measure spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and NECR were acquired in 3D mode according to the NEMA NU2 protocols (coincidence window: 8 ns, energy window : 409∼664 keV). For the measurement of spatial resolution, images were reconstructed with FBP using ramp filter and an iterative reconstruction algorithm, 3D RAMLA. Data for sensitivity measurement were acquired using NEMA sensitivity phantom filled with F-18 solution and surrounded by 1∼5 aluminum sleeves after we confirmed that dead time loss did not exceed 1%. To measure NECR and scatter fraction, 1110 MBq of F-18 solution was injected into a NEMA scatter phantom with a length of 70 cm and dynamic scan with 20-min frame duration was acquired for 7 half-lives. Oblique sinograms were collapsed into transaxial slices using single slice rebinning method, and true to background (scatter + random) ratio for each slice and frame was estimated. Scatter fraction was determined by averaging the true to background ratio of last 3 frames in which the dead time loss was below 1%. Transverse and axial resolutions at 1 cm radius were (1) 5.3 and 6.5 mm (FBP), (2) 5.1 and 5.9 mm (3D RAMLA). Transverse radial, transverse tangential, and axial resolution at 10 cm were (1) 5.7, 5.7, and 7.0 mm (FBP), (2) 5.4, 5.4, and 6.4 mm (3D RAMLA). Attenuation free values of sensitivity were 3,620 counts/sec/MBq at the center of transaxial FOV and 4,324 counts/sec/MBq at 10 cm offset

  2. A stereotaxic frame and computer software for use with CT body scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.A.; Roberts, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype stereotaxic frame for use in conjunction with CT body scanners has been developed and is illustrated. Such a frame may be rigidly attached to the patient's cranium prior to CT scanning and kept attached until completion of the stereotaxic procedure. The frame produces landmarks in each CT slice which allow the CT scanner computer to calculate the spatial orientation of the slice with respect to the frame. Thus the computer may transfer information from the CT slice coordinate system to the frame coordinate system. Using this type of stereotaxic frame it is possible to complete the stereotaxic procedure either in the CT scanner or in the neurosurgery operating suite. In a series of 20 experiments with a target phantom the tip of the probe was placed at a target point with a mean error of 2.0 millimeters. (Auth.)

  3. Performance of an improved first generation optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Xin; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Adamovics, John

    2013-01-01

    Performance analysis of a modified 3D dosimetry optical scanner based on the first generation optical CT scanner OCTOPUS is presented. The system consists of PRESAGE™ dosimeters, the modified 3D scanner, and a new developed in-house user control panel written in Labview program which provides more flexibility to optimize mechanical control and data acquisition technique. The total scanning time has been significantly reduced from initial 8 h to ∼2 h by using the modified scanner. The functional performance of the modified scanner has been evaluated in terms of the mechanical integrity uncertainty of the data acquisition process. Optical density distribution comparison between the modified scanner, OCTOPUS and the treatment plan system has been studied. It has been demonstrated that the agreement between the modified scanner and treatment plans is comparable with that between the OCTOPUS and treatment plans. (note)

  4. Performance evaluation of 8 CT scanners for clinical use in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, I.; De Denaro, M.; Giribona, P.; Gicericin, C.; Bravar, D.

    1988-01-01

    In the past few years the use of CT scanners has widely spread in Italian care institutions. This methodology has thus become an important creates the need for an accurate study of the various aspects of the phenomenon, e.g. technological, diagnostic and economic. In order to evaluate the quality of the CT scanners used in our country, the majors suppliers of the Italian market were asked to provide us with a unit from their production. Six out of 7 companies complied with our request. A standard protocol was used to evaluate the performance of 8 CT scanners, currently used in Italy. The following parameters were evaluated: spatial resolution, contrast resolution, noise, slice thickness, uniformity, linearity and radiation dose. Five currently-used operating modalities were employed. The results allow an overall assessment of the performance of the 8 CT scanners

  5. Why do commercial CT scanners still employ traditional, filtered back-projection for image reconstruction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Xiaochuan; Sidky, Emil Y; Vannier, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Despite major advances in x-ray sources, detector arrays, gantry mechanical design and especially computer performance, one component of computed tomography (CT) scanners has remained virtually constant for the past 25 years—the reconstruction algorithm. Fundamental advances have been made in the solution of inverse problems, especially tomographic reconstruction, but these works have not been translated into clinical and related practice. The reasons are not obvious and seldom discussed. This review seeks to examine the reasons for this discrepancy and provides recommendations on how it can be resolved. We take the example of field of compressive sensing (CS), summarizing this new area of research from the eyes of practical medical physicists and explaining the disconnection between theoretical and application-oriented research. Using a few issues specific to CT, which engineers have addressed in very specific ways, we try to distill the mathematical problem underlying each of these issues with the hope of demonstrating that there are interesting mathematical problems of general importance that can result from in depth analysis of specific issues. We then sketch some unconventional CT-imaging designs that have the potential to impact on CT applications, if the link between applied mathematicians and engineers/physicists were stronger. Finally, we close with some observations on how the link could be strengthened. There is, we believe, an important opportunity to rapidly improve the performance of CT and related tomographic imaging techniques by addressing these issues. (topical review)

  6. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  7. 双源 CT 双能量虚拟平扫对脂肪肝的诊断价值%The diagnostic value of dual energy virtual non-contrast images in hepatic steatosis with dual source CT scanner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王士阗; 王萱; 王禨; 徐凯; 薛华丹; 金征宇

    2014-01-01

    _目的:探讨双源 CT 双能量腹部虚拟平扫对脂肪肝的诊断价值。方法:回顾性分析采用双源 CT 行腹部双能量增强扫描诊断为脂肪肝的77例患者的平扫期(120 kV)及虚拟平扫(VNC)图像。虚拟平扫图像运用门脉期双能量(100及140 kV)图像重建而来。选择肝门层面测量真实平扫(TNC)与 VNC 图像上肝右叶、肝左叶、脾脏、下腔静脉的 CT 值及噪声,并在肝门层面测量上腹部前后径及左右径。记录整个扫描和平扫期对应的剂量长度乘积(DLP)。评价 TNC 与VNC 图像间各 CT 值及噪声的差异,分析两组图像上肝右叶噪声与前后径、左右径及平均径的关系。分别用肝/脾 CT 值比<0.8、肝/下腔静脉 CT 值比<1.0,做为诊断中重度脂肪肝的标准,比较 TNC 和 VNC 图像诊断中重度脂肪肝的一致性。结果:VNC 图像上肝左叶、右叶及脾脏的 CT 值均高于 TNC(P<0.01),差异小于10 HU。VNC 图像上各部位噪声均低于 TNC。TNC 图像上,肝右叶噪声与前后径、左右径、平均径均有中等相关性(r=0.562,0.608,P<0.01);在 VNC图像上,肝右叶噪声与上述径线值相关性弱。用肝/脾 CT 值比<0.8作为诊断重度脂肪肝的标准,VNC 与 TNC 图像诊断重度脂肪肝一致性的 kappa 值为0.591;用肝/静脉 CT 值比<1.0作为诊断标准,两种图像一致性的 kappa 值为0.458。用 VNC 代替 TNC 图像,可降低24.2%的总扫描剂量。结论:VNC 图像与 TNC 图像在诊断中重度脂肪肝上具有中等的一致性,推荐运用肝/脾 CT 值比<0.8这一诊断标准。%To investigate the value of dual energy (DE)virtual non-contrast (VNC)images in the diagno-sis of hepatic steatosis.Methods:This retrospective study was based on contrast enhanced abdominal DECT scan of 77 pa-tients with hepatic steatosis.The VNC images were reconstructed from two sets of

  8. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H [Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital of The C.G.M.F, Puzi City, Chiayi County, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  9. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle

  10. Developing patient-specific dose protocols for a CT scanner and exam using diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    The management of image quality and radiation dose during pediatric CT scanning is dependent on how well one manages the radiographic techniques as a function of the type of exam, type of CT scanner, and patient size. The CT scanner's display of expected CT dose index volume (CTDI vol ) after the projection scan provides the operator with a powerful tool prior to the patient scan to identify and manage appropriate CT techniques, provided the department has established appropriate diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). This paper provides a step-by-step process that allows the development of DRLs as a function of type of exam, of actual patient size and of the individual radiation output of each CT scanner in a department. Abdomen, pelvis, thorax and head scans are addressed. Patient sizes from newborns to large adults are discussed. The method addresses every CT scanner regardless of vendor, model or vintage. We cover adjustments to techniques to manage the impact of iterative reconstruction and provide a method to handle all available voltages other than 120 kV. This level of management of CT techniques is necessary to properly monitor radiation dose and image quality during pediatric CT scans. (orig.)

  11. Improved quality of image got through whole-body CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahina, Kiyotaka

    1980-01-01

    The quality of brain images taken with a whole-body CT scanner has so far been generally inferior in quality to those got through a CT scanner exclusively used for brains. In order to improve the whole-body CT scanner so as to get better brain image, its detection system has been made multichannel; the capacity of its X-ray tube, increased; and its software, innovated. As a result, the spatial resolution has been improved from 5.51 p/cm to 9.01 p/cm, the contrast resolution has been improved from 3.2 mm% to 1.5 mm%, with the noise maintained at 0.5%. In clinical examination, the image quality has been improved equally well for brains, abdomens and lungs. Especially high appreciation is given to the diagnosis information got through this new scanner. (author)

  12. Inter-laboratory comparison of medical computed tomography (CT) scanners for industrial applications in the slaughterhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Bager; Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch

    2013-01-01

    differences in CT performance. The presented Round Robin scheme has demonstrated its potential as such a method. The benefit of the phantom set is that it provides a convenient way of comparing volume determination between different CT scanners. The suggested phantoms are mimicking important carcass features...

  13. Performance and limitations of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners for imaging very low activity sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedenberg, Melissa I; Badawi, Ramsey D; Tarantal, Alice F; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-02-01

    Emerging applications for positron emission tomography (PET) may require the ability to image very low activity source distributions in the body. The performance of clinical PET scanners in the regime where activity in the field of view is source in the NEMA scatter phantom), the BGO-based scanner significantly outperformed the LSO-based scanner. This was largely due to the effect of background counts emanating from naturally occurring but radioactive (176)Lu within the LSO detector material, which dominates the observed counting rate at the lowest activities. Increasing the lower energy threshold from 350 keV to 425 keV in an attempt to reduce this background did not significantly improve the measured NECR performance. The measured singles rate due to (176)Lu emissions within the scanner energy window was also found to be dependent on temperature, and to be affected by the operation of the CT component, making approaches to correct or compensate for the background more challenging. We conclude that for PET studies in a very low activity range, BGO-based scanners are likely to have better performance because of the lack of significant background. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A rural CT scanner: evaluating the effect on local health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkens, B.J.; Mowbray, R.D.; Creeden, L.; Engels, P.T.; Rothwell, D.M.; Chan, B.T.B.; Tu, K.

    2006-01-01

    The first small rural hospital in Ontario to propose a computed tomography (CT) scanner was in Walkerton, a town 160 km north of London. The Ontario Ministry of Health approved the proposal as a pilot project to evaluate the effect on local health care of a rural scanner. This evaluation study had 3 parts: a survey of physicians, a survey of patients, and an analysis of population CT scanning rates. The physicians in the area served by the scanner were asked about its impact on their care of their patients in a mailed questionnaire and in semistructured interviews. Scanner outpatients were given a questionnaire in which they rated the importance of its advantages. The analysis of scanning rates--the ratio of number of scans to estimated population--compared rates in the area with other Ontario rates before and after the scanner was introduced. The physicians reported that local CT allowed them to diagnose and treat patients sooner, closer to home, and with greater confidence. On average, 75% of the patients ranked faster and closer access as very important. Scanning rates in the area rose, although they did not match urban rates. The study confirms that the rural scanner changed the area's health care in significant ways and that it helped to narrow the gap between rural and urban service levels. We recommend that CT be expanded to other rural regions. (author)

  15. Development of PC based Monte Carlo simulations for the calculation of scanner-specific normalized organ doses from CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, J. T. M.; Shrimpton, P. C.; Zankl, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the simulation of contemporary computed tomography (CT) scanners using Monte Carlo calculation methods to derive normalized organ doses, which enable hospital physicists to estimate typical organ and effective doses for CT examinations. The hardware used in a small PC-cluster at the Health Protection Agency (HPA) for these calculations is described. Investigations concerning optimization of software, including the radiation transport codes MCNP5 and MCNPX, and the Intel and PGI FORTRAN compilers, are presented in relation to results and calculation speed. Differences in approach for modelling the X-ray source are described and their influences are analysed. Comparisons with previously published calculations at HPA from the early 1990's proved satisfactory for the purposes of quality assurance and are presented in terms of organ dose ratios for whole body exposure and differences in organ location. Influences on normalized effective dose are discussed in relation to choice of cross section library, CT scanner technology (contemporary multi slice versus single slice), definition for effective dose (1990 and 2007 versions) and anthropomorphic phantom (mathematical and voxel). The results illustrate the practical need for the updated scanner-specific dose coefficients presently being calculated at HPA, in order to facilitate improved dosimetry for contemporary CT practice. (authors)

  16. Regional Diagnostic Reference Levels and Collective Effective Doses from Computed Tomography (CT) Scanners in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, R.S.; Dinakaran, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostic examinations performed using computed tomography (CT) are on the increase, and the use of this modality needs to be monitored periodically. The aim of this study was to formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) and assess collective effective doses from CT scanners in Tamil Nadu, India. In-site CT dose measurements were performed for 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) funded project for a period of two years. Regional DRLs were formulated at third quartile level for three CT protocols such as thorax, abdomen and pelvis and were found to be 557 mGy.cm, 521 mGy.cm and 294 mGy.cm, respectively. The collective effective dose in Tamil Nadu was found to be 14.93 man Sv per day. (author)

  17. Incorrectly placed gonad shields: Effect on CT automatic exposure correction from four different scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Weber Kusk, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the influence of incorrectly placed gonad shields on radiation dose when performing abdominal CT with automatic exposure correction, using systems from different vendors. Methods and materials: An anthropomorphic phantom was scanned without gonad shields, and with gonad shields placed in two different positions relative to the scan range. Dose Length Product was recorded. mA distribution in the longitudinal direction was plotted. Mean dose was compared using the t-test. Results: Three scanners showed different increase in relative DLP according to shield position. Conclusion: Care must be taken when placing lead shielding at CT and characteristics of each scanner should be known to the operator

  18. Accuracy of automated volumetry of pulmonary nodules across different multislice CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Marco; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Katoh, Markus; Guenther, Rolf W.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Gietema, H.A.; Prokop, Mathias; Czech, Andre; Diederich, Stefan; Bakai, Annemarie; Salganicoff, Marcos

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of an automated volumetry software for phantom pulmonary nodules across various 16-slice multislice spiral CT (MSCT) scanners from different vendors. A lung phantom containing five different nodule categories (intraparenchymal, around a vessel, vessel attached, pleural, and attached to the pleura), with each category comprised of 7-9 nodules (total, n = 40) of varying sizes (diameter 3-10 mm; volume 6.62 mm 3 -525 mm 3 ), was scanned with four different 16-slice MSCT scanners (Siemens, GE, Philips, Toshiba). Routine and low-dose chest protocols with thin and thick collimations were applied. The data from all scanners were used for further analysis using a dedicated prototype volumetry software. Absolute percentage volume errors (APE) were calculated and compared. The mean APE for all nodules was 8.4% (±7.7%) for data acquired with the 16-slice Siemens scanner, 14.3% (±11.1%) for the GE scanner, 9.7% (±9.6%) for the Philips scanner and 7.5% (±7.2%) for the Toshiba scanner, respectively. The lowest APEs were found within the diameter size range of 5-10 mm and volumes >66 mm 3 . Nodule volumetry is accurate with a reasonable volume error in data from different scanner vendors. This may have an important impact for intraindividual follow-up studies. (orig.)

  19. Construction of a ct scanner using heavy ions or protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.O.

    1981-01-01

    A computed tomography x-ray scanner, in which a monochromatic xray beam is generated by irradiating an x-ray producing target with high energy monoenergetic ions. The ion beam is preferably produced by a cyclotron. The x-ray beam is preferably rotated through an object to be scanned by angularly displacing the ion beam and target about the center axis of the object. A conventional x-ray detector array, a signal and data processor and imaging means are provided to convert detected x-ray absorption measurements into a two-dimensional visual image of the scanned object cross-section

  20. The performance characteristics of the Philips Gemini PET/CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Keefe, G.J.; Papenfuss, A.T.; Scott, A.M.; Rowe, C.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre for PET at the ARMC is commissioning a next generation PET/CT scanner based on gadolinium silicic dioxide (GSO) crystal technology to replace the BGO crystal PET scanner that has been in operation since 1992. The Gemini PET/CT scanner is a fully 3D PET system which offers significantly increased resolution and sensitivity allowing wholebody scans in under 30 minutes. Until the late 90's, PET scanners were largely used with septa for neurological imaging and the performance characteristics of PET scanners were presented according to the NEMA-NU2-94 standard which specifically addresses the performance of PET scanners for neurological applications. PET is now largely used without septa for oncological imaging and as such, the NEMA-NU2-94 standard does not adequately reflect performance. The NEMA-NU2-2001 standard was designed to incorporate the effects of out-of-FOV activity and its contribution to performance by virtue of the increased scatter and randoms that result when performing wholebody scans without the use of septa. As part of the acceptance program of the Allegro/Gemini systems, the NEMA-NU2-2001 standard will be used to characterise the spatial resolution, sensitivity, randoms and scatter contributions and the Noise Equivalent Count rate (NECr). These results will be presented and compared with the ECAT 951/31R performance characteristics. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  1. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Demir; Türkay Toklu; Mohammad Abuqbeitah; Hüseyin Çetin; H. Sezer Sezgin; Nami Yeyin; Kerim Sönmezoğlu

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated...

  2. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H. Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated asp...

  3. Technology as an Occasion for Structuring: Evidence from Observations of CT Scanners and the Social Order of Radiology Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, Stephen R.

    1986-01-01

    New technologies such as the CT scanner are challenging traditional role relations among radiology workers and may be altering the organizational and occupational structure of radiological work. This paper expands recent sociological thought by showing how identical CT scanners occasion similar structuring processes and created divergent forms of…

  4. Radiation exposure during transmission measurements: comparison between CT- and germanium-based techniques with a current PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Huang, Yung-Hui; Lee, Jason J.S.; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Su-Cheng; Su, Cheng-Tau; Chen, Liang-Kung; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2004-01-01

    In positron emission tomographic (PET) scanning, transmission measurements for attenuation correction are commonly performed by using external germanium-68 rod sources. Recently, combined PET and computed tomographic (CT) scanners have been developed in which the CT data can be used for both anatomical-metabolic image formation and attenuation correction of the PET data. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference between germanium- and CT-based transmission scanning in terms of their radiation doses by using the same measurement technique and to compare the doses that patients receive during brain, cardiac and whole-body scans. Measurement of absorbed doses to organs was conducted by using a Rando Alderson phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters. Effective doses were calculated according to the guidelines in the International Commission on Radiation Protection Publication Number 60. Compared with radionuclide doses used in routine 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose PET imaging, doses absorbed during germanium-based transmission scans were almost negligible. On the other hand, absorbed doses from CT-based transmission scans were significantly higher, particularly with a whole-body scanning protocol. Effective doses were 8.81 mSv in the high-speed mode and 18.97 mSv in the high-quality mode for whole-body CT-based transmission scans. These measurements revealed that the doses received by a patient during CT-based transmission scanning are more than those received in a typical PET examination. Therefore, the radiation doses represent a limitation to the generalised use of CT-based transmission measurements with current PET/CT scanner systems. (orig.)

  5. Two examples of indication specific radiation dose calculations in dental CBCT and Multidetector CT scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, Andreas; Zhang, Guozhi; Lopez-Rendon, Xochitl; Politis, Constantinus; Hermans, Robert; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Shaheen, Eman; Bosmans, Hilde

    2017-09-01

    To calculate organ doses and estimate the effective dose for justification purposes in patients undergoing orthognathic treatment planning purposes and temporal bone imaging in dental cone beam CT (CBCT) and Multidetector CT (MDCT) scanners. The radiation dose to the ICRP reference male voxel phantom was calculated for dedicated orthognathic treatment planning acquisitions via Monte Carlo simulations in two dental CBCT scanners, Promax 3D Max (Planmeca, FI) and NewTom VGi evo (QR s.r.l, IT) and in Somatom Definition Flash (Siemens, DE) MDCT scanner. For temporal bone imaging, radiation doses were calculated via MC simulations for a CBCT protocol in NewTom 5G (QR s.r.l, IT) and with the use of a software tool (CT-expo) for Somatom Force (Siemens, DE). All procedures had been optimized at the acceptance tests of the devices. For orthognathic protocols, dental CBCT scanners deliver lower doses compared to MDCT scanners. The estimated effective dose (ED) was 0.32mSv for a normal resolution operation mode in Promax 3D Max, 0.27mSv in VGi-evo and 1.18mSv in the Somatom Definition Flash. For temporal bone protocols, the Somatom Force resulted in an estimated ED of 0.28mSv while for NewTom 5G the ED was 0.31 and 0.22mSv for monolateral and bilateral imaging respectively. Two clinical exams which are carried out with both a CBCT or a MDCT scanner were compared in terms of radiation dose. Dental CBCT scanners deliver lower doses for orthognathic patients whereas for temporal bone procedures the doses were similar. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Financing technical-medical activities. CT scanner example in France (1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, C.; Lefaure, C.; Fagnani, F.

    1988-01-01

    To analyze the french methods for financing technical-medical activities as CT scanners, and to assess if they can face, or not, the management constraints of such activities a financial simulation has been executed. First, current expenditures are totalized (including depreciations and financial charges) with variations according to the numer of examinations per year. Costs are classified especially according to fixed and variable charges: the weight of fixed charges, especially equipment charges, is the most significant. It's very high in yearly expenditures. Most, that involves a very fast decreasing cost with increasing number of procedures. Second, consequences of such accounts are analyzed: - on private CT scanners, Payed with a charge per examination whatever would be the factor's cost; - on public CT scanners, payed with an annual allowance; in this case charges equal receipts whatever would be the cost for a procedure. Third, a break point is defined; either the annual activity is higher: there would be an excedent; either it is lower: there would be a deficit. Then, those results are reported to CT-scanners activity's data in France (1986). After all, financing systems themselves, are discussed and a few hypothesis to explain those desadjustments between charges and their financing way are suggested [fr

  7. Use of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters for measuring diagnostic doses on CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, B; Venning, A J; Baldock, C

    2004-01-01

    X-ray CT has been used to evaluate polymer gel dosimeters for dose response in the therapeutic dose range. This method of polymer gel dosimeter evaluation has been shown to be useful for instance in the comparison of complex sterotactic field distributions with treatment plans. Image averaging and subtraction techniques are used for noise reduction in polymer gel dosimeters resulting in the delivery of several CT slices across the polymer gel dosimeters. It was a logical progression to evaluate normoxic polymer gel dosimeters with optimized CT scanning protocols. During these investigations it was found that unirradiated regions in irradiated normoxic polymer gel dosimetry phantoms polymerised possibly as a result of the evaluation using CT. This prompted an investigation of the CT diagnostic dose response of the normoxic polymer gel dosimeter in order to determine the dose contribution when evaluated using a CT scanner. Having established that there was an effect on the normoxic polymer gel dosimeter when evaluating with a CT scanner the suitability of these gels in the determination of CT diagnostic dose measurement was further investigated

  8. Optimized control of X-ray exposure and image noise using a particular multislice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Koyama, Yoshihiro; Nagasawa, Hirofumi

    2008-01-01

    Patient dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) always results in a trade off between radiation exposure and image quality. There are few reports that estimate the relationship between image quality and X-ray exposure in CT examinations as one optimal index. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal parameter settings enabling a low radiation exposure without compromising image quality using a particular 4-row multislice CT (MSCT) scanner (Aquilion VZ 4-slice CT scanner, Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara, Tochigi, Japan). Normalized dose divided by image noise for helical pitches (nDNR: normalized dose to noise ratio) were calculated in consideration of beam collimation and tube current-time product. Optimal tube current-time product was calculated using the nDNR for the helical pitches based on user-defined standards of quality of the CT image. As a result, the nDNR proved to be well-supported to decrease the patient exposure in various exposure conditions of MSCT scans; however, the dose and image noise did not show a linear relation to the helical pitch. In conclusion, nDNR can be applied to patient dose reduction while keeping an acceptable image quality using a particular 4-row MSCT scanner. (author)

  9. A LabVIEW® based generic CT scanner control software platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierick, M; Van Loo, D; Masschaele, B; Boone, M; Van Hoorebeke, L

    2010-01-01

    UGCT, the Centre for X-ray tomography at Ghent University (Belgium) does research on X-ray tomography and its applications. This includes the development and construction of state-of-the-art CT scanners for scientific research. Because these scanners are built for very different purposes they differ considerably in their physical implementations. However, they all share common principle functionality. In this context a generic software platform was developed using LabVIEW® in order to provide the same interface and functionality on all scanners. This article describes the concept and features of this software, and its potential for tomography in a research setting. The core concept is to rigorously separate the abstract operation of a CT scanner from its actual physical configuration. This separation is achieved by implementing a sender-listener architecture. The advantages are that the resulting software platform is generic, scalable, highly efficient, easy to develop and to extend, and that it can be deployed on future scanners with minimal effort.

  10. SU-E-J-35: Clinical Performance Evaluation of a Phase II Proton CT Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandapaka, A; Ghebremedhin, A; Farley, D; Giacometti, V; Vence, N; Bashkirov, V; Patyal, B; Schulte, R; Plautz, T; Zatserklyaniy, A; Johnson, R; Sadrozinski, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop the methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of a Phase II Proton CT scanner Methods: Range errors on the order of 3%-5% constitute a major uncertainty in current charged particle treatment planning based on Hounsfield Unit (HU)-relative stopping power (RSP) calibration curves. Within our proton CT collaboration, we previously developed and built a Phase I proton CT scanner that provided a sensitive area of 9 cm (axial) × 18 cm (in-plane). This scanner served to get initial experience with this new treatment planning tool and to incorporate lessons learned into the next generation design. A Phase II scanner was recently completed and is now undergoing initial performance testing. It will increase the proton acquisition rate and provide a larger detection area of 9 cm x 36 cm. We are now designing a comprehensive evaluation program to test the image quality, imaging dose, and range uncertainty associated with this scanner. The testing will be performed along the lines of AAPM TG 66. Results: In our discussion of the evaluation protocol we identified the following priorities. The image quality of proton CT images, in particular spatial resolution and low-density contrast discrimination, will be evaluated with the Catphan600 phantom. Initial testing showed that the Catphan uniformity phantom did not provide sufficient uniformity; it was thus replaced by a cylindrical water phantom. The imaging dose will be tested with a Catphan dose module, and compared to a typical cone beam CT dose for comparable image quality. Lastly, we developed a dedicated dosimetry range phantom based on the CIRS pediatric head phantom HN715. Conclusion: A formal evaluation of proton CT as a new tool for proton treatment planning is an important task. The availability of the new Phase II proton CT scanner will allow us to perform this task. This research is supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH under award number R01

  11. Simple traction-immobilization device for CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.; Federle, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Successful computed tomographic (CT) scanning of acutely ill or traumatized patients often requires immobilization or traction of the extremities. Existing medical appliances and external fixation devices often are cumbersome, produce technical artifacts, or are uncomfortable for patients. This paper describes a traction-immobilization device that overcomes many of these difficulties. The authors have used this device successfully in several hundred cases and found that it markedly facilitated patient comfort and throughput. Construction is simple and inexpensive, using materials available in most hardware stores

  12. Development of radioactive source scanner based on PLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guogui; Gao Xiang; Guo Hongli

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive radial uniformity of 68 Ge line radioactive sources is a critical quality parameter. The radioactive source scanner with linear scanning function is developed by making use of high-speed pulse counters, high-speed pulse output ports, and the powerful instruction system of Siemens S7-200 series programmable logic controller (PLC). A computer used as a host computer of the instrument communicate with. the PLC by point to point interface (PPI) protocol, The instrument with functions of data collection, transmission, displaying, saving, motion control and instrument parameter settings, can be used to measure the radioactive radial uniformity and total activity of line radioactive source. The advantages of Using the PLC to develop nuclear instrumentation are development speed, strong anti-interference ability, and low-cost. This paper mainly describes the control system implementation and feature of the instrument. (authors)

  13. Comparison of scatter doses from a multislice and a single slice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrage, J. W.; Causer, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    During shielding calculations for a new multislice CT (MSCT) scanner it was found that the manufacturer's data indicated significantly higher external scatter doses than would be generated for a single slice CT (SSCT). Even allowing for increased beam width, the manufacturer's data indicated that the scatter dose per scan was higher by a factor of about 3 to 4. The magnitude of the discrepancy was contrary to expectations and also contrary to a statement by the UK ImPACT group, which indicated that when beam width is taken into account, the scatter doses should be similar. The matter was investigated by comparing scatter doses from an SSCT and an MSCT. Scatter measurements were performed at three points using a standard perspex CTDI phantom, and CT dose indices were also measured to compare scanner output. MSCT measurements were performed with a 40 mm wide beam, SSCT measurements with a 10 mm wide beam. A film badge survey was also performed after the installation of the MSCT scanner to assess the adequacy of lead shielding in the room. It was found that the scatter doses from the MSCT were lower than indicated by the manufacturer's data. MSCT scatter doses were approximately 4 times higher than those from the SSCT, consistent with expectations due to beam width differences. The CT dose indices were similar, and the film badge survey indicated that the existing shielding, which had been adequate for the SSCT, was also adequate for the MSCT

  14. Development and performance evaluation of an experimental fine pitch detector multislice CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yasuhiro; Nukui, Masatake; Ishihara, Yotaro; Fujishige, Takashi; Ogata, Kentaro; Moritake, Masahiro; Kurochi, Haruo; Ogata, Tsuyoshi; Yahata, Mitsuru; Tang, Xiangyang

    2009-04-01

    The authors have developed an experimental fine pitch detector multislice CT scanner with an ultrasmall focal spot x-ray tube and a high-density matrix detector through current CT technology. The latitudinal size of the x-ray tube focal spot was 0.4 mm. The detector dimension was 1824 channels (azimuthal direction) x 32 rows (longitudinal direction) at row width of 0.3125 mm, in which a thinner reflected separator surrounds each detector cell coupled with a large active area photodiode. They were mounted on a commercial 64-slice CT scanner gantry while the scan field of view (50 cm) and gantry rotation speed (0.35 s) can be maintained. The experimental CT scanner demonstrated the spatial resolution of 0.21-0.22 mm (23.8-22.7 lp/cm) with the acrylic slit phantom and in-plane 50%-MTF 9.0 lp/cm and 10%-MTF 22.0 lp/cm. In the longitudinal direction, it demonstrated the spatial resolution of 0.24 mm with the high-resolution insert of the CATPHAN phantom and 0.34 mm as the full width at half maximum of the slice sensitivity profile. In low-contrast detectability, 3 mm at 0.3% was visualized at the CTDI(vol) of 47.2 mGy. Two types of 2.75 mm diameter vessel phantoms with in-stent stenosis at 25%, 50%, and 75% stair steps were scanned, and the reconstructed images can clearly resolve the stenosis at each case. The experimental CT scanner provides high-resolution imaging while maintaining low-contrast detectability, demonstrating the potentiality for clinical applications demanding high spatial resolution, such as imaging of inner ear, lung, and bone, or low-contrast detectability, such as imaging of coronary artery.

  15. Calculation of the Scattered Radiation Profile in 64 Slice CT Scanners Using Experimental Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Akbarzadeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important parameters in x-ray CT imaging is the noise induced by detected scattered radiation. The detected scattered radiation is completely dependent on the scanner geometry as well as size, shape and material of the scanned object. The magnitude and spatial distribution of the scattered radiation in x-ray CT should be quantified for development of robust scatter correction techniques. Empirical methods based on blocking the primary photons in a small region are not able to extract scatter in all elements of the detector array while the scatter profile is required for a scatter correction procedure. In this study, we measured scatter profiles in 64 slice CT scanners using a new experimental measurement. Material and Methods: To measure the scatter profile, a lead block array was inserted under the collimator and the phantom was exposed at the isocenter. The raw data file, which contained detector array readouts, was transferred to a PC and was read using a dedicated GUI running under MatLab 7.5. The scatter profile was extracted by interpolating the shadowed area. Results: The scatter and SPR profiles were measured. Increasing the tube voltage from 80 to 140 kVp resulted in an 80% fall off in SPR for a water phantom (d=210 mm and 86% for a polypropylene phantom (d = 350 mm. Increasing the air gap to 20.9 cm caused a 30% decrease in SPR. Conclusion: In this study, we presented a novel approach for measurement of scattered radiation distribution and SPR in a CT scanner with 64-slice capability using a lead block array. The method can also be used on other multi-slice CT scanners. The proposed technique can accurately estimate scatter profiles. It is relatively straightforward, easy to use, and can be used for any related measurement.

  16. Validation of novel calibration scheme with traceable point-like (22)Na sources on six types of PET scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Oda, Keiichi; Wada, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Toshiaki; Sato, Yasushi; Yamada, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Mikio; Murayama, Hideo; Kikuchi, Kei; Miyatake, Hiroki; Abe, Yutaka; Miwa, Kenta; Akimoto, Kenta; Wagatsuma, Kei

    2013-05-01

    To improve the reliability and convenience of the calibration procedure of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, we have been developing a novel calibration path based on traceable point-like sources. When using (22)Na sources, special care should be taken to avoid the effects of 1.275-MeV γ rays accompanying β (+) decays. The purpose of this study is to validate this new calibration scheme with traceable point-like (22)Na sources on various types of PET scanners. Traceable point-like (22)Na sources with a spherical absorber design that assures uniform angular distribution of the emitted annihilation photons were used. The tested PET scanners included a clinical whole-body PET scanner, four types of clinical PET/CT scanners from different manufacturers, and a small-animal PET scanner. The region of interest (ROI) diameter dependence of ROI values was represented with a fitting function, which was assumed to consist of a recovery part due to spatial resolution and a quadratic background part originating from the scattered γ rays. The observed ROI radius dependence was well represented with the assumed fitting function (R (2) > 0.994). The calibration factors determined using the point-like sources were consistent with those by the standard cross-calibration method within an uncertainty of ±4 %, which was reasonable considering the uncertainty in the standard cross-calibration method. This novel calibration scheme based on the use of traceable (22)Na point-like sources was successfully validated for six types of commercial PET scanners.

  17. Fast, high-resolution 3D dosimetry utilizing a novel optical-CT scanner incorporating tertiary telecentric collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakhalkar, H. S.; Oldham, M.

    2008-01-01

    This study introduces a charge coupled device (CCD) area detector based optical-computed tomography (optical-CT) scanner for comprehensive verification of radiation dose distributions recorded in nonscattering radiochromic dosimeters. Defining characteristics include: (i) a very fast scanning time of ∼5 min to acquire a complete three-dimensional (3D) dataset, (ii) improved image formation through the use of custom telecentric optics, which ensures accurate projection images and minimizes artifacts from scattered and stray-light sources, and (iii) high resolution (potentially 50 μm) isotropic 3D dose readout. The performance of the CCD scanner for 3D dose readout was evaluated by comparison with independent 3D readout from the single laser beam OCTOPUS-scanner for the same PRESAGE dosimeters. The OCTOPUS scanner was considered the 'gold standard' technique in light of prior studies demonstrating its accuracy. Additional comparisons were made against calculated dose distributions from the ECLIPSE treatment-planning system. Dose readout for the following treatments were investigated: (i) a single rectangular beam irradiation to investigate small field and very steep dose gradient dosimetry away from edge effects, (ii) a 2-field open beam parallel-opposed irradiation to investigate dosimetry along steep dose gradients, and (iii) a 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation to investigate dosimetry for complex treatment delivery involving modulation of fluence and for dosimetry along moderate dose gradients. Dose profiles, dose-difference plots, and gamma maps were employed to evaluate quantitative estimates of agreement between independently measured and calculated dose distributions. Results indicated that dose readout from the CCD scanner was in agreement with independent gold-standard readout from the OCTOPUS-scanner as well as the calculated ECLIPSE dose distribution for all treatments, except in regions within a few millimeters of the

  18. Whole body X-ray CT scanner SCT-3000T series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Teruhiko; Takemura, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Satoru; Sato, Yukio; Kawamoto, Yasushi; Goto, Mitsuhiro; Mishina, Yukio

    1989-01-01

    The whole body CT scanner, SCT-3000T series which improve the patient through-put and the diagnostic capability, has been developed. In the SCT-3000T series CT scanners, the great reduction of the reconstruction time and the scan cycle time has been achieved by developing the special purpose hardwares for image reconstruction such as the fast front end processor, the intelligent buffer memory. In case of the SCT-3000TX routine conditions of operation, including 3.0 sec scan, table increment, image reconstruction and image filing, the scan cycle time is about 9 seconds which is the shortest value among the competitive models. Furthermore, the higher diagnostic capability has been provided with the system, by adopting the 1024 x 1024 display matrices, and by developing the diagnostic softwares such as 3-D display program, arbitrary curved plane MPR program, r-CBF measurement program and etc. (author)

  19. Radiation doses during chest examinations using dose modulation techniques in multislice CT scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone Roshan; Pradip Joe; Dinakran Paul; Srikanth B

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radiation dose and image quality using a manual protocol and dose modulation techniques in a 6-slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-one patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT of the chest were included in the study. For the manual protocol settings, constant tube potential (kV) and tube current-time product (mAs) of 140 kV and 120 mAs, respectively, were used. The angular and z-axis dose modulation techniques utilized a constant tu...

  20. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated aspects were spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, count rate performance, image quality, count loss and random events correction accuracy. The findings of this study demonstrated superior sensitivity (~ 4 folds) of PET scanner in PET/MR compared to PET/CT system. Image quality test exhibited higher contrast in PET/MR (~ 9%) compared with PET/CT. The scatter fraction of PET/MR was 43.4% at noise equivalent count rate (NECR) peak of 218 kcps and the corresponding activity concentration was 17.7 kBq/cc. Whereas the scatter fraction of PET/CT was found as 39.2% at NECR peak of 72 kcps and activity concentration of 24.3 kBq/cc. The percentage error of the random event correction accuracy was 3.4% and 3.1% in PET/MR and PET/CT, respectively. It was concluded that PET/MR system is about 4 times more sensitive than PET/CT, and the contrast of hot lesions in PET/MR was ~ 9% higher than PET/CT. These outcomes also emphasize the possibility to achieve excellent clinical PET images with low administered dose and/or a short acquisition time in PET/MR.

  1. Evaluation of patient dose using a virtual CT scanner: Applications to 4DCT simulation and Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMarco, J J; Agazaryan, N; McNitt-Gray, M F; Cagnon, C H; Angel, E; Zankl, M

    2008-01-01

    This work evaluates the effects of patient size on radiation dose from simulation imaging studies such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). 4DCT studies are scans that include temporal information, frequently incorporating highly over-sampled imaging series necessary for retrospective sorting as a function of respiratory phase. This type of imaging study can result in a significant dose increase to the patient due to the slower table speed as compared with a conventional axial or helical scan protocol. Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging is a relatively new imaging technique that requires an on-board kilovoltage x-ray tube and a flat-panel detector. Instead of porting individual reference fields, the kV tube and flat-panel detector are rotated about the patient producing a cone-beam CT data set (kV-CBCT). To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of adult patients and virtual source models of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. The GSF family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models, were implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The adult patient models represent a range of patient sizes and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented. Simulated 4DCT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a multi-detector CT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, bow-tie filtration, and helical source path. Standard MCNPX tally functions were applied to each model to estimate absolute organ dose based upon an air-kerma normalization measurement for nominal scanner operating parameters

  2. CT imaging of the internal human ear: Test of a high resolution scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettuzzi, M., E-mail: matteo.bettuzzi@unibo.it [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and National Institute of Nuclear Physics Section of Bologna (Italy); Brancaccio, R.; Morigi, M.P. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and National Institute of Nuclear Physics Section of Bologna (Italy); Gallo, A. [Medicine Faculty, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro and INFN Cosenza (Italy); Strolin, S.; Casali, F. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and National Institute of Nuclear Physics Section of Bologna (Italy); Lamanna, Ernesto [Medicine Faculty, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro and INFN Cosenza (Italy); Ariu, Marilu [CEFLA Dental Group, Imola (Italy)

    2011-08-21

    During the course of 2009, in the framework of a project supported by the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, a number of tests were carried out at the Department of Physics of the University of Bologna in order to achieve a good quality CT scan of the internal human ear. The work was carried out in collaboration with the local 'S. Orsola' Hospital in Bologna and a company (CEFLA) already involved in the production and commercialization of a CT scanner dedicated to dentistry. A laboratory scanner with a simple concept detector (CCD camera-lens-mirror-scintillator) was used to see to what extent it was possible to enhance the quality of a conventional CT scanner when examining the internal human ear. To test the system, some conventional measurements were made, such as the spatial resolution calculation with the MTF and dynamic range evaluation. Different scintillators were compared to select the most suitable for the purpose. With 0.5 mm thick structured cesium iodide and a field of view of 120x120 mm{sup 2}, a spatial resolution of 6.5l p/mm at 5% MTF was obtained. The CT of a pair of human head phantoms was performed at an energy of 120 kVp. The first phantom was a rough representation of the human head shape, with soft tissue made of coarse slabs of Lucite. Some inserts, like small aluminum cylinders and cubes, with 1 mm diameter drilled holes, were used to simulate the channels that one finds inside the human inner ear. The second phantom is a plastic PVC fused head with a real human cranium inside. The bones in the cranium are well conserved and the inner ear features, such as the cochlea and semicircular channels, are clearly detectable. After a number of CT tests we obtained good results as far as structural representation and channel detection are concerned. Some images of the 3D rendering of the CT volume are shown below. The doctors of the local hospital who followed our experimentation expressed their satisfaction. The CT was compared to a

  3. The utilization of dual source CT in imaging of polytrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaou, S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Radiology, 899 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z1M9 (Canada)], E-mail: savvas.nicolaou@vch.ca; Eftekhari, A.; Sedlic, T.; Hou, D.J.; Mudri, M.J.; Aldrich, John; Louis, L. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Radiology, 899 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z1M9 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Despite the growing role of imaging, trauma remains the leading cause of death in people below the age of 45 years in the western industrialized countries. Trauma has been touted as the largest epidemic in the 20th century. The advent of MDCT has been the greatest advance in trauma care in the last 25 years. However, there are still challenges in CT imaging of the polytrauma individual including time restraints, diagnostic errors, radiation dose effects and bridging the gap between anatomy and physiology. This article will analyze these challenges and provide possible solutions offered by the unique design of the dual source CT scanner.

  4. The utilization of dual source CT in imaging of polytrauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaou, S.; Eftekhari, A.; Sedlic, T.; Hou, D.J.; Mudri, M.J.; Aldrich, John; Louis, L.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the growing role of imaging, trauma remains the leading cause of death in people below the age of 45 years in the western industrialized countries. Trauma has been touted as the largest epidemic in the 20th century. The advent of MDCT has been the greatest advance in trauma care in the last 25 years. However, there are still challenges in CT imaging of the polytrauma individual including time restraints, diagnostic errors, radiation dose effects and bridging the gap between anatomy and physiology. This article will analyze these challenges and provide possible solutions offered by the unique design of the dual source CT scanner

  5. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Anton; le Roux, Stephan Gerhard; Guelpa, Anina

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory's first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  6. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessis, Anton du, E-mail: anton2@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Roux, Stephan Gerhard le, E-mail: lerouxsg@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Guelpa, Anina, E-mail: aninag@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory’s first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  7. Temporal resolution measurement of 128-slice dual source and 320-row area detector computed tomography scanners in helical acquisition mode using the impulse method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takanori; Urikura, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Hoshino, Takashi; Nishimaru, Eiji; Niwa, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    To analyse the temporal resolution (TR) of modern computed tomography (CT) scanners using the impulse method, and assess the actual maximum TR at respective helical acquisition modes. To assess the actual TR of helical acquisition modes of a 128-slice dual source CT (DSCT) scanner and a 320-row area detector CT (ADCT) scanner, we assessed the TRs of various acquisition combinations of a pitch factor (P) and gantry rotation time (R). The TR of the helical acquisition modes for the 128-slice DSCT scanner continuously improved with a shorter gantry rotation time and greater pitch factor. However, for the 320-row ADCT scanner, the TR with a pitch factor of pitch factor of >1.0, it was approximately one half of the gantry rotation time. The maximum TR values of single- and dual-source helical acquisition modes for the 128-slice DSCT scanner were 0.138 (R/P=0.285/1.5) and 0.074s (R/P=0.285/3.2), and the maximum TR values of the 64×0.5- and 160×0.5-mm detector configurations of the helical acquisition modes for the 320-row ADCT scanner were 0.120 (R/P=0.275/1.375) and 0.195s (R/P=0.3/0.6), respectively. Because the TR of a CT scanner is not accurately depicted in the specifications of the individual scanner, appropriate acquisition conditions should be determined based on the actual TR measurement. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inner images of the human body with a 3D CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hisashi

    1994-01-01

    This article deals with not only CT-endoscopy (CTES) technique but also various imaging and processing techniques of 3D CT. CTES images, which were obtained from 137 patients with suspected cardiovascular disorder or disease of other tubular organs, were reconstructed using a newly developed volumetric scanner with a slip-ring system. Among the 137 patients, 107 (78%) were successfully diagnosed by CTES. For cardiovascular region, dissecting aneurysm was detected in 27/32, aortitis in 9/9, and intra-arterial thrombosis in 5/6. Various imaging and processing techniques, including CT number conversion technique, multi-threshold range imaging, 'open-window' and 'virtual operation', and long segmental arteriogram by intravenous contrast injection, are displayed in futures. In conclusion, CTES might become a safe and minimally invasive means for observing the inner surface of the tubular organs, particularly of the aorta, without the need of fiberscopic manipulation. (N.K.)

  9. Lack of CT scanner in a rural emergency department increases inter-facility transfers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Catherine; Fleet, Richard; Tounkara, Fatoumata Korika; Lavallée-Bourget, Isabelle; Turgeon-Pelchat, Catherine

    2017-12-28

    Rural emergency departments (EDs) are an important gateway to care for the 20% of Canadians who reside in rural areas. Less than 15% of Canadian rural EDs have access to a computed tomography (CT) scanner. We hypothesized that a significant proportion of inter-facility transfers from rural hospitals without CT scanners are for CT imaging. Our objective was to assess inter-facility transfers for CT imaging in a rural ED without a CT scanner. We selected a rural ED that offers 24/7 medical care with admission beds but no CT scanner. Descriptive statistics were collected from 2010 to 2015 on total ED visits and inter-facility transfers. Data was accessible through hospital and government databases. Between 2010 and 2014, there were respectively 13,531, 13,524, 13,827, 12,883, and 12,942 ED visits, with an average of 444 inter-facility transfers. An average of 33% (148/444) of inter-facility transfers were to a rural referral centre with a CT scan, with 84% being for CT scan. Inter-facility transfers incur costs and potential delays in patient diagnosis and management, yet current databases could not capture transfer times. Acquiring a CT scan may represent a reasonable opportunity for the selected rural hospital considering the number of required transfers.

  10. Three-dimensional contrasted visualization of pancreas in rats using clinical MRI and CT scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ting; Coudyzer, Walter; Peeters, Ronald; Liu, Yewei; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Feng, Yuanbo; Xia, Qian; Yu, Jie; Jiang, Yansheng; Dymarkowski, Steven; Huang, Gang; Chen, Feng; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to visualize the pancreas in post-mortem rats with local contrast medium infusion by three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) using clinical imagers. A total of 16 Sprague Dawley rats of about 300 g were used for the pancreas visualization. Following the baseline imaging, a mixed contrast medium dye called GadoIodo-EB containing optimized concentrations of Gd-DOTA, iomeprol and Evens blue was infused into the distally obstructed common bile duct (CBD) for post-contrast imaging with 3.0 T MRI and 128-slice CT scanners. Images were post-processed with the MeVisLab software package. MRI findings were co-registered with CT scans and validated with histomorphology, with relative contrast ratios quantified. Without contrast enhancement, the pancreas was indiscernible. After infusion of GadoIodo-EB solution, only the pancreatic region became outstandingly visible, as shown by 3D rendering MRI and CT and proven by colored dissection and histological examinations. The measured volume of the pancreas averaged 1.12 ± 0.04 cm(3) after standardization. Relative contrast ratios were 93.28 ± 34.61% and 26.45 ± 5.29% for MRI and CT respectively. We have developed a multifunctional contrast medium dye to help clearly visualize and delineate rat pancreas in situ using clinical MRI and CT scanners. The topographic landmarks thus created with 3D demonstration may help to provide guidelines for the next in vivo pancreatic MRI research in rodents. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Dosimetric impact of image artifact from a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Vincent; Podgorsak, Matthew B.; Tran, Tuan-Anh; Malhotra, Harish K.; Wang, Iris Z. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Traditional computed tomography (CT) units provide a maximum scan field-of-view (sFOV) diameter of 50 cm and a limited bore size, which cannot accommodate a large patient habitus or an extended simulation setup in radiation therapy (RT). Wide-bore CT scanners with increased bore size were developed to address these needs. Some scanners have the capacity to reconstruct the CT images at an extended FOV (eFOV), through data interpolation or extrapolation, using projection data acquired with a conventional sFOV. Objects that extend past the sFOV for eFOV reconstruction may generate image artifacts resulting from truncated projection data; this may distort CT numbers and structure contours in the region beyond the sFOV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of image artifacts from eFOV reconstruction with a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. Methods: Testing phantoms (i.e., a mini CT phantom with equivalent tissue inserts, a set of CT normal phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms of the thorax and the pelvis) were used to evaluate eFOV artifacts. Reference baseline images of these phantoms were acquired with the phantom centrally positioned within the sFOV. For comparison, the phantoms were then shifted laterally and scanned partially outside the sFOV, but still within the eFOV. Treatment plans were generated for the thoracic and pelvic anthropomorphic phantoms utilizing the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) to study the potential effects of eFOV artifacts on dose calculations. All dose calculations of baseline and test treatment plans were carried out using the same MU. Results: Results show that both body contour and CT numbers are altered by image artifacts in eFOV reconstruction. CT number distortions of up to -356 HU for bone tissue and up to 323 HU for lung tissue were observed in the mini CT phantom. Results from the large body normal phantom, which is close to a clinical patient size, show

  12. Metallic artifacts caused by dental metal prostheses on PET images. A PET/CT phantom study using different PET/CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Hiroaki; Kakimoto, Naoya; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei; Fujino, Kouichi; Hamada, Seiki; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of computed tomography (CT) artifacts caused by dental metal prostheses on positron emission tomography (PET) images. A dental arch cast was fixed in a cylindrical water-bath phantom. A spherical phantom positioned in the vicinity of the dental arch cast was used to simulate a tumor. To simulate the tumor imaging, the ratio of the 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose radioactivity concentration of the spherical phantom to that of the water-bath phantom was set at 2.5. A dental bridge composed of a gold-silver-palladium alloy on the right mandibular side was prepared. A spherical phantom was set in the white artifact area on the CT images (site A), in a slightly remote area from the white artifact (site B), and in a black artifact area (site C). A PET/CT scan was performed with and without the metal bridge at each simulated tumor site, and the artifactual influence was evaluated on the axial attenuation-corrected (AC) PET images, in which the simulated tumor produced the strongest accumulation. Measurements were performed using three types of PET/CT scanners (scanners 1 and 2 with CT-based attenuation correction, and 3 with Cesium-137 ( 137 Cs)-based attenuation correction). The influence of the metal bridge was evaluated using the change rate of the SUVmean with and without the metal bridge. At site A, an overestimation was shown (scanner 1: +5.0% and scanner 2: +2.5%), while scanner 3 showed an underestimation of -31.8%. At site B, an overestimation was shown (scanner 1: +2.1% and scanner 2: +2.0%), while scanner 3 showed an underestimation of -2.6%. However, at site C, an underestimation was shown (scanner 1: -25.0%, scanner 2: -32.4%, and scanner 3: -8.4%). When CT is used for attenuation correction in patients with dental metal prostheses, an underestimation of radioactivity of accumulated tracer is anticipated in the dark streak artifact area on the CT images. In this study, the dark streak artifacts of the CT

  13. Application of decision-making methodology to certificate-of-need applications for CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottinger, H.W.; Shapiro, P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a case study and application of decision-making methodology to two competing Certificate of Need (CON) applications for CT body scanners. We demonstrate the use of decision-making methodology by evaluating the CON applications. Explicit value judgements reflecting the monetary equivalent of the different categories of benefit are introduced to facilitate this comparison. The difference between the benefits (measured in monetary terms) and costs is called the net social value. Any alternative with positive net social value is judged economically justifiable, and the alternative with the greatest net social value is judged the most attractive. (orig.)

