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Sample records for source aquila x-1

  1. Measuring a truncated disk in Aquila X-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, Ashley L.; Tomsick, John A.; Miller, Jon M.

    2016-01-01

    We present NuSTAR and Swift observations of the neutron star Aquila X-1 during the peak of its 2014 July outburst. The spectrum is soft with strong evidence for a broad Fe Kα line. Modeled with a relativistically broadened reflection model, we find that the inner disk is truncated with an inner r...

  2. Measuring a Truncated Disk in Aquila X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ashley L.; Tomsick, John A.; Miller, Jon M.; Chenevez, Jerome; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Feurst, Felix; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present NuSTAR and Swift observations of the neutron star Aquila X-1 during the peak of its 2014 July outburst. The spectrum is soft with strong evidence for a broad Fe K(alpha) line. Modeled with a relativistically broadened reflection model, we find that the inner disk is truncated with an inner radius of 15 +/- 3RG. The disk is likely truncated by either the boundary layer and/or a magnetic field. Associating the truncated inner disk with pressure from a magnetic field gives an upper limit of B < 5+/- 2x10(exp 8) G. Although the radius is truncated far from the stellar surface, material is still reaching the neutron star surface as evidenced by the X-ray burst present in the NuSTAR observation.

  3. On the morphology of outbursts of accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar Aquila X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, C.; Ekşi, K. Y.; Göğüş, E.

    2017-10-01

    We present the X-ray light curves of the last two outbursts - 2014 & 2016 - of the well known accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP) Aquila X-1 using the monitor of all sky X-ray image (MAXI) observations in the 2-20 keV band. After calibrating the MAXI count rates to the all-sky monitor (ASM) level, we report that the 2016 outburst is the most energetic event of Aql X-1, ever observed from this source. We show that 2016 outburst is a member of the long-high class according to the classification presented by Güngör et al. with ˜ 68 cnt/s maximum flux and ˜ 60 days duration time and the previous outburst, 2014, belongs to the short-low class with ˜ 25 cnt/s maximum flux and ˜ 30 days duration time. In order to understand differences between outbursts, we investigate the possible dependence of the peak intensity to the quiescent duration leading to the outburst and find that the outbursts following longer quiescent episodes tend to reach higher peak energetic.

  4. Aquila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Eagle; abbrev. Aql, gen. Aquilae; area 652 sq. deg.) An equatorial constellation that lies between Sagitta and Sagittarius, and culminates at midnight in mid-July. Its origin dates back to Babylonian times and it is said to represent the eagle of Zeus in Greek mythology, which carried the thunderbolts that Zeus hurled at his enemies and which snatched up Ganymede to become cup-bearer to the g...

  5. Bowen emission from Aquila X-1: evidence for multiple components and constraint on the accretion disc vertical structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ibarra, F.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Wang, L.; Casares, J.; Mata Sánchez, D.; Steeghs, D.; Armas Padilla, M.; Charles, P. A.

    2018-03-01

    We present a detailed spectroscopic study of the optical counterpart of the neutron star X-ray transient Aquila X-1 during its 2011, 2013 and 2016 outbursts. We use 65 intermediate resolution GTC-10.4 m spectra with the aim of detecting irradiation-induced Bowen blend emission from the donor star. While Gaussian fitting does not yield conclusive results, our full phase coverage allows us to exploit Doppler mapping techniques to independently constrain the donor star radial velocity. By using the component N III 4640.64/4641.84 Å, we measure Kem = 102 ± 6 km s-1. This highly significant detection (≳13σ) is fully compatible with the true companion star radial velocity obtained from near-infrared spectroscopy during quiescence. Combining these two velocities we determine, for the first time, the accretion disc opening angle and its associated error from direct spectroscopic measurements and detailed modelling, obtaining α = 15.5 ^{+ 2.5}_{-5} deg. This value is consistent with theoretical work if significant X-ray irradiation is taken into account and is important in the light of recent observations of GX339-4, where discrepant results were obtained between the donor's intrinsic radial velocity and the Bowen-inferred value. We also discuss the limitations of the Bowen technique when complete phase coverage is not available.

  6. SPECTRAL-TIMING ANALYSIS OF THE LOWER kHz QPO IN THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY AQUILA X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyer, Jon S.; Cackett, Edward M., E-mail: jon.troyer@wayne.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 W. Hancock St, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    Spectral-timing products of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems, including energy- and frequency-dependent lags, have been analyzed previously in 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-53, and 4U 1728-34. Here, we study the spectral-timing properties of the lower kHz QPO of the neutron star LMXB Aquila X-1 for the first time. We compute broadband energy lags as well as energy-dependent lags and the covariance spectrum using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer . We find characteristics similar to those of previously studied systems, including soft lags of ∼30 μ s between the 3.0–8.0 keV and 8.0–20.0 keV energy bands at the average QPO frequency. We also find lags that show a nearly monotonic trend with energy, with the highest-energy photons arriving first. The covariance spectrum of the lower kHz QPO is well fit by a thermal Comptonization model, though we find a seed photon temperature higher than that of the mean spectrum, which was also seen in Peille et al. and indicates the possibility of a composite boundary layer emitting region. Lastly, we see in one set of observations an Fe K component in the covariance spectrum at 2.4- σ confidence, which may raise questions about the role of reverberation in the production of lags.

  7. Scorpius X-1 - an evolving double radio source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geldzahler, B.J.; Fomalont, E.B.; National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA)

    1986-01-01

    The radio emission from Sco X-1 has been monitored with the VLA over a 5 yr period with 0.4 arcsec resolution at 4.85 GHz. The source contains three components: an unresolved radio core coincident with the stellar binary system; an unresolved lobe northeast of the core; and an extended lobe southwest of the core. All radio components are approximately comoving with the binary system and are thus undoubtedly associated with it. The northeast lobe is moving away from the core at a rate of 0.013-0.017 arcsec/yr, which corresponds to a velocity of 31-41 km/sec, assuming a distance of 500 pc to Sco X-1. The relative velocity of a hot spot in the southwest lobe with respect to the core is less than 70 km/sec. The flux density in the lobes appears to vary by about 20 percent over time scales of 1 yr, and the variations between the lobes may be correlated. The twin-exhaust beam model where energy is transported from the core to the lobes in narrow beams is the most acceptable model for the evolution of the source. However, interstellar density (greater than 0.6/cu cm) is needed to restrain the velocity of the northeast lobe (presumably the working surface of the beam). 16 references

  8. SEISMIC SITE RESPONSE ESTIMATION IN THE NEAR SOURCE REGION OF THE 2009 L’AQUILA, ITALY, EARTHQUAKE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, E.; Azzara, R.; Bergamashi, F.; Bordoni, P.; Cara, F.; Cogliano, R.; Cultrera, G.; di Giulio, G.; Duval, A.; Fodarella, A.; Milana, G.; Pucillo, S.; Régnier, J.; Riccio, G.; Salichon, J.

    2009-12-01

    The 6th of April 2009, at 3:32 local time, a Mw 6.3 earthquake hit the Abruzzo region (central Italy) causing more than 300 casualties. The epicenter of the earthquake was 95km NE of Rome and 10km from the center of the city of L’Aquila, the administrative capital of the Abruzzo region. This city has a population of about 70,000 and was severely damaged by the earthquake, the total cost of the buildings damage being estimated around 3 Bn €. Historical masonry buildings particularly suffered from the seismic shaking, but some reinforced concrete structures from more modern construction were also heavily damaged. To better estimate the seismic solicitation of these structures during the earthquake, we deployed temporary arrays in the near source region. Downtown L’Aquila, as well as a rural quarter composed of ancient dwelling-centers located western L’Aquila (Roio area), have been instrumented. The array set up downtown consisted of nearly 25 stations including velocimetric and accelerometric sensors. In the Roio area, 6 stations operated for almost one month. The data has been processed in order to study the spectral ratios of the horizontal component of ground motion at the soil site and at a reference site, as well as the spectral ratio of the horizontal and the vertical movement at a single recording site. Downtown L’Aquila is set on a Quaternary fluvial terrace (breccias with limestone boulders and clasts in a marly matrix), which forms the left bank of the Aterno River and slopes down in the southwest direction towards the Aterno River. The alluvial are lying on lacustrine sediments reaching their maximum thickness (about 250m) in the center of L’Aquila. After De Luca et al. (2005), these quaternary deposits seem to lead in an important amplification factor in the low frequency range (0.5-0.6 Hz). However, the level of amplification varies strongly from one point to the other in the center of the city. This new experimentation allows new and more

  9. Systems analysis and engineering of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochau, G.E.; Hands, J.A.; Raglin, P.S.; Ramirez, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    The X-1 Advanced Radiation Source, which will produce ∼ 16 MJ in x-rays, represents the next step in providing US Department of Energy's Stockpile Stewardship program with the high-energy, large volume, laboratory x-ray sources needed for the Radiation Effects Science and Simulation (RES), Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), and Weapon Physics (WP) Programs. Advances in fast pulsed power technology and in z-pinch hohlraums on Sandia National Laboratories' Z Accelerator in 1997 provide sufficient basis for pursuing the development of X-1. This paper will introduce the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source Facility Project, describe the systems analysis and engineering approach being used, and identify critical technology areas being researched

  10. Spectral state transitions of the Ultraluminous X-ray Source IC 342 X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, H.; Kaaret, P.; Lang, C.; Feng, H.; Grisé, F.; Miller, N.; Cseh, D.; Corbel, S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2014-10-01

    We observed the Ultraluminous X-ray Source (ULX) IC 342 X-1 simultaneously in X-ray and radio with Chandra and the JVLA to investigate previously reported unresolved radio emission coincident with the ULX. The Chandra data reveal a spectrum that is much softer than observed previously and is well modelled by a thermal accretion disc spectrum. No significant radio emission above the rms noise level was observed within the region of the ULX, consistent with the interpretation as a thermal state though other states cannot be entirely ruled out with the current data. We estimate the mass of the black hole using the modelled inner disc temperature to be 30 M_{⊙} ≲ M√{cosi}≲ 200 M_{⊙} based on a Shakura-Sunyaev disc model. Through a study of the hardness and high-energy curvature of available X-ray observations, we find that the accretion state of X-1 is not determined by luminosity alone.

  11. X-RAY OUTFLOWS AND SUPER-EDDINGTON ACCRETION IN THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE HOLMBERG IX X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Roberts, T. P.; Middleton, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of X-ray continuum emission and flux variability have not conclusively revealed the nature of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) at the high-luminosity end of the distribution (those with L X ≥ 10 40 erg s –1 ). These are of particular interest because the luminosity requires either super-Eddington accretion onto a black hole of mass ∼10 M ☉ or more standard accretion onto an intermediate-mass black hole. Super-Eddington accretion models predict strong outflowing winds, making atomic absorption lines a key diagnostic of the nature of extreme ULXs. To search for such features, we have undertaken a long, 500 ks observing campaign on Holmberg IX X-1 with Suzaku. This is the most sensitive data set in the iron K bandpass for a bright, isolated ULX to date, yet we find no statistically significant atomic features in either emission or absorption; any undetected narrow features must have equivalent widths less than 15-20 eV at 99% confidence. These limits are far below the ∼>150 eV lines expected if observed trends between mass inflow and outflow rates extend into the super-Eddington regime and in fact rule out the line strengths observed from disk winds in a variety of sub-Eddington black holes. We therefore cannot be viewing the central regions of Holmberg IX X-1 through any substantial column of material, ruling out models of spherical super-Eddington accretion. If Holmberg IX X-1 is a super-Eddington source, any associated outflow must have an anisotropic geometry. Finally, the lack of iron emission suggests that the stellar companion cannot be launching a strong wind and that Holmberg IX X-1 must primarily accrete via Roche-lobe overflow

  12. Discovery of a 115 Day Orbital Period in the Ultraluminous X-ray Source NGC 5408 X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of a 115 day periodicity in SWIFT/XRT monitoring data from the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1. Our o ngoing campaign samples its X-ray flux approximately twice weekly and has now achieved a temporal baseline of ti 485 days. Periodogram ana lysis reveals a significant periodicity with a period of 115.5 +/- 4 days. The modulation is detected with a significance of 3.2 x 10(exp -4) . The fractional modulation amplitude decreases with increasing e nergy, ranging from 0.13 +/- 0.02 above 1 keV to 0.24 +/- 0.02 below 1 keV. The shape of the profile evolves as well, becoming less sharply peaked at higher energies. The periodogram analysis is consistent wi th a periodic process, however, continued monitoring is required to c onfirm the coherent nature of the modulation. Spectral analysis indic ates that NGC 5408 X-1 can reach 0.3 - 10 keV luminosities of approxi mately 2 x 10 40 ergs/s . We suggest that, like the 62 day period of the ULX in M82 (X41.4-1-60), the periodicity detected in NGC 5408 X-1 represents the orbital period of the black hole binary containing the ULX. If this is true then the secondary can only be a giant or super giant star.

  13. A hard X-ray study of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5204 X-1 with NuSTAR and XMM-Newton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukherjee, E. S.; Walton, D. J.; Bachetti, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from coordinated X-ray observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5204 X-1 performed by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array and XMM-Newton in early 2013. These observations provide the first detection of NGC 5204 X-1 above 10 keV, extending the broadband cover...

  14. Broadband X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous x-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 observed with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the coordinated broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku in late 2012. These observations provide the first high-quality spectra of Holmberg IX X-1 above 10 keV to date, extending the...

  15. Remote Sensing of Urban Microclimate Change in L’Aquila City (Italy after Post-Earthquake Depopulation in an Open Source GIS Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Baiocchi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This work reports a first attempt to use Landsat satellite imagery to identify possible urban microclimate changes in a city center after a seismic event that affected L’Aquila City (Abruzzo Region, Italy, on 6 April 2009. After the main seismic event, the collapse of part of the buildings, and the damaging of most of them, with the consequence of an almost total depopulation of the historic city center, may have caused alterations to the microclimate. This work develops an inexpensive work flow—using Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ scenes—to construct the evolution of urban land use after the catastrophic main seismic event that hit L’Aquila. We hypothesized, that, possibly, before the event, the temperature was higher in the city center due to the presence of inhabitants (and thus home heating; while the opposite case occurred in the surrounding areas, where new settlements of inhabitants grew over a period of a few months. We decided not to look to independent meteorological data in order to avoid being biased in their investigations; thus, only the smallest dataset of Landsat ETM+ scenes were considered as input data in order to describe the thermal evolution of the land surface after the earthquake. We managed to use the Landsat archive images to provide thermal change indications, useful for understanding the urban changes induced by catastrophic events, setting up an easy to implement, robust, reproducible, and fast procedure.

  16. The ultraluminous x-ray sources ngc 1313 x-1 and x-2: a broadband study with NuSTAR and XMM-Newton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachetti, Matteo; Rana, Vikram; Walton, Dominic J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observations of the two ultraluminous X-ray sources: NGC 1313 X-1 and X-2. The combined spectral bandpass of the two satellites enables us to produce the first spectrum of X-1 between 0.3 and 30 keV, while X-2 is not significantly detected by NuSTAR...

  17. NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Suzaku Observations of the Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Holmberg II X-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Middleton, M. J.; Rana, V.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first broadband 0.3-25.0 keV X-ray observations of the bright ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg II X-1, performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku in 2013 September. The NuSTAR data provide the first observations of Holmberg II X-1 above 10 keV and reveal a very steep high...

  18. Calibration and performance testing of the IAEA Aquila Active Well Coincidence Counter (Unit 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O..; Siebelist, R.; Wenz, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    An Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and a portable shift register (PSR-B) produced by Aquila Technologies Group, Inc., have been tested and cross-calibrated with existing AWCCs used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report summarizes the results of these tests and the cross-calibration of the detector. In addition, updated tables summarizing the cross-calibration of existing AWCCs and AmLi sources are also included. Using the Aquila PSR-B with existing IAEA software requires secondary software also supplied by Aquila to set up the PSR-B with the appropriate measurement parameters

  19. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE HOLMBERG IX X-1 AND ITS STELLAR ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grise, F.; Kaaret, P.; Pakull, M. W.; Motch, C.

    2011-01-01

    Holmberg IX X-1 is an archetypal ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX). Here we study the properties of the optical counterpart and of its stellar environment using optical data from SUBARU/Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph, GEMINI/GMOS-N and Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys, as well as simultaneous Chandra X-ray data. The V ∼ 22.6 spectroscopically identified optical counterpart is part of a loose cluster with an age ∼ sun . The counterpart is more luminous than the other stars of the association, suggesting a non-negligible optical contribution from the accretion disk. An observed UV excess also points to non-stellar light similar to X-ray active low-mass X-ray binaries. A broad He II λ4686 emission line identified in the optical spectrum of the ULX further suggests optical light from X-ray reprocessing in the accretion disk. Using stellar evolutionary tracks, we have constrained the mass of the counterpart to be ∼> 10 M sun , even if the accretion disk contributes significantly to the optical luminosity. Comparison of the photometric properties of the counterpart with binary models show that the donor may be more massive, ∼> 25 M sun , with the ULX system likely undergoing case AB mass transfer. Finally, the counterpart exhibits photometric variability of 0.14 mag between two HST observations separated by 50 days which could be due to ellipsoidal variations and/or disk reprocessing of variable X-ray emission.

  20. A 1990 global emission inventory of anthropogenic sources of carbon monoxide on 1o x 1o developed in the framework of EDGAR/GEIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, J.G.J.; Bouwman, A.F.; Bloos, J.P.J.; Berdowski, J.J.M.; Visschedijk, A.J.H.

    1999-01-01

    A global emission inventory of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions with 1 o x 1 o latitude-longitude resolution was compiled for 1990 on a sectoral basis. The sectoral sources considered include large-scale biomass burning (29%, of which savanna burning, 18%, and deforestation, 11%), fossil fuel combustion (27%, predominantly in road transport), biofuel combustion (19%, predominantly fuelwood combustion), agricultural waste burning (21%) and industrial process sources (4%). The inventory was compiled using mostly national statistics as activity data, emission factors at global or country level, and specific grid maps to convert, by sector, country total emissions to the 1 o x 1 o grid. A special effort was made to compile a global inventory of biofuel use, since this was considered to be a significant source on a global level, and a major source in some regions such as India and China. The global anthropogenic source of CO in 1990 is estimated at about 974 Tg CO yr -1 . The inventory is available on a sectoral basis on a 1 o x 1 o grid for input to global atmospheric models and on a regional/country basis for policy analysis. (author)

  1. Broadband X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 observed with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Fuerst, F.; Madsen, K. K.; Rana, V.; Stern, D. [Space Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Webb, N. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Fabian, A. C.; Parker, M. L. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Ptak, A.; Zhang, W. W., E-mail: dwalton@srl.caltech.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    We present results from the coordinated broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku in late 2012. These observations provide the first high-quality spectra of Holmberg IX X-1 above 10 keV to date, extending the X-ray coverage of this remarkable source up to ∼30 keV. Broadband observations were undertaken at two epochs, between which Holmberg IX X-1 exhibited both flux and strong spectral variability, increasing in luminosity from L {sub X} = (1.90 ± 0.03) × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} to L {sub X} = (3.35 ± 0.03) × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1}. Neither epoch exhibits a spectrum consistent with emission from the standard low/hard accretion state seen in Galactic black hole binaries, which would have been expected if Holmberg IX X-1 harbors a truly massive black hole accreting at substantially sub-Eddington accretion rates. The NuSTAR data confirm that the curvature observed previously in the 3-10 keV bandpass does represent a true spectral cutoff. During each epoch, the spectrum appears to be dominated by two optically thick thermal components, likely associated with an accretion disk. The spectrum also shows some evidence for a nonthermal tail at the highest energies, which may further support this scenario. The available data allow for either of the two thermal components to dominate the spectral evolution, although both scenarios require highly nonstandard behavior for thermal accretion disk emission.

  2. The ultraluminous X-ray sources NGC 1313 X-1 and X-2: A broadband study with NuSTAR and XMM-Newton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Webb, Natalie A. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Rana, Vikram; Walton, Dominic J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Fabian, Andrew C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Hornschemeier, Ann; Ptak, Andrew F.; Zhang, William W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: matteo.bachetti@irap.omp.eu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observations of the two ultraluminous X-ray sources: NGC 1313 X-1 and X-2. The combined spectral bandpass of the two satellites enables us to produce the first spectrum of X-1 between 0.3 and 30 keV, while X-2 is not significantly detected by NuSTAR above 10 keV. The NuSTAR data demonstrate that X-1 has a clear cutoff above 10 keV, whose presence was only marginally detectable with previous X-ray observations. This cutoff rules out the interpretation of X-1 as a black hole in a standard low/hard state, and it is deeper than predicted for the downturn of a broadened iron line in a reflection-dominated regime. The cutoff differs from the prediction of a single-temperature Comptonization model. Further, a cold disk-like blackbody component at ∼0.3 keV is required by the data, confirming previous measurements by XMM-Newton only. We observe a spectral transition in X-2, from a state with high luminosity and strong variability to a lower-luminosity state with no detectable variability, and we link this behavior to a transition from a super-Eddington to a sub-Eddington regime.

  3. Low Frequency Quasi-periodic Oscillations in the High-eccentric LMXB Cir X-1: Extending the WK Correlation for Z Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Qingcui; Chen, Li [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Belloni, T. M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E, Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Qu, Jinlu, E-mail: buqc@mail.bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: tomaso.belloni@brera.inaf.it, E-mail: chenli@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: qujl@ihep.ac.cn [Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Using archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ( RXTE ) data, we studied the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (LFQPOs) in the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Cir X-1 and examined their contribution to frequency–frequency correlations for Z sources. We also studied the orbital phase effects on the LFQPO properties and found them to be phase independent. Comparing LFQPO frequencies in different classes of LMXBs, we found that systems that show both Z and atoll states form a common track with atoll/BH sources in the so-called WK correlation, while persistent Z systems are offset by a factor of about two. We found that neither source luminosity nor mass accretion rate is related to the shift of persistent Z systems. We discuss the possibility of a misidentification of fundamental frequency for horizontal branch oscillations from persistent Z systems and interpreted the oscillations in terms of models based on relativistic precession.

  4. The L'Aquila trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Alessandro; Cocco, Massimo; Cultrera, Giovanna; Galadini, Fabrizio; Margheriti, Lucia; Nostro, Concetta; Pantosti, Daniela

    2013-04-01

    The first step of the trial in L'Aquila (Italy) ended with a conviction of a group of seven experts to 6 years of jail and several million euros refund for the families of the people who died during the Mw 6.3 earthquake on April 6, 2009. This verdict has a tremendous impact on the scientific community as well as on the way in which scientists deliver their expert opinions to decision makers and society. In this presentation, we describe the role of scientists in charge of releasing authoritative information concerning earthquakes and seismic hazard and the conditions that led to the verdict, in order to discuss whether this trial represented a prosecution to science, and if errors were made in communicating the risk. Documents, articles and comments about the trial are collected in the web site http://processoaquila.wordpress.com/. We will first summarize what was the knowledge about the seismic hazard of the region and the vulnerability of L'Aquila before the meeting of the National Commission for Forecasting and Predicting Great Risks (CGR) held 6 days before the main shock. The basic point of the accusation is that the CGR suggested that no strong earthquake would have occurred (which of course was never mentioned by any seismologist participating to the meeting). This message would have convinced the victims to stay at home, instead of moving out after the M3.9 and M3.5 earthquakes few hours before the mainshock. We will describe how the available scientific information was passed to the national and local authorities, and in general how the Italian scientific Institution in charge of seismic monitoring and research (INGV), the Civil Protection Department (DPC) and the CGR should interact according to the law. As far as the communication and outreach to the public, the scientific Institutions as INGV have the duty to communicate scientific information. Instead, the risk management and the definition of actions for risk reduction is in charge of Civil

  5. New results from Ooty EAS array for cosmic sources at PeV energies: Cygnus X-3, Crab pulsar and Sco X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonwar, S.C.; Gupta, S.K.; Gopalakrishnan, N.V.; Rajeev, M.R.; Srivatsan, R.; Sreekantan, B.V.

    1990-01-01

    Ooty group has reported detection of a steady signal from Cyg X-3 based on observations made during 1984-86 through detection of a directional excess. Further analysis of data has revealed a significant flux enhancement during April 1986, confirming observations reported by the CYGNUS group at Los Alamos and the Baksan group. These results show conclusively that the flux from Cyg X-3 is variable over a time scale of few weeks. We also report here the details of an unusual burst from Cyg X-3, consisting of 5 showers in 13 minutes, on June 19, 1985, which shows the variability of the flux from Cyg X-3 on a much shorter time scale of few minutes. Our analysis of showers arriving from the direction of the Crab pulsar has shown only a small time-averaged excess. But these data, when folded with the Crab pulsar period, show a very significant excess at the expected phase of the optical interpulse. This is the first detection of 33 ms pulsation in the PeV energy flux from the Crab pulsar. The exact alignment of the phase of emission over nearly 20 decades of energy, from meter wavelengths to PeV, makes the Crab pulsar a really unique source to study and understand details of mechanisms for emission and acceleration of particles in compact sources. We also present here a discussion of our observations on another X-ray binary, Sco X-1. Ooty data show a very significant excess in the number of showers from the direction of Sco X-1 during a two month period in 1986, in agreement with observations reported by the Mt. Chacaltaya group. These observations establish this X-ray binary as another important source of PeV energy radiation. (orig.)

  6. The earthquake lights (EQL of the 6 April 2009 Aquila earthquake, in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fidani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A seven-month collection of testimonials about the 6 April 2009 earthquake in Aquila, Abruzzo region, Italy, was compiled into a catalogue of non-seismic phenomena. Luminous phenomena were often reported starting about nine months before the strong shock and continued until about five months after the shock. A summary and list of the characteristics of these sightings was made according to 20th century classifications and a comparison was made with the Galli outcomes. These sightings were distributed over a large area around the city of Aquila, with a major extension to the north, up to 50 km. Various earthquake lights were correlated with several landscape characteristics and the source and dynamic of the earthquake. Some preliminary considerations on the location of the sightings suggest a correlation between electrical discharges and asperities, while flames were mostly seen along the Aterno Valley.

  7. Balloon observation of the binary X-ray source Her X-1 1.24 sec pulsation and cyclotron line emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, W.; Reppin, C.; Truemper, J.; Voges, W.; Kendziorra, E.; Staubert, R.; Tuebingen Univ.

    1978-01-01

    During a balloon observation from Palestine, Texas, the authors detected for the first time the 1.24 sec pulsation of Hercules X-1 in the hard X-ray range up to 70 keV and discovered strong line emission in its spectrum at 58 keV. They estimated a line flux of 3x10 -3 photons cm -2 sec -1 and a line width of less than 12 keV. The phenomenon is interpreted as electron cyclotron emission at the basic frequency emitted by the hot polar plasma of the rotating neutron star. The line measured leads to a magnetic field strength of 5.3x10 12 gauss. In further observations during a balloon campaign in Sept./Oct. 1977 the authors confirmed the existence of the line emission and for the first time found pulsed X-ray emission above 15 keV during the 'short on' - and 'off'-state of the Her X-1 35 day cycle. The pulse to interpulse ratio seems to vary with the 35 day phase

  8. On the Nature of the mHz X-ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass.We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling.We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  9. NUSTAR and Xmm-Newton Observations of the Extreme Ultraluminous X-Ray Source NGC 5907 UlX1: A Vanishing Act

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Bachetti, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained from two broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5907 ULX1, known to have a peak X-ray luminosity of ~5 × 1040 erg s–1. These XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations, separated by only ~4 days, revealed an extreme level of short-term...

  10. X-1E on Lakebed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1955-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1E in 1955 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed near the NACA High-Speed Flight Station, Edwards, California. The X-1E was notable for being shorter, with a thinner wing than the X-1A, -B, and -D. Aerodynamic heating caused the ailerons, rudder, and elevators to remain unpainted throughout the X-1E's flight test program. When the ventral fins were added, they were left unpainted too. On August 31, 1956, the aircraft reached a top speed of 1,480 miles per hour (Mach 2.24). There were four versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Supersonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all-moving stabilizer. The flights of the X-1s opened up a new era in aviation. The first X-1 was air-launched unpowered from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress on January 25, 1946. Powered flights began in December 1946. On October 14

  11. [Medium- and long-term health effects of the L'Aquila earthquake (Central Italy, 2009) and of other earthquakes in high-income Countries: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll Gallardo, Alba; Alesina, Marta; Pacelli, Barbara; Serrone, Dario; Iacutone, Giovanni; Faggiano, Fabrizio; Della Corte, Francesco; Allara, Elias

    2016-01-01

    to compare the methodological characteristics of the studies investigating the middle- and long-term health effects of the L'Aquila earthquake with the features of studies conducted after other earthquakes occurred in highincome Countries. a systematic comparison between the studies which evaluated the health effects of the L'Aquila earthquake (Central Italy, 6th April 2009) and those conducted after other earthquakes occurred in comparable settings. Medline, Scopus, and 6 sources of grey literature were systematically searched. Inclusion criteria comprised measurement of health outcomes at least one month after the earthquake, investigation of earthquakes occurred in high-income Countries, and presence of at least one temporal or geographical control group. out of 2,976 titles, 13 studies regarding the L'Aquila earthquake and 51 studies concerning other earthquakes were included. The L'Aquila and the Kobe/Hanshin- Awaji (Japan, 17th January 1995) earthquakes were the most investigated. Studies on the L'Aquila earthquake had a median sample size of 1,240 subjects, a median duration of 24 months, and used most frequently a cross sectional design (7/13). Studies on other earthquakes had a median sample size of 320 subjects, a median duration of 15 months, and used most frequently a time series design (19/51). the L'Aquila studies often focussed on mental health, while the earthquake effects on mortality, cardiovascular outcomes, and health systems were less frequently evaluated. A more intensive use of routine data could benefit future epidemiological surveillance in the aftermath of earthquakes.