  14. Endoscopic visualization of luminal organ and great vessels with three dimensional CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Amemiya, Ryuta; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    Thirty cases examined by three dimensional CT scanner (3DCT) are reported. The observation of inner view using 3DCT were performed in 12 large vessels with vascular disorder, 10 pulmonary bronchi with lung cancer and 8 common bile ducts involved obstructive disease. In order to visualize interface of the lumen, a new software, which was developed by HITACHI MEDICO Inc., was used. In all cases but one the inner view of the luminal organ was clearly demonstrated as 3D images and it was possible to judge some changes of luminal interface involved by the diseases. The 3DCT endoscopic image might be useful as a new endoscopic technique without fiberscopy. (author)

  15. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm 2 (0.002 mm −1 ) to 0.29 mm 2 (0.74 mm −1 ). The GE kernels “Soft,”“Standard,”“Chest,” and “Lung” closely matched the Siemens kernels “B35f,”“B43f,”“B41f,” and “B80f” (RMSD 2 , |PFD| −1 , respectively). The GE “Bone,”“Bone+,” and “Edge” kernels all matched most closely with Siemens “B75f” kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm 2 and 0.41 mm −1 , respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is

  16. Low-dose CT pulmonary angiography on a 15-year-old CT scanner: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Kaup

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Computed tomography (CT low-dose (LD imaging is used to lower radiation exposure, especially in vascular imaging; in current literature, this is mostly on latest generation high-end CT systems. Purpose To evaluate the effects of reduced tube current on objective and subjective image quality of a 15-year-old 16-slice CT system for pulmonary angiography (CTPA. Material and Methods CTPA scans from 60 prospectively randomized patients (28 men, 32 women were examined in this study on a 15-year-old 16-slice CT scanner system. Standard CT (SD settings were 100 kV and 150 mAs, LD settings were 100 kV and 50 mAs. Attenuation of the pulmonary trunk, various anatomic landmarks, and image noise were quantitatively measured; contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR were calculated. Three independent blinded radiologists subjectively rated each image series using a 5-point grading scale. Results CT dose index (CTDI in the LD series was 66.46% lower compared to the SD settings (2.49 ± 0.55 mGy versus 7.42 ± 1.17 mGy. Attenuation of the pulmonary trunk showed similar results for both series (SD 409.55 ± 91.04 HU; LD 380.43 HU ± 93.11 HU; P = 0.768. Subjective image analysis showed no significant differences between SD and LD settings regarding the suitability for detection of central and peripheral PE (central SD/LD, 4.88; intra-class correlation coefficients [ICC], 0.894/4.83; ICC, 0.745; peripheral SD/LD, 4.70; ICC, 0.943/4.57; ICC, 0.919; all P > 0.4. Conclusion The LD protocol, on a 15-year-old CT scanner system without current high-end hardware or post-processing tools, led to a dose reduction of approximately 67% with similar subjective image quality and delineation of central and peripheral pulmonary arteries.

  17. Pitfalls in urinary stone identification using CT attenuation values: Are we getting the same information on different scanner models?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosjean, Romain, E-mail: r.grosjean@chu-nancy.fr [IADI Laboratory, INSERM-U947, Nancy-University, Allée du Morvan, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Daudon, Michel, E-mail: michel.daudon@tnn.aphp.fr [IADI Laboratory, INSERM-U947, Nancy-University, Allée du Morvan, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Chammas, Mario F., E-mail: mariochammas@usp.br [University of Sao Paulo – Division of Urology, Av. Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar, 255, 7" o Andar – s. 7123, São Paulo (Brazil); Claudon, Michel, E-mail: m.claudon@chu-nancy.fr [IADI Laboratory, INSERM-U947, Nancy-University, Allée du Morvan, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Eschwege, Pascal, E-mail: peschwege@yahoo.com [Department of Urology, Brabois Hospital, University Hospital of Nancy, Allée du Morvan, 54511 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Felblinger, Jacques, E-mail: j.felblinger@chu-nancy.fr [IADI Laboratory, INSERM-U947, Nancy-University, Allée du Morvan, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Hubert, Jacques, E-mail: j.hubert@chu-nancy.fr [Department of Urology, Brabois Hospital, University Hospital of Nancy, Allée du Morvan, 54511 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2013-08-15

    Introduction: Evaluate the capability of different Computed Tomography scanners to determine urinary stone compositions based on CT attenuation values and to evaluate potential differences between each model. Methods: 241 human urinary stones were obtained and their biochemical composition determined. Four different CT scanners (Siemens, Philips, GEMS and Toshiba) were evaluated. Mean CT-attenuation values and the standard deviation were recorded separately and compared with a t-paired test. Results: For all tested CT scanners, when the classification of the various types of stones was arranged according to the mean CT-attenuation values and to the confidence interval, large overlappings between stone types were highlighted. The t-paired test showed that most stone types could not be identified. Some types of stones presented mean CT attenuation values significantly different from one CT scanner to another. At 80 kV, the mean CT attenuation values obtained with the Toshiba Aquilion were significantly different from those obtained with the Siemens Sensation. On the other hand, mean values obtained with the Philips Brilliance were all significantly equal to those obtained with the Siemens Sensation and with the Toshiba Aquilion. At 120 kV mean CT attenuation values of uric acid, cystine and struvite stones obtained with the Philips model are significantly different from those obtained with the Siemens and the Toshiba but equal to those obtained with the GE 64. Conclusions: According to our study, there is a great variability when different brands and models of scanners are compared directly. Furthermore, the CT scan analysis and HU evaluation appears to gather insufficient information in order to characterize and identify the composition of renal stones.

  18. Pitfalls in urinary stone identification using CT attenuation values: Are we getting the same information on different scanner models?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosjean, Romain; Daudon, Michel; o Andar – s. 7123, São Paulo (Brazil))" data-affiliation=" (University of Sao Paulo – Division of Urology, Av. Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar, 255, 7o Andar – s. 7123, São Paulo (Brazil))" >Chammas, Mario F.; Claudon, Michel; Eschwege, Pascal; Felblinger, Jacques; Hubert, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluate the capability of different Computed Tomography scanners to determine urinary stone compositions based on CT attenuation values and to evaluate potential differences between each model. Methods: 241 human urinary stones were obtained and their biochemical composition determined. Four different CT scanners (Siemens, Philips, GEMS and Toshiba) were evaluated. Mean CT-attenuation values and the standard deviation were recorded separately and compared with a t-paired test. Results: For all tested CT scanners, when the classification of the various types of stones was arranged according to the mean CT-attenuation values and to the confidence interval, large overlappings between stone types were highlighted. The t-paired test showed that most stone types could not be identified. Some types of stones presented mean CT attenuation values significantly different from one CT scanner to another. At 80 kV, the mean CT attenuation values obtained with the Toshiba Aquilion were significantly different from those obtained with the Siemens Sensation. On the other hand, mean values obtained with the Philips Brilliance were all significantly equal to those obtained with the Siemens Sensation and with the Toshiba Aquilion. At 120 kV mean CT attenuation values of uric acid, cystine and struvite stones obtained with the Philips model are significantly different from those obtained with the Siemens and the Toshiba but equal to those obtained with the GE 64. Conclusions: According to our study, there is a great variability when different brands and models of scanners are compared directly. Furthermore, the CT scan analysis and HU evaluation appears to gather insufficient information in order to characterize and identify the composition of renal stones

  19. Beyond 18F-FDG: Characterization of PET/CT and PET/MR Scanners for a Comprehensive Set of Positron Emitters of Growing Application--18F, 11C, 89Zr, 124I, 68Ga, and 90Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, A Therese; Chaal, Jasper; Tjio, Gabriel; Totman, John J; Conti, Maurizio; Townsend, David W

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate image quality for a comprehensive set of isotopes ((18)F, (11)C, (89)Zr, (124)I, (68)Ga, and (90)Y) on 2 clinical scanners: a PET/CT scanner and a PET/MR scanner. Image quality and spatial resolution were tested according to NU 2-2007 of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association. An image-quality phantom was used to measure contrast recovery, residual bias in a cold area, and background variability. Reconstruction methods available on the 2 scanners were compared, including point-spread-function correction for both scanners and time of flight for the PET/CT scanner. Spatial resolution was measured using point sources and filtered backprojection reconstruction. With the exception of (90)Y, small differences were seen in the hot-sphere contrast recovery of the different isotopes. Cold-sphere contrast recovery was similar across isotopes for all reconstructions, with an improvement seen with time of flight on the PET/CT scanner. The lower-statistic (90)Y scans yielded substantially lower contrast recovery than the other isotopes. When isotopes were compared, there was no difference in measured spatial resolution except for PET/MR axial spatial resolution, which was significantly higher for (124)I and (68)Ga. Overall, both scanners produced good images with (18)F, (11)C, (89)Zr, (124)I, (68)Ga, and (90)Y. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  20. In vitro imaging of coronary artery stents: Are there differences between 16- and 64-slice CT scanners?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Florian; Feuchtner, Gudrun M.; Homolka, Peter; Langenberger, Herbert; Stadler, Alfred; Bader, Till R.; Weber, Michael; Lammer, Johannes; Loewe, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of 64-slice with 16-slice CT scanners for the in vitro evaluation of coronary artery stents. Methods and materials: Twelve different coronary artery stents were placed in the drillings of a combined heart and chest phantom, which was scanned with a 16- and 64-slice CT scanner. Coronal reformations were evaluated for artificial lumen narrowing, intraluminal attenuation values, and false widening of the outer stent diameter as an indicator of artifacts outside the stent. Results: Mean artificial lumen narrowing was not significantly different between the 16- and 64-slice CT scanner (44% versus 39%; p = 0.408). The differences between the Hounsfield Units (HU) measurements inside and outside the stents were significantly lower (p = 0.001) with 64- compared to 16-slice CT. The standard deviation of the HU measurements inside the stents was significantly (p = 0.002) lower with 64- than with 16-slice CT. Artifacts outside the stents were not significantly different between the scanners (p = 0.866). Conclusion: Visualization of the in-stent lumen is improved with 64-slice CT when compared with 16-slice CT as quantified by significantly lesser intraluminal image noise and less artificial rise in intraluminal HU measurement, which is the most important parameter for the evaluation of stent patency in vivo

  1. Continued Development Of An Inexpensive Simulator Based CT Scanner For Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschmann, K. R.; Parker, D. L.; Smith, V.

    1982-11-01

    An abundant number of different CT scanner models has been developed in the past ten years, meeting increasing standards of performance. From the beginning they remained a comparatively expensive piece of equipment. This is due not only to their technical complexity but is also due to the difficulties involved in assessing "true" specifications (avoiding "overde-sign"). Our aim has been to provide, for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning, a low cost CT scanner system featuring large freedom in patient positioning. We have taken advantage of the concurrent tremendously increased amount of knowledge and experience in the technical area of CT1 . By way of extensive computer simulations we gained confidence that an inexpensive C-arm simulator gantry and a simple one phase-two pulse generator in connection with a standard x-ray tube could be used, without sacrificing image quality. These components have been complemented by a commercial high precision shaft encoder, a simple and effective fan beam collimator, a high precision, high efficiency, luminescence crystal-silicon photodiode detector with 256 channels, low noise electronic preamplifier and sampling filter stages, a simplified data aquisition system furnished by Toshiba/ Analogic and an LSI 11/23 microcomputer plus data storage disk as well as various smaller interfaces linking the electrical components. The quality of CT scan pictures of phantoms,performed by the end of last year confirmed that this simple approach is working well. As a next step we intend to upgrade this system with an array processor in order to shorten recon-struction time to one minute per slice. We estimate that the system including this processor could be manufactured for a selling price of $210,000.

  2. Aquilion ONE / ViSION Edition CT scanner realizing 3D dynamic observation with low-dose scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Masahiro; Saito, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanners have been continuously advancing as essential diagnostic imaging equipment for the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases, including the three major disease classes of cerebrovascular disease, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Through the development of helical CT scanners and multislice CT scanners, Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation has developed the Aquilion ONE, a CT scanner with a scanning range of up to 160 mm per rotation that can obtain three-dimensional (3D) images of the brain, heart, and other organs in a single rotation. We have now developed the Aquilion ONE / ViSION Edition, a next-generation 320-row multislice CT scanner incorporating the latest technologies that achieves a shorter scanning time and significant reduction in dose compared with conventional products. This product with its low-dose scanning technology will contribute to the practical realization of new diagnosis and treatment modalities employing four-dimensional (4D) data based on 3D dynamic observations through continuous rotations. (author)

  3. Measurements of computed tomography dose index for axial and spiral CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breiki, G; Abbas, Y.; Diab, H.M.; Gomaa, M

    2007-01-01

    The energy deposited in the patient by the rotating x-ray beam in computed tomography produces more uniform absorbed dose values within the section of imaged tissue than those produced in conventional radiological procedures. The dose values within a specific section are determined by factors such as voltage, current, scan field, rotation angle, filtration, collimation, and section thickness and spacing. This study is a part of extensive project, aiming to investigate practice of computed tomography at various hospitals and to implement a Reference Dose Levels (RDLs) to routine CT examinations in Egypt. The dosimetric quantities proposed in the European Guidelines (EG) for CT are weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDI w ) for a single slice and dose-length product (DLP) for a complete examination. Patient-related data as well as technical parameters for head, chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations were collected for seven CT scanners in public and private hospitals.Dose measurements were performed for both axial and spiral models for a range of CT examinations using CT dosimetry head and body phantoms, and ion chamber designed for CT dosimetry. The determined CTDI w and DLP values were compared with the European Commission reference dose levels (ECRDLs) and also with some international survey results. Mean values of CTDI w had a range of 36-69 m Gy with average 55 m Gy for head, and 11-35 mGy with average 23 mGy for chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations. The current reference CTDI w values are 60 m Gy for adult head and 25 m Gy for adult Abdomen

  4. Accuracy of Dual-Energy Virtual Monochromatic CT Numbers: Comparison between the Single-Source Projection-Based and Dual-Source Image-Based Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueguchi, Takashi; Ogihara, Ryota; Yamada, Sachiko

    2018-03-21

    To investigate the accuracy of dual-energy virtual monochromatic computed tomography (CT) numbers obtained by two typical hardware and software implementations: the single-source projection-based method and the dual-source image-based method. A phantom with different tissue equivalent inserts was scanned with both single-source and dual-source scanners. A fast kVp-switching feature was used on the single-source scanner, whereas a tin filter was used on the dual-source scanner. Virtual monochromatic CT images of the phantom at energy levels of 60, 100, and 140 keV were obtained by both projection-based (on the single-source scanner) and image-based (on the dual-source scanner) methods. The accuracy of virtual monochromatic CT numbers for all inserts was assessed by comparing measured values to their corresponding true values. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the dependency of measured CT numbers on tissue attenuation, method, and their interaction. Root mean square values of systematic error over all inserts at 60, 100, and 140 keV were approximately 53, 21, and 29 Hounsfield unit (HU) with the single-source projection-based method, and 46, 7, and 6 HU with the dual-source image-based method, respectively. Linear regression analysis revealed that the interaction between the attenuation and the method had a statistically significant effect on the measured CT numbers at 100 and 140 keV. There were attenuation-, method-, and energy level-dependent systematic errors in the measured virtual monochromatic CT numbers. CT number reproducibility was comparable between the two scanners, and CT numbers had better accuracy with the dual-source image-based method at 100 and 140 keV. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SedCT: MATLAB™ tools for standardized and quantitative processing of sediment core computed tomography (CT) data collected using a medical CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, B. T.; Stoner, J. S.; Wiest, J.

    2017-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of sediment cores allows for high-resolution images, three-dimensional volumes, and down core profiles. These quantitative data are generated through the attenuation of X-rays, which are sensitive to sediment density and atomic number, and are stored in pixels as relative gray scale values or Hounsfield units (HU). We present a suite of MATLAB™ tools specifically designed for routine sediment core analysis as a means to standardize and better quantify the products of CT data collected on medical CT scanners. SedCT uses a graphical interface to process Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) files, stitch overlapping scanned intervals, and create down core HU profiles in a manner robust to normal coring imperfections. Utilizing a random sampling technique, SedCT reduces data size and allows for quick processing on typical laptop computers. SedCTimage uses a graphical interface to create quality tiff files of CT slices that are scaled to a user-defined HU range, preserving the quantitative nature of CT images and easily allowing for comparison between sediment cores with different HU means and variance. These tools are presented along with examples from lacustrine and marine sediment cores to highlight the robustness and quantitative nature of this method.

  6. Quantitative characterization of liver tumor radiodensity in CT images: a phantom study between two scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Benjamin Paul; Li, Qin; McKenney, Sarah; Fricke, Stanley Thomas; Fang, Yuan; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Petrick, Nicholas

    2018-02-01

    Quantitative assessment of tumor radiodensity is important for the clinical evaluation of contrast enhancement and treatment response, as well as for the extraction of texture-related features for image analysis or radiomics. Radiodensity estimation, Hounsfield Units (HU) in CT images, can be affected by patient factors such as tumor size, and by system factors such as acquisition and reconstruction protocols. In this project, we quantified the measurability of liver tumor HU using a 3D-printed phantom, imaged with two CT systems: Siemens Somatom Force and GE Lightspeed VCT. The phantom was printed by dithering two materials to create spherical tumors (10, 14 mm) with uniform densities (90, 95, 100, 105 HU). Image datasets were acquired at 120 kVp including 15 repeats using two matching exposures across the CT systems, and reconstructed using comparable algorithms. The radiodensity of each tumor was measured using an automated matched-filter method. We assessed the performance of each protocol using the area under the ROC curve (AUC) as the metric for distinguishing between tumors with different radiodensities. The AUC ranged from 0.8 to 1.0 and was affected by tumor size, radiodensity, and scanner; the lowest AUC values corresponded to low dose measurements of 10 mm tumors with less than 5 HU difference. The two scanners exhibited similar performance >0.9 AUC for large lesions with contrast above 7 HU, though differences were observed for the smallest and lowest contrast tumors. These results show that HU estimation should be carefully examined, considering that uncertainty in the tumor radiodensity may propagate to quantification of other characteristics, such as size and texture.

  7. Design and Development of a Megavoltage CT Scanner for Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai

    A Varian 4 MeV isocentric therapy accelerator has been modified to perform also as a CT scanner. The goal is to provide low cost computed tomography capability for use in radiotherapy. The system will have three principal uses. These are (i) to provide 2- and 3-dimensional maps of electron density distribution for CT assisted therapy planning, (ii) to aid in patient set up by providing sectional views of the treatment volume and high contrast scout-mode verification images and (iii) to provide a means for periodically checking the patients anatomical conformation against what was used to generate the original therapy plan. The treatment machine was modified by mounting an array of detectors on a frame bolted to the counter weight end of the gantry in such a manner as to define a 'third generation' CT Scanner geometry. The data gathering is controlled by a Z-80 based microcomputer system which transfers the x-ray transmission data to a general purpose PDP 11/34 for processing. There a series of calibration processes and a logarithmic conversion are performed to get projection data. After reordering the projection data to an equivalent parallel beam sinogram format a convolution algorithm is employed to construct the image from the equivalent parallel projection data. Results of phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2.6 mm and an electron density discrimination of less than 1% which are sufficiently good for accurate therapy planning. Results also show that the system is linear to within the precision of our measurement ((DBLTURN).75%) over a wide range of electron densities corresponding to those found in body tissues. Animal and human images are also presented to demonstrate that the system's imaging capability is sufficient to allow the necessary visualization of anatomy.

  8. SU-E-I-21: Dosimetric Characterization and Image Quality Evaluation of the AIRO Mobile CT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J; Bruner, A [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The AIRO Mobile CT system was recently introduced which overcomes the limitations from existing CT, CT fluoroscopy, and intraoperative O-arm. With an integrated table and a large diameter bore, the system is suitable for cranial, spine and trauma procedures, making it a highly versatile intraoperative imaging system. This study is to investigate radiation dose and image quality of the AIRO and compared with those from a routine CT scanner. Methods: Radiation dose was measured using a conventional 100mm pencil ionization chamber and CT polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA) body and head phantoms. Image quality was evaluated with a CATPHAN 500 phantom. Spatial resolution, low contrast resolution (CNR), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), and Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) were analyzed. Results: Under identical technique conditions, radiation dose (mGy/mAs) from the AIRO mobile CT system (AIRO) is higher than that from a 64 slice CT scanner. MTFs show that both Soft and Standard filters of the AIRO system lost resolution quickly compared to the Sensation 64 slice CT. With the Standard kernel, the spatial resolutions of the AIRO system are 3lp/cm and 4lp/cm for the body and head FOVs, respectively. NNPSs show low frequency noise due to ring-like artifacts. Due to a higher dose in terms of mGy/mAs at both head and body FOV, CNR of the AIRO system is higher than that of the Siemens scanner. However detectability of the low contrast objects is poorer in the AIRO due to the presence of ring artifacts in the location of the targets. Conclusion: For image guided surgery applications, the AIRO has some advantages over a routine CT scanner due to its versatility, large bore size, and acceptable image quality. Our evaluation of the physical performance helps its future improvements.

  9. A novel APD-based detector module for multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saoudi, A.; Lecomte, R.

    1999-01-01

    The lack of anatomical information in SPECT and PET images is one of the major factors limiting the ability to localize and accurately quantify radionuclide uptake in small regions of interest. This problem could be resolved by using multi-modality scanners having the capability to acquire anatomical and functional images simultaneously. The feasibility of a novel detector suitable for measuring high-energy annihilation radiation in PET, medium-energy γ-rays in SPECT and low-energy X-rays in transmission CT is demonstrated and its performance is evaluated for potential use in multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT imaging. The proposed detector consists of a thin CsI(Tl) scintillator sitting on top of a deep GSO/LSO pair read out by an avalanche photodiode. The GSO/LOS pair provides depth-of-interaction information for 511 keV detection in PET, while the thin CsI(Tl) that is essentially transparent to annihilation radiation is used for detecting lower energy X- and γ-rays. The detector performance is compared to that of an LSO/YSO phoswich. Although the implementation of the proposed GSO/LSO/CsI(Tl) detector raises special problems that increase complexity, it generally outperforms the LSO/YSO phoswich for simultaneous PET, SPECT and CT imaging

  10. Dose performance and image quality: Dual source CT versus single source CT in cardiac CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Min; Qi Hengtao; Wang Ximing; Wang Tao; Chen, Jiu-Hong; Liu Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dose performance and image quality of 64-slice dual source CT (DSCT) in comparison to 64-slice single source CT (SSCT) in cardiac CT angiography (CTA). Methods: 100 patients examined by DSCT and 60 patients scanned by SSCT were included in this study. Objective indices such as image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio and signal-to-noise ratio were analyzed. Subjective image quality was assessed by two cardiovascular radiologists in consensus using a four-point scale (1 = excellent to 4 = not acceptable). Estimation of effective dose was performed on the basis of dose length product (DLP). Results: At low heart rates ( 0.05), but, at high heart rates (>70 bpm), DSCT provided robust image quality (P 70 bpm), DSCT is able to provide robust diagnostic image quality at doses far below that of SSCT.

  11. Stability of deep features across CT scanners and field of view using a physical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rahul; Shafiq-ul-Hassan, Muhammad; Moros, Eduardo G.; Gillies, Robert J.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.

    2018-02-01

    Radiomics is the process of analyzing radiological images by extracting quantitative features for monitoring and diagnosis of various cancers. Analyzing images acquired from different medical centers is confounded by many choices in acquisition, reconstruction parameters and differences among device manufacturers. Consequently, scanning the same patient or phantom using various acquisition/reconstruction parameters as well as different scanners may result in different feature values. To further evaluate this issue, in this study, CT images from a physical radiomic phantom were used. Recent studies showed that some quantitative features were dependent on voxel size and that this dependency could be reduced or removed by the appropriate normalization factor. Deep features extracted from a convolutional neural network, may also provide additional features for image analysis. Using a transfer learning approach, we obtained deep features from three convolutional neural networks pre-trained on color camera images. An we examination of the dependency of deep features on image pixel size was done. We found that some deep features were pixel size dependent, and to remove this dependency we proposed two effective normalization approaches. For analyzing the effects of normalization, a threshold has been used based on the calculated standard deviation and average distance from a best fit horizontal line among the features' underlying pixel size before and after normalization. The inter and intra scanner dependency of deep features has also been evaluated.

  12. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M. S.; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  13. Limited Evaluation of Image Quality Produced by a Portable Head CT Scanner (CereTom) in a Neurosurgery Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Ariz Chong; Adnan, Johari Siregar; Rahman, Noor Azman A.; Palur, Ravikant

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Computed tomography (CT) is the preferred diagnostic toolkit for head and brain imaging of head injury. A recent development is the invention of a portable CT scanner that can be beneficial from a clinical point of view. Aim To compare the quality of CT brain images produced by a fixed CT scanner and a portable CT scanner (CereTom). Methods This work was a single-centre retrospective study of CT brain images from 112 neurosurgical patients. Hounsfield units (HUs) of the images from CereTom were measured for air, water and bone. Three assessors independently evaluated the images from the fixed CT scanner and CereTom. Streak artefacts, visualisation of lesions and grey–white matter differentiation were evaluated at three different levels (centrum semiovale, basal ganglia and middle cerebellar peduncles). Each evaluation was scored 1 (poor), 2 (average) or 3 (good) and summed up to form an ordinal reading of 3 to 9. Results HUs for air, water and bone from CereTom were within the recommended value by the American College of Radiology (ACR). Streak artefact evaluation scores for the fixed CT scanner was 8.54 versus 7.46 (Z = −5.67) for CereTom at the centrum semiovale, 8.38 (SD = 1.12) versus 7.32 (SD = 1.63) at the basal ganglia and 8.21 (SD = 1.30) versus 6.97 (SD = 2.77) at the middle cerebellar peduncles. Grey–white matter differentiation showed scores of 8.27 (SD = 1.04) versus 7.21 (SD = 1.41) at the centrum semiovale, 8.26 (SD = 1.07) versus 7.00 (SD = 1.47) at the basal ganglia and 8.38 (SD = 1.11) versus 6.74 (SD = 1.55) at the middle cerebellar peduncles. Visualisation of lesions showed scores of 8.86 versus 8.21 (Z = −4.24) at the centrum semiovale, 8.93 versus 8.18 (Z = −5.32) at the basal ganglia and 8.79 versus 8.06 (Z = −4.93) at the middle cerebellar peduncles. All results were significant with P-value < 0.01. Conclusions Results of the study showed a significant difference in image quality produced by the fixed CT scanner and

  14. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI 100 as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI 100 is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, σ. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI 100 calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good agreement between the

  15. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat [Servei de Radiofisica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good

  16. Design and construction of a small animal PET/CT scanner combining scintillation Phoswich modules and hybrid pixels detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, St.

    2010-07-01

    The pathway that has been followed by the imXgam team at CPPM was to combine on a single rotating device the detector modules of the small animal PET scanner ClearPET with a photon counting X-ray detector in order to perform simultaneous acquisition of images from the anatomy (X-ray CT) and from the metabolic function (PET) of the common field-of-view. A preliminary study of the hybrid imaging system ClearPET/XPAD3 carried out using Gate led us to form a new PET detection assembly based on 21 Phoswich modules, to fix the design of the PET/CT device, as well as to study and solve the difficulties arising from simultaneous hybrid imaging. Last but not least, the simulation tool also allowed us for thinking how well such a system could judiciously use the spatial and temporal correlations between anatomic and functional information. From an instrumentation point of view, we succeeded to set up the ClearPET/XPAD3 prototype. Once both imaging systems were operational individually, we demonstrated on one side that the ClearPET prototype was perfectly capable of performing correctly in simultaneous acquisition conditions, providing that the detector modules were appropriately shielded. On the other side, the new generation of the hybrid pixel camera using the XPAD3-S chip proved to be quite promising given the good quality of the first reconstructed images. Finally, the proof of concept of simultaneous PET/CT data acquisition was made using a sealed positron source and an X-ray tube. (author)

  17. A measurement-based generalized source model for Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Ransheng; Yang, Chengwen; Zhou, Li; Zhai, Hezheng; Deng, Jun

    2017-03-07

    The goal of this study is to develop a generalized source model for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans based solely on the measurement data without a priori knowledge of scanner specifications. The proposed generalized source model consists of an extended circular source located at x-ray target level with its energy spectrum, source distribution and fluence distribution derived from a set of measurement data conveniently available in the clinic. Specifically, the central axis percent depth dose (PDD) curves measured in water and the cone output factors measured in air were used to derive the energy spectrum and the source distribution respectively with a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The in-air film measurement of fan-beam dose profiles at fixed gantry was back-projected to generate the fluence distribution of the source model. A benchmarked Monte Carlo user code was used to simulate the dose distributions in water with the developed source model as beam input. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed source model was tested on a GE LightSpeed and a Philips Brilliance Big Bore multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners available in our clinic. In general, the Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs in water and dose profiles along lateral and longitudinal directions agreed with the measurements within 4%/1 mm for both CT scanners. The absolute dose comparison using two CTDI phantoms (16 cm and 32 cm in diameters) indicated a better than 5% agreement between the Monte Carlo-simulated and the ion chamber-measured doses at a variety of locations for the two scanners. Overall, this study demonstrated that a generalized source model can be constructed based only on a set of measurement data and used for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of patients' CT scans, which would facilitate patient-specific CT organ dose estimation and cancer risk management in the diagnostic and therapeutic radiology.

  18. A measurement-based generalized source model for Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Ransheng; Yang, Chengwen; Zhou, Li; Zhai, Hezheng; Deng, Jun

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a generalized source model for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans based solely on the measurement data without a priori knowledge of scanner specifications. The proposed generalized source model consists of an extended circular source located at x-ray target level with its energy spectrum, source distribution and fluence distribution derived from a set of measurement data conveniently available in the clinic. Specifically, the central axis percent depth dose (PDD) curves measured in water and the cone output factors measured in air were used to derive the energy spectrum and the source distribution respectively with a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The in-air film measurement of fan-beam dose profiles at fixed gantry was back-projected to generate the fluence distribution of the source model. A benchmarked Monte Carlo user code was used to simulate the dose distributions in water with the developed source model as beam input. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed source model was tested on a GE LightSpeed and a Philips Brilliance Big Bore multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners available in our clinic. In general, the Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs in water and dose profiles along lateral and longitudinal directions agreed with the measurements within 4%/1 mm for both CT scanners. The absolute dose comparison using two CTDI phantoms (16 cm and 32 cm in diameters) indicated a better than 5% agreement between the Monte Carlo-simulated and the ion chamber-measured doses at a variety of locations for the two scanners. Overall, this study demonstrated that a generalized source model can be constructed based only on a set of measurement data and used for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of patients’ CT scans, which would facilitate patient-specific CT organ dose estimation and cancer risk management in the diagnostic and therapeutic radiology.

  19. Breakeven analysis of computed tomography (Based on utilization of whole body C.T. scanner of SNU hospital)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Hwan; Choi, Myung Jun; Yoo, Chang Ho

    1986-01-01

    The C.T. scanner, an important tool for image-based diagnostics, is one of the costliest types of medical equipment. At present, there are in Korea a total of 66 units installed, and more units will be added in the future. For the fact the price of the C.T. scanner as well as scanning charge for using the equipment is very high as compared to those of the other kinds of medical equipment. The break-even analysis of computed tomography is considered fundamental as well as essential both to rational hospital management and keeping the charge for its use at an optimum level in consideration of the patient's medical expense burden. Even if pursuit of profits is not the role objective of a hospital, it cannot be denied that a break-even analysis provides an important factor for the decision making process in hospital management. The present study has the purpose of finding the ways and means to help rationalize hospital operation and improve its earning power through break-even analysis of C.T. scanner operation. For this purpose the total cost of the GE 8800 Whole Body C. T. Scanner installed at the Seoul National University Hospital was computed, and the records of its operation were analyzed. The expenses for its operation were divided into direct and indirect expenses depending on whether generation of the cost was recognized in the C. T. room or not, and the actual cost was computed for each of these accounting units

  20. Reducing Radiation Doses in Female Breast and Lung during CT Examinations of Thorax: A new Technique in two Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehnati P.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chest CT is a commonly used examination for the diagnosis of lung diseases, but a breast within the scanned field is nearly never the organ of interest. Objective: The purpose of this study is to compare the female breast and lung doses using split and standard protocols in chest CT scanning. Materials and Methods: The sliced chest and breast female phantoms were used. CT exams were performed using a single-slice (SS- and a 16 multi-slice (MS- CT scanner at 100 kVp and 120 kVp. Two different protocols, including standard and split protocols, were selected for scanning. The breast and lung doses were measured using thermo-luminescence dosimeters which were inserted into different layers of the chest and breast phantoms. The differences in breast and lung radiation doses in two protocols were studied in two scanners, analyzed by SPSS software and compared by t-test. Results: Breast dose by split scanning technique reduced 11% and 31% in SS- and MS- CT. Also, the radiation dose of lung tissue in this method decreased 18% and 54% in SS- and MS- CT, respectively. Moreover, there was a significant difference (p< 0.0001 in the breast and lung radiation doses between standard and split scanning protocols. Conclusion: The application of a split scan technique instead of standard protocol has a considerable potential to reduce breast and lung doses in SS- and MS- CT scanners. If split scanning protocol is associated with an optimum kV and MSCT, the maximum dose decline will be provided.

  1. Evaluation and Testing of Several Free/Open Source Web Vulnerability Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Suteva, Natasa; Zlatkovski, Dragi; Mileva, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Web Vulnerability Scanners (WVSs) are software tools for identifying vulnerabilities in web applications. There are commercial WVSs, free/open source WVSs, and some companies offer them as a Software-as-a-Service. In this paper, we test and evaluate six free/open source WVSs using the web application WackoPicko with many known vulnerabilities, primary for false negative rates.

  2. Radiation doses during chest examinations using dose modulation techniques in multislice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S.; Pradip, Joe; Dinakran, Paul M.; Srikanth, B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the radiation dose and image quality using a manual protocol and dose modulation techniques in a 6-slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-one patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT of the chest were included in the study. For the manual protocol settings, constant tube potential (kV) and tube current-time product (mAs) of 140 kV and 120 mAs, respectively, were used. The angular and z-axis dose modulation techniques utilized a constant tube potential of 140 kV; mAs values were automatically selected by the machine. Effective doses were calculated using dose-length product (DLP) values and the image quality was assessed using the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio values. Mean effective doses using manual protocol for patients of weights 40-60 kg, 61-80 kg, and 81 kg and above were 8.58 mSv, 8.54 mSv, and 9.07 mSv, respectively. Mean effective doses using z-axis dose modulation for patients of weights 40-60 kg, 61-80 kg, and 81 kg and above were 4.95 mSv, 6.87 mSv, and 10.24 mSv, respectively. The SNR at the region of the liver for patients of body weight of 40-60 kg was 5.1 H, 6.2 H, and 8.8 H for manual, angular, and z-axis dose modulation, respectively. Conclusion: Dose reduction of up to 15% was achieved using angular dose modulation and of up to 42% using z-axis dose modulation, with acceptable diagnostic image quality compared to the manual protocol. (author)

  3. Optimization of a fast optical CT scanner for nPAG gel dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; DeDeene, Yves

    2009-05-01

    A fast laser scanning optical CT scanner was constructed and optimized at the Ghent university. The first images acquired were contaminated with several imaging artifacts. The origins of the artifacts were investigated. Performance characteristics of different components were measured such as the laser spot size, light attenuation by the lenses and the dynamic range of the photo-detector. The need for a differential measurement using a second photo-detector was investigated. Post processing strategies to compensate for hardware related errors were developed. Drift of the laser and of the detector was negligible. Incorrectly refractive index matching was dealt with by developing an automated matching process. When scratches on the water bath and phantom container are present, these pose a post processing challenge to eliminate the resulting artifacts from the reconstructed images Secondary laser spots due to multiple reflections need to be further investigated. The time delay in the control of the galvanometer and detector was dealt with using black strips that serve as markers of the projection position. Still some residual ringing artifacts are present. Several small volumetric test phantoms were constructed to obtain an overall picture of the accuracy.

  4. Optimization of individualized abdominal scan protocol with 64-slice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Minxia; Zhao Xinming; Song Junfeng; Zhou Chunwu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore an individualized abdominal scan protocol with a 64-slice CT scanner. Methods: From Sep. 2010 to Nov. 2010, one hundred consecutive patients, who underwent twice non-contrast-enhanced abdominal CT scans within 3 months, were enrolled in this study. For each patient, the tube current of 274 eff. mAs and 207 eff. mAs were applied respectively in the first and second abdominal scan. The imaging qualities of the two scans were evaluated retrospectively by 3 reviewers. All the individual variants,including height, weight, body mass index (BMI), the maximum transverse diameter, the anteroposterior diameter and the average maximum diameter of abdomen were recorded. A five-point scale was used for grading the image noise of eight organs, including abdominal aorta, portal vein, liver, spleen, gallbladder, pancreas, renal cortex and renal medulla. Diagnostic acceptability of CT images at three anatomic levels,including porta hepatis, pancreas and the upper pole of renal, was also evaluated by using a five-point scale. The noise value of abdominal aorta was defined as the standard deviation (SD) of CT values of aorta at the level of porta hepatis. Scatter diagram and Pearson correlation analysis were used for evaluating the linear relationship between the individual variants and the noise value of abdominal aorta, and multivariate linear regression analysis was used for evaluating the relevance between the individual variants and the noise value of aorta. Results: In this patients group, the average height was (164.6 ± 7.5) cm,the average weight was (64.3 ± 11.0) kg, the BMI was (23.7 ±3.3) kg/m 2 , the maximum transverse diameter of abdomen was (29.8 ± 2.3) cm, the anteroposterior diameter of abdomen was (23.1 ± 2.9) cm, and the average maximum diameter of abdomen was (26.5 ± 2.5) cm. Pearson correlation analysis showed significant positive linear correlation between the noise value of abdominal aorta (1 1.7 ± 3.0) and patients' weight (r=0

  5. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwahofer, Andrea [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; Clinical Center Vivantes, Neukoelln (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology; Baer, Esther [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Kachelriess, Marc [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiology; Grossmann, J. Guenter [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; Ortenau Klinikum Offenburg-Gengenbach (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology; Sterzing, Florian [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2015-07-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ{sub Al} = 2.7 g/cm{sup 3}), titanium (ρ{sub Ti} = 4.5 g/cm{sup 3}), steel (ρ{sub steel} = 7.9 g/cm{sup 3}) and tungsten (ρ{sub W} = 19.3 g/cm{sup 3}) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV (Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ = 10 g/cm{sup 3}) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 ke

  6. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Clinical Center Vivantes, Neukoelln; Baer, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Kachelriess, Marc; Grossmann, J. Guenter; Ortenau Klinikum Offenburg-Gengenbach; Sterzing, Florian; German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg

    2015-01-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al = 2.7 g/cm 3 ), titanium (ρ Ti = 4.5 g/cm 3 ), steel (ρ steel = 7.9 g/cm 3 ) and tungsten (ρ W = 19.3 g/cm 3 ) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV (Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ = 10 g/cm 3 ) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the

  7. Initial investigation of a novel light-scattering gel phantom for evaluation of optical CT scanners for radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosi, Stephen; Naseri, Pourandokht; Puran, Alicia; Davies, Justin; Baldock, Clive

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for stable gel materials for phantoms used to validate optical computerized tomography (CT) scanners used in conjunction with radiation-induced polymerizing gel dosimeters. Phantoms based on addition of light-absorbing dyes to gelatine to simulate gel dosimeters have been employed. However, to more accurately simulate polymerizing gels one requires phantoms that employ light-scattering colloidal suspensions added to the gel. In this paper, we present the initial results of using an optical CT scanner to evaluate a novel phantom in which radiation-exposed polymer gels are simulated by the addition of colloidal suspensions of varying turbidity. The phantom may be useful as a calibration transfer standard for polymer gel dosimeters. The tests reveal some phenomena peculiar to light-scattering gels that need to be taken into account when calibrating polymer gel dosimeters

  8. A 128-slice CT scanner helpful in localising coronary sinus ostium during CRT-D implantation – case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaźwiec, Przemysław; Jagielski, Dariusz; Gać, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has become a successful treatment option for symptomatic heart failure in patients with poor left ventricular (LV) systolic function and broad QRS complex in the surface electrocardiogram (ECG). In this report we present a case of a 70-year-old woman with advanced heart failure due to ischaemic heart disease who underwent an upgrade from VVIR stimulator (pacemaker, PM) to cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D). The first attempt was unsuccessful due to problems with inefficient cannulation of the orifice of the coronary sinus (CS). After performing a 3D reconstruction with a 128-slice CT scanner, it was possible to carry out the up-grade to CRT-D resulting in enormous clinical improvement. The case represents an example of the usefulness of 3D reconstruction with the 128-slice CT scanner used after failed CRT-D implantation due to difficulties with efficient cannulation of the coronary sinus orifice in a rare anatomical variant

  9. Sci-Fri AM: Quality, Safety, and Professional Issues 03: The Increasing Costs of Shielding Diagnostic CT Scanners in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richer, Jeff; Frimeth, Jeff; Nesbitt, James [Windsor Regional Hospital, Xspect Inc., XRCT Inc. (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: In Ontario, shielding for all X-ray machines, including CT scanners, must be evaluated according to Safety Code 20A (Health Canada, 1983) which is based on NCRP-49 (NCRP, 1976). NCRP-147 (NCRP, 2004) is the international standard for shielding calculations of CT scanners and is also referenced in Safety Code 35 (Health Canada, 2008) which, was published to supersede SC20A. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the cost effectiveness of NCRP-147 for CT scanner shielding. Methods: CT scanner shielding calculations are performed using SC20A and NCRP-147: A room located on the third floor with the nearest building 75m away A room with high occupancy uncontrolled adjacent spaces Two side by side rooms on the main floor Results: 1. SC20A: The exterior windows required 0.1mm of Pb to protect the public who may occupy the building at 75m. 1. NCRP-147: No additional shielding required. 2. SC20A: Two walls adjacent to high occupancy uncontrolled space required an additional 1.58mm Pb. 2. NCRP-147: No additional shielding required. 3. SC20A: The entire floor and ceiling slabs in both rooms required an additional 0.79mm Pb. In addition, 0.79mm Pb was added to the walls from the ceiling to overlap the existing Pb shielding in the walls. 3. NCRP-147: No additional shielding required. Conclusion: The application of NCRP Report No. 147 affords the required protection to staff and the public, in the true spirit of the ALARA principle, taking into account relevant social and economic factors.

  10. Advanced high speed X-ray CT scanner for measurement and visualization of multi-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Tetsuro; Kawanishi, Kohei; Nishikawa, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    The development of an ultra-fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner has been performed. The object of interest is in a transient or unsettled state, which makes the conventional CT scanner inappropriate. A concept of electrical switching of electron beam of X-ray generation unit is adopted to reduce the scanning time instead of a mechanical motion adopted by a conventional CT scanner. The mechanical motion is a major obstacle to improve the scanning speed. A prototype system with a scanning time of 3.6 milliseconds was developed at first. And, the feasibility was confirmed to measure the dynamic events of two-phase flow. However, faster scanning speed is generally required for the practical use in the thermalhydraulics research field. Therefore, the development of advanced type has been performed. This advanced type can operate under the scanning time of 0.5 milliseconds and is applicable for the measurement of the multi-phase flow with velocity up to 4-5 m/s. (author)

  11. Design and characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT scanner for detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has substantial clinical impact in diagnosis and treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury. This paper describes the design, development, and preliminary performance characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) head scanner prototype for imaging of acute ICH. Methods: A task-based image quality model was used to analyze the detectability index as a function of system configuration, and hardware design was guided by the results of this model-based optimization. A robust artifact correction pipeline was developed using GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) scatter simulation, beam hardening corrections, detector veiling glare, and lag deconvolution. An iterative penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) reconstruction framework with weights adjusted for artifact-corrected projections was developed. Various bowtie filters were investigated for potential dose and image quality benefits, with a MC-based tool providing estimates of spatial dose distribution. Results: The initial prototype will feature a source-detector distance of 1000 mm and source-axis distance of 550 mm, a 43x43 cm2 flat panel detector, and a 15° rotating anode x-ray source with 15 kW power and 0.6 focal spot size. Artifact correction reduced image nonuniformity by ~250 HU, and PWLS reconstruction with modified weights improved the contrast to noise ratio by 20%. Inclusion of a bowtie filter can potentially reduce dose by 50% and improve CNR by 25%. Conclusions: A dedicated CBCT system capable of imaging millimeter-scale acute ICH was designed. Preliminary findings support feasibility of point-of-care applications in TBI and stroke imaging, with clinical studies beginning on a prototype.

  12. Assessment of a new trauma workflow concept implementing a sliding CT scanner in the trauma room: the effect on workup times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung Kon Jin, P. H. Ping; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; van Kuijk, Cees; Hoogerwerf, Nico; Luitse, Jan S.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We developed a new shockroom resuscitation setting that includes a moveable, multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner capable of scanning patients during the initial trauma resuscitation phase without (multiple) patient transfers that previously were necessary. This enables us to

  13. Experimental validation of a method characterizing bow tie filters in CT scanners using a real-time dose probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenney, Sarah E.; Nosratieh, Anita; Gelskey, Dale; Yang Kai; Huang Shinying; Chen Lin; Boone, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Beam-shaping or ''bow tie'' (BT) filters are used to spatially modulate the x-ray beam in a CT scanner, but the conventional method of step-and-shoot measurement to characterize a beam's profile is tedious and time-consuming. The theory for characterization of bow tie relative attenuation (COBRA) method, which relies on a real-time dosimeter to address the issues of conventional measurement techniques, was previously demonstrated using computer simulations. In this study, the feasibility of the COBRA theory is further validated experimentally through the employment of a prototype real-time radiation meter and a known BT filter. Methods: The COBRA method consisted of four basic steps: (1) The probe was placed at the edge of a scanner's field of view; (2) a real-time signal train was collected as the scanner's gantry rotated with the x-ray beam on; (3) the signal train, without a BT filter, was modeled using peak values measured in the signal train of step 2; and (4) the relative attenuation of the BT filter was estimated from filtered and unfiltered data sets. The prototype probe was first verified to have an isotropic and linear response to incident x-rays. The COBRA method was then tested on a dedicated breast CT scanner with a custom-designed BT filter and compared to the conventional step-and-shoot characterization of the BT filter. Using basis decomposition of dual energy signal data, the thickness of the filter was estimated and compared to the BT filter's manufacturing specifications. The COBRA method was also demonstrated with a clinical whole body CT scanner using the body BT filter. The relative attenuation was calculated at four discrete x-ray tube potentials and used to estimate the thickness of the BT filter. Results: The prototype probe was found to have a linear and isotropic response to x-rays. The relative attenuation produced from the COBRA method fell within the error of the relative attenuation measured with the step-and-shoot method

  14. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  15. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, J; Bednarz, B; Caracappa, P F; Xu, X G

    2009-01-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  16. Analysis of image sharpness reproducibility on a novel engineered micro-CT scanner with variable geometry and embedded recalibration software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, D; Belcari, N; Del Guerra, A; Bartolomei, A; Salvadori, P A

    2012-04-01

    This study investigates the reproducibility of the reconstructed image sharpness, after modifications of the geometry setup, for a variable magnification micro-CTCT) scanner. All the measurements were performed on a novel engineered μCT scanner for in vivo imaging of small animals (Xalt), which has been recently built at the Institute of Clinical Physiology of the National Research Council (IFC-CNR, Pisa, Italy), in partnership with the University of Pisa. The Xalt scanner is equipped with an integrated software for on-line geometric recalibration, which will be used throughout the experiments. In order to evaluate the losses of image quality due to modifications of the geometry setup, we have made 22 consecutive acquisitions by changing alternatively the system geometry between two different setups (Large FoV - LF, and High Resolution - HR). For each acquisition, the tomographic images have been reconstructed before and after the on-line geometric recalibration. For each reconstruction, the image sharpness was evaluated using two different figures of merit: (i) the percentage contrast on a small bar pattern of fixed frequency (f = 5.5 lp/mm for the LF setup and f = 10 lp/mm for the HR setup) and (ii) the image entropy. We have found that, due to the small-scale mechanical uncertainty (in the order of the voxel size), a recalibration is necessary for each geometric setup after repositioning of the system's components; the resolution losses due to the lack of recalibration are worse for the HR setup (voxel size = 18.4 μm). The integrated on-line recalibration algorithm of the Xalt scanner allowed to perform the recalibration quickly, by restoring the spatial resolution of the system to the reference resolution obtained after the initial (off-line) calibration. Copyright © 2011 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic determination of equivalent CT source models for personalized dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosendahl Stephan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With improvements in CT technology, the need for reliable patient-specific dosimetry increased in the recent years. The accuracy of Monte-Carlo simulations for absolute dose estimation is related to scanner specific information on the X-ray spectra of the scanner as well as the form filter geometries and compositions. In this work a mobile measurement setup is developed, which allows both to determine the X-ray spectra and equivalent form filter of a specific scanner from just one helical scan in less than 2 minutes.

  18. SU-E-I-31: Differences Observed in Radiation Doses Across 2 Similar CT Scanners From Adult Brain-Neck CT Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, K [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya, JP (Japan); UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the difference in radiation doses from adult Brain-Neck CT angiography (CTA) between two CT scanners. Methods: We collected CT dose index data (CTDIvol, DLP) from adult Brain-Neck CTA performed with two CT scanners (Sensation 64 (S64) and Definition AS (AS), Siemens Healthcare) performed at two of our facilities from Jan 1st to Dec 31th, 2014. X-ray dose management software (Radmetrics, Bayer Healthcare) was used to mine these data. All exams were performed with Tube Current Modulation (Care Dose 4D), tube voltage of 120 kVp, quality reference mAs of 300, beam collimation of 64*0.6 mm. The rotation time was set to 0.5 sec for S64 and 1.0 sec for AS. We also scanned an anthropomorphic skull and chest phantom under routine Brain-Neck CTA protocol with the two scanners and extracted the tube current values from the raw projection data. Results: The mean CTDIvol and DLP in Brain-Neck CTA was 72 mGy and 2554 mGy*cm for AS, which was substantially larger than the mean values of 46 mGy and 1699 mGy*cm for S64. The maximum tube current was 583 mA for most cases on the S64 while the maximum was 666 mA for AS even though the rotation time set for AS was 1.0 sec. Measurements obtained with the anthropomorphic phantom showed that the tube current reached 583 mA at the shoulder region for S64 while it reached to 666 mA for AS. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that substantially different CT doses can Result from Brain-Neck CTA protocols even when similar scanners and similar settings are used. Though both scanners have a similar maximum mA rating, differences in mA were observed through the shoulders, resulting in substantially different CTDIvol values.

  19. TH-C-18A-06: Combined CT Image Quality and Radiation Dose Monitoring Program Based On Patient Data to Assess Consistency of Clinical Imaging Across Scanner Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christianson, O; Winslow, J; Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: One of the principal challenges of clinical imaging is to achieve an ideal balance between image quality and radiation dose across multiple CT models. The number of scanners and protocols at large medical centers necessitates an automated quality assurance program to facilitate this objective. Therefore, the goal of this work was to implement an automated CT image quality and radiation dose monitoring program based on actual patient data and to use this program to assess consistency of protocols across CT scanner models. Methods: Patient CT scans are routed to a HIPPA compliant quality assurance server. CTDI, extracted using optical character recognition, and patient size, measured from the localizers, are used to calculate SSDE. A previously validated noise measurement algorithm determines the noise in uniform areas of the image across the scanned anatomy to generate a global noise level (GNL). Using this program, 2358 abdominopelvic scans acquired on three commercial CT scanners were analyzed. Median SSDE and GNL were compared across scanner models and trends in SSDE and GNL with patient size were used to determine the impact of differing automatic exposure control (AEC) algorithms. Results: There was a significant difference in both SSDE and GNL across scanner models (9–33% and 15–35% for SSDE and GNL, respectively). Adjusting all protocols to achieve the same image noise would reduce patient dose by 27–45% depending on scanner model. Additionally, differences in AEC methodologies across vendors resulted in disparate relationships of SSDE and GNL with patient size. Conclusion: The difference in noise across scanner models indicates that protocols are not optimally matched to achieve consistent image quality. Our results indicated substantial possibility for dose reduction while achieving more consistent image appearance. Finally, the difference in AEC methodologies suggests the need for size-specific CT protocols to minimize variability in image

  20. TH-C-18A-06: Combined CT Image Quality and Radiation Dose Monitoring Program Based On Patient Data to Assess Consistency of Clinical Imaging Across Scanner Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christianson, O; Winslow, J; Samei, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: One of the principal challenges of clinical imaging is to achieve an ideal balance between image quality and radiation dose across multiple CT models. The number of scanners and protocols at large medical centers necessitates an automated quality assurance program to facilitate this objective. Therefore, the goal of this work was to implement an automated CT image quality and radiation dose monitoring program based on actual patient data and to use this program to assess consistency of protocols across CT scanner models. Methods: Patient CT scans are routed to a HIPPA compliant quality assurance server. CTDI, extracted using optical character recognition, and patient size, measured from the localizers, are used to calculate SSDE. A previously validated noise measurement algorithm determines the noise in uniform areas of the image across the scanned anatomy to generate a global noise level (GNL). Using this program, 2358 abdominopelvic scans acquired on three commercial CT scanners were analyzed. Median SSDE and GNL were compared across scanner models and trends in SSDE and GNL with patient size were used to determine the impact of differing automatic exposure control (AEC) algorithms. Results: There was a significant difference in both SSDE and GNL across scanner models (9–33% and 15–35% for SSDE and GNL, respectively). Adjusting all protocols to achieve the same image noise would reduce patient dose by 27–45% depending on scanner model. Additionally, differences in AEC methodologies across vendors resulted in disparate relationships of SSDE and GNL with patient size. Conclusion: The difference in noise across scanner models indicates that protocols are not optimally matched to achieve consistent image quality. Our results indicated substantial possibility for dose reduction while achieving more consistent image appearance. Finally, the difference in AEC methodologies suggests the need for size-specific CT protocols to minimize variability in image

  1. Influence of Co-57 and CT Transmission Measurements on the Quantification Accuracy and Partial Volume Effect of a Small Animal PET Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Julia G; Schmid, Andreas M; Pichler, Bernd J

    2017-12-01

    Non-invasive in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) provides high detection sensitivity in the nano- to picomolar range and in addition to other advantages, the possibility to absolutely quantify the acquired data. The present study focuses on the comparison of transmission data acquired with an X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner or a Co-57 source for the Inveon small animal PET scanner (Siemens Healthcare, Knoxville, TN, USA), as well as determines their influences on the quantification accuracy and partial volume effect (PVE). A special focus included the impact of the performed calibration on the quantification accuracy. Phantom measurements were carried out to determine the quantification accuracy, the influence of the object size on the quantification, and the PVE for different sphere sizes, along the field of view and for different contrast ratios. An influence of the emission activity on the Co-57 transmission measurements was discovered (deviations up to 24.06 % measured to true activity), whereas no influence of the emission activity on the CT attenuation correction was identified (deviations influenced by the applied calibration factor and by the object size. The PVE demonstrated a dependency on the sphere size, the position within the field of view, the reconstruction and correction algorithms and the count statistics. Depending on the reconstruction algorithm, only ∼30-40 % of the true activity within a small sphere could be resolved. The iterative 3D reconstruction algorithms uncovered substantially increased recovery values compared to the analytical and 2D iterative reconstruction algorithms (up to 70.46 % and 80.82 % recovery for the smallest and largest sphere using iterative 3D reconstruction algorithms). The transmission measurement (CT or Co-57 source) to correct for attenuation did not severely influence the PVE. The analysis of the quantification accuracy and the PVE revealed an influence of the object size, the reconstruction

  2. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT: a dual-tracer and dual-scanner validation in patients with heart valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær; Kero, Tanja; Orndahl, Lovisa Holm; Kim, Won Yong; Bjerner, Tomas; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Wiggers, Henrik; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Sörensen, Jens

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated method for extracting forward stroke volume (FSV) using indicator dilution theory directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies for two different tracers and scanners. 35 subjects underwent a dynamic (11)C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint-64 PET/CT (scanner I). In addition, 10 subjects underwent both dynamic (15)O-water PET and (11)C-acetate PET scans on a GE Discovery-ST PET/CT (scanner II). The left ventricular (LV)-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic extrapolation of the downslope of the TAC. FSV was calculated as the injected dose divided by the product of heart rate and the area under the curve of the first-pass peak. Gold standard FSV was measured using phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). FSVPET correlated highly with FSVCMR (r = 0.87, slope = 0.90 for scanner I, r = 0.87, slope = 1.65, and r = 0.85, slope = 1.69 for scanner II for (15)O-water and (11)C-acetate, respectively) although a systematic bias was observed for both scanners (p dynamic PET/CT and cluster analysis. Results are almost identical for (11)C-acetate and (15)O-water. A scanner-dependent bias was observed, and a scanner calibration factor is required for multi-scanner studies. Generalization of the method to other tracers and scanners requires further validation.

  3. CT Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Disease by 256-Slice Scanner: Accuracy, Advantages and Disadvantages Compared to Digital Subtraction Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Atul; Jain, Narendra; Bhagwat, Anand

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) may cause disabling claudication or critical limb ischemia. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) technology has evolved to the level of 256-slice CT scanners which has significantly improved the spatial and temporal resolution of the images. This has provided the capability of chasing the contrast bolus at a fast speed enabling angiographic imaging of long segments of the body. These images can be reconstructed in various planes and various modes for detailed analysis of the peripheral vascular diseases which helps in making treatment decision. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the CT angiograms (CTAs) of all cases of PAOD done by 256-slice CT scanner at a tertiary care vascular center and comparing these images with the digital subtraction angiograms (DSAs) of these patients. The retrospective study included 53 patients who underwent both CTA and DSA at our center over a period of 3 years from March 2013 to March 2016. The CTA showed high sensitivity (93%) and specificity (92.7%) for overall assessment of degree of stenosis in a vascular segment in cases of aortic and lower limb occlusive disease. The assessment of lesions of infrapopliteal segment was comparatively inferior (sensitivity 91.6%, accuracy 73.3%, and positive predictive value 78.5%), more so in the presence of significant calcification. The advantages of CTA were its noninvasive nature, ability to image large area of body, almost no adverse effects to the patients, and better assessment of vessel wall disease. However, the CTA assessment of collaterals was inferior with a sensitivity of only 62.7% as compared to DSA. Overall, 256-slice CTA provides fast and accurate imaging of vascular tree which can restrict DSA only in few selected cases as a problem-solving tool where clinico-radiological mismatch is present.

  4. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Xu, X. George; Liu, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the geant4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization. PMID:26520720

  5. SU-F-T-215: An Investigation Of Multi-Scanner CT Hounsfield Unit Calibration for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Using 3D Gamma Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Li, X; Liu, G; Liu, Q; Liang, J; Ding, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We compare and investigate the dosimetric impacts on pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton treatment plans generated with CT calibration curves from four different CT scanners and one averaged ‘global’ CT calibration curve. Methods: The four CT scanners are located at three different hospital locations within the same health system. CT density calibration curves were collected from these scanners using the same CT calibration phantom and acquisition parameters. Mass density to HU value tables were then commissioned in a commercial treatment planning system. Five disease sites were chosen for dosimetric comparisons at brain, lung, head and neck, adrenal, and prostate. Three types of PBS plans were generated at each treatment site using SFUD, IMPT, and robustness optimized IMPT techniques. 3D dose differences were investigated using 3D Gamma analysis. Results: The CT calibration curves for all four scanners display very similar shapes. Large HU differences were observed at both the high HU and low HU regions of the curves. Large dose differences were generally observed at the distal edges of the beams and they are beam angle dependent. Out of the five treatment sites, lung plans exhibits the most overall range uncertainties and prostate plans have the greatest dose discrepancy. There are no significant differences between the SFUD, IMPT, and the RO-IMPT methods. 3D gamma analysis with 3%, 3 mm criteria showed all plans with greater than 95% passing rate. Two of the scanners with close HU values have negligible dose difference except for lung. Conclusion: Our study shows that there are more than 5% dosimetric differences between different CT calibration curves. PBS treatment plans generated with SFUD, IMPT, and the robustness optimized IMPT has similar sensitivity to the CT density uncertainty. More patient data and tighter gamma criteria based on structure location and size will be used for further investigation.

  6. User needs elicitation via analytic hierarchy process (AHP). A case study on a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecchia, Leandro; Martin, Jennifer L; Ragozzino, Angela; Vanzanella, Carmela; Scognamiglio, Arturo; Mirarchi, Luciano; Morgan, Stephen P

    2013-01-05

    The rigorous elicitation of user needs is a crucial step for both medical device design and purchasing. However, user needs elicitation is often based on qualitative methods whose findings can be difficult to integrate into medical decision-making. This paper describes the application of AHP to elicit user needs for a new CT scanner for use in a public hospital. AHP was used to design a hierarchy of 12 needs for a new CT scanner, grouped into 4 homogenous categories, and to prepare a paper questionnaire to investigate the relative priorities of these. The questionnaire was completed by 5 senior clinicians working in a variety of clinical specialisations and departments in the same Italian public hospital. Although safety and performance were considered the most important issues, user needs changed according to clinical scenario. For elective surgery, the five most important needs were: spatial resolution, processing software, radiation dose, patient monitoring, and contrast medium. For emergency, the top five most important needs were: patient monitoring, radiation dose, contrast medium control, speed run, spatial resolution. AHP effectively supported user need elicitation, helping to develop an analytic and intelligible framework of decision-making. User needs varied according to working scenario (elective versus emergency medicine) more than clinical specialization. This method should be considered by practitioners involved in decisions about new medical technology, whether that be during device design or before deciding whether to allocate budgets for new medical devices according to clinical functions or according to hospital department.

  7. SU-F-I-54: Spatial Resolution Studies in Proton CT Using a Phase-II Prototype Head Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plautz, Tia E.; Johnson, R. P.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Bashkirov, V.; Hurley, R. F.; Schulte, R. W. [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Piersimoni, P. [University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Giacometti, V. [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the pre-clinical (phase II) head scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT) by the pCT collaboration. To evaluate the spatial resolution achievable by this system. Methods: Our phase II proton CT scanner prototype consists of two silicon telescopes that track individual protons upstream and downstream from a phantom, and a 5-stage scintillation detector that measures a combination of the residual energy and range of the proton. Residual energy is converted to water equivalent path length (WEPL) of the protons in the scanned object. The set of WEPL values and associated paths of protons passing through the object over a 360° angular scan is processed by an iterative parallelizable reconstruction algorithm that runs on GP-GPU hardware. A custom edge phantom composed of water-equivalent polymer and tissue-equivalent material inserts was constructed. The phantom was first simulated in Geant4 and then built to perform experimental beam tests with 200 MeV protons at the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center. The oversampling method was used to construct radial and azimuthal edge spread functions and modulation transfer functions. The spatial resolution was defined by the 10% point of the modulation transfer function in units of lp/cm. Results: The spatial resolution of the image was found to be strongly correlated with the radial position of the insert but independent of the relative stopping power of the insert. The spatial resolution varies between roughly 4 and 6 lp/cm in both the the radial and azimuthal directions depending on the radial displacement of the edge. Conclusion: The amount of image degradation due to our detector system is small compared with the effects of multiple Coulomb scattering, pixelation of the image and the reconstruction algorithm. Improvements in reconstruction will be made in order to achieve the theoretical limits of spatial resolution.

  8. Pin-photodiode array for the measurement of fan-beam energy and air kerma distributions of X-ray CT scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Aoyama, Takahiko; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao; Kameyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Yoshinori

    2016-07-01

    Patient dose estimation in X-ray computed tomography (CT) is generally performed by Monte Carlo simulation of photon interactions within anthropomorphic or cylindrical phantoms. An accurate Monte Carlo simulation requires an understanding of the effects of the bow-tie filter equipped in a CT scanner, i.e. the change of X-ray energy and air kerma along the fan-beam arc of the CT scanner. To measure the effective energy and air kerma distributions, we devised a pin-photodiode array utilizing eight channels of X-ray sensors arranged at regular intervals along the fan-beam arc of the CT scanner. Each X-ray sensor consisted of two plate type of pin silicon photodiodes in tandem - front and rear photodiodes - and of a lead collimator, which only allowed X-rays to impinge vertically to the silicon surface of the photodiodes. The effective energy of the X-rays was calculated from the ratio of the output voltages of the photodiodes and the dose was calculated from the output voltage of the front photodiode using the energy and dose calibration curves respectively. The pin-photodiode array allowed the calculation of X-ray effective energies and relative doses, at eight points simultaneously along the fan-beam arc of a CT scanner during a single rotation of the scanner. The fan-beam energy and air kerma distributions of CT scanners can be effectively measured using this pin-photodiode array. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Recent developments with a prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. G.; Jirasek, A.; Wells, D.

    2013-06-01

    The latest design of a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner is presented. A new beam creation system consists of a 635 nm laser diode module with variable, DC voltage-controlled beam intensity. A change in scanner alignment allows for the elimination of ring artefacts caused by data corruption that is spaced symmetrically across the detector array. These artefacts, as well as a pair of streaking artefacts caused by flask seams, are removed in sinogram space. A flask registration technique has been developed that allows for accurate, reproducible dosimeter placement. Protocol investigations with gel dosimeters have indicated the importance of: i) proper cooling techniques during gel manufacture, and ii) scanning the dosimeter while it is at room temperature. Latest reconstructions of a normoxic polymer gel dosimeter are presented as an indicator of current system performance.

  10. Recent developments with a prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, W G; Jirasek, A; Wells, D

    2013-01-01

    The latest design of a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner is presented. A new beam creation system consists of a 635 nm laser diode module with variable, DC voltage-controlled beam intensity. A change in scanner alignment allows for the elimination of ring artefacts caused by data corruption that is spaced symmetrically across the detector array. These artefacts, as well as a pair of streaking artefacts caused by flask seams, are removed in sinogram space. A flask registration technique has been developed that allows for accurate, reproducible dosimeter placement. Protocol investigations with gel dosimeters have indicated the importance of: i) proper cooling techniques during gel manufacture, and ii) scanning the dosimeter while it is at room temperature. Latest reconstructions of a normoxic polymer gel dosimeter are presented as an indicator of current system performance.

  11. Early clinical experience in CT scanning of the abdomen using a third generation scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, L.; Churchill, R.J.; Reynes, C.J.; Marsan, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Five-second scanning offers an improvement over second generation scanners. There is no need for glucagon administration since there is virtually no objectionable artifact secondary to motion. Scans with the Photrax 4000 show resolution of structures such as gallbladder wall and renal fascia routinely. The anatomic structures visualized are more clearly identified than on second generation scans. Representative normal and pathological anatomy will be shown. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB [de

  12. Monitor hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in living mouse tail using photoacoustic CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to use PCT spectroscopy scanner to monitor the hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation change of living mouse by imaging the artery and veins in a mouse tail. Materials and Methods: One mouse tail was scanned using the PCT small animal scanner at the isosbestic wavelength (796nm) to obtain its hemoglobin concentration. Immediately after the scan, the mouse was euthanized and its blood was extracted from the heart. The true hemoglobin concentration was measured using a co-oximeter. Reconstruction correction algorithm to compensate the acoustic signal loss due to the existence of bone structure in the mouse tail was developed. After the correction, the hemoglobin concentration was calculated from the PCT images and compared with co-oximeter result. Next, one mouse were immobilized in the PCT scanner. Gas with different concentrations of oxygen was given to mouse to change the oxygen saturation. PCT tail vessel spectroscopy scans were performed 15 minutes after the introduction of gas. The oxygen saturation values were then calculated to monitor the oxygen saturation change of mouse. Results: The systematic error for hemoglobin concentration measurement was less than 5% based on preliminary analysis. Same correction technique was used for oxygen saturation calculation. After correction, the oxygen saturation level change matches the oxygen volume ratio change of the introduced gas. Conclusion: This living mouse tail experiment has shown that NIR PCT-spectroscopy can be used to monitor the oxygen saturation status in living small animals.

  13. Evaluation of the Meditech M250 and a comparison with other CT scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greensmith, R.; Richardson, R.B.; Mackintosh, I.P.; Sargood, A.J.; Stevens, P.H.

    1985-11-01

    The Meditech M250 computerised tomography (CT) machine was evaluated during the first half of 1984. Measurements were made of noise, modulation transfer function, slice width, radiation dose profile, uniformity and linearity of CT number, effective photon energy and parameters relating to machine specification, such as pixel size and scan time. All breakdowns were logged to indicate machine reliability. A comparison with the established EMI CT1010 and CT5005 was made for noise, resolution and multislice radiation dose, as well as the dose efficiency or quality (Q) factor for both head and body modes of operation. The M250 was found to perform to its intended specification with an acceptable level of reliability.

  14. An evaluation of the Meditech M250 and a comparison with other CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greensmith, R.; Richardson, R.B.; Mackintosh, I.P.; Sargood, A.J.; Stevens, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Meditech M250 computerised tomography (CT) machine was evaluated during the first half of 1984. Measurements were made of noise, modulation transfer function, slice width, radiation dose profile, uniformity and linearity of CT number, effective photon energy and parameters relating to machine specification, such as pixel size and scan time. All breakdowns were logged to indicate machine reliability. A comparison with the established EMI CT1010 and CT5005 was made for noise, resolution and multislice radiation dose, as well as the dose efficiency or quality (Q) factor for both head and body modes of operation. The M250 was found to perform to its intended specification with an acceptable level of reliability. (author)

  15. An evaluation of the Meditech M250 and a comparison with other CT scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greensmith, R; Richardson, R B; Sargood, A J; Stevens, P H; Mackintosh, I P

    1985-11-01

    The Meditech M250 computerised tomography (CT) machine was evaluated during the first half of 1984. Measurements were made of noise, modulation transfer function, slice width, radiation dose profile, uniformity and linearity of CT number, effective photon energy and parameters relating to machine specification, such as pixel size and scan time. All breakdowns were logged to indicate machine reliability. A comparison with the established EMI CT1010 and CT5005 was made for noise, resolution and multislice radiation dose, as well as the dose efficiency or quality (Q) factor for both head and body modes of operation. The M250 was found to perform to its intended specification with an acceptable level of reliability.

  16. Four-dimensional measurement of intrafractional respiratory motion of pancreatic tumors using a 256 multi-slice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Hara, Ryusuke; Yanagi, Takeshi; Sharp, Gregory C.; Kumagai, Motoki; Asakura, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Riwa; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify pancreas and pancreatic tumor movement due to respiratory motion using volumetric cine CT images. Materials and methods: Six patients with pancreatic tumors were scanned in cine mode with a 256 multi-slice CT scanner under free breathing conditions. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and pancreas were manually contoured on the CT data set by a radiation oncologist. Intrafractional respiratory movement of the GTV and pancreas was calculated, and the results were compared between the respiratory ungated and gated phases, which is a 30% duty cycle around exhalation. Results: Respiratory-induced organ motion was observed mainly in the anterior abdominal side than the posterior side. Average GTV displacement (ungated/gated phases) was 0.7 mm/0.2 mm in both the left and right directions, and 2.5 mm/0.9 mm in the anterior, 0.1 mm/0 mm in the posterior, and 8.9 mm/2.6 mm in the inferior directions. Average pancreas center of mass displacement relative to that at peak exhalation was mainly in the inferior direction, at 9.6 mm in the ungated phase and 2.3 mm in the gated phase. Conclusions: By allowing accurate determination of the margin, quantitative analysis of tumor and pancreas displacement provides useful information in treatment planning in all radiation approaches for pancreatic tumors.

  17. High resolution SPECT imaging for visualization of intratumoral heterogeneity using a SPECT/CT scanner dedicated for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Izumi O.; Tani, Kotaro; Tsuda, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    conditions using a SPECT/CT scanner. (author)

  18. The effect of CT scanners in the trauma room – an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulffeld, S.; Rasmussen, L. S.; Højlund Bech, B.

    2017-01-01

    with a trauma resuscitation table. Subgroup analyses were performed on severely injured and patients with traumatic brain injury. Results: We included 784 patients before and 742 patients after the reconstruction. Case-mix differed between study periods as there was a higher proportion of severe injuries......, traumatic brain injury and penetrating trauma in the after period. We found a minor increase in time to CT in the after period (20 vs. 21 min, P = 0.008). In a multivariate regression analysis adjusted for differences in case-mix and with time to CT as outcome, period was an insignificant explanatory...

  19. A fast dual wavelength laser beam fluid-less optical CT scanner for radiotherapy 3D gel dosimetry II: dosimetric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    New clinical radiotherapy dosimetry systems need comprehensive demonstration of measurement quality. Practicality and reliability are other important aspects for clinical dosimeters. In this work the performance of an optical CT scanner for true 3D dosimetry is assessed using a radiochromic gel dosimeter. The fluid-less scanner utilised dual lasers to avoid the necessity for pre-irradiation scans and give greater robustness of image quality, enhancing practicality. Calibration methods using both cuvettes and reconstructed volumes were developed. Dosimetric accuracy was similar for dual and single wavelength measurements, except that cuvette calibration reliability was reduced for dual wavelength without pre-irradiation scanning. Detailed performance parameters were specified for the dosimetry system indicating the suitability for clinical use. The most significant limitations of the system were due to the gel dosimeter rather than the optical CT scanner. Quality assurance guidelines were developed to maintain dosimetry system performance in routine use.

  20. Investigation of the influence of image reconstruction filter and scan parameters on operation of automatic tube current modulation systems for different CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sookpeng, Supawitoo; Martin, Colin J.; Gentle, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the user selected CT scanning parameters under automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) between hospitals has a substantial influence on the radiation doses and image quality for patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of changing image reconstruction filter and scan parameter settings on tube current, dose and image quality for various CT scanners operating under ATCM. The scan parameters varied were pitch factor, rotation time, collimator configuration, kVp, image thickness and image filter convolution (FC) used for reconstruction. The Toshiba scanner varies the tube current to achieve a set target noise. Changes in the FC setting and image thickness for the first reconstruction were the major factors affecting patient dose. A two-step change in FC from smoother to sharper filters doubles the dose, but is counterbalanced by an improvement in spatial resolution. In contrast, Philips and Siemens scanners maintained tube current values similar to those for a reference image and patient, and the tube current only varied slightly for changes in individual CT scan parameters. The selection of a sharp filter increased the image noise, while use of iDose iterative reconstruction reduced the noise. Since the principles used by CT manufacturers for ATCM vary, it is important that parameters which affect patient dose and image quality for each scanner are made clear to operator to aid in optimisation. (authors)

  1. Objective image characterization of a spectral CT scanner with dual-layer detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozguner, Orhan; Dhanantwari, Amar; Halliburton, Sandra; Wen, Gezheng; Utrup, Steven; Jordan, David

    2018-01-01

    This work evaluated the performance of a detector-based spectral CT system by obtaining objective reference data, evaluating attenuation response of iodine and accuracy of iodine quantification, and comparing conventional CT and virtual monoenergetic images in three common phantoms. Scanning was performed using the hospital’s clinical adult body protocol. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated for a tungsten wire and visual line pair targets were evaluated. Image noise power spectrum (NPS) and pixel standard deviation were calculated. MTF for monoenergetic images agreed with conventional images within 0.05 lp cm-1. NPS curves indicated that noise texture of 70 keV monoenergetic images is similar to conventional images. Standard deviation measurements showed monoenergetic images have lower noise except at 40 keV. Mean CT number and CNR agreed with conventional images at 75 keV. Measured iodine concentration agreed with true concentration within 6% for inserts at the center of the phantom. Performance of monoenergetic images at detector based spectral CT is the same as, or better than, that of conventional images. Spectral acquisition and reconstruction with a detector based platform represents the physical behaviour of iodine as expected and accurately quantifies the material concentration.

  2. Source position error influence on industry CT image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Peng; Li Zhipeng; Wu Haifeng

    2004-01-01

    Based on the emulational exercise, the influence of source position error on industry CT (ICT) image quality was studied and the valuable parameters were obtained for the design of ICT. The vivid container CT image was also acquired from the CT testing system. (authors)

  3. Energy dependence of contrast-detail-dose and object-detectability-dose curves for CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, L.K.; Cohen, G.

    1982-01-01

    The energy dependence of contrast-detail-dose (CdD) and object-detectability-dose (OdD) curves for computed tomographic scanners is investigated. The effects of changes in beam energy on perceptibility are shown to be due to changes in signal-to-noise ratio resulting from changes in contrast and photon statistics. Energy-dependence analysis of OdD curves is shown to depend on the atomic composition of the phantom used to generate the curves, while such an analysis of CdD curves is independent of the atomic composition of the phantom. It is also shown that any OdD curve can be generated from CdD curves and that use of this fact rectifies any potential energy-dependent interpretation of CdD curves

  4. Dual-energy attenuation coefficient decomposition with differential filtration and application to a microCT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taschereau, R; Silverman, R W; Chatziioannou, A F

    2010-01-01

    Dual-energy x-ray computed tomography (DECT) has the capability to decompose attenuation coefficients using two basis functions and has proved its potential in reducing beam-hardening artifacts from reconstructed images. The method typically involves two successive scans with different x-ray tube voltage settings. This work proposes an approach to dual-energy imaging through x-ray beam filtration that requires only one scan and a single tube voltage setting. It has been implemented in a preclinical microCT tomograph with minor modifications. Retrofitting of the microCT scanner involved the addition of an automated filter wheel and modifications to the acquisition and reconstruction software. Results show that beam-hardening artifacts are reduced to noise level. Acquisition of a μ-Compton image is well suited for attenuation-correction of PET images while dynamic energy selection (4D viewing) offers flexibility in image viewing by adjusting contrast and noise levels to suit the task at hand. All dual-energy and single energy reference scans were acquired at the same soft tissue dose level of 50 mGy.

  5. Dual-energy attenuation coefficient decomposition with differential filtration and application to a microCT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taschereau, R; Silverman, R W; Chatziioannou, A F [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)], E-mail: rtaschereau@mednet.ucla.edu

    2010-02-21

    Dual-energy x-ray computed tomography (DECT) has the capability to decompose attenuation coefficients using two basis functions and has proved its potential in reducing beam-hardening artifacts from reconstructed images. The method typically involves two successive scans with different x-ray tube voltage settings. This work proposes an approach to dual-energy imaging through x-ray beam filtration that requires only one scan and a single tube voltage setting. It has been implemented in a preclinical microCT tomograph with minor modifications. Retrofitting of the microCT scanner involved the addition of an automated filter wheel and modifications to the acquisition and reconstruction software. Results show that beam-hardening artifacts are reduced to noise level. Acquisition of a {mu}-Compton image is well suited for attenuation-correction of PET images while dynamic energy selection (4D viewing) offers flexibility in image viewing by adjusting contrast and noise levels to suit the task at hand. All dual-energy and single energy reference scans were acquired at the same soft tissue dose level of 50 mGy.

  6. Estimation of eye lens dose during brain scans using Gafchromic XR-QA2 film in various multidetector CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhilesh, Philomina; Jamhale, Shramika H.; Sharma, S.D.; Kumar, Rajesh; Datta, D.; Kulkarni, Arti R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate eye lens dose during brain scans in 16-, 64-, 128- and 256-slice multidetector computed tomography (CT) scanners in helical acquisition mode and to test the feasibility of using radiochromic film as eye lens dosemeter during CT scanning. Eye lens dose measurements were performed using Gafchromic XR-QA2 film on a polystyrene head phantom designed with outer dimensions equivalent to the head size of a reference Indian man. The response accuracy of XR-QA2 film was validated by using thermoluminescence dosemeters. The eye lens dose measured using XR-QA2 film on head phantom for plain brain scanning in helical mode ranged from 43.8 to 45.8 mGy. The XR-QA2 film measured dose values were in agreement with TLD measured dose values within a maximum variation of 8.9%. The good correlation between the two data sets confirms the viability of using XR-QA2 film for eye lens dosimetry. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of doses delivered during CT examination by different scanners for purposes of intercomparison and dose optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashiru, Adam

    2017-07-01

    This research study was aimed at performing dosimetry intercomparison on different CT scanners in the diagnostic radiology departments of Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH), Sweden Ghana Medical Center (SGMC) and Global Medical and Imaging Center (GMIC). Using the standard body phantom and integrated ion chamber technique volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLPs) within the phantom were evaluated. The ion chamber technique was applied to two 16 slice Siemens and one Toshiba Aquilion one CT scanners. CTDIvol and DLP values for the standard body polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom were estimated and comparison made with corresponding console displayed values for accuracy and also to deduce a suitable method for optimization of patients and occupationally exposed worker doses. Effective doses were also calculated. An intra and inter institutional comparison of measured doses and console displayed doses were performed. Chest protocol at Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) was applied during the scanning of the phantom. Estimated CTDIvol values (mGy) were 17mGy, 24mGy and 13.1mGy for SGMC, GMIC and KBTH respectively. These values deviated from the console displayed values by 24.1%, 22.9% and 31.3% respectively. Similarly, estimated DLP values (mGy.cm) were 675mGy.cm,944mGy.cm and 419mGy.cm for SGMC, GMIC and KBTH respectively deviating from the console displayed values by 24.1%, 24.2% and 29% respectively. In terms of effective doses (E), the calculated E (mSv) values were 9.45mSv, 13.2mSv and 5.87mSv estimated from the DLPs from SGMC, GMIC and KBTH respectively using K, the anatomy-specific dose coefficient expressing effective dose normalized to DLP in a standard CT dosimetry phantom of 0.014 mSv mGy-1 cm-1. The estimated doses were compared to other selected international Dose Reference Levels (DRLs) and were within range. (au)

  8. Form measurements in an industrial CT scanner investigated using a polymer step gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, J.; Stolfi, Alessandro; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    . The present investigation concerns the measurement of flatness at different positions in the CT measurement volume using a milled miniature step gauge. The artifact is a 42 mm long step gauge with 11 grooves at 2 mm steps, made of polyphenylene sulphide PPS (? = 1.650 g/cm3), with limited form...... error and good surface finish. A total of 132 flatness measurements were performed on the left step gauge grooves. The linear distribution of the grooves pointed out a non-uniform CT performance over the step gauge length with max deviation up to 25 μm. However, an appropriate choice of parameters...... yielded a reduction of the max deviation along the step gauge length by approximately 13 μm....

  9. Analysis of the enamel hypoplasia using micro-CT scanner versus classical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, Justyna; Skrzat, Janusz; Wróbel, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    This article demonstrates the use of micro-CT scanning of the teeth surface for recognizing and evaluating severity of the enamel hypoplasia. To test capabilities of the microtomography versus classical method of evaluation hypoplastic defects of the enamel we selected two human teeth (C, M(2)) showing different types of enamel hypoplasia: linear, pits, and groove. Examined samples derive from archeological material dated on XVII-XVIII AD and excavated in Poland. In the current study we proved that micro-CT scanning is a powerful technique not only for imaging all kinds of the enamel hypoplasia but also allows to perform accurate measurements of the enamel defects. We figure out that contrary to the classical method of scoring enamel defects, the micro-computed tomography yields adequate data which serve for estimating the length of stress episode and length of interval between them.

  10. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott; Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W.; Sloan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A

  11. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm

  12. Technical Note: Insertion of digital lesions in the projection domain for dual-source, dual-energy CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Andrea; Chen, Baiyu; Li, Zhoubo; Yu, Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia

    2017-05-01

    To compare algorithms performing material decomposition and classification in dual-energy CT, it is desirable to know the ground truth of the lesion to be analyzed in real patient data. In this work, we developed and validated a framework to insert digital lesions of arbitrary chemical composition into patient projection data acquired on a dual-source, dual-energy CT system. A model that takes into account beam-hardening effects was developed to predict the CT number of objects with known chemical composition. The model utilizes information about the x-ray energy spectra, the patient/phantom attenuation, and the x-ray detector energy response. The beam-hardening model was validated on samples of iodine (I) and calcium (Ca) for a second-generation dual-source, dual-energy CT scanner for all tube potentials available and a wide range of patient sizes. The seven most prevalent mineral components of renal stones were modeled and digital stones were created with CT numbers computed for each patient/phantom size and x-ray energy spectra using the developed beam-hardening model. Each digital stone was inserted in the dual-energy projection data of a water phantom scanned on a dual-source scanner and reconstructed with the routine algorithms in use in our practice. The geometry of the forward projection for dual-energy data was validated by comparing CT number accuracy and high-contrast resolution of simulated dual-energy CT data of the ACR phantom with experimentally acquired data. The beam-hardening model and forward projection method accurately predicted the CT number of I and Ca over a wide range of tube potentials and phantom sizes. The images reconstructed after the insertion of digital kidney stones were consistent with the images reconstructed from the scanner, and the CT number ratios for different kidney stone types were consistent with data in the literature. A sample application of the proposed tool was also demonstrated. A framework was developed and validated

  13. Verification of CTDI and Dlp values for a head tomography reported by the manufacturers of the CT scanners, using a CT dose profiler probe, a head phantom and a piranha electrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo C, E.; Garcia F, I. B.; Garcia H, J.; Roman L, S.; Salmeron C, O.

    2015-10-01

    The extensive use of Computed Tomography (CT) and the associated increase in patient dose calls for an accurate dose evaluation technique. The CT contributes up to 70% of the total dose given to patients during X-ray examinations. The rapid advancements in CT technology are placing new demands on the methods and equipment that are used for quality assurance. The wide beam widths found in CT scanners with multiple beam apertures make it impossible to use existing CT ionization chambers to measure the total dose given to the patient. Using a standard 10 cm CT ionization chamber may result in inaccurate measurements due to underestimation of the dose profile for wide beams. The use a CT dose profiler based on solid-state technology and the Piranha electrometer from RTI electronics provides a potential solution to the arising concerns over patient dose. This study intend to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of CT Dose Index (CTDI) and Dose Length Product (Dlp) values for a head tomography reported by the manufacturers of the CT scanners at each study. (Author)

  14. Verification of CTDI and Dlp values for a head tomography reported by the manufacturers of the CT scanners, using a CT dose profiler probe, a head phantom and a piranha electrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo C, E.; Garcia F, I. B.; Garcia H, J.; Roman L, S. [Servicios de Salud de Michoacan, Centro Estatal de Atencion Oncologica, Gertrudis Bocanegra No. 300, Col. Cuauhtemoc, 58020 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Salmeron C, O., E-mail: edithcastillocorona@gmail.com [Servicios de Salud de Michoacan, Hospital General Dr. Miguel Silva, Isidro Huarte s/n, Centro Historico, 58000 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The extensive use of Computed Tomography (CT) and the associated increase in patient dose calls for an accurate dose evaluation technique. The CT contributes up to 70% of the total dose given to patients during X-ray examinations. The rapid advancements in CT technology are placing new demands on the methods and equipment that are used for quality assurance. The wide beam widths found in CT scanners with multiple beam apertures make it impossible to use existing CT ionization chambers to measure the total dose given to the patient. Using a standard 10 cm CT ionization chamber may result in inaccurate measurements due to underestimation of the dose profile for wide beams. The use a CT dose profiler based on solid-state technology and the Piranha electrometer from RTI electronics provides a potential solution to the arising concerns over patient dose. This study intend to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of CT Dose Index (CTDI) and Dose Length Product (Dlp) values for a head tomography reported by the manufacturers of the CT scanners at each study. (Author)

  15. Development of a Method to Assess the Precision Of the z-axis X-ray Beam Collimation in a CT Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yon-Min

    2018-05-01

    Generally X-ray equipment specifies the beam collimator for the accuracy measurement as a quality control item, but the computed tomography (CT) scanner with high dose has no collimator accuracy measurement item. If the radiation dose is to be reduced, an important step is to check if the beam precisely collimates at the body part for CT scan. However, few ways are available to assess how precisely the X-ray beam is collimated. In this regard, this paper provides a way to assess the precision of z-axis X-ray beam collimation in a CT scanner. After the image plate cassette had been exposed to the X-ray beam, the exposed width was automatically detected by using a computer program developed by the research team to calculate the difference between the exposed width and the imaged width (at isocenter). The result for the precision of z-axis X-ray beam collimation showed that the exposed width was 3.8 mm and the overexposure was high at 304% when a narrow beam of a 1.25 mm imaged width was used. In this study, the precision of the beam collimation of the CT scanner, which is frequently used for medical services, was measured in a convenient way by using the image plate (IP) cassette.

  16. Radiation Exposure to Staff in Intensive Care Unit with Portable CT Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bedside radiological procedures pose a risk of radiation exposure to ICU staff. The perception of risk may increase the degree of caution among the health care staff and raise new barriers preventing patients from obtaining prompt care. Objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the annual cumulative radiation dose to individual ICU staff. Methods. In this prospective study, forty subjects were required to wear thermoluminescent dosimeter badges during their working hours. The badges were analyzed to determine the exposure after 3 months. Results. A total of 802 radiological procedures were completed at bedside during the study period. The estimated annual dosage to doctors and nurses on average was 0.99 mSv and 0.88 mSv (p<0.001, respectively. Residents were subjected to the highest radiation exposure (1.04 mSv per year, p=0.002. The radiation dose was correlated with day shift working hours (r=0.426; p=0.006 and length of service (r=-0.403; p<0.01. Conclusions. With standard precautions, bedside radiological procedures—including portable CT scans—do not expose ICU staff to high dose of ionizing radiation. The level of radiation exposure is related to the daytime working hours and length of service.

  17. Laser scanner data processing and 3D modeling using a free and open source software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriele, Fatuzzo; Michele, Mangiameli; Giuseppe, Mussumeci; Salvatore, Zito

    2015-01-01

    The laser scanning is a technology that allows in a short time to run the relief geometric objects with a high level of detail and completeness, based on the signal emitted by the laser and the corresponding return signal. When the incident laser radiation hits the object to detect, then the radiation is reflected. The purpose is to build a three-dimensional digital model that allows to reconstruct the reality of the object and to conduct studies regarding the design, restoration and/or conservation. When the laser scanner is equipped with a digital camera, the result of the measurement process is a set of points in XYZ coordinates showing a high density and accuracy with radiometric and RGB tones. In this case, the set of measured points is called “point cloud” and allows the reconstruction of the Digital Surface Model. Even the post-processing is usually performed by closed source software, which is characterized by Copyright restricting the free use, free and open source software can increase the performance by far. Indeed, this latter can be freely used providing the possibility to display and even custom the source code. The experience started at the Faculty of Engineering in Catania is aimed at finding a valuable free and open source tool, MeshLab (Italian Software for data processing), to be compared with a reference closed source software for data processing, i.e. RapidForm. In this work, we compare the results obtained with MeshLab and Rapidform through the planning of the survey and the acquisition of the point cloud of a morphologically complex statue

  18. Laser scanner data processing and 3D modeling using a free and open source software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriele, Fatuzzo [Dept. of Industrial and Mechanical Engineering, University of Catania (Italy); Michele, Mangiameli, E-mail: amichele.mangiameli@dica.unict.it; Giuseppe, Mussumeci; Salvatore, Zito [Dept. of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Catania (Italy)

    2015-03-10

    The laser scanning is a technology that allows in a short time to run the relief geometric objects with a high level of detail and completeness, based on the signal emitted by the laser and the corresponding return signal. When the incident laser radiation hits the object to detect, then the radiation is reflected. The purpose is to build a three-dimensional digital model that allows to reconstruct the reality of the object and to conduct studies regarding the design, restoration and/or conservation. When the laser scanner is equipped with a digital camera, the result of the measurement process is a set of points in XYZ coordinates showing a high density and accuracy with radiometric and RGB tones. In this case, the set of measured points is called “point cloud” and allows the reconstruction of the Digital Surface Model. Even the post-processing is usually performed by closed source software, which is characterized by Copyright restricting the free use, free and open source software can increase the performance by far. Indeed, this latter can be freely used providing the possibility to display and even custom the source code. The experience started at the Faculty of Engineering in Catania is aimed at finding a valuable free and open source tool, MeshLab (Italian Software for data processing), to be compared with a reference closed source software for data processing, i.e. RapidForm. In this work, we compare the results obtained with MeshLab and Rapidform through the planning of the survey and the acquisition of the point cloud of a morphologically complex statue.

  19. Assessment of radiation exposure on a dual-source computed tomography-scanner performing coronary computed tomography-angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, S.; Herzog, P.; Johnson, T.; Boehm, H.; Nikolaou, K.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The radiation exposure of a dual-source-64-channel multi-detector-computed-tomography-scanner (Somatom-Defintion, Siemens, Germany) was assessed in a phantom-study performing coronary-CT-angiography (CTCA) in comparison to patients' data randomly selected from routine scanning. Methods: 240 CT-acquisitions of a computed tomography dose index (CTDI)-phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) were performed using a synthetically generated Electrocardiography (ECG)-signal with variable heart rates (30-180 beats per minute (bpm)). 120 measurements were acquired using continuous tube-output; 120 measurements were performed using ECG-synchronized tube-modulation. The pulsing window was set at minimum duration at 65% of the cardiac cycle between 30 and 75 bpm. From 90-180 bpm the pulsing window was set at 30-70% of the cardiac cycle. Automated pitch adaptation was always used. A comparison between phantom CTDI and two patient groups' CTDI corresponding to the two pulsing groups was performed. Results: Without ECG-tube-modulation CDTI-values were affected by heart-rate-changes resulting in 85.7 mGray (mGy) at 30 and 45 bpm, 65.5 mGy/60 bpm, 54.7 mGy/75 bpm, 46.5 mGy/90 bpm, 34.2 mGy/120 bpm, 27.0 mGy/150 bpm and 22.1 mGy/180 bpm equal to effective doses between 14.5 mSievert (mSv) at 30/45 bpm and 3.6 mSv at 180 bpm. Using ECG-tube-modulation these CTDI-values resulted: 32.6 mGy/30 bpm, 36.6 mGy/45 bpm, 31.4 mGy/60 bpm, 26.8 mGy/75 bpm, 23.7 mGy/90 bpm, 19.4 mGy/120 bpm, 17.2 mGy/150 bpm and 15.6 mGy/180 bpm equal to effective doses between 5.5 mSv at 30 bpm and 2.6 mSv at 180 bpm. Significant CTDI-differences were found between patients with lower/moderate and higher heart rates in comparison to the phantom CTDI-results. Conclusions: Dual source CTCA is particularly dose efficient at high heart rates when automated pitch adaptation, especially in combination with ECG-based tube-modulation is used. However in clinical routine scanning for patients with higher heart rates

  20. Image quality and radiation dose of coronary CT angiography performed with whole-heart coverage CT scanner with intra-cycle motion correction algorithm in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreini, Daniele; Pontone, Gianluca; Mushtaq, Saima; Mancini, Maria Elisabetta; Conte, Edoardo; Guglielmo, Marco; Volpato, Valentina; Annoni, Andrea; Baggiano, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Ditali, Valentina; Perchinunno, Marco; Fiorentini, Cesare; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Pepi, Mauro

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate image quality, coronary evaluability and radiation exposure of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) performed with whole-heart coverage cardiac-CT in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We prospectively enrolled 164 patients with AF who underwent a clinically indicated CCTA with a 16-cm z-axis coverage scanner. In all patients CCTA was performed using prospective ECG-triggering with targeted RR interval. We evaluated image quality, coronary evaluability and effective dose (ED). Patients were divided in two subgroups based on heart rate (HR) during imaging. Group 1: 64 patients with low HR (ethics committee approved the study protocol. In a segment-based analysis, coronary evaluability was 98.4 % (2,577/2,620 segments) in the whole population, without significant differences between groups (1,013/1,024 (98.9 %) and 1,565/1,596 (98.1 %), for groups 1 and 2, respectively, p=0.15). Mean ED was similar in both groups (3.8±1.9 mSv and 3.9±2.1 mSv in groups 1 and 2, respectively, p=0.75) CONCLUSIONS: The whole-heart-coverage scanner could evaluate coronary arteries with high image quality and without increase in radiation exposure in AF patients, even in the high HR group. • Last-generation CT scanner improves coronary artery assessment in AF patients. • The new CT scanner enables low radiation exposure in AF patients. • Diagnostic ICA maybe avoided in AF patients with suspected CAD. • Whole-heart coverage CT scanner enables low radiation exposure in AF patients.

  1. FormScanner: Open-Source Solution for Grading Multiple-Choice Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chadwick; Lo, Glenn; Young, Kaisa; Borsetta, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The multiple-choice exam remains a staple for many introductory physics courses. In the past, people have graded these by hand or even flaming needles. Today, one usually grades the exams with a form scanner that utilizes optical mark recognition (OMR). Several companies provide these scanners and particular forms, such as the eponymous…

  2. High speed imaging of dynamic processes with a switched source x-ray CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, William M; Lionheart, William R B; Morton, Edward J; Cunningham, Mike; Luggar, Russell D

    2015-01-01

    Conventional x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners are limited in their scanning speed by the mechanical constraints of their rotating gantries and as such do not provide the necessary temporal resolution for imaging of fast-moving dynamic processes, such as moving fluid flows. The Real Time Tomography (RTT) system is a family of fast cone beam CT scanners which instead use multiple fixed discrete sources and complete rings of detectors in an offset geometry. We demonstrate the potential of this system for use in the imaging of such high speed dynamic processes and give results using simulated and real experimental data. The unusual scanning geometry results in some challenges in image reconstruction, which are overcome using algebraic iterative reconstruction techniques and explicit regularisation. Through the use of a simple temporal regularisation term and by optimising the source firing pattern, we show that temporal resolution of the system may be increased at the expense of spatial resolution, which may be advantageous in some situations. Results are given showing temporal resolution of approximately 500 µs with simulated data and 3 ms with real experimental data. (paper)

  3. Whole brain CT perfusion deficits using 320-detector-row CT scanner in TIA patients are associated with ABCD2 score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Bijal K; Mustafa, Ghulam; McMurtray, Aaron; Masud, Mohammed W; Gunukula, Sameer K; Kamal, Haris; Kandel, Amit; Beltagy, Abdelrahman; Li, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) are cerebral ischemic events without infarction. The uses of CT perfusion (CTP) techniques such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), time to peak (TTP), mean transit time (MTT) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) provide real time data about ischemia. It has been shown that CTP changes occur in less sensitive CTP scanners in patients with TIA. Larger detector row CTP (whole brain perfusion studies) may show that CTP abnormalities are more prevalent than previously noted. It is also unclear if these changes are associated with TIA severity. To demonstrate that TIA patients are associated with perfusion deficits using whole brain 320-detector-row CT perfusion, and to determine an association between ABCD2 score and perfusion deficit using whole brain perfusion. We retrospectively reviewed all TIA patients for CTP deficits from 2008-2010. Perfusion imaging was reviewed at admission; and it was determined if a perfusion deficit was present along with vascular territory involved. Of 364 TIA patients, 62 patients had CTP deficits. The largest group of patients had MCA territory involved with 48 of 62 patients (77.42%). The most common perfusion abnormality was increased TTP with 46 patients (74.19%). The ABCD2 score was reviewed in association with perfusion deficit. Increased age >60, severe hypertension (>180/100 mmHg), patients with speech abnormalities, and duration of symptoms >10 min were associated with a perfusion deficit but history of diabetes or minimal/moderate hypertension (140/90-179/99 mmHg) was not. There was no association between motor deficit and perfusion abnormality. Perfusion deficits are found in TIA patients using whole brain CTP and associated with components of the ABCD2 score.