  12. Testimonies to the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) and to the L'Aquila process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenda, Pavel; Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    Lot of confusions, misinformation, false solidarity, efforts to misuse geoethics and other unethical activities in favour of the top Italian seismologists responsible for a bad and superficial evaluation of the situation 6 days prior to the earthquake - that is a general characteristics for the whole period of 5 years separating us from the horrible morning of April 6, 2009 in L'Aquila with 309 human victims. The first author of this presentation as a seismologist had unusual opportunity to visit the unfortunate city in April 2009. He got all "first-hand" information that a real scientifically based prediction did exist already for some shocks in the area on March 29 and 30, 2009. The author of the prediction Gianpaolo Giuliani was obliged to stop any public information diffused by means of internet. A new prediction was known to him on March 31 - in the day when the "Commission of Great Risks" offered a public assurance that any immediate earthquake can be practically excluded. In reality the members of the commission completely ignored such a prediction declaring it as a false alarm of "somebody" (even without using the name of Giuliani). The observations by Giuliani were of high quality from the scientific point of view. G. Giuliani predicted L'Aquila earthquake in the professional way - for the first time during many years of observations. The anomalies, which preceded L'Aquila earthquake were detected on many places in Europe in the same time. The question is, what locality would be signed as potential focal area, if G. Giuliani would know the other observations in Europe. The deformation (and other) anomalies are observable before almost all of global M8 earthquakes. Earthquakes are preceded by deformation and are predictable. The testimony of the second author is based on many unfortunate personal experiences with representatives of the INGV Rome and their supporters from India and even Australia. In July 2010, prosecutor Fabio Picuti charged the Commission

  13. X-ray structural study of Ge(001):Te 1x1 performed at the advanced photon source. Current status of the surface-interface structure beamline at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Sakata, O

    2002-01-01

    This article is composed of two parts. In the first half, we describe a study that we performed at 5ID-C of the Dupont- Northwestern University-Dow (DND) CAT in the Advanced Photon Source, the Argonne National Laboratory for 1998 to 2000. A surface structure of Ge(001):Te 1x1 was determined by least-squares fits of x-ray scattered intensities with calculations based on some surface atomic structural models. The fitted structural model has a characteristic that a direction of a Ge-Ge dimer bond on the first Ge atomic layer is perpendicular to a Te missing row. It was distinct from those based on first-principles total energy calculations. In the second half, we introduce up-to-the-minute status of BL13XU for surface-interface structural studies at SPring-8. Scientific research goals we desire are mentioned as well. (author)

  14. Exploring the η Aquila System: Another Cepheid Parallax and Further Evidence for a Tertiary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, George Frederick; Barnes, Thomas G.; Evans, Nancy; Cochran, William; McArthur, Barbara E.; Harrison, Thomas E.

    2018-01-01

    We report progress towards a re-analysis of Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor astrometric data, originally acquired to determine a parallax for and absolute magnitudes of the classical Cepheid, η Aquila. This object was not included in past Cepheid Period-Luminosity Relation (PLR) work (Benedict et al. 2007, AJ, 133, 1810), because we had an insufficient number of epochs with which to establish a suspected and complicating companion orbit. Our new investigation is considerably aided by including a significant number of radial velocity measures (RV) from six sources, including new, high-quality Hobby-Eberly Telescope spectra. We first derive a 12 Fourier coefficient description of the Cepheid pulsation, solving for velocity offsets required to bring the six RV data sets into coincidence. We next model the RV residuals to that fit with an orbit. The resulting orbit has very high eccentricity. The astrometric residuals show only a very small perturbation, consistent with a prediction from the spectroscopic orbit. We finally include that orbit in a combined astrometry and radial velocity model. This modeling, similar to that presented in Benedict and Harrison (2017, AJ, 153, 258) yields a parallax, allowing inclusion of η Aquila in a PLR. It also establishes a Cepheid/companion mass ratio for the early-type star companion identified in IUE spectra (Evans 1991, ApJ, 372, 597).

  15. Mental health in L'Aquila after the earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Stratta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the present work we describe the mental health condition of L'Aquila population in the aftermath of the earthquake in terms of structural, process and outcome perspectives. METHOD: Literature revision of the published reports on the L'Aquila earthquake has been performed. RESULTS: Although important psychological distress has been reported by the population, capacity of resilience can be observed. However if resilient mechanisms intervened in immediate aftermath of the earthquake, important dangers are conceivable in the current medium-long-term perspective due to the long-lasting alterations of day-to-day life and the disruption of social networks that can be well associated with mental health problems. CONCLUSIONS: In a condition such as an earthquake, the immediate physical, medical, and emergency rescue needs must be addressed initially. However training first responders to identify psychological distress symptoms would be important for mental health triage in the field.

  16. On the recurrence time and outburst properties of the soft X-ray transient Aquila X-1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Vojtěch

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 381, č. 1 (2002), s. 151-167 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/00/P013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : stars activity * stars magnetic fields * close binaries Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.781, year: 2002

  17. Nova Aquilae 1982: the nature of its dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longmore, A.J.; Williams, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    Infrared photometric measurements of Nova Aquilae 1982, covering a period from 37 to 261 days after its discovery, have been obtained. Thermal emission was present even from the first observation. The observations show that the conventional picture of dust forming in the nova ejecta does not apply in this case, and suggest that a re-examination of the infrared modelling of earlier novae would be worthwhile. (U.K.)

  18. Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Study of BY Circini and V 1425 Aquilae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ferent authors (Woudt & Warner 2003; Bateson & McIntosh 1998; Johnson et al. 1997; Greeley et al. 1995; Evans & Yudin 1995; Cooper et al. 1995; Gilmore et al. 1995; Liller et al. 1995). Nova Aquilae 1995 was discovered on 1995 February 7 by Nakano et al. (1995), with an orbital period of 6.14 h (Retter et al. 1998a) at a ...

  19. Lessons of L'Aquila for Operational Earthquake Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    The L'Aquila earthquake of 6 Apr 2009 (magnitude 6.3) killed 309 people and left tens of thousands homeless. The mainshock was preceded by a vigorous seismic sequence that prompted informal earthquake predictions and evacuations. In an attempt to calm the population, the Italian Department of Civil Protection (DPC) convened its Commission on the Forecasting and Prevention of Major Risk (MRC) in L'Aquila on 31 March 2009 and issued statements about the hazard that were widely received as an "anti-alarm"; i.e., a deterministic prediction that there would not be a major earthquake. On October 23, 2012, a court in L'Aquila convicted the vice-director of DPC and six scientists and engineers who attended the MRC meeting on charges of criminal manslaughter, and it sentenced each to six years in prison. A few weeks after the L'Aquila disaster, the Italian government convened an International Commission on Earthquake Forecasting for Civil Protection (ICEF) with the mandate to assess the status of short-term forecasting methods and to recommend how they should be used in civil protection. The ICEF, which I chaired, issued its findings and recommendations on 2 Oct 2009 and published its final report, "Operational Earthquake Forecasting: Status of Knowledge and Guidelines for Implementation," in Aug 2011 (www.annalsofgeophysics.eu/index.php/annals/article/view/5350). As defined by the Commission, operational earthquake forecasting (OEF) involves two key activities: the continual updating of authoritative information about the future occurrence of potentially damaging earthquakes, and the officially sanctioned dissemination of this information to enhance earthquake preparedness in threatened communities. Among the main lessons of L'Aquila is the need to separate the role of science advisors, whose job is to provide objective information about natural hazards, from that of civil decision-makers who must weigh the benefits of protective actions against the costs of false alarms

  20. Maps Suggest Transport and Source Processes of PM2.5 at 1 km x 1 km for the Whole San Joaquin Valley, Winter 2011 (Generalizations from DISCOVER-AQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, R. B.

    2016-12-01

    We present interpreted data analysis using MAIAC (Multiangle implementation of Atmospheric Correction) retrievals and appropriate RAPid Update Cycle (RAP) meteorology to map respirable aerosol (PM2.5) for the period January and February, 2011. The San Joaquin Valley is one of the unhealthiest regions in the USA for PM2.5 and related morbidity. The methodology evaluated can be used for the entire moderate-resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS, VIIRS) data record. Other difficult areas of the West: Riverside, CA, Salt Lake City, UT, and Doña Ana County, NM share similar difficulties and solutions. The maps of boundary layer depth for 11-16 hr local time from RAP allows us to interpret aerosol optical thickness as a concentration of particles in a nearly well-mixed box capped by clean air. That mixing is demonstrated by DISCOVER-AQ data and afternoon samples from the airborne measurements, P3B (on-board) and B200 (HSRL2 lidar). This data and the PM2.5 gathered at the deployment sites allowed us to estimate and then evaluate consistency and daily variation of the AOT to PM2.5 relationship. Mixed-effects modeling allowed a refinement of that relation from day to day; RAP mixed layers explained the success of previous mixed-effects modeling. Compositional, size-distribution, and MODIS angle-of-regard effects seem to describe the need for residual daily correction beyond ML depth. We report on an extension method to the entire San Joaquin Valley for all days with MODIS imagery using the permanent PM2.5 stations, evaluated for representativeness. Resulting map movies show distinct sources, particularly Interstate-5 (at 1km x 1km resolution) and the broader Bakersfield area. Accompanying winds suggest transport effects and variable pathways of pollution cleanout. Such estimates should allow morbidity/mortality studies. They should be also useful for actual model assimilations, where composition and sources are uncertain. We conclude with a description of new work to

  1. Lessons Learned from L'Aquila Trial for Scientists' Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koketsu, K.; Cerase, A.; Amato, A.; Oki, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Appeal and Supreme Courts of Italy concluded that there was no bad communication by defendants except for the "glass of wine interview" which was made by a government official before the scientists' meeting. This meeting was held 6 days before the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake to discuss the outlook for the seismic activity in the L'Aquila area. However, at least two TV stations and a newspaper reported the content of the "glass of wine interview" in the next morning as it was announced by the defendant scientists. The reports triggered a domino effect of misinterpretations, which may be well acknowledged in the light of the social amplification of risk framework. These TV stations and newspaper should be also considered responsible for the bad communication. This point was missing in the sentence documents by the Appeal and Supreme Courts. Therefore, for scientists, a lesson of communication, especially during a seismic hazard crisis, is that they must carefully craft their messages and the way they circulate, both in broadcast and digital media, and follow reports released by the media on their activities. As another lesson, scientists must be aware that key concepts of safety such as "no danger" and "favorable situation", which were used in the "glass of wine interview", and the idea of probability can have different meanings for scientists, media, and citizens.

  2. Structural damages of L'Aquila (Italy earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kaplan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available On 6 April 2009 an earthquake of magnitude 6.3 occurred in L'Aquila city, Italy. In the city center and surrounding villages many masonry and reinforced concrete (RC buildings were heavily damaged or collapsed. After the earthquake, the inspection carried out in the region provided relevant results concerning the quality of the materials, method of construction and the performance of the structures. The region was initially inhabited in the 13th century and has many historic structures. The main structural materials are unreinforced masonry (URM composed of rubble stone, brick, and hollow clay tile. Masonry units suffered the worst damage. Wood flooring systems and corrugated steel roofs are common in URM buildings. Moreover, unconfined gable walls, excessive wall thicknesses without connection with each other are among the most common deficiencies of poorly constructed masonry structures. These walls caused an increase in earthquake loads. The quality of the materials and the construction were not in accordance with the standards. On the other hand, several modern, non-ductile concrete frame buildings have collapsed. Poor concrete quality and poor reinforcement detailing caused damage in reinforced concrete structures. Furthermore, many structural deficiencies such as non-ductile detailing, strong beams-weak columns and were commonly observed. In this paper, reasons why the buildings were damaged in the 6 April 2009 earthquake in L'Aquila, Italy are given. Some suggestions are made to prevent such disasters in the future.

  3. Long-term studies with the Ariel 5 ASM. I - Hercules X-1, Vela X-1, and Centaurus X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, S. S.; Kaluzienski, L. J.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    Twelve hundred days of 3-6 keV X-ray data from Her X-1, Vela X-1, and Cen X-3 accumulated with the Ariel 5 All-Sky Monitor are interrogated. The binary periodicities of all three can be clearly observed, as can the 35 day variation of Her X-1, for which we can refine the period to 34.875 plus or minus 0.030 days. No such longer-term periodicity less than 200 days is observed from Vela X-1. The 26.6 days low-state recurrence period for Cen X-3 is not observed, but a 43.0 day candidate periodicity is found which may be consistent with the precession of an accretion disk in that system. The present results are illustrative of the long-term studies which can be performed on approximately 50 sources over a temporal base which will ultimately extend to at least 1800 days.

  4. Characterization of earthquake-induced ground motion from the L'Aquila seismic sequence of 2009, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagnini, Luca; Akinci, Aybige; Mayeda, Kevin; Munafo', Irene; Herrmann, Robert B.; Mercuri, Alessia

    2011-01-01

    Based only on weak-motion data, we carried out a combined study on region-specific source scaling and crustal attenuation in the Central Apennines (Italy). Our goal was to obtain a reappraisal of the existing predictive relationships for the ground motion, and to test them against the strong-motion data [peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV) and spectral acceleration (SA)] gathered during the Mw 6.15 L'Aquila earthquake (2009 April 6, 01:32 UTC). The L'Aquila main shock was not part of the predictive study, and the validation test was an extrapolation to one magnitude unit above the largest earthquake of the calibration data set. The regional attenuation was determined through a set of regressions on a data set of 12 777 high-quality, high-gain waveforms with excellent S/N ratios (4259 vertical and 8518 horizontal time histories). Seismograms were selected from the recordings of 170 foreshocks and aftershocks of the sequence (the complete set of all earthquakes with ML≥ 3.0, from 2008 October 1 to 2010 May 10). All waveforms were downloaded from the ISIDe web page (), a web site maintained by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV). Weak-motion data were used to obtain a moment tensor solution, as well as a coda-based moment-rate source spectrum, for each one of the 170 events of the L'Aquila sequence (2.8 ≤Mw≤ 6.15). Source spectra were used to verify the good agreement with the source scaling of the Colfiorito seismic sequence of 1997-1998 recently described by Malagnini (2008). Finally, results on source excitation and crustal attenuation were used to produce the absolute site terms for the 23 stations located within ˜80 km of the epicentral area. The complete set of spectral corrections (crustal attenuation and absolute site effects) was used to implement a fast and accurate tool for the automatic computation of moment magnitudes in the Central Apennines.

  5. The temporal behaviour of Taurus X-1 (the Crab Nebula)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, P.J.N.

    1975-01-01

    Copernicus data on Taurus X-1 and the Crab pulsar extending over a 2 1/2-yr period indicate that under normal conditions the source has a flux that is constant to within 2.5 per cent at the 90 per cent confidence level. The pulsed/total flux ratio also shows no significant changes during the same time. (author)

  6. Low energy gamma rays emitted by Sco X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui-Van, A.; Martin, I.M.

    1975-01-01

    Sco X-1 was observed on a balloon flight launched from Sao Jose dos Campos, S.P., Brazil, on December 20, 1974. A 3 sigma excess of the raw count rate, covering the energy range 0.2 to 5.0 MeV, was found during the transit of the source. A power-law spectrum provided an adequate fit to the data. Although it was difficult to separate the contribution of the universal diffuse component, the existence of hard-component in the spectrum of Sco X-1 could indicate the presence of matter hotter than previously deduced from soft X-ray observations [pt

  7. Low-energy gamma rays from Cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roques, J.P.; Mandrou, P.; Lebrun, F.; Paul, J.

    1985-08-01

    Cyg X-1 was observed by the CESR balloon borne telescope OPALE, in June 1976. The high-energy spectrum of the source, which was in its ''superlow state'', was seen to extend well beyond 1 MeV. In this paper, the observed low-energy γ-ray component of Cyg X-1 is compared with the predictions of recent models involving accretion onto a stellar black hole, and including a possible contribution from the pair-annihilation 511 keV γ-ray line

  8. The 6 April 2009 earthquake at L'Aquila: a preliminary analysis of magnetic field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Villante

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Several investigations reported the possible identification of anomalous geomagnetic field signals prior to earthquake occurrence. In the ULF frequency range, candidates for precursory signatures have been proposed in the increase in the noise background and polarization parameter (i.e. the ratio between the amplitude/power of the vertical component and that one of the horizontal component, in the changing characteristics of the slope of the power spectrum and fractal dimension, in the possible occurrence of short duration pulses. We conducted, with conventional techniques of data processing, a preliminary analysis of the magnetic field observations performed at L'Aquila during three months preceding the 6 April 2009 earthquake, focusing attention on the possible occurrence of features similar to those identified in previous events. Within the limits of this analysis, we do not find compelling evidence for any of the features which have been proposed as earthquake precursors: indeed, most of aspects of our observations (which, in some cases, appear consistent with previous findings might be interpreted in terms of the general magnetospheric conditions and/or of different sources.

  9. Spectroscopic follow-up of the Hercules-Aquila Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simion, Iulia T.; Belokurov, Vasily; Koposov, Sergey E.; Sheffield, Allyson; Johnston, Kathryn V.

    2018-05-01

    We designed a follow-up program to find the spectroscopic properties of the Hercules-Aquila Cloud (HAC) and test scenarios for its formation. We measured the radial velocities (RVs) of 45 RR Lyrae in the southern portion of the HAC using the facilities at the MDM observatory, producing the first large sample of velocities in the HAC. We found a double-peaked distribution in RVs, skewed slightly to negative velocities. We compared both the morphology of HAC projected on to the plane of the sky and the distribution of velocities in this structure outlined by RR Lyrae and other tracer populations at different distances to N-body simulations. We found that the behaviour is characteristic of an old, well-mixed accretion event with small apo-galactic radius. We cannot yet rule out other formation mechanisms for the HAC. However, if our interpretation is correct, HAC represents just a small portion of a much larger debris structure spread throughout the inner Galaxy whose distinct kinematic structure should be apparent in RV studies along many lines of sight.

  10. Pediatric Epidemic of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in the Area of L’Aquila, Italy, Four Years after a Catastrophic Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Nigro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: A Salmonella enterica epidemic occurred in children of the area of L’Aquila (Central Italy, Abruzzo region between June 2013 and October 2014, four years after the catastrophic earthquake of 6 April 2009. Methods: Clinical and laboratory data were collected from hospitalized and ambulatory children. Routine investigations for Salmonella infection were carried out on numerous alimentary matrices of animal origin and sampling sources for drinking water of the L’Aquila district, including pickup points of the two main aqueducts. Results: Salmonella infection occurred in 155 children (83 females: 53%, aged 1 to 15 years (mean 2.10. Of these, 44 children (28.4% were hospitalized because of severe dehydration, electrolyte abnormalities, and fever resistant to oral antipyretic and antibiotic drugs. Three children (1.9% were reinfected within four months after primary infection by the same Salmonella strain. Four children (2.6%, aged one to two years, were coinfected by rotavirus. A seven-year old child had a concomitant right hip joint arthritis. The isolated strains, as confirmed in about the half of cases or probable/possible in the remaining ones, were identified as S. enterica serovar Typhimurium [4,5:i:-], monophasic variant. Aterno river, bordering the L’Aquila district, was recognized as the main responsible source for the contamination of local crops and vegetables derived from polluted crops. Conclusions: The high rate of hospitalized children underlines the emergence of a highly pathogenic S. enterica strain probably subsequent to the contamination of the spring water sources after geological changes occurred during the catastrophic earthquake.

  11. Pediatric Epidemic of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in the Area of L'Aquila, Italy, Four Years after a Catastrophic Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Giovanni; Bottone, Gabriella; Maiorani, Daniela; Trombatore, Fabiana; Falasca, Silvana; Bruno, Gianfranco

    2016-05-06

    A Salmonella enterica epidemic occurred in children of the area of L'Aquila (Central Italy, Abruzzo region) between June 2013 and October 2014, four years after the catastrophic earthquake of 6 April 2009. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from hospitalized and ambulatory children. Routine investigations for Salmonella infection were carried out on numerous alimentary matrices of animal origin and sampling sources for drinking water of the L'Aquila district, including pickup points of the two main aqueducts. Salmonella infection occurred in 155 children (83 females: 53%), aged 1 to 15 years (mean 2.10). Of these, 44 children (28.4%) were hospitalized because of severe dehydration, electrolyte abnormalities, and fever resistant to oral antipyretic and antibiotic drugs. Three children (1.9%) were reinfected within four months after primary infection by the same Salmonella strain. Four children (2.6%), aged one to two years, were coinfected by rotavirus. A seven-year old child had a concomitant right hip joint arthritis. The isolated strains, as confirmed in about the half of cases or probable/possible in the remaining ones, were identified as S. enterica serovar Typhimurium [4,5:i:-], monophasic variant. Aterno river, bordering the L'Aquila district, was recognized as the main responsible source for the contamination of local crops and vegetables derived from polluted crops. The high rate of hospitalized children underlines the emergence of a highly pathogenic S. enterica strain probably subsequent to the contamination of the spring water sources after geological changes occurred during the catastrophic earthquake.

  12. Modelling interstellar structures around Vela X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Katushkina, O. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2018-03-01

    We report the discovery of filamentary structures stretched behind the bow-shock-producing high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 using the SuperCOSMOS H-alpha Survey and present the results of optical spectroscopy of the bow shock carried out with the Southern African Large Telescope. The geometry of the detected structures suggests that Vela X-1 has encountered a wedge-like layer of enhanced density on its way and that the shocked material of the layer partially outlines a wake downstream of Vela X-1. To substantiate this suggestion, we carried out 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of interaction between Vela X-1 and the layer for three limiting cases. Namely, we run simulations in which (i) the stellar wind and the interstellar medium (ISM) were treated as pure hydrodynamic flows, (ii) a homogeneous magnetic field was added to the ISM, while the stellar wind was assumed to be unmagnetized, and (iii) the stellar wind was assumed to possess a helical magnetic field, while there was no magnetic field in the ISM. We found that although the first two simulations can provide a rough agreement with the observations, only the third one allowed us to reproduce not only the wake behind Vela X-1, but also the general geometry of the bow shock ahead of it.

  13. Cray X1 Evaluation Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, J.S.

    2004-02-09

    On August 15, 2002 the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Center for Computational Sciences (CCS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to deploy a new scalable vector supercomputer architecture for solving important scientific problems in climate, fusion, biology, nanoscale materials and astrophysics. ''This program is one of the first steps in an initiative designed to provide U.S. scientists with the computational power that is essential to 21st century scientific leadership,'' said Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, director of the department's Office of Science The Cray X1 is an attempt to incorporate the best aspects of previous Cray vector systems and massively-parallel-processing (MPP) systems into one design. Like the Cray T90, the X1 has high memory bandwidth, which is key to realizing a high percentage of theoretical peak performance. Like the Cray T3E, the X1 has a high-bandwidth, low-latency, scalable interconnect, and scalable system software. And, like the Cray SV1, the X1 leverages commodity off-the-shelf (CMOS) technology and incorporates non-traditional vector concepts, like vector caches and multi-streaming processors. In FY03, CCS procured a 256-processor Cray X1 to evaluate the processors, memory subsystem, scalability of the architecture, software environment and to predict the expected sustained performance on key DOE applications codes. The results of the micro-benchmarks and kernel benchmarks show the architecture of the Cray X1 to be exceptionally fast for most operations. The best results are shown on large problems, where it is not possible to fit the entire problem into the cache of the processors. These large problems are exactly the types of problems that are important for the DOE and ultra-scale simulation.

  14. Atmospheric chemistry of n-CxF2x+1CHO (x = 1, 2, 3, 4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, M. D.; Ball, J. C.; Wallington, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the atmospheric fate of n-C(x)F(2)(x)(+1)C(O) (x = 1, 2, 3, 4) radicals in 700 Torr O(2)/N(2) diluent at 298 +/- 3 K. A competition is observed between reaction with O(2) to form n-C(x)()F(2)(x)()(+1)C(O)O(2) radicals and decomposition to form n-C(x...... to the atmospheric chemistry of n-C(x)F(2)(x)(+1)C(O) radicals and their possible role in contributing to the formation of perfluorocarboxylic acids in the environment....

  15. Survey for hemoparasites in imperial eagles (Aquila heliaca), steppe eagles (Aquila nipalensis), and white-tailed sea eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla) from Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Lynda L; Layman, Seth; Bragin, Evgeny A; Katzner, Todd

    2004-04-01

    Prevalence of hemoparasites has been investigated in many avian species throughout Europe and North America. Basic hematologic surveys are the first step toward evaluating whether host-parasite prevalences observed in North America and Europe occur elsewhere in the world. We collected blood smears from 94 nestling imperial eagles (Aquila heliaca), five nestling steppe eagles (Aquila nipalensis), and 14 nestling white-tailed sea eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla) at Naurzum Zapovednik (Naurzum National Nature Reserve) in Kazakhstan during the summers of 1999 and 2000. In 1999, six of 29 imperial eagles were infected with Lencocytozoon toddi. Five of 65 imperial eagles and one of 14 white-tailed sea eagle were infected with L. toddi in 2000. Furthermore, in 2000, one of 65 imperial eagles was infected with Haemoproteus sp. We found no parasites in steppe eagles in either year, and no bird had multiple-species infections. These data are important because few hematologic studies of these eagle species have been conducted.

  16. Near-infrared and optical studies of the highly obscured nova V1831 Aquilae (Nova Aquilae 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, D. P. K.; Srivastava, Mudit K.; Ashok, N. M.; Munari, U.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Righetti, G. L.; Maitan, A.

    2018-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) and optical photometry and spectroscopy are presented for the nova V1831 Aquilae, covering the early decline and dust-forming phases during the first ∼90 d after its discovery. The nova is highly reddened due to interstellar extinction. Based solely on the nature of the NIR spectrum, we are able to classify the nova to be of the Fe II class. The distance and extinction to the nova are estimated to be 6.1 ± 0.5 kpc and Av ∼ 9.02, respectively. Lower limits of the electron density, emission measure and ionized ejecta mass are made from a Case B analysis of the NIR Brackett lines, while the neutral gas mass is estimated from the optical [O I] lines. We discuss the cause of the rapid strengthening of the He I 1.0830-μm line during the early stages. V1831 Aql formed a modest amount of dust fairly early (∼19.2 d after discovery); the dust shell is not seen to be optically thick. Estimates of the dust temperature, dust mass and grain size are made. Dust formation commences around day 19.2 at a condensation temperature of 1461 ± 15 K, suggestive of a carbon composition, following which the temperature is seen to decrease gradually to 950 K. The dust mass shows a rapid initial increase, which we interpret as being due to an increase in the number of grains, followed by a period of constancy, suggesting the absence of grain destruction processes during this latter time. A discussion of the evolution of these parameters is made, including certain peculiarities seen in the grain radius evolution.

  17. The Academic Impact of Natural Disasters: Evidence from L'Aquila Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Giorgio

    2018-01-01

    This paper uses a standard difference-in-differences approach to examine the effect of the L'Aquila earthquake on the academic performance of the students of the local university. The empirical results indicate that this natural disaster reduced students' probability of graduating on-time and slightly increased students' probability of dropping…

  18. A new Wolf-Rayet star and its circumstellar nebula in Aquila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Hamann, W.-R.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Fabrika, S.; Valeev, A. F.