  4. Dynamic comparison of PET imaging performance between state-of-the-art ToF-PET/CT and ToF-PET/MR scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delso, Gaspar; Deller, Tim; Khalighi, Mehdi; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Schulthess, Gustav von

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present work was to determine the potential for dose reduction in a new clinical ToF-PET/MR scanner. This was achieved by means of long dynamic phantom acquisitions designed to provide a fair comparison of image quality and lesion detectability, as a function of activity, between the new PET/MR system and a state-of-the art PET/CT.

  5. SU-G-206-07: Dual-Energy CT Inter- and Intra-Scanner Variability Within One Make and Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, M; Wood, C; Cody, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It can be logistically quite difficult to scan patients on the same exact device for their repeat visits in multi-scanner facilities. The reliability between dual-energy CT scanners’ quantitative results is not known, nor is their individual repeatability. Therefore, we evaluated inter- and intra-scanner variability with respect to several key clinical quantitative metrics specific to dual-energy CT. Methods: Eleven identical GE HD-750 CT scanners in a busy clinical environment were used to perform dual-energy (DE) CT scans of a large elliptical quality control (QC) phantom (Gammex, Inc.; Middleton, WI) which contains many standard insert materials. The DE-QC phantom was scanned bi-weekly during 2016; 3 to 4 scans were obtained from each scanner (a total of 35 data sets were used for analysis). Iodine accuracy for the 2mg/ml, 5mg/ml and 15mg/ml rods (from the Iodine(Water) image set) and soft tissue HU (40 HU based on NIST constants) from the 50keV data set were used to assess inter- and intra-scanner variability (standard deviation). Results: Intra-scanner variability average for 2mg/ml Iodine was 0.10 mg/ml (range 0.05–0.15 mg/ml), for 5mg/ml Iodine was 0.12 mg/ml (range 0.07–0.16 mg/ml), for 15 mg/ml Iodine was 0.25 mg/ml (range 0.16–0.37 mg/ml), and for the soft tissue inserts was 2.1 HU (range 1.8–2.6 HU). Inter-scanner variability average for 2mg/ml Iodine was 0.16 mg/ml (range 0.11–0.19 mg/ml), for 5mg/ml Iodine was 0.18 mg/ml (range 0.11–0.22 mg/ml), for 15 mg/ml Iodine was 0.35 mg/ml (range 0.23–0.44 mg/ml), and for the soft tissue inserts was 3.8 HU (range 3.1–4.5 HU). Conclusion: Intra-scanner variability for the iodine and soft tissue inserts averaged 3.1% and 5.2% respectively, and inter-scanner variability for these regions analyzed averaged 5.0% and 9.5%, respectively. Future work will include determination of smallest measurable change and acceptable limits for DE-CT scanner variability over longer time intervals. This

  6. MR-based attenuation correction for cardiac FDG PET on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner: comparison with standard CT attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vontobel, Jan; Liga, Riccardo; Possner, Mathias; Clerc, Olivier F.; Mikulicic, Fran; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Voert, Edwin E.G.W. ter; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Stehli, Julia; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Benz, Dominik C.; Graeni, Christoph; Gaemperli, Oliver; Herzog, Bernhard; Buechel, Ronny R.; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of attenuation correction (AC) for cardiac {sup 18}F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) using MR-based attenuation maps. We included 23 patients with no known cardiac history undergoing whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging for oncological indications on a PET/CT scanner using time-of-flight (TOF) and subsequent whole-body PET/MR imaging on an investigational hybrid PET/MRI scanner. Data sets from PET/MRI (with and without TOF) were reconstructed using MR AC and semi-quantitative segmental (20-segment model) myocardial tracer uptake (per cent of maximum) and compared to PET/CT which was reconstructed using CT AC and served as standard of reference. Excellent correlations were found for regional uptake values between PET/CT and PET/MRI with TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.913; p < 0.0001) with narrow Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-8.5 to +12.6 %). Correlation coefficients were slightly lower between PET/CT and PET/MRI without TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.851; p < 0.0001) with broader Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-12.5 to +15.0 %). PET/MRI with and without TOF showed minimal underestimation of tracer uptake (-2.08 and -1.29 %, respectively), compared to PET/CT. Relative myocardial FDG uptake obtained from MR-based attenuation corrected FDG PET is highly comparable to standard CT-based attenuation corrected FDG PET, suggesting interchangeability of both AC techniques. (orig.)

  7. The role of multispectral scanners as data sources for EPA hydrologic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, R.; Hill, D.

    1982-01-01

    An estimated cost savings of 30% to 50% was realized from using LANDSAT-derived data as input into a program which simulates hydrologic and water quality processes in natural and man-made water systems. Data from the satellite were used in conjunction with EPA's 11-channel multispectral scanner to obtain maps for characterizing the distribution of turbidity plumes in Flathead Lake and to predict the effect of increasing urbanization in Montana's Flathead River Basin on the lake's trophic state. Multispectral data are also being studied as a possible source of the parameters needed to model the buffering capability of lakes in an effort to evaluate the effect of acid rain in the Adirondacks. Water quality in Lake Champlain, Vermont is being classified using data from the LANDSAT and the EPA MSS. Both contact-sensed and MSS data are being used with multivariate statistical analysis to classify the trophic status of 145 lakes in Illinois and to identify water sampling sites in Appalachicola Bay where contaminants threaten Florida's shellfish.

  8. Estimating Effective Dose of Radiation From Pediatric Cardiac CT Angiography Using a 64-MDCT Scanner: New Conversion Factors Relating Dose-Length Product to Effective Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattner, Sigal; Chelliah, Anjali; Prinsen, Peter; Ruzal-Shapiro, Carrie B; Xu, Yanping; Jambawalikar, Sachin; Amurao, Maxwell; Einstein, Andrew J

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the conversion factors that enable accurate estimation of the effective dose (ED) used for cardiac 64-MDCT angiography performed for children. Anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1- and 10-year-old children, with 50 metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimeters placed in organs, underwent scanning performed using a 64-MDCT scanner with different routine clinical cardiac scan modes and x-ray tube potentials. Organ doses were used to calculate the ED on the basis of weighting factors published in 1991 in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) publication 60 and in 2007 in ICRP publication 103. The EDs and the scanner-reported dose-length products were used to determine conversion factors for each scan mode. The effect of infant heart rate on the ED and the conversion factors was also assessed. The mean conversion factors calculated using the current definition of ED that appeared in ICRP publication 103 were as follows: 0.099 mSv · mGy -1 · cm -1 , for the 1-year-old phantom, and 0.049 mSv · mGy -1 · cm -1 , for the 10-year-old phantom. These conversion factors were a mean of 37% higher than the corresponding conversion factors calculated using the older definition of ED that appeared in ICRP publication 60. Varying the heart rate did not influence the ED or the conversion factors. Conversion factors determined using the definition of ED in ICRP publication 103 and cardiac, rather than chest, scan coverage suggest that the radiation doses that children receive from cardiac CT performed using a contemporary 64-MDCT scanner are higher than the radiation doses previously reported when older chest conversion factors were used. Additional up-to-date pediatric cardiac CT conversion factors are required for use with other contemporary CT scanners and patients of different age ranges.

  9. Accuracy of iodine quantification using dual energy CT in latest generation dual source and dual layer CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; van Hamersvelt, Robbert W; Willemink, Martin J; Schmidt, Bernhard T; Flohr, Thomas; Schilham, Arnold; Milles, Julien; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Leiner, Tim; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2017-09-01

    To determine the accuracy of iodine quantification with dual energy computed tomography (DECT) in two high-end CT systems with different spectral imaging techniques. Five tubes with different iodine concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/ml) were analysed in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. Adding two phantom rings simulated increased patient size. For third-generation dual source CT (DSCT), tube voltage combinations of 150Sn and 70, 80, 90, 100 kVp were analysed. For dual layer CT (DLCT), 120 and 140 kVp were used. Scans were repeated three times. Median normalized values and interquartile ranges (IQRs) were calculated for all kVp settings and phantom sizes. Correlation between measured and known iodine concentrations was excellent for both systems (R = 0.999-1.000, p < 0.0001). For DSCT, median measurement errors ranged from -0.5% (IQR -2.0, 2.0%) at 150Sn/70 kVp and -2.3% (IQR -4.0, -0.1%) at 150Sn/80 kVp to -4.0% (IQR -6.0, -2.8%) at 150Sn/90 kVp. For DLCT, median measurement errors ranged from -3.3% (IQR -4.9, -1.5%) at 140 kVp to -4.6% (IQR -6.0, -3.6%) at 120 kVp. Larger phantom sizes increased variability of iodine measurements (p < 0.05). Iodine concentration can be accurately quantified with state-of-the-art DECT systems from two vendors. The lowest absolute errors were found for DSCT using the 150Sn/70 kVp or 150Sn/80 kVp combinations, which was slightly more accurate than 140 kVp in DLCT. • High-end CT scanners allow accurate iodine quantification using different DECT techniques. • Lowest measurement error was found in scans with largest photon energy separation. • Dual-source CT quantified iodine slightly more accurately than dual layer CT.

  10. Daily quality controls analysis of a CT scanner simulator; Analise dos testes diarios de controle de qualidade de um tomografo simulador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasques, Maira Milanelo; Santos, Gabriela R.; Furnari, Laura, E-mail: maira.vasques@hc.fmusp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-07-01

    With the increasing technological developments, radiotherapy practices, which allow for better involvement of the tumor with the required therapeutic dose and minimize the complications of normal tissues, have become reality in several Radiotherapy services. The use of these resources in turn, was only possible due to the progress made in planning based on digital volumetric images of good quality, such as computed tomography (CT), which allow the correct delimitation of the tumor volume and critical structures. Specific tests for quality control in a CT scanner used in radiotherapy, named CT simulator, should be applied as part of the institutional Quality Assurance Program. This study presents the methodology used in the Instituto de Radiologia do Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMUSP) for daily testing of the CT scanner simulator and the results obtained throughout more than two years. The experience gained in the period conducted showed that the tests are easy to perform and can be done in a few minutes by a trained professional. Data analysis showed good reproducibility, which allowed the tests could be performed less frequently, after 16 months of data collection. (author)

  11. Daily quality controls analysis of a CT scanner simulator; Analise dos testes diarios de controle de qualidade de um tomografo simulador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasques, Maira Milanelo, E-mail: maira.vasques@hc.fmusp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Santos, Gabriela R.; Furnari, Laura [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FM/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Radiologia. Setor de Radioterapia

    2016-07-01

    With the increasing technological developments radiotherapy practices which minimize the complications of normal tissues and allow better involvement of the tumor with the therapeutic dose have become reality in several Radiotherapy services. The use of these resources in turn, was only possible due to the progress made in planning based on digital volumetric images of good quality, such as computed tomography (CT) which allow the correct delimitation of the tumor volume and critical structures. Specific tests for quality control in a CT scanner used in radiotherapy, named CT simulator should be applied as part of the institutional Quality Assurance Program. This study presents the methodology used in the Instituto de Radiologia do Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMUSP) for daily testing of the CT scanner simulator and the results obtained throughout more than two years. The experience gained in the period conducted showed that the tests are easy to perform and can be done in a few minutes by a trained professional. Data analysis showed good reproducibility, which allowed the tests could be performed less frequently, after 16 months of data collection. (author)

  12. Respiratory-gated segment reconstruction for radiation treatment planning using 256-slice CT-scanner during free breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Kohno, Ryosuke; Minohara, Shinichi; Kohno, Kazutoshi; Asakura, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya

    2005-04-01

    The conventional respiratory-gated CT scan technique includes anatomic motion induced artifacts due to the low temporal resolution. They are a significant source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning for the thorax and upper abdomen. Temporal resolution and image quality are important factors to minimize planning target volume margin due to the respiratory motion. To achieve high temporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio, we developed a respiratory gated segment reconstruction algorithm and adapted it to Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm (FDK) with a 256-detector row CT. The 256-detector row CT could scan approximately 100 mm in the cranio-caudal direction with 0.5 mm slice thickness in one rotation. Data acquisition for the RS-FDK relies on the assistance of the respiratory sensing system by a cine scan mode (table remains stationary). We evaluated RS-FDK in phantom study with the 256-detector row CT and compared it with full scan (FS-FDK) and HS-FDK results with regard to volume accuracy and image noise, and finally adapted the RS-FDK to an animal study. The RS-FDK gave a more accurate volume than the others and it had the same signal-to-noise ratio as the FS-FDK. In the animal study, the RS-FDK visualized the clearest edges of the liver and pulmonary vessels of all the algorithms. In conclusion, the RS-FDK algorithm has a capability of high temporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore it will be useful when combined with new radiotherapy techniques including image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and 4D radiation therapy.

  13. CT with a CMOS flat panel detector integrated on the YAP-(S)PET scanner for in vivo small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Domenico, Giovanni; Cesca, Nicola; Zavattini, Guido; Auricchio, Natalia; Gambaccini, Mauro

    2007-01-01

    Several research groups are pursuing multimodality simultaneous functional and morphological imaging. In this line of research the high resolution YAP-(S)PET small animal integrated PET-SPECT imaging system, constructed by our group of medical physics at the University of Ferrara, is being upgraded with a computed tomography (CT). In this way it will be possible to perform in vivo molecular and genomic imaging studies on small animals (such as mice and rats) and at the same time obtain morphological information necessary for both attenuation correction and accurate localization of the region under investigation. We have take simultaneous PET-CT and SPECT-CT images of phantoms obtained with a single scanner

  14. Left ventricular functional parameters and geometric patterns in Korean adults on coronary CT angiography with a 320-detector-row CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ki Nam; Cho, Won Jin; Kim, Young Dae [College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Min; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, Jong Min [Dept. of Radiology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To assess the normal reference values of left ventricle (LV) functional parameters in Korean adults on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with a 320-detector-row CT scanner, and to analyze sex-related differences and correlations with various clinical characteristics. This study retrospectively enrolled 172 subjects (107 men and 65 women; age, 58 ± 10.9 years; body surface area [BSA], 1.75 ± 0.2 m{sup 2}) who underwent CCTA without any prior history of cardiac disease. The following parameters were measured by post-processing the CT data: LV volume, LV functional parameters (ejection fraction, stroke volume, cardiac output, etc.), LV myocardial mass, LV inner diameter, and LV myocardial thickness (including septal wall thickness [SWT], posterior wall thickness [PWT], and relative wall thickness [RWT = 2 × PWT / LV inner diameter]). All of the functional or volumetric parameters were normalized using the BSA. The general characteristics and co-morbidities for the enrolled subjects were recorded, and the correlations between these factors and the LV parameters were then evaluated. The LV myocardial thickness (SWT, 1.08 ± 0.18 cm vs. 0.90 ± 0.17 cm, p < 0.001; PWT, 0.91 ± 0.15 cm vs. 0.78 ± 0.10 cm, p < 0.001; RWT, 0.38 ± 0.08 cm vs. 0.33 ± 0.05 cm, p < 0.001), LV volume (LV end-diastolic volume, 112.9 ± 26.1 mL vs. 98.2 ± 21.0 mL, p < 0.001; LV end-systolic volume, 41.7 ± 14.7 mL vs. 33.7 ± 12.2 mL, p = 0.001) and mass (145.0 ± 29.1 g vs. 107.9 ± 20.0 g, p < 0.001) were significantly greater in men than in women. However, these differences were not significant after normalization using BSA, except for the LV mass (LV mass index, 79.6 ± 14.0 g/m{sup 2} vs. 66.2 ± 11.0 g/m{sup 2},p < 0.001). The cardiac output and ejection fraction were not significantly different between the men and women (cardiac output, 4.3 ± 1.0 L/min vs. 4.2 ± 0.9 L/min, p = 0.452; ejection fraction, 63.4 ± 7.7% vs. 66.4 ± 7.6%, p = 0.079). Most of the LV parameters were

  15. Dual-source CT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: Comparison with single-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yining; Zhang Zhuhua; Kong Lingyan; Song Lan; Merges, Reto D.; Chen Jiuhong; Jin Zhengyu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) for the visualization of the coronary arteries in a population with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared to single-source CT (SSCT) and to explore the impact of patients' heart rate (HR) on image quality (IQ) and reconstruction timing. Methods: Thirty consecutive patients (11 male, 19 female; 69.0 ± 9.2 years old) with suspected coronary artery disease and permanent AF were examined on a DSCT scanner (120 kV, 400 mAs/rot, 0.33 s rotation time, 64 x 0.6 mm collimation, pitch 0.20-0.28, Siemens Somatom Definition). Patients were divided into two groups: low and medium HR group (HR ≤ 80 bpm, n = 14) and high HR group (HR > 80 bpm, n = 16). Five of the patients also underwent conventional coronary angiography (CAG). The raw data from both tube detector arrays were reconstructed as DSCT data using a routine algorithm (temporal resolution of 83 ms). The raw data from one tube detector array was reconstructed separately on the same system using a routine single source algorithm (temporal resolution of 83-165 ms) and defined as virtual SSCT data. Image quality was assessed using a four-point grading scale from excellent (1) to non-assessable (4). Results: IQ of the DSCT data was significantly better than that of the virtual SSCT data (mean score 1.33 ± 0.61 vs. 1.80 ± 1.02; Z = -8.755, P = 0.000). 98.6% of the segments shown in DSCT were diagnostic, compared with 89.9% of the segments in virtual SSCT, χ 2 = 32.595, P = 0.000. In DSCT group, IQ of low HR group was also better than that of high HR group, although the difference was not as big (mean score 1.25 ± 0.52 vs. 1.38 ± 0.66; Z = -2.227, P = 0.026). The mean HR of low HR group and high HR group were 67.4 ± 8.5 beats per minute (bpm) and 94.2 ± 8.8 bpm (t = -8.499, P = 0.000). The range of the variation of HR was higher in high HR group than in low HR group (mean difference between maximum and minimum HR 79.5 ± 21.0 vs. 49.9 ± 21

  16. Dual-source CT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: Comparison with single-source CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yining [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)], E-mail: yiningpumc@hotmail.com; Zhang Zhuhua [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)], E-mail: yiningpumc@sina.com; Kong Lingyan [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)], E-mail: klyan78@hotmail.com; Song Lan [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)], E-mail: sallysonglan@sina.com; Merges, Reto D. [CT Research Collaboration, Siemens Ltd. (China)], E-mail: reto.merges@siemens.com; Chen Jiuhong [CT Research Collaboration, Siemens Ltd. (China)], E-mail: jiuhong.chen@siemens.com; Jin Zhengyu [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)], E-mail: jin_zhengyu@sina.com

    2008-12-15

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) for the visualization of the coronary arteries in a population with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared to single-source CT (SSCT) and to explore the impact of patients' heart rate (HR) on image quality (IQ) and reconstruction timing. Methods: Thirty consecutive patients (11 male, 19 female; 69.0 {+-} 9.2 years old) with suspected coronary artery disease and permanent AF were examined on a DSCT scanner (120 kV, 400 mAs/rot, 0.33 s rotation time, 64 x 0.6 mm collimation, pitch 0.20-0.28, Siemens Somatom Definition). Patients were divided into two groups: low and medium HR group (HR {<=} 80 bpm, n = 14) and high HR group (HR > 80 bpm, n = 16). Five of the patients also underwent conventional coronary angiography (CAG). The raw data from both tube detector arrays were reconstructed as DSCT data using a routine algorithm (temporal resolution of 83 ms). The raw data from one tube detector array was reconstructed separately on the same system using a routine single source algorithm (temporal resolution of 83-165 ms) and defined as virtual SSCT data. Image quality was assessed using a four-point grading scale from excellent (1) to non-assessable (4). Results: IQ of the DSCT data was significantly better than that of the virtual SSCT data (mean score 1.33 {+-} 0.61 vs. 1.80 {+-} 1.02; Z = -8.755, P = 0.000). 98.6% of the segments shown in DSCT were diagnostic, compared with 89.9% of the segments in virtual SSCT, {chi}{sup 2} = 32.595, P = 0.000. In DSCT group, IQ of low HR group was also better than that of high HR group, although the difference was not as big (mean score 1.25 {+-} 0.52 vs. 1.38 {+-} 0.66; Z = -2.227, P = 0.026). The mean HR of low HR group and high HR group were 67.4 {+-} 8.5 beats per minute (bpm) and 94.2 {+-} 8.8 bpm (t = -8.499, P = 0.000). The range of the variation of HR was higher in high HR group than in low HR group (mean difference between maximum and minimum HR

  17. The value of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography using a 320-slice CT scanner in the diagnosis of MCI and AD patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bo; Gu, Guo-jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Yi; Shen, Xing; Li, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    To validate the value of whole-brain computed tomography perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA) in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whole-brain CTP and four-dimensional CT angiography (4D-CTA) images were acquired in 30 MCI, 35 mild AD patients, 35 moderate AD patients, 30 severe AD patients and 50 normal controls (NC). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time to peak (TTP), and correlation between CTP and 4D-CTA were analysed. Elevated CBF in the left frontal and temporal cortex was found in MCI compared with the NC group. However, TTP was increased in the left hippocampus in mild AD patients compared with NC. In moderate and severe AD patients, hypoperfusion was found in multiple brain areas compared with NC. Finally, we found that the extent of arterial stenosis was negatively correlated with CBF in partial cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and positively correlated with TTP in these areas of AD and MCI patients. Our findings suggest that whole-brain CTP and 4D-CTA could serve as a diagnostic modality in distinguishing MCI and AD, and predicting conversion from MCI based on TTP of left hippocampus. (orig.)

  18. The value of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography using a 320-slice CT scanner in the diagnosis of MCI and AD patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo; Gu, Guo-jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Yi [Medical School of Tongji University, Department of Medical Imaging, Tongji Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shen, Xing [Traditional Chinese Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kun Shan, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Bo; Zhang, Wei [Medical School of Jiaotong University, Department of Medical Imaging, Renji Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2017-11-15

    To validate the value of whole-brain computed tomography perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA) in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whole-brain CTP and four-dimensional CT angiography (4D-CTA) images were acquired in 30 MCI, 35 mild AD patients, 35 moderate AD patients, 30 severe AD patients and 50 normal controls (NC). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time to peak (TTP), and correlation between CTP and 4D-CTA were analysed. Elevated CBF in the left frontal and temporal cortex was found in MCI compared with the NC group. However, TTP was increased in the left hippocampus in mild AD patients compared with NC. In moderate and severe AD patients, hypoperfusion was found in multiple brain areas compared with NC. Finally, we found that the extent of arterial stenosis was negatively correlated with CBF in partial cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and positively correlated with TTP in these areas of AD and MCI patients. Our findings suggest that whole-brain CTP and 4D-CTA could serve as a diagnostic modality in distinguishing MCI and AD, and predicting conversion from MCI based on TTP of left hippocampus. (orig.)

  19. Evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT studies using wide area-detector scanners: a phantom study with cadaveric correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Formery, Anne-Sophie; Blum, Alain [CHRU-Nancy Hopital Central, Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Hossu, Gabriela [Universite de Lorraine, IADI U947, Nancy (France); INSERM, CIC-IT 1433, Nancy (France); Winninger, Daniel [IDCmem, Nancy (France); Batch, Toufik [Hopital de Mercy, Service de Radiologie, Metz (France); Gervaise, Alban [Legouest Military Instruction Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Metz (France)

    2017-02-15

    To establish evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT on wide area-detector CT. In order to assess factors influencing image quality in kinematic CT studies, a phantom consisting of a polymethylmethacrylate rotating disk with round wells of different sizes was imaged with various acquisition protocols. Cadaveric acquisitions were performed on the ankle joint during motion in two different axes and at different speeds to allow validation of phantom data. Images were acquired with a 320 detector-row CT scanner and were evaluated by two readers. Motion artefacts were significantly correlated with various parameters (movement axis, distance to centre, rotation speed and volume acquisition speed) (p < 0.0001). The relation between motion artefacts and distance to motion fulcrum was exponential (R{sup 2} 0.99). Half reconstruction led to a 23 % increase in image noise and a 40 % decrease in motion artefacts. Cadaveric acquisitions confirmed phantom data. Based on these findings, high tube rotation speed and half reconstruction are recommended for kinematic CT. The axis of motion significantly influences image artefacts and should be considered in patient training and evaluation of acquisition protocol suitability. This study provides evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT. (orig.)

  20. WE-EF-207-05: Monte Carlo Dosimetry for a Dedicated Cone-Beam CT Head Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Xu, J; Dang, H; Stayman, J W; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V E; Siewerdsen, J H [Johns Hopkins University, Balitmore, MD (United States); Wang, X; Foos, D H [Carestream Health, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) is an attractive platform for point-of-care imaging of traumatic brain injury and intracranial hemorrhage. This work implements and evaluates a fast Monte-Carlo (MC) dose estimation engine for development of a dedicated head CBCT scanner, optimization of acquisition protocols, geometry, bowtie filter designs, and patient-specific dosimetry. Methods: Dose scoring with a GPU-based MC CBCT simulator was validated on an imaging bench using a modified 16 cm CTDI phantom with 7 ion chamber shafts along the central ray for 80–100 kVp (+2 mm Al, +0.2 mm Cu). Dose distributions were computed in a segmented CBCT reconstruction of an anthropomorphic head phantom with 4×10{sup 5} tracked photons per scan (5 min runtime). Circular orbits with angular span ranging from short scan (180° + fan angle) to full rotation (360°) were considered for fixed total mAs per scan. Two aluminum filters were investigated: aggressive bowtie, and moderate bowtie (matched to 16 cm and 32 cm water cylinder, respectively). Results: MC dose estimates showed strong agreement with measurements (RMSE<0.001 mGy/mAs). A moderate (aggressive) bowtie reduced the dose, per total mAs, by 20% (30%) at the center of the head, by 40% (50%) at the eye lens, and by 70% (80%) at the posterior skin entrance. For the no bowtie configuration, a short scan reduced the eye lens dose by 62% (from 0.08 mGy/mAs to 0.03 mGy/mAs) compared to full scan, although the dose to spinal bone marrow increased by 40%. For both bowties, the short scan resulted in a similar 40% increase in bone marrow dose, but the reduction in the eye lens was more pronounced: 70% (90%) for the moderate (aggressive) bowtie. Conclusions: Dose maps obtained with validated MC simulation demonstrated dose reduction in sensitive structures (eye lens and bone marrow) through combination of short-scan trajectories and bowtie filters. Xiaohui Wang and David Foos are employees of Carestream Health.

  1. Development and clinical translation of a cone-beam CT scanner for high-quality imaging of intracranial hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Zbijewski, W.; Stayman, J. W.; Mow, M.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Aygun, N.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt, reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is essential for treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury, and would benefit from availability of imaging directly at the point-of-care. This work reports the performance evaluation of a clinical prototype of a cone-beam CT (CBCT) system for ICH imaging and introduces novel algorithms for model-based reconstruction with compensation for data truncation and patient motion. Methods: The tradeoffs in dose and image quality were investigated as a function of analytical (FBP) and model-based iterative reconstruction (PWLS) algorithm parameters using phantoms with ICH-mimicking inserts. Image quality in clinical applications was evaluated in a human cadaver imaged with simulated ICH. Objects outside of the field of view (FOV), such as the head-holder, were found to introduce challenging truncation artifacts in PWLS that were mitigated with a novel multi-resolution reconstruction strategy. Following phantom and cadaver studies, the scanner was translated to a clinical pilot study. Initial clinical experience indicates the presence of motion in some patient scans, and an image-based motion estimation method that does not require fiducial tracking or prior patient information was implemented and evaluated. Results: The weighted CTDI for a nominal scan technique was 22.8 mGy. The high-resolution FBP reconstruction protocol achieved < 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function (PSF). The PWLS soft-tissue reconstruction showed <1.2 mm PSF FWHM and lower noise than FBP at the same resolution. Effects of truncation in PWLS were mitigated with the multi-resolution approach, resulting in 60% reduction in root mean squared error compared to conventional PWLS. Cadaver images showed clear visualization of anatomical landmarks (ventricles and sulci), and ICH was conspicuous. The motion compensation method was shown in clinical studies to restore visibility of fine bone structures

  2. Technical Note: FreeCT_ICD: An Open Source Implementation of a Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Method using Coordinate Descent Optimization for CT Imaging Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John M; Noo, Frédéric; Young, Stefano; Hsieh, Scott S; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2018-06-01

    To facilitate investigations into the impacts of acquisition and reconstruction parameters on quantitative imaging, radiomics and CAD using CT imaging, we previously released an open source implementation of a conventional weighted filtered backprojection reconstruction called FreeCT_wFBP. Our purpose was to extend that work by providing an open-source implementation of a model-based iterative reconstruction method using coordinate descent optimization, called FreeCT_ICD. Model-based iterative reconstruction offers the potential for substantial radiation dose reduction, but can impose substantial computational processing and storage requirements. FreeCT_ICD is an open source implementation of a model-based iterative reconstruction method that provides a reasonable tradeoff between these requirements. This was accomplished by adapting a previously proposed method that allows the system matrix to be stored with a reasonable memory requirement. The method amounts to describing the attenuation coefficient using rotating slices that follow the helical geometry. In the initially-proposed version, the rotating slices are themselves described using blobs. We have replaced this description by a unique model that relies on tri-linear interpolation together with the principles of Joseph's method. This model offers an improvement in memory requirement while still allowing highly accurate reconstruction for conventional CT geometries. The system matrix is stored column-wise and combined with an iterative coordinate descent (ICD) optimization. The result is FreeCT_ICD, which is a reconstruction program developed on the Linux platform using C++ libraries and the open source GNU GPL v2.0 license. The software is capable of reconstructing raw projection data of helical CT scans. In this work, the software has been described and evaluated by reconstructing datasets exported from a clinical scanner which consisted of an ACR accreditation phantom dataset and a clinical pediatric

  3. WE-FG-207B-12: Quantitative Evaluation of a Spectral CT Scanner in a Phantom Study: Results of Spectral Reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, X; Arbique, G; Guild, J; Anderson, J; Yagil, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the quantitative image quality of spectral reconstructions of phantom data from a spectral CT scanner. Methods: The spectral CT scanner (IQon Spectral CT, Philips Healthcare) is equipped with a dual-layer detector and generates conventional 80-140 kVp images and variety of spectral reconstructions, e.g., virtual monochromatic (VM) images, virtual non-contrast (VNC) images, iodine maps, and effective atomic number (Z) images. A cylindrical solid water phantom (Gammex 472, 33 cm diameter and 5 cm thick) with iodine (2.0-20.0 mg I/ml) and calcium (50-600 mg/ml) rod inserts was scanned at 120 kVp and 27 mGy CTDIvol. Spectral reconstructions were evaluated by comparing image measurements with theoretical values calculated from nominal rod compositions provided by the phantom manufacturer. The theoretical VNC was calculated using water and iodine basis material decomposition, and the theoretical Z was calculated using two common methods, the chemical formula method (Z1) and the dual-energy ratio method (Z2). Results: Beam-hardening-like artifacts between high-attenuation calcium rods (≥300 mg/ml, >800 HU) influenced quantitative measurements, so the quantitative analysis was only performed on iodine rods using the images from the scan with all the calcium rods removed. The CT numbers of the iodine rods in the VM images (50∼150 keV) were close to theoretical values with average difference of 2.4±6.9 HU. Compared with theoretical values, the average difference for iodine concentration, VNC CT number and effective Z of iodine rods were −0.10±0.38 mg/ml, −0.1±8.2 HU, 0.25±0.06 (Z1) and −0.23±0.07 (Z2). Conclusion: The results indicate that the spectral CT scanner generates quantitatively accurate spectral reconstructions at clinically relevant iodine concentrations. Beam-hardening-like artifacts still exist when high-attenuation objects are present and their impact on patient images needs further investigation. YY is an employee of Philips

  4. WE-FG-207B-12: Quantitative Evaluation of a Spectral CT Scanner in a Phantom Study: Results of Spectral Reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, X; Arbique, G; Guild, J; Anderson, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Yagil, Y [Philips Healthcare, Haifa (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the quantitative image quality of spectral reconstructions of phantom data from a spectral CT scanner. Methods: The spectral CT scanner (IQon Spectral CT, Philips Healthcare) is equipped with a dual-layer detector and generates conventional 80-140 kVp images and variety of spectral reconstructions, e.g., virtual monochromatic (VM) images, virtual non-contrast (VNC) images, iodine maps, and effective atomic number (Z) images. A cylindrical solid water phantom (Gammex 472, 33 cm diameter and 5 cm thick) with iodine (2.0-20.0 mg I/ml) and calcium (50-600 mg/ml) rod inserts was scanned at 120 kVp and 27 mGy CTDIvol. Spectral reconstructions were evaluated by comparing image measurements with theoretical values calculated from nominal rod compositions provided by the phantom manufacturer. The theoretical VNC was calculated using water and iodine basis material decomposition, and the theoretical Z was calculated using two common methods, the chemical formula method (Z1) and the dual-energy ratio method (Z2). Results: Beam-hardening-like artifacts between high-attenuation calcium rods (≥300 mg/ml, >800 HU) influenced quantitative measurements, so the quantitative analysis was only performed on iodine rods using the images from the scan with all the calcium rods removed. The CT numbers of the iodine rods in the VM images (50∼150 keV) were close to theoretical values with average difference of 2.4±6.9 HU. Compared with theoretical values, the average difference for iodine concentration, VNC CT number and effective Z of iodine rods were −0.10±0.38 mg/ml, −0.1±8.2 HU, 0.25±0.06 (Z1) and −0.23±0.07 (Z2). Conclusion: The results indicate that the spectral CT scanner generates quantitatively accurate spectral reconstructions at clinically relevant iodine concentrations. Beam-hardening-like artifacts still exist when high-attenuation objects are present and their impact on patient images needs further investigation. YY is an employee of Philips

  5. Multi-slice and dual-source CT in cardiac imaging. Principles - protocols - indications - outlook. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnesorge, B.M.; Flohr, T.G.; Becker, C.R.; Reiser, M.F.; Knez, A

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac diseases, and in particular coronary artery disease, are the leading cause of death and morbidity in industrialized countries. The development of non-invasive imaging techniques for the heart and the coronary arteries has been considered a key element in improving patient care. A breakthrough in cardiac imaging using CT occurred in 1998, with the introduction of multi-slice computed tomography (CT). Since then, amazing advances in performance have taken place with scanners that acquire up to 64 slices per rotation. This book discusses the state-of-the-art developments in multi-slice CT for cardiac imaging as well as those that can be anticipated in the future. It serves as a comprehensive work that covers all aspects of this technology, from the technical fundamentals and image evaluation all the way to clinical indications and protocol recommendations. This fully reworked second edition draws on the most recent clinical experience obtained with 16- and 64-slice CT scanners by world-leading experts from Europe and the United States. It also includes ''hands-on'' experience in the form of 10 representative clinical case studies, which are included on the accompanying CD. As a further highlight, the latest results of the very recently introduced dual-source CT, which may soon represent the CT technology of choice for cardiac applications, are presented. This book will not only convince the reader that multi-slice cardiac CT has arrived in clinical practice, it will also make a significant contribution to the education of radiologists, cardiologists, technologists, and physicists-whether newcomers, experienced users, or researchers. (orig.)

  6. National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU-4 performance evaluation of the PET component of the NanoPET/CT preclinical PET/CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szanda, Istvan; Mackewn, Jane; Patay, Gergely; Major, Peter; Sunassee, Kavitha; Mullen, Gregory E; Nemeth, Gabor; Haemisch, York; Blower, Philip J; Marsden, Paul K

    2011-11-01

    The NanoPET/CT represents the latest generation of commercial preclinical PET/CT systems. This article presents a performance evaluation of the PET component of the system according to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU-4 2008 standard. The NanoPET/CT consists of 12 lutetium yttrium orthosilicate:cerium modular detectors forming 1 ring, with 9.5-cm axial coverage and a 16-cm animal port. Each detector crystal is 1.12 × 1.12 × 13 mm, and 1 module contains 81 × 39 of these crystals. An optical light guide transmits the scintillation light to the flat-panel multianode position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. Analog-to-digital converter cards and a field-programmable gate array-based data-collecting card provide the readout. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, counting rate capabilities, and image quality were evaluated in accordance with the NEMA NU-4 standard. Energy and temporal resolution measurements and a mouse imaging study were performed in addition to the standard. Energy resolution was 19% at 511 keV. The spatial resolution, measured as full width at half maximum on single-slice rebinning/filtered backprojection-reconstructed images, approached 1 mm on the axis and remained below 2.5 mm in the central 5-cm transaxial region both in the axial center and at one-quarter field of view. The maximum absolute sensitivity for a point source at the center of the field of view was 7.7%. The maximum noise equivalent counting rates were 430 kcps at 36 MBq and 130 kcps at 27 MBq for the mouse- and rat-sized phantoms, respectively. The uniformity and recovery coefficients were measured with the image-quality phantom, giving good-quality images. In a mouse study with an (18)F-labeled thyroid-specific tracer, the 2 lobes of the thyroid were clearly distinguishable, despite the small size of this organ. The flexible readout system allowed experiments to be performed in an efficient manner, and the system remained stable throughout. The large number

  7. Systematic errors in digital volume correlation due to the self-heating effect of a laboratory x-ray CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B; Pan, B; Tao, R; Lubineau, G

    2017-01-01

    The use of digital volume correlation (DVC) in combination with a laboratory x-ray computed tomography (CT) for full-field internal 3D deformation measurement of opaque materials has flourished in recent years. During x-ray tomographic imaging, the heat generated by the x-ray tube changes the imaging geometry of x-ray scanner, and further introduces noticeable errors in DVC measurements. In this work, to provide practical guidance high-accuracy DVC measurement, the errors in displacements and strains measured by DVC due to the self-heating for effect of a commercially available x-ray scanner were experimentally investigated. The errors were characterized by performing simple rescan tests with different scan durations. The results indicate that the maximum strain errors associated with the self-heating of the x-ray scanner exceed 400 µε . Possible approaches for minimizing or correcting these displacement and strain errors are discussed. Finally, a series of translation and uniaxial compression tests were performed, in which strain errors were detected and then removed using pre-established artificial dilatational strain-time curve. Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy and accuracy of the proposed strain error correction approach. (paper)

  8. Systematic errors in digital volume correlation due to the self-heating effect of a laboratory x-ray CT scanner

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, B

    2017-02-15

    The use of digital volume correlation (DVC) in combination with a laboratory x-ray computed tomography (CT) for full-field internal 3D deformation measurement of opaque materials has flourished in recent years. During x-ray tomographic imaging, the heat generated by the x-ray tube changes the imaging geometry of x-ray scanner, and further introduces noticeable errors in DVC measurements. In this work, to provide practical guidance high-accuracy DVC measurement, the errors in displacements and strains measured by DVC due to the self-heating for effect of a commercially available x-ray scanner were experimentally investigated. The errors were characterized by performing simple rescan tests with different scan durations. The results indicate that the maximum strain errors associated with the self-heating of the x-ray scanner exceed 400 µε. Possible approaches for minimizing or correcting these displacement and strain errors are discussed. Finally, a series of translation and uniaxial compression tests were performed, in which strain errors were detected and then removed using pre-established artificial dilatational strain-time curve. Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy and accuracy of the proposed strain error correction approach.

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  13. Present and future in the use of micro-CT scanner 3D analysis for the study of dental and root canal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Nicola M; Plotino, Gianluca; Gambarini, Gianluca; Testarelli, Luca; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando; Pecci, Raffaella; Bedini, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the present article is to illustrate and analyze the applications and the potential of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) in the analysis of tooth anatomy and root canal morphology. The authors performed a micro-CT analysis of the following different teeth: maxillary first molars with a second canal in the mesiobuccal (MB) root, mandibular first molars with complex anatomy in the mesial root, premolars with single and double roots and with complicated apical anatomy. The hardware device used in this study was a desktop X-ray microfocus CT scanner (SkyScan 1072, SkyScan bvba, Aartselaar, Belgium). A specific software ResolveRT Amira (Visage Imaging) was used for the 3D analysis and imaging. The authors obtained three-dimensional images from 15 teeth. It was possible to precisely visualize and analyze external and internal anatomy of teeth, showing the finest details. Among the 5 upper molars analyzed, in three cases, the MB canals joined into one canal, while in the other two molars the two mesial canals were separate. Among the lower molars two of the five samples exhibited a single canal in the mesial root, which had a broad, flat appearance in a mesiodistal dimension. In the five premolar teeth, the canals were independent; however, the apical delta and ramifications of the root canals were quite complex. Micro-CT offers a simple and reproducible technique for 3D noninvasive assessment of the anatomy of root canal systems.

  14. Present and future in the use of micro-CT scanner 3D analysis for the study of dental and root canal morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola M. Grande

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present article is to illustrate and analyze the applications and the potential of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT in the analysis of tooth anatomy and root canal morphology. The authors performed a micro-CT analysis of the following different teeth: maxillary first molars with a second canal in the mesiobuccal (MB root, mandibular first molars with complex anatomy in the mesial root, premolars with single and double roots and with complicated apical anatomy. The hardware device used in this study was a desktop X-ray microfocus CT scanner (SkyScan 1072, SkyScan bvba, Aartselaar, Belgium. A specific software ResolveRT Amira (Visage Imaging was used for the 3D analysis and imaging. The authors obtained three-dimensional images from 15 teeth. It was possible to precisely visualize and analyze external and internal anatomy of teeth, showing the finest details. Among the 5 upper molars analyzed, in three cases, the MB canals joined into one canal, while in the other two molars the two mesial canals were separate. Among the lower molars two of the five samples exhibited a single canal in the mesial root, which had a broad, flat appearance in a mesiodistal dimension. In the five premolar teeth, the canals were independent; however, the apical delta and ramifications of the root canals were quite complex. Micro-CT offers a simple and reproducible technique for 3D noninvasive assessment of the anatomy of root canal systems.

  15. Relationships of clinical protocols and reconstruction kernels with image quality and radiation dose in a 128-slice CT scanner: Study with an anthropomorphic and water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Krauss, B.; Banckwitz, R.; Maentele, W.; Bauer, R.W.; Vogl, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Research highlights: ► Clinical protocol, reconstruction kernel, reconstructed slice thickness, phantom diameter or the density of material it contains directly affects the image quality of DSCT. ► Dual energy protocol shows the lowest DLP compared to all other protocols examined. ► Dual-energy fused images show excellent image quality and the noise is same as that of single- or high-pitch mode protocol images. ► Advanced CT technology improves image quality and considerably reduce radiation dose. ► An important finding is the comparatively higher DLP of the dual-source high-pitch protocol compared to other single- or dual-energy protocols. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of scanning parameters (clinical protocols), reconstruction kernels and slice thickness with image quality and radiation dose in a DSCT. Materials and methods: The chest of an anthropomorphic phantom was scanned on a DSCT scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition flash) using different clinical protocols, including single- and dual-energy modes. Four scan protocols were investigated: 1) single-source 120 kV, 110 mA s, 2) single-source 100 kV, 180 mA s, 3) high-pitch 120 kV, 130 mA s and 4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140 kV, eff.mA s 89, 76. The automatic exposure control was switched off for all the scans and the CTDIvol selected was in between 7.12 and 7.37 mGy. The raw data were reconstructed using the reconstruction kernels B31f, B80f and B70f, and slice thicknesses were 1.0 mm and 5.0 mm. Finally, the same parameters and procedures were used for the scanning of water phantom. Friedman test and Wilcoxon-Matched-Pair test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The DLP based on the given CTDIvol values showed significantly lower exposure for protocol 4, when compared to protocol 1 (percent difference 5.18%), protocol 2 (percent diff. 4.51%), and protocol 3 (percent diff. 8.81%). The highest change in Hounsfield Units was observed with dual

  16. Study of Image Quality From CT Scanner Multi-Detector by using Americans College of Radiology (ACR) Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyadin; Dewang, Syamsir; Abdullah, Bualkar; Tahir, Dahlang

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the image quality of CT scan using phantom American College of Radiology (ACR) was determined. Scanning multidetector CT is used to know the image quality parameters by using a solid phantom containing four modules and primarily from materials that are equivalent to water. Each module is 4 cm in diameter and 20 cm in diameter. There is white alignment marks painted white to reflect the alignment laser and there are also “HEAD”, “FOOT”, and “TOP” marks on the phantom to help align. This test obtains CT images of each module according to the routine inspection protocol of the head. Acceptance of image quality obtained for determination: CT Number Accuracy (CTN), CT Number Uniformity and Noise, Linearity CT Number, Slice Technique, Low Contrast Resolution and High Contrast Resolution represent image quality parameters. In testing CT Number Accuracy (CTN), CT Uniform number and Noise are in the range of tolerable values allowed. In the test, Linearity CT Number obtained correlation value above 0.99 is the relationship between electron density and CT Number. In a low contrast resolution test, the smallest contrast groups are visible. In contrast, the high resolution is seen up to 7 lp/cm. The quality of GE CT Scan is very high, as all the image quality tests obtained are within the tolerance brackets of values permitted by the Nuclear Power Control Agency (BAPETEN). Image quality test is a way to get very important information about the accuracy of snoring result by using phantom ACR.

  17. Investigation of time-of-flight benefits in an LYSO-based PET/CT scanner: A Monte Carlo study using GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geramifar, P.; Ay, M.R.; Shamsaie Zafarghandi, M.; Sarkar, S.; Loudos, G.; Rahmim, A.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of fast scintillators yielding great light yield and/or stopping power, along with advances in photomultiplier tubes and electronics, have rekindled interest in time-of-flight (TOF) PET. Because the potential performance improvements offered by TOF PET are substantial, efforts to improve PET timing should prove very fruitful. In this study, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to explore what gains in PET performance could be achieved if the coincidence resolving time (CRT) in the LYSO-based PET component of Discovery RX PET/CT scanner were improved. For this purpose, the GATE Monte Carlo package was utilized, providing the ability to model and characterize various physical phenomena in PET imaging. For the present investigation, count rate performance and signal to noise ratio (SNR) values in different activity concentrations were simulated for different coincidence timing windows of 4, 5.85, 6, 6.5, 8, 10 and 12 ns and with different CRTs of 100-900 ps FWHM involving 50 ps FWHM increments using the NEMA scatter phantom. Strong evidence supporting robustness of the simulations was found as observed in the good agreement between measured and simulated data for the cases of estimating axial sensitivity, axial and transaxial detection position, gamma non-collinearity angle distribution and positron annihilation distance. In the non-TOF context, the results show that the random event rate can be reduced by using narrower coincidence timing window widths, demonstrating considerable enhancements in the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) performance. The peak NECR had increased by ∼50% when utilizing the coincidence window width of 4 ns. At the same time, utilization of TOF information resulted in improved NECR and SNR with the dramatic reduction of random coincidences as a function of CRT. For example, with CRT of 500 ps FWHM, a factor of 2.3 reduction in random rates, factor of 1.5 increase in NECR and factor of 2.1 improvement in SNR is achievable

  18. Investigation of time-of-flight benefits in an LYSO-based PET/CT scanner: A Monte Carlo study using GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geramifar, P. [Faculty of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Amir Kabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Shariati Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, M.R., E-mail: mohammadreza_ay@tums.ac.ir [Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Shariati Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsaie Zafarghandi, M. [Faculty of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Amir Kabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarkar, S. [Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Shariati Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Loudos, G. [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute, Athens (Greece); Rahmim, A. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (United States)

    2011-06-11

    The advent of fast scintillators yielding great light yield and/or stopping power, along with advances in photomultiplier tubes and electronics, have rekindled interest in time-of-flight (TOF) PET. Because the potential performance improvements offered by TOF PET are substantial, efforts to improve PET timing should prove very fruitful. In this study, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to explore what gains in PET performance could be achieved if the coincidence resolving time (CRT) in the LYSO-based PET component of Discovery RX PET/CT scanner were improved. For this purpose, the GATE Monte Carlo package was utilized, providing the ability to model and characterize various physical phenomena in PET imaging. For the present investigation, count rate performance and signal to noise ratio (SNR) values in different activity concentrations were simulated for different coincidence timing windows of 4, 5.85, 6, 6.5, 8, 10 and 12 ns and with different CRTs of 100-900 ps FWHM involving 50 ps FWHM increments using the NEMA scatter phantom. Strong evidence supporting robustness of the simulations was found as observed in the good agreement between measured and simulated data for the cases of estimating axial sensitivity, axial and transaxial detection position, gamma non-collinearity angle distribution and positron annihilation distance. In the non-TOF context, the results show that the random event rate can be reduced by using narrower coincidence timing window widths, demonstrating considerable enhancements in the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) performance. The peak NECR had increased by {approx}50% when utilizing the coincidence window width of 4 ns. At the same time, utilization of TOF information resulted in improved NECR and SNR with the dramatic reduction of random coincidences as a function of CRT. For example, with CRT of 500 ps FWHM, a factor of 2.3 reduction in random rates, factor of 1.5 increase in NECR and factor of 2.1 improvement in SNR is

  19. Comparison study of portable bladder scanner versus cone-beam CT scan for measuring bladder volumes in post-prostatectomy patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, K A; White, R; Mathlum, M; Mak-Hau, V; Lynch, R

    2014-01-01

    In post-prostatectomy radiotherapy to the prostatic bed, consistent bladder volume is essential to maintain the position of treatment target volume. We assessed the differences between bladder volume readings from a portable bladder scanner (BS-V) and those obtained from planning CT (CT-V) or cone-beam CT (CBCT-V). Interfraction bladder volume variation was also determined. BS-V was recorded before and after planning CT or CBCT. The percentage differences between the readings using the two imaging modalities, standard deviations and 95% confidence intervals were determined. Data were analysed for the whole patient cohort and separately for the older BladderScan™ BVI3000 and newer BVI9400 model. Interfraction bladder volume variation was determined from the percentage difference between the CT-V and CBCT-V. Treatment duration, incorporating the time needed for BS and CBCT, was recorded. Fourteen patients were enrolled, producing 133 data sets for analysis. BS-V was taken using the BVI9400 in four patients (43 data sets). The mean BS-V was 253.2 mL, and the mean CT-V or CBCT-V was 199 cm(3). The mean percentage difference between the two modalities was 19.7% (SD 42.2; 95%CI 12.4 to 26.9). The BVI9400 model produced more consistent readings, with a mean percentage difference of -6.2% (SD 27.8; 95% CI -14.7 to -2.4%). The mean percentage difference between CT-V and CBCT-V was 31.3% (range -48% to 199.4%). Treatment duration from time of first BS reading to CBCT was, on average, 12 min (range 6-27). The BS produces bladder volume readings of an average 19.7% difference from CT-V or CBCT-V and can potentially be used to screen for large interfraction bladder volume variations in radiotherapy to prostatic bed. The observed interfraction bladder volume variation suggests the need to improve bladder volume consistency. Incorporating the BS into practice is feasible. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Comparison study of portable bladder scanner versus cone-beam CT scan for measuring bladder volumes in post-prostatectomy patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ung, K.A.; White, R.; Mathlum, M.; Lynch, R.; Mak-Hau, V.

    2014-01-01

    In post-prostatectomy radiotherapy to the prostatic bed, consistent bladder volume is essential to maintain the position of treatment target volume. We assessed the differences between bladder volume readings from a portable bladder scanner (BS-V) and those obtained from planning CT (CT-V) or cone-beam CT (CBCT-V). Interfraction bladder volume variation was also determined. BS-V was recorded before and after planning CT or CBCT. The percentage differences between the readings using the two imaging modalities, standard deviations and 95% confidence intervals were determined. Data were analysed for the whole patient cohort and separately for the older BladderScan™ BVI3000 and newer BVI9400 model. Interfraction bladder volume variation was determined from the percentage difference between the CT-V and CBCT-V. Treatment duration, incorporating the time needed for BS and CBCT, was recorded. Fourteen patients were enrolled, producing 133 data sets for analysis. BS-V was taken using the BVI9400 in four patients (43 data sets). The mean BS-V was 253.2mL, and the mean CT-V or CBCT-V was 199cm3. The mean percentage difference between the two modalities was 19.7% (SD 42.2; 95%CI 12.4 to 26.9). The BVI9400 model produced more consistent readings, with a mean percentage difference of −6.2% (SD 27.8; 95% CI −14.7 to −2.4%). The mean percentage difference between CT-V and CBCT-V was 31.3% (range −48% to 199.4%). Treatment duration from time of first BS reading to CBCT was, on average, 12min (range 6–27). The BS produces bladder volume readings of an average 19.7% difference from CT-V or CBCT-V and can potentially be used to screen for large interfraction bladder volume variations in radiotherapy to prostatic bed. The observed interfraction bladder volume variation suggests the need to improve bladder volume consistency. Incorporating the BS into practice is feasible.

  1. Image quality and radiation dose of coronary CT angiography performed with whole-heart coverage CT scanner with intra-cycle motion correction algorithm in patients with atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreini, Daniele; Fiorentini, Cesare; Pontone, Gianluca; Mushtaq, Saima; Mancini, Maria Elisabetta; Conte, Edoardo; Guglielmo, Marco; Volpato, Valentina; Annoni, Andrea; Baggiano, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Ditali, Valentina; Pepi, Mauro; Perchinunno, Marco; Bartorelli, Antonio L.

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate image quality, coronary evaluability and radiation exposure of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) performed with whole-heart coverage cardiac-CT in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We prospectively enrolled 164 patients with AF who underwent a clinically indicated CCTA with a 16-cm z-axis coverage scanner. In all patients CCTA was performed using prospective ECG-triggering with targeted RR interval. We evaluated image quality, coronary evaluability and effective dose (ED). Patients were divided in two subgroups based on heart rate (HR) during imaging. Group 1: 64 patients with low HR (<75 bpm), group 2: 100 patients with high HR (≥75 bpm). Written informed consent was obtained from all patients and the institutional ethics committee approved the study protocol. In a segment-based analysis, coronary evaluability was 98.4 % (2,577/2,620 segments) in the whole population, without significant differences between groups (1,013/1,024 (98.9 %) and 1,565/1,596 (98.1 %), for groups 1 and 2, respectively, p=0.15). Mean ED was similar in both groups (3.8±1.9 mSv and 3.9±2.1 mSv in groups 1 and 2, respectively, p=0.75) The whole-heart-coverage scanner could evaluate coronary arteries with high image quality and without increase in radiation exposure in AF patients, even in the high HR group. (orig.)

  2. Computed tomography in neoplastic diseases of the skull base and adjacent areas using EMI scanner CT-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Yoshimi; Ohtake, Eiji; Asakura, Koichi; Tanohata, Kazunori; Ito, Otomasa

    1980-01-01

    CT-findings of 145 patients with and without neoplastic diseases of the skull base were evaluated using EMI CT-1000. Analysis of 64 patients without any lesion at the skull base showed more artifacts compared with that of higher slices, so that good or fair images were obtained only in 64% of this groups of patients. The most important factor in producing artifacts are considered to be caused by patient's movement. We also evaluated the tumor extension to the skull base in 81 patients. They were 24 brain tumors, 21 pituitary adenomas, and 36 nasopharyngeal and paranasal cancers. Four out of 24 brain tumors showed extracranial extension, 12 pituitary adenomas infiltrating outside of the sella turcica, and 10 cases of nasopharyngeal cancers showed intracranial extension. It was concluded that CT presented an excellent information in evaluating the degree of extension of neoplasms which invading to the skull base. (author)

  3. Open source deformable image registration system for treatment planning and recurrence CT scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Brink, Carsten; Hansen, Christian Rønn

    2016-01-01

    manually contoured eight anatomical regions-of-interest (ROI) twice on pCT and once on rCT. METHODS: pCT and rCT images were deformably registered using the open source software elastix. Mean surface distance (MSD) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between contours were used for validation of DIR...

  4. Preliminary design of the BPM electronics memory scanner/dual boxcar averager for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Votaw, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The memory scanner/dual boxcar averager are VXI modules that are part of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beam position monitor (BPM) data acquisition system. Each pair of modules is designed to gather and process digital data from up to nine digital channels transmitting the BPM data from the storage ring (360 locations) and the synchrotron (80 locations). They store beam history in a buffer, store the latest scan of all channels, and provide boxcar averaged X and Y position data for the global orbit feedback system, provide boxcar average X and Y position data for beam diagnostics, and a buffered output of SCDU data as it is scanned for the beam abort interlock system. The system's capability to support single pass, closed orbit and tune measurement functions will also be briefly described

  5. WE-AB-BRA-11: Improved Imaging of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Seed Implants by Combining an Endorectal X-Ray Sensor with a CT Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, J; Matthews, K; Jia, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test feasibility of the use of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for improved image resolution of permanent brachytherapy seed implants compared to conventional CT. Methods: Two phantoms simulating the male pelvic region were used to test the capabilities of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for imaging permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Phantom 1 was constructed from acrylic plastic with cavities milled in the locations of the prostate and the rectum. The prostate cavity was filled a Styrofoam plug implanted with 10 training seeds. Phantom 2 was constructed from tissue-equivalent gelatins and contained a prostate phantom implanted with 18 strands of training seeds. For both phantoms, an intraoral digital dental x-ray sensor was placed in the rectum within 2 cm of the seed implants. Scout scans were taken of the phantoms over a limited arc angle using a CT scanner (80 kV, 120–200 mA). The dental sensor was removed from the phantoms and normal helical CT and scout (0 degree) scans using typical parameters for pelvic CT (120 kV, auto-mA) were collected. A shift-and add tomosynthesis algorithm was developed to localize seed plane location normal to detector face. Results: The endorectal sensor produced images with improved resolution compared to CT scans. Seed clusters and individual seed geometry were more discernable using the endorectal sensor. Seed 3D locations, including seeds that were not located in every projection image, were discernable using the shift and add algorithm. Conclusion: This work shows that digital endorectal x-ray sensors are a feasible method for improving imaging of permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Future work will consist of optimizing the tomosynthesis technique to produce higher resolution, lower dose images of 1) permanent brachytherapy seed implants for post-implant dosimetry and 2) fine anatomic details for imaging and managing prostatic disease compared to CT images. Funding: LSU Faculty Start-up Funding

  6. WE-AB-BRA-11: Improved Imaging of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Seed Implants by Combining an Endorectal X-Ray Sensor with a CT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, J; Matthews, K; Jia, G [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test feasibility of the use of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for improved image resolution of permanent brachytherapy seed implants compared to conventional CT. Methods: Two phantoms simulating the male pelvic region were used to test the capabilities of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for imaging permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Phantom 1 was constructed from acrylic plastic with cavities milled in the locations of the prostate and the rectum. The prostate cavity was filled a Styrofoam plug implanted with 10 training seeds. Phantom 2 was constructed from tissue-equivalent gelatins and contained a prostate phantom implanted with 18 strands of training seeds. For both phantoms, an intraoral digital dental x-ray sensor was placed in the rectum within 2 cm of the seed implants. Scout scans were taken of the phantoms over a limited arc angle using a CT scanner (80 kV, 120–200 mA). The dental sensor was removed from the phantoms and normal helical CT and scout (0 degree) scans using typical parameters for pelvic CT (120 kV, auto-mA) were collected. A shift-and add tomosynthesis algorithm was developed to localize seed plane location normal to detector face. Results: The endorectal sensor produced images with improved resolution compared to CT scans. Seed clusters and individual seed geometry were more discernable using the endorectal sensor. Seed 3D locations, including seeds that were not located in every projection image, were discernable using the shift and add algorithm. Conclusion: This work shows that digital endorectal x-ray sensors are a feasible method for improving imaging of permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Future work will consist of optimizing the tomosynthesis technique to produce higher resolution, lower dose images of 1) permanent brachytherapy seed implants for post-implant dosimetry and 2) fine anatomic details for imaging and managing prostatic disease compared to CT images. Funding: LSU Faculty Start-up Funding

  7. A fast dual wavelength laser beam fluid-less optical CT scanner for radiotherapy 3D gel dosimetry I: design and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    Three dimensional dosimetry by optical CT readout of radiosensitive gels or solids has previously been indicated as a solution for measurement of radiotherapy 3D dose distributions. The clinical uptake of these dosimetry methods has been limited, partly due to impracticalities of the optical readout such as the expertise and labour required for refractive index fluid matching. In this work a fast laser beam optical CT scanner is described, featuring fluid-less and dual wavelength operation. A second laser with a different wavelength is used to provide an alternative reference scan to the commonly used pre-irradiation scan. Transmission data for both wavelengths is effectively acquired simultaneously, giving a single scan process. Together with the elimination of refractive index fluid matching issues, scanning practicality is substantially improved. Image quality and quantitative accuracy were assessed for both dual and single wavelength methods. The dual wavelength scan technique gave improvements in uniformity of reconstructed optical attenuation coefficients in the sample 3D volume. This was due to a reduction of artefacts caused by scan to scan changes. Optical attenuation measurement accuracy was similar for both dual and single wavelength modes of operation. These results established the basis for further work on dosimetric performance.

  8. Temporal resolution and motion artifacts in single-source and dual-source cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schöndube, Harald; Allmendinger, Thomas; Stierstorfer, Karl; Bruder, Herbert; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The temporal resolution of a given image in cardiac computed tomography (CT) has so far mostly been determined from the amount of CT data employed for the reconstruction of that image. The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of such measures to the newly introduced modality of dual-source CT as well as to methods aiming to provide improved temporal resolution by means of an advanced image reconstruction algorithm. Methods: To provide a solid base for the examinations described in this paper, an extensive review of temporal resolution in conventional single-source CT is given first. Two different measures for assessing temporal resolution with respect to the amount of data involved are introduced, namely, either taking the full width at half maximum of the respective data weighting function (FWHM-TR) or the total width of the weighting function (total TR) as a base of the assessment. Image reconstruction using both a direct fan-beam filtered backprojection with Parker weighting as well as using a parallel-beam rebinning step are considered. The theory of assessing temporal resolution by means of the data involved is then extended to dual-source CT. Finally, three different advanced iterative reconstruction methods that all use the same input data are compared with respect to the resulting motion artifact level. For brevity and simplicity, the examinations are limited to two-dimensional data acquisition and reconstruction. However, all results and conclusions presented in this paper are also directly applicable to both circular and helical cone-beam CT. Results: While the concept of total TR can directly be applied to dual-source CT, the definition of the FWHM of a weighting function needs to be slightly extended to be applicable to this modality. The three different advanced iterative reconstruction methods examined in this paper result in significantly different images with respect to their motion artifact level, despite exactly the same

  9. Temporal resolution and motion artifacts in single-source and dual-source cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöndube, Harald; Allmendinger, Thomas; Stierstorfer, Karl; Bruder, Herbert; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The temporal resolution of a given image in cardiac computed tomography (CT) has so far mostly been determined from the amount of CT data employed for the reconstruction of that image. The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of such measures to the newly introduced modality of dual-source CT as well as to methods aiming to provide improved temporal resolution by means of an advanced image reconstruction algorithm. To provide a solid base for the examinations described in this paper, an extensive review of temporal resolution in conventional single-source CT is given first. Two different measures for assessing temporal resolution with respect to the amount of data involved are introduced, namely, either taking the full width at half maximum of the respective data weighting function (FWHM-TR) or the total width of the weighting function (total TR) as a base of the assessment. Image reconstruction using both a direct fan-beam filtered backprojection with Parker weighting as well as using a parallel-beam rebinning step are considered. The theory of assessing temporal resolution by means of the data involved is then extended to dual-source CT. Finally, three different advanced iterative reconstruction methods that all use the same input data are compared with respect to the resulting motion artifact level. For brevity and simplicity, the examinations are limited to two-dimensional data acquisition and reconstruction. However, all results and conclusions presented in this paper are also directly applicable to both circular and helical cone-beam CT. While the concept of total TR can directly be applied to dual-source CT, the definition of the FWHM of a weighting function needs to be slightly extended to be applicable to this modality. The three different advanced iterative reconstruction methods examined in this paper result in significantly different images with respect to their motion artifact level, despite exactly the same amount of data being used

  10. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Aaron, E-mail: aso@robarts.ca [Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang [CT Engineering, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew [Cardiology, University Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Islam, Ali [Radiology, St. Joseph’s Hospital London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 4V2, Canada and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Methods: Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP

  11. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Aaron; Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang; Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew; Islam, Ali; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Methods: Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP

  12. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Aaron; Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang; Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew; Islam, Ali; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-08-01

    The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP maps were generated

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow new CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called "multislice CT" or "multidetector CT," ...

  14. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, W., E-mail: wbfisica@gmail.com [Bahia Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology – IFBA, Vitória da Conquista, 45.100-000 (Brazil); Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil); Santos, W.S. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil); Paschoal, C.M.M., E-mail: cinthiam.paschoal@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Vale do Acarau State University – UVA, Sobral 62.040-730 (Brazil); Souza, D.N. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil)

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current–time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... membranes covering the brain. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... for the moving table. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head ...

  3. Energy Limits in Second Generation High-pitch Dual Source CT - Comparison in an Upper Abdominal Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Beeres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of our study was to find out how much energy is applicable in second-generation dual source high-pitch computed tomography (CT in imaging of the abdomen. Materials and Methods: We examined an upper abdominal phantom using a Somatom Definition Flash CT-Scanner (Siemens, Forchheim, Germany. The study protocol consisted of a scan-series at 100 kV and 120 kV. In each scan series we started with a pitch of 3.2 and reduced it in steps of 0.2, until a pitch of 1.6 was reached. The current was adjusted to the maximum the scanner could achieve. Energy values, image noise, image quality, and radiation exposure were evaluated. Results: For a pitch of 3.2 the maximum applicable current was 142 mAs at 120 kV and in 100 kV the maximum applicable current was 114 mAs. For conventional abdominal imaging, current levels of 200 to 260 mAs are generally used. To achieve similar current levels, we had to decrease the pitch to 1.8 at 100 kV - at this pitch we could perform our imaging at 204 mAs. At a pitch of 2.2 in 120 kV we could apply a current of 206 mAs. Conclusion: We conclude our study by stating that if there is a need for a higher current, we have to reduce the pitch. In a high-pitch dual source CT, we always have to remember where our main focus is, so we can adjust the pitch to the energy we need in the area of the body that has to be imaged, to find answers to the clinical question being raised.

  4. Perfusion CT of the Brain and Liver and of Lung Tumors: Use of Monte Carlo Simulation for Patient Dose Estimation for Examinations With a Cone-Beam 320-MDCT Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Maria; Geleijns, Jacob; Joemai, Raoul M S; Salvadó, Marçal

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the patient dose from perfusion CT examinations of the brain, lung tumors, and the liver on a cone-beam 320-MDCT scanner using a Monte Carlo simulation and the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). A Monte Carlo simulation based on the Electron Gamma Shower Version 4 package code was used to calculate organ doses and the effective dose in the reference computational phantoms for an adult man and adult woman as published by the ICRP. Three perfusion CT acquisition protocols--brain, lung tumor, and liver perfusion--were evaluated. Additionally, dose assessments were performed for the skin and for the eye lens. Conversion factors were obtained to estimate effective doses and organ doses from the volume CT dose index and dose-length product. The sex-averaged effective doses were approximately 4 mSv for perfusion CT of the brain and were between 23 and 26 mSv for the perfusion CT body protocols. The eye lens dose from the brain perfusion CT examination was approximately 153 mGy. The sex-averaged peak entrance skin dose (ESD) was 255 mGy for the brain perfusion CT studies, 157 mGy for the lung tumor perfusion CT studies, and 172 mGy for the liver perfusion CT studies. The perfusion CT protocols for imaging the brain, lung tumors, and the liver performed on a 320-MDCT scanner yielded patient doses that are safely below the threshold doses for deterministic effects. The eye lens dose, peak ESD, and effective doses can be estimated for other clinical perfusion CT examinations from the conversion factors that were derived in this study.

  5. Dual-source CT cardiac imaging: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Rist, Carsten; Buhmann, Sonja; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Becker, Christoph R.; Leber, Alexander W.; Ziegler, Franz von; Knez, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The relation of heart rate and image quality in the depiction of coronary arteries, heart valves and myocardium was assessed on a dual-source computed tomography system (DSCT). Coronary CT angiography was performed on a DSCT (Somatom Definition, Siemens) with high concentration contrast media (Iopromide, Ultravist 370, Schering) in 24 patients with heart rates between 44 and 92 beats per minute. Images were reconstructed over the whole cardiac cycle in 10% steps. Two readers independently assessed the image quality with regard to the diagnostic evaluation of right and left coronary artery, heart valves and left ventricular myocardium for the assessment of vessel wall changes, coronary stenoses, valve morphology and function and ventricular function on a three point grading scale. The image quality ratings at the optimal reconstruction interval were 1.24±0.42 for the right and 1.09±0.27 for the left coronary artery. A reconstruction of diagnostic systolic and diastolic images is possible for a wide range of heart rates, allowing also a functional evaluation of valves and myocardium. Dual-source CT offers very robust diagnostic image quality in a wide range of heart rates. The high temporal resolution now also makes a functional evaluation of the heart valves and myocardium possible. (orig.)

  6. A New Automated Way to Measure Polyethylene Wear in THA Using a High Resolution CT Scanner: Method and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Q. Maguire Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most advantageous total hip arthroplasty (THA operation is the first, timely replacement of only the liner is socially and economically important because the utilization of THA is increasing as younger and more active patients are receiving implants and they are living longer. Automatic algorithms were developed to infer liner wear by estimating the separation between the acetabular cup and femoral component head given a computed tomography (CT volume. Two series of CT volumes of a hip phantom were acquired with the femoral component head placed at 14 different positions relative to the acetabular cup. The mean and standard deviation (SD of the diameter of the acetabular cup and femoral component head, in addition to the range of error in the expected wear values and the repeatability of all the measurements, were calculated. The algorithms resulted in a mean (±SD for the diameter of the acetabular cup of 54.21 (±0.011 mm and for the femoral component head of 22.09 (±0.02 mm. The wear error was ±0.1 mm and the repeatability was 0.077 mm. This approach is applicable clinically as it utilizes readily available computed tomography imaging systems and requires only five minutes of human interaction.

  7. Dual-source CT in chest pain diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Nikolaou, K.; Fink, C.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.R.; Becker, A.; Knez, A.

    2007-01-01

    With the depiction of pulmonary arteries, coronary arteries, and the aorta, CT angiography of the chest offers a comprehensive diagnostic work-up of unclear chest pain. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT in this patient group. A total of 47 patients suffering from unclear chest pain were examined with a Siemens Somatom Definition. Volume and flow of contrast media (Ultravist, Schering) were adapted to the body weight. The examinations were evaluated with regard to image quality and contrast opacification and to the diagnostic accuracy with reference to the final clinical diagnosis. Adequate contrast opacification was achieved in all examinations. The depiction of the coronary arteries was diagnostic in all cases. The cause of chest pain could be identified in 41 cases. Among the diagnoses were coronary and myocardial pathologies, valvular disease, aortic aneurysms and dissections, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonic consolidation. DSCT angiography of the chest offers a very good image quality even at high heart rates so that a high diagnostic accuracy is achieved in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.) [de

  8. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: detection of source and etiology with multi-detector-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, Hans; Pfammatter, Thomas; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Wildi, Stefan [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauerfeind, Peter [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Gastroenterology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    This study was conducted to determine the ability of multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) to identify the source and etiology of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eighteen patients with acute upper (n = 10) and lower (n = 8) gastrointestinal bleeding underwent 4-detector-row CT (n = 6), 16-detector-row CT (n = 11), and 64-slice CT (n = 1) with an arterial and portal venous phase of contrast enhancement. Unenhanced scans were performed in nine patients. CT scans were reviewed to determine conspicuity of bleeding source, underlying etiology, and for potential causes of false-negative prospective interpretations. Bleeding sources were prospectively identified with CT in 15 (83%) patients, and three (17%) bleeding sources were visualized in retrospect, allowing the characterization of all sources of bleeding with CT. Contrast extravasation was demonstrated with CT in all 11 patients with severe bleeding, but only in 1 of 7 patients with mild bleeding. The etiology could not be identified on unenhanced CT scans in any patient, whereas arterial-phase and portal venous-phase CT depicted etiology in 15 (83%) patients. Underlying etiology was correctly identified in all eight patients with mild GI bleeding. Multi-detector-row CT enables the identification of bleeding source and precise etiology in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  9. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: detection of source and etiology with multi-detector-row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, Hans; Pfammatter, Thomas; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem; Wildi, Stefan; Bauerfeind, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the ability of multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) to identify the source and etiology of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eighteen patients with acute upper (n = 10) and lower (n = 8) gastrointestinal bleeding underwent 4-detector-row CT (n = 6), 16-detector-row CT (n = 11), and 64-slice CT (n = 1) with an arterial and portal venous phase of contrast enhancement. Unenhanced scans were performed in nine patients. CT scans were reviewed to determine conspicuity of bleeding source, underlying etiology, and for potential causes of false-negative prospective interpretations. Bleeding sources were prospectively identified with CT in 15 (83%) patients, and three (17%) bleeding sources were visualized in retrospect, allowing the characterization of all sources of bleeding with CT. Contrast extravasation was demonstrated with CT in all 11 patients with severe bleeding, but only in 1 of 7 patients with mild bleeding. The etiology could not be identified on unenhanced CT scans in any patient, whereas arterial-phase and portal venous-phase CT depicted etiology in 15 (83%) patients. Underlying etiology was correctly identified in all eight patients with mild GI bleeding. Multi-detector-row CT enables the identification of bleeding source and precise etiology in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  10. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-02: Validation of a CT X-Ray Source Characterization Technique for Dose Computation Using An Anthropomorphic Thorax Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommerville, M; Tambasco, M [San Diego State University, San Diego, CA (United States); Poirier, Y [CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To experimentally validate a rotational kV x-ray source characterization technique by computing CT dose in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom using an in-house dose computation algorithm (kVDoseCalc). Methods: The lateral variation in incident energy spectra of a GE Optima big bore CT scanner was found by measuring the HVL along the internal, full bow-tie filter axis. The HVL and kVp were used to generate the x-ray spectra using Spektr software, while beam fluence was derived by dividing the integral product of the spectra and in-air mass-energy absorption coefficients by in-air dose measurements along the bow-tie filter axis. Beams produced by the GE Optima scanner were modeled at 80 and 140 kVp tube settings. kVDoseCalc calculates dose by solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation using a combination of deterministic and stochastic methods. Relative doses in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom (E2E SBRT Phantom) irradiated by the GE Optima scanner were measured using a (0.015 cc) PTW Freiburg ionization chamber, and compared to computations from kVDoseCalc. Results: The agreement in relative dose between dose computation and measurement for points of interest (POIs) within the primary path of the beam was within experimental uncertainty for both energies, however points outside the primary beam were not. The average absolute percent difference for POIs within the primary path of the beam was 1.37% and 5.16% for 80 and 140 kVp, respectively. The minimum and maximum absolute percent difference for both energies and all POIs within the primary path of the beam was 0.151% and 6.41%, respectively. Conclusion: The CT x-ray source characterization technique based on HVL measurements and kVp can be used to accurately compute CT dose in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom.

  11. Diagnosis of pulmonary artery embolism. Comparison of single-source CT and 3rd generation dual-source CT using a dual-energy protocol regarding image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petritsch, Bernhard; Kosmala, Aleksander; Gassenmeier, Tobias; Weng, Andreas Max; Veldhoen, Simon; Kunz, Andreas Steven; Bley, Thorsten Alexander

    2017-01-01

    To compare radiation dose, subjective and objective image quality of 3 rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT) and dual-energy CT (DECT) with conventional 64-slice single-source CT (SSCT) for pulmonary CTA. 180 pulmonary CTA studies were performed in three patient cohorts of 60 patients each. Group 1: conventional SSCT 120 kV (ref.); group 2: single-energy DSCT 100 kV (ref.); group 3: DECT 90/Sn150 kV. CTDIvol, DLP, effective radiation dose were reported, and CT attenuation (HU) was measured on three central and peripheral levels. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) were calculated. Two readers assessed subjective image quality according to a five-point scale. Mean CTDIvol and DLP were significantly lower in the dual-energy group compared to the SSCT group (p < 0.001 [CTDIvol]; p < 0.001 [DLP]) and the DSCT group (p = 0.003 [CTDIvol]; p = 0.003 [DLP]), respectively. The effective dose in the DECT group was 2.79 ± 0.95 mSv and significantly smaller than in the SSCT group (4.60 ± 1.68 mSv, p < 0.001) and the DSCT group (4.24 ± 2.69 mSv, p = 0.003). The SNR and CNR were significantly higher in the DSCT group (p < 0.001). Subjective image quality did not differ significantly among the three protocols and was rated good to excellent in 75 % (135/180) of cases with an inter-observer agreement of 80 %. Dual-energy pulmonary CTA protocols of 3 rd generation dual-source scanners allow for significant reduction of radiation dose while providing excellent image quality and potential additional information by means of perfusion maps. Dual-energy CT with 90/Sn150 kV configuration allows for significant dose reduction in pulmonary CTA. Subjective image quality was similar among the three evaluated CT-protocols (64-slice SSCT, single-energy DSCT, 90/Sn150 kV DECT) and was rated good to excellent in 75% of cases. Dual-energy CT provides potential additional information by means of iodine distribution maps.

  12. Diagnosis of pulmonary artery embolism. Comparison of single-source CT and 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT using a dual-energy protocol regarding image quality and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petritsch, Bernhard; Kosmala, Aleksander; Gassenmeier, Tobias; Weng, Andreas Max; Veldhoen, Simon; Kunz, Andreas Steven; Bley, Thorsten Alexander [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-06-15

    To compare radiation dose, subjective and objective image quality of 3 rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT) and dual-energy CT (DECT) with conventional 64-slice single-source CT (SSCT) for pulmonary CTA. 180 pulmonary CTA studies were performed in three patient cohorts of 60 patients each. Group 1: conventional SSCT 120 kV (ref.); group 2: single-energy DSCT 100 kV (ref.); group 3: DECT 90/Sn150 kV. CTDIvol, DLP, effective radiation dose were reported, and CT attenuation (HU) was measured on three central and peripheral levels. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) were calculated. Two readers assessed subjective image quality according to a five-point scale. Mean CTDIvol and DLP were significantly lower in the dual-energy group compared to the SSCT group (p < 0.001 [CTDIvol]; p < 0.001 [DLP]) and the DSCT group (p = 0.003 [CTDIvol]; p = 0.003 [DLP]), respectively. The effective dose in the DECT group was 2.79 ± 0.95 mSv and significantly smaller than in the SSCT group (4.60 ± 1.68 mSv, p < 0.001) and the DSCT group (4.24 ± 2.69 mSv, p = 0.003). The SNR and CNR were significantly higher in the DSCT group (p < 0.001). Subjective image quality did not differ significantly among the three protocols and was rated good to excellent in 75 % (135/180) of cases with an inter-observer agreement of 80 %. Dual-energy pulmonary CTA protocols of 3 rd generation dual-source scanners allow for significant reduction of radiation dose while providing excellent image quality and potential additional information by means of perfusion maps. Dual-energy CT with 90/Sn150 kV configuration allows for significant dose reduction in pulmonary CTA. Subjective image quality was similar among the three evaluated CT-protocols (64-slice SSCT, single-energy DSCT, 90/Sn150 kV DECT) and was rated good to excellent in 75% of cases. Dual-energy CT provides potential additional information by means of iodine distribution maps.

  13. A measurement-based X-ray source model characterization for CT dosimetry computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Mitchell; Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to show that the nominal peak tube voltage potential (kVp) and measured half-value layer (HVL) can be used to generate energy spectra and fluence profiles for characterizing a computed tomography (CT) X-ray source, and to validate the source model and an in-house kV X-ray dose computation algorithm (kVDoseCalc) for computing machine- and patient-specific CT dose. Spatial variation of the X-ray source spectra of a Philips Brilliance and a GE Optima Big Bore CT scanner were found by measuring the HVL along the direction of the internal bow-tie filter axes. Third-party software, Spektr, and the nominal kVp settings were used to generate the energy spectra. Beam fluence was calculated by dividing the integral product of the spectra and the in-air NIST mass-energy attenuation coefficients by in-air dose measurements along the filter axis. The authors found the optimal number of photons to seed in kVDoseCalc to achieve dose convergence. The Philips Brilliance beams were modeled for 90, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. The GE Optima beams were modeled for 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. Relative doses measured using a Capintec Farmer-type ionization chamber (0.65 cc) placed in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom and irradiated by the Philips Brilliance, were compared to those computed with kVDoseCalc. Relative doses in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom (E2E SBRT Phantom) irradiated by the GE Optima were measured using a (0.015 cc) PTW Freiburg ionization chamber and compared to computations from kVDoseCalc. The number of photons required to reduce the average statistical uncertainty in dose to measurement over all 12 PMMA phantom positions was found to be 1.44%, 1.47%, and 1.41% for 90, 120, and 140 kVp, respectively. The maximum percent difference between calculation and measurement for all energies, measurement positions, and phantoms was less than 3.50%. Thirty-five out of a total of 36 simulation conditions were

  14. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J; Lee, J; Kim, H; Kim, I; Ye, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm 2 applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield

  15. Test-retest reliability of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements made using a low-dose standing CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segal, Neil A. [University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Mailstop 1046, Kansas City, KS (United States); The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Bergin, John; Kern, Andrew; Findlay, Christian [The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Anderson, Donald D. [The University of Iowa, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2017-02-15

    To determine the test-retest reliability of knee joint space width (JSW) measurements made using standing CT (SCT) imaging. This prospective two-visit study included 50 knees from 30 subjects (66% female; mean ± SD age 58.2 ± 11.3 years; BMI 29.1 ± 5.6 kg/m{sup 2}; 38% KL grade 0-1). Tibiofemoral geometry was obtained from bilateral, approximately 20 fixed-flexed SCT images acquired at visits 2 weeks apart. For each compartment, the total joint area was defined as the area with a JSW <10 mm. The summary measurements of interest were the percentage of the total joint area with a JSW less than 0.5-mm thresholds between 2.0 and 5.0 mm in each tibiofemoral compartment. Test-retest reliability of the summary JSW measurements was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 2,1) for the percentage area engaged at each threshold of JSW and root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were calculated to assess reproducibility. The ICCs were excellent for each threshold assessed, ranging from 0.95 to 0.97 for the lateral and 0.90 to 0.97 for the medial compartment. RMSE ranged from 1.1 to 7.2% for the lateral and from 3.1 to 9.1% for the medial compartment, with better reproducibility at smaller JSW thresholds. The knee joint positioning protocol used demonstrated high day-to-day reliability for SCT 3D tibiofemoral JSW summary measurements repeated 2 weeks apart. Low-dose SCT provides a great deal of information about the joint while maintaining high reliability, making it a suitable alternative to plain radiographs for evaluating JSW in people with knee OA. (orig.)

  16. Test-retest reliability of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements made using a low-dose standing CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segal, Neil A.; Bergin, John; Kern, Andrew; Findlay, Christian; Anderson, Donald D.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the test-retest reliability of knee joint space width (JSW) measurements made using standing CT (SCT) imaging. This prospective two-visit study included 50 knees from 30 subjects (66% female; mean ± SD age 58.2 ± 11.3 years; BMI 29.1 ± 5.6 kg/m 2 ; 38% KL grade 0-1). Tibiofemoral geometry was obtained from bilateral, approximately 20 fixed-flexed SCT images acquired at visits 2 weeks apart. For each compartment, the total joint area was defined as the area with a JSW <10 mm. The summary measurements of interest were the percentage of the total joint area with a JSW less than 0.5-mm thresholds between 2.0 and 5.0 mm in each tibiofemoral compartment. Test-retest reliability of the summary JSW measurements was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 2,1) for the percentage area engaged at each threshold of JSW and root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were calculated to assess reproducibility. The ICCs were excellent for each threshold assessed, ranging from 0.95 to 0.97 for the lateral and 0.90 to 0.97 for the medial compartment. RMSE ranged from 1.1 to 7.2% for the lateral and from 3.1 to 9.1% for the medial compartment, with better reproducibility at smaller JSW thresholds. The knee joint positioning protocol used demonstrated high day-to-day reliability for SCT 3D tibiofemoral JSW summary measurements repeated 2 weeks apart. Low-dose SCT provides a great deal of information about the joint while maintaining high reliability, making it a suitable alternative to plain radiographs for evaluating JSW in people with knee OA. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of penalized likelihood estimation reconstruction on a digital time-of-flight PET/CT scanner for 18F-FDG whole-body examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Elin; Sundin, Anders; Trampal, Carlos; Lindsjö, Lars; Ilan, Ezgi; Danfors, Torsten; Antoni, Gunnar; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark

    2018-02-15

    Resolution and quantitative accuracy of positron emission tomography (PET) are highly influenced by the reconstruction method. Penalized likelihood estimation algorithms allow for fully convergent iterative reconstruction, generating a higher image contrast while limiting noise compared to ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM). In this study, block-sequential regularized expectation maximization (BSREM) was compared to time-of-flight OSEM (TOF-OSEM). Various strengths of noise penalization factor β were tested along with scan durations and transaxial field of views (FOVs) with the aim to evaluate the performance and clinical use of BSREM for 18 F-FDG-PET-computed tomography (CT), both in quantitative terms and in a qualitative visual evaluation. Methods: Eleven clinical whole-body 18 F-FDG-PET/CT examinations acquired on a digital TOF PET/CT scanner were included. The data were reconstructed using BSREM with point spread function (PSF) recovery and β 133, 267, 400 and 533, and TOF-OSEM with PSF, for various acquisition times/bed position (bp) and FOVs. Noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), signal-to-background ratio (SBR), and standardized uptake values (SUVs) were analysed. A blinded visual image quality evaluation, rating several aspects, performed by two nuclear medicine physicians complemented the analysis. Results: The lowest levels of noise were reached with the highest β resulting in the highest SNR, which in turn resulted in the lowest SBR. Noise equivalence to TOF-OSEM was found with β 400 but produced a significant increase of SUV max (11%), SNR (22%) and SBR (12%) compared to TOF-OSEM. BSREM with β 533 at decreased acquisition (2 min/bp) was comparable to TOF-OSEM at full acquisition duration (3 min/bp). Reconstructed FOV had an impact on BSREM outcome measures, SNR increased while SBR decreased when shifting FOV from 70 to 50 cm. The visual image quality evaluation resulted in similar scores for reconstructions although β 400 obtained the

  18. SU-G-TeP2-09: Evaluation of the MaxFOV Extended Field of View (EFOV) Reconstruction Algorithm On a GE RT590 CT Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grzetic, S; Weldon, M; Noa, K; Gupta, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares the newly released MaxFOV Revision 1 EFOV reconstruction algorithm for GE RT590 to the older WideView EFOV algorithm. Two radiotherapy overlays from Q-fix and Diacor, are included in our analysis. Hounsfield Units (HU) generated with the WideView algorithm varied in the extended field (beyond 50cm) and the scanned object’s border varied from slice to slice. A validation of HU consistency between the two reconstruction algorithms is performed. Methods: A CatPhan 504 and CIRS062 Electron Density Phantom were scanned on a GE RT590 CT-Simulator. The phantoms were positioned in multiple locations within the scan field of view so some of the density plugs were outside the 50cm reconstruction circle. Images were reconstructed using both the WideView and MaxFOV algorithms. The HU for each scan were characterized both in average over a volume and in profile. Results: HU values are consistent between the two algorithms. Low-density material will have a slight increase in HU value and high-density material will have a slight decrease in HU value as the distance from the sweet spot increases. Border inconsistencies and shading artifacts are still present with the MaxFOV reconstruction on the Q-fix overlay but not the Diacor overlay (It should be noted that the Q-fix overlay is not currently GE-certified). HU values for water outside the 50cm FOV are within 40HU of reconstructions at the sweet spot of the scanner. CatPhan HU profiles show improvement with the MaxFOV algorithm as it approaches the scanner edge. Conclusion: The new MaxFOV algorithm improves the contour border for objects outside of the standard FOV when using a GE-approved tabletop. Air cavities outside of the standard FOV create inconsistent object borders. HU consistency is within GE specifications and the accuracy of the phantom edge improves. Further adjustments to the algorithm are being investigated by GE.

  19. Coronary calcium screening with dual-source CT: reliability of ungated, high-pitch chest CT in comparison with dedicated calcium-scoring CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutt, Antoine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain; Deken, Valerie [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Biostatistics (EA 2694), Lille (France); Molinari, Francesco [Centre Hospitalier General de Tourcoing, Department of Radiology, Tourcoing (France)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate the reliability of ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening. One hundred and eighty-five smokers underwent a dual-source CT examination with acquisition of two sets of images during the same session: (a) ungated, high-pitch and high-temporal resolution acquisition over the entire thorax (i.e., chest CT); (b) prospectively ECG-triggered acquisition over the cardiac cavities (i.e., cardiac CT). Sensitivity and specificity of chest CT for detecting positive CAC scores were 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively. There was excellent inter-technique agreement for determining the quantitative CAC score (ICC = 0.986). The mean difference between the two techniques was 11.27, representing 1.81 % of the average of the two techniques. The inter-technique agreement for categorizing patients into the four ranks of severity was excellent (weighted kappa = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.93-0.98). The inter-technique differences for quantitative CAC scores did not correlate with BMI (r = 0.05, p = 0.575) or heart rate (r = -0.06, p = 0.95); 87.2 % of them were explained by differences at the level of the right coronary artery (RCA: 0.8718; LAD: 0.1008; LCx: 0.0139; LM: 0.0136). Ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT is a reliable imaging mode for CAC screening in the conditions of routine chest CT examinations. (orig.)

  20. SU-G-IeP2-15: Virtual Insertion of Digital Kidney Stones Into Dual-Source, Dual- Energy CT Projection Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrero, A; Chen, B; Huang, A; Montoya, J; Yu, L; McCollough, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In order to investigate novel methods to more accurately estimate the mineral composition of kidney stones using dual energy CT, it is desirable to be able to combine digital stones of known composition with actual phantom and patient scan data. In this work, we developed and validated a method to insert digital kidney stones into projection data acquired on a dual-source, dual-energy CT system. Methods: Attenuation properties of stones of different mineral composition were computed using tabulated mass attenuation coefficients, the chemical formula for each stone type, and the effective beam energy at each evaluated tube potential. A previously developed method to insert lesions into x-ray CT projection data was extended to include simultaneous dual-energy CT projections acquired on a dual-source gantry (Siemens Somatom Flash). Digital stones were forward projected onto both detectors and the resulting projections added to the physically acquired sinogram data. To validate the accuracy of the technique, digital stones were inserted into different locations in the ACR CT accreditation phantom; low and high contrast resolution, CT number accuracy and noise properties were compared before and after stone insertion. The procedure was repeated for two dual-energy tube potential pairs in clinical use on the scanner, 80/Sn140 kV and 100/Sn140 kV, respectively. Results: The images reconstructed after the insertion of digital kidney stones were consistent with the images reconstructed from the scanner. The largest average CT number difference for the 4 insert in the CT number accuracy module of the phantom was 3 HU. Conclusion: A framework was developed and validated for the creation of digital kidney stones of known mineral composition, and their projection-domain insertion into commercial dual-source, dual-energy CT projection data. This will allow a systematic investigation of the impact of scan and reconstruction parameters on stone attenuation and dual

  1. The vascularized groin lymph node flap (VGLN): Anatomical study and flap planning using multi-detector CT scanner. The golden triangle for flap harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeltzer, Assaf A; Anzarut, Alexander; Braeckmans, Delphine; Seidenstuecker, Katrin; Hendrickx, Benoit; Van Hedent, Eddy; Hamdi, Moustapha

    2017-09-01

    A growing number of surgeons perform lymph node transfers for the treatment of lymphedema. When harvesting a vascularized lymph node groin flap (VGLNF) one of the major concerns is the potential risk of iatrogenic lymphedema of the donor-site. This article helps understanding of the lymph node distribution of the groin in order to minimize this risk. Fifty consecutive patients undergoing abdominal mapping by multi-detector CT scanner were included and 100 groins analyzed. The groin was divided in three zones (of which zone II is the safe zone) and lymph nodes were counted and mapped with their distances to anatomic landmarks. Further node units were plotted and counted. The average age was 48 years. A mean number of nodes of 6.5/groin was found. In zone II, which is our zone of interest a mean of 3.1 nodes were counted with a mean size of 7.8 mm. In three patients no nodes were found in zone II. In five patients nodes were seen in zone II but were not sufficient in size or number to be considered a lymph node unit. On average the lymph node unit in zone II was found to be 48.3 mm from the pubic tubercle when projected on a line from the pubic tubercle to the anterior superior iliac spine, 16.0 mm caudal to this line, and 20.4 mm above the groin crease. On average the lymph node unit was a mean of 41.7 mm lateral to the SCIV-SIEV confluence. This study provides increased understanding of the lymphatic anatomy in zone II of the groin flap and suggests a refined technique for designing the VGLNF. As with any flap there is a degree of individual patient variability. However, having information on the most common anatomy and flap design is of great value. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Scintillation scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrbrodt, A.W.; Mog, W.F.; Brunnett, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    A scintillation scanner having a visual image producing means coupled through a lost motion connection to the boom which supports the scintillation detector is described. The lost motion connection is adjustable to compensate for such delays as may occur between sensing and recording scintillations. 13 claims, 5 figures

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called "multislice CT" or "multidetector CT," ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called "multislice CT" or "multidetector CT," ... best for your child. top of page Additional Information and Resources The Alliance for Radiation Safety in ...

  5. Comparison of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake between PET from a simultaneously acquiring whole-body PET/MR hybrid scanner and PET from PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesmueller, Marco; Schmidt, Daniela; Beck, Michael; Kuwert, Torsten; Gall, Carl C. von; Quick, Harald H.; Navalpakkam, Bharath; Lell, Michael M.; Uder, Michael; Ritt, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    PET/MR hybrid scanners have recently been introduced, but not yet validated. The aim of this study was to compare the PET components of a PET/CT hybrid system and of a simultaneous whole-body PET/MR hybrid system with regard to reproducibility of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake. A total of 46 patients underwent a whole-body PET/CT scan 1 h after injection and an average of 88 min later a second scan using a hybrid PET/MR system. The radioactive tracers used were 18 F-deoxyglucose (FDG), 18 F-ethylcholine (FEC) and 68 Ga-DOTATATE (Ga-DOTATATE). The PET images from PET/CT (PET CT ) and from PET/MR (PET MR ) were analysed for tracer-positive lesions. Regional tracer uptake in these foci was quantified using volumes of interest, and maximal and average standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV avg , respectively) were calculated. Of the 46 patients, 43 were eligible for comparison and statistical analysis. All lesions except one identified by PET CT were identified by PET MR (99.2 %). In 38 patients (88.4 %), the same number of foci were identified by PET CT and by PET MR . In four patients, more lesions were identified by PET MR than by PET CT , in one patient PET CT revealed an additional focus compared to PET MR . The mean SUV max and SUV avg of all lesions determined by PET MR were by 21 % and 11 % lower, respectively, than the values determined by PET CT (p CT and PET MR were minor, but statistically significant. Nevertheless, a more detailed study of the quantitative accuracy of PET MR and the factors governing it is needed to ultimately assess its accuracy in measuring tissue tracer concentrations. (orig.)

  6. Using 80 kVp on a 320-row scanner for hepatic multiphasic CT reduces the contrast dose by 50 % in patients at risk for contrast-induced nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Narumi; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Imuta, Masanori; Yamamura, Sadahiro; Yuki, Hideaki; Kidoh, Masafumi; Hirata, Kenichiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Hatemura, Masahiro; Kai, Noriyuki [Kumamoto University Hospital, Department of Central Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    We evaluated the effects of a low contrast material (CM) dose protocol using 80-kVp on the image quality of hepatic multiphasic CT scans acquired on a 320-row CT scanner. We scanned 30 patients with renal insufficiency (eGFR < 45 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}) using 80-kVp and a CM dose of 300mgI/kg. Another 30 patients without renal insufficiency (eGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}) were scanned with the conventional 120-kVp protocol and the standard CM dose of 600mgI/kg. Quantitative image quality parameters, i.e. CT attenuation, image noise, and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were compared and the visual image quality was scored on a four-point scale. The volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) recorded with the 80- and the 120-kVp protocols were also compared. Image noise and contrast enhancement were equivalent for the two protocols. There was no significant difference in the CNR of all anatomic sites and in the visual scores for overall image quality. The CTDI{sub vol} and SSDE were approximately 25-30 % lower under the 80-kVp protocol. Hepatic multiphase CT using 80-kVp on a 320-row CT scanner allowed for a decrease in the CM dose and a reduction in the radiation dose without image quality degradation in patients with renal insufficiency. (orig.)

  7. Semi-quantitative and simulation analyses of effects of {gamma} rays on determination of calibration factors of PET scanners with point-like {sup 22}Na sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Tomoyuki [School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Minamiku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-0373 (Japan); Sato, Yasushi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1, Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8568 (Japan); Oda, Keiichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Nakamachi, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan); Wada, Yasuhiro [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, 6-7-3, Minamimachi, Minatoshima, Chuo, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0047 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Yamada, Takahiro, E-mail: hasegawa@kitasato-u.ac.jp [Japan Radioisotope Association, 2-28-45, Komagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8941 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    The uncertainty of radioactivity concentrations measured with positron emission tomography (PET) scanners ultimately depends on the uncertainty of the calibration factors. A new practical calibration scheme using point-like {sup 22}Na radioactive sources has been developed. The purpose of this study is to theoretically investigate the effects of the associated 1.275 MeV {gamma} rays on the calibration factors. The physical processes affecting the coincidence data were categorized in order to derive approximate semi-quantitative formulae. Assuming the design parameters of some typical commercial PET scanners, the effects of the {gamma} rays as relative deviations in the calibration factors were evaluated by semi-quantitative formulae and a Monte Carlo simulation. The relative deviations in the calibration factors were less than 4%, depending on the details of the PET scanners. The event losses due to rejecting multiple coincidence events of scattered {gamma} rays had the strongest effect. The results from the semi-quantitative formulae and the Monte Carlo simulation were consistent and were useful in understanding the underlying mechanisms. The deviations are considered small enough to correct on the basis of precise Monte Carlo simulation. This study thus offers an important theoretical basis for the validity of the calibration method using point-like {sup 22}Na radioactive sources.

  8. The Reconstruction Toolkit (RTK), an open-source cone-beam CT reconstruction toolkit based on the Insight Toolkit (ITK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rit, S; Vila Oliva, M; Sarrut, D; Brousmiche, S; Labarbe, R; Sharp, G C

    2014-01-01

    We propose the Reconstruction Toolkit (RTK, http://www.openrtk.org), an open-source toolkit for fast cone-beam CT reconstruction, based on the Insight Toolkit (ITK) and using GPU code extracted from Plastimatch. RTK is developed by an open consortium (see affiliations) under the non-contaminating Apache 2.0 license. The quality of the platform is daily checked with regression tests in partnership with Kitware, the company supporting ITK. Several features are already available: Elekta, Varian and IBA inputs, multi-threaded Feldkamp-David-Kress reconstruction on CPU and GPU, Parker short scan weighting, multi-threaded CPU and GPU forward projectors, etc. Each feature is either accessible through command line tools or C++ classes that can be included in independent software. A MIDAS community has been opened to share CatPhan datasets of several vendors (Elekta, Varian and IBA). RTK will be used in the upcoming cone-beam CT scanner developed by IBA for proton therapy rooms. Many features are under development: new input format support, iterative reconstruction, hybrid Monte Carlo / deterministic CBCT simulation, etc. RTK has been built to freely share tomographic reconstruction developments between researchers and is open for new contributions.