    2010-04-01

    We report the discovery of a new Wolf-Rayet star in Aquila via detection of its circumstellar nebula (reminiscent of ring nebulae associated with late WN stars) using the Spitzer Space Telescope archival data. Our spectroscopic follow-up of the central point source associated with the nebula showed that it is a WN7h star (we named it WR121b). We analysed the spectrum of WR121b by using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmospheres, obtaining a stellar temperature of ~=50kK. The stellar wind composition is dominated by helium with ~20 per cent of hydrogen. The stellar spectrum is highly reddened [E(B - V) = 2.85mag]. Adopting an absolute magnitude of Mv = -5.7, the star has a luminosity of logL/Lsolar = 5.75 and a mass-loss rate of 10-4.7Msolaryr-1, and resides at a distance of 6.3kpc. We searched for a possible parent cluster of WR121b and found that this star is located at ~=1° from the young star cluster embedded in the giant HII region W43 (containing a WN7+a/OB? star - WR121a). We also discovered a bow shock around the O9.5III star ALS9956, located at from the cluster. We discuss the possibility that WR121b and ALS9956 are runaway stars ejected from the cluster in W43. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC). E-mail: vgvaram@mx.iki.rssi.ru (VVG); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK); wrh@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de (WRH); berdnik@sai.msu.ru (LNB); fabrika@sao.ru (SF); azamat@sao.ru (AFV)

  19. The Return of the Bursts : Thermonuclear Flashes from Circinus X-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linares, M.; Watts, A.; Altamirano, D.; Soleri, P.; Degenaar, N.; Yang, Y.; Wijnands, R.; Casella, P.; Homan, J.; Chakrabarty, D.; Rea, N.; Armas-Padilla, M.; Cavecchi, Y.; Kalamkar, M.; Kaur, R.; Patruno, A.; van der Klis, M.

    We report the detection of 15 X-ray bursts with RXTE and Swift observations of the peculiar X-ray binary Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) during its 2010 May X-ray re-brightening. These are the first X-ray bursts observed from the source after the initial discovery by Tennant and collaborators, 25 years ago.

  20. A status report on Cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eardley, D.M.; Lightman, A.P.; Shakura, N.I.; Shapiro, S.L.; Sunyaev, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Detailed models of gas flow and X-ray production are discussed, but it is concluded that the strongest argument in favour of a black hole is that Cygnus X-1 is a compact object, and has a mass larger than that allowed for a neutron star or white dwarf. Evidence for the former feature is associated with the observation of very rapid time variability in X-rays. Evidence for the latter follows from a union of various types of observations of the Cyg X-1 star system, in which the visible star is the single-line spectroscopic binary HDE 226868, a normal supergiant. The evidence is reviewed under the following headings: geometry of the accretion flow; emission mechanism; time variability. (U.K.)

  1. Mass determination of Hercules X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahcall, J.N.; Chester, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    The allowed range of masses for Hercules X-1 is calculated using the optical pulsation data of Middleditch and Nelson, a simple geometrical model for the optical pulsations, and Uhuru X-ray observations of the mass function and eclipse duration. For a specific set of assumptions, we obtain 0.6M/sub sun/ 1 < or =2.0M/sub sun/

  2. Young Researcher Meeting, L'Aquila 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostini, F; Antolini, C; Bossa, M; Cattani, G; Dell'Oro, S; D'Angelo, M; Di Stefano, M; Fragione, G; Migliaccio, M; Pagnanini, L; Pietrobon, D; Pusceddu, E; Serra, M; Stellato, F

    2016-01-01

    The Young Researcher Meeting (www.yrmr.it) has been established as a forum for students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers determined to play a proactive role in the scientific progress. Since 2009, we run itinerant, yearly meetings to discuss the most recent developments and achievements in physics, as we are firmly convinced that sharing expertise and experience is the foundation of the research activity. One of the main purposes of the conference is actually to create an international network of young researchers, both experimentalists and theorists, and fruitful collaborations across the different branches of physics. The format we chose is an informal meeting primarily aimed at students and postdoctoral researchers at the beginning of their scientific career, who are encouraged to present their work in brief presentations able to provide genuine engagement of the audience and cross-pollination of ideas. The sixth edition of the Young Researcher Meeting was held at the Gran Sasso Science Institute (GSSI), L'Aquila. The high number of valuable contributions gave rise to a busy program for a two-day conference on October 12 th -13 th . The event gathered 70 participants from institutes all around the world. The plenary talk sessions covered several areas of pure and applied physics, and they were complemented by an extremely rich and interactive poster session. This year's edition of the meeting also featured a lectio magistralis by Prof. E. Coccia, director of the GSSI, who discussed the frontiers in gravitational wave physics, commemorating the International Year of Light on the centenary of Einstein's theory of general relativity. On October 14 th , the participants to the conference took part to a guided tour of the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (LNGS), one of the major particle physics laboratories in the world. In this volume, we collect part of the contributions that have been presented at the conference as either talks or

  3. ORNL Cray X1 evaluation status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, P.K.; Alexander, R.A.; Apra, E.; Balay, S.; Bland, A.S; Colgan, J.; D'Azevedo, E.F.; Dongarra, J.J.; Dunigan, T.H. Jr.; Fahey, M.R.; Fahey, R.A.; Geist, A.; Gordon, M.; Harrison, R.J.; Kaushik, D.; Krishnakumar, M.; Luszczek, P.; Mezzacappa, A.; Nichols, J.A.; Nieplocha, J.; Oliker, L.; Packwood, T.; Pindzola, M.S.; Schulthess, T.C.; Vetter, J.S.; White III, J.B.; Windus, T.L.; Worley, P.H.; Zacharia, T.

    2004-01-01

    On August 15, 2002 the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Center for Computational Sciences (CCS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to deploy a new scalable vector supercomputer architecture for solving important scientific problems in climate, fusion, biology, nanoscale materials and astrophysics. ''This program is one of the first steps in an initiative designed to provide U.S. scientists with the computational power that is essential to 21st century scientific leadership,'' said Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, director of the department's Office of Science. In FY03, CCS procured a 256-processor Cray X1 to evaluate the processors, memory subsystem, scalability of the architecture, software environment and to predict the expected sustained performance on key DOE applications codes. The results of the micro-benchmarks and kernel bench marks show the architecture of the Cray X1 to be exceptionally fast for most operations. The best results are shown on large problems, where it is not possible to fit the entire problem into the cache of the processors. These large problems are exactly the types of problems that are important for the DOE and ultra-scale simulation. Application performance is found to be markedly improved by this architecture: - Large-scale simulations of high-temperature superconductors run 25 times faster than on an IBM Power4 cluster using the same number of processors. - Best performance of the parallel ocean program (POP v1.4.3) is 50 percent higher than on Japan s Earth Simulator and 5 times higher than on an IBM Power4 cluster. - A fusion application, global GYRO transport, was found to be 16 times faster on the X1 than on an IBM Power3. The increased performance allowed simulations to fully resolve questions raised by a prior study. - The transport kernel in the AGILE-BOLTZTRAN astrophysics code runs 15 times faster than on an IBM Power4 cluster using the same number of processors. - Molecular dynamics simulations related to the phenomenon of

  4. ORNL Cray X1 evaluation status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, P.K.; Alexander, R.A.; Apra, E.; Balay, S.; Bland, A.S; Colgan, J.; D' Azevedo, E.F.; Dongarra, J.J.; Dunigan Jr., T.H.; Fahey, M.R.; Fahey, R.A.; Geist, A.; Gordon, M.; Harrison, R.J.; Kaushik, D.; Krishnakumar, M.; Luszczek, P.; Mezzacappa, A.; Nichols, J.A.; Nieplocha, J.; Oliker, L.; Packwood, T.; Pindzola, M.S.; Schulthess, T.C.; Vetter, J.S.; White III, J.B.; Windus, T.L.; Worley, P.H.; Zacharia, T.

    2004-05-01

    On August 15, 2002 the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Center for Computational Sciences (CCS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to deploy a new scalable vector supercomputer architecture for solving important scientific problems in climate, fusion, biology, nanoscale materials and astrophysics. ''This program is one of the first steps in an initiative designed to provide U.S. scientists with the computational power that is essential to 21st century scientific leadership,'' said Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, director of the department's Office of Science. In FY03, CCS procured a 256-processor Cray X1 to evaluate the processors, memory subsystem, scalability of the architecture, software environment and to predict the expected sustained performance on key DOE applications codes. The results of the micro-benchmarks and kernel bench marks show the architecture of the Cray X1 to be exceptionally fast for most operations. The best results are shown on large problems, where it is not possible to fit the entire problem into the cache of the processors. These large problems are exactly the types of problems that are important for the DOE and ultra-scale simulation. Application performance is found to be markedly improved by this architecture: - Large-scale simulations of high-temperature superconductors run 25 times faster than on an IBM Power4 cluster using the same number of processors. - Best performance of the parallel ocean program (POP v1.4.3) is 50 percent higher than on Japan s Earth Simulator and 5 times higher than on an IBM Power4 cluster. - A fusion application, global GYRO transport, was found to be 16 times faster on the X1 than on an IBM Power3. The increased performance allowed simulations to fully resolve questions raised by a prior study. - The transport kernel in the AGILE-BOLTZTRAN astrophysics code runs 15 times faster than on an IBM Power4 cluster using the same number of processors. - Molecular dynamics simulations

  5. The nature of the companion star in Circinus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Helen M.; Soria, Roberto; Gibson, Joel

    2016-02-01

    We present optical spectra and images of the X-ray binary Circinus X-1. The optical light curve of Cir X-1 is strongly variable, changing in brightness by 1.2 mag in the space of four days. The shape of the light curve is consistent with that seen in the 1980s, when the X-ray and radio counterparts of the source were at least ten times as bright as they are currently. We detect strong, variable H α emission lines, consisting of multiple components which vary with orbital phase. We estimate the extinction to the source from the strength of the diffuse interstellar bands and the Balmer decrement; the two methods give AV = 7.6 ± 0.6 mag and AV > 9.1 mag, respectively. The optical light curve can be modelled as arising from irradiation of the companion star by the central X-ray source, where a low-temperature star fills its Roche lobe in an orbit of moderate eccentricity (e ˜ 0.4). We suggest that the companion star is overluminous and underdense, due to the impact of the supernova which occurred less than 5000 yr ago.

  6. X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome systems in the Neotropical Gymnotiformes electric fish of the genus Brachyhypopomus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adauto Lima Cardoso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Several types of sex chromosome systems have been recorded among Gymnotiformes, including male and female heterogamety, simple and multiple sex chromosomes, and different mechanisms of origin and evolution. The X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y systems identified in three species of this order are considered homoplasic for the group. In the genus Brachyhypopomus, only B. gauderio presented this type of system. Herein we describe the karyotypes of Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus and B. n. sp. FLAV, which have an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system that evolved via fusion between an autosome and the Y chromosome. The morphology of the chromosomes and the meiotic pairing suggest that the sex chromosomes of B. gauderio and B. pinnicaudatus have a common origin, whereas in B . n. sp. FLAV the sex chromosome system evolved independently. However, we cannot discard the possibility of common origin followed by distinct processes of differentiation. The identification of two new karyotypes with an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system in Gymnotiformes makes it the most common among the karyotyped species of the group. Comparisons of these karyotypes and the evolutionary history of the taxa indicate independent origins for their sex chromosomes systems. The recurrent emergence of the X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y system may represent sex chromosomes turnover events in Gymnotiformes.

  7. Gas phase UV and IR absorption spectra of CxF2x+1CHO (x=1-4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashikawa, Y; Kawasaki, M; Waterland, RL

    2004-01-01

    The UV and IR spectra of CxF2x+1 CHO (x = 1-4) were investigated using computational and experimental techniques. CxF2x+1CHO (x = 1-4) have broad UV absorption features centered at 300-310 nm. The maximum absorption cross-section increases significantly and shifts slightly to the red with increased...

  8. L'Aquila's reconstruction challenges: has Italy learned from its previous earthquake disasters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozerdem, Alpaslan; Rufini, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Italy is an earthquake-prone country and its disaster emergency response experiences over the past few decades have varied greatly, with some being much more successful than others. Overall, however, its reconstruction efforts have been criticised for being ad hoc, delayed, ineffective, and untargeted. In addition, while the emergency relief response to the L'Aquila earthquake of 6 April 2009-the primary case study in this evaluation-seems to have been successful, the reconstruction initiative got off to a very problematic start. To explore the root causes of this phenomenon, the paper argues that, owing to the way in which Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi has politicised the process, the L'Aquila reconstruction endeavour is likely to suffer problems with local ownership, national/regional/municipal coordination, and corruption. It concludes with a set of recommendations aimed at addressing the pitfalls that may confront the L'Aquila reconstruction process over the next few years. © 2013 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2013.

  9. The dynamic behaviour of the mammoth in the Spanish fortress, L’Aquila, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casarin Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fossil remains of a “Mammuthus Meridionalis” were found the 25th of march 1954 in a lime quarry close to the city of L’Aquila. The Mammoth skeleton was soon “reconstructed” on a forged iron frame, and it was located in one of the main halls of the Spanish fortress in L’Aquila. A comprehensive restoration was recently completed (2013-2015, also considering the study of the adequacy of the supporting frame, which demonstrated to survive the relevant 2009 l’Aquila earthquake. After a laser-scanner survey, allowing to build a very detailed Finite Element model, Operational Modal Analysis was employed in order to obtain the dynamic identification of the structure. Results of the experimental activities explained the capacity of the structure to bear the 2009 main shock, since the natural frequencies demonstrated to be quite reduced. The structure acted as a “natural” seismic device, avoiding to reach its Ultimate Limit State however paying the toll of relevant displacements. The seismic motion caused several cracks at the edge of the bones, indicating the non-fulfilment of the ALS (damage Limit State of Artistic contents. A proposal for seismic isolation and redesign of the supporting frame was then discussed. The paper illustrates the scientific activities assisting the restoration intervention, entailing a multidisciplinary approach, in the fields of restoration, palaeontology and seismic engineering.

  10. Evidence for an approx.300 day period in Cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priedhorsky, W.C.; Terrell, J.; Holt, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    We present the time history of X-ray emission from Cyg X-1 over an 11 year period, with 10 day resolution. The data were obtained by experiments on the Vela 5B (1969--1979) and Ariel 5 (1974--1980) satellites. Cyg X-1 varies by approx.25% with a 294 +- 4 day period. This modulation is apparently unrelated to the known transitions between the source high and low states. Flux minima occur at 1974.05+nP. The observed period is within the possible range for the precession period of an accretion disk, or of the companion star HDE 226868, in the Cyg X-1 system

  11. New paleoseismic data across the Mt. Marine Fault between the 2016 Amatrice and 2009 L’Aquila seismic sequences (central Apennines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Moro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Paleoseismological investigations have been carried out along the Mt. Marine normal fault, a probable source of the February 2, 1703 (Me=6.7 earthquake. The fault affects the area between the 2016 Amatrice and 2009 L’Aquila seismic sequences. Paleoseismological analysis provides data which corroborate previous studies, highlighting the occurrence of 5 events of surface faulting after the 6th–5th millenium B.C., the most recent of which is probably the 2 February 1703 earthquake. A minimum displacement per event of about 0.35 m has been measured. The occurrence of a minimum four faulting events within the last 7,000 years suggests a maximum 1,700 years recurrence interval.

  12. A NICER Look at the Aql X-1 Hard State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Peter; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Cackett, Edward M.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Gendreau, Keith C.; Guillot, Sebastien; Homan, Jeroen; Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Keek, Laurens; Kenyon, Steve; Lamb, Frederick K.; Ludlam, Renee; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Markwardt, Craig; Miller, Jon M.; Prigozhin, Gregory; Soong, Yang; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Uttley, Phil

    2018-05-01

    We report on a spectral-timing analysis of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Aql X-1 with the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) on the International Space Station (ISS). Aql X-1 was observed with NICER during a dim outburst in 2017 July, collecting approximately 50 ks of good exposure. The spectral and timing properties of the source correspond to that of a (hard) extreme island state in the atoll classification. We find that the fractional amplitude of the low-frequency (soft thermal emission and the power-law emission. Additionally, we measure hard time lags, indicating the thermal emission at 0.5 keV leads the power-law emission at 10 keV on a timescale of ∼100 ms at 0.3 Hz to ∼10 ms at 3 Hz. Our results demonstrate that the thermal emission in the hard state is intrinsically variable, and is driving the modulation of the higher energy power-law. Interpreting the thermal spectrum as disk emission, we find that our results are consistent with the disk propagation model proposed for accretion onto black holes.

  13. Comprehensive spectral analysis of Cyg X-1 using RXTE data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, Rizwan; Jaaffrey, S. N. A.; Misra, Ranjeev

    2012-01-01

    We analyze a large number (> 500) of pointed Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of Cyg X-1 and model the spectrum of each one. A subset of the observations for which there is a simultaneous reliable measure of the hardness ratio by the All Sky Monitor shows that the sample covers nearly all the spectral shapes of Cyg X-1. Each observation is fitted with a generic empirical model consisting of a disk black body spectrum, a Comptonized component whose input photon shape is the same as the disk emission, a Gaussian to represent the iron line and a reflection feature. The relative strength, width of the iron line and the reflection parameter are in general correlated with the high energy photon spectral index Γ. This is broadly consistent with a geometry where for the hard state (low Γ ∼ 1.7) there is a hot inner Comptonizing region surrounded by a truncated cold disk. The inner edge of the disk moves inwards as the source becomes softer till finally in the soft state (high Γ > 2.2) the disk fills the inner region and active regions above the disk produce the Comptonized component. However, the reflection parameter shows non-monotonic behavior near the transition region (Γ ∼ 2), which suggests a more complex geometry or physical state of the reflector. In addition, the inner disk temperature, during the hard state, is on average higher than in the soft one, albeit with large scatter. These inconsistencies could be due to limitations in the data and the empirical model used to fit them. The flux of each spectral component is well correlated with Γ, which shows that unlike some other black hole systems, Cyg X-1 does not show any hysteresis behavior. In the soft state, the flux of the Comptonized component is always similar to the disk one, which confirms that the ultra-soft state (seen in other brighter black hole systems) is not exhibited by Cyg X-1. The rapid variation of the Compton amplification factor with Γ naturally explains the absence of

  14. Atmospheric chemistry of perfluorinated aldehyde hydrates (n-C(x)F(2x+1)CH(OH)2, x = 1, 3, 4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Toft, A.; Nielsen, O.J.

    2006-01-01

    . Bubbling CF(3)CHO/air mixtures through liquid water led to >80% conversion of CF(3)CHO into the hydrate within the approximately 2 s taken for passage through the bubbler. These results suggest that OH radical initiated oxidation of C(x)F(2x+1)CH(OH)(2) hydrates could be a significant source...

  15. High resolution measurements of Cyg X-1 from rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothschild, R.E.; Boldt, E.A.; Holt, S.S.; Serlemitsos, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    Cyg X-1 was observed on two occasions (Oct. 4, 1973 and Oct. 3, 1974) by the Goddard x-ray rocket payload. This payload consisted of two gas proportional counters (xenon--methane with 710 cm 2 and argon--methane with 610 cm 2 ) using the same 128 channel pulse height analyzer and having 320 μs temporal resolution on the 1973 flight and 160 μs resolution on the 1974 flight. During both flights bursts of 1 ms duration were observed with very high statistical certainty. To date all 13 of these bursts have been analyzed for spectral and temporal character, and the results of this analysis are presented. The spectra of overall x-ray emission from both flights are also presented. In a source known for its variability it is remarkable that the spectra taken one year apart are virtually identical

  16. Ultra-high energy signals from Hercules X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, T.J.; Alexandreas, D.E.; Allen, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    The expectation that high-energy neutrinos are emitted from astrophysical objects depends strongly on the observation of those objects in gamma-rays, especially at TeV and PeV energies. A search for bursts of gamma-ray events from Hercules X-1 at energies above 50 TeV yielded two significant bursts, both occurring on UT 24 July 1986. The events were pulsed with a period of 1.23568 s, significantly different from estimates of the pulsar period at that time. The probability that the signal is a random background fluctuation is about 2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/5/, not including the fact that there were two other independent observations of the source at nearly the same time. The muon content of the burst events is anomalous when compared with expectations of gamma-ray showers, perhaps signalling the onset of new physics at these energies. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Menopon gaillinae lice in the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos and Marsh harear (Circus aeruginosus in Najaf province, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Fatlawi M. A. A

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Our study considered as the first work on ectoparasites of the Golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos and Marsh harear (Circus aeruginosus in Iraq. Overall, we examined 17 eagles for the period from 01\\Nov\\2016 until 25\\Feb\\2017, out of which 4were found infected (23.5%. All infected birds were female. Aquila was hunted from Najaf sea area. Under the wing and between feathers of Aquila grossly examined for detect any parasites. Lice of genus Menopon gaillinae isolated from 4 eagles, from under the wing area. Infected eagles suffering from skin redness. 38 parasites isolated from infected eagle, we prepared a slide from these louse for spp. classification. This study was on the first hand record of shaft louse (M. gallinae in Golden eagle and Marsh harear in Iraq

  18. Serpens X-1 observed by INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masetti, N.; Foschini, L.; Palazzi, E.

    2004-01-01

    -1 has been clearly detected up to 30 keV with unprecedented positional accuracy for high-energy emission. The 20-30 keV light curve showed substantial variability during the observation. Comparison with previous observations indicates that the source was in its high ("banana") state and displayed...

  19. L'Aquila 1962. "Alternative Attuali" e l'idea di "mostra-saggio"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletti, Luca Pietro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nel 1962 Enrico Crispolti inaugura, presso il Forte Cinquecentesco dell'Aquila, la prima edizione della rassegna "Alternative Attuali", proponendo un nuovo modello di mostra collettiva: non una semplice rassegna di artisti diversi, ma la proposta di un dialogo fra diverse posizioni (le "alternative" volte al superamento dell'Informale. Con il modello della "mostra-saggio", arricchita da un dibattito in catalogo, veniva per la prima volta applicata una idea espositiva che mettesse in prospettiva critica (e in proiezione storica la situazione presente.

  20. Aquila Remotely Piloted Vehicle System Technology Demonstration (RPV-STD) Program. Volume 3. Field Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    FLIGHT TESTS Tis 8ootion sumarizes ech of the Crows Landln Flight Tests, hrm I to It Deoemiber 1975. 23 2.4.1 Flight 1 Aquila RPV 001 took off at 09.42...RC pilot In the stablied RC mode. To facilitate theme attempts, an automobile , with Its headlights on high beam, was positioned on each side of the...the vans. At approxi- mately 2 to 3 km, the actual automobile headlights would become visible. Then, the operator would attempt to reposition the RPV

  1. Mortality in the l'aquila (central Italy) earthquake of 6 april 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David; Magni, Michele

    2013-01-07

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of data on mortality in the magnitude 6.3 earthquake that struck the central Italian city and province of L'Aquila during the night of 6 April 2009. The aim is to create a profile of the deaths in terms of age, gender, location, behaviour during the tremors, and other aspects. This could help predict the pattern of casualties and priorities for protection in future earthquakes. To establish a basis for analysis, the literature on seismic mortality is surveyed. The conclusions of previous studies are synthesised regarding patterns of mortality, entrapment, survival times, self-protective behaviour, gender and age. These factors are investigated for the data set covering the 308 fatalities in the L'Aquila earthquake, with help from interview data on behavioural factors obtained from 250 survivors. In this data set, there is a strong bias towards victimisation of young people, the elderly and women. Part of this can be explained by geographical factors regarding building performance: the rest of the explanation refers to the vulnerability of the elderly and the relationship between perception and action among female victims, who tend to be more fatalistic than men and thus did not abandon their homes between a major foreshock and the main shock of the earthquake, three hours later. In terms of casualties, earthquakes commonly discriminate against the elderly and women. Age and gender biases need further investigation and should be taken into account in seismic mitigation initiatives.

  2. L’Aquila Smart Clean Air City: The Italian Pilot Project for Healthy Urban Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Avveduto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to atmospheric pollution is a major concern for urban populations. Currently, no effective strategy has been adopted to tackle the problem. The paper presents the Smart Clean Air City project, a pilot experiment concerning the improvement in urban air quality. Small wet scrubber systems will be operating in a network configuration in suitable urban areas of L’Aquila city (Italy. The purpose of this work is to describe the project and show the preliminary results obtained in the characterization of two urban sites before the remediation test; the main operating principles of the wet scrubber system will be discussed, as well as the design of the mobile treatment plant for the processing of wastewater resulting from scrubber operation. Measurements of particle size distributions in the range of 0.30–25 µm took place in the two sites of interest, an urban background and a traffic area in the city of L’Aquila. The mean number concentration detected was 2.4 × 107 and 4.5 × 107 particles/m3, respectively. Finally, theoretical assessments, performed by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD codes, will show the effects of the wet scrubber operation on air pollutants under different environmental conditions and in several urban usage patterns.

  3. Science, Right and Communication of Risk in L'Aquila trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamura, Marco; Miozzo, Davide; Boni, Giorgio; Amato, Davide; Ferraris, Luca; Siccardi, Franco

    2013-04-01

    CIMA Research Foundation has had access to all the information of the criminal trial held in l'Aquila intended against some of the members of the Commissione Nazionale Grandi Rischi (National Commission for Forecasting and Preventing Major Risks) and some directors of the Italian Civil Protection Department. These information constitute the base of a study that has examined: - the initiation of investigations by the families of the victims; - the public prosecutor's indictment; - the testimonies; - the liaison between experts in seismology social scientists and communication; - the statement of the defence; - the first instance decision of condemnation. The study reveals the paramount importance of communication of risk as element of prevention. Taken into particular account is the method of the Judicial Authority ex-post control on the evaluations and decisions of persons with a role of decision maker within the Civil Protection system. In the judgment just published by the Court of l'Aquila, the reassuring information from scientists and operators of Civil Protection appears to be considered as a negative value.

  4. Burnout among healthcare workers at L'Aquila: its prevalence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Antonella; Fiasca, Fabiana; Mazzei, Mariachiara; Abbossida, Vincenzo; Bianchini, Valeria

    2017-12-01

    Burnout, which is now recognized as a real problem in terms of its negative outcome on healthcare efficiency, is a stress condition that can be increased by exposure to natural disasters, such as the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake. This study aims to evaluate burnout syndrome, its associated risk factors and stress levels, and the individual coping strategies among healthcare professionals at L'Aquila General Hospital. A cross-sectional study of 190 healthcare workers was conducted. There was a questionnaire for the collection of the socio-demographic, occupational and anamnestic data, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the General Health Questionnaire-12 items (GHQ-12) and the Brief COPE were used. The burnout dimensions showed high scores in Emotional Exhaustion (38.95%), in Depersonalization (23.68%) and in lack of Personal Accomplishment (23.16%), along with the presence of moderate to high levels of distress (54.21%). In addition to factors already known to be associated with burnout (job perception and high levels of distress) exposure to an earthquake emerged as a factor independently associated with the syndrome. Adaptive coping strategies such as religiosity showed a significant and negative relationship with burnout. Our research highlights the need for interventions directed at a reduction in workload and work-stressors and an improvement of adaptive coping strategies, especially in a post-disaster workplace.

  5. Blog, social network e strategie narrative di resistenza nel post-terremoto dell’Aquila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giuliani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An earthquake, when it attacks a territory and its history, strikes the collective memory of a population. The reconstruction that followed the earthquake of L'Aquila contained elements that were equally problematic for the cohesion of the social and relational network, and therefore for mental health of stricken citizens and territories. Blogs, Facebook and online communication have been a possibility for the population (not only for the age group that usually makes use of digital technologies to share informations, chronicles, narrations about the postearthquake and to tell a story that was different from the sweetened one told by media. While trying a way to process loss and their own discomfort, many authors and bloggers became datum points for a community of readers thanks to their stories and chronicles. In addition, for the active citizenry the virtual setting of the Web became a substitute to the physical agora that had been wiped out by the earthquake and the dispersion of the community all over national territory. The experience of L'Aquila, also recreated through conversations with bloggers and the observation of Facebook status updates, shows interesting elements in order to understand the role of new media in everyday life and in an exceptional context such as collective trauma

  6. Geosphere coupling and hydrothermal anomalies before the 2009 Mw 6.3 L'Aquila earthquake in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wu

    2016-08-01

    LCAC mode was proposed to interpret the possible mechanisms of the multiple quasi-synchronous anomalies preceding the L'Aquila earthquake. Results indicate that CO2-rich fluids in deep crust might have played a significant role in the local LCAC process.

  7. Adaptive Response of Children and Adolescents with Autism to the 2009 Earthquake in L'Aquila, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Marco; Ciprietti, Tiziana; Di Egidio, Claudia; Gabrielli, Maura; Masedu, Francesco; Tomassini, Anna Rita; Sorge, Germana

    2012-01-01

    The literature offers no descriptions of the adaptive outcomes of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) after natural disasters. Aim of this study was to evaluate the adaptive behaviour of participants with ASD followed for 1 year after their exposure to the 2009 earthquake in L'Aquila (Italy) compared with an unexposed peer group with ASD,…

  8. Observation of short period fluctuation of CygX-1 with balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Michio; Sakurai, Takahisa; Uchida, Masayoshi

    1977-01-01

    CygX-1 presents very complex short period fluctuation of X-ray, therefore the hard X-ray was especially observed in 1972 and 1973 with large balloons, and the data were analyzed. This short period fluctuation and energy spectra of CygX-1 in the normal and flare time bands were compared. The observing apparatuses consisted of the 3 in diameter NaI detector and a high pressure proportional counter. The observing method is to turn the gondora alternately to the directions of source (ON) and background (OFF). As for the data analysis, the events at ON and OFF in the observation data in 1972 and 1973 were plotted for time interval. The background component is in agreement with Poisson's distribution, but source component is not. This difference for Poisson's distribution means the behavior of CygX-1. The power spectrum was analyzed, and the strong power density was observed at 5.4 x 10 -2 Hz in ON, but such power density was not observed in OFF. Accordingly this is presumed to be caused by CygX-1. The events for time interval in flare time are shown. The rise of about 2.9 σ exists at 80 msec. The count rates were compared for photon energy in the normal and flare times. The short period fluctuation of hard X-ray from CygX-1 deviates from Poisson's distribution and is different in the normal and flare times. (Nakai, Y.)

  9. When is f(x1,x2,... ,xn)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    When is f(x1,x2,... ,xn) = u1(x1) + u2(x2) +···+ un(xn)? ... (i) there exist non-zero integers p1,p2,... ,pk such that ..... probability measure for the countable collection of functions 1Ai , i = 1, 2, 3,. .... For question (B) a sufficient condition is that.

  10. Long-term studies with the Ariel-5 asm. 1: Her X-1, Vela X-1 and Cen X-3. [periodic variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, S. S.; Kaluzienski, L. J.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    Twelve hundred days of 3-6 keV X-ray data from Her X-1, Vela X-1 and Cen X-3 accumulated with the Ariel-5 all-sky monitor are interrogated. The binary periodicities of all three can be clearly observed, as can the approximately 35-d variation of Her X-1, for which we can refine the period to 34.875 plus or minus .030-d. No such longer-term periodicity less than 200-d is observed from Vela X-1. The 26.6-d low-state recurrence period for Cen X-3 previously suggested is not observed, but a 43.0-d candidate periodicity is found which may be consistent with the precession of an accretion disk in that system. The present results are illustrative of the long-term studies which can be performed on approximately 50 sources over a temporal base which will ultimately extend to at least 1800 days.

  11. Recent observations of Hercules X-1 with HEAO-1 and OSO-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Becker, R. H.; Bussard, R. W.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.; Rothschild, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    HEAO 1 X-ray observations of Her X-1 near an onset of the high state are discussed. An X-ray light curve is determined which indicates that for about 0.5 day before the X-ray intensity turn-on there was 1.2-sec pulsed emission from the source at a level intermediate between the high- and low-state intensities. These results are taken as demonstrating the stability in the 35-day cycle when compared with previous observations. An inconclusive search for 58-keV line emission from Her X-1 is also reported.

  12. Un San Sebastiano di Silvestro dell’Aquila e un San Vito di Saturnino Gatti / A St. Sebastian by Silvestro dell’Aquila and a St. Vitus by Saturnino Gatti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Principi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available L’articolo si focalizza sull’attribuzione di un’inedita statua a Silvestro di Giacomo da Sulmona, meglio noto come Silvestro dell’Aquila (documentato dal 1471-1504 e un’altra a Saturnino Gatti (1463 circa-1518, protagonisti della scultura del Rinascimento in Abruzzo. La prima proposta riguarda un San Sebastiano ligneo, grande poco meno del vero, conservato nella chiesa di Santa Maria ad Nives di Rocca di Mezzo, principale centro dell’Altipiano delle Rocche e paese natale del celebre cardinale Amico Agnifili, committente di Silvestro di Giacomo. La seconda acquisizione concerne una scultura lignea grande al naturale raffigurante San Vito, rintracciata nell’omonima chiesa di Colle San Vito, nel comune di Tornimparte, situata a pochi passi dagli affreschi eseguiti da Saturnino Gatti tra il 1490 e il 1494 in San Panfilo a Villagrande. Grazie ad un’analisi dei diversi contesti in cui si generarono le sculture e soprattutto attraverso stringenti confronti con opere note del catalogo dei due artisti si può riferire la prima statua alla tarda produzione di Silvestro dell’Aquila e la seconda al periodo di maturità di Saturnino Gatti.   The article focuses on the attribution of two unpublished wooden statues respectively realized by two masters of Renaissance sculpture in Abruzzo: Silvestro di Giacomo, known as Silvestro dell’Aquila (whose activity is documented at L’Aquila from 1471 to 1504; and Saturnino Gatti. The scultpure attributed to Silvestro dell’Aquila portrays Saint Sebastian, and is of almost life-size dimensions. It was spotted out inside the church of Santa Maria ad Nives at Rocca di Mezzo, the most renowned village on the upland of «Le Rocche», in the nearbies of L’Aquila; it was the birthplace of Cardinal Amico Agnifili, who happened to be Silvestro’s patron. The second statue, by Saturnino Gatti, represents Saint Vitus and is hold in the homonymous church at Colle San Vito in the municipal district of

  13. BChPT x 1/Nc: masses and currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goity, Jose L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Fernando, Ishara P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2018-04-01

    A summary of the implementation of the combined BChPT X 1/Nc expansion for three flavors is presented, along with its applications to the octet and decuplet baryon masses, SU(3) charges and axial couplings.

  14. Short-term variability of Cyg X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, M.; Doi, K.; Ogawara, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The short-term X-ray variability distinguishes Cyg X-1, which is the most likely candidate for a black hole, from other X-ray sources. The present status of our knowledge on this short-term variation, mainly from the UHURU, the MIT and the GSFC observations, is reviewed. The nature of impulsive variations which compose the time variation exceeding the statistical fluctuation is discussed. There are indications that the energy spectrum of large pulses is harder than the average spectrum, or that the large pulses are the characteristics of the hard component of the spectrum if it is composed of two, soft and hard, components. Features of the variations may be partly simulated by the superposition of random shot-noise pulses with a fraction of a second duration. However, the autocorrelation analysis and the dynamic spectrum analysis indicate that the correlation lasts for several seconds and in the variation are buried some regularities which exhibit power concentrations in several frequency bands; 0.2-0.3, 0.4-0.5, 0.8, 1.2-1.5 Hz. There are several possible interpretations of these results in terms of; e.g. (a) a mixture of shot-noise pulses with two or more constant durations, (b) the shape of the basic shot-noise pulse, (c) bunching of the pulses, (d) superposition of wave-packets or temporal oscillations. But we have not yet reached any definite understandings in the nature of the variabilities. The substructure of the fluctuations on a time scale of milliseconds suggested by two investigations is also discussed. (Auth.)

  15. Short-term variability of CYG X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, M.; Doi, K.; Ogawara, Y.; Takagishi, K.; Wada, M.

    1975-01-01

    The short-term X-ray variability distinguishes Cyg X-1, which is the most likely candidate of the black hole, from other X-ray sources. Present status of our knowledge on this short-term variation mainly from the Uhuru, the MIT and the GSFC observations is reviewed. The nature of impulsive variations which compose the time variation exceeding the statistical fluctuation is discussed. There are indications that the energy spectrum of large pulses is harder than the average spectrum or the large pulses are the characteristics of the hard component of the spectrum if it is composed of two, soft and hard, components. Features of the variations may be partly simulated by the superposition of random short-noise pulses with a fraction of a second duration. However, the autocorrelation analysis and the dynamic spectrum analysis indicate that the correlation lasts for several seconds and in the variation buried are some regularities which exhibit power concentrations in several frequency bands; 0.2 -- 0.3, 0.4 -- 0.5, 0.8, 1.2 -- 1.5 Hz. There are several possible interpretation of these results in terms of: e.g. a) a mixture of short-noise pulses with two or more constant durations, b) the shape of the basic shot-noise pulse, c) bunching of the pulses, d) superposition of wave-packets or temporal oscillations. But we have not yet reached any definite understandings in the nature of the variabilities. The sub-structure of the fluctuations on a time scale of milli-second suggested by two investigations is also discussed. (auth.)

  16. High-energy gamma-rays from Cyg X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Malyshev, Denys; Chernyakova, Maria; Pooley, Guy G.

    2017-11-01

    We have obtained a firm detection of Cyg X-1 during its hard and intermediate spectral states in the energy range of 40 MeV-60 GeV based on observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, confirming the independent results at ≥60 MeV of a previous work. The detection significance is ≃8σ in the 0.1-10 GeV range. In the soft state, we have found only upper limits on the emission at energies ≳0.1 MeV. However, we have found emission with a very soft spectrum in the 40-80 MeV range, not detected previously. This is likely to represent the high-energy cut-off of the high-energy power-law tail observed in the soft state. Similarly, we have detected a γ-ray soft excess in the hard state, which appears to be of similar origin. We have also confirmed the presence of an orbital modulation of the detected emission in the hard state, expected if the γ-rays are from Compton upscattering of stellar blackbody photons. However, the observed modulation is significantly weaker than that predicted if the blackbody upscattering were the dominant source of γ-rays. This argues for a significant contribution from γ-rays produced by the synchrotron self-Compton process. We have found that such strong contribution is possible if the jet is strongly clumped. We reproduce the observed hard-state average broad-band spectrum using a self-consistent jet model, taking into account all the relevant emission processes, e± pair absorption and clumping. This model also reproduces the amplitude of the observed orbital modulation.

  17. X-1A in flight with flight data superimposed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1953-01-01

    This photo of the X-1A includes graphs of the flight data from Maj. Charles E. Yeager's Mach 2.44 flight on December 12, 1953. (This was only a few days short of the 50th anniversary of the Wright brothers' first powered flight.) After reaching Mach 2.44, then the highest speed ever reached by a piloted aircraft, the X-1A tumbled completely out of control. The motions were so violent that Yeager cracked the plastic canopy with his helmet. He finally recovered from a inverted spin and landed on Rogers Dry Lakebed. Among the data shown are Mach number and altitude (the two top graphs). The speed and altitude changes due to the tumble are visible as jagged lines. The third graph from the bottom shows the G-forces on the airplane. During the tumble, these twice reached 8 Gs or 8 times the normal pull of gravity at sea level. (At these G forces, a 200-pound human would, in effect, weigh 1,600 pounds if a scale were placed under him in the direction of the force vector.) Producing these graphs was a slow, difficult process. The raw data from on-board instrumentation recorded on oscillograph film. Human computers then reduced the data and recorded it on data sheets, correcting for such factors as temperature and instrument errors. They used adding machines or slide rules for their calculations, pocket calculators being 20 years in the future. Three second generation Bell Aircraft Corporations X-1s were built, though four were requested. They were the X-1A (48-1384); X-1B (48-1385); X-1C (canceled and never built); X-1D (48-1386). These aircraft were similar to the X-1s, except they were five feet longer, had conventional canopies, and were powered by Reaction Motors, Inc. XLR11-RM-5 rocket engines. The RM-5, like the previous engines, had no throttle and was controlled by igniting one or more of the four thrust chambers at will. The original program outline called for the X-1A and X-1B to be used for dynamic stability and air loads investigations. The X-1D was to be used

  18. X-1E launch from B-50 mothership

    Science.gov (United States)

    1950-01-01

    Beginning in 1946, two XS-1 experimental research aircraft (later redesignated X-1s) conducted pioneering tests at Muroc Army Air Field (now Edwards Air Force Base) in California to obtain flight data on conditions in the transonic speed range. These early tests culminated on October 14, 1947, in the first piloted flight faster than Mach 1.0, the speed of sound. During November, 1947, the Air Force authorized studies that led to a contract (W-33-038-ac-20062) with Bell Aircraft to build four (later three) improved X-1 aircraft (the X-1C being cancelled). Designated X-1A (#48-1384), X-1B (#48-1385), and X-1D (#48-1386), the airplanes were ready by late 1950. The aircraft were about five feet longer and 2,500 lbs. heavier than the original X-craft planes. They used the 8-percent wing like the earlier X-craft. The D-model had a low-pressure turbo-pump and the B model was fitted with a prototype hydrogen peroxide reaction control system for later aircraft to use in exoatmospheric research flights. Access was through a lift-off canopy. The planes were finished in their bare metal color and white. The X-1D was ready first, but on what was intended to be its second flight (August 22, 1951) it was jettisoned and crashed at Muroc after an aerial explosion while still mated to its mother (B-50A [#46-006A]) ship. The long-delayed X-1 #3 airplane with the turbine pump was finally completed for the NACA in 1951. It made its first glide flight on July 20, 1951, with NACA pilot Joseph Cannon. Its second and final captive flight was on November 9, 1951. It was destroyed on the ground by an explosion and fire along with its B-50A mother ship while attempting to jettison fuel. The X-1A arrived at Muroc in January, 1953 and had its first powered flight on February 21, 1953. On December 8, 1953 with Yeager as pilot, the aircraft investigated high-speed stability and control issues. The X-1A was turned over to the NACA, but was lost to aerial explosion on August 8, 1955, shortly before

  19. Is Cygus X-1 a chaotic dynamical system?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unno, Wasaburo; Yoneyama, Tadaoki; Urata, Kenji; Masaki, Isao; Kondo, Masa-aki; Inoue, Hajime.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray data of Cyg X-1 observed by the Tenma satellite were analyzed to determine whether Cyg X-1 is a chaotic dynamical system of low dimension. Since Poisson noise disturbs the determination of the attractor dimension of the system, comparative studies were carried out for the Cyg X-1 data relative to artificial data of purely stochastic Poisson noise and to a Lorenz attractor plus noise. The attractor dimension was searched using trajectories of time series data in phase space, the dimension of which was varied up to 21. The relation between the attractor dimension and the phase-space dimension for the Cyg X-1 data starts to deviate from that of noise data from a phase-space dimension of about 7, showing the presence of an attractor with a dimension of about 7 or less. Though three positive Lyapunov exponents were calculated, they are too small (∼10 -2 ) to prove with certainty that the Cyg X-1 attractor should be a strange attractor. (author)

  20. Developing Engineered Fuel (Briquettes) Using Fly Ash from the Aquila Coal-Fired Power Plant in Canon City and Locally Available Biomass Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Carrasco; H. Sarper

    2006-06-30

    The objective of this research is to explore the feasibility of producing engineered fuels from a combination of renewable and non renewable energy sources. The components are flyash (containing coal fines) and locally available biomass waste. The constraints were such that no other binder additives were to be added. Listed below are the main accomplishments of the project: (1) Determination of the carbon content of the flyash sample from the Aquila plant. It was found to be around 43%. (2) Experiments were carried out using a model which simulates the press process of a wood pellet machine, i.e. a bench press machine with a close chamber, to find out the ideal ratio of wood and fly ash to be mixed to get the desired briquette. The ideal ratio was found to have 60% wood and 40% flyash. (3) The moisture content required to produce the briquettes was found to be anything below 5.8%. (4) The most suitable pressure required to extract the lignin form the wood and cause the binding of the mixture was determined to be 3000psi. At this pressure, the briquettes withstood an average of 150psi on its lateral side. (5) An energy content analysis was performed and the BTU content was determined to be approximately 8912 BTU/lb. (6) The environmental analysis was carried out and no abnormalities were noted. (7) Industrial visits were made to pellet manufacturing plants to investigate the most suitable manufacturing process for the briquettes. (8) A simulation model of extrusion process was developed to explore the possibility of using a cattle feed plant operating on extrusion process to produce briquettes. (9) Attempt to produce 2 tons of briquettes was not successful. The research team conducted a trial production run at a Feed Mill in La Junta, CO to produce two (2) tons of briquettes using the extrusion process in place. The goal was to, immediately after producing the briquettes; send them through Aquila's current system to test the ability of the briquettes to flow

  1. Geoethical implications in the L'Aquila case: scientific knowledge and communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    On October 22nd 2012, three and a half years after the earthquake that destroyed the city of L'Aquila (central Italy), killing more than 300 people and wounding about 1,500, a landmark judgment for the scientific research established the condemnation of six members of the Major Risks Committee of the Italian Government and a researcher of INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia), called to provide information about the evolution of the seismic sequence. The judge held that these Geoscientists were negligent during the meeting of 31st March 2009, convened to discuss the scientific aspects of the seismic risk of this area, affected by a long seismic sequence, also in the light of repeated warnings about the imminence of a strong earthquake, on the base of measurements of radon gas by an Italian independent technician, transmitted to the population by mass-media. Without going into the legal aspects of the criminal proceedings, this judgment strikes for the hardness of the condemnation to be paid by the scientists (six years of imprisonment, perpetual disqualification from public office and legal disqualification during the execution of the penalty, compensation for victims up to several hundred thousands of Euros). Some of them are scientists known worldwide for their proven skills, professionalism and experience. In conclusion, these scientists were found guilty of having contributed to the death of many people, because they have not communicated in an appropriate manner all available information on the seismic hazard and vulnerability of the area of L'Aquila. This judgment represents a watershed in the way of looking at the social role of geoscientists in the defense against natural hazards and their responsibility towards the people. But, in what does this responsibility consist of? It consists of the commitment to conduct an updated and reliable scientific research, which provides for a detailed analysis of the epistemic uncertainty for a more

  2. P2X1 receptors and the endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LS Harrington

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP is now established as a principle vaso-active mediator in the vasculature. Its actions on arteries are complex, and are mediated by the P2X and P2Y receptor families. It is generally accepted that ATP induces a bi-phasic response in arteries, inducing contraction via the P2X and P2Y receptors on the smooth muscle cells, and vasodilation via the actions of P2Y receptors located on the endothelium. However, a number of recent studies have placed P2X1 receptors on the endothelium of some arteries. The use of a specific P2X1 receptor ligand, a, b methylene ATP has demonstrated that P2X1 receptors also have a bi-functional role. The actions of ATP on P2X1 receptors is therefore dependant on its location, inducing contraction when located on the smooth muscle cells, and dilation when expressed on the endothelium, comparable to that of P2Y receptors.

  3. RXTE detects X-ray bursts from Circinus X-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linares, M.; Soleri, P.; Watts, A.; Altamirano, D.; Armas-Padilla, M.; Cavecchi, Y.; Degenaar, N.; Kalamkar, M.; Kaur, R.; van der Klis, M.; Patruno, A.; Wijnands, R.; Yang, Y.; Casella, P.; Rea, N.

    After the recent report of X-ray re-brightening (ATel #2608), RXTE has observed the peculiar neutron star X-ray binary Cir X-1 eleven times during the last two weeks (May 11-25, 2010). We report the detection of nine X-ray bursts in RXTE-PCA data, 25 years after the first -and the only previous-

  4. THE ROTATION PERIOD OF HD-77581 (VELA X-1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZUIDERWIJK, EJ

    The rotation period of HD 77581, supergiant primary in the X-ray binary Vela X-1, is determined from an analysis of selected absorption line profiles. The rotation rate determined from He I line profiles is 0.67 +/- 0.04 times that of the binary angular velocity, corresponding to a rotation velocity

  5. Hard X-ray observation of HER X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; La Padula, C.; Polcaro, V.F.; Vialetto, G. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Frascati (Italy). Lab. di Astrofisica Spaziale); Manchanda, R.K. (Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India))

    1981-01-01

    A hard X-rays (15-170 KeV) measurement of the spectrum of Her X-1, during a mid turn-on is presented. The presence of an emission line at about 53 KeV during the mid-on state is confirmed by the present measure.

  6. Hard X-ray observation of HER X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; La Padula, C.; Polcaro, V.F.; Vialetto, G.

    1981-01-01

    A hard X-rays (15-170 KeV) measurement of the spectrum of Her X-1, during a mid turn-on is presented. The presence of an emission line at about 53 KeV during the mid-on state is confirmed by the present measure. (orig.)

  7. Response of the middle atmosphere to Sco X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Barcus, J. R.; Mitchell, J. D.

    1985-10-01

    On the night of Mar. 9, 1983 (UT) at Punta Lobos Launch Site, Peru (12.5 deg S, 76.8 deg W, magnetic dip -0.7 deg), a sequence of sounding rockets was flown to study the electrical structure of the equatorial middle atmosphere and to evaluate perturbations on this environment induced by the X-ray star Sco X-1. The rocket series was anchored by two Nike Orion payloads (31.032 and 31.033) which were launched at 0327 and 0857 UT, near Sco X-1 star-rise and after it had attained an elevation angle of 70 deg E. An enhanced flux of X-rays was observed on the second Nike Orion flight (31.033). This increase is directly attributed to Sco X-1, both from the spectral properties of the measured X-ray distribution and by spatial information acquired from a spinning X-ray detector during the upleg portion of the 31.033 flight. Simultaneously, a growth in ion conductivity and density was seen to occur in the lower mesosphere between 60 and 80 km on the second flight, specifically in the region of maximum energy deposition by the Sco X-1 X-rays. The results imply the presence of a significant number of ionized heavy constituents within the lower mesosphere, with masses possibly in the submacroscopoic range.

  8. Cygnus X-1: Discovery of variable circular polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalsky, J.J.; Swedlund, J.B.; Stokes, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    HDE 226868, the optical counterpart of Cyg X-1, has been observed for circular polarization during 1974. Observations in five colors suggest that circular polarization results from an interstellar effect. Measurements of the blue polarization reveal circular polarization variations synchronous with the 5)./sub /6 orbital period. The circular polarization variation appears to be similar to the blue intensity variation

  9. STATUS BAKU MUTU AIR LAUT PERAIRAN TELUK AMBON LUAR UNTUK WISATA BAHARI KAPAL TENGGELAM SS AQUILA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guntur Adhi Rahmawan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ambon Bay waters consist of two parts, Inner Ambon Bay and Outer Ambon Bay separated by a gap that is narrow and shallow. Ambon Bay has a lot of functionality and usability both in transportation, conservation, and tourism. The existence of one of the sites SS. Aquila sinking ship that sank since May 27, 1958, became one of the tourist attraction diving in Ambon Bay. Determination of water pollution index Ambon Bay becomes very important to do as support material and development of sea travel. Determining pollution index is done by direct measurement using the sea water quality parameters Water Quality Checker (DKK TOA WQC Type-24, as well as laboratory analysis to determine the chemical parameters of seawater (pH, TSS, salinity, turbidity, oil, grease. The results showed that the waters of the Bay of Ambon Affairs based on some parameters water quality standard for marine tourism is still included in accordance with the standard criteria by Keputusan Menteri Negara Lingkungan Hidup Nomor: 51 Tahun 2004 on Guidelines for Determination of Water Quality Status.

  10. Precursory slow-slip loaded the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, A.; Aoudia, A.; Javed, F.; Barzaghi, R.

    2016-05-01

    Slow-slip events (SSEs) are common at subduction zone faults where large mega earthquakes occur. We report here that one of the best-recorded moderate size continental earthquake, the 2009 April 6 moment magnitude (Mw) 6.3 L'Aquila (Italy) earthquake, was preceded by a 5.9 Mw SSE that originated from the decollement beneath the reactivated normal faulting system. The SSE is identified from a rigorous analysis of continuous GPS stations and occurred on the 12 February and lasted for almost two weeks. It coincided with a burst in the foreshock activity with small repeating earthquakes migrating towards the main-shock hypocentre as well as with a change in the elastic properties of rocks in the fault region. The SSE has caused substantial stress loading at seismogenic depths where the magnitude 4.0 foreshock and Mw 6.3 main shock nucleated. This stress loading is also spatially correlated with the lateral extent of the aftershock sequence.

  11. Rubble masonry response under cyclic actions: The experience of L’Aquila city (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonti, Roberta; Barthel, Rainer; Formisano, Antonio; Borri, Antonio; Candela, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Several methods of analysis are available in engineering practice to study old masonry constructions. Two commonly used approaches in the field of seismic engineering are global and local analyses. Despite several years of research in this field, the various methodologies suffer from a lack of comprehensive experimental validation. This is mainly due to the difficulty in simulating the many different kinds of masonry and, accordingly, the non-linear response under horizontal actions. This issue can be addressed by examining the local response of isolated panels under monotonic and/or alternate actions. Different testing methodologies are commonly used to identify the local response of old masonry. These range from simplified pull-out tests to sophisticated in-plane monotonic tests. However, there is a lack of both knowledge and critical comparison between experimental validations and numerical simulations. This is mainly due to the difficulties in implementing irregular settings within both simplified and advanced numerical analyses. Similarly, the simulation of degradation effects within laboratory tests is difficult with respect to old masonry in-situ boundary conditions. Numerical models, particularly on rubble masonry, are commonly simplified. They are mainly based on a kinematic chain of rigid blocks able to perform different “modes of damage” of structures subjected to horizontal actions. This paper presents an innovative methodology for testing; its aim is to identify a simplified model for out-of-plane response of rubbleworks with respect to the experimental evidence. The case study of L’Aquila district is discussed

  12. Rubble masonry response under cyclic actions: The experience of L’Aquila city (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonti, Roberta, E-mail: roberta.fonti@tum.de; Barthel, Rainer, E-mail: r.barthel@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [TUM University, Chair of Structural Design, Arcisstraße 21, 80333 Munich (Germany); Formisano, Antonio, E-mail: antoform@unina.it [University of Naples “Federico II”, DIST Department, P.le V. Tecchio, 80, 80125 Naples (Italy); Borri, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.borri@unipg.it [University of Perugia, Department of Engineering, Via G. Duranti 95, 06125 Perugia (Italy); Candela, Michele, E-mail: ing.mcandela@libero.it [University of Reggio Calabria, PAU Department, Salita Melissari 1, 89124 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2015-12-31

    Several methods of analysis are available in engineering practice to study old masonry constructions. Two commonly used approaches in the field of seismic engineering are global and local analyses. Despite several years of research in this field, the various methodologies suffer from a lack of comprehensive experimental validation. This is mainly due to the difficulty in simulating the many different kinds of masonry and, accordingly, the non-linear response under horizontal actions. This issue can be addressed by examining the local response of isolated panels under monotonic and/or alternate actions. Different testing methodologies are commonly used to identify the local response of old masonry. These range from simplified pull-out tests to sophisticated in-plane monotonic tests. However, there is a lack of both knowledge and critical comparison between experimental validations and numerical simulations. This is mainly due to the difficulties in implementing irregular settings within both simplified and advanced numerical analyses. Similarly, the simulation of degradation effects within laboratory tests is difficult with respect to old masonry in-situ boundary conditions. Numerical models, particularly on rubble masonry, are commonly simplified. They are mainly based on a kinematic chain of rigid blocks able to perform different “modes of damage” of structures subjected to horizontal actions. This paper presents an innovative methodology for testing; its aim is to identify a simplified model for out-of-plane response of rubbleworks with respect to the experimental evidence. The case study of L’Aquila district is discussed.

  13. Multiscale Documentation and Monitoring of L'aquila Historical Centre Using Uav Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominici, D.; Alicandro, M.; Rosciano, E.; Massimi, V.

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays geomatic techniques can guarantee not only a precise and accurate survey for the documentation of our historical heritage but also a solution to monitor its behaviour over time after, for example, a catastrophic event (earthquakes, landslides, ecc). Europe is trying to move towards harmonized actions to store information on cultural heritage (MIBAC with the ICCS forms, English heritage with the MIDAS scheme, etc) but it would be important to provide standardized methods in order to perform measuring operations to collect certified metric data. The final result could be a database to support the entire management of the cultural heritage and also a checklist of "what to do" and "when to do it". The wide range of geomatic techniques provides many solutions to acquire, to organize and to manage data at a multiscale level: high resolution satellite images can provide information in a short time during the "early emergency" while UAV photogrammetry and laser scanning can provide digital high resolution 3D models of buildings, ortophotos of roofs and facades and so on. This paper presents some multiscale survey case studies using UAV photogrammetry: from a minor historical village (Aielli) to the centre of L'Aquila (Santa Maria di Collemaggio Church) from the post-emergency to now. This choice has been taken not only to present how geomatics is an effective science for modelling but also to present a complete and reliable way to perform conservation and/or restoration through precise monitoring techniques, as shown in the third case study.

  14. The genome sequence of a widespread apex predator, the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M Doyle

    Full Text Available Biologists routinely use molecular markers to identify conservation units, to quantify genetic connectivity, to estimate population sizes, and to identify targets of selection. Many imperiled eagle populations require such efforts and would benefit from enhanced genomic resources. We sequenced, assembled, and annotated the first eagle genome using DNA from a male golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos captured in western North America. We constructed genomic libraries that were sequenced using Illumina technology and assembled the high-quality data to a depth of ∼40x coverage. The genome assembly includes 2,552 scaffolds >10 Kb and 415 scaffolds >1.2 Mb. We annotated 16,571 genes that are involved in myriad biological processes, including such disparate traits as beak formation and color vision. We also identified repetitive regions spanning 92 Mb (∼6% of the assembly, including LINES, SINES, LTR-RTs and DNA transposons. The mitochondrial genome encompasses 17,332 bp and is ∼91% identical to the Mountain Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus nipalensis. Finally, the data reveal that several anonymous microsatellites commonly used for population studies are embedded within protein-coding genes and thus may not have evolved in a neutral fashion. Because the genome sequence includes ∼800,000 novel polymorphisms, markers can now be chosen based on their proximity to functional genes involved in migration, carnivory, and other biological processes.