  9. Initial experience with prospectively triggered, sequential CT coronary angiography on a 128-slice scanner; Erste Erfahrungen mit der sequenziellen, prospektiv getriggerten CT-Koronarangiografie an einem 128-Schicht-Computertomografen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, K.; Baum, U.; Kuefner, M.A.; Kuettner, A.; Uder, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Radiologisches Inst.; Gauss, S.; Achenbach, S.; Daniel, W.G.; Ropers, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Medizinische Klinik 2

    2009-04-15

    Purpose: Spiral CT angiography (CTA) of the coronaries using low-pitch scanning and ECG-gated image reconstruction is a robust method for detecting or excluding relevant coronary plaque. However, the resulting dose exposure is considerable. The aim of the present study was to evaluate image quality and artifacts as well as to record dose values for sequential coronary CTA using a 128-slice scanner with a temporal resolution of 150 ms. Materials und Methods: 20 patients with a regular heart rate and without contraindications for oral/I.V. beta blockers, who were referred for CTA of the coronaries for exclusion or detection of relevant plaques, were examined by sequential CTA with the following parameters: 120 kV, 200 ref mAs, collimation 2 x 64 x 0.6, table feed of 34.5 mm at a detector width of 38.4 mm. A total acquisition time of 380 ms per table position allowed for mild shifting of the reconstruction window within the cardiac cycle of {+-} 5 %. 50 ml of contrast agent were injected at 5 ml/s followed by a 50 ml split bolus (20 % contrast). The individual start delay was determined by a test bolus scan (10 ml contrast + 50 ml saline flush at 5 ml/s). The image quality for each segment, coronary artery, and patient was determined on a 4-point scale. Dose values were estimated based on the individual dose length product as provided by the scanner's patient protocol. Artifacts were evaluated to determine the cause (calcium vs. motion). Results: All patients received beta blocker pretreatment. The mean heart rate was 62 {+-} 5 beats/min. 5 % (13/286) of all segments in 5/20 patients were rated as non-diagnostic. The mean dose length product was 213 mGy x cm, and the mean effective dose was 3.6 mSv. Calcifications were the major cause of non-diagnostic images. However breathing or other motion artifacts occurred as well. (orig.)

  10. A nanotube-based field emission x-ray source for microcomputed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Cheng, Y.; Lee, Y.Z.; Gao, B.; Qiu, Q.; Lin, W.L.; Lalush, D.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2005-01-01

    Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) is a noninvasive imaging tool commonly used to probe the internal structures of small animals for biomedical research and for the inspection of microelectronics. Here we report the development of a micro-CT scanner with a carbon nanotube- (CNT-) based microfocus x-ray source. The performance of the CNT x-ray source and the imaging capability of the micro-CT scanner were characterized

  11. Flatbed scanners as a source of imaging. Brightness assessment and additives determination in a nickel electroplating bath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, M; Amigo, J M; Bro, R; Ostra, M; Ubide, C; Zuriarrain, J

    2011-05-23

    Desktop flatbed scanners are very well-known devices that can provide digitized information of flat surfaces. They are practically present in most laboratories as a part of the computer support. Several quality levels can be found in the market, but all of them can be considered as tools with a high performance and low cost. The present paper shows how the information obtained with a scanner, from a flat surface, can be used with fine results for exploratory and quantitative purposes through image analysis. It provides cheap analytical measurements for assessment of quality parameters of coated metallic surfaces and monitoring of electrochemical coating bath lives. The samples used were steel sheets nickel-plated in an electrodeposition bath. The quality of the final deposit depends on the bath conditions and, especially, on the concentration of the additives in the bath. Some additives become degraded with the bath life and so is the quality of the plate finish. Analysis of the scanner images can be used to follow the evolution of the metal deposit and the concentration of additives in the bath. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to find significant differences in the coating of sheets, to find directions of maximum variability and to identify odd samples. The results found are favorably compared with those obtained by means of specular reflectance (SR), which is here used as a reference technique. Also the concentration of additives SPB and SA-1 along a nickel bath life can be followed using image data handled with algorithms such as partial least squares (PLS) regression and support vector regression (SVR). The quantitative results obtained with these and other algorithms are compared. All this opens new qualitative and quantitative possibilities to flatbed scanners. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J; Lee, J [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, I [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ye, S [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm{sup 2} applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield.

  13. Computer Tomography Scanners in Portugal (1990-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Crispim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of Computed Tomography (CT has increased every year since its introduction into medicine in 1972. Technological developments have made CT one of the most important imaging modalities in modern medicine. This importance is evidenced in the increasing demand and number of CT scanners installed in Portugal and worldwide. This review compiles the most recent national statistics from official publications on the number of CT scanners installed in Portugal and compares them with data available in international publications. We conclude that the number of CT scanners installed in Portugal exceeded the EU27 average by 61.5 % and the OECD average by 78.2 %, and that in 2011 there were 203 CT scanners installed in hospitals in Portugal, which equated to 19.23 CT scanners per million inhabitants.

  14. Attenuation correction for the NIH ATLAS small animal PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Rutao; Liow, JeihSan; Seidel, Jurgen

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated two methods of attenuation correction for the NIH ATLAS small animal PET scanner: 1) a CT-based method that derives 511 keV attenuation coefficients (mu) by extrapolation from spatially registered CT images; and 2) an analytic method based on the body outline of emission images and an empirical mu. A specially fabricated attenuation calibration phantom with cylindrical inserts that mimic different body tissues was used to derive the relationship to convert CT values to (I for PET. The methods were applied to three test data sets: 1) a uniform cylinder phantom, 2) the attenuation calibration phantom, and 3) a mouse injected with left bracket **1**8F right bracket FDG. The CT-based attenuation correction factors were larger in non-uniform regions of the imaging subject, e.g. mouse head, than the analytic method. The two methods had similar correction factors for regions with uniform density and detectable emission source distributions.

  15. A novel high-pressure vessel for simultaneous observations of seismic velocity and in situ CO2 distribution in a porous rock using a medical X-ray CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Nishizawa, Osamu; Zhang, Yi; Park, Hyuck; Xue, Ziqiu

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between seismic wave velocity or attenuation and CO2 saturation is essential for CO2 storage in deep saline formations. In the present study, we describe a novel upright high-pressure vessel that is designed to keep a rock sample under reservoir conditions and simultaneously image the entire sample using a medical X-ray CT scanner. The pressure vessel is composed of low X-ray absorption materials: a carbon-fibre-enhanced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cylinder and PEEK vessel closures supported by carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) joists. The temperature was controlled by a carbon-coated film heater and an aramid fibre thermal insulator. The assembled sample cell allows us to obtain high-resolution images of rock samples during CO2 drainage and brine imbibition under reservoir conditions. The rock sample was oriented vertical to the rotation axis of the CT scanner, and seismic wave paths were aligned parallel to the rotation axis to avoid shadows from the acoustic transducers. The reconstructed CO2 distribution images allow us to calculate the CO2 saturation in the first Fresnel zone along the ray path between transducers. A robust relationship between the seismic wave velocity or attenuation and the CO2 saturation in porous rock was obtained from experiments using this pressure vessel.

  16. Performance on a CT Scanner. Application for the dose correction in the presence of heterogeneities, experimental study using high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Therese.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the physical analysis of a second generation C T scanner: the A C T A Scanner 0200 FS (PFIZER) used at the 'Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif' and its application in radiotherapy. The first part of the study specifically concerns the physical performance of the C T Scanner, and, the evaluation of the doses, delivered to patients during tomodensitometric examinations. The second part envisages the possibilities of the application of C T scanning in radiotherapy. A particular study is established for the utilization of the physical characteristics, furnished by the C T Scanner, concerning different organs, in dose calculations, in the presence of heterogeneities. An experimental study using high energy photon beams more particularly 25 MV X ray beams produced by a linear accelerator (type Sagittaire) has been realized with materials, simulating different human tissues. Consequently, the validity of different correction methods proposed in the literature has been tested for the soft tissues and bone as for the lungs. Modifications are suggested to allow the use of these methods for the photons of very high energy [fr

  17. Neurosurgical operating computerized tomographic scanner system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okudera, Hiroshi; Sugita, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Kimishima, Sakae; Yoshida, Hisashi.

    1988-01-01

    A neurosurgical operating computerized tomography scanner system is presented. This system has been developed for obtaining intra- and postoperative CT images in the operating room. A TCT-300 scanner (manufactured by the Toshiba Co., Tokyo) is placed in the operating room. The realization of a true intraoperative CT image requires certain improvements in the CT scanner and operating table. To adjust the axis of the co-ordinates of the motor system of the MST-7000 microsurgical operating table (manufactured by the Mizuho Ika Co., Tokyo) to the CT scanner, we have designed an interface and a precise motor system so that the computer of the CT scanner can directly control the movement of the operating table. Furthermore, a new head-fixation system has been designed for producing artifact-free intraoperative CT images. The head-pins of the head-fixation system are made of carbon-fiber bars and titanium tips. A simulation study of the total system in the operating room with the CT scanner, operating table, and head holder using a skull model yielded a degree of error similar to that in the phantom testing of the original scanner. Three patients underwent resection of a glial tumor using this system. Intraoperative CT scans taken after dural opening showed a bulging of the cortex, a shift in the central structure, and a displacement of the cortical subarachnoid spaces under the influence of gravity. With a contrast medium the edge of the surrounding brain after resection was enhanced and the residual tumor mass was demonstrated clearly. This system makes it possible to obtain a noninvasive intraoperative image in a situation where structural shifts are taking place. (author)

  18. Investigating the generalisation of an atlas-based synthetic-CT algorithm to another centre and MR scanner for prostate MR-only radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Jonathan J.; Dowling, Jason A.; Kelly, Charles G.; McKenna, Jill; Johnstone, Emily; Speight, Richard; Henry, Ann; Greer, Peter B.; McCallum, Hazel M.

    2017-12-01

    There is increasing interest in MR-only radiotherapy planning since it provides superb soft-tissue contrast without the registration uncertainties inherent in a CT-MR registration. However, MR images cannot readily provide the electron density information necessary for radiotherapy dose calculation. An algorithm which generates synthetic CTs for dose calculations from MR images of the prostate using an atlas of 3 T MR images has been previously reported by two of the authors. This paper aimed to evaluate this algorithm using MR data acquired at a different field strength and a different centre to the algorithm atlas. Twenty-one prostate patients received planning 1.5 T MR and CT scans with routine immobilisation devices on a flat-top couch set-up using external lasers. The MR receive coils were supported by a coil bridge. Synthetic CTs were generated from the planning MR images with (sCT1V ) and without (sCT) a one voxel body contour expansion included in the algorithm. This was to test whether this expansion was required for 1.5 T images. Both synthetic CTs were rigidly registered to the planning CT (pCT). A 6 MV volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was created on the pCT and recalculated on the sCT and sCT1V . The synthetic CTs’ dose distributions were compared to the dose distribution calculated on the pCT. The percentage dose difference at isocentre without the body contour expansion (sCT-pCT) was Δ D_sCT=(0.9 +/- 0.8) % and with (sCT1V -pCT) was Δ D_sCT1V=(-0.7 +/- 0.7) % (mean  ±  one standard deviation). The sCT1V result was within one standard deviation of zero and agreed with the result reported previously using 3 T MR data. The sCT dose difference only agreed within two standard deviations. The mean  ±  one standard deviation gamma pass rate was Γ_sCT = 96.1 +/- 2.9 % for the sCT and Γ_sCT1V = 98.8 +/- 0.5 % for the sCT1V (with 2% global dose difference and 2~mm distance to agreement gamma criteria). The one voxel body contour

  19. The number and distribution of computerised tomography scanners in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semin, S.; Amato, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the number and distribution of CT scanners in Turkey. Our results show 173 CT scanners in Turkey in 1994, which equals 2.9 scanners per million people. All of the scanners are located in 45 cities, where 81 % of the population resides. The other 31 cities in Turkey have no scanners. Of the 173 scanners, 103 (59.6 %) are owned by the private sector and the other 70 are owned by the public sector. Of Turkey's CT scanners, 49.2 % are located in private health centres, 21.9 % in university hospitals, 16.7 % in Ministry of Health (MOH) hospitals, 10.4 % in private hospitals and 1.8 % in social security hospitals. (orig.)

  20. Coronary artery anomalies in adults: imaging at dual source CT coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laspas, Fotios; Roussakis, Arkadios; Mourmouris, Christos; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Andreou, John

    2013-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries have an incidence of 1%, and most of these are benign. However, a small number are associated with myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. Various imaging modalities are available for coronary artery assessment. Recently, multi-detector CT has emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool for defining coronary artery anomalies. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the dual source CT appearance of congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries in adults.

  1. Quantitative assessment of left ventricular function with dual-source CT in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: initial findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, S.; Johnson, T.R.C.; Wintersperger, B.J.; Minaifar, N.; Bhargava, A.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.; Nikolaou, K. [University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography are currently regarded as standard modalities for the quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction. With the recent introduction of dual-source computedtomography (DSCT), the increased temporal resolution of 83 ms should also improve the assessment of cardiac function in CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of DSCT in the assessment of left ventricular functional parameters with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Fifteen patients (two female, 13 male; mean age 50.8 {+-} 19.2 years) underwent CT and MRI examinations on a DSCT (Somatom Definition; Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) and a 3.0-Tesla MR scanner (Magnetom Trio; Siemens Medical Solutions), respectively. Multiphase axial CT images were analysed with a semiautomatic region growing algorithms (Syngo Circulation; Siemens Medical Solutions) by two independent blinded observers. In MRI, dynamic cine loops of short axis slices were evaluated with semiautomatic contour detection software (ARGUS; Siemens Medical Solutions) independently by two readers. End-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume (SV) were determined for both modalities, and correlation coefficient, systematic error, limits of agreement and inter-observer variability were assessed. In DSCT, EDV and ESV were 135.8 {+-} 41.9 ml and 54.9 {+-} 29.6 ml, respectively, compared with 132.1 {+-} 40.8 ml EDV and 57.6 {+-} 27.3 ml ESV in MRI. Thus, EDV was overestimated by 3.7 ml (limits of agreement -46.1/+53.6), while ESV was underestimated by 2.6 ml (-36.6/+31.4). Mean EF was 61.6 {+-} 12.4% in DSCT and 57.9 {+-} 9.0% in MRI, resulting in an overestimation of EF by 3.8% with limits of agreement at -14.7 and +22.2%. Rank correlation rho values were 0.81 for EDV (P = 0.0024), 0.79 for ESV (P = 0.0031) and 0.64 for EF (P = 0.0168). The kappa value of inter

  2. Quantitative assessment of left ventricular function with dual-source CT in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: initial findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, S.; Johnson, T.R.C.; Wintersperger, B.J.; Minaifar, N.; Bhargava, A.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.; Nikolaou, K.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography are currently regarded as standard modalities for the quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction. With the recent introduction of dual-source computedtomography (DSCT), the increased temporal resolution of 83 ms should also improve the assessment of cardiac function in CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of DSCT in the assessment of left ventricular functional parameters with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Fifteen patients (two female, 13 male; mean age 50.8 ± 19.2 years) underwent CT and MRI examinations on a DSCT (Somatom Definition; Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) and a 3.0-Tesla MR scanner (Magnetom Trio; Siemens Medical Solutions), respectively. Multiphase axial CT images were analysed with a semiautomatic region growing algorithms (Syngo Circulation; Siemens Medical Solutions) by two independent blinded observers. In MRI, dynamic cine loops of short axis slices were evaluated with semiautomatic contour detection software (ARGUS; Siemens Medical Solutions) independently by two readers. End-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume (SV) were determined for both modalities, and correlation coefficient, systematic error, limits of agreement and inter-observer variability were assessed. In DSCT, EDV and ESV were 135.8 ± 41.9 ml and 54.9 ± 29.6 ml, respectively, compared with 132.1 ± 40.8 ml EDV and 57.6 ± 27.3 ml ESV in MRI. Thus, EDV was overestimated by 3.7 ml (limits of agreement -46.1/+53.6), while ESV was underestimated by 2.6 ml (-36.6/+31.4). Mean EF was 61.6 ± 12.4% in DSCT and 57.9 ± 9.0% in MRI, resulting in an overestimation of EF by 3.8% with limits of agreement at -14.7 and +22.2%. Rank correlation rho values were 0.81 for EDV (P = 0.0024), 0.79 for ESV (P 0.0031) and 0.64 for EF (P = 0.0168). The kappa value of inter-observer variability were

  3. Assessment of CT numbers in limited and medium field-of-view scans taken using Accuitomo 170 and Veraviewepocs 3De cone-beam computed tomography scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Matheus L. [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Tosoni, Guilherme M. [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis and Surgery, Araraquara Dental School, Sao Paulo State University, Araraquara (Brazil); Lindsey, David H.; Mendoza, Kristopher; Tetradis, Sotirios; Mallya, Sanjay M. [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2014-12-15

    To assess the influence of anatomic location on the relationship between computed tomography (CT) number and X-ray attenuation in limited and medium field-of-view (FOV) scans. Tubes containing solutions with different concentrations of K2HPO4 were placed in the tooth sockets of a human head phantom. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired, and CT numbers of the K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} solutions were measured. The relationship between CT number and K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} concentration was examined by linear regression analyses. Then, the variation in CT number according to anatomic location was examined. The relationship between K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} concentration and CT number was strongly linear. The slopes of the linear regressions for the limited FOVs were almost 2-fold lower than those for the medium FOVs. The absolute CT number differed between imaging protocols and anatomic locations. There is a strong linear relationship between X-ray attenuation and CT number. The specific imaging protocol and anatomic location of the object strongly influence this relationship.

  4. The cobalt-60 container scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jigang, A.; Liye, Z.; Yisi, L.; Haifeng, W.; Zhifang, W.; Liqiang, W.; Yuanshi, Z.; Xincheng, X.; Furong, L.; Baozeng, G.; Chunfa, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has successfully designed and constructed a container (cargo) scanner, which uses cobalt-60 of 100-300 Ci as radiation source. The following performances of the Cobalt-60 container scanner have been achieved at INET: a) IQI (Image Quality Indicator) - 2.5% behind 100 mm of steel; b) CI (Contrast Indicator) - 0.7% behind 100 mm of steel; c) SP (Steel Penetration) - 240 mm of steel; d) Maximum Dose per Scanning - 0.02mGy; e) Throughput - twenty 40-foot containers per hour. These performances are equal or similar to those of the accelerator scanners. Besides these nice enough inspection properties, the Cobalt-60 scanner possesses many other special features which are better than accelerator scanners: a) cheap price - it will be only or two tenths of the accelerator scanner's; b) low radiation intensity - the radiation protection problem is much easier to solve and a lot of money can be saved on the radiation shielding building; c) much smaller area for installation and operation; d) simple operation and convenient maintenance; e) high reliability and stability. The Cobalt-60 container (or cargo) scanner is satisfied for boundary customs, seaports, airports and railway stations etc. Because of the nice special features said above, it is more suitable to be applied widely. Its high properties and low price will make it have much better application prospects

  5. Radiation dose levels in pediatric chest CT: experience in 499 children evaluated with dual-source single-energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martine, Remy-Jardin; Colas, Lucie; Jean-Baptiste, Faivre; Remy, Jacques [CHU Lille (EA 2694) University of Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Santangelo, Teresa [CHU Lille (EA 2694) University of Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy); Duhamel, Alain [University of Lille (EA 2694), Department of Biostatistics, CHU Lille, Lille (France); Deschildre, Antoine [CHU Lille - University of Lille, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Lille (France)

    2017-02-15

    The availability of dual-source technology has introduced the possibility of scanning children at lower kVp with a high-pitch mode, combining high-speed data acquisition and high temporal resolution. To establish the radiation dose levels of dual-source, single-energy chest CT examinations in children. We retrospectively recorded the dose-length product (DLP) of 499 consecutive examinations obtained in children <50 kg, divided into five weight groups: group 1 (<10 kg, n = 129); group 2 (10-20 kg, n = 176); group 3 (20-30 kg, n = 99), group 4 (30-40 kg, n = 58) and group 5 (40-49 kg, n = 37). All CT examinations were performed with high temporal resolution (75 ms), a high-pitch mode and a weight-adapted selection of the milliamperage. CT examinations were obtained at 80 kVp with a milliamperage ranging between 40 mAs and 90 mAs, and a pitch of 2.0 (n = 162; 32.5%) or 3.0 (n = 337; 67.5%). The mean duration of data acquisition was 522.8 ± 192.0 ms (interquartile range 390 to 610; median 490). In the study population, the mean CT dose index volume (CTDIvol{sub 32}) was 0.83 mGy (standard deviation [SD] 0.20 mGy; interquartile range 0.72 to 0.94; median 0.78); the mean DLP{sub 32} was 21.4 mGy.cm (SD 9.1 mGy.cm; interquartile range 15 to 25; median 19.0); and the mean size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was 1.7 mGy (SD 0.4 mGy; interquartile range 1.5 to 1.9; median 1.7). The DLP{sub 32}, CTDI{sub vol32} and SSDE were found to be statistically significant in the five weight categories (P < 0.0001). This study establishes the radiation dose levels for dual-source, single-kVp chest CT from a single center. In the five weight categories, the median values varied 15-37 mGy.cm for the DLP{sub 32}, 0.78-1.25 mGy for the CTDI{sub vol32} and 1.6-2.1 mGy for the SSDE. (orig.)

  6. Radiation dose levels in pediatric chest CT: experience in 499 children evaluated with dual-source single-energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martine, Remy-Jardin; Colas, Lucie; Jean-Baptiste, Faivre; Remy, Jacques; Santangelo, Teresa; Duhamel, Alain; Deschildre, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    The availability of dual-source technology has introduced the possibility of scanning children at lower kVp with a high-pitch mode, combining high-speed data acquisition and high temporal resolution. To establish the radiation dose levels of dual-source, single-energy chest CT examinations in children. We retrospectively recorded the dose-length product (DLP) of 499 consecutive examinations obtained in children <50 kg, divided into five weight groups: group 1 (<10 kg, n = 129); group 2 (10-20 kg, n = 176); group 3 (20-30 kg, n = 99), group 4 (30-40 kg, n = 58) and group 5 (40-49 kg, n = 37). All CT examinations were performed with high temporal resolution (75 ms), a high-pitch mode and a weight-adapted selection of the milliamperage. CT examinations were obtained at 80 kVp with a milliamperage ranging between 40 mAs and 90 mAs, and a pitch of 2.0 (n = 162; 32.5%) or 3.0 (n = 337; 67.5%). The mean duration of data acquisition was 522.8 ± 192.0 ms (interquartile range 390 to 610; median 490). In the study population, the mean CT dose index volume (CTDIvol 32 ) was 0.83 mGy (standard deviation [SD] 0.20 mGy; interquartile range 0.72 to 0.94; median 0.78); the mean DLP 32 was 21.4 mGy.cm (SD 9.1 mGy.cm; interquartile range 15 to 25; median 19.0); and the mean size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was 1.7 mGy (SD 0.4 mGy; interquartile range 1.5 to 1.9; median 1.7). The DLP 32 , CTDI vol32 and SSDE were found to be statistically significant in the five weight categories (P < 0.0001). This study establishes the radiation dose levels for dual-source, single-kVp chest CT from a single center. In the five weight categories, the median values varied 15-37 mGy.cm for the DLP 32 , 0.78-1.25 mGy for the CTDI vol32 and 1.6-2.1 mGy for the SSDE. (orig.)

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanner or may be over the weight limit—usually 450 pounds—for the moving table. CT ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide ... clicking and whirring sounds as the CT scanner's internal parts, not usually visible to you, revolve around ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. CT imaging ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. CT imaging ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  18. Present and future in the use of micro-CT scanner 3D analysis for the study of dental and root canal morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola M. Grande; Gianluca Plotino; Gianluca Gambarini; Luca Testarelli; Ferdinando D’Ambrosio; Raffaella Pecci; Rossella Bedini

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the present article is to illustrate and analyze the applications and the potential of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) in the analysis of tooth anatomy and root canal morphology. The authors performed a micro-CT analysis of the following different teeth: maxillary first molars with a second canal in the mesiobuccal (MB) root, mandibular first molars with complex anatomy in the mesial root, premolars with single and double roots and with complicated apical anatomy. The hardware...

  19. Monitoring of health of trees by gamma-ray tomographic scanners and the first Kanpur error theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Ruchi; Razdan, Mayuri; Quraishi, A.M.; Munshi, Prabhat

    2004-01-01

    CT scanners produce nondestructively images of a given cross-section with the help of radiation source-detector system and a suitable tomographic reconstruction algorithm. These CT images have inherent error associated with them and for unknown objects it is not possible to calculate it directly. Careful application of the first Kanpur theorem, however, gives an indirect estimate of the inaccuracy of these images. An interesting outcome of this theorem is monitoring of health of trees. (author)

  20. Performance of turbo high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary CT angiography: first ex vivo and patient experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsbach, Fabian; Gordic, Sonja; Husarik, Daniela; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Divison of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany); Wildermuth, Simon [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Divison of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    To evaluate image quality, maximal heart rate allowing for diagnostic imaging, and radiation dose of turbo high-pitch dual-source coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). First, a cardiac motion phantom simulating heart rates (HRs) from 60-90 bpm in 5-bpm steps was examined on a third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT (prospective ECG-triggering, pitch 3.2; rotation time, 250 ms). Subjective image quality regarding the presence of motion artefacts was interpreted by two readers on a four-point scale (1, excellent; 4, non-diagnostic). Objective image quality was assessed by calculating distortion vectors. Thereafter, 20 consecutive patients (median, 50 years) undergoing clinically indicated CCTA were included. In the phantom study, image quality was rated diagnostic up to the HR75 bpm, with object distortion being 1 mm or less. Distortion increased above 1 mm at HR of 80-90 bpm. Patients had a mean HR of 66 bpm (47-78 bpm). Coronary segments were of diagnostic image quality for all patients with HR up to 73 bpm. Average effective radiation dose in patients was 0.6 ± 0.3 mSv. Our combined phantom and patient study indicates that CCTA with turbo high-pitch third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT can be performed at HR up to 75 bpm while maintaining diagnostic image quality, being associated with an average radiation dose of 0.6 mSv. (orig.)

  1. Performance of turbo high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary CT angiography: first ex vivo and patient experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsbach, Fabian; Gordic, Sonja; Husarik, Daniela; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Wildermuth, Simon

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate image quality, maximal heart rate allowing for diagnostic imaging, and radiation dose of turbo high-pitch dual-source coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). First, a cardiac motion phantom simulating heart rates (HRs) from 60-90 bpm in 5-bpm steps was examined on a third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT (prospective ECG-triggering, pitch 3.2; rotation time, 250 ms). Subjective image quality regarding the presence of motion artefacts was interpreted by two readers on a four-point scale (1, excellent; 4, non-diagnostic). Objective image quality was assessed by calculating distortion vectors. Thereafter, 20 consecutive patients (median, 50 years) undergoing clinically indicated CCTA were included. In the phantom study, image quality was rated diagnostic up to the HR75 bpm, with object distortion being 1 mm or less. Distortion increased above 1 mm at HR of 80-90 bpm. Patients had a mean HR of 66 bpm (47-78 bpm). Coronary segments were of diagnostic image quality for all patients with HR up to 73 bpm. Average effective radiation dose in patients was 0.6 ± 0.3 mSv. Our combined phantom and patient study indicates that CCTA with turbo high-pitch third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT can be performed at HR up to 75 bpm while maintaining diagnostic image quality, being associated with an average radiation dose of 0.6 mSv. (orig.)

  2. Dual-layer spectral detector CT: non-inferiority assessment compared to dual-source dual-energy CT in discriminating uric acid from non-uric acid renal stones ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Lakshmi; Duan, Xinhui; Xi, Yin; Lewis, Matthew A; Pearle, Margaret S; Antonelli, Jodi A; Goerne, Harold; Kolitz, Elysha M; Abbara, Suhny; Lenkinski, Robert E; Fielding, Julia R; Leyendecker, John R

    2018-04-07

    To assess the non-inferiority of dual-layer spectral detector CT (SDCT) compared to dual-source dual-energy CT (dsDECT) in discriminating uric acid (UA) from non-UA stones. Fifty-seven extracted urinary calculi were placed in a cylindrical phantom in a water bath and scanned on a SDCT scanner (IQon, Philips Healthcare) and second- and third-generation dsDECT scanners (Somatom Flash and Force, Siemens Healthcare) under matched scan parameters. For SDCT data, conventional images and virtual monoenergetic reconstructions were created. A customized 3D growing region segmentation tool was used to segment each stone on a pixel-by-pixel basis for statistical analysis. Median virtual monoenergetic ratios (VMRs) of 40/200, 62/92, and 62/100 for each stone were recorded. For dsDECT data, dual-energy ratio (DER) for each stone was recorded from vendor-specific postprocessing software (Syngo Via) using the Kidney Stones Application. The clinical reference standard of X-ray diffraction analysis was used to assess non-inferiority. Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to assess diagnostic performance of detecting UA stones. Six pure UA, 47 pure calcium-based, 1 pure cystine, and 3 mixed struvite stones were scanned. All pure UA stones were correctly separated from non-UA stones using SDCT and dsDECT (AUC = 1). For UA stones, median VMR was 0.95-0.99 and DER 1.00-1.02. For non-UA stones, median VMR was 1.4-4.1 and DER 1.39-1.69. SDCT spectral reconstructions demonstrate similar performance to those of dsDECT in discriminating UA from non-UA stones in a phantom model.

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning is like other ... patient, as the mild discomfort will not last long. When your child enters the scanner, special lights ...

  4. The impact of heart rate on image quality and reconstruction timing of dual-source CT coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yining; Jin Zhengyu; Kong Lingyan; Zhang Zhuhua; Song Lan; Mu Wenbin; Wang Yun; Zhao Wenmin; Zhang Shuyang; Lin Songbai

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of patient's heart rate (HR) on coronary CT angiography (CTA) image quality (IQ) and reconstruction timing in dual-source CT (DSCT). Methods Ninety-five patients with suspicion of coronary artery disease were examined with a DSCT scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens) using 32 x 0.6 mm collimation. All patients were divided three groups according to the heart rate (HR): group 1, HR ≤ 70 beats per minute (bpm), n=26; group 2, HR >70 bpm to ≤90 bpm, n=37; group 3, HR > 90 bpm, n=32. No beta-blockers were taken before CT scan. 50- 60 ml of nonionic contrast agent were injected with a rate of 5 ml/s. Images were reconstructed from 10% to 100% of the R-R interval using single-segment reconstruction. Two readers independently assessed IQ of all coronary, segments using a 3-point scale from excellent (1) to non-assessable (3) for coronary segments and the relationship between IQ and the HR. Results: Overall mean IQ score was 1.31 ± 0.55 for all patients with 1.08 ± 0.27 for group 1, 1.32 ± 0.58 for group 2 and 1.47 ± 0.61 for group 3. The IQ was better in the LAD than the RCA and LCX (P<0.01). Only 1.4% (19/1386) of coronary artery segments were considered non-assessable due to the motion artifacts. Optimal image quality of all coronary segments in 74 patients (77.9%) can be achieved with one reconstruction data set. The best IQ was predominately in diastole (88.5%) in group 1, while the best IQ was in systole (84.4%) in group 3. Conclusions: DSCT can achieve the optimal IQ with a wide range of HR using single-segment reconstruction. With the increasing of HR, the timing of data reconstruction for the best IQ shifts from mid-diastole to systole. (authors)

  5. Estimation and comparison of effective dose (E) in standard chest CT by organ dose measurements and dose-length-product methods and assessment of the influence of CT tube potential (energy dependency) on effective dose in a dual-source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jijo; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Krauss, Bernhard; Vogl, Thomas J; Maentele, Werner; Bauer, Ralf W

    2012-04-01

    To determine effective dose (E) during standard chest CT using an organ dose-based and a dose-length-product-based (DLP) approach for four different scan protocols including high-pitch and dual-energy in a dual-source CT scanner of the second generation. Organ doses were measured with thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD) in an anthropomorphic male adult phantom. Further, DLP-based dose estimates were performed by using the standard 0.014mSv/mGycm conversion coefficient k. Examinations were performed on a dual-source CT system (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens). Four scan protocols were investigated: (1) single-source 120kV, (2) single-source 100kV, (3) high-pitch 120kV, and (4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140kV with equivalent CTDIvol and no automated tube current modulation. E was then determined following recommendations of ICRP publication 103 and 60 and specific k values were derived. DLP-based estimates differed by 4.5-16.56% and 5.2-15.8% relatively to ICRP 60 and 103, respectively. The derived k factors calculated from TLD measurements were 0.0148, 0.015, 0.0166, and 0.0148 for protocol 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Effective dose estimations by ICRP 103 and 60 for single-energy and dual-energy protocols show a difference of less than 0.04mSv. Estimates of E based on DLP work equally well for single-energy, high-pitch and dual-energy CT examinations. The tube potential definitely affects effective dose in a substantial way. Effective dose estimations by ICRP 103 and 60 for both single-energy and dual-energy examinations differ not more than 0.04mSv. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Systematic errors in digital volume correlation due to the self-heating effect of a laboratory x-ray CT scanner

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, B; Pan, B; Tao, Ran; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    The use of digital volume correlation (DVC) in combination with a laboratory x-ray computed tomography (CT) for full-field internal 3D deformation measurement of opaque materials has flourished in recent years. During x-ray tomographic imaging

  7. Accuracy of iodine quantification using dual energy CT in latest generation dual source and dual layer CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging - North East Netherlands, P.O. Box EB44, Groningen (Netherlands); Hamersvelt, Robbert W. van; Willemink, Martin J.; Schilham, Arnold; Leiner, Tim [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schmidt, Bernhard T.; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany); Milles, Julien [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging - North East Netherlands, P.O. Box EB44, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-09-15

    To determine the accuracy of iodine quantification with dual energy computed tomography (DECT) in two high-end CT systems with different spectral imaging techniques. Five tubes with different iodine concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/ml) were analysed in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. Adding two phantom rings simulated increased patient size. For third-generation dual source CT (DSCT), tube voltage combinations of 150Sn and 70, 80, 90, 100 kVp were analysed. For dual layer CT (DLCT), 120 and 140 kVp were used. Scans were repeated three times. Median normalized values and interquartile ranges (IQRs) were calculated for all kVp settings and phantom sizes. Correlation between measured and known iodine concentrations was excellent for both systems (R = 0.999-1.000, p < 0.0001). For DSCT, median measurement errors ranged from -0.5% (IQR -2.0, 2.0%) at 150Sn/70 kVp and -2.3% (IQR -4.0, -0.1%) at 150Sn/80 kVp to -4.0% (IQR -6.0, -2.8%) at 150Sn/90 kVp. For DLCT, median measurement errors ranged from -3.3% (IQR -4.9, -1.5%) at 140 kVp to -4.6% (IQR -6.0, -3.6%) at 120 kVp. Larger phantom sizes increased variability of iodine measurements (p < 0.05). Iodine concentration can be accurately quantified with state-of-the-art DECT systems from two vendors. The lowest absolute errors were found for DSCT using the 150Sn/70 kVp or 150Sn/80 kVp combinations, which was slightly more accurate than 140 kVp in DLCT. (orig.)

  8. A simple scanner for Compton tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cesareo, R; Brunetti, A; Golosio, B; Castellano, A

    2002-01-01

    A first generation CT-scanner was designed and constructed to carry out Compton images. This CT-scanner is composed of a 80 kV, 5 mA X-ray tube and a NaI(Tl) X-ray detector; the tube is strongly collimated, generating a X-ray beam of 2 mm diameter, whilst the detector is not collimated to collect Compton photons from the whole irradiated cylinder. The performances of the equipment were tested contemporaneous transmission and Compton images.

  9. Cine CT: a new technology for cardiac computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.P.; Peschmann, K.R.; Rand, R.E.; Napel, S.A.; Gould, R.; Farmer, D.W.; Lipton, M.J.; Higgins, C.B.; Couch, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The technical requirements for adequate evaluation of cardiac anatomy and physiology, namely scan speeds in the 33-100 msec range, simultaneous multi-slice capability, 15-20 multi-level scans/second and a repeat multi-slice study at one per second, have been realized with the inception of the Cine-CT scanner. This scanner acquires scan data in 50 milliseconds by eliminating moving parts and using a scanning electron beam to produce a high speed X-ray source. The authors describe this scanner and the three scanning modes available: continuous or cine mode; flow or triggered mode; and full resolution mode. (Auth.)

  10. In vitro differentiation of renal stone composition using dual-source, dual-energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Changsheng; Zhang Longjiang; Xu Feng; Qi Li; Zhao Yan'e; Zheng Ling; Huang Wei; Liu Youhuang; Lu Guangming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ability of dual-source. dual-energy CT in differentiating uric acid stones from non-uric acid stones with infrared spectroscopy as reference standard. Materials and Methods: Urinary calculus from 308 patients were scanned in first generation dual-source CT with dual-energy mode between July 2011 and June 2012. Renal Stone application was used to analyze their composition. The uric acid stones color were coded red and non-uric acid stones were blue. CT values were measured in 60 selective urinary calculus including 30 uric acid stones and 30 non-uric acid stones. The accuracy of dual energy CT to differentiate uric acid and no-uric acid stones was calculated. Results: Of 308 patients, 60 patients had uric acid stones and 248 non-uric acid stones. No difference was found for uric acid stone at 80 kV and 140 kV (375.8±69.2 HU vs. 374.1±69.4 HU; t=-0.217, P=0.830), while CT values of non-uric acid stones were higher at 80 kV than those at 140 kV (1455.1±312.4 HU vs. 1039.6±194.4 HU; t=-12.16. P<0.001). CT values of non-uric acid stones at 80 kV, 140 kV, and average weighted images (1455.1±312.4 HU, 1 039.6±194.4 HU, and 882.0±176.4 HU, respectively) were higher than those of uric acid stones (375.8±69.2 HU, 374.1±69.4 HU, and 366.3±80.1 HU, respectively; P<0.001). With infrared spectrum findings as reference standard, the accuracy of dual energy CT in differentiating uric acid stones from non-uric acid stones was 100%. Conclusions: Dual-source, dual-energy CT can accurately differentiate uric acid stones from non-uric acid stones, and plays an important role in treatment planning of renal stones. (authors)

  11. Clinical utility of ultra high pitch dual source thoracic CT imaging of acute pulmonary embolism in the emergency department: Are we one step closer towards a non-gated triple rule out?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Daniel J., E-mail: danieljameshou@gmail.com; Tso, David K., E-mail: david.k.tso@gmail.com; Davison, Chris, E-mail: chrisdavison100@gmail.com; Inacio, Joao, E-mail: joao.r.inacio@gmail.com; Louis, Luck J., E-mail: lucklouis@gmail.com; Nicolaou, Savvakis, E-mail: savvas.nicolaou@vch.ca; Reimann, Anja J., E-mail: anja.reimann@gmx.de

    2013-10-01

    Objectives/Purpose: Aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the image quality and the radiation dose of an ultra high pitch CT scan for the evaluation of pulmonary embolism and visualization of cardiac structures in comparison to our institution's standard pulmonary embolism protocol. Method and materials: The study cohort consisted of 115 consecutive patients, 57 underwent CT pulmonary angiography on a dual source 128 slice scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition FLASH) via an ultra high pitch mode (Pitch 2.8) while 58 were scanned on a dual source 64 slice scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition Dual Source) with standard pitch (Pitch 0.9). Qualitative image assessment was determined by two blinded radiologists with 3 and 15 years’ experience in chest and cardiac CT. Quantitative image assessment was determined by the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Effective radiation dose was calculated via the product of the dose length product. Results: For the ultra high pitch protocol, 14% (8/57) were positive for pulmonary embolus compared to 13.7% (8/58) for the standard pitch group. 98.2% of the ultra high pitch scans were diagnostic for pulmonary embolus vs. 94.8% of the standard protocol. Visualization of cardiac structures was significantly improved with the ultra high pitch protocol (p < 0.0001). Significantly more lung parenchymal motion was observed on the standard protocol (p < 0.0001). The mean pulmonary vessel attenuation, SNR, and CNR were not significantly different. The mean effective dose was lower for the ultra high pitch studies (4.09 mSv ± 0.78 vs. 7.72 mSv ± 2.60, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Ultra high pitch CT imaging for pulmonary embolus is a technique which has potential to assess motion free evaluation of most cardiac structures and proximal coronary arteries at lower radiation doses.

  12. Utilization pattern of whole body computed tomography scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Chul Ho; Lee, Sang Suk

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography scanner (CT scanner) is one of the most expensive and sophisticated diagnostic tool and has already been utilized in many hospitals in Korea. The price as well as operating costs of CT scanner is so expensive as to regulate its installment by government even in the United States. In order to identify the efficient utilization of the CT scanner, the utilization pattern for CT scanning was analyzed at three general hospital in seoul. The results are as follows: 1. Five out of one thousand outpatients and five out of one hundred inpatients were CT scanned. 2. Eighty percent of patients who were scanned were those of inpatients of the hospitals where the scanned are installed. 3. Head standings constitute 45.6 percent of examinations, internal medicine 63.8 percent, and 38.5 percent neurosurgery respectively. 4. The rate of indication for CT scanning showed no statistically significant difference between insured and non-insured groups. 5. Computed tomography scanner units were operated 5.5 days a week in average and full operation rate was 79.5% in average. 6. The major diagnoses mode by head scanning were: hematoma (56.7%), infarction (12.6%), tumor (8.2%), and hydrocephalus (4.4%). 7. Number of patients taken CT Scanning was 43 persons a week in average for each whole body scanner unit

  13. Radiation dosimetry of computed tomography x-ray scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, J.L.; Williamson, B.D.P.; Le Heron, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the development and application of the methods employed in National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) surveys of computed tomography x-ray scanners (CT scanners). It includes descriptions of the phantoms and equipment used, discussion of the various dose parameters measured, the principles of the various dosimetry systems employed and some indication of the doses to occupationally exposed personnel

  14. Closing in on the K Edge : Coronary CT Angiography at 100, 80, and 70 kV-Initial Comparison of a Second-versus a Third-Generation Dual-Source CT System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Mathias; Haubenreisser, Holger; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Leidecker, Christianne; Allmendinger, Thomas; Lehmann, Ralf; Sudarski, Sonja; Borggrefe, Martin; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Henzler, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate radiation and contrast medium requirements for performing high-pitch coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiography at 70 kV using a third-generation dual-source CT system in comparison to a second-generation dual-source CT system. Materials and Methods: All

  15. Whole body line scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berninger, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A bar-shaped scintillator converts incident collimated gamma rays to light pulses which are detected by a row of photoelectric tubes positioned along the output face of the scintillator wherein each tube has a convexly curved photocathode disposed in close proximity to the scintillator. Electronic circuitry connected to the output of phototubes develops the scintillation event x-axis position coordinate electrical signal with good linearity and with substantial independence of the spacing between the scintillator and photocathodes so that the phototubes can be positioned as close to the scintillator as possible to obtain reduced distortion in the field of view and improved spatial resolution. A mechanical drive of the scanner results in an image of the gamma ray source being formed by sequencing the developed scintillation position coordinate signals in the y-axis dimension

  16. P.I.X.S.C.A.N.: a micro-CT scanner for small animal based on hybrid pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, R.

    2008-03-01

    Since more than a dozen years, efforts were led in the field of X-ray tomography for small animals, principally for the improvement of spatial resolution and the diminution of the absorbed dose. The C.P.P.M. developed the micro-CT P.I.X.S.C.A.N. based on the hybrid pixel detector X.P.A.D.2. In this context, my thesis work consists in studying the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 and the contribution of the hybrid pixels in the imaging of small animals. A fast analytical simulation, FastSimu, was developed. An extrapolation of the performance of the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N, as well as the validation of the results obtained with the measured data, were led by means of the analytical simulator FastSimu. The demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 allowed to obtain reconstructed images with a rather good quality for a relatively weak absorbed dose. Its spatial resolution is degraded by the high number of defective pixels of the detector X.P.A.D.2. Beyond this study, a new version of the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 is under construction. This latter, characterized by two and a half times smaller pixels and about no defective pixels will bring a considerable improvement on spatial resolution. (author)

  17. Open source deformable image registration system for treatment planning and recurrence CT scans. Validation in the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Brink, Carsten; Hansen, Christian Roenn; Bertelsen, Anders; Johansen, Joergen; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Grau, Cai

    2016-01-01

    Clinical application of deformable registration (DIR) of medical images remains limited due to sparse validation of DIR methods in specific situations, e. g. in case of cancer recurrences. In this study the accuracy of DIR for registration of planning CT (pCT) and recurrence CT (rCT) images of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients was evaluated. Twenty patients treated with definitive IMRT for HNSCC in 2010-2012 were included. For each patient, a pCT and an rCT scan were used. Median interval between the scans was 8.5 months. One observer manually contoured eight anatomical regions-of-interest (ROI) twice on pCT and once on rCT. pCT and rCT images were deformably registered using the open source software elastix. Mean surface distance (MSD) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between contours were used for validation of DIR. A measure for delineation uncertainty was estimated by assessing MSD from the re-delineations of the same ROI on pCT. DIR and manual contouring uncertainties were correlated with tissue volume and rigidity. MSD varied 1-3 mm for different ROIs for DIR and 1-1.5 mm for re-delineated ROIs performed on pCT. DSC for DIR varied between 0.58 and 0.79 for soft tissues and was 0.79 or higher for bony structures, and correlated with the volumes of ROIs (r = 0.5, p < 0.001) and tissue rigidity (r = 0.54, p < 0.001). DIR using elastix in HNSCC on planning and recurrence CT scans is feasible; an uncertainty of the method is close to the voxel size length of the planning CT images. (orig.) [de

  18. Open source deformable image registration system for treatment planning and recurrence CT scans : Validation in the head and neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Brink, Carsten; Hansen, Christian Rønn; Bertelsen, Anders; Johansen, Jørgen; Grau, Cai; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2016-08-01

    Clinical application of deformable registration (DIR) of medical images remains limited due to sparse validation of DIR methods in specific situations, e. g. in case of cancer recurrences. In this study the accuracy of DIR for registration of planning CT (pCT) and recurrence CT (rCT) images of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients was evaluated. Twenty patients treated with definitive IMRT for HNSCC in 2010-2012 were included. For each patient, a pCT and an rCT scan were used. Median interval between the scans was 8.5 months. One observer manually contoured eight anatomical regions-of-interest (ROI) twice on pCT and once on rCT. pCT and rCT images were deformably registered using the open source software elastix. Mean surface distance (MSD) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between contours were used for validation of DIR. A measure for delineation uncertainty was estimated by assessing MSD from the re-delineations of the same ROI on pCT. DIR and manual contouring uncertainties were correlated with tissue volume and rigidity. MSD varied 1-3 mm for different ROIs for DIR and 1-1.5 mm for re-delineated ROIs performed on pCT. DSC for DIR varied between 0.58 and 0.79 for soft tissues and was 0.79 or higher for bony structures, and correlated with the volumes of ROIs (r = 0.5, p elastix in HNSCC on planning and recurrence CT scans is feasible; an uncertainty of the method is close to the voxel size length of the planning CT images.

  19. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning is like other ... accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... outside of the CT scanner itself is very low. If you suspect you may be pregnant, however, ... cause cancer. However, CT scans result in a low-level exposure. Whether such levels cause cancer is ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the CT technologist or nurse at the time of the CT examination. If your child has ... detectors rotate around the patient. At the same time, the examination table is moving through the scanner, ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a very detailed multidimensional view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow new CT scanners ... to read. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? CT exams ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning is like other ... scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, ...

  4. Dual-energy CT characteristics of colon and rectal cancer allows differentiation from stool by dual-source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdeniz, İlknur; İdilman, İlkay S; Köklü, Seyfettin; Hamaloğlu, Erhan; Özmen, Mustafa; Akata, Deniz; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to determine dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) characteristics of colorectal cancer and investigate effectiveness of DECT method in differentiating tumor from stool in patients with colorectal cancer. Fifty consecutive patients with colorectal tumors were enrolled. Staging was performed by DECT (80-140 kV) using dual-source CT after rectal air insufflation and without bowel preparation. Both visual and quantitative analyses were performed at 80 kV and 140 kV, on iodine map and virtual noncontrast (VNC) images. All colorectal tumors had homogeneous pattern on iodine map. Stools demonstrated heterogeneous pattern in 86% (43/50) and homogeneous pattern in 14% (7/50) on iodine maps and were less visible on VNC images. Median density of tumors was 54 HU (18-100 HU) on iodine map and 28 HU (11-56 HU) on VNC images. Median density of stool was 36.5 HU (8-165 HU) on iodine map and -135.5 HU (-438 HU to -13 HU) on VNC images. The density of stools was significantly lower than tumors on both iodine map and VNC images (P VNC images was -1 HU with area under the curve of 1 and a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Density or visual analysis of iodine map and VNC DECT images allow accurate differentiation of tumor from stool.

  5. The completeness condition and source orbits for exact image reconstruction in 3D cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xiping; Kang Kejun

    1997-01-01

    The completeness condition for exact image reconstruction in 3D cone-beam CT are carefully analyzed in theory, and discussions about some source orbits which fulfill the completeness condition are followed

  6. Value of an early arteriographic acquisition for evaluating the splanchnic vessels as an adjunct to biphasic CT using a multislice scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zandrino, F.; Curone, P.; Benzi, L.; Musante, F. [Department of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliera ' ' SS Antonio e Biagio e C. Arrigo' ' , Via Venezia 16, 15100 Alessandria (Italy)

    2003-05-01

    Our objective was to assess the clinical value of an early arterial scan for assessing the hepatic and mesenteric vasculature in patients with suspected primary or metastatic hypervascular liver disease undergoing multislice computed tomography. In 42 patients a very early arteriographic scan was performed before standard arterial and portal venous scans. Technical parameters of the very early acquisition were: 2.5-mm image thickness; table speed 15 mm/s; pitch 6; 120 kVp; 300 mA; 8.9-s scan time; cranio-caudal acquisition direction; 1.25-mm image interval reconstruction;16-s delay after injection of 110 ml of iodinated contrast agent at 5 ml/s; scan volume focused to image hepatic, splenic, and superior mesenteric arteries (SMA). Standard arterial and portal venous phases were performed with 5-mm image thickness, 15-mm/s table speed, pitch 6, 8- to 10-s scan time, 30- and 70-s delay. The three phases were performed during three different breath-holds. Axial, multiplanar reformatted, maximum intensity projection, and volume-rendering images were evaluated. Image quality was scored, and vascular abnormalities were recorded. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed in 17 patients. In 36 of 42 patients good-quality CT angiograms were obtained. In 9 patients 12 vascular abnormalities were found, all confirmed at DSA: 3 right hepatic arteries originating from the SMA, 2 left hepatic arteries from the gastric artery, 2 stenoses of the SMA, 1 independent origin of the hepatic and splenic arteries, 2 arteriovenous fistulas, and 2 aneurysms of the common hepatic artery and the SMA. This technique could add important information about vascular splanchnic anatomy which would be particularly useful for surgeons and interventional radiologists. (orig.)