  15. Rubble masonry response under cyclic actions: The experience of L'Aquila city (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonti, Roberta; Barthel, Rainer; Formisano, Antonio; Borri, Antonio; Candela, Michele

    2015-12-01

    Several methods of analysis are available in engineering practice to study old masonry constructions. Two commonly used approaches in the field of seismic engineering are global and local analyses. Despite several years of research in this field, the various methodologies suffer from a lack of comprehensive experimental validation. This is mainly due to the difficulty in simulating the many different kinds of masonry and, accordingly, the non-linear response under horizontal actions. This issue can be addressed by examining the local response of isolated panels under monotonic and/or alternate actions. Different testing methodologies are commonly used to identify the local response of old masonry. These range from simplified pull-out tests to sophisticated in-plane monotonic tests. However, there is a lack of both knowledge and critical comparison between experimental validations and numerical simulations. This is mainly due to the difficulties in implementing irregular settings within both simplified and advanced numerical analyses. Similarly, the simulation of degradation effects within laboratory tests is difficult with respect to old masonry in-situ boundary conditions. Numerical models, particularly on rubble masonry, are commonly simplified. They are mainly based on a kinematic chain of rigid blocks able to perform different "modes of damage" of structures subjected to horizontal actions. This paper presents an innovative methodology for testing; its aim is to identify a simplified model for out-of-plane response of rubbleworks with respect to the experimental evidence. The case study of L'Aquila district is discussed.

  16. Movements and landscape use of Eastern Imperial Eagles Aquila heliaca in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poessel, Sharon; Bragin, Evgeny A.; Sharpe, Peter B.; Garcelon, David K.; Bartoszuk, Kordian; Katzner, Todd E.

    2018-01-01

    Capsule: We describe ecological factors associated with movements of a globally declining raptor species, the Eastern Imperial Eagle Aquila heliaca.Aims: To describe the movements, habitat associations and resource selection of Eastern Imperial Eagles marked in Central Asia.Methods: We used global positioning system (GPS) data sent via satellite telemetry devices deployed on Eastern Imperial Eagles captured in Kazakhstan to calculate distances travelled and to associate habitat and weather variables with eagle locations collected throughout the annual cycle. We also used resource selection models to evaluate habitat use of tracked birds during autumn migration. Separately, we used wing-tagging recovery data to broaden our understanding of wintering locations of eagles.Results: Eagles tagged in Kazakhstan wintered in most countries on the Arabian Peninsula, as well as Iran and India. The adult eagle we tracked travelled more efficiently than did the four pre-adults. During autumn migration, telemetered eagles used a mixture of vegetation types, but during winter and summer, they primarily used bare and sparsely vegetated areas. Finally, telemetered birds used orographic updrafts to subsidize their autumn migration flight, but they relied on thermal updrafts during spring migration.Conclusion: Our study is the first to use GPS telemetry to describe year-round movements and habitat associations of Eastern Imperial Eagles in Central Asia. Our findings provide insight into the ecology of this vulnerable raptor species that can contribute to conservation efforts on its behalf.

  17. Ileo-ceco-rectal Intussusception Requiring Intestinal Resection and Anastomosis in a Tawny Eagle (Aquila rapax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, Mikel; Huynh, Minh; Forbes, Neil

    2015-03-01

    A 23-year-old male tawny eagle (Aquila rapax) was examined because of sudden onset of lethargy, regurgitation, and hematochezia. An intestinal obstruction was suspected based on radiographic findings, and an ileo-ceco-rectal intussusception was confirmed by coelioscopy. A 14.3-cm section of intestine was resected before an intestinal anastomosis was done. Coelomic endoscopic examination confirmed a postsurgical complication of adhesions between the intestinal anastomosis and the dorsal coelomic wall, resulting in a partial luminal stricture and requiring surgical removal of the adhesions. Rectoscopy was useful in diagnosing a mild luminal stricture related to the second surgery. Complete recovery was observed 2 months after surgery. Lack of further complications in the 2 years after surgery demonstrates good tolerance of intestinal resection and anastomosis of a large segment of bowel in an eagle. This report is the first reported case of intussusception in an eagle and emphasizes the potential use of endoscopic examination in the diagnosis as well as in the management of complications.

  18. Assessment of lead exposure in Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) from spent ammunition in central Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Julia Rodriguez-Ramos; Hofle, Ursula; Mateo, Rafael; de Francisco, Olga Nicolas; Abbott, Rachel; Acevedo, Pelayo; Blanco, Juan-Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) is found only in the Iberian Peninsula and is considered one of the most threatened birds of prey in Europe. Here we analyze lead concentrations in bones (n = 84), livers (n = 15), primary feathers (n = 69), secondary feathers (n = 71) and blood feathers (n = 14) of 85 individuals collected between 1997 and 2008 in central Spain. Three birds (3.6%) had bone lead concentration > 20 (mu or u)g/g and all livers were within background lead concentration. Bone lead concentrations increased with the age of the birds and were correlated with lead concentration in rachis of secondary feathers. Spatial aggregation of elevated bone lead concentration was found in some areas of Montes de Toledo. Lead concentrations in feathers were positively associated with the density of large game animals in the area where birds were found dead or injured. Discontinuous lead exposure in eagles was evidenced by differences in lead concentration in longitudinal portions of the rachis of feathers.

  19. Predators as prey at a Golden Eagle Aquila chrysaetos eyrie in Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, D.H.; Tsengeg, Pu; Whitlock, P.; Ellis, Merlin H.

    2000-01-01

    Although golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) have for decades been known to occasionally take large or dangerous quarry, the capturing of such was generally believed to be rare and/or the act of starved birds. This report provides details of an exceptional diet at a golden eagle eyrie in eastern Mongolia with unquantified notes on the occurrence of foxes at other eyries in Mongolia. Most of the prey we recorded were unusual, including 1 raven (Corvus corax), 3 demoiselle cranes (Anthropoides virgo), 1 upland buzzard (Buteo hemilasius), 3 owls, 27 foxes, and 11 Mongolian gazelles. Some numerical comparisons are of interest. Our value for gazelle calves (10 minimum count, 1997) represents 13% of 78 prey items and at least one adult was also present. Our total of only 15 hares (Lepus tolai) and 4 marmots (Marmota sibirica) compared to 27 foxes suggests not so much a preference for foxes, but rather that populations of more normal prey were probably depressed at this site. Unusual prey represented 65% of the diet at this eyrie.

  20. Damage and recovery of historic buildings: The experience of L’Aquila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modena, Claudio; Valluzzi, Maria Rosa; Da Porto, Franca; Munari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Problems range from the same definition and choice of the “conventional” safety level, to the methodologies that can be used to perform reliable structural analyses and safety verifications (as modern ones are frequently not suitable for the construction under consideration) and to the selection, design and execution of appropriate materials and interventions techniques aimed to repair and strengthen the built heritage while preserving its cultural, historic, artistic values. The earthquake that struck the Abruzzo region on 6. April 2009 at 3:32 a.m., had its epicentre in the capital of the region, L’Aquila, and seriously affected a wide area around the city, where many historic towns and villages are found. Lessons learned from this event gave relevant contributions to develop specific tools, to appropriately tackle the above mentioned problems, available to practitioner engineers and architects: methodology to intervene on complex and connected buildings in the historic centres, definition of adequate materials and techniques to intervene on the damaged buildings, codes and codes of practice specific for historic constructions. A short review of all the mentioned aspects is presented in the paper, making specific reference to research activities, practical applications and to the recent evolution of codes and guidelines [it

  1. Aql X-1 transition towards the soft (banana) state accompanied by radio/NIR detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakoff, G. R.; Miller-Jones, J.; Fox, O.; Linares, M.; Altamirano, D.; Russell, D.

    2009-11-01

    The currently active neutron star transient and atoll source Aql X-1 (Linares et al., ATEL #2288) has begun the transition from the hard (extreme island) state to the soft (banana) state (Rodriguez et al. ATEL #2299). This transition likely began around 2009 Nov 15 (MJD = 55150). The latest RXTE PCA observation (2009 Nov 17, MJD=55152.17+/-0.02, 2-60 keV fractional rms variability amplitude of ~11% for 0.1-10 Hz) indicates that the source is in the intermediate (island) state.

  2. The showerfront time-structure of ''anomalous muon'' events associated with Hercules X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandreas, D.E.; Allen, R.C.; Biller, S.D.; Dion, G.M.; Lu, X-Q.; Vishwanath, P.R.; Yodh, G.B.; Berley, D.; Chang, C.Y.; Dingus, B.L.; Dion, C.; Goodman, J.A.; Gupta, S.K.; Haines, T.J.; Kwok, P.W.; Stark, M.J.; Burman, R.L.; Hoffman, C.M.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Nagle, D.E.; Potter, M.E.; Sandberg, V.D.; Zhang, W.P.; Cady, D.R.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The 11 ''in-phase'' source events from the 1986 muon-rich bursts associated with Hercules X-1 (previously reported by this group) have been studied for indications of further anomalous behavior. The most significant effect observed resulted from an analysis of the showerfront time-structures of these events. This analysis was then applied a priori to the rest of the source day, where an additional ∼9 signal events are expected to remain. The same effect was observed at a chance probability level of ∼0.1%. 1 ref., 7 figs

  3. Observation of hard X-rays line emission from Her X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polcaro, V.F.; Bazzano, A.; la Padula, C.; Ubertini, P.; Vialetto, G.; Manchanda, R.K.; Damle, S.V.

    1982-04-01

    We present the results of a hard X-ray measurement of the binary source Her X-1, carried out with a balloon borne X-ray telescope consisting of two Multiwire Proportional Counters, having 900 cm/sup 2/ sensitive area each and spectral resolution of 15% and 24% FWHM respectively at 60 keV. The source was observed during the 'Mid-on' state. Our data confirm the previously reported high energy emission line overimposed on the low energy thermal spectrum.

  4. Observation of Cyg X-1 with the K-10-11 rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Tsunenari; Matsuoka, Masaru; Miyamoto, Shigenori; Oda, Minoru; Ogawara, Yoshiaki

    1976-01-01

    The X-ray emission mechanism owing to the mass accretion to compact objects is one of cosmic X-ray sources. White dwarf, neutron star and black hole are considered as the compact objects. The mass of Cyg X-1 has been estimated to be about 10 times as large as the mass of the sun, and Cyg X-1 is only one prominent candidate for the black hole. The observation of the X-ray from Cyg C-1 provides the useful information on the physical state of the black hole. Particularly, the X-ray from Cyg X-1 showed the characteristic time variations which have not been detected in other X-ray sources. They are the intensive time variation over the duration of msec to day, the pulsation of about 1 msec breadth, and the transition between two X-ray emission states. The X-ray detector abroad the K-10-11 rocket is the proportional counter filled with 90% Xe and 10% CO 2 , and covers the 1.5-2.5 kev X-ray energy range. The total detector area is about 950 cm 2 . The observed result showed the characteristic intensive time variation and the msec pulsation. The data analysis is now in progress, and the preliminary result will be reported. (Yoshimori, M.)

  5. The hard X-ray spectrum of Cyg X-1 during the transition in November 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, M.; Maurus, H.; Urbach, R.

    1976-01-01

    Some observations are reported of the hard X-ray spectrum of Cyg X-1 during a transition to the high state in November 1975, made with a balloon-borne X-ray detector. The range covered was 25 to 150 keV. The data obtained appeared to confirm the characteristic spectral time variation, and suggested a single power law spectrum from 3 to 80 keV, with an increasing spectral index during the upward transition to the high state. A power spectrum is expected if it is assumed that the universe Compton effect is the basic mechanism that produces the hard X-ray tail of Cyg X-1. Spectral time variation may be caused by a varying intensity of an inner soft photon source within a stable hot cloud. (U.K.)

  6. Short-term variability of Cyg X-1 and the accretion disk temperature fluctuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Recent theoretical models which have been proposed to explain the observed time-averaged spectrum of Cyg X-1 assume that the hard x-rays are emitted by inverse-Compton mechanism from an optically thin, hot accretion disk around a black hole. Results are reported here of balloon observations (20-68 keV) and compared with previous rocket observations (1.5-25 keV). Using the results an analysis is made of the variability of the source intensity in the hard x-ray range which suggests that the variation is essentially spectral indicating that it originated from temperature fluctuation in an accretive disk. Such a model, which explains the stochastic nature of the variability, its characteristic time scale and spectral features at the same time in the context of the conventional accretion disk model for Cyg X-1, is examined. (U.K.)

  7. Hard X-ray spectrum of Her X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; La Padula, C.D.; Polcaro, V.F.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a balloon borne hard X-ray observation of Her X-1 is presented. The experiment, released from the base of Hyderabad (India) the 19th April 1980, was a collaboration between the Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale (Italy) and the TIFR (India). The data obtained are compatible with a thermal emission at low energy with a strong emission line overimposed on the continuum around 50-60 keV

  8. Response of the middle atmosphere to Sco X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, R.A.; Barcus, J.R.; Mitchell, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    On the night of 9 March 1983 (UT) at Punta Lobos Launch Site, Peru, a sequence of sounding rockets was flown to study the electrical structure of the equatorial middle atmosphere and to evaluate perturbations on this environment induced by the X-ray star Sco X-1. The rocket series was anchored by two Nike Orion payloads which were launched at 0327 and 0857 UT, near Sco X-1 star-rise and after it had attained an elevation angle of 70 deg E. Each of these payloads carried instrumentation during parachute descent to measure X-ray and electron fluxes, ion density, conductivity and mobility, and in situ electric fields. In addition, several smaller payloads capable of measuring the atmospheric electrical parameters were launched at times interspersed among the large rockets. An enhanced flux of X-rays was observed on the second Nike Orion flight. This increase is directly attributed to Sco X-1, both from the spectral properties of the measured X-ray distribution and by spatial information acquired from a spinning X-ray detector during the upleg portion of the 31.033 flight. Simultaneously, a growth in ion conductivity and density was seen to occur in the lower mesosphere between 60 and 80 km on the second flight. The results are discussed. (author)

  9. EVIDENCE FOR AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE IN NGC 5408 X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of correlated spectral and timing behavior in the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1. An ∼100 ks pointing with XMM/Newton obtained in 2008 January reveals a strong 10 mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the >1 keV flux, as well as flat-topped, band-limited noise breaking to a power law. The energy spectrum is again dominated by two components, a 0.16 keV thermal disk and a power law with an index of ∼2.5. These new measurements, combined with results from our previous 2006 January pointing in which we first detected QPOs, show for the first time in a ULX a pattern of spectral and temporal correlations strongly analogous to that seen in Galactic black hole (BH) sources, but at much higher X-ray luminosity and longer characteristic timescales. We find that the QPO frequency is proportional to the inferred disk flux, while the QPO and broadband noise amplitude (rms) are inversely proportional to the disk flux. Assuming that QPO frequency scales inversely with the BH mass at a given power-law spectral index we derive mass estimates using the observed QPO frequency-spectral index relations from five stellar-mass BH systems with dynamical mass constraints. The results from all sources are consistent with a mass range for NGC 5408 X-1 from 1000 to 9000 M sun . We argue that these are conservative limits, and a more likely range is from 2000 to 5000 M sun . Moreover, the recent relation from Gierlinski et al. that relates the BH mass to the strength of variability at high frequencies (above the break in the power spectrum) is also indicative of such a high mass for NGC 5408 X-1. Importantly, none of the above estimates appears consistent with a BH mass less than ∼1000 M sun for NGC 5408 X-1. We argue that these new findings strongly support the conclusion that NGC 5408 X-1 harbors an intermediate-mass BH.

  10. Modeling Late-Summer Distribution of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the Western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Ryan M; Murphy, Robert K; Millsap, Brian A; Howe, William H; Gardner, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Increasing development across the western United States (USA) elevates concerns about effects on wildlife resources; the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is of special concern in this regard. Knowledge of golden eagle abundance and distribution across the western USA must be improved to help identify and conserve areas of major importance to the species. We used distance sampling and visual mark-recapture procedures to estimate golden eagle abundance from aerial line-transect surveys conducted across four Bird Conservation Regions in the western USA between 15 August and 15 September in 2006-2010, 2012, and 2013. To assess golden eagle-habitat relationships at this scale, we modeled counts of golden eagles seen during surveys in 2006-2010, adjusted for probability of detection, and used land cover and other environmental factors as predictor variables within 20-km2 sampling units randomly selected from survey transects. We found evidence of positive relationships between intensity of use by golden eagles and elevation, solar radiation, and mean wind speed, and of negative relationships with the proportion of landscape classified as forest or as developed. The model accurately predicted habitat use observed during surveys conducted in 2012 and 2013. We used the model to construct a map predicting intensity of use by golden eagles during late summer across our ~2 million-km2 study area. The map can be used to help prioritize landscapes for conservation efforts, identify areas where mitigation efforts may be most effective, and identify regions for additional research and monitoring. In addition, our map can be used to develop region-specific (e.g., state-level) density estimates based on the latest information on golden eagle abundance from a late-summer survey and aid designation of geographic management units for the species.

  11. Suicidal intention and negative spiritual coping one year after the earthquake of L'Aquila (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratta, Paolo; Capanna, Cristina; Riccardi, Ilaria; Carmassi, Claudia; Piccinni, Armando; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Rossi, Alessandro

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated the rate of suicidal intention and its relationship with the features of religious involvement in a non-clinical sample of the adult population exposed to the L'Aquila earthquake. The study population was composed of 426 people who had experienced the earthquake (188 males and 238 females). For comparison, 522 people were recruited from nearby unaffected areas. The sample was investigated for suicidal intention screening, distinguishing Suicidal Screen-Negative (SSN) subjects from Positive (SSP) subjects. Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality (BMMRS) and Impact of Event Scale (IES) assessments were administered. More SSP subjects were observed in the population exposed to the earthquake (Odds Ratio 3.54). A higher proportion of females showed suicidal ideation. Multivariate analysis showed overall significance for the between-subject factor. Univariate F tests for each BMMRS variable that contributed to significant overall effect showed that negative spiritual coping was significantly different. No differences were observed for IES scores between the two groups, but correlations with negative spiritual coping were found. The samples are relatively small and data are based on self-reports. Negative religious coping such as expression of conflict and doubt regarding matters of faith, as well as a feeling of being punished or abandoned by God, can prevail in response to prolonged stress without relief, as was experienced by the population exposed to the earthquake. These features are more associated with suicide ideation. Degree of religious affiliation and commitment examination by mental health practitioners can be useful when suicidal ideation is investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. MULTISCALE DOCUMENTATION AND MONITORING OF L’AQUILA HISTORICAL CENTRE USING UAV PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dominici

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays geomatic techniques can guarantee not only a precise and accurate survey for the documentation of our historical heritage but also a solution to monitor its behaviour over time after, for example, a catastrophic event (earthquakes, landslides, ecc. Europe is trying to move towards harmonized actions to store information on cultural heritage (MIBAC with the ICCS forms, English heritage with the MIDAS scheme, etc but it would be important to provide standardized methods in order to perform measuring operations to collect certified metric data. The final result could be a database to support the entire management of the cultural heritage and also a checklist of “what to do” and “when to do it”. The wide range of geomatic techniques provides many solutions to acquire, to organize and to manage data at a multiscale level: high resolution satellite images can provide information in a short time during the “early emergency” while UAV photogrammetry and laser scanning can provide digital high resolution 3D models of buildings, ortophotos of roofs and facades and so on. This paper presents some multiscale survey case studies using UAV photogrammetry: from a minor historical village (Aielli to the centre of L’Aquila (Santa Maria di Collemaggio Church from the post-emergency to now. This choice has been taken not only to present how geomatics is an effective science for modelling but also to present a complete and reliable way to perform conservation and/or restoration through precise monitoring techniques, as shown in the third case study.

  13. The Si(100)-Sb 2x1 and Ge(100) 2x1 surfaces: A multi-technique study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, M.

    1993-08-01

    The electronic and geometric structures of the clean and Sb terminated Si(100)2x1 and Ge(100)-2x1 surfaces have been investigated using a multi-technique approach. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure (SEXAFS) spectroscopy and angle-integrated core-level photoemission electron spectroscopy (PES) were employed to measure the surface symmetry, defect structure, relevant bond lengths, atomic coordination and electronic structure. By employing a multi-technique approach, it is possible to correlate changes in the geometric structure to specific features of the core-level lineshape of the substrate. This allows for the assignment of components of the core-level lineshape to be assigned to specific surface and near-surface atoms

  14. A possible very high energy gamma-ray burst from Hercules X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishwanath, P.R.; Bhat, P.N.; Ramanamurthy, P.V.; Sreekantan, B.V.

    1989-01-01

    A large increase is observed in the trigger rate in the direction of Hercules X-1 in the Atmospheric Cerenkov array at Pachmarhi, India. The burst lasted from 2147 UT to 2201 UT on April 11, 1986. The accidental coincidence rate did not show any increase during the burst. Barring any electronic noise or celestial or terrestrial optical phenomenon with time structure similar to that of atmospheric Cerenkov phenomenon, the increase is ascribed to TeV gamma rays from Her X-1. The number of gamma-ray events during the burst amounted to about 54 percent of the cosmic-ray flux, resulting in a 42-sigma effect. This is the largest TeV gamma-ray signal seen from any source till now. The time-averaged flux for the burst period is 1.8 x 10 photons/sq cm per s above a threshold energy of 0.4 TeV, which results in a luminosity of 1.8 x 10 to the 37 ergs/s. The burst took place at the end of the 'high on' state in the 35-day cycle of the Her X-1 binary system indicating accretion disk as the possible production site. 14 refs

  15. The Reflection Component from Cygnus X-1 in the Soft State Measured by NuSTAR and Suzaku

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomsick, John A.; Nowak, Michael A.; Parker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The black hole binary Cygnus X-1 was observed in late-2012 with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku, providing spectral coverage over the ~1-300 keV range. The source was in the soft state with a multi-temperature blackbody, power-law, and reflection components along...

  16. Long term variability of HDE 226868 = Cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liller, W.

    1976-01-01

    Investigation of blue-sensitive photographs of HDE 226868 = Cygnus X-1 reveal no (+-0.06 mag) long-term changes in brightness since the beginning of the century nor any abrupt intensity changes similar to what has been observed at x-ray and radio frequencies. From the double sinusoidal fluctuation with 5.6 day period, an attempt is made to derive a more precise value for the orbital period, but problems are encountered and discussed. There exists evidence that the amplitude of the orbital fluctuations is increasing slowly with time

  17. Imaging the Crust in the Northern Sector of the 2009 L'Aquila Seismic Sequence through Oil Exploration Data Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazia Ciaccio, Maria; Improta, Luigi; Patacca, Etta; Scandone, Paolo; Villani, Fabio

    2010-05-01

    The 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence activated a complex, about 40 km long, NW-trending and SW-dipping normal fault system, consisting of three main faults arranged in right-lateral en-echelon geometry. While the northern sector of the epicentral area was extensively investigated by oil companies, only a few scattered, poor-quality commercial seismic profiles are available in the central and southern sector. In this study we interpret subsurface commercial data from the northern sector, which is the area where is located the source of the strong Mw5.4 aftershock occurred on the 9th April 2009. Our primary goals are: (1) to define a reliable framework of the upper crust structure, (2) to investigate how the intense aftershock activity, the bulk of which is clustered in the 5-10 km depth range, relates to the Quaternary extensional faults present in the area. The investigated area lies between the western termination of the W-E trending Gran Sasso thrust system to the south, the SW-NE trending Mt. Sibillini thrust front (Ancona-Anzio Line Auctt.) to the north and west, and by the NNW-SSE trending, SW-dipping Mt. Gorzano normal fault to the east. In this area only middle-upper Miocene deposits are exposed (Laga Flysch and underlying Cerrogna Marl), but commercial wells have revealed the presence of a Triassic-Miocene sedimentary succession identical to the well known Umbria-Marche stratigraphic sequence. We have analyzed several confidential seismic reflection profiles, mostly provided by ENI oil company. Seismic lines are tied to two public wells, 5766 m and 2541 m deep. Quality of the reflection imaging is highly variable. A few good quality stack sections contain interpretable signal down to 4.5-5.5 s TWT, corresponding to depths exceeding 10-12 km and thus allowing crustal imaging at seismogenic depths. Key-reflectors for the interpretation correspond to: (1) the top of the Miocene Cerrogna marls, (2) the top of the Upper Albian-Oligocene Scaglia Group, (3) the

  18. Application of seismic isolation for seismic strengthening of buildings damaged by the earthquake of L’Aquila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsetti, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The earthquake of 6 April 2009 destroyed the social and economic network fabric of the town of 'L'Aquila'. Since then, many buildings have been restored and some designers have taken the opportunity of rebuilding the town applying innovative technologies. In this context, despite the inevitable bureaucratic hurdles and economic constraints, added to the death of Mr. Mancinelli in 2012 (GLIS Member), several projects were carried out on existing buildings with the idea of applying base seismic isolation. A decade after the first application of this solution on an existing building in Fabriano by Mr. Mancinelli, the experience has proved to be a success, both in terms of achieved results and ease of management. For L’Aquila earthquake the idea was to replicate the positive experience of the “Marche earthquake”, though the problems and obstacles to face often were substantially different. The experience outlined below is a summary of the issues faced and resolved in two projects, taking into account that any solution can be further improved and refined depending on the ability and sensitivity of the designer. We have come to the conclusion that the projects of a base seismic isolation of existing buildings are 'tailor-made' projects, and that the solutions have to be analysed a case by case, even if the main concepts are simple and applicable to a wide range of buildings [it

  19. Optical and radio counterpart of Circinus X-1 (3U 1516-56)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, J A.J.; Murdin, P G; Peterson, B A [Anglo-Australian Observatory, Epping (Australia); and others

    1977-11-01

    Circinus X-1 (3U 1516-56) has a radio counterpart which, at high frequencies, show flares with the same 16.6 day periodicity as the X-ray intensity. In each cycle the radio flare occurs shortly after the intensity drop-off which defines the X-ray modulation. The radio source is positionally coincident with a faint red star having very strong H..cap alpha.. and weak He I emission lines which are probably variable. The object may be an early-type emission-line star or a symbiotic star, at a distance of 10 kpc.

  20. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  1. Broad-Band Spectroscopy of Hercules X-1 with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Fumi; Enoto, Teruaki; Iwakiri, Wataru; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Nagase, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    Hercules X-1 was observed with Suzaku in the main-on state from 2005 to 2010. The 0.4- 100 keV wide-band spectra obtained in four observations showed a broad hump around 4-9 keV in addition to narrow Fe lines at 6.4 and 6.7 keV. The hump was seen in all the four observations regardless of the selection of the continuum models. Thus it is considered a stable and intrinsic spectral feature in Her X-1. The broad hump lacked a sharp structure like an absorption edge. Thus it was represented by two different spectral models: an ionized partial covering or an additional broad line at 6.5 keV. The former required a persistently existing ionized absorber, whose origin was unclear. In the latter case, the Gaussian fitting of the 6.5-keV line needs a large width of sigma = 1.0-1.5 keV and a large equivalent width of 400-900 eV. If the broad line originates from Fe fluorescence of accreting matter, its large width may be explained by the Doppler broadening in the accretion flow. However, the large equivalent width may be inconsistent with a simple accretion geometry.

  2. On the parameters of the system Cyg X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    Estimations are given of the mass of the supergiant HDE 226868 in the system Cyg X-1 which are made on the basis of interpretation of spectroscopic observations by means of the model-atmosphere method. The importance is pointed out of accounting for deviations from LTE in calculations of equivalent widths and profiles of hydrogen lines by which the acceleration of gravity force on the surface of the optical star of system is determined. Supergiant mass determined in that way turns out to be M*=(16±3)M sun . Provided the zone of formation of the emission He II λ4686 A must be localized near the supergiant surface, the least value of inclination of system orbit plane is estimated: i>or approx. 35 deg. The possibility is pointed out of variability of equivalent widths of He II emission λ4686 A, which is connected with eclipse of the ''spot'', i.e. of area of localization of this emission. It is noted that for large angles (i>or approx. 35 deg) of orbit inclinaion, the mass of the degenerate star in the system Cyg X-1 does not exceed 10 M sun

  3. Non-inductive components of electromagnetic signals associated with L'Aquila earthquake sequences estimated by means of inter-station impulse response functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Di Lorenzo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available On 6 April 2009 at 01:32:39 UT a strong earthquake occurred west of L'Aquila at the very shallow depth of 9 km. The main shock local magnitude was Ml = 5.8 (Mw = 6.3. Several powerful aftershocks occurred the following days. The epicentre of the main shock occurred 6 km away from the Geomagnetic Observatory of L'Aquila, on a fault 15 km long having a NW-SE strike, about 140°, and a SW dip of about 42°. For this reason, L'Aquila seismic events offered very favourable conditions to detect possible electromagnetic emissions related to the earthquake. The data used in this work come from the permanent geomagnetic Observatories of L'Aquila and Duronia. Here the results concerning the analysis of the residual magnetic field estimated by means of the inter-station impulse response functions in the frequency band from 0.3 Hz to 3 Hz are shown.