  7. Estimation and comparison of effective dose (E) in standard chest CT by organ dose measurements and dose-length-product methods and assessment of the influence of CT tube potential (energy dependency) on effective dose in a dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Krauss, Bernhard; Vogl, Thomas J.; Maentele, Werner; Bauer, Ralf W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The dual-energy protocol delivers the lowest effective dose of the investigated protocols for standard chest CT examinations, thus enabling functional imaging (like dual-energy perfusion) and can produce weighted images without dose penalty. ► The high-pitch protocol goes along with a 16% increase in dose compared to the standard 120 kV protocol and thus should preferably be used in pediatric, acute care settings (e.g. pulmonary embolism, aortic dissection and the like) or restless patients. ► The difference in effective dose estimates between ICRP 60 and 103 is minimal. ► Tube potential definitely has an effect on estimates of effective dose. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine effective dose (E) during standard chest CT using an organ dose-based and a dose-length-product-based (DLP) approach for four different scan protocols including high-pitch and dual-energy in a dual-source CT scanner of the second generation. Materials and methods: Organ doses were measured with thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD) in an anthropomorphic male adult phantom. Further, DLP-based dose estimates were performed by using the standard 0.014 mSv/mGycm conversion coefficient k. Examinations were performed on a dual-source CT system (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens). Four scan protocols were investigated: (1) single-source 120 kV, (2) single-source 100 kV, (3) high-pitch 120 kV, and (4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140 kV with equivalent CTDIvol and no automated tube current modulation. E was then determined following recommendations of ICRP publication 103 and 60 and specific k values were derived. Results: DLP-based estimates differed by 4.5–16.56% and 5.2–15.8% relatively to ICRP 60 and 103, respectively. The derived k factors calculated from TLD measurements were 0.0148, 0.015, 0.0166, and 0.0148 for protocol 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Effective dose estimations by ICRP 103 and 60 for single-energy and dual-energy protocols show a difference of less than 0.04 m

  8. Detecting Intracranial Hemorrhage Using Automatic Tube Current Modulation With Advanced Modeled Iterative Reconstruction in Unenhanced Head Single- and Dual-Energy Dual-Source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Wichmann, Julian L; Bennett, Dennis W; Leithner, Doris; Bauer, Ralf W; Vogl, Thomas J; Bodelle, Boris

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine diagnostic accuracy, image quality, and radiation dose of low-dose single- and dual-energy unenhanced third-generation dual-source head CT for detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). A total of 123 patients with suspected ICH were examined using a dual-source 192-MDCT scanner. Standard-dose 120-kVp single-energy CT (SECT; n = 36) and 80-kVp and 150-kVp dual-energy CT (DECT; n = 30) images were compared with low-dose SECT (n = 32) and DECT (n = 25) images obtained using automated tube current modulation (ATCM). Advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) was used for all protocols. Detection of ICH was performed by three readers who were blinded to the image acquisition parameters of each image series. Image quality was assessed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Interobserver agreement was calculated using the Fleiss kappa. Radiation dose was measured as dose-length product (DLP). Detection of ICH was excellent (sensitivity, 94.9-100%; specificity, 94.7-100%) in all protocols (p = 1.00) with perfect interobserver agreement (0.83-0.96). Qualitative ratings showed significantly better ratings for both standard-dose protocols regarding gray matter-to-white matter contrast (p ≤ 0.014), whereas highest gray matter-to-white matter contrast-to-noise ratio was observed with low-dose DECT images (p ≥ 0.057). The lowest posterior fossa artifact index was measured for standard-dose DECT, which showed significantly lower values compared with low-dose protocols (p ≤ 0.034). Delineation of ventricular margins and sharpness of subarachnoidal spaces were rated excellent in all protocols (p ≥ 0.096). Low-dose techniques lowered radiation dose by 26% for SECT images (DLP, 575.0 ± 72.3 mGy · cm vs 771.5 ± 146.8 mGy · cm; p dual-source CT while allowing significant radiation dose reduction.

  9. Multisource inverse-geometry CT. Part II. X-ray source design and prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neculaes, V. Bogdan, E-mail: neculaes@ge.com; Caiafa, Antonio; Cao, Yang; De Man, Bruno; Edic, Peter M.; Frutschy, Kristopher; Gunturi, Satish; Inzinna, Lou; Reynolds, Joseph; Vermilyea, Mark; Wagner, David; Zhang, Xi; Zou, Yun [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); Pelc, Norbert J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Lounsberry, Brian [Healthcare Science Technology, GE Healthcare, West Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53219 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This paper summarizes the development of a high-power distributed x-ray source, or “multisource,” designed for inverse-geometry computed tomography (CT) applications [see B. De Man et al., “Multisource inverse-geometry CT. Part I. System concept and development,” Med. Phys. 43, 4607–4616 (2016)]. The paper presents the evolution of the source architecture, component design (anode, emitter, beam optics, control electronics, high voltage insulator), and experimental validation. Methods: Dispenser cathode emitters were chosen as electron sources. A modular design was adopted, with eight electron emitters (two rows of four emitters) per module, wherein tungsten targets were brazed onto copper anode blocks—one anode block per module. A specialized ceramic connector provided high voltage standoff capability and cooling oil flow to the anode. A matrix topology and low-noise electronic controls provided switching of the emitters. Results: Four modules (32 x-ray sources in two rows of 16) have been successfully integrated into a single vacuum vessel and operated on an inverse-geometry computed tomography system. Dispenser cathodes provided high beam current (>1000 mA) in pulse mode, and the electrostatic lenses focused the current beam to a small optical focal spot size (0.5 × 1.4 mm). Controlled emitter grid voltage allowed the beam current to be varied for each source, providing the ability to modulate beam current across the fan of the x-ray beam, denoted as a virtual bowtie filter. The custom designed controls achieved x-ray source switching in <1 μs. The cathode-grounded source was operated successfully up to 120 kV. Conclusions: A high-power, distributed x-ray source for inverse-geometry CT applications was successfully designed, fabricated, and operated. Future embodiments may increase the number of spots and utilize fast read out detectors to increase the x-ray flux magnitude further, while still staying within the stationary target inherent

  10. Radiographic scanner apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wake, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The preferred embodiment of this invention includes a hardware system, or processing means, which operates faster than software. Moreover the computer needed is less expensive and smaller. Radiographic scanner apparatus is described for measuring the intensity of radiation after passage through a planar region and for reconstructing a representation of the attenuation of radiation by the medium. There is a source which can be rotated, and detectors, the output from which forms a data line. The detectors are disposed opposite the planar region from the source to produce a succession of data lines corresponding to the succession of angular orientations of the source. There is a convolver means for convolving each of these data lines, with a filter function, and a means of processing the convolved data lines to create the representation of the radiation attenuation in the planar region. There is also apparatus to generate a succession of data lines indicating radiation attenuation along a determinable path with convolver means. (U.K.)

  11. Dual energy CTA of the supraaortic arteries: Technical improvements with a novel dual source CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, Michael M.; Hinkmann, Fabian; Nkenke, Emeka; Schmidt, Bernhard; Seidensticker, Peter; Kalender, Willi A.; Uder, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a well-accepted imaging modality to evaluate the supraaortic vessels. Initial reports have suggested that dual energy CTA (DE-CTA) can enhance diagnosis by creating bone-free data sets, which can be visualized in 3D, but a number of limitations of this technique have also been addressed. We sought to describe the performance of DE-CTA of the supraaortic vessels with a novel dual source CT system with special emphasis on image quality and post-processing related artifacts. Materials and methods: Thirty-three patients underwent carotid CT angiography on a second generation dual source CT system. Simultaneous acquisitions of 100 and 140 kV data sets in arterial phase were performed. Two examiners evaluated overall bone suppression with a 3-point scale (1 = poor; 3 = excellent) and image quality regarding integrity of the vessel lumen of different vessel segments (n = 26) with a 5-point scale (1 = poor; 5 = excellent), CTA source data served as the reference. Results: Excellent bone suppression could be achieved in the head and neck. Only minor bone remnants occurred, mean score for bone removal was 2.9. Mean score for vessel integrity was 4.3. Eight hundred fifty-seven vessel segments could be evaluated. Six hundred thirty-five segments (74%) showed no lumen alteration, 65 segments (7.6%) lumen alterations 10% resulting in a total luminal reduction 50%, and 113 segments (13.2%) showed a gap in the vessel course (100% total lumen reduction). Artificial gaps of the vessel lumen occurred in 28 vessel segments due to artifacts caused by dental hardware and in all but one (65) ophthalmic arteries. Conclusions: Excellent bone suppression could be achieved, DE imaging with 100 and 140 kV lead to improved image quality and vessel integrity in the shoulder region than previously reported. The ophthalmic artery still cannot be adequately visualized.

  12. X-ray-based attenuation correction for positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, Paul E; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Beyer, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    A synergy of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners is the use of the CT data for x-ray-based attenuation correction of the PET emission data. Current methods of measuring transmission use positron sources, gamma-ray sources, or x-ray sources. Each of the types of transmission scans involves different trade-offs of noise versus bias, with positron transmission scans having the highest noise but lowest bias, whereas x-ray scans have negligible noise but the potential for increased quantitative errors. The use of x-ray-based attenuation correction, however, has other advantages, including a lack of bias introduced from post-injection transmission scanning, which is an important practical consideration for clinical scanners, as well as reduced scan times. The sensitivity of x-ray-based attenuation correction to artifacts and quantitative errors depends on the method of translating the CT image from the effective x-ray energy of approximately 70 keV to attenuation coefficients at the PET energy of 511 keV. These translation methods are usually based on segmentation and/or scaling techniques. Errors in the PET emission image arise from positional mismatches caused by patient motion or respiration differences between the PET and CT scans; incorrect calculation of attenuation coefficients for CT contrast agents or metallic implants; or keeping the patient's arms in the field of view, which leads to truncation and/or beam-hardening (or x-ray scatter) artifacts. Proper interpretation of PET emission images corrected for attenuation by using the CT image relies on an understanding of the potential artifacts. In cases where an artifact or bias is suspected, careful inspection of all three available images (CT and PET emission with and without attenuation correction) is recommended. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Volumetric evaluation of dual-energy perfusion CT by the presence of intrapulmonary clots using a 64-slice dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Munemasa; Nakashima, Yoshiteru; Kunihiro, Yoshie; Nakao, Sei; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Morikage, Noriyasu; Sano, Yuichi; Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dual-energy perfusion CT (DE p CT) directly represents the iodine distribution in lung parenchyma and low perfusion areas caused by intrapulmonary clots (IPCs) are visualized as low attenuation areas. Purpose: To evaluate if volumetric evaluation of DE p CT can be used as a predictor of right heart strain by the presence of IPCs. Material and Methods: One hundred and ninety-six patients suspected of having acute pulmonary embolism (PE) underwent DE p CT using a 64-slice dual-source CT. DE p CT images were three-dimensionally reconstructed with four threshold ranges: 1-120 HU (V 120 ), 1-15 HU (V 15 ), 1-10 HU (V 10 ), and 1-5 HU (V 5 ). Each relative ratio per V 120 was expressed as the %V 15 , %V 10 , and %V 5 . Volumetric data-sets were compared with D-dimer, pulmonary arterial (PA) pressure, right ventricular (RV) diameter, RV/left ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratio, PA diameter, and PA/aorta (PA/Ao) diameter ratio. The areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) were examined for their relationship to the presence of IPCs. This study was approved by the local ethics committee. Results: PA pressure and D-dimer were significantly higher in the patients who had IPCs. In the patients with IPCs, V 15 , V 10 , V 5 , %V 15 , %V 10 , and %V 5 were also significantly higher than those without IPC (P = 0.001). %V 5 had a better correlation with D-dimer (r = 0.30, P p CT had a correlation with D-dimer and RV/LV diameter ratio, and the relative ratio of volumetric CT measurements with a lower attenuation threshold might be recommended for the analysis of acute PE

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the examination table will move during the scan, so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral ... and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the examination table will move during the scan, so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral ... and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the examination table will move during the scan, so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral ... and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... should always inform their physician and the CT technologist if there is any possibility that they may ... located in a separate control room, where the technologist operates the scanner and monitors your examination in ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... membranes covering the brain. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... for the moving table. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner or may be over the weight limit—usually 450 pounds—for the moving table. Compared ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... to you, revolve around you during the imaging process. You will be alone in the exam room ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... takes less than a minute and the entire process is usually completed within 10 minutes. top of ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... to you, revolve around you during the imaging process. You will be alone in the exam room ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ...

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... a few seconds, and even faster in small children. Such speed is beneficial for all patients but ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... a few seconds, and even faster in small children. Such speed is beneficial for all patients but ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... a few seconds, and even faster in small children. Such speed is beneficial for all patients but ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... entire body will be "inside" the scanner at one time such as with MRI. If an intravenous ... CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... quickly. When you enter the CT scanner, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ... its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. Unlike conventional ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... quickly. When you enter the CT scanner, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ... its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. Unlike conventional ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... intravenously (injected into a vein) to help evaluate blood vessels and organs such as the liver, kidneys and pancreas. When you enter the CT scanner, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. A diagnosis ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... have a known allergy to contrast material, or "dye," your doctor may prescribe medications (usually a steroid) ... like? The CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... have a known allergy to contrast material, or "dye," your doctor may prescribe medications (usually a steroid) ... like? The CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have a known allergy to contrast material, or "dye," your doctor may prescribe medications (usually a steroid) ... like? The CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the European Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the European Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data ...

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the European Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. kidney ... and organs such as the liver, kidneys and pancreas. When you enter the CT scanner, special light ...

  5. Radiation safety concerns and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography scanners in Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S.; Dinakaran, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation safety in computed tomography (CT) scanners is of concern due its widespread use in the field of radiological imaging. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses imparted to patients undergoing thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations and formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRL) in Tamil Nadu, South India. In-site CT dose measurement was performed in 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu for a period of 2 years as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB)-funded project. Out of the 127 CT scanners,13 were conventional; 53 single-slice helical scanners (SSHS); 44 multislice CT (MSCT) scanners; and 17 refurbished scanners. CT dose index (CTDI) was measured using a 32-cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-body phantom in each CT scanner. Dose length product (DLP) for different anatomical regions was generated using CTDI values. The regional DRLs for thorax, abdomen and pelvis examinations were 557, 521 and 294 mGy cm, respectively. The mean effective dose was estimated using the DLP values and was found to be 8.04, 6.69 and 4.79 mSv for thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations, respectively. The establishment of DRLs in this study is the first step towards optimization of CT doses in the Indian context. (author)

  6. [Clinical application of high-pitch excretory phase images during dual-source CT urography with stellar photon detector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Xue, Hua-dan; Jin, Zheng-yu; Wang, Xuan; Chen, Yu; He, Yong-lan; Zhang, Da-ming; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Yun; Qi, Bing; Xu, Kai; Wang, Ming

    2014-10-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the clinical feasibility of high-pitch excretory phase images during dual-source CT urography with Stellar photon detector. Totally 100 patients received dual-source CT high-pitch urinary excretory phase scanning with Stellar photon detector [80 kV, ref.92 mAs, CARE Dose 4D and CARE kV, pitch of 3.0, filter back projection reconstruction algorithm (FBP)] (group A). Another 100 patients received dual-source CT high-pitch urinary excretory phase scanning with common detector(100 kV, ref.140 mAs, CARE Dose 4D, pitch of 3.0, FBP) (group B). Quantitative measurement of CT value of urinary segments (Hounsfield units), image noise (Hounsfield units), and effective radiation dose (millisievert) were compared using independent-samples t test between two groups. Urinary system subjective opacification scores were compared using Mann-Whitney U test between two groups. There was no significant difference in subjective opacification score of intrarenal collecting system and ureters between two groups (all P>0.05). The group A images yielded significantly higher CT values of all urinary segments (all P0.05). The effective radiation dose of group A (1.1 mSv) was significantly lower than that of group B (3.79 mSv) (Ppitch low-tube-voltage during excretory phase dual-source CT urography with Stellar photon detector is feasible, with acceptable image noise and lower radiation dose.

  7. 3D Printing of CT Dataset: Validation of an Open Source and Consumer-Available Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Chandra; Eshja, Esmeralda; Peroni, Caterina; Orlandi, Matteo A; Bizzotto, Nicola; Poggi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The broad availability of cheap three-dimensional (3D) printing equipment has raised the need for a thorough analysis on its effects on clinical accuracy. Our aim is to determine whether the accuracy of 3D printing process is affected by the use of a low-budget workflow based on open source software and consumer's commercially available 3D printers. A group of test objects was scanned with a 64-slice computed tomography (CT) in order to build their 3D copies. CT datasets were elaborated using a software chain based on three free and open source software. Objects were printed out with a commercially available 3D printer. Both the 3D copies and the test objects were measured using a digital professional caliper. Overall, the objects' mean absolute difference between test objects and 3D copies is 0.23 mm and the mean relative difference amounts to 0.55 %. Our results demonstrate that the accuracy of 3D printing process remains high despite the use of a low-budget workflow.

  8. Polyquant CT: direct electron and mass density reconstruction from a single polyenergetic source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jonathan H.; Perelli, Alessandro; Nailon, William H.; Davies, Mike E.

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying material mass and electron density from computed tomography (CT) reconstructions can be highly valuable in certain medical practices, such as radiation therapy planning. However, uniquely parameterising the x-ray attenuation in terms of mass or electron density is an ill-posed problem when a single polyenergetic source is used with a spectrally indiscriminate detector. Existing approaches to single source polyenergetic modelling often impose consistency with a physical model, such as water-bone or photoelectric-Compton decompositions, which will either require detailed prior segmentation or restrictive energy dependencies, and may require further calibration to the quantity of interest. In this work, we introduce a data centric approach to fitting the attenuation with piecewise-linear functions directly to mass or electron density, and present a segmentation-free statistical reconstruction algorithm for exploiting it, with the same order of complexity as other iterative methods. We show how this allows both higher accuracy in attenuation modelling, and demonstrate its superior quantitative imaging, with numerical chest and metal implant data, and validate it with real cone-beam CT measurements.

  9. Multimodality Registration without a Dedicated Multimodality Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Beattie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality scanners that allow the acquisition of both functional and structural image sets on a single system have recently become available for animal research use. Although the resultant registered functional/structural image sets can greatly enhance the interpretability of the functional data, the cost of multimodality systems can be prohibitive, and they are often limited to two modalities, which generally do not include magnetic resonance imaging. Using a thin plastic wrap to immobilize and fix a mouse or other small animal atop a removable bed, we are able to calculate registrations between all combinations of four different small animal imaging scanners (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and computed tomography [CT] at our disposal, effectively equivalent to a quadruple-modality scanner. A comparison of serially acquired CT images, with intervening acquisitions on other scanners, demonstrates the ability of the proposed procedures to maintain the rigidity of an anesthetized mouse during transport between scanners. Movement of the bony structures of the mouse was estimated to be 0.62 mm. Soft tissue movement was predominantly the result of the filling (or emptying of the urinary bladder and thus largely constrained to this region. Phantom studies estimate the registration errors for all registration types to be less than 0.5 mm. Functional images using tracers targeted to known structures verify the accuracy of the functional to structural registrations. The procedures are easy to perform and produce robust and accurate results that rival those of dedicated multimodality scanners, but with more flexible registration combinations and while avoiding the expense and redundancy of multimodality systems.

  10. New prospective 4D-CT for mitigating the effects of irregular respiratory motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tinsu; Martin, Rachael M.; Luo, Dershan

    2017-08-01

    Artifact caused by irregular respiration is a major source of error in 4D-CT imaging. We propose a new prospective 4D-CT to mitigate this source of error without new hardware, software or off-line data-processing on the GE CT scanner. We utilize the cine CT scan in the design of the new prospective 4D-CT. The cine CT scan at each position can be stopped by the operator when an irregular respiration occurs, and resumed when the respiration becomes regular. This process can be repeated at one or multiple scan positions. After the scan, a retrospective reconstruction is initiated on the CT console to reconstruct only the images corresponding to the regular respiratory cycles. The end result is a 4D-CT free of irregular respiration. To prove feasibility, we conducted a phantom and six patient studies. The artifacts associated with the irregular respiratory cycles could be removed from both the phantom and patient studies. A new prospective 4D-CT scanning and processing technique to mitigate the impact of irregular respiration in 4D-CT has been demonstrated. This technique can save radiation dose because the repeat scans are only at the scan positions where an irregular respiration occurs. Current practice is to repeat the scans at all positions. There is no cost to apply this technique because it is applicable on the GE CT scanner without new hardware, software or off-line data-processing.

  11. Accuracy of iodine quantification using dual energy CT in latest generation dual source and dual layer CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; van Hamersvelt, Robbert W; Willemink, Martin J; Schmidt, Bernhard T; Flohr, Thomas; Schilham, Arnold; Milles, Julien; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Leiner, Tim; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of iodine quantification with dual energy computed tomography (DECT) in two high-end CT systems with different spectral imaging techniques. METHODS: Five tubes with different iodine concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/ml) were analysed in an anthropomorphic

  12. Dual energy CTA of the supraaortic arteries: Technical improvements with a novel dual source CT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, Michael M., E-mail: Michael.lell@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Radiology, University Erlangen, Maximiliansplatz 1, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Hinkmann, Fabian [Department of Radiology, University Erlangen, Maximiliansplatz 1, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Nkenke, Emeka [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, Bernhard [Bayer-Schering Healthcare, Berlin (Germany); Seidensticker, Peter [Siemens Healthcare, CT-Division, Forchheim (Germany); Kalender, Willi A. [Institute of Medical Physics, University Erlangen (Germany); Uder, Michael [Department of Radiology, University Erlangen, Maximiliansplatz 1, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan [Department of Cardiology, University Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Objectives: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a well-accepted imaging modality to evaluate the supraaortic vessels. Initial reports have suggested that dual energy CTA (DE-CTA) can enhance diagnosis by creating bone-free data sets, which can be visualized in 3D, but a number of limitations of this technique have also been addressed. We sought to describe the performance of DE-CTA of the supraaortic vessels with a novel dual source CT system with special emphasis on image quality and post-processing related artifacts. Materials and methods: Thirty-three patients underwent carotid CT angiography on a second generation dual source CT system. Simultaneous acquisitions of 100 and 140 kV data sets in arterial phase were performed. Two examiners evaluated overall bone suppression with a 3-point scale (1 = poor; 3 = excellent) and image quality regarding integrity of the vessel lumen of different vessel segments (n = 26) with a 5-point scale (1 = poor; 5 = excellent), CTA source data served as the reference. Results: Excellent bone suppression could be achieved in the head and neck. Only minor bone remnants occurred, mean score for bone removal was 2.9. Mean score for vessel integrity was 4.3. Eight hundred fifty-seven vessel segments could be evaluated. Six hundred thirty-five segments (74%) showed no lumen alteration, 65 segments (7.6%) lumen alterations <10%, 27 segments (3.1%) lumen alterations >10% resulting in a total luminal reduction <50%, 17 segments (2%) lumen alterations of more than 10% resulting in a total luminal reduction >50%, and 113 segments (13.2%) showed a gap in the vessel course (100% total lumen reduction). Artificial gaps of the vessel lumen occurred in 28 vessel segments due to artifacts caused by dental hardware and in all but one (65) ophthalmic arteries. Conclusions: Excellent bone suppression could be achieved, DE imaging with 100 and 140 kV lead to improved image quality and vessel integrity in the shoulder region than previously

  13. Volumetric evaluation of dual-energy perfusion CT by the presence of intrapulmonary clots using a 64-slice dual-source CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Munemasa; Nakashima, Yoshiteru; Kunihiro, Yoshie; Nakao, Sei; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Dept. of Radiology, Yamaguchi Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi (Japan)], e-mail: radokada@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Morikage, Noriyasu [Medical Bioregulation Dept. of Organ Regulatory Surgery, Yamaguchi Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi (Japan); Sano, Yuichi [Dept. of Radiology, Yamaguchi Univ. Hospital, Yamaguchi (Japan); Suga, Kazuyoshi [Dept. of Radiology, St Hills Hospital, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Dual-energy perfusion CT (DE{sub p}CT) directly represents the iodine distribution in lung parenchyma and low perfusion areas caused by intrapulmonary clots (IPCs) are visualized as low attenuation areas. Purpose: To evaluate if volumetric evaluation of DE{sub p}CT can be used as a predictor of right heart strain by the presence of IPCs. Material and Methods: One hundred and ninety-six patients suspected of having acute pulmonary embolism (PE) underwent DE{sub p}CT using a 64-slice dual-source CT. DE{sub p}CT images were three-dimensionally reconstructed with four threshold ranges: 1-120 HU (V{sub 120}), 1-15 HU (V{sub 15}), 1-10 HU (V{sub 10}), and 1-5 HU (V{sub 5}). Each relative ratio per V{sub 120} was expressed as the %V{sub 15}, %V{sub 10}, and %V{sub 5}. Volumetric data-sets were compared with D-dimer, pulmonary arterial (PA) pressure, right ventricular (RV) diameter, RV/left ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratio, PA diameter, and PA/aorta (PA/Ao) diameter ratio. The areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) were examined for their relationship to the presence of IPCs. This study was approved by the local ethics committee. Results: PA pressure and D-dimer were significantly higher in the patients who had IPCs. In the patients with IPCs, V{sub 15}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 5}, %V{sub 15}, %V{sub 10}, and %V{sub 5} were also significantly higher than those without IPC (P = 0.001). %V{sub 5} had a better correlation with D-dimer (r = 0.30, P < 0.001) and RV/LV diameter ratio (r = 0.27, P < 0.001), and showed a higher AUC (0.73) than the other CT measurements. Conclusion: The volumetric evaluation by DE{sub p}CT had a correlation with D-dimer and RV/LV diameter ratio, and the relative ratio of volumetric CT measurements with a lower attenuation threshold might be recommended for the analysis of acute PE.

  14. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashouf, S.; Lechtman, E.; Lai, P.; Keller, B. M.; Karotki, A.; Beachey, D. J.; Pignol, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 × \\text{ICF} formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  15. Cerebral angiography with prospective ECG triggering preliminary study of dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yuejun; Qian Nong; Shao Yanhui; Pan Changjie; Rong Weiliang; Xu Yiqun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the image quality and radiation dose in dual-source CT cerebral angiography with prospective ECG-triggered sequence mode (step-and-shoot, SAS). Methods: A total of forty-three patients with clinically suspected cerebral vascular disease underwent cerebral CT angiography with prospective ECG-triggering (step-and-shoot, SAS). Data acquisition was at 60% R-R interval of the ECG presentation mode. The post-processing included maximum intensity projection (MIP), multiplanar reformation (MPR) and volume rendering (VR). The CTA image quality, radiation dose and rates of excellent images were evaluated. Results: The CTA image quality score was 4.72 ± 0.50 and 97.7% (42/43) patients had excellent CTA images. The average effective dose of SAS-CTA was (0.22 ± 0.01)mSv, which was lower by 76.31% than that of DE-CTA. Conclusions: Prospective ECG-triggering sequence could be used in cerebral angiography with a significant reduction in radiation dose and diagnostic image quality. (authors)

  16. Adrenal incidentaloma triage with single source (fast kVp switch) dual energy CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Daniel I; Keshavarzi, Nahid R; Parker, Robert A; Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F; Francis, Isaac R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate single source dual energy CT (DECT) for distinguishing benign and indeterminate adrenal nodules, with attention to effects of phase of intravenous contrast enhancement. Materials and methods An IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective review revealed 273 contrast-enhanced abdominal DECTs from November 2009–March 2012. 50 adrenal nodules ≥ 0.8 cm were identified in 41 patients: 22 female, 19 male, average age 66 (range 36–88 years). CT post-processing and measurements were independently performed by two radiologists (R1 and R2) for each nodule: (1) HU on true non-contrast images; (2) post-contrast HU on monochromatic spectral images at 40, 75, and 140 keV; (3) post-contrast material density (mg/cc) on virtual non-contrast (VNC) images. Nodules were separated into benign (VNC images, benign nodules had significantly lower material density (R1: 992.4 mg/cc ± 9.9; R2: 992.7 mg/cc ±9.6) than indeterminate nodules (R1: 1001.1mg/cc ±20.5 (p .038); R2: 1007.6 HU ±13.4 (p <.0001). Conclusion DECT tools can mathematically subtract iodine or minimize its effects in high energy reconstructions, approximating non-contrast imaging and potentially reducing the need for additional studies to triage adrenal nodules detected on post-contrast DECT exams. PMID:25055267

  17. Preliminary study of single contrast enhanced dual energy heart imaging using dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jin; Zhang Longjiang; Zhou Changsheng; Lu Guangming; Ma Yan; Gu Haifeng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and preliminary applications of single contrast enhanced dual energy heart imaging using dual-source CT (DSCT). Methods: Thirty patients underwent dual energy heart imaging with DSCT, of which 6 cases underwent SPECT or DSA within one week. Two experienced radiologists assessed image quality of coronary arteries and iodine map of myocardium. and correlated the coronary artery stenosis with the perfusion distribution of iodine map. Results: l00% (300/300) segments reached diagnostic standards. The mean score of image for all patients was 4.68±0.57. Mural coronary artery was present in 10 segments in S cases, atherosclerotic plaques in 32 segments in 12 cases, of which 20 segments having ≥50% stenosis, 12 segments ≤50% stenosis; dual energy CT coronary angiography was consistent with the DSA in 3 patients. 37 segmental perfusion abnormalities on iodine map were found in 15 cases, including 28 coronary blood supply segment narrow segment and 9 no coronary stenosis (including three negative segments in SPECD. Conclusion: Single contrast enhanced dual energy heart imaging can provide good coronary artery and myocardium perfusion images in the patients with appropriate heart rate, which has a potential to be used in the clinic and further studies are needed. (authors)

  18. Assessment of thoracic aortic elasticity: a preliminary study using electrocardiographically gated dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ning; Guo, Lijun; Sun, Haitao; Gao, Fei; Liu, Cheng; Beck, Thomas; Chen, Jiuhong; Biermann, Christina

    2011-01-01

    To gain a new insight into the elastic properties of the thoracic aorta in patients without aortic diseases using electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated dual-source (DS) CT. 56 subjects with no cardiovascular disease, selected from 2,700 people undergoing ECG-gated DSCT examination, were divided into three groups according to their age. CT data were reconstructed in 5% step throughout the RR interval. Diameter and area were measured at the curve of the ascending aorta (AA) and at the same level of the descending aorta (DA). The pulsation and elasticity of the aorta were evaluated. Aortic diameter changes were noted throughout the cardiac cycle. The maximum average diameter was seen at an RR interval of 24.02 ± 4.99% for the AA and 25.63 ± 4.77% for the DA. The minimum was at 93.5 ± 4.04% for the AA and 96.6 ± 4.58% for the DA. There was an age-dependent decrease in elasticity, while different correlation coefficients were found between various age groups and different elastic parameters. The properties of aortic pulsation and wall elasticity could be well shown by ECG-gated DSCT. The new findings regarding segment difference and age relevance were significant and should be taken into account in clinical trials and treatments for the elasticity related cardiovascular diseases. (orig.)

  19. High-pitch dual-source CT angiography of the whole aorta without ECG synchronisation: Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeres, Martin; Schell, Boris; Mastragelopoulos, Aristidis; Kerl, Josef Matthias; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Lee, Clara; Siebenhandl, Petra; Bodelle, Boris; Zangos, Stephan; Vogl, Thomas J.; Jacobi, Volkmar; Bauer, Ralf W.; Herrmann, Eva

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility, image quality and radiation dose for high-pitch dual-source CT angiography (CTA) of the whole aorta without ECG synchronisation. Each group of 40 patients underwent CTA either on a 16-slice (group 1) or dual-source CT device with conventional single-source (group 2) or high-pitch mode with a pitch of 3.0 (group 3). The presence of motion or stair-step artefacts of the thoracic aorta was independently assessed by two readers. Subjective and objective scoring of motion and artefacts were significantly reduced in the high-pitch examination protocol (p < 0.05). The imaging length was not significantly different, but the imaging time was significantly (p < 0.001) shorter in the high-pitch group (12.2 vs. 7.4 vs. 1.7 s for groups 1, 2 and 3). The ascending aorta and the coronary ostia were reliably evaluable in all patients of group 3 without motion artefacts as well. High-pitch dual-source CT angiography of the whole aorta is feasible in unselected patients. As a significant advantage over regular pitch protocols, motion-free imaging of the aorta is possible without ECG synchronisation. Thus, this CT mode bears potential to become a standard CT protocol before trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). (orig.)

  20. Twisting wire scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharibyan, V.; Delfs, A.; Koruptchenkov, I.; Noelle, D.; Tiessen, H.; Werner, M.; Wittenburg, K.

    2012-11-15

    A new type of 'two-in-one' wire scanner is proposed. Recent advances in linear motors' technology make it possible to combine translational and rotational movements. This will allow to scan the beam in two perpendicular directions using a single driving motor and a special fork attached to it. Vertical or horizontal mounting will help to escape problems associated with the 45 deg scanners. Test results of the translational part with linear motors is presented.

  1. Twisting wire scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharibyan, V.; Delfs, A.; Koruptchenkov, I.; Noelle, D.; Tiessen, H.; Werner, M.; Wittenburg, K.

    2012-11-01

    A new type of 'two-in-one' wire scanner is proposed. Recent advances in linear motors' technology make it possible to combine translational and rotational movements. This will allow to scan the beam in two perpendicular directions using a single driving motor and a special fork attached to it. Vertical or horizontal mounting will help to escape problems associated with the 45 deg scanners. Test results of the translational part with linear motors is presented.

  2. Construction and Test of Low Cost X-Ray Tomography Scanner for Physical-Chemical Analysis and Nondestructive Inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jose Martins Jr. de; Martins, Antonio Cesar Germano

    2009-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object measuring the transmitted radiation at different directions. In this work, we describe the development of a low cost micro-CT X-ray scanner that is being developed for nondestructive testing. This tomograph operates using a microfocus X-ray source and contains a silicon photodiode as detectors. The performance of the system, by its spatial resolution, has been estimated through its Modulation Transfer Function-MTF and the obtained value at 10% of MTF is 661 μm. It was built as a general purpose nondestructive testing device.

  3. Radiation Dose Reduction of Chest CT with Iterative Reconstruction in Image Space - Part I: Studies on Image Quality Using Dual Source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Hye Jeon; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Jin Seong; Song, Jae Woo; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lim, Chae Hun; Kim, Song Soo

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the image quality (IQ) is improved with iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS), and whether IRIS can be used for radiation reduction in chest CT. Standard dose chest CT (SDCT) in 50 patients and low dose chest CT (LDCT) in another 50 patients were performed, using a dual-source CT, with 120 kVp and same reference mAs (50 mAs for SDCT and 25 mAs for LDCT) employed to both tubes by modifying a dual-energy scan mode. Full-dose data were obtained by combining the data from both tubes and half-dose data were separated from a single tube. These were reconstructed by using a filtered back projection (FBP) and IRIS: full-dose FBP (F-FBP); full-dose IRIS (F-IRIS); half-dose FBP (H-FBP) and half-dose IRIS (H-IRIS). Objective noise was measured. The subjective IQ was evaluated by radiologists for the followings: noise, contrast and sharpness of mediastinum and lung. Objective noise was significantly lower in H-IRIS than in F-FBP (p < 0.01). In both SDCT and LDCT, the IQ scores were highest in F-IRIS, followed by F-FBP, H-IRIS and H-FBP, except those for sharpness of mediastinum, which tended to be higher in FBP. When comparing CT images between the same dose and different reconstruction (F-IRIS/F-FBP and H-IRIS/H-FBP) algorithms, scores tended to be higher in IRIS than in FBP, being more distinct in half-dose images. However, despite the use of IRIS, the scores were lower in H-IRIS than in F-FBP. IRIS generally helps improve the IQ, being more distinct at the reduced radiation. However, reduced radiation by half results in IQ decrease even when using IRIS in chest CT.

  4. Product development of Indian cargo scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    A cargo scanner is required for nonintrusive screening of suspected cargo containers in trade, using high energy X-ray, to detect any mis-declarations, contraband goods concealment or hidden ammunition or explosives. The cargo scanners help authorities to process large number of suspected cargo with a high level of confidence with other additional benefit of faster clearance, minimised intrusive inspection and generating secured digital record of the process. BARC is in process of developing Indian Cargo Scanner with indigenous X-ray source. Proof of concept and conformance of the results to the international standards has been demonstrated in laboratory. Full scale equipment named as Portal scanner shall be demonstrated at Gamma field Trombay in year 2017. Subsequently the technology transfer may be done to a suitable Indian vendor

  5. Dual-source virtual non-contrast CT of the head: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wei; Xu Yiming; Shao Jin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate image quality and clinical value of dual-source dual energy virtual non-contrast (VNC) CT of the head. Methods: Sixty-two patients suspected of cerebrovascular diseases underwent conventional non-contrast (CNC) CT and dual energy CTA examination of the head with dual-source CT. Virtual non-contrast images were reconstructed using dual energy software. The CT values of gray matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, hyperdense hemorrhagic lesion and hypodense ischemic lesion were compared between CNC and VNC images. A four-score scale was used to assess image quality subjectively. Image noise, radiation dosage and detection rate were compared between CNC and VNC images. Paired t test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Chi-square test (McNemar test and Kappa test) were used. Results: The CT value on CNC and VNC images, were (43.3±1.5) and (33.2±1.3) HU for gray matter (t=46.98, P 0.05, Kappa = 1.000) at per-patient level. Twenty-two patients with hypodense ischemic lesions were found on VNC images with one false positive case and two false negative cases. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 91.3% (21/23), 97.4% (38/39), 95.5% (21/22) and 95.0% (38/40) respectively. No statistical difference was found in detecting hypodense lesions between VNC and CNC images (χ 2 = 0.00, P>0.05, Kappa = 0.895). In per-lesion analysis, 53 hemorrhage lesions were found on VNC images with false negative results of four lesions and no false positive result. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 93.0% (53/57). 100.0% (38/38), 100.0% (53/.53) and 90.5% (38/42) respectively. There was no significant difference in detection rate of hyperdense lesion between VNC and CNC images (χ 2 = 2.25, P>0.05, Kappa = 0.914). Thirty-eight hypodense lesions were found on VNC images with 2 false positive lesions and 13 false negative lesions. The sensitivity, specificity

  6. Dual-source CT coronary angiography in patients with premature heart-beats: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yining; Zhang Zhuhua; Kong Lingyan; Song Lan; Mu Wenbin; Wang Yun; Jin Zhengyu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography in a population with premature heart-beats. Methods: Seventy patients with suspected coronary artery disease and premature heart-beats were routinely imaged on a DSCT scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens AG, Germany). The images were reconstmcted before and after ECG editing. Two readers independently assessed image quality of all coronary segments using a four-point grading scale from excellent (1) to non-assessable (4). The results of the two groups were compared with a paired t-test, and a P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The mean heart rate during examination ranged from 49 to 111 bpm[ mean(70.7±12.4) bpm]. Twenty-eight of 70 patients with relatively small variability of the heart rate [(41.0±18.4) bpm] got diagnostic image quality without ECG editing. In other 42 patients with larger variability of the heart rate [(71.4±28.7) bpm], the mean image quality scores were 2.09±1.27 and 1.50±0.79 before and after ECG editing, there was a significant difference (t= 13.764, P 2 =121.846, P<0.01). Finally, the diagnostic image accounted 98.0% (1014/1035) in all segments of 70 patients. Conclusion: DSCT can provide diagnostic images for patients with premature heart-beats. The image quality in patients with larger variability of the heart rate can be significantly improved through ECG editing. (authors)

  7. Prospectively ECG-triggered sequential dual-source coronary CT angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: comparison with retrospectively ECG-gated helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lei; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Zhaoqi [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Yining; Jin, Zhengyu [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhang, Longjiang; Lu, Guangming [Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-07-15

    To investigate the feasibility of applying prospectively ECG-triggered sequential coronary CT angiography (CCTA) to patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and evaluate the image quality and radiation dose compared with a retrospectively ECG-gated helical protocol. 100 patients with persistent AF were enrolled. Fifty patients were randomly assigned to a prospective protocol and the other patients to a retrospective protocol using a second-generation dual-source CT (DS-CT). Image quality was evaluated using a four-point grading scale (1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = moderate, 4 = poor) by two reviewers on a per-segment basis. The coronary artery segments were considered non-diagnostic with a quality score of 4. The radiation dose was evaluated. Diagnostic segment rate in the prospective group was 99.4 % (642/646 segments), while that in the retrospective group was 96.5 % (604/626 segments) (P < 0.001). Effective dose was 4.29 {+-} 1.86 and 11.95 {+-} 5.34 mSv for each of the two protocols (P < 0.001), which was a 64 % reduction in the radiation dose for prospective sequential imaging compared with retrospective helical imaging. In AF patients, prospectively ECG-triggered sequential CCTA is feasible using second-generation DS-CT and can decrease >60 % radiation exposure compared with retrospectively ECG-gated helical imaging while improving diagnostic image quality. (orig.)

  8. CT-angiography source images indicate less fatal outcome despite coma of patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallesen, Lars P; Khomenko, Andrei; Dzialowski, Imanuel; Barlinn, Jessica; Barlinn, Kristian; Zerna, Charlotte; van der Hoeven, Erik Jrj; Algra, Ale; Kapelle, L Jaap; Michel, Patrik; Bodechtel, Ulf; Demchuk, Andrew M; Schonewille, Wouter; Puetz, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Background Coma is associated with poor outcome in patients with basilar artery occlusion. Aims We sought to assess whether the posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score and the Pons-Midbrain Index applied to CT angiography source images predict the outcome of comatose patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study. Methods Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study was a prospective, observational registry of patients with acute basilar artery occlusion with 48 recruiting centers worldwide. We applied posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score and Pons-Midbrain Index to CT angiography source images of Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study patients who presented with coma. We calculated adjusted risk ratios to assess the association of dichotomized posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score (≥8 vs. International Cooperation Study registry, CT angiography source images were available for review in 158 patients. Among these, 78 patients (49%) presented with coma. Compared to non-comatose patients, comatose patients were more likely to die (risk ratios 2.34; CI 95% 1.56-3.52) and less likely to have a favourable outcome (risk ratios 0.44; CI 95% 0.24-0.80). Among comatose patients, a Pons-Midbrain Index < 3 was related to reduced mortality (adjusted RR 0.66; 95% CI 0.46-0.96), but not to favourable outcome (adjusted RR 1.19; 95% CI 0.39-3.62). Posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score dichotomized at ≥ 8 vs. <8 was not significantly associated with death (adjusted RR 0.70; 95% CI 0.46-1.05). Conclusion In comatose patients with basilar artery occlusion, the extent of brainstem ischemia appears to be related to mortality but not to favourable outcome.

  9. Detection of pulmonary nodules at paediatric CT: maximum intensity projections and axial source images are complementary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Arthurs, Owen J.; Tasker, Angela D.; Set, Patricia A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images might be useful in helping to differentiate small pulmonary nodules from adjacent vessels on thoracic multidetector CT (MDCT). The aim was to evaluate the benefits of axial MIP images over axial source images for the paediatric chest in an interobserver variability study. We included 46 children with extra-pulmonary solid organ malignancy who had undergone thoracic MDCT. Three radiologists independently read 2-mm axial and 10-mm MIP image datasets, recording the number of nodules, size and location, overall time taken and confidence. There were 83 nodules (249 total reads among three readers) in 46 children (mean age 10.4 ± 4.98 years, range 0.3-15.9 years; 24 boys). Consensus read was used as the reference standard. Overall, three readers recorded significantly more nodules on MIP images (228 vs. 174; P < 0.05), improving sensitivity from 67% to 77.5% (P < 0.05) but with lower positive predictive value (96% vs. 85%, P < 0.005). MIP images took significantly less time to read (71.6 ± 43.7 s vs. 92.9 ± 48.7 s; P < 0.005) but did not improve confidence levels. Using 10-mm axial MIP images for nodule detection in the paediatric chest enhances diagnostic performance, improving sensitivity and reducing reading time when compared with conventional axial thin-slice images. Axial MIP and axial source images are complementary in thoracic nodule detection. (orig.)

  10. Philips Gemini TF64 PET/CT Acceptance Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González Gonzalez, Joaquín J.; Calderón Marin, Carlos F.; Varela Corona, Consuelo; Machado Tejeda, Adalberto; González Correa, Héctor J.

    2016-01-01

    The Philips Gemini TF64 is the first PET/CT scanner installed in Cuba at the Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology in 2014. It is a third generation fully tridimensional whole body PET scanner with time-of-flight (TOF) technology combined with a 64-slice Brilliance CT scanner. The CT detector module contains 672x64 solid state detector, incorporating GOS scintillators, optical diodes and electronic signal channels arranged in 64 side by side arcs, with 672 detectors in each arc. There are sixteen 0.75 mm individual detector elements around the center and four 1.5 mm elements at each end, resulting in a 24 mm total detection length. The PET detector consists of 28 pixelar modules of a 23x44 array of 4x4x22 mm3 of LYSO crystals arranged in an Anger-logic detector design. The hardware coincidence-timing window for this scanner is set at 4 ns and delayed coincidence window technique is used to estimate the random coincidences in collected data. In this study the performance characteristics of PET/CT scanner were measured as part of the program tests of acceptance for clinical use.Methodology. The performance characteristics of CT scanner were evaluated by manufacturer protocol using Philips system performance phantom. Some additional geometrical tests were performed by the user. The intrinsic measurements of energy resolution as well as timing resolution, which define the TOF performance of PET scanner, were performed following the recommendations of manufacturer using 18 F. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, counting rate performance, image quality and accuracy were measured according to the NEMA NU-2 2007 procedures. Additionally, to characterize the effect of TOF reconstruction on lesion contrast and noise, the standard NEMA torso phantom was reconstructed with and without TOF capability. The accuracy of PET/CT image registration was tested according to the manufacturer protocol using an image alignment calibration holder with 6 point sources of 22

  11. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Muramatsu, Yukio; Gomi, Shiho; Suzuki, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Hirobumi; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Aso, Tomohiko; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Takaaki; Tsuta, Koji; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Tochigi, Naobumi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Sugihara, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT) scanners. Materials and Methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm × 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm × 16 or 0.5 mm × 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images fr...

  12. Dose reduction strategies for cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midgley, S.M.; Einsiedel, P.; Langenberg, F.; Lui, E.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Recent advances in CT technology have produced brighter X-ray sources. gantries capable of increased rotation speeds, faster scintil lation materials arranged into multiple rows of detectors, and associated advances in 3D reconstruction methods. These innovations have allowed multi-detector CT to be turned to the diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities and compliment traditional imaging techniques such as coronary angiography. This study examines the cardiac imaging solution offered by the Siemens Somatom Definition Dual Source 64 slice CT scanner. Our dose reduction strategies involve optimising the data acquisition protocols according to diagnostic task, patient size and heart rate. The relationship between scan parameters, image quality and patient dose is examined and verified against measurements with phantoms representing the standard size patient. The dose reduction strategies are reviewed with reference to survey results of patient dose. Some cases allow the insertion of shielding to protect radiosensitive organs, and results are presented to quantify the dose saving.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... multislice CT" or "multidetector CT," allow thinner slices to be obtained, resulting in more detail of the body, in a shorter period of time. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of the body in just a few seconds. Such speed is beneficial for ...

  14. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176 Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176 Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  15. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  16. Ionization beam scanner

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    Inner structure of an ionization beam scanner, a rather intricate piece of apparatus which permits one to measure the density distribution of the proton beam passing through it. On the outside of the tank wall there is the coil for the longitudinal magnetic field, on the inside, one can see the arrangement of electrodes creating a highly homogeneous transverse electric field.

  17. TH-C-18A-12: Evaluation of the Impact of Body Size and Tube Output Limits in the Optimization of Fast Scanning with High-Pitch Dual Source CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Giraldo, J [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc (United States); Mileto, A.; Hurwitz, L.; Marin, D. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of body size and tube power limits in the optimization of fast scanning with high-pitch dual source CT (DSCT). Methods: A previously validated MERCURY phantom, made of polyethylene, with circular cross-section of diameters 16, 23, 30 and 37cm, and connected through tapered sections, was scanned using a second generation DSCT system. The DSCT operates with two independently controlled x-ray tube generators offering up to 200 kW power reserve (100 kW per tube). The entire length of the phantom (42cm) was scanned with two protocols using: A)Standard single-source CT (SSCT) protocol with pitch of 0.8, and B) DSCT protocol with high-pitch values ranging from 1.6 to 3.2 (0.2 steps). All scans used 120 kVp with 150 quality reference mAs using automatic exposure control. Scanner radiation output (CTDIvol) and effective mAs values were extracted retrospectively from DICOM files for each slice. Image noise was recorded. All variables were assessed relative to phantom diameter. Results: With standard-pitch SSCT, the scanner radiation output (and tube-current) were progressively adapted with increasing size, from 6 mGy (120 mAs) up to 15 mGy (270 mAs) from the thinnest (16cm) to the thickest diameter (37 cm), respectively. By comparison, using high-pitch (3.2), the scanner output was bounded at about 8 mGy (140 mAs), independent of phantom diameter. Although relative to standard-pitch, the high-pitch led to lower radiation output for the same scan, the image noise was higher, particularly for larger diameters. To match the radiation output adaptation of standard-pitch, a high-pitch mode of 1.6 was needed, with the advantage of scanning twice as fast. Conclusion: To maximize the benefits of fast scanning with high-pitch DSCT, the body size and tube power limits of the system need to be considered such that a good balance between speed of acquisition and image quality are warranted. JCRG is an employee of Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc.

  18. Automatic selection of optimal systolic and diastolic reconstruction windows for dual-source CT coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifarth, H.; Puesken, M.; Wienbeck, S.; Maintz, D.; Heindel, W.; Juergens, K.U.; Fischbach, R.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of a motion-map algorithm that automatically determines optimal reconstruction windows for dual-source coronary CT angiography. In datasets from 50 consecutive patients, optimal systolic and diastolic reconstruction windows were determined using the motion-map algorithm. For manual determination of the optimal reconstruction window, datasets were reconstructed in 5% steps throughout the RR interval. Motion artifacts were rated for each major coronary vessel using a five-point scale. Mean motion scores using the motion-map algorithm were 2.4 ± 0.8 for systolic reconstructions and 1.9 ± 0.8 for diastolic reconstructions. Using the manual approach, overall motion scores were significantly better (1.9 ± 0.5 and 1.7 ± 0.6, p 90% of cases using either approach. Using the automated approach, there was a negative correlation between heart rate and motion scores for systolic reconstructions (ρ = -0.26, p 80 bpm (systolic reconstruction). (orig.)