  4. Smart City L’Aquila : An Application of the “Infostructure” Approach to Public Urban Mobility in a Post-Disaster Context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falco, E.; Malavolta, Ivano; Radzimski, Adam; Ruberto, Stefano; Iovino, Ludovico; Gallo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Ever since the earthquake of April 6, 2009 hit the city of L’Aquila, Italy, the city has been facing major challenges in terms of social, physical, and economic reconstruction. The system of public urban mobility, the bus network, is no exception with its old bus fleet, non-user-friendly

  5. Smart City L’Aquila : An Application of the “Infostructure” Approach to Public Urban Mobility in a Post-Disaster Context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falco, Enzo; Malavolta, Ivano; Radzimski, Adam; Ruberto, Stefano; Iovino, Ludovico; Gallo, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Ever since the earthquake of April 6, 2009 hit the city of L’Aquila, Italy, the city has been facing major challenges in terms of social, physical, and economic reconstruction. The system of public urban mobility, the bus network, is no exception with its old bus fleet, non-user-friendly

  6. Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Analyses of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis from Three Areas in Western North America; Initial Results and Conservation Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica H Craig

    Full Text Available Understanding the genetics of a population is a critical component of developing conservation strategies. We used archived tissue samples from golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis in three geographic regions of western North America to conduct a preliminary study of the genetics of the North American subspecies, and to provide data for United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS decision-making for golden eagle management. We used a combination of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA D-loop sequences and 16 nuclear DNA (nDNA microsatellite loci to investigate the extent of gene flow among our sampling areas in Idaho, California and Alaska and to determine if we could distinguish birds from the different geographic regions based on their genetic profiles. Our results indicate high genetic diversity, low genetic structure and high connectivity. Nuclear DNA Fst values between Idaho and California were low but significantly different from zero (0.026. Bayesian clustering methods indicated a single population, and we were unable to distinguish summer breeding residents from different regions. Results of the mtDNA AMOVA showed that most of the haplotype variation (97% was within the geographic populations while 3% variation was partitioned among them. One haplotype was common to all three areas. One region-specific haplotype was detected in California and one in Idaho, but additional sampling is required to determine if these haplotypes are unique to those geographic areas or a sampling artifact. We discuss potential sources of the high gene flow for this species including natal and breeding dispersal, floaters, and changes in migratory behavior as a result of environmental factors such as climate change and habitat alteration. Our preliminary findings can help inform the USFWS in development of golden eagle management strategies and provide a basis for additional research into the complex dynamics of the North American subspecies.

  7. Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Analyses of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis) from Three Areas in Western North America; Initial Results and Conservation Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Erica H; Adams, Jennifer R; Waits, Lisette P; Fuller, Mark R; Whittington, Diana M

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genetics of a population is a critical component of developing conservation strategies. We used archived tissue samples from golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis) in three geographic regions of western North America to conduct a preliminary study of the genetics of the North American subspecies, and to provide data for United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) decision-making for golden eagle management. We used a combination of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop sequences and 16 nuclear DNA (nDNA) microsatellite loci to investigate the extent of gene flow among our sampling areas in Idaho, California and Alaska and to determine if we could distinguish birds from the different geographic regions based on their genetic profiles. Our results indicate high genetic diversity, low genetic structure and high connectivity. Nuclear DNA Fst values between Idaho and California were low but significantly different from zero (0.026). Bayesian clustering methods indicated a single population, and we were unable to distinguish summer breeding residents from different regions. Results of the mtDNA AMOVA showed that most of the haplotype variation (97%) was within the geographic populations while 3% variation was partitioned among them. One haplotype was common to all three areas. One region-specific haplotype was detected in California and one in Idaho, but additional sampling is required to determine if these haplotypes are unique to those geographic areas or a sampling artifact. We discuss potential sources of the high gene flow for this species including natal and breeding dispersal, floaters, and changes in migratory behavior as a result of environmental factors such as climate change and habitat alteration. Our preliminary findings can help inform the USFWS in development of golden eagle management strategies and provide a basis for additional research into the complex dynamics of the North American subspecies.

  8. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA analyses of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis) from three areas in western North America; initial results and conservation implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Erica H; Adams, Jennifer R.; Waits, Lisette P.; Fuller, Mark R.; Whittington, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genetics of a population is a critical component of developing conservation strategies. We used archived tissue samples from golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis) in three geographic regions of western North America to conduct a preliminary study of the genetics of the North American subspecies, and to provide data for United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) decision-making for golden eagle management. We used a combination of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop sequences and 16 nuclear DNA (nDNA) microsatellite loci to investigate the extent of gene flow among our sampling areas in Idaho, California and Alaska and to determine if we could distinguish birds from the different geographic regions based on their genetic profiles. Our results indicate high genetic diversity, low genetic structure and high connectivity. Nuclear DNA Fst values between Idaho and California were low but significantly different from zero (0.026). Bayesian clustering methods indicated a single population, and we were unable to distinguish summer breeding residents from different regions. Results of the mtDNA AMOVA showed that most of the haplotype variation (97%) was within the geographic populations while 3% variation was partitioned among them. One haplotype was common to all three areas. One region-specific haplotype was detected in California and one in Idaho, but additional sampling is required to determine if these haplotypes are unique to those geographic areas or a sampling artifact. We discuss potential sources of the high gene flow for this species including natal and breeding dispersal, floaters, and changes in migratory behavior as a result of environmental factors such as climate change and habitat alteration. Our preliminary findings can help inform the USFWS in development of golden eagle management strategies and provide a basis for additional research into the complex dynamics of the North American subspecies.

  9. [Resilience, social relations, and pedagogic intervention five years after the earthquake occurred in L'Aquila (Central Italy) in 2009: an action-research in the primary schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarelli, Alessandro; Ciccozzi, Chiara; Fiorenza, Arianna

    2016-01-01

    the action-research "Outdoor training and citizenship between children from L'Aquila", carried out from 2014 to 2015 in some schools situated in the municipality of L'Aquila, aimed to answer to the needs emerged in reference to the social and psychological problems among children during the period after the L'Aquila earthquake occurred in 2009. In particular, the article provides documentary evidence about the results regarding the parts related to the study of resilience (cognitive objective) and of social relations (objective tied to the educational intervention), five years after the earthquake. the pedagogical research team, in close cooperation with the Cartography Laboratory of the University of L'Aquila and with the Grupo de Innovación Educativa Areté de la Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, has worked according to the research-action methodology, collecting secondary data and useful data to check the effectiveness of the educational actions put in place in order to promote resilient behaviours and to activate positive group dynamics. the study has been developed in 4 primary schools of the L'Aquila and has involved 83 children from 8 to 12 years. A control group made by 55 subjects, homogeneous for sex and age, has been identified in the primary schools of Borgorose, a little town near Rieti (Central Italy). data about the abilities of resilience and about the response to the stress have been collected in the first phase of the study with the purpose to outline the initial situation and develop an appropriate educational intervention. The comparison with the control group made by 55 subjects who were not from L'Aquila allowed to check that, 5 years after the disaster, the context of life produces a meaningful discrepancy in terms of responses to the stress and to the ability of resilience, and this fact is definitely negative for children from L'Aquila. On the other hand, data related to social relations allowed to verify how the educational intervention

  10. A longitudinal study of quality of life of earthquake survivors in L'Aquila, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Marco; Masedu, Francesco; Mazza, Monica; Tiberti, Sergio; Di Giovanni, Chiara; Calvarese, Anna; Pirro, Roberta; Sconci, Vittorio

    2013-12-07

    People's well-being after loss resulting from an earthquake is a concern in countries prone to natural disasters. Most studies on post-earthquake subjective quality of life (QOL) have focused on the effects of psychological impairment and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on the psychological dimension of QOL. However, there is a need for studies focusing on QOL in populations not affected by PTSD or psychological impairment. The aim of this study was to estimate QOL changes over an 18-month period in an adult population sample after the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake. The study was designed as a longitudinal survey with four repeated measurements performed at six monthly intervals. The setting was the general population of an urban environment after a disruptive earthquake. Participants included 397 healthy adult subjects. Exclusion criteria were comorbidities such as physical, psychological, psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases at the beginning of the study. The primary outcome measure was QOL, as assessed by the WHOQOL-BREF instrument. A generalised estimating equation model was run for each WHOQOL-BREF domain. Overall, QOL scores were observed to be significantly higher 18 months after the earthquake in all WHOQOL-BREF domains. The model detected an average increase in the physical QOL scores (from 66.6 ± 5.2 to 69.3 ± 4.7), indicating a better overall physical QOL for men. Psychological domain scores (from 64.9 ± 5.1 to 71.5 ± 6.5) were observed to be worse in men than in women. Levels at the WHOQOL domain for psychological health increased from the second assessment onwards in women, indicating higher resiliency. Men averaged higher scores than women in terms of social relationships and the environmental domain. Regarding the physical, psychological and social domains of QOL, scores in the elderly group (age > 60) were observed to be similar to each other regardless of the significant covariates used. WHOQOL-BREF scores of the psychological domain

  11. The L'Aquila process and the perils of bad communication of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Responsibilities and observance of ethical behaviour by scientists have increased more than ever with the advancement of science and of the social and economic development of a country. Nowadays, geoscientists are often charged by local and/or national and international authorities with the task of providing ways to foster economic development while protecting human life and safeguarding the environment. But besides technical and scientific expertise, in a democratic country all this requires efficient ways and various channels of scientific divulgation. Geoscientists themselves should be involved in these procedures, or at least they should be called to verify that correct communication is actually released. Unfortunately, it seems that awareness of such new and ever-increasing responsibilities is not yet being always realized at a needed level. The question is especially sensible in Italy, a country in which the hydro-geological, seismological, volcanological and coastal set-up requires careful technical and scientific treatment. Given the fragility of the natural system, the role of geoscientists should not be restricted to the delivery of scientific expertise: in fact, and perhaps more than elsewhere, problems are compounded by the need of communication based on sound science not only to governing authorities, but also to the public at large, possibly including also an array of mass media. Many international organizations have been wrongly interpreting the accusation and especially the sentence at the first stage of the L'Aquila process as a problem of impossibility to predict earthquakes. But the recently published motivation of the sentence seems to have brought to light the lack of a scrupulous overview of the situation prior to the disastrous seismic event, practically leaving the task of public information to the judgment or perception of the national agency in charge of natural hazards. It turned out that a major outcome of the process, apart from the

  12. The WA105-3x1x1 m3 dual phase LAr-TPC demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Sebastien

    2016-11-15

    The dual phase Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) is the state-of-art technology for neutrino detection thanks to its superb 3D tracking and calorimetry performance. Its main feature is the charge amplification in gas argon which provides excellent signal-to-noise ratio. Electrons produced in the liquid argon are extracted in the gas phase. Here, a readout plane based on Large Electron Multiplier detectors provides amplification of the charges before its collection onto an anode with strip readout. The charge amplification enables constructing fully homoge- nous giant LAr-TPCs with tuneable gain, excellent charge imaging performance and increased sensitivity to low energy events. Following a staged approach the WA105 collaboration is con- structing a dual phase LAr-TPC with an active volume of 3x1x1m3 that will soon be tested with cosmic rays. Its construction and operation aims to test scalable solutions for the crucial aspects of this technology: ultra high argon purity in non-evacuable tank, la...

  13. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  14. The Extreme Spin of the Black Hole Cygnus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Lijun; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Reid, Mark J.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Steiner, James F.; Narayan, Ramesh; Xiang, Jingen; Remillard, Ronald A.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Davis, Shane W.

    2011-01-01

    Remarkably, an astronomical black hole is completely described by the two numbers that specify its mass and its spin. Knowledge of spin is crucial for understanding how, for example, black holes produce relativistic jets. Recently, it has become possible to measure the spins of black holes by focusing on the very inner region of an accreting disk of hot gas orbiting the black hole. According to General Relativity (GR), this disk is truncated at an inner radius 1 that depends only on the mass and spin of the black hole. We measure the radius of the inner edge of this disk by fitting its continuum X-ray spectrum to a fully relativistic model. Using our measurement of this radius, we deduce that the spin of Cygnus X-1 exceeds 97% of the maximum value allowed by GR.

  15. Pion production In The Inner Disk Around Cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirelles Filho, C.; Miyake, H.; Timoteo, V.S.; Lima, C.L.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron production via 4He breakup and p(p, nπ+)p is considered in the innermost region of an accretion disk surrounding a Kerr Black Hole. Close to the horizon, the contribution from p(p, nπ+)p to the neutron production is comparable to that from the breakup. It is shown that the viscosity generated by the collisions of the accreting matter with the neutrons may drive stationary accretion, for accretion rates below a critical value. In this case, solution to the disk equations is double-valued and for both solutions protons overnumber the pairs. We suggest that these solutions may mimic the states of high and low luminosity observed in Cygnus X-1

  16. 10 microsecond time resolution studies of Cygnus X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, H. C. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Time variability analyses have been applied to data composed of event times of X-rays emitted from the binary system Cygnus X-1 to search for unique black hole signatures. The X-ray data analyzed was collected at ten microsecond time resolution or better from two instruments, the High Energy Astrophysical Observatory (HEAO) A-1 detector and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA). HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA collected data from 1977--79 and from 1996 on with energy sensitivity from 1--25 keV and 2--60 keV, respectively. Variability characteristics predicted by various models of an accretion disk around a black hole have been searched for in the data. Drop-offs or quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the Fourier power spectra are expected from some of these models. The Fourier spectral technique was applied to the HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA data with careful consideration given for correcting the Poisson noise floor for instrumental effects. Evidence for a drop-off may be interpreted from the faster fall off in variability at frequencies greater than the observed breaks. Both breaks occur within the range of Keplerian frequencies associated with the inner edge radii of advection-dominated accretion disks predicted for Cyg X-1. The break between 10--20 Hz is also near the sharp rollover predicted by Nowak and Wagoner`s model of accretion disk turbulence. No QPOs were observed in the data for quality factors Q > 9 with a 95% confidence level upper limit for the fractional rms amplitude at 1.2% for a 16 M⊙ black hole.

  17. Long term variability of Cygnus X-1. V. State definitions with all sky monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, V.; Hell, N.; Pottschmidt, K.; Böck, M.; Nowak, M. A.; Rodriguez, J.; Bodaghee, A.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Case, G. L.; Hanke, M.; Kühnel, M.; Markoff, S. B.; Pooley, G. G.; Rothschild, R. E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Wilms, J.

    2013-06-01

    We present a scheme for determining the spectral state of the canonical black hole Cyg X-1 using data from previous and current X-ray all sky monitors (RXTE-ASM, Swift-BAT, MAXI, and Fermi-GBM). Determinations of the hard/intermediate and soft state agree to better than 10% between different monitors, facilitating the determination of the state and its context for any observation of the source, potentially over the lifetimes of different individual monitors. A separation of the hard and the intermediate states, which strongly differ in their spectral shape and short-term timing behavior, is only possible when data in the soft X-rays (probability of Cyg X-1 remaining in a given state for at least one week to be larger than 85% in the hard state and larger than 75% in the soft state. Intermediate states are short lived, with a 50% probability that the source leaves the intermediate state within three days. Reliable detection of these potentially short-lived events is only possible with monitor data that have a time resolution better than 1 d.

  18. SUPERORBITAL PHASE-RESOLVED ANALYSIS OF SMC X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Chou, Yi; Yang, Ting-Chang; Su, Yi-Hao, E-mail: m929011@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: yichou@astro.ncu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-10

    The high-mass X-ray binary SMC X-1 is an eclipsing binary with an orbital period of 3.89 days. This system exhibits a superorbital modulation with a period varying between {approx}40 days and {approx}65 days. The instantaneous frequency and the corresponding phase of the superorbital modulation can be obtained by a recently developed time-frequency analysis technique, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT). We present a phase-resolved analysis of both the spectra and the orbital profiles with the superorbital phase derived from the HHT. The X-ray spectra observed by the Proportional Counter Array on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer are fitted well by a blackbody plus a Comptonized component. The plasma optical depth, which is a good indicator of the distribution of material along the line of sight, is significantly anti-correlated with the flux detected at 2.5-25 keV. However, the relationship between the plasma optical depth and the equivalent width of the iron line is not monotonic. There is no significant correlation for fluxes higher than {approx}35 mCrab but clear positive correlation when the intensity is lower than {approx}20 mCrab. This indicates that the iron line production is dominated by different regions of this binary system in different superorbital phases. To study the dependence of the orbital profile on the superorbital phase, we obtained the eclipse profiles by folding the All Sky Monitor light curve with the orbital period for different superorbital states. A dip feature, similar to the pre-eclipse dip in Her X-1, lying at orbital phase {approx}0.6-0.85, was discovered during the superorbital transition state. This indicates that the accretion disk has a bulge that absorbs considerable X-ray emission in the stream-disk interaction region. The dip width is anti-correlated with the flux, and this relation can be interpreted by the precessing tilted accretion disk scenario.

  19. Golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) habitat selection as a function of land use and terrain, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Jeff A.; Madden, Melanie C.; Bloom, Peter H.; Katzner, Todd E.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2018-04-16

    Beginning in 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with Bloom Biological, Inc., began telemetry research on golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) captured in the San Diego, Orange, and western Riverside Counties of southern California. This work was supported by the San Diego Association of Governments, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the U.S. Geological Survey. Since 2014, we have tracked more than 40 eagles, although this report focuses only on San Diego County eagles.An important objective of this research is to develop habitat selection models for golden eagles. Here we provide predictions of population-level habitat selection for golden eagles in San Diego County based on environmental covariates related to land use and terrain.

  20. HBIM for restoration projects: case-study on San Cipriano Church in Castelvecchio Calvisio, Province of L’Aquila, Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romolo Continenza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been significant developments in research into assigning semantic content to 3D models for the purposes of documentation, conservation and architectural and archaeological heritage management, the application of 3D GIS to individual artifacts has remained rare. Where 3D GIS has been used in this context, it has not been done in a consistent or standardised way.As an alternative to the elaborate construction of 3D GIS, the international academic community has embarked on a process of investigating how HBIM (Historical BIM might be used in the fields of historical architecture and archaeology.In this paper, we report on experiments carried out at the San Cipriano Church in Castelvecchio Calvisio, Province of L’Aquila, Italy, on the basis of the integrated survey of the church, before turning to a discussion of the planning of restoration work in a BIM environment.

  1. The environmental project of the enhancement of the fluvial area: L’Aquila and the Aterno River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mastrolonardo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Il contributo si colloca in un programma interdisciplinare volto alla valorizzazione e la tutela del fiume, attraverso il controllo dei flussi e l’attivazione di simbiosi. Si integrano, con un approccio che parte dalla progettazione ambientale, le tematiche urbane, paesaggistiche, tecnologiche ed ecologiche, per orientare lo sviluppo del territorio in termini di tutela e valorizzazione delle risorse, e per recuperare le discontinuità rappresentata oggi dal fiume, in alcuni contesti urbani, conferendole maggiore riconoscibilità e potenzialità. Nello specifico si indaga il rapporto tra L’Aquila e il fiume Aterno per individuare, a livello locale, le strategie perseguibili per il recupero delle connessioni tra l’ambito fluviale e urbano, per la valorizzazione del territorio e il ripristino della funzionalità dell’acqua nel suo ciclo vitale. 

  2. Biotelemetery data for golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) captured in coastal southern California, February 2016–February 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Jeff A.; Madden, Melanie C.; Sebes, Jeremy B.; Bloom, Peter H.; Katzner, Todd E.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2017-05-12

    Because of a lack of clarity about the status of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in coastal southern California, the USGS, in collaboration with local, State, and other Federal agencies, began a multi-year survey and tracking program of golden eagles to address questions regarding habitat use, movement behavior, nest occupancy, genetic population structure, and human impacts on eagles. Golden eagle trapping and tracking efforts began in September 2014. During trapping efforts from September 29, 2014, to February 23, 2016, 27 golden eagles were captured. During trapping efforts from February 24, 2016, to February 23, 2017, an additional 10 golden eagles (7 females and 3 males) were captured in San Diego, Orange, and western Riverside Counties. Biotelemetry data for 26 of the 37 golden eagles that were transmitting data from February 24, 2016, to February 23, 2017 are presented. These eagles ranged as far north as northern Nevada and southern Wyoming, and as far south as La Paz, Baja California, Mexico.

  3. NuSTAR discovery of a luminosity dependent cyclotron line energy in Vela X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristin K.; Walton, Dominic J. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Pottschmidt, Katja [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Wilms, Jörn [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Sternwartstr. 7, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany); Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    We present NuSTAR observations of Vela X-1, a persistent, yet highly variable, neutron star high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB). Two observations were taken at similar orbital phases but separated by nearly a year. They show very different 3-79 keV flux levels as well as strong variability during each observation, covering almost one order of magnitude in flux. These observations allow, for the first time ever, investigations on kilo-second time-scales of how the centroid energies of cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) depend on flux for a persistent HMXB. We find that the line energy of the harmonic CRSF is correlated with flux, as expected in the sub-critical accretion regime. We argue that Vela X-1 has a very narrow accretion column with a radius of around 0.4 km that sustains a Coulomb interaction dominated shock at the observed luminosities of L {sub x} ∼ 3 × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup –1}. Besides the prominent harmonic line at 55 keV the fundamental line around 25 keV is clearly detected. We find that the strengths of the two CRSFs are anti-correlated, which we explain by photon spawning. This anti-correlation is a possible explanation for the debate about the existence of the fundamental line. The ratio of the line energies is variable with time and deviates significantly from 2.0, also a possible consequence of photon spawning, which changes the shape of the line. During the second observation, Vela X-1 showed a short off-state in which the power-law softened and a cut-off was no longer measurable. It is likely that the source switched to a different accretion regime at these low mass accretion rates, explaining the drastic change in spectral shape.

  4. Limits on the potential accuracy of earthquake risk evaluations using the L’Aquila (Italy earthquake as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Douglas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with attempting to ‘predict’ (hindcast the damage caused by the L’Aquila 2009 earthquake (Mw 6.3 and, more generally, with the question of how close predicted damage can ever be to observations. Damage is hindcast using a well-established empirical-based approach based on vulnerability indices and macroseismic intensities, adjusted for local site effects. Using information that was available before the earthquake and assuming the same event characteristics as the L’Aquila mainshock, the overall damage is reasonably well predicted but there are considerable differences in the damage pattern. To understand the reasons for these differences, information that was only available after the event were include within the calculation. Despite some improvement in the predicted damage, in particularly by the modification of the vulnerability indices and the parameter influencing the width of the damage distribution, these hindcasts do not match all the details of the observations. This is because of local effects: both in terms of the ground shaking, which is only detectable by the installation of a much denser strong-motion network and a detailed microzonation, and in terms of the building vulnerability, which cannot be modeled using a statistical approach but would require detailed analytical modeling for which calibration data are likely to be lacking. Future studies should concentrate on adjusting the generic components of the approach to make them more applicable to their location of interest. To increase the number of observations available to make these adjustments, we encourage the collection of damage states (and not just habitability classes following earthquakes and also the installation of dense strong-motion networks in built-up areas.

  5. [Psychological distress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in young survivors of L'Aquila earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollice, Rocco; Bianchini, Valeria; Roncone, Rita; Casacchia, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the presence of PTSD diagnosis, psychological distress and post-traumatic symptoms in a population of young earthquake survivors after L'Aquila earthquake. Between April 2009 and January 2010, 187 young people seeking help consecutively at the Service for Monitoring and early Intervention against psychoLogical and mEntal suffering in young people (SMILE) of L'Aquila University Psychiatric Department, underwent clinical interview with the Semi-Structured Clinical Interview DSM-IV-I and-II (SCID-I and SCID-II) and psychometric evaluation with Impact Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) and General Health Questionnaire-12 items (GHQ-12). 44.2% and 37.4% respectively, showed high and moderate levels of psychological distress. 66.7% reported the presence of a significant post-traumatic symptoms (Post-traumatic Syndrome) with an IES-R>28, while a diagnosis of PTSD was made in 13.8% of the sample. The obsessive-compulsive trait, female sex and high level of distress (GHQ ≥20) appear to be the main risk factors for the development of PTSD than those who had a post-traumatic syndrome for which the displacement and social disruption, appear to be more associated with post-traumatic aftermaths. Our findings, in line with recent literature, confirm that a natural disaster produces an high psychological distress with long-term aftermaths. Early intervention for survivors of collective or individual trauma, regardless of the presence of a PTSD diagnosis should be a primary goal in a program of Public Health.

  6. S.S. Annunziata Church (L'Aquila, Italy) unveiled by non- and micro-destructive testing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfarra, Stefano; Cheilakou, Eleni; Theodorakeas, Panagiotis; Paoletti, Domenica; Koui, Maria

    2017-03-01

    The present research work explores the potential of an integrated inspection methodology, combining Non-destructive testing and micro-destructive analytical techniques, for both the structural assessment of the S.S. Annunziata Church located in Roio Colle (L'Aquila, Italy) and the characterization of its wall paintings' pigments. The study started by applying passive thermal imaging for the structural monitoring of the church before and after the application of a consolidation treatment, while active thermal imaging was further used for assessing this consolidation procedure. After the earthquake of 2009, which seriously damaged the city of L'Aquila and its surroundings, part of the internal plaster fell off revealing the presence of an ancient mural painting that was subsequently investigated by means of a combined analytical approach involving portable VIS-NIR fiber optics diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) and laboratory methods, such as environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The results obtained from the thermographic analysis provided information concerning the two different constrictive phases of the Church, enabled the assessment of the consolidation treatment, and contributed to the detection of localized problems mainly related to the rising damp phenomenon and to biological attack. In addition, the results obtained from the combined analytical approach allowed the identification of the wall painting pigments (red and yellow ochre, green earth, and smalt) and provided information on the binding media and the painting technique possibly applied by the artist. From the results of the present study, it is possible to conclude that the joint use of the above stated methods into an integrated methodology can produce the complete set of useful information required for the planning of the Church's restoration

  7. Synchrotron and Coulomb Boiler in Cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malzac, Julien; Belmont, Renaud

    2009-01-01

    We use a new code to simulate the radiation and kinetic processes in the X-ray emitting region around accreting black holes and constrain the magnetic field and temperature of the hot protons in the corona of Cygnus X-1. In the hard state we find a magnetic field below equipartition with radiation, suggesting that the corona is not powered through magnetic field dissipation (as assumed in most accretion disc corona models). On the other hand, our results also point toward proton temperatures that are substantially lower than typical temperatures of the ADAF models. Finally, we show that in both spectral states Comptonising plasma could be powered essentially through power-law acceleration of non-thermal electrons, which are then partly thermalised by the synchrotron and Coulomb boiler. This suggests that, contrary to current beliefs, the corona of the HSS and that of the LHS could be of very similar nature. The differences between the LHS and HSS coronal spectra would then be predominantly caused by the strong disc soft cooling emission which is present in the HSS and absent in the LHS.

  8. Optical photometry of Cygnus X-1: 1972-1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, E.N.; Quintanilla, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    The blue (Johnson B) magnitude of HDE 226868, the optical counterpart of Cygnus X-1, has been measured on 349 nights between 1972 April and 1976 December. The best-fit period to these data is 5.6015 +- 0.0006 days and the light-curve obtained by folding these data with this period shows features with duration < 0.1 P in addition to the well-established double maxima and minima. It is found that the mean brightness of the star changes by 0.02 mag on a timescale of approximately 150 day and that the extremes of this brightness range are associated with two forms of the light-curve which in combination yield much of the detailed structure of the five-year mean curve. The observations show that there was no change much greater than 0.001 mag in either the 5.6 or 150-day light-curves associated with the X-ray high states. However, a unique form of the 5.6-day light-curve did occur just at the start of the 1975 November X-ray high state. There is some evidence for an overall brightness change during the five years of approximately 0.01 mag. (author)

  9. The Extreme Spin of the Black Hole in Cygnus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Lijun; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Reid, Mark J.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Steiner, James F.; Narayan, Ramesh; Xiang, Jingen; Remillard, Ronald A.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Davis, Shane W.

    2011-01-01

    The compact primary in the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 was the first black hole to be established via dynamical observations. We have recently determined accurate values for its mass and distance, and for the orbital inclination angle of the binary. Building on these results, which are based on our favored (asynchronous) dynamical model, we have measured the radius of the inner edge of the black hole s accretion disk by fitting its thermal continuum spectrum to a fully relativistic model of a thin accretion disk. Assuming that the spin axis of the black hole is aligned with the orbital angular momentum vector, we have determined that Cygnus X-1 contains a near-extreme Kerr black hole with a spin parameter a* > 0.95 (3(sigma)). For a less probable (synchronous) dynamical model, we find a. > 0.92 (3 ). In our analysis, we include the uncertainties in black hole mass, orbital inclination angle, and distance, and we also include the uncertainty in the calibration of the absolute flux via the Crab. These four sources of uncertainty totally dominate the error budget. The uncertainties introduced by the thin-disk model we employ are particularly small in this case given the extreme spin of the black hole and the disk s low luminosity.

  10. Einstein SSS and MPC observations of Aql X-1 and 4U1820-30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, R. L.; Christian, D. J.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    The results of timing and spectral analyses of the X-ray sources Aql X-1 (X1908+005) and 4U1820-30 (NGC6624) are reported using data obtained with the Einstein SSS (Solid State Spectrometer) and MPC (Monitor Proportional Counter) instruments. A classic type I burst was observed from Aql X-1 in both detectors and a coherent modulation with a period of 131.66 + or - 0.02 ms and a pulsed fraction of 10 percent was detected in the SSS data. There is no evidence for a loss of coherance during the approximately 80 sec when the burst is observable. The 2 sigma upper limit on the rate of change of the pulse period is 0.00005s/s. It is argued that an asymmetrical burst occurring on a neutron star rotating at 7.6 Hz offers a plausible explanation for the oscillation. The data from 4U1820-30 show that the amplitude of the 685 sec modulation, identified as the orbital period, is independent of energy down to 0.6 keV. The SSS data show that the light curve in the 0.6 to 4.5 keV band is smoother than at higher energies.

  11. Hard x ray observations of Vela X-1 and A0535+26 with HEXE: Discovery of cyclotron lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziorra, E.; Mony, B.; Kretschmar, P.; Maisack, M.; Staubert, R.; Doebereiner, S.; Englhauser, J.; Pietsch, W.; Reppin, C.; Truemper, J.

    1992-01-01

    The X ray pulsars Vela X-1 (4U 0900-40) and A0535+26) were observed with the High Energy X ray Experiment (HEXE) onboard the Mir space station at energies above 20 keV. The pulse profiles of Vela X-1 (P = 283.22 s for JD 244 7486) and A0535+26 (P = 103.27 s for JD 244 7626) were measured up to at least 100 keV. The time averaged pulse profiles of the two sources both show a clear double peak structure with an asymmetric main pulse and a more symmetric secondary pulse. The spectrum of the main pulse is significantly harder than that of the secondary. Pulse phase resolved spectra show absorption features at 54 keV and possibly 27 keV for Vela X-1 and around 100 keV for A0535+26. If these features are interpreted as second and first harmonic (fundamental) cyclotron absorption lines, lower limits are derived of 2.6 x 10(exp 12) and 4.3 x 10(exp 12) Gauss for the magnetic fields of the neutron stars in Vela X-1 and A0535+26, respectively.

  12. Ultraviolet, X-ray, and infrared observations of HDE 226868 equals Cygnus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, A.; Chiappetti, L.; Tanzi, E. G.; Tarenghi, M.; Gursky, H.; Dupree, A. K.; Hartmann, L. W.; Raymond, J.; Davis, R. J.; Black, J.

    1980-01-01

    During April, May, and July of 1978, HDE 226868, the optical counterpart of Cygnus X-1, was repeatedly observed in the ultraviolet with the IUE satellite. Some X-ray and infrared observations have been made during the same period. The general shape of the spectrum is that expected from a late O supergiant. Strong absorption features are apparent in the ultraviolet, some of which have been identified. The equivalent widths of the most prominent lines appear to be modulated with the orbital phase. This modulation is discussed in terms of the ionization contours calculated by Hatchett and McCray, for a binary X-ray source in the stellar wind of the companion.

  13. A detection of HER-X 1 at PeV energies, with anomalous muon number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    The CYGNUS collaboration is operating a ground-based array of scintillation detectors to detect-extensive air showers. This paper reports that the objective is to detect compact sources of Ultra High Energy (PeV) gamma radiation. At the present time the array consists of 106 scintillation detectors of ∼10 4 m 2 . It is supplemented by a tracking detector of muons, shielded by about 6 feet of steel: its purpose is to compare the number of muons from purported gamma-ray primaries with the number from ordinary cosmic-ray primaries. Last year we reported 2 an unusual episode of emission from the direction of the binary source Hercules X-1, with the following features: on 24 July 1986 an excess event rate in the direction of Her X-1 was detected. The pulsar period observed, namely T = (1.23568s ± 0.0003s), is blue-shifted by about 0.16% from the contemporary X-ray period. The average number of muons detected in these events is not less than the number for ordinary cosmic ray events as seen in our detector. At Tev energies, two stations operating air-Cherenkov telescopes, namely Mt. Hopkins and Haleakala, had reported periods nearly identical to the authors': Lamb et al., T = (1.23579 ± 0.0002), and Resvanis et al., T = (1.23593 ± 0.0002). Recently the Haleakala group have added another detection, on May 23, 1987: T = 23598s. Another report comes from the Tata Institute, Bombay, which operates the air-shower array at Ooty

  14. Isotope cloud linked to failed neutrino source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2018-02-01

    For 2 weeks in the fall of 2017, traces of the isotope ruthenium-106 wafted across Europe. The radioactive cloud was too thin to be dangerous, but it posed a mystery to scientists. Now, researchers at the French Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Security say the isotope may have been released from the Mayak nuclear facility in southern Russia. They argue the leak may have happened when technicians botched the fabrication of a cerium-144 source needed in the search for sterile neutrinos at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in L'Aquila, Italy. The Russian government has vehemently denied that an accident took place, however.

  15. Lessons from the conviction of the L'Aquila seven: The standard probabilistic earthquake hazard and risk assessment is ineffective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Max

    2013-04-01

    An earthquake of M6.3 killed 309 people in L'Aquila, Italy, on 6 April 2011. Subsequently, a judge in L'Aquila convicted seven who had participated in an emergency meeting on March 30, assessing the probability of a major event to follow the ongoing earthquake swarm. The sentence was six years in prison, a combine fine of 2 million Euros, loss of job, loss of retirement rent, and lawyer's costs. The judge followed the prosecution's accusation that the review by the Commission of Great Risks had conveyed a false sense of security to the population, which consequently did not take their usual precautionary measures before the deadly earthquake. He did not consider the facts that (1) one of the convicted was not a member of the commission and had merrily obeyed orders to bring the latest seismological facts to the discussion, (2) another was an engineer who was not required to have any expertise regarding the probability of earthquakes, (3) and two others were seismologists not invited to speak to the public at a TV interview and a press conference. This exaggerated judgment was the consequence of an uproar in the population, who felt misinformed and even mislead. Faced with a population worried by an earthquake swarm, the head of the Italian Civil Defense is on record ordering that the population be calmed, and the vice head executed this order in a TV interview one hour before the meeting of the Commission by stating "the scientific community continues to tell me that the situation is favorable and that there is a discharge of energy." The first lesson to be learned is that communications to the public about earthquake hazard and risk must not be left in the hands of someone who has gross misunderstandings about seismology. They must be carefully prepared by experts. The more significant lesson is that the approach to calm the population and the standard probabilistic hazard and risk assessment, as practiced by GSHAP, are misleading. The later has been criticized as

  16. Swift/XRT detection of an X-ray flare and jet emission from Cir X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A. K. H.; Yang, Y.-J.

    2010-06-01

    Following the detection of a brightening and several X-ray bursts of Cir X-1 (ATel #2608,#2643,#2650,#2651,#2653; Linares et al. arXiv:1006.1379), the source has returned to low flux level since June based on observations taken with RXTE/ASM and MAXI/GSC. We examined the Swift/XRT imaging mode data taken on 2010 June 6 and June 10. On June 6 (at orbital phase 0.8; defined by Stewart et al. 1993), the 0.3-10 keV XRT count rate of Cir X-1 is about 0.07 c/s while it brightened to 0.8 c/s on June 10 (at phase 0.03).

  17. Strong foreshock signal preceding the L'Aquila (Italy earthquake (Mw 6.3 of 6 April 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Minadakis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We used the earthquake catalogue of INGV extending from 1 January 2006 to 30 June 2009 to detect significant changes before and after the 6 April 2009 L'Aquila mainshock (Mw=6.3 in the seismicity rate, r (events/day, and in b-value. The statistical z-test and Utsu-test were applied to identify significant changes. From the beginning of 2006 up to the end of October 2008 the activity was relatively stable and remained in the state of background seismicity (r=1.14, b=1.09. From 28 October 2008 up to 26 March 2009, r increased significantly to 2.52 indicating weak foreshock sequence; the b-value did not changed significantly. The weak foreshock sequence was spatially distributed within the entire seismogenic area. In the last 10 days before the mainshock, strong foreshock signal became evident in space (dense epicenter concentration in the hanging-wall of the Paganica fault, in time (drastic increase of r to 21.70 events/day and in size (b-value dropped significantly to 0.68. The significantly high seismicity rate and the low b-value in the entire foreshock sequence make a substantial difference from the background seismicity. Also, the b-value of the strong foreshock stage (last 10 days before mainshock was significantly lower than that in the aftershock sequence. Our results indicate the important value of the foreshock sequences for the prediction of the mainshock.

  18. The 2009 MW MW 6.1 L'Aquila fault system imaged by 64k earthquake locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valoroso, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    On April 6 2009, a MW 6.1 normal-faulting earthquake struck the axial area of the Abruzzo region in central Italy. We investigate the complex architecture and mechanics of the activated fault system by using 64k high-resolution foreshock and aftershock locations. The fault system is composed by two major SW dipping segments forming an en-echelon NW trending system about 50 km long: the high-angle L’Aquila fault and the listric Campotosto fault, located in the first 10 km depth. From the beginning of 2009, fore shocks activated the deepest portion of the main shock fault. A week before the MW 6.1 event, the largest (MW 4.0) foreshock triggered seismicity migration along a minor off-fault segment. Seismicity jumped back to the main plane a few hours before the main shock. High-precision locations allowed to peer into the fault zone showing complex geological structures from the metre to the kilometre scale, analogous to those observed by field studies and seismic profiles. Also, we were able to investigate important aspects of earthquakes nucleation and propagation through the upper crust in carbonate-bearing rocks such as: the role of fluids in normal-faulting earthquakes; how crustal faults terminate at depths; the key role of fault zone structure in the earthquake rupture evolution processes.

  19. From Colfiorito to L'Aquila Earthquake: learning from the past to communicating the risk of the present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, T.; Crescimbene, M.; La Longa, F.

    2012-04-01

    Italy is a country at risk of impending earthquake in the near future. Very probably, as it has already happened in the 13 years between the last two important seismic events (Colfiorito 1997- L'Aquila 2009), there won't be enough time to solve all the problems connected to seismic risk: first of all the corruption related to politics concerning buildings; the lack of the money necessary to strengthen the already existing ones, historical centres, monuments and the masterpieces of Art; the difficult relations of the Institutions with the traditional media (newspapers, radio and TV) and, at the same time, the new media (web); the difficulties for scientists to reach important results in the immediate future due to the lack of funding and, last but not least, to the conflicting relationships inside the scientific community itself. In this scenario, communication and education play a crucial role in minimizing the risk of the population. In the present work we reconsider the past with the intent of starting to trace a path for a future strategy of risk communication where everybody involved, included the population, should do his best in order to face the next emergency.

  20. Ulna de Aquila chrysaetos hallada en un entierro ceremonial del periodo Formativo Medio en Mascota, Jalisco, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Germán Cupul-Magaña

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available La identificación y el análisis de los restos de aves de los sitios arqueológicos pueden proporcionar información sobre qué significaron y cómo fueron usados. En el México prehispánico las aves sirvieron como alimento, materia prima para la elaboración de herramientas y en rituales religiosos. En esta nota comentamos el hallazgo de la ulna izquierda de un águila real adulta, Aquila chrysaetos, en el yacimiento arqueológico de Los Tanques (ca. 800 a.C. en Mascota, Jalisco, México. La ulna  se encontró dentro del bulto bien envuelto del entierro de un hombre joven de entre 19 y 25 años de edad. Su presencia en el entierro indica el alto estatus social del individuo y es parte de un código ritual mortuorio.

  1. The Smart Ring Experience in l’Aquila (Italy: Integrating Smart Mobility Public Services with Air Quality Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Gabriella Villani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the “City Dynamics and Smart Environment” activities of the Smart Ring project, a model for the smart city, based on the integration of sustainable urban transport services and environmental monitoring over a 4–5-km circular path, the “Smart Ring”, around the historical center of l’Aquila (Italy. We describe our pilot experience performed during an experimental on-demand public service electric bus, “SmartBus”, which was equipped with a multi-parametric air quality low-cost gas electrochemical sensor platform, “NASUS IV”. For five days (28–29 August 2014 and 1–3 September 2014, the sensor platform was installed inside the SmartBus and measured air quality gas compounds (nitrogen dioxide, carbon oxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide during the service. Data were collected and analyzed on the bases of an air quality index, which provided qualitative insights on the air status potentially experienced by the users. The results obtained are in agreement with the synoptic meteorological conditions, the urban background air quality reference measurements and the potential traffic flow variations. Furthermore, they indicated that the air quality status was influenced by the gas component NO 2 , followed by H 2 S, SO 2 and CO. We discuss the features of our campaign, and we highlight the potential, limitations and key factors to consider for future project designs.

  2. Estimation of occupancy, breeding success, and predicted abundance of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the Diablo Range, California, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, J. David; Kolar, Patrick S.; Fuller, Mark R.; Hunt, W. Grainger; Hunt, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    We used a multistate occupancy sampling design to estimate occupancy, breeding success, and abundance of territorial pairs of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the Diablo Range, California, in 2014. This method uses the spatial pattern of detections and non-detections over repeated visits to survey sites to estimate probabilities of occupancy and successful reproduction while accounting for imperfect detection of golden eagles and their young during surveys. The estimated probability of detecting territorial pairs of golden eagles and their young was less than 1 and varied with time of the breeding season, as did the probability of correctly classifying a pair’s breeding status. Imperfect detection and breeding classification led to a sizeable difference between the uncorrected, naïve estimate of the proportion of occupied sites where successful reproduction was observed (0.20) and the model-based estimate (0.30). The analysis further indicated a relatively high overall probability of landscape occupancy by pairs of golden eagles (0.67, standard error = 0.06), but that areas with the greatest occupancy and reproductive potential were patchily distributed. We documented a total of 138 territorial pairs of golden eagles during surveys completed in the 2014 breeding season, which represented about one-half of the 280 pairs we estimated to occur in the broader 5,169-square kilometer region sampled. The study results emphasize the importance of accounting for imperfect detection and spatial heterogeneity in studies of site occupancy, breeding success, and abundance of golden eagles.

  3. Genetic structure and viability selection in the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), a vagile raptor with a Holarctic distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Jacqueline M.; Katzner, Todd E.; Roemer, Gary; Cain, James W.; Millsap, Brian; McIntyre, Carol; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Fernandez, Nadia B.; Wheeler, Maria; Bulut, Zafer; Bloom, Peter; DeWoody, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers can reveal interesting aspects of organismal ecology and evolution, especially when surveyed in rare or elusive species. Herein, we provide a preliminary assessment of golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) population structure in North America using novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These SNPs included one molecular sexing marker, two mitochondrial markers, 85 putatively neutral markers that were derived from noncoding regions within large intergenic intervals, and 74 putatively nonneutral markers found in or very near protein-coding genes. We genotyped 523 eagle samples at these 162 SNPs and quantified genotyping error rates and variability at each marker. Our samples corresponded to 344 individual golden eagles as assessed by unique multilocus genotypes. Observed heterozygosity of known adults was significantly higher than of chicks, as was the number of heterozygous loci, indicating that mean zygosity measured across all 159 autosomal markers was an indicator of fitness as it is associated with eagle survival to adulthood. Finally, we used chick samples of known provenance to test for population differentiation across portions of North America and found pronounced structure among geographic sampling sites. These data indicate that cryptic genetic population structure is likely widespread in the golden eagle gene pool, and that extensive field sampling and genotyping will be required to more clearly delineate management units within North America and elsewhere.

  4. Biotelemetry data for golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) captured in coastal southern California, November 2014–February 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Jeff A.; Madden, Melanie C.; Sebes, Jeremy B.; Bloom, Peter H.; Katzner, Todd E.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2016-04-21

    The status of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in coastal southern California is unclear. To address this knowledge gap, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with local, State, and other Federal agencies began a multi-year survey and tracking program of golden eagles to address questions regarding habitat use, movement behavior, nest occupancy, genetic population structure, and human impacts on eagles. Golden eagle trapping and tracking efforts began in October 2014 and continued until early March 2015. During the first trapping season that focused on San Diego County, we captured 13 golden eagles (8 females and 5 males). During the second trapping season that began in November 2015, we focused on trapping sites in San Diego, Orange, and western Riverside Counties. By February 23, 2016, we captured an additional 14 golden eagles (7 females and 7 males). In this report, biotelemetry data were collected between November 22, 2014, and February 23, 2016. The location data for eagles ranged as far north as San Luis Obispo, California, and as far south as La Paz, Baja California, Mexico.

  5. X-ray diffraction investigation of the sulphur induced 4x1 reconstruction of Ni(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, M.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Nielsen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The atomic structure of the Ni(110)4 x 1-S reconstruction has been determined on the basis of surface X-ray diffraction measurements. An analysis of the in-plane diffraction data shows that the model consists of Ni rows along the [001] direction, two for every 4 x 1 unit cell, corresponding to 0....

  6. [Between perception and reality: towards an assessment of socio-territorial discomfort in L'Aquila (Central Italy) after the earthquak].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, Lina Maria

    2016-01-01

    to consider perceptions and narratives of the inhabitants of L'Aquila about their context of life, in order to point out what kind of relationship is present in L'Aquila, between the territory and its inhabitants after the earthquake; to evaluate how and where symptomatic attitudes about a widespread discomfort in social interactions have been generalized. since 2010, the joint work by the research team of the "Cartolab" laboratory and pedagogy area (Department of Human Studies, University of L'Aquila) has developed and applied a participatory research methodology. This methodology is both an inquiry used by experts to increase the participation of people who experience the everyday life in L'Aquila, and a tool to draw moral, ethical and political considerations in order to activate change in social and political dynamics at the urban scale. During 2013, the methodology of Participatory- Participating Research Action (PPRA) was implemented through cycles of territorial meetings involving citizens and municipal administrators. These meetings have been promoted and organized with the Office of Participation of the Municipality of L'Aquila. the PPRA aimed to assess: 1. the social, political and economic quality of the territory evaluated by people involved in the survey, with reference to life conditions, living context, and future projections of self and of the territory; 2. the perception of the security. Through a qualitative/quantitative approach, the data collected through questionnaire and public meetings have involved 309 young (16-30 years old) and 227 adults (31-85 years old) for the first aspect, and 314 citizens (16-80 years old) for the second aspect, respectively. the results highlight a socioterritorial discomfort emerging in L'Aquila for a relevant part of the population. This discomfort is shaped by a negative rating on life conditions and context: adults provide poor quality evaluations about the present and cannot figure out some kind of vision for

  7. Ranked solutions of the matric equation A1X1=A2X2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Duane Porter

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Let GF(pz denote the finite field of pz elements. Let A1 be s×m of rank r1 and A2 be s×n of rank r2 with elements from GF(pz. In this paper, formulas are given for finding the number of X1,X2 over GF(pz which satisfy the matric equation A1X1=A2X2, where X1 is m×t of rank k1, and X2 is n×t of rank k2. These results are then used to find the number of solutions X1,…,Xn, Y1,…,Ym, m,n>1, of the matric equation A1X1…Xn=A2Y1…Ym.

  8. Why local people did not present a problem in the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, Japan though people accused in the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, M.

    2016-12-01

    Risk communication is a big issues among seismologists after the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake all over the world. A lot of people remember 7 researchers as "L'Aquila 7" were accused in Italy. Seismologists said it is impossible to predict an earthquake by science technology today and join more outreach activities. "In a subsequent inquiry of the handling of the disaster, seven members of the Italian National Commission for the Forecast and Prevention of Major Risks were accused of giving "inexact, incomplete and contradictory" information about the danger of the tremors prior to the main quake. On 22 October 2012, six scientists and one ex-government official were convicted of multiple manslaughter for downplaying the likelihood of a major earthquake six days before it took place. They were each sentenced to six years' imprisonment (Wikipedia)". Finally 6 scientists are not guilty. The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake hit Kyushu, Japan in April. They are very similar seismological situations between the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake and the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake. The foreshock was Mj6.5 and Mw6.2 in 14 April 2016. The main shock was Mj7.3 and Mw7.0. Japan Metrological Agency (JMA) misleaded foreshock as mainshock before main shock occured. 41 people died by the main shock in Japan. However local people did not accused scientists in Japan. It has been less big earhquakes around 100 years in Kumamoto. Poeple was not so matured that they treated earthquake information in Kyushu, Japan. How are there differences between Japan and Italy? We learn about outreach activities for sciencits from this case.

  9. [The hazards of reconstruction: anthropology of dwelling and social health risk in the L'Aquila (Central Italy) post-earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccozzi, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Even starting from the purpose of restoring the damage caused by a natural disaster, the post-earthquake reconstructions imply the risk of triggering a set of social disasters that may affect the public health sphere. In the case of the L'Aquila earthquake this risk seems to emerge within the urban planning on two levels of dwelling: at a landscape level, where there has been a change in the shape of the city towards a sprawling-sprinkling process; at an architectural level, on the problematic relationship between the politics and the poetics of cultural heritage protection and the goal to get restoration works capable to ensure the citizens seismic safety.

  10. [Sleep disturbances and spatial memory deficits in post-traumatic stress disorder: the case of L'Aquila (Central Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Michele; Mazza, Monica; Curcio, Giuseppe; Iaria, Giuseppe; De Gennaro, Luigi; Tempesta, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Altered sleep is a common and central symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In fact, sleep disturbances are included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria for PTSD. However, it has been hypothesized that sleep disturbances are crucially involved in the aetiology of PTSD, rather than being solely a symptom arising secondarily from this disorder. Therefore, knowing the long-term effects of a trauma can be essential to establish the need of specific interventions for the prevention and treatment of mental disorders that may persist years after a traumatic experience. In one study we showed, for the first time, that even after a period of two years people exposed to a catastrophic disaster such as the L'Aquila earthquake continue to suffer from a reduced sleep quality. Moreover, we observed that sleep quality scores decreased as a function of the proximity to the epicentre, suggesting that the psychological effects of an earthquake may be pervasive and long-lasting. It has been widely shown that disruption of sleep by acute stress may lead to deterioration in memory processing. In fact, in a recent study we observed alterations in spatial memory in PTSD subjects. Our findings indicated that PTSD is accompanied by an impressive deficit in forming a cognitive map of the environment, as well as in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. The fact that this deterioration was correlated to the subjective sleep disturbances in our PTSD group demonstrates the existence of an intimate relationship between sleep, memory consolidation, and stress.

  11. Summer and winter space use and home range characteristics of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tricia A.; Brooks, Robert P.; Lanzone, Michael J.; Cooper, Jeff; O'Malley, Kieran; Brandes, David; Duerr, Adam E.; Katzner, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Movement behavior and its relationship to habitat provide critical information toward understanding the effects of changing environments on birds. The eastern North American population of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) is a genetically distinct and small population of conservation concern. To evaluate the potential responses of this population to changing landscapes, we calculated the home range and core area sizes of 52 eagles of 6 age–sex classes during the summer and winter seasons. Variability in range size was related to variation in topography and open cover, and to age and sex. In summer, eagle ranges that were smaller had higher proportions of ridge tops and open cover and had greater topographic roughness than did larger ranges. In winter, smaller ranges had higher proportions of ridge tops, hillsides and cliffs, and open cover than did larger ranges. All age and sex classes responded similarly to topography and open cover in both seasons. Not surprisingly, adult eagles occupied the smallest ranges in both seasons. Young birds used larger ranges than adults, and subadults in summer used the largest ranges (>9,000 km2). Eastern adult home ranges in summer were 2–10 times larger than those reported for other populations in any season. Golden Eagles in eastern North America may need to compensate for generally lower-quality habitat in the region by using larger ranges that support access to adequate quantities of resources (prey, updrafts, and nesting, perching, and roosting sites) associated with open cover and diverse topography. Our results suggest that climate change–induced afforestation on the breeding grounds and ongoing land cover change from timber harvest and energy development on the wintering grounds may affect the amount of suitable habitat for Golden Eagles in eastern North America.

  12. Modelling hard and soft states of Cygnus X-1 with propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapisarda, S.; Ingram, A.; van der Klis, M.

    2017-12-01

    We present a timing analysis of three Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 with the propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations model PROPFLUC. The model simultaneously predicts power spectra, time lags and coherence of the variability as a function of energy. The observations cover the soft and hard states of the source, and the transition between the two. We find good agreement between model predictions and data in the hard and soft states. Our analysis suggests that in the soft state the fluctuations propagate in an optically thin hot flow extending up to large radii above and below a stable optically thick disc. In the hard state, our results are consistent with a truncated disc geometry, where the hot flow extends radially inside the inner radius of the disc. In the transition from soft to hard state, the characteristics of the rapid variability are too complex to be successfully described with PROPFLUC. The surface density profile of the hot flow predicted by our model and the lack of quasi-periodic oscillations in the soft and hard states suggest that the spin of the black hole is aligned with the inner accretion disc and therefore probably with the rotational axis of the binary system.

  13. Participation of the Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory in Different Programs for Coordinated Investigation of Cyg X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumsiashvili, M. I.; Kochiashvili, N. T.

    2000-10-01

    Broad-band photometric observations of the black hole candidate Cyg X-1 were carried out in 1975-1998 at the Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory in the framework of coordinated observations, at the varies observatories of the former Soviet Union. All data have been reduced to a homogeneous set.Comparison of the optical and X-ray data clearly shows the existence of several kinds of variability. Analysis of the prolonged photoelectric observations of V 1357 Cyg=Cyg X-1 confirmed long-period optical variation of this X-ray binary system with the period of 294 d revealed by Kemp et al. This periodicity is most strongly pronounced at the orbital period phase when the optical star is in front of the X-ray source. Variations of the mean level of Cyg X-1 and of the light curve form with the phase of the period 294 d agree well with the model of the precessing accretion disk which radiates in the optical range mainly by scattering and processing of the optical star radiation. The direction of the disc precession coincides with that of the orbital motion and it is hard to understand this fact in the models with the forced precession. The triple system model is less probable. There are also observations of this objects made in the Abastumani Observatory in 1982-1988 which are represented the Table and light curves. These observations have not discussed by coordinators. The observations taken in the course of the International campaign "The Optical Monitoring of the Unique Astrophysical Objects" were realized by the observatories located on the territories of Georgia, Russia, Uzbekistan and Ukraine in 1994-1998. They are united in a single set, taking into account the systemic differences between them. Number of usual observations is 2247 in 399 nights in U B V R bands. The observations were performed simultaneously in X-ray band in the energy range of 2-10 keV (ASM/RXTE), and 20-100 keV (BASTE/CGRO), and also with radio observations at the Mullard radio observatory. Our

  14. Linear polarization observations of some X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakhovskoy, N.M.; Efimov, Yu.S.

    1975-01-01

    Multicolour linear polarization of optical radiation of the X-ray sources Sco X-1, Cyg X-2, Cyg X-1 and Her X-1 was measured at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in 1970-1973. These observations indicate that polarization of Sco X-1 in the ultraviolet, blue and red spectral regions appears to be variable. No statistically significant variations of polarization were found for the other three sources observed. (Auth.)

  15. Multi-Directional Seismic Assessment of Historical Masonry Buildings by Means of Macro-Element Modelling: Application to a Building Damaged during the L’Aquila Earthquake (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cannizzaro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The experience of the recent earthquakes in Italy caused a shocking impact in terms of loss of human life and damage in buildings. In particular, when it comes to ancient constructions, their cultural and historical value overlaps with the economic and social one. Among the historical structures, churches have been the object of several studies which identified the main characteristics of the seismic response and the most probable collapse mechanisms. More rarely, academic studies have been devoted to ancient palaces, since they often exhibit irregular and complicated arrangement of the resisting elements, which makes their response very difficult to predict. In this paper, a palace located in L’Aquila, severely damaged by the seismic event of 2009 is the object of an accurate study. A historical reconstruction of the past strengthening interventions as well as a detailed geometric relief is performed to implement detailed numerical models of the structure. Both global and local models are considered and static nonlinear analyses are performed considering the influence of the input direction on the seismic vulnerability of the building. The damage pattern predicted by the numerical models is compared with that observed after the earthquake. The seismic vulnerability assessments are performed in terms of ultimate peak ground acceleration (PGA using capacity curves and the Italian code spectrum. The results are compared in terms of ultimate ductility demand evaluated performing nonlinear dynamic analyses considering the actual registered seismic input of L’Aquila earthquake.

  16. Timing and Spectral Studies of the Peculiar X-ray Binary Circinus X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saz Parkinson, Pablo M.