  19. Improved assessment of mediastinal and pulmonary pathologies in combined staging CT examinations using a fast-speed acquisition dual-source CT protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Franziska M.; Holzner, Veronica; Meinel, Felix G.; Armbruster, Marco; Brandlhuber, Martina; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Sommer, Wieland H. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Dual-Source CT (DSCT) and to evaluate the clinical utility in chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT studies. 45 cancer patients with two follow-up combined chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations (maximally ±10 kV difference in tube potential) were included. The first scan had to be performed with our standard protocol (fixed pitch 0.6), the second one using a novel fast-speed DSCT protocol (fixed pitch 1.55). Effective doses (ED) were calculated, noise measurements performed. Scan times were compared, motion artefacts and the diagnostic confidence rated in consensus reading. ED for the standard and fast-speed scans was 9.1 (7.0-11.1) mSv and 9.2 (7.4-12.8) mSv, respectively (P = 0.075). Image noise was comparable (abdomen; all P > 0.05) or reduced for fast-speed CTs (trachea, P = 0.001; ascending aorta, P < 0.001). Motion artefacts of the heart/the ascending aorta (all P < 0.001) and breathing artefacts (P < 0.031) were reduced in fast DSCT. The diagnostic confidence for the evaluation of mediastinal (P < 0.001) and pulmonary (P = 0.008) pathologies was improved for fast DSCT. Fast DSCT for chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations is performed within 2 seconds scan time and eliminates relevant intrathoracic motion/breathing artefacts. Mediastinal/pulmonary pathologies can thus be assessed with high diagnostic confidence. Abdominal image quality remains excellent. (orig.)

  20. Scanner calibration revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozhitkov Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2. reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Methods Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. Results We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Conclusions Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  1. Do we really need to thank the Beatles for the financing of the development of the computed tomography scanner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizlin, Zeev V; Vos, Patrick M

    2012-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the revenues from the selling of the Beatles' records by Electric and Musical Industries (EMI) allowed the company to develop the computed tomography (CT) scanner. Some went to define this as the Beatles' gift to medicine. However, significant controversies and discrepancies arise from analysis of this statement, making its correctness doubtful. The details of financing required for the CT development and the part of EMI in financial input have never been publicly announced. This work analyzes the financial contributions to the CT development and investigates if the revenues received from the sales of the Beatles' records were used for the creation of the CT scanner. Timeline of the development of the EMI CT scanner and the financial inputs of EMI and British Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) were assessed. Without salary expenses to Godfrey Hounsfield and his team, the development of the CT scanner cost EMI approximately £100,000. The British DHSS's expenses were £606,000. Hence, the financial contribution of DHSS into the development of the CT scanner was significantly bigger than that of EMI. Accordingly, British tax payers and officials of British DHSS are to be thanked for the CT scanner. The Beatles' input into the world's culture is valuable and does not require decoration by nonexistent connection to the development of CT. A positive aspect to this misconception is that it keeps in public memory the name of the company that developed the CT scanner.

  2. Overranging at multisection CT: an underestimated source of excess radiation exposure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilham, A.; Molen, A.J. van der; Prokop, M.; Jong, H.W. de

    2010-01-01

    To reconstruct the first and last sections of a helical computed tomographic (CT) scan, the scan length is automatically extended beyond the planned image boundaries, a phenomenon known as overranging. With common 16-section CT scanning protocols, the overrange length is between 3 and 6 cm. For

  3. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Yang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm 3 Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT

  4. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Yang, Jie [Pinnacle Health - Fox Chase Regional Cancer Center, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT.

  5. High-pitch coronary CT angiography in dual-source CT during free breathing vs. breath holding in patients with low heart rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.bischoff@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Meinel, Felix G. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Del Prete, Alessandra [Department of Radiology Magrassi-Lanzara, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Reiser, Maximilian F.; Becker, Hans-Christoph [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is usually performed during breath holding to reduce motion artifacts caused by respiration. However, some patients are not able to follow the breathing commands adequately due to deafness, hearing impairment, agitation or pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of high-pitch CCTA in free breathing patients when compared to breath holding patients. Methods: In this study we evaluated 40 patients (20 free breathing and 20 breath holding patients) with a heart rate of 60 bpm or below referred for CCTA who were examined on a 2nd generation dual-source CT system. Image quality of each coronary artery segment was rated using a 4-point grading scale (1: non diagnostic–4: excellent). Results: Mean heart rate during image acquisition was 52 ±5 bpm in both groups. There was no significant difference in mean image quality, slightly favoring image acquisition during breath holding (mean image quality score 3.76 ± 0.32 in breath holding patients vs. 3.61 ± 0.45 in free breathing patients; p = 0.411). Due to a smaller amount of injected contrast medium, there was a trend for signal intensity to be slightly lower in free breathing patients, but this was not statistically significant (435 ± 123 HU vs. 473 ± 117 HU; p = 0.648). Conclusion: In patients with a low heart rate who are not able to hold their breath adequately, CCTA can also be acquired during free breathing without substantial loss of image quality when using a high pitch scan mode in 2nd generation dual-source CT.

  6. Initial results of the quality control in 11 computed tomography scanners at Curitiba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodlulovich, S; Oliveira, L.; Jakubiak, R.R.; Miquelin, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 11 scanners installed in public and private centers of Curitiba, Brazil. This sample represents 30% of the CT scanners in the city so far. The ACR CT accreditation phantom was used to verify the accomplishment of the scanners performance to the international quality requirements. The results indicate that efforts should be concentrated in the maintenance of the equipments and specific training of the technicians. Most of the scanners have showed some non-conformity. In 27,5% of the sample the positioning requirement wasn't accomplished. The CT number accuracy evaluation showed that in 72,3 % of the scanners the CT numbers were out of the tolerance range, reaching values 35% greater than the limit. The low contrast resolution criteria weren't accomplished in 9% of the scanners. The main concern is that there isn't a specific program to evaluate the image quality of the CT scanners neither to estimate the CT doses in the procedures. (author)

  7. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner is typically a large machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the center. A moveable ... up in shades of gray and air appears black. With CT scanning, numerous x-ray beams and ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the body, in a shorter period of time. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of the body in just a few seconds. Such speed is beneficial for ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow new CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a ... reducing the need for sedation and general anesthesia. New technologies that will make even faster scanning possible ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning is like other ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is possible, every effort is made to limit the amount of radiation children may receive from ... CT scanner or may be over the weight limit—usually 450 pounds—for the moving table. Other ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning is like other ... you and/or your child remember to tell health care providers in the future. If the contrast ...

  13. CT triage for lung malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Martin Weber; Karstoft, Jens; Mussmann, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Generation of multiplanar reformation (MPR) images has become automatic on most modern computed tomography (CT) scanners, potentially increasing the workload of the reporting radiologists. It is not always clear if this increases diagnostic performance in all clinical tasks. Purpose...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow new CT scanners to obtain multiple slices ... the need for sedation and general anesthesia. New technologies that will make even faster scanning possible are ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning is like other ... For children this means shorter imaging times and less time required to hold still in order to ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like? The CT scanner is typically a large machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... of this tunnel. In the center of the machine, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning is like other ... six years are able to hold their breath long enough to complete the scan although they may ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning is like other ... that the patient needs to lie still is reduced. Though the scanning itself causes no pain, your ...

  19. Image Quality of 3rd Generation Spiral Cranial Dual-Source CT in Combination with an Advanced Model Iterative Reconstruction Technique: A Prospective Intra-Individual Comparison Study to Standard Sequential Cranial CT Using Identical Radiation Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Holger; Maros, Máté E; Meyer, Mathias; Förster, Alex; Haubenreisser, Holger; Kurth, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Flohr, Thomas; Leidecker, Christianne; Groden, Christoph; Scharf, Johann; Henzler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To prospectively intra-individually compare image quality of a 3rd generation Dual-Source-CT (DSCT) spiral cranial CT (cCT) to a sequential 4-slice Multi-Slice-CT (MSCT) while maintaining identical intra-individual radiation dose levels. 35 patients, who had a non-contrast enhanced sequential cCT examination on a 4-slice MDCT within the past 12 months, underwent a spiral cCT scan on a 3rd generation DSCT. CTDIvol identical to initial 4-slice MDCT was applied. Data was reconstructed using filtered backward projection (FBP) and 3rd-generation iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm at 5 different IR strength levels. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated subjective image quality using a 4-point Likert-scale and objective image quality was assessed in white matter and nucleus caudatus with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) being subsequently calculated. Subjective image quality of all spiral cCT datasets was rated significantly higher compared to the 4-slice MDCT sequential acquisitions (pspiral compared to sequential cCT datasets with mean SNR improvement of 61.65% (p*Bonferroni0.05spiral cCT with an advanced model IR technique significantly improves subjective and objective image quality compared to a standard sequential cCT acquisition acquired at identical dose levels.

  20. Gamma scanner conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.

    1979-11-01

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) will include several stations for the nondestructive examination of irradiated fuels. One of these stations will be the gamma scanner which will be employed to detect gamma radiation from the irradiated fuel pins. The conceptual design of the gamma scan station is described. The gamma scanner will use a Standard Exam Stage (SES) as a positioner and transport mechanism for the fuel pins which it will obtain from a magazine. A pin guide mechanism mounted on the face of the collimator will assure that the fuel pins remain in front of the collimator during scanning. The collimator has remotely adjustable tungsten slits and can be manually rotated to align the slit at various angles. A shielded detector cart located in the operating corridor holds an intrinsic germanium detector and associated sodium-iodide anticoincidence detector. The electronics associated with the counting system consist of standard NIM modules to process the detector signals and a stand-alone multichannel analyzer (MCA) for counting data accumulation. Data from the MCA are bussed to the station computer for analysis and storage on magnetic tape. The station computer controls the collimator, the MCA, a source positioner and the SES through CAMAC-based interface hardware. Most of the electronic hardware is commercially available but some interfaces will require development. Conceptual drawings are included for mechanical hardware that must be designed and fabricated

  1. Dual-source dual-energy CT for the differentiation of urinary stone composition: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qifang; Zhang Wanshi; Meng Limin; Shi Huiping; Wang Dong; Bi Yongmin; Li Xiangsheng; Fang Hong; Guo Heqing; Yan Jingmin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dual-source dual-energy CT (DSCT) for the differentiation of' urinary stone composition in vitro. Methods: Ninety-seven urinary stones were obtained by endoscopic lithotripsy and scanned using dual-source dual-energy CT. The stones were divided into six groups according to infrared spectroscopy stone analysis: uric acid (UA) stones (n=10), cystine stones (n=5), struvite stones (n=6), calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones (n=22), mixed UA stones (n=7) and mixed calcium stones (n=47). Hounsfield units (HU) of each stone were recorded for the 80 kV and the 140 kV datasets by hand-drawing method. HU difference, HU ratio and dual energy index (DEI) were calculated and compared among the stone groups with one-way ANOVA. Using dual energy software to determine the composition of all stones, results were compared to infrared spectroscopy analysis. Results: There were statistical differences in HU difference [(-17±13), (229±34), (309±45), (512±97), (201±64) and (530±71) HU respectively], in HU ratio (0.96±0.03, 1.34±0.04, 1.41±0.03, 1.47±0.03, 1.30±0.07, and 1.49±0.03 respectively), and DEI (-0.006±0.004, 0.064±0.007, 0.080± 0.007, 0.108±0.011, 0.055±0.014 and 0.112±0.008 respectively) among different stone groups (F= 124.894, 407.028, 322.864 respectively, P<0.01). There were statistical differences in HU difference, HU ratio and DEI between UA stones and the other groups (P<0.01). There were statistical differences in HU difference, HU ratio and DEI between CaOx or mixed calcium stones and the other four groups (P< 0.01). There was statistical difference in HU ratio between cystine and struvite stones (P<0.01). There were statistical differences in HU difference, HU ratio and DEI between struvite and mixed UA stones (P< 0.05). Dual energy software correctly characterized 10 UA stones, 4 cystine stones, 22 CaOx stones and 6 mixed UA stones. Two struvite stones were considered to contain cystine. One cystine stone, 1 mixed UA stone, 4

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: Meta analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Gang, E-mail: cjr.sungang@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Li, Min [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Jiang, Zhi-wei [Department of Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 169, Changle West Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Xu, Lin [Department of Medical Cardiology, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Peng, Zhao-hui; Ding, Juan; Li, Li [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Jin, Zhi-tao [Department of Cardiology, General Hospital of the Second Artillery, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Rationale and objective: To synthesize the available data to underscore the diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT (DSCT) coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Materials and methods: We searched in the electronic databases of PubMed for all published studies that examined patients with AF using DSCT. We used an exact binomial rendition of the bivariate mixed-effects regression model to synthesize the diagnostic data. Results: The positive and negative likelihood ratios (LRs) at the patient level were 6.0 (CI, 3.6–10.1) and 0.03(CI, 0.004–0.2), respectively. The negative predictive values higher than 90% were available for a CAD prevalence <78%. The pooled vessel- and segment-level estimates showed higher positive and negative LRs than the patient-level estimates (15.3 [CI, 9.8–23.9] and 0.1 [CI, 0.07–0.3]; 25.1 [CI, 10.8–58.5] and 0.2 [CI, 0.2–0.3], respectively). No statistically significant heterogeneity between studies and publication bias were found at the patient level estimate. A sensitivity analysis showed that no study influenced the pooled results larger than 0.02. Conclusions: Cardiac angiography with DSCT can be applied as an imaging test for ruling out CAD in patient with AF. However, DSCT angiography may be not an effective tool for risk stratification for the high negative LR at the artery and segment levels.

  3. CT of tracheal agenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J.; Newman, Beverley

    2006-01-01

    Tracheal agenesis is a rare and usually lethal anomaly. In the past, opaque contrast medium was injected via the esophagus to demonstrate the anatomy. To demonstrate the utility of helical and multidetector CT in delineating the aberrant anatomy in newborns with tracheal agenesis. Four newborns with tracheal agenesis were identified from three institutions. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Each child was imaged with chest radiography. One child was imaged on a single-detector helical CT scanner and the other three on multidetector scanners. Helical and multidetector CT with 2D and 3D reconstructions clearly delineated the aberrant tracheobronchial and esophageal anatomy in each infant. Minimum intensity projection reformatted CT images were particularly helpful. One infant each had type I and type II tracheal agenesis. Two infants had type III tracheal agenesis. All four infants died. CT is a useful tool for delineating the aberrant anatomy of newborns with tracheal agenesis and thus helps in making rational clinical decisions. (orig.)

  4. Quantification of coronary artery stenoses. Comparison of 64-slice and dual source CT angiography with cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Stephanie; Nikolaou, K.; Johnson, T.; Rist, C.; Knez, A.; Reiser, M.; Becker, C.

    2007-01-01

    Until now stenoses of the coronary arteries have been evaluated visually with CT angiography. Therefore, the results were highly dependent on subjective factors inherent in the examiner. New software tools for semiquantitative analysis (CT-QCA, quantitative coronary assessment) might be adequate to improve the diagnostic accuracy und reproducibility. CTAs of 20 patients were analyzed. Ten patients each were evaluated using 64-slice CT (64SCT) and dual source CT (DSCT) (Somatom Sensation 64 and Somatom Definition, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim), respectively. Two radiologists independently evaluated the data visually and with the help of a software tool (Syngo Circulation, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim). The results of the quantitative assessment of the invasive heart catheterization served as the reference standard. Sensitivity and specificity as well as the correlation coefficient, the systematic error, and the interobserver agreement (kappa) were determined. In each of both patient groups 12 stenoses were detected. For the detection of stenoses >75%, sensitivity and specificity for the visual evaluation using the 64SCT were 100% and 90%, and with the CT-QCA both were 100%. For the DSCT sensitivity and specificity were 100% for both the visual and semiautomated evaluation. The Bland-Altman plot of the results of the 64SCT showed an overestimation of 3.3% (±62.7%/56.2%) compared to the heart catheterization. The results of the DSCT exhibited an overestimation of 6.2% (±33.1%/19.8%). The interobserver agreement of the CT-QCA and the visual evaluation showed a kappa value of 0.75 and for DSCT of 1.0. The results showed a good correlation of grading stenosis between the software-assisted evaluation and the results of the coronary catheter angiography. The promising results of the DSCT are due to a superior temporal resolution compared to the 64SCT. Confirmation of these data by trials in larger patient collectives is warranted. (orig.) [de

  5. Xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique in children with bronchiolitis obliterans: correlation of xenon and CT density values with pulmonary function test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dong Hyun; Seo, Joon Beom; Chae, Eun Jin; Lee, Jeongjin; Hong, Soo-Jong; Yu, Jinho; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Krauss, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique is a recently introduced, promising functional lung imaging method. To expand its clinical applications evidence of additional diagnostic value of xenon ventilation CT over conventional chest CT is required. To evaluate the usefulness of xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique in children with bronchiolitis obliterans (BO). Seventeen children (age 7-18 years; 11 boys) with BO underwent xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique. Xenon and CT density values were measured in normal and hyperlucent lung regions on CT and were compared between the two regions. Volumes of hyperlucent regions and ventilation defects were calculated with thresholds determined by visual and histogram-based analysis. Indexed volumes of hyperlucent lung regions and ventilation defects were correlated with pulmonary function test results. Effective doses of xenon CT were calculated. Xenon (14.6 ± 6.4 HU vs 26.1 ± 6.5 HU; P 25-75 , (γ = -0.68-0.88, P ≤ 0.002). Volume percentages of xenon ventilation defects (35.0 ± 16.4%)] were not significantly different from those of hyperlucent lung regions (38.2 ± 18.6%). However, mismatches between the volume percentages were variable up to 21.4-33.3%. Mean effective dose of xenon CT was 1.9 ± 0.5 mSv. In addition to high-resolution anatomic information, xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique demonstrates impaired regional ventilation and its heterogeneity accurately in children with BO without additional radiation exposure. (orig.)

  6. Clinical evaluation of a dose monitoring software tool based on Monte Carlo Simulation in assessment of eye lens doses for cranial CT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika; Suntharalingam, Saravanabavaan; Nassenstein, Kai; Forsting, Michael; Theysohn, Jens; Wetter, Axel; Ringelstein, Adrian [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this study was to verify the results of a dose monitoring software tool based on Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) in assessment of eye lens doses for cranial CT scans. In cooperation with the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Neuherberg, Germany), phantom measurements were performed with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD LiF:Mg,Ti) using cranial CT protocols: (I) CT angiography; (II) unenhanced, cranial CT scans with gantry angulation at a single and (III) without gantry angulation at a dual source CT scanner. Eye lens doses calculated by the dose monitoring tool based on MCS and assessed with TLDs were compared. Eye lens doses are summarized as follows: (I) CT angiography (a) MCS 7 mSv, (b) TLD 5 mSv; (II) unenhanced, cranial CT scan with gantry angulation, (c) MCS 45 mSv, (d) TLD 5 mSv; (III) unenhanced, cranial CT scan without gantry angulation (e) MCS 38 mSv, (f) TLD 35 mSv. Intermodality comparison shows an inaccurate calculation of eye lens doses in unenhanced cranial CT protocols at the single source CT scanner due to the disregard of gantry angulation. On the contrary, the dose monitoring tool showed an accurate calculation of eye lens doses at the dual source CT scanner without gantry angulation and for CT angiography examinations. The dose monitoring software tool based on MCS gave accurate estimates of eye lens doses in cranial CT protocols. However, knowledge of protocol and software specific influences is crucial for correct assessment of eye lens doses in routine clinical use. (orig.)

  7. Clinical evaluation of a dose monitoring software tool based on Monte Carlo Simulation in assessment of eye lens doses for cranial CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guberina, Nika; Suntharalingam, Saravanabavaan; Nassenstein, Kai; Forsting, Michael; Theysohn, Jens; Wetter, Axel; Ringelstein, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the results of a dose monitoring software tool based on Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) in assessment of eye lens doses for cranial CT scans. In cooperation with the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Neuherberg, Germany), phantom measurements were performed with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD LiF:Mg,Ti) using cranial CT protocols: (I) CT angiography; (II) unenhanced, cranial CT scans with gantry angulation at a single and (III) without gantry angulation at a dual source CT scanner. Eye lens doses calculated by the dose monitoring tool based on MCS and assessed with TLDs were compared. Eye lens doses are summarized as follows: (I) CT angiography (a) MCS 7 mSv, (b) TLD 5 mSv; (II) unenhanced, cranial CT scan with gantry angulation, (c) MCS 45 mSv, (d) TLD 5 mSv; (III) unenhanced, cranial CT scan without gantry angulation (e) MCS 38 mSv, (f) TLD 35 mSv. Intermodality comparison shows an inaccurate calculation of eye lens doses in unenhanced cranial CT protocols at the single source CT scanner due to the disregard of gantry angulation. On the contrary, the dose monitoring tool showed an accurate calculation of eye lens doses at the dual source CT scanner without gantry angulation and for CT angiography examinations. The dose monitoring software tool based on MCS gave accurate estimates of eye lens doses in cranial CT protocols. However, knowledge of protocol and software specific influences is crucial for correct assessment of eye lens doses in routine clinical use. (orig.)

  8. Single- and dual-energy CT of the abdomen: comparison of radiation dose and image quality of 2nd and 3rd generation dual-source CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Hardie, Andrew D.; Felmly, Lloyd M.; Perry, Jonathan D.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Mangold, Stefanie [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Caruso, Damiano [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Latina (Italy); Canstein, Christian [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Malvern, PA (United States); Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    To compare single-energy (SECT) and dual-energy (DECT) abdominal CT examinations in matched patient cohorts regarding differences in radiation dose and image quality performed with second- and third-generation dual-source CT (DSCT). We retrospectively analysed 200 patients (100 male, 100 female; mean age 61.2 ± 13.5 years, mean body mass index 27.5 ± 3.8 kg/m{sup 2}) equally divided into four groups matched by gender and body mass index, who had undergone portal venous phase abdominal CT with second-generation (group A, 120-kV-SECT; group B, 80/140-kV-DECT) and third-generation DSCT (group C, 100-kV-SECT; group D, 90/150-kV-DECT). The radiation dose was normalised for 40-cm scan length. Dose-independent figure-of-merit (FOM) contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for various organs and vessels. Subjective overall image quality and reader confidence were assessed. The effective normalised radiation dose was significantly lower (P < 0.001) in groups C (6.2 ± 2.0 mSv) and D (5.3 ± 1.9 mSv, P = 0.103) compared to groups A (8.8 ± 2.3 mSv) and B (9.7 ± 2.4 mSv, P = 0.102). Dose-independent FOM-CNR peaked for liver, kidney, and portal vein measurements (all P ≤ 0.0285) in group D. Subjective image quality and reader confidence were consistently rated as excellent in all groups (all ≥1.53 out of 5). With both DSCT generations, abdominal DECT can be routinely performed without radiation dose penalty compared to SECT, while third-generation DSCT shows improved dose efficiency. (orig.)

  9. Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score applied to CT angiography source images is a strong predictor of futile recanalization in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawiorski, Michal M.; Alonso de Lecinana, Maria [Hospital Universitario La Paz, IdiPAZ, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, IRYCIS, Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Sanchez, Patricia; Fuentes, Blanca; Sanz-Cuesta, Borja E.; Marin, Begona; Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Diez-Tejedor, Exuperio [Hospital Universitario La Paz, IdiPAZ, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Pastor, Andres; Diaz-Otero, Fernando [Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, IiSGM, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Calleja, Patricia [Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Lourido, Daniel; Vicente, Agustina; Fandino, Eduardo [Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, IRYCIS, Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Sierra-Hidalgo, Fernando [Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario Infanta Leonor, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Reliable predictors of poor clinical outcome despite successful revascularization might help select patients with acute ischemic stroke for thrombectomy. We sought to determine whether baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) applied to CT angiography source images (CTA-SI) is useful in predicting futile recanalization. Data are from the FUN-TPA study registry (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT02164357) including patients with acute ischemic stroke due to proximal arterial occlusion in anterior circulation, undergoing reperfusion therapies. Baseline non-contrast CT and CTA-SI-ASPECTS, time-lapse to image acquisition, occurrence, and timing of recanalization were recorded. Outcome measures were NIHSS at 24 h, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, modified Rankin scale score, and mortality at 90 days. Futile recanalization was defined when successful recanalization was associated with poor functional outcome (death or disability). Included were 110 patients, baseline NIHSS 17 (IQR 12; 20), treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT; 45 %), primary mechanical thrombectomy (MT; 16 %), or combined IVT + MT (39 %). Recanalization rate was 71 %, median delay of 287 min (225; 357). Recanalization was futile in 28 % of cases. In an adjusted model, baseline CTA-SI-ASPECTS was inversely related to the odds of futile recanalization (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7), whereas NCCT-ASPECTS was not (OR 0.8; 95 % CI 0.5-1.2). A score ≤5 in CTA-SI-ASPECTS was the best cut-off to predict futile recanalization (sensitivity 35 %; specificity 97 %; positive predictive value 86 %; negative predictive value 77 %). CTA-SI-ASPECTS strongly predicts futile recanalization and could be a valuable tool for treatment decisions regarding the indication of revascularization therapies. (orig.)

  10. Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score applied to CT angiography source images is a strong predictor of futile recanalization in acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawiorski, Michal M.; Alonso de Lecinana, Maria; Martinez-Sanchez, Patricia; Fuentes, Blanca; Sanz-Cuesta, Borja E.; Marin, Begona; Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Diez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Garcia-Pastor, Andres; Diaz-Otero, Fernando; Calleja, Patricia; Lourido, Daniel; Vicente, Agustina; Fandino, Eduardo; Sierra-Hidalgo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Reliable predictors of poor clinical outcome despite successful revascularization might help select patients with acute ischemic stroke for thrombectomy. We sought to determine whether baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) applied to CT angiography source images (CTA-SI) is useful in predicting futile recanalization. Data are from the FUN-TPA study registry (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT02164357) including patients with acute ischemic stroke due to proximal arterial occlusion in anterior circulation, undergoing reperfusion therapies. Baseline non-contrast CT and CTA-SI-ASPECTS, time-lapse to image acquisition, occurrence, and timing of recanalization were recorded. Outcome measures were NIHSS at 24 h, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, modified Rankin scale score, and mortality at 90 days. Futile recanalization was defined when successful recanalization was associated with poor functional outcome (death or disability). Included were 110 patients, baseline NIHSS 17 (IQR 12; 20), treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT; 45 %), primary mechanical thrombectomy (MT; 16 %), or combined IVT + MT (39 %). Recanalization rate was 71 %, median delay of 287 min (225; 357). Recanalization was futile in 28 % of cases. In an adjusted model, baseline CTA-SI-ASPECTS was inversely related to the odds of futile recanalization (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7), whereas NCCT-ASPECTS was not (OR 0.8; 95 % CI 0.5-1.2). A score ≤5 in CTA-SI-ASPECTS was the best cut-off to predict futile recanalization (sensitivity 35 %; specificity 97 %; positive predictive value 86 %; negative predictive value 77 %). CTA-SI-ASPECTS strongly predicts futile recanalization and could be a valuable tool for treatment decisions regarding the indication of revascularization therapies. (orig.)

  11. Early small-bowel ischemia: dual-energy CT improves conspicuity compared with conventional CT in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potretzke, Theodora A; Brace, Christopher L; Lubner, Meghan G; Sampson, Lisa A; Willey, Bridgett J; Lee, Fred T

    2015-04-01

    To compare dual-energy computed tomography (CT) with conventional CT for the detection of small-bowel ischemia in an experimental animal model. The study was approved by the animal care and use committee and was performed in accordance with the Guide for Care and Use of Laboratory Animals issued by the National Research Council. Ischemic bowel segments (n = 8) were created in swine (n = 4) by means of surgical occlusion of distal mesenteric arteries and veins. Contrast material-enhanced dual-energy CT and conventional single-energy CT (120 kVp) sequences were performed during the portal venous phase with a single-source fast-switching dual-energy CT scanner. Attenuation values and contrast-to-noise ratios of ischemic and perfused segments on iodine material-density, monospectral dual-energy CT (51 keV, 65 keV, and 70 keV), and conventional 120-kVp CT images were compared. Linear mixed-effects models were used for comparisons. The attenuation difference between ischemic and perfused segments was significantly greater on dual-energy 51-keV CT images than on conventional 120-kVp CT images (mean difference, 91.7 HU vs 47.6 HU; P conventional CT by increasing attenuation differences between ischemic and perfused segments on low-kiloelectron volt and iodine material density images. © RSNA, 2014.

  12. Importance of bony analysis for interpreting ear CT scans: part three; ORL - tomodensitometrie de l'oreille. Interet de l'analyse osseuse dans l'interpretation des scanners de l'oreille (troisieme partie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serhal, M.; Dordea, M.; Cymbalista, M. [Hopital de Montfermeil, Service de Radiologie, 93 - Montfermeil (France); Halimi, P. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service de Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France); Iffenecker, C. [Clinique Radiologique, 62 - Boulogne sur Mer (France); Bensimon, J.L

    2003-02-01

    The accurate description of bony changes in ear CT scans has a great diagnostic and therapeutic impact. The third part shows the way to analyze bone remodeling when CT scan is performed for tumors in the vicinity of the temporal bone, for intra temporal lesions of the facial nerve and for external auditory canal malformations. It demonstrates how bony analysis should be included in postoperative report of ear CT scan. The importance of bony signs in tumors and pseudo tumors of the inner ear are outlined. (authors)

  13. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic {sup 176}Lu radiation of PET detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyang [School of Automation and Electrical Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gu, Yu, E-mail: guyu@ustb.edu.cn [School of Automation and Electrical Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Dai, Tiantian, E-mail: maxinedtt@163.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic {sup 176}Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic {sup 176}Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  14. Coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2009-07-01

    Coronary CT angiography has attained increasing scientific attention at academic institutions and has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality. Extending this knowledge into a practice setting is the purpose of 'Coronary CT Angiography'. This book will assist you in integrating cardiac CT into your daily practice, while also giving an overview of the current technical status and applications. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors are also presented providing an objective overview of noninvasive coronary angiography using CT. (orig.)

  15. Spatial Distribution of Iron Within the Normal Human Liver Using Dual-Source Dual-Energy CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadia, Andres F; Grant, Katharine L; Carey, Kathleen E; Bolch, Wesley E; Morin, Richard L

    2017-11-01

    Explore the potential of dual-source dual-energy (DSDE) computed tomography (CT) to retrospectively analyze the uniformity of iron distribution and establish iron concentration ranges and distribution patterns found in healthy livers. Ten mixtures consisting of an iron nitrate solution and deionized water were prepared in test tubes and scanned using a DSDE 128-slice CT system. Iron images were derived from a 3-material decomposition algorithm (optimized for the quantification of iron). A conversion factor (mg Fe/mL per Hounsfield unit) was calculated from this phantom study as the quotient of known tube concentrations and their corresponding CT values. Retrospective analysis was performed of patients who had undergone DSDE imaging for renal stones. Thirty-seven patients with normal liver function were randomly selected (mean age, 52.5 years). The examinations were processed for iron concentration. Multiple regions of interest were analyzed, and iron concentration (mg Fe/mL) and distribution was reported. The mean conversion factor obtained from the phantom study was 0.15 mg Fe/mL per Hounsfield unit. Whole-liver mean iron concentrations yielded a range of 0.0 to 2.91 mg Fe/mL, with 94.6% (35/37) of the patients exhibiting mean concentrations below 1.0 mg Fe/mL. The most important finding was that iron concentration was not uniform and patients exhibited regionally high concentrations (36/37). These regions of higher concentration were observed to be dominant in the middle-to-upper part of the liver (75%), medially (72.2%), and anteriorly (83.3%). Dual-source dual-energy CT can be used to assess the uniformity of iron distribution in healthy subjects. Applying similar techniques to unhealthy livers, future research may focus on the impact of hepatic iron content and distribution for noninvasive assessment in diseased subjects.

  16. Optimized imaging quality and radiation dose for coronary artery angiography using 128-slice, dual-source Flash Spiral CT under the natural heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yuejun; Qian Nong; Shao Yanhui; Pan Changjie; Rong Weiliang; Xu Yiqun; Tao Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the quality and radiation doses of coronary artery angiography under the natural heart rate condition between Flash spiral heart mode and prospective electrocardiogram- triggering sequence mode using dual-source, in order to choose personalized low doses of coronary artery scanning mode. Methods: Sixty patients who underwent coronary angiography (CTA) on a 128-slice, dual- source CT scanner were divided into 2 group i.e, group A (27 cases) and group B (33 cases). Flash spiral heart scan mode was employed for group A. Inclusion criteria included: heart rate 75 bpm), date acquisition was set at 30%-50% of the R-R interval. (3) At the arrhythmias, premature beat, fibrillation atrial, date acquisition was set at 20%-90% of the R-R interval. In both groups, patients with a BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m 2 were examined with a tube voltage of 120 kV, while the other patients with a BMI 2 were examined with a tube voltage of 100 kV. The BMI was (24.6±1.0) kg/m 2 in group A, while that was (24.6±0.9) kg/m 2 in group B. In both groups, all images were transferred to the workstation for further processing and analysis. The imaging quality of coronary artery segments and the radiation dose were compared with t test. Results: A total of 336 coronary artery segments were evaluated in group A and 412 segments were evaluated in group B. The imaging quality of coronary artery segments were scored. Excellent or good was achieved in 98.2% (330 of 336) artery segments in group A, and that was 98.1% (404 of 412) in group B. There was no statistical difference in imaging quality between the two groups (t=0.513, P=0.608). The average effective dose was (0.74±0.29) mSv in group A, whereas that was (3.67± 1.37) mSv in group B. There was a significant difference between the two groups (t=-10.858, P= 0.000). Conclusions: The personalized low doses coronary artery scanning mode can substantially reduce radiation damage while preserving good imaging quality. (authors)

  17. Attenuation correction for the HRRT PET-scanner using transmission scatter correction and total variation regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sune H; Svarer, Claus; Sibomana, Merence

    2013-09-01

    In the standard software for the Siemens high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) positron emission tomography (PET) scanner the most commonly used segmentation in the μ -map reconstruction for human brain scans is maximum a posteriori for transmission (MAP-TR). Bias in the lower cerebellum and pons in HRRT brain images have been reported. The two main sources of the problem with MAP-TR are poor bone/soft tissue segmentation below the brain and overestimation of bone mass in the skull. We developed the new transmission processing with total variation (TXTV) method that introduces scatter correction in the μ-map reconstruction and total variation filtering to the transmission processing. Comparing MAP-TR and the new TXTV with gold standard CT-based attenuation correction, we found that TXTV has less bias as compared to MAP-TR. We also compared images acquired at the HRRT scanner using TXTV to the GE Advance scanner images and found high quantitative correspondence. TXTV has been used to reconstruct more than 4000 HRRT scans at seven different sites with no reports of biases. TXTV-based reconstruction is recommended for human brain scans on the HRRT.

  18. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Ge, G; Winkler, M; Cong, W; Wang, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose

  19. Coronary CT angiography: Diagnostic value and clinical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-12-26

    Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography has been increasingly used in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease due to improved spatial and temporal resolution with high diagnostic value being reported when compared to invasive coronary angiography. Diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography has been significantly improved with the technological developments in multislice CT scanners from the early generation of 4-slice CT to the latest 320- slice CT scanners. Despite the promising diagnostic value, coronary CT angiography is still limited in some areas, such as inferior temporal resolution, motion-related artifacts and high false positive results due to severe calcification. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the technical developments of multislice CT and diagnostic value of coronary CT angiography in coronary artery disease based on different generations of multislice CT scanners. Prognostic value of coronary CT angiography in coronary artery disease is also discussed, while limitations and challenges of coronary CT angiography are highlighted.

  20. Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  1. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  2. Automated tube voltage selection for radiation dose and contrast medium reduction at coronary CT angiography using 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Poole, Zachary B.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Canstein, Christian [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA (United States); Caruso, Damiano [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Rome (Italy); Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the relationship between automated tube voltage selection (ATVS) and body mass index (BMI) and its effect on image quality and radiation dose of coronary CT angiography (CCTA). We evaluated 272 patients who underwent CCTA with 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT (DSCT). Prospectively ECG-triggered spiral acquisition was performed with automated tube current selection and advanced iterative reconstruction. Tube voltages were selected by ATVS (70-120 kV). BMI, effective dose (ED), and vascular attenuation in the coronary arteries were recorded. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Five-point scales were used for subjective image quality analysis. Image quality was rated good to excellent in 98.9 % of examinations without significant differences for proximal and distal attenuation (all p ≥.0516), whereas image noise was rated significantly higher at 70 kV compared to ≥100 kV (all p <.0266). However, no significant differences were observed in SNR or CNR at 70-120 kV (all p ≥.0829). Mean ED at 70-120 kV was 1.5 ± 1.2 mSv, 2.4 ± 1.5 mSv, 3.6 ± 2.7 mSv, 5.9 ± 4.0 mSv, 7.9 ± 4.2 mSv, and 10.7 ± 4.1 mSv, respectively (all p ≤.0414). Correlation analysis showed a moderate association between tube voltage and BMI (r =.639). ATVS allows individual tube voltage adaptation for CCTA performed with 3{sup rd} generation DSCT, resulting in significantly decreased radiation exposure while maintaining image quality. (orig.)

  3. Scanner after 10 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manelfe, C.; Bonafe, A.; Prere, J. (Service de Neuroradiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Purpan, 31 - Toulouse (France))

    1984-01-21

    CT scanning has become of the main methods of investigating cranio-cerebral pathology. Technological advances have improved the quality of the images and shortened the time of investigation. This atraumatic method determines the diagnosis, management and sometimes the treatment of conditions such as cerebrovascular accidents, tumours, trauma, infection, degenerative disease. High resolution scans have transformed the diagnosis of hypophyseal, orbital and ENT diseases.

  4. submitter Dynamical Models of a Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Barjau, Ana; Dehning, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of the beam profile measurements achievable by the current wire scanners at CERN is limited by the vibrations of their mechanical parts. In particular, the vibrations of the carbon wire represent the major source of wire position uncertainty which limits the beam profile measurement accuracy. In the coming years, due to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, a wire traveling speed up to 20 $m s^{−1}$ and a position measurement accuracy of the order of 1 μm will be required. A new wire scanner design based on the understanding of the wire vibration origin is therefore needed. We present the models developed to understand the main causes of the wire vibrations observed in an existing wire scanner. The development and tuning of those models are based on measurements and tests performed on that CERN proton synchrotron (PS) scanner. The final model for the (wire + fork) system has six degrees-of-freedom (DOF). The wire equations contain three different excitation terms: inertia...

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of 128-slice dual-source CT coronary angiography: a randomized comparison of different acquisition protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neefjes, Lisan A.; Kate, Gert-Jan R. ten; Rossi, Alexia; Nieman, Koen; Papadopoulou, Stella L.; Dharampal, Anoeshka S.; Dedic, Admir; Feyter, Pim J. de; Mollet, Nico R.; Genders, Tessa S.S.; Hunink, M.G.M.; Schultz, Carl J.; Weustink, Annick C.; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Straten, Marcel van; Cademartiri, Filippo; Krestin, Gabriel P.

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance and radiation exposure of 128-slice dual-source CT coronary angiography (CTCA) protocols to detect coronary stenosis with more than 50 % lumen obstruction. We prospectively included 459 symptomatic patients referred for CTCA. Patients were randomized between high-pitch spiral vs. narrow-window sequential CTCA protocols (heart rate below 65 bpm, group A), or between wide-window sequential vs. retrospective spiral protocols (heart rate above 65 bpm, group B). Diagnostic performance of CTCA was compared with quantitative coronary angiography in 267 patients. In group A (231 patients, 146 men, mean heart rate 58 ± 7 bpm), high-pitch spiral CTCA yielded a lower per-segment sensitivity compared to sequential CTCA (89 % vs. 97 %, P = 0.01). Specificity, PPV and NPV were comparable (95 %, 62 %, 99 % vs. 96 %, 73 %, 100 %, P > 0.05) but radiation dose was lower (1.16 ± 0.60 vs. 3.82 ± 1.65 mSv, P 0.05). Radiation dose of sequential CTCA was lower compared to retrospective CTCA (6.12 ± 2.58 vs. 8.13 ± 4.52 mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic performance was comparable in both groups. Sequential CTCA should be used in patients with regular heart rates using 128-slice dual-source CT, providing optimal diagnostic accuracy with as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation dose. circle 128-slice dual-source CT coronary angiography offers several different acquisition protocols. (orig.)

  6. Detector Position Estimation for PET Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Larry; Miyaoka, Robert; Lewellen, Tom; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul

    2012-06-11

    Physical positioning of scintillation crystal detector blocks in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners is not always exact. We test a proof of concept methodology for the determination of the six degrees of freedom for detector block positioning errors by utilizing a rotating point source over stepped axial intervals. To test our method, we created computer simulations of seven Micro Crystal Element Scanner (MiCES) PET systems with randomized positioning errors. The computer simulations show that our positioning algorithm can estimate the positions of the block detectors to an average of one-seventh of the crystal pitch tangentially, and one-third of the crystal pitch axially. Virtual acquisitions of a point source grid and a distributed phantom show that our algorithm improves both the quantitative and qualitative accuracy of the reconstructed objects. We believe this estimation algorithm is a practical and accurate method for determining the spatial positions of scintillation detector blocks.

  7. Detector position estimation for PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Larry; Miyaoka, Robert; Lewellen, Tom; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Physical positioning of scintillation crystal detector blocks in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners is not always exact. We test a proof of concept methodology for the determination of the six degrees of freedom for detector block positioning errors by utilizing a rotating point source over stepped axial intervals. To test our method, we created computer simulations of seven Micro Crystal Element Scanner (MiCES) PET systems with randomized positioning errors. The computer simulations show that our positioning algorithm can estimate the positions of the block detectors to an average of one-seventh of the crystal pitch tangentially, and one-third of the crystal pitch axially. Virtual acquisitions of a point source grid and a distributed phantom show that our algorithm improves both the quantitative and qualitative accuracy of the reconstructed objects. We believe this estimation algorithm is a practical and accurate method for determining the spatial positions of scintillation detector blocks.

  8. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Using a multidetector CT unit to examine children is faster than the older CT scanners, reducing the need for sedation and general anesthesia. New technologies that will make even faster scanning possible ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Using a multidetector CT unit to examine children is faster than the older CT scanners, reducing the need for sedation and general anesthesia. New technologies that will make even faster scanning possible are ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is properly positioned. With modern CT scanners, your child will hear only slight buzzing, clicking and whirring sounds as the ... be taken to protect the welfare of your child, including close ... they should have a CT study only if it is essential for making a diagnosis ...

  11. Toward morphological thoracic EIT: major signal sources correspond to respective organ locations in CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Damien; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Adler, Andy; Solà, Josep; Böhm, Stephan H; Bodenstein, Marc

    2012-11-01

    Lung and cardiovascular monitoring applications of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) require localization of relevant functional structures or organs of interest within the reconstructed images. We describe an algorithm for automatic detection of heart and lung regions in a time series of EIT images. Using EIT reconstruction based on anatomical models, candidate regions are identified in the frequency domain and image-based classification techniques applied. The algorithm was validated on a set of simultaneously recorded EIT and CT data in pigs. In all cases, identified regions in EIT images corresponded to those manually segmented in the matched CT image. Results demonstrate the ability of EIT technology to reconstruct relevant impedance changes at their anatomical locations, provided that information about the thoracic boundary shape (and electrode positions) are used for reconstruction.

  12. Development of the Shimadzu computed tomographic scanner SCT-200N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Masahiro

    1982-01-01

    The Shimadzu Computed Tomographic Scanner SCT-200N has been developed as an ideal CT scanner for diagnosing the head and spine. Due to the large aperture, moderate scan time and the Zoom Scan Mode, any part of the body can be scanned. High quality image can be obtained by adopting the precisely stabilized X-ray unit and densely packed array of 64-detectors. As for its operation, capability of computed radiography (CR) prior to patient positioning and real time reconstruction ensure efficient patient through-put. Details of the SCT-200N are described in this paper. (author)

  13. Software development for modeling positrons emission tomograph scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner

    2013-01-01

    The Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) is an international platform recognized and used to develop Computational Model Exposure (CME) in the context of Nuclear Medicine, although currently there are dedicated modules for applications in Radiotherapy and Computed Tomography (CT). GATE uses Monte Carlo (MC) methods, and has a scripting language of its own. The writing of scripts for simulation of a PET scanner in GATE involves a number of interrelated steps, and the accuracy of the simulation is dependent on the correct setup of the geometries involved, since the physical processes depend on them, as well as the modeling of electronic detectors in module Digitizer, for example. The manual implementation of this setup can be a source of errors, especially for users without experience in the field of simulations or without any previous knowledge of a programming language, and also due to the the fact that the modeling process in GATE still remains bounded to LINUX / UNIX based systems, an environment only familiar to a few. This becomes an obstacle for beginners and prevents the use of GATE by a larger number of users interested in optimizing their experiments and/or clinical protocols through a more accessible, fast and friendly application. The objective of this work is therefore to develop a user-friendly software for the modeling of Positron Emission Tomography called GUIGATE (Graphical User Interface for GATE), with specific modules dedicated to quality control in PET scanners. The results exhibit the features available in this first version of GUIGATE, present in a set of windows that allow users to create their input files, perform and display in real time the model and analyze its output file in a single environment, allowing so intuitively access the entire architecture of the GATE simulation and to CERN's data analyzer, the ROOT. (author)

  14. The effect of pitch in multislice spiral/helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.; Vannier, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of pitch on raw data interpolation in multislice spiral/helical computed tomography (CT) and provide guidelines for scanner design and protocol optimization. Multislice spiral CT is mainly characterized by the three parameters: the number of detector arrays, the detector collimation, and the table increment per x-ray source rotation. The pitch in multislice spiral CT is defined as the ratio of the table increment over the detector collimation in this study. In parallel to the current framework for studying longitudinal image resolution, the central fan-beam rays of direct and opposite directions are considered, assuming a narrow cone-beam angle. Generally speaking, sampling in the Radon domain by the direct and opposite central rays is nonuniform along the longitudinal axis. Using a recently developed methodology for quantifying the sensibility of signal reconstruction from non-uniformly sampled finite points, the effect of pitch on raw data interpolation is analyzed in multislice spiral CT. Unlike single-slice spiral CT, in which image quality decreases monotonically as the pitch increases, the sensibility of raw data interpolation in multislice spiral CT increases, suggesting that image quality does not decrease monotonically in this case. The most favorable pitch can be found from the sensitivity-slice spiral CT is provided. The study on the effect of pitch using the sensitivity analysis approach reveals the fundamental characteristics of raw data interpolation in multislice spiral CT, and gives insights into interaction between pitch and image quality. These results may be valuable for design of multislice spiral CT scanners and imaging protocol optimization in clinical applications. (authors)

  15. Single source dual energy CT: What is the optimal monochromatic energy level for the analysis of the lung parenchyma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohana, M., E-mail: mickael.ohana@gmail.com [iCube Laboratory, Université de Strasbourg/CNRS, UMR 7357, 67400 Illkirch (France); Service de Radiologie B, Nouvel Hôpital Civil – Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 1 place de l’hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Labani, A., E-mail: aissam.labani@chru-strasbourg.fr [Service de Radiologie B, Nouvel Hôpital Civil – Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 1 place de l’hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Severac, F., E-mail: francois.severac@chru-strasbourg.fr [Département de Biostatistiques et d’Informatique Médicale, Hôpital Civil – Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg,1 place de l’hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Jeung, M.Y., E-mail: Mi-Young.Jeung@chru-strasbourg.fr [Service de Radiologie B, Nouvel Hôpital Civil – Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 1 place de l’hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Gaertner, S., E-mail: Sebastien.Gaertner@chru-strasbourg.fr [Service de Médecine Vasculaire, Nouvel Hôpital Civil – Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg,1 place de l’hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg (France); and others

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Lung parenchyma aspect varies with the monochromatic energy level in spectral CT. • Optimal diagnostic and image quality is obtained at 50–55 keV. • Mediastinum and parenchyma could be read on the same monochromatic energy level. - Abstract: Objective: To determine the optimal monochromatic energy level for lung parenchyma analysis in spectral CT. Methods: All 50 examinations (58% men, 64.8 ± 16yo) from an IRB-approved prospective study on single-source dual energy chest CT were retrospectively included and analyzed. Monochromatic images in lung window reconstructed every 5 keV from 40 to 140 keV were independently assessed by two chest radiologists. Based on the overall image quality and the depiction/conspicuity of parenchymal lesions, each reader had to designate for every patient the keV level providing the best diagnostic and image quality. Results: 72% of the examinations exhibited parenchymal lesions. Reader 1 picked the 55 keV monochromatic reconstruction in 52% of cases, 50 in 30% and 60 in 18%. Reader 2 chose 50 keV in 52% cases, 55 in 40%, 60 in 6% and 40 in 2%. The 50 and 55 keV levels were chosen by at least one reader in 64% and 76% of all patients, respectively. Merging 50 and 55 keV into one category results in an optimal setting selected by reader 1 in 82% of patients and by reader 2 in 92%, with a 74% concomitant agreement. Conclusion: The best image quality for lung parenchyma in spectral CT is obtained with the 50–55 keV monochromatic reconstructions.

  16. Image quality optimization and evaluation of linearly mixed images in dual-source, dual-energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lifeng; Primak, Andrew N.; Liu Xin; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2009-01-01

    In dual-source dual-energy CT, the images reconstructed from the low- and high-energy scans (typically at 80 and 140 kV, respectively) can be mixed together to provide a single set of non-material-specific images for the purpose of routine diagnostic interpretation. Different from the material-specific information that may be obtained from the dual-energy scan data, the mixed images are created with the purpose of providing the interpreting physician a single set of images that have an appearance similar to that in single-energy images acquired at the same total radiation dose. In this work, the authors used a phantom study to evaluate the image quality of linearly mixed images in comparison to single-energy CT images, assuming the same total radiation dose and taking into account the effect of patient size and the dose partitioning between the low-and high-energy scans. The authors first developed a method to optimize the quality of the linearly mixed images such that the single-energy image quality was compared to the best-case image quality of the dual-energy mixed images. Compared to 80 kV single-energy images for the same radiation dose, the iodine CNR in dual-energy mixed images was worse for smaller phantom sizes. However, similar noise and similar or improved iodine CNR relative to 120 kV images could be achieved for dual-energy mixed images using the same total radiation dose over a wide range of patient sizes (up to 45 cm lateral thorax dimension). Thus, for adult CT practices, which primarily use 120 kV scanning, the use of dual-energy CT for the purpose of material-specific imaging can also produce a set of non-material-specific images for routine diagnostic interpretation that are of similar or improved quality relative to single-energy 120 kV scans.