    2003-08-26

    Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) is an X-ray binary displaying an array of phenomena which makes it unique in our Galaxy. Despite several decades of observation, controversy surrounds even the most basic facts about this system. It is generally classified as a Neutron Star (NS) Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB),though this classification is based primarily on the observation of Type I X-ray Bursts by EXOSAT in 1985. It is believed to be in a very eccentric {approx} 16.5 day orbit, displaying periodic outbursts in the radio and other frequency bands (including optical and IR) which reinforce the notion that this is in fact the orbital period. Cir X-1 lies in the plane of the Galaxy, where optical identification of the companion is made difficult due to dust obscuration. The companion is thought to be a low mass star, though a high mass companion has not currently been ruled out. In this work, the author analyzes recent observations of Cir X-1 made with the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) experiment, as well as archival observations of Cir X-1 made by a variety of instruments, from as early as 1969. The fast (< 1 s) timing properties of Cir X-1 are studied by performing FFT analyses of the USA data. Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in the 1-50 Hz range are found and discussed in the context of recent correlations which question the leading models invoked for their generation. The energy dependence of the QPOs (rms increasing with energy) argues against them being generated in the disk and favors models in which the QPOs are related to a higher energy Comptonizing component. The power spectrum of Cir X-1 in its soft state is compared to that of Cygnus X-1 (Cyg X-1), the prototypical black hole candidate. Using scaling arguments the author argues that the mass of Cir X-1 could exceed significantly the canonical 1.4 M{circle_dot} mass of a neutron star, possibly partly explaining why this object appears so different to other neutron stars. The spectral evolution of Cir X-1 is

  17. The growth of Zn on a Si(1 0 0)-2x1 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zhaoxiong; Tanaka, Ken-ichi

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption of Zn atoms on a Si(1 0 0)-2x1 surface was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy at room temperature. Narrow lines are grown perpendicular to the Si-dimer rows of the [1 1 0] direction at low coverage. The narrow line is formed by arraying rectangular Zn 3 dots, where a dot is composed of one Zn atom on a Si dimer and the other two in the neighboring two hollow sites. When the Si(1 0 0)-2x1 surface is covered with one monolayer of Zn, a 4x1 structure is established. More deposition of Zn on the 4x1 monolayer grows into three-dimensional Zn islands

  18. 1-deg x 1-deg Terrestrial Mean Free-Air Anomalies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1x1 degree Terrestrial Mean Free-Air Gravity Anomaly and Geoid Undulations Data Base was compiled and developed by the Ohio State University. This data base was...

  19. Environment and development in Reconstruction Plans in L'Aquila territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Forlani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The operational engagement on the Plans for Reconstruction (earthquake 2009 could allow to propose territorial development in terms of sustainability, informed by energy considerations and the opportunity to establish new activities, related to local economies, based on the search for possible sources of renewable energy and virtuous use of water and waste cycle. In particular, the reclassification of settlements could predispose transition elements, oriented to new concepts of living, which prelude to the definition of a sustainable "city"; we specifically refer to the possibility of developing a "smart" service network and regulating the housing dimension. It lacked, so far, the involvement of the "regional policy" for the guidance and support for the configuration of administrative and financial situations, suitable for a wide participation in fund raising, beyond the mere physical reconstruction.

  20. Hard X-ray observations of the Her X-1 line feature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchanda, R.K.; Vialetto, G.; Bazzano, A.; La Padula, C.; Polcaro, V.F.; Ubertini, P.

    1982-01-01

    We have carried out two observations separated by a year in 1980 and 1981 during the mid-on phase of Her X-1, by using xenon filled multi-wire proportional chambers. This paper presents the time-averaged spectral results of Her X-1 in the 15-150 keV energy range. The possible case of the line centroid variability seen during 1980 experiment is also discussed. (orig./WL)

  1. Analysis of B chromosome nondisjunction induced by the r-X1 deficiency in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shih-Hsuan; Peng, Shu-Fen; Cheng, Ya-Ming

    2017-11-20

    The maize B chromosome typically undergoes nondisjunction during the second microspore division. For normal A chromosomes, the r-X1 deficiency in maize can induce nondisjunction during the second megaspore and first microspore divisions. However, it is not known whether the r-X1 deficiency also induces nondisjunction of the maize B chromosome during these cell divisions. To answer this question, chromosome numbers were determined in the progeny of r-X1/R-r female parents carrying two B chromosomes. Some of the r-X1-lacking progeny (21.2%) contained zero or two B chromosomes. However, a much higher percentage of the r-X1-containing progeny (43.4%) exhibited zero or two B chromosomes, but none displayed more than two B chromosomes. Thus, the results indicated that the r-X1 deficiency could also induce nondisjunction of the B chromosome during the second megaspore division; moreover, the B chromosome in itself could undergo nondisjunction during the same division. In addition, pollen grains from plants with two B chromosomes lacking or exhibiting the r-X1 deficiency were compared via pollen fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a B chromosome-specific probe. The results revealed that the r-X1 deficiency could induce the occurrence of B chromosome nondisjunction during the first microspore division and that the B chromosome in itself could undergo nondisjunction during the same division at a lower frequency. Our data shed more light on the behavior of the maize B chromosome during cell division.

  2. Surface Temperature and Precipitation Affecting GPS Signals Before the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake (Central Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescentini, L.; Amoruso, A.; Chiaraluce, L.

    2017-12-01

    This work focuses on GPS time series recorded before the Mw 6.1 earthquake which struck Central Italy in April 2009. It shows how environmental noise effects may be subtle and relevant when investigating relatively small strain signals and how the availability of data from weather stations and water level sensors co-located with GPS stations may provide critical information which must be taken into consideration while dealing with deformation signals.The preparatory phase of a large earthquake may include both seismic (foreshocks) and aseismic (slow slip event, SSE) deforming episodes but, unlike afterslip, no slow event has yet been recorded before moderate earthquakes, even when they occurred close to high-sensitivity strain meters. An exception to this seems to be represented by the 2009 earthquake. The main shock was preceded by a foreshock sequence lasting 6 months; it has been claimed that an analysis of continuous GPS data shows that during the foreshock sequence a 5.9 Mw SSE occurred along a decollement located beneath the reactivated normal fault system. This hypothesized SSE, that started in the middle of February 2009 and lasted for almost two weeks, would have eventually loaded the largest foreshock and the main shock.We show that the strain signal that the SSE would have generated at two laser strainmeters operating at about 20 km NE from the SSE source was essentially undetected. On the contrary, a transient signal is present in temperature and precipitation time series recorded close to the GPS station, MTTO, that has largest signal referred to the SSE, implying that these contaminated the GPS record. This interpretation is corroborated by the strong similarity, during the coldest winter months, between the displacement data of MTTO and a linear combination of filtered temperature and precipitation data, mimicking simple heat conduction and snow accumulation/removal processes. Such a correlation between displacement and environmental data is missing

  3. A Collision Risk Model to Predict Avian Fatalities at Wind Facilities: An Example Using Golden Eagles, Aquila chrysaetos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Leslie; Bjerre, Emily; Millsap, Brian; Otto, Mark C; Runge, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Wind power is a major candidate in the search for clean, renewable energy. Beyond the technical and economic challenges of wind energy development are environmental issues that may restrict its growth. Avian fatalities due to collisions with rotating turbine blades are a leading concern and there is considerable uncertainty surrounding avian collision risk at wind facilities. This uncertainty is not reflected in many models currently used to predict the avian fatalities that would result from proposed wind developments. We introduce a method to predict fatalities at wind facilities, based on pre-construction monitoring. Our method can directly incorporate uncertainty into the estimates of avian fatalities and can be updated if information on the true number of fatalities becomes available from post-construction carcass monitoring. Our model considers only three parameters: hazardous footprint, bird exposure to turbines and collision probability. By using a Bayesian analytical framework we account for uncertainties in these values, which are then reflected in our predictions and can be reduced through subsequent data collection. The simplicity of our approach makes it accessible to ecologists concerned with the impact of wind development, as well as to managers, policy makers and industry interested in its implementation in real-world decision contexts. We demonstrate the utility of our method by predicting golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) fatalities at a wind installation in the United States. Using pre-construction data, we predicted 7.48 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.1, 19.81)). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service uses the 80th quantile (11.0 eagle fatalities year-1) in their permitting process to ensure there is only a 20% chance a wind facility exceeds the authorized fatalities. Once data were available from two-years of post-construction monitoring, we updated the fatality estimate to 4.8 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.76, 9.4); 80th quantile, 6

  4. Facebook, quality of life, and mental health outcomes in post-disaster urban environments: the l'aquila earthquake experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masedu, Francesco; Mazza, Monica; Di Giovanni, Chiara; Calvarese, Anna; Tiberti, Sergio; Sconci, Vittorio; Valenti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    An understudied area of interest in post-disaster public health is individuals' use of social networks as a potential determinant of quality of life (QOL) and mental health outcomes. A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out to examine whether continual use of online social networking (Facebook) in an adult population following a massive earthquake was correlated with prevalence of depression and post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and QOL outcomes. Participants were a sample of 890 adults aged 25-54 who had been exposed to the L'Aquila earthquake of 2009. Definition of "user" required a daily connection to the Facebook online social network for more than 1 h per day from at least 2 years. Depression and PTSD were assessed using the Screening Questionnaire for Disaster Mental Health. QOL outcomes were measured using the World Health Organisation Quality of Life BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) instrument. Logistic regression was carried out to calculate the prevalence odds ratios (POR) for social network use and other covariates. Two hundred and twenty one of 423 (52.2%) men, and 195 of 383 (50.9%) women, had been using Facebook as social network for at least 2 years prior to our assessment. Social network use correlated with both depression and PTSD, after adjusting for gender. A halved risk of depression was found in users vs. non-users (POR 0.50 ± 0.16). Similarly, a halved risk of PTSD in users vs. non-users (POR 0.47 ± 0.14) was found. Both men and women using online social networks had significantly higher QOL scores in the psychological and social domains of the WHOQOL-BREF. Social network use among adults 25-54 years old has a positive impact on mental health and QOL outcomes in the years following a disaster. The use of social networks may be an important tool for coping with the mental health outcomes of disruptive natural disasters, helping to maintain, if not improve, QOL in terms of social relationships and psychological distress.

  5. Facebook, quality of life and mental health outcomes in post-disaster urban environments: the L’Aquila earthquake experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eMasedu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAn understudied area of interest in post-disaster public health is individuals’ use of social networks as a potential determinant of quality of life (QOL and mental health outcomes. A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out to examine whether continual use of online social networking (Facebook in an adult population following a massive earthquake was correlated with prevalence of depression and PTSD and QOL outcomes. MethodsParticipants were a sample of 890 adults aged 25 to 54 who had been exposed to the L'Aquila earthquake of 2009. Definition of user required a daily connection to the Facebook online social network for more than one hour per day from at least two years.Depression and PTSD were assessed using the Screening Questionnaire for Disaster Mental Health (SQD. QOL outcomes were measured using the WHOQOL-BREF instrument. Logistic regression was carried out to calculate the prevalence odds ratios (POR for social network use and other covariates.ResultsTwo hundred and twenty one of 423 (52.2% men, and 195 of 383 (50.9% women, had been using Facebook as social network for at least two years prior to our assessment. Social network use correlated with both depression and PTSD, after adjusting for gender. A halved risk of depression was found in users vs. non-users (POR 0.50±0.16. Similarly, a halved risk of PTSD in users vs. non-users (POR 0.47±0.14 was found. Both men and women using online social networks had significantly higher QOL scores in the psychological and social domains of the WHOQOL-BREF.ConclusionsSocial network use among adults 25 to 54 years old has a positive impact on mental health and QOL outcomes in the years following a disaster. The use of social networks may be an important tool for coping with the mental health outcomes of disruptive natural disasters, helping to maintain, if not improve, QOL in terms of social relationships and psychological distress.

  6. SISTEMA DE CROMOSSOMOS SEXUAIS MÚLTIPLOS X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y NA MOSCA-DAS-FRUTAS Anastrepha sororcula (DIPTERA: TEPHRITIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Regina de Araújo Moura Cunha

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sistemas de cromossomos sexuais simples estão difundidos entre os Tephritidae do gênero Anastrepha. Espécies deste gênero apresentam enorme importância pelo impacto que causam em frutíferas cultivadas, sobretudo no nordeste do Brasil. Análises citogenéticas desenvolvidas em Anastrepha sororcula, através da análise da estrutura cariotípica e bandamento C revelaram a presença de um sistema de cromossomos sexuais múltiplos do tipo X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y nesta espécie. Enquanto as fêmeas apresentam um cariótipo homomórfico com 2n=12, os machos possuem 2n=11, onde se destaca um grande cromossomo Y despareado. O nível de divergência cariotípica da espécie A. sororcula do nordeste, com a presença de um sistema de cromossomos sexuais múltiplos, em relação às regiões central e sudeste do Brasil, podem indicar a ocorrência de impedimentos reprodutivos entre os exemplares das duas áreas e que possivelmente, como outros exemplos que existem neste gênero, A. sororcula constitua um complexo de espécies ainda não inteiramente definido. Palavras-chave: Alossomos, peste agrícola, citogenética de insetos, heterocromatina. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18561/2179-5746/biotaamazonia.v4n2p1-4

  7. On the origin of a sunquake during the 2014 March 29 X1 flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judge, Philip G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Kleint, Lucia [Institute of 4D Technologies, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Donea, Alina [Center for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Science, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Dalda, Alberto Sainz [Stanford-Lockheed Institute for Space Research, Stanford University, HEPL, 466 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Fletcher, Lyndsay, E-mail: judge@ucar.edu, E-mail: lucia.kleint@fhnw.ch, E-mail: alina.donea@monash.edu, E-mail: asdalda@stanford.edu, E-mail: lyndsay.fletcher@glasgow.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-01

    Helioseismic data from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager instrument have revealed a sunquake associated with the X1 flare SOL2014-03-29T17:48 in active region NOAA 12017. We try to discover if acoustic-like impulses or actions of the Lorentz force caused the sunquake. We analyze spectropolarimetric data obtained with the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Fortunately, the FIRS slit crossed the flare kernel close to the acoustic source during the impulsive phase. The infrared FIRS data remain unsaturated throughout the flare. Stokes profiles of lines of Si I 1082.7 nm and He I 1083.0 nm are analyzed. At the flare footpoint, the Si I 1082.7 nm core intensity increases by a factor of several, and the IR continuum increases by 4% ± 1%. Remarkably, the Si I core resembles the classical Ca II K line's self-reversed profile. With nLTE radiative models of H, C, Si, and Fe, these properties set the penetration depth of flare heating to 100 ± 100 km (i.e., photospheric layers). Estimates of the non-magnetic energy flux are at least a factor of two less than the sunquake energy flux. Milne-Eddington inversions of the Si I line show that the local magnetic energy changes are also too small to drive the acoustic pulse. Our work raises several questions. Have we missed the signature of downward energy propagation? Is it intermittent in time and/or non-local? Does the 1-2 s photospheric radiative damping time discount compressive modes?.

  8. AstroSat /LAXPC Observation of Cygnus X-1 in the Hard State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Ranjeev; Pahari, Mayukh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune 411007 (India); Yadav, J S; Chauhan, Jai Verdhan; Antia, H M; Chitnis, V R; Dedhia, Dhiraj; Katoch, Tilak; Madhwani, P.; Shah, Parag [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai (India); Agrawal, P C [UM-DAE Center of Excellence for Basic Sciences, University of Mumbai, Kalina, Mumbai-400098 (India); Manchanda, R K [University of Mumbai, Kalina, Mumbai-400098 (India); Paul, B, E-mail: rmisra@iucaa.in [Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Raman Research Institute, Bengaluru-560080 (India)

    2017-02-01

    We report the first analysis of data from AstroSat /LAXPC observations of Cygnus X-1 in 2016 January. LAXPC spectra reveals that the source was in the canonical hard state, represented by a prominent thermal Comptonization component having a photon index of ∼1.8 and high temperature of kT{sub e} > 60 keV along with weak reflection and possible disk emission. The power spectrum can be characterized by two broad lorentzian functions centered at ∼0.4 and ∼3 Hz. The rms of the low-frequency component decreases from ∼15% at around 4 keV to ∼10% at around 50 keV, while that of the high-frequency one varies less rapidly from ∼13.5% to ∼11.5% in the same energy range. The time lag between the hard (20–40 keV) and soft (5–10 keV) bands varies in a step-like manner being nearly constant at ∼50 milliseconds from 0.3 to 0.9 Hz, decreasing to ∼8 milliseconds from 2 to 5 Hz and finally dropping to ∼2 milliseconds for higher frequencies. The time lags increase with energy for both the low and high-frequency components. The event mode LAXPC data allows for flux resolved spectral analysis on a timescale of 1 s, which clearly shows that the photon index increased from ∼1.72 to ∼1.80 as the flux increased by nearly a factor of two. We discuss the results in the framework of the fluctuation propagation model.

  9. Slope instability mapping around L'Aquila (Abruzzo, Italy) with Persistent Scatterers Interferometry from ERS, ENVISAT and RADARSAT datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righini, Gaia; Del Conte, Sara; Cigna, Francesca; Casagli, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    In the last decade Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI) was used in natural hazards investigations with significant results and it is considered a helpful tool in ground deformations detection and mapping (Berardino et. al., 2003; Colesanti et al., 2003; Colesanti & Wasowski, 2006; Hilley et al., 2004). In this work results of PSI processing were interpreted after the main seismic shock that affected the Abruzzo region (Central Italy) on 6th of April 2009, in order to carry out a slope instability mapping according to the requirement of National Department of Civil Protection and in the framework of the Landslides thematic services of the EU FP7 project ‘SAFER' (Services and Applications For Emergency Response - Grant Agreement n° 218802). The area of interest was chosen in almost 460 km2 around L'Aquila according the highest probability of reactivations of landslides which depends on the local geological conditions, on the epicenter location and on other seismic parameters (Keefer, 1984). The radar images datasets were collected in order to provide estimates of the mean yearly velocity referred to two distinct time intervals: historic ERS (1992-2000) and recent ENVISAT (2002-2009), RADARSAT (2003-2009); the ERS and RADARSAT images were processed by Tele-Rilevamento Europa (TRE) using PS-InSAR(TM) technique, while the ENVISAT images were processed by e-GEOS using PSP-DIFSAR technique. A pre-existing landslide inventory map was updated through the integration of conventional photo interpretation and the radar-interpretation chain, as defined by Farina et al. (2008) and reported in literature (Farina et al. 2006, Meisina et al. 2007, Pancioli et al., 2008; Righini et al., 2008, Casagli et al., 2008, Herrera et al., 2009). The data were analyzed and interpreted in Geographic Information System (GIS) environment. Main updates of the pre-existing landslides are focusing on the identification of new landslides, modification of boundaries through the spatial

  10. 2x1 prototype plasma-electrode pockels cell (PEPC) for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, M. A.

    1996-10-01

    A large aperture optical switch based on plasma electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) technology is an integral part of the National Ignition Facility (NIP) laser design. This optical switch will trap the input optical pulse in the NIF amplifier cavity for four gain passes and then switch the high-energy output optical pulse out of the cavity. The switch will consist of arrays of plasma electrode Pockels cells working in conjunction with thin-film, Brewster's angle polarizes. The 192 beams in the NIF will be arranged in 4x2 bundles. To meet the required beam-to-beam spacing within each bundle, we have proposed a NIF PEPC design based on a 4x1 mechanical module (column) which is in turn comprised of two electrically independent 2x1 PEPC units. In this paper, we report on the design a single 2x1 prototype module and experimental tests of important design issues using our single, 32 cm aperture PEPC prototype. The purpose the 2x1 prototype is to prove the viability of a 2x1 PEPC and to act, as an engineering test bed for the NIF PEPC design

  11. The reflection component from Cygnus X-1 in the soft state measured by NuSTAR and Suzaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Nowak, Michael A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Parker, Michael; Fabian, Andy C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Miller, Jon M.; King, Ashley L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Harrison, Fiona A.; Forster, Karl; Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Natalucci, Lorenzo [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, INAF-IAPS, via del Fosso del Cavaliere, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Pottschmidt, Katja [CRESST and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ross, Randy R., E-mail: jtomsick@ssl.berkeley.edu [Physics Department, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA 01610 (United States); and others

    2014-01-01

    The black hole binary Cygnus X-1 was observed in late 2012 with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku, providing spectral coverage over the ∼1-300 keV range. The source was in the soft state with a multi-temperature blackbody, power law, and reflection components along with absorption from highly ionized material in the system. The high throughput of NuSTAR allows for a very high quality measurement of the complex iron line region as well as the rest of the reflection component. The iron line is clearly broadened and is well described by a relativistic blurring model, providing an opportunity to constrain the black hole spin. Although the spin constraint depends somewhat on which continuum model is used, we obtain a {sub *} > 0.83 for all models that provide a good description of the spectrum. However, none of our spectral fits give a disk inclination that is consistent with the most recently reported binary values for Cyg X-1. This may indicate that there is a >13° misalignment between the orbital plane and the inner accretion disk (i.e., a warped accretion disk) or that there is missing physics in the spectral models.

  12. The reflection component from Cygnus X-1 in the soft state measured by NuSTAR and Suzaku

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Nowak, Michael A.; Parker, Michael; Fabian, Andy C.; Miller, Jon M.; King, Ashley L.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Forster, Karl; Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Ross, Randy R.

    2014-01-01

    The black hole binary Cygnus X-1 was observed in late 2012 with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku, providing spectral coverage over the ∼1-300 keV range. The source was in the soft state with a multi-temperature blackbody, power law, and reflection components along with absorption from highly ionized material in the system. The high throughput of NuSTAR allows for a very high quality measurement of the complex iron line region as well as the rest of the reflection component. The iron line is clearly broadened and is well described by a relativistic blurring model, providing an opportunity to constrain the black hole spin. Although the spin constraint depends somewhat on which continuum model is used, we obtain a * > 0.83 for all models that provide a good description of the spectrum. However, none of our spectral fits give a disk inclination that is consistent with the most recently reported binary values for Cyg X-1. This may indicate that there is a >13° misalignment between the orbital plane and the inner accretion disk (i.e., a warped accretion disk) or that there is missing physics in the spectral models.

  13. NuSTAR AND SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE HARD STATE IN CYGNUS X-1: LOCATING THE INNER ACCRETION DISK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, M. L.; Lohfink, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Alston, W. N.; Kara, E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Miller, J. M.; Yamaoka, K.; Nowak, M.; Grinberg, V.; Christensen, F. E.; Fürst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; King, A. L.; Stern, D.

    2015-01-01

    We present simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR ) and Suzaku observations of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 in the hard state. This is the first time this state has been observed in Cyg X-1 with NuSTAR, which enables us to study the reflection and broadband spectra in unprecedented detail. We confirm that the iron line cannot be fit with a combination of narrow lines and absorption features, instead requiring a relativistically blurred profile in combination with a narrow line and absorption from the companion wind. We use the reflection models of García et al. to simultaneously measure the black hole spin, disk inner radius, and coronal height in a self-consistent manner. Detailed fits to the iron line profile indicate a high level of relativistic blurring, indicative of reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find a high spin, a small inner disk radius, and a low source height and rule out truncation to greater than three gravitational radii at the 3σ confidence level. In addition, we find that the line profile has not changed greatly in the switch from soft to hard states, and that the differences are consistent with changes in the underlying reflection spectrum rather than the relativistic blurring. We find that the blurring parameters are consistent when fitting either just the iron line or the entire broadband spectrum, which is well modeled with a Comptonized continuum plus reflection model

  14. COMUNALIDAD Y BUEN VIVIR COMO ESTRATEGIAS INDÍGENAS FRENTE A LA VIOLENCIA EN MICHOACÁN: LOS CASOS DE CHERÁN Y SAN MIGUEL DE AQUILA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina María Cendejas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available La escalada de violencia en la que vive el estado occidental de Michoacán, México, desde 2006, ha afectado con especial virulencia a las regiones de la Tierra Caliente, la Sierra Costa y la Meseta Purépecha. En este artículo se abordan dos casos de comunidades indígenas, una purépecha: Cherán, y una nahua: San Miguel de Aquila. Se describen y comparan las respuestas de ambas ante los embates del crimen organizado, en busca de los elementos que expliquen los resultados dramáticamente distintos que han obtenido a partir de sus respectivas iniciativas de respuesta colectiva ante la violencia. El enfoque desde la ecología política permite analizar la problemática de ambos casos como resultado del «asalto global a los bienes comunes», mientras que las nociones de comunalidad y buen vivir resultan pertinentes para identificar las fortalezas, las debilidades y las posibles consecuencias a futuro de los movimientos sociales. COMMUNALITY AND BUEN VIVIR AS INDIGENOUS STRATEGIES TO FACE VIOLENCE IN MICHOACAN: THE CASES OF CHERÁN AND SAN MIGUEL DE AQUILA The escalation of violence experienced since 2006 in the Western state of Michoacan, Mexico, has significantly affected the regions of Tierra Caliente, Sierra Costa and Meseta Purépecha. This article addresses two cases of indigenous communities, a Purepecha community in Cherán, and a Nahua community in San Miguel de Aquila. The collective responses of these two communities to the attacks of organized crime are described and compared in search of elements to explain the dramatically different results obtained by both communities. An approach from the perspective of political ecology allows for an analysis of the issues faced by each one of them as a result of the «global assault on common goods». The notions of comunalidad and buen vivir ‘good living’ are germane to an identification of strengths, weaknesses and possible future consequences of the social movements.

  15. Getting high utilization of peak GFLOPS in real applications in the Cray X1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, J.M. [Cray Research, Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2003-07-01

    This paper will show the advanced characteristics of the Cray X1 and discuss how they are used to achieve high-utilized GFLOPS on many real world applications. On most MPP systems, other than the Earth Simulator and the Cray Inc. X1, advanced scientific applications do not obtain a high percentage of peak performance, in some cases less than 2%. When this small percentage of peak is attained on the processor, one needs to have more individual processors to achieve a TFLOP of sustained performance. Larger numbers of processors result in a tremendous burden on the interconnect. Here again MPPs other than the Earth Simulator and the X1 do not have the interconnect to support the increased number of processors. Combining low processor performance with insufficient scaling results in less than desired performance for many applications. (author)

  16. Getting high utilization of peak GFLOPS in real applications in the Cray X1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper will show the advanced characteristics of the Cray X1 and discuss how they are used to achieve high-utilized GFLOPS on many real world applications. On most MPP systems, other than the Earth Simulator and the Cray Inc. X1, advanced scientific applications do not obtain a high percentage of peak performance, in some cases less than 2%. When this small percentage of peak is attained on the processor, one needs to have more individual processors to achieve a TFLOP of sustained performance. Larger numbers of processors result in a tremendous burden on the interconnect. Here again MPPs other than the Earth Simulator and the X1 do not have the interconnect to support the increased number of processors. Combining low processor performance with insufficient scaling results in less than desired performance for many applications. (author)

  17. New results from long-term observations of Cyg X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S.S.; Boldt, E.A.; Serlemitsos, P.J.; Kaluzienski, L.J.

    1975-08-01

    Observations of Cyg X-1 between October 1974 and July 1975 reveal a persistent 5.6 day modulation of the 3- to 6-keV x-ray intensity, having a minimum in phase with superior conjunction of the HDE 226868 binary system. The modulation is found to be most pronounced just prior to the April--May 1975 increase of Cyg X-1, after which both the modulation and intensity are at their lowest values for the entire duration of the observations. These data imply that the x-ray emission from Cyg X-1 arises from the compact member of HDE 226868, and that the increase of April--May 1975 may have represented the depletion of accreting material which was not mixed into a cylindrically symmetric accretion disk about the compact member

  18. New results from long-term observations of Cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S.S.; Boldt, E.A.; Serlemitsos, P.J.; Kaluzienski, L.J.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of Cyg X-1 between 1974 October and 1975 July reveal a persistent 5/subd/./sub /6 modulation of the 3--6 keV X-ray intensity, having a minimum in phase with superior conjunction of the HDE 226868 binary system. The modulation is found to be most pronounced just prior to the 1975 April--May increase of Cyg X-1, after which both the modulation and intensity are at their lowest values for the entire duration of the observations. These data imply that the X-ray emission from Cyg X-1 arises from the compact member of HDE 226868, and that the increase of 1975 April--May may have represented the depletion of accreting material which had not yet been mixed into a cylindrically symmetric accretion disk about the compact member

  19. New results from long-term observations of Cyg X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S.S.; Boldt, E.A.; Serlemitsos, P.J.; Kaluzienski, L.J.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of Cyg X-1 between October 1974 and July 1975 reveal a persistent 5.6 day modulation of the 3 to 6 keV x-ray intensity, having a minimum in phase with superior conjunction of the HDE 226868 binary system. The modulation is found to be most pronounced just prior to the April to May 1975 increase of Cyg X-1, after which both the modulation and intensity are at their lowest values for the entire duration of the observations. These data imply that the x-ray emission from Cyg X-1 arises from the compact member of HDE 226868, and that the increase of April to May 1975 may have represented the depletion of accreting material which had not yet been mixed into a cylindrically symmetric accretion disk about the compact member

  20. Purinergic control of inflammation and thrombosis: Role of P2X1 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Oury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation shifts the hemostatic mechanisms in favor of thrombosis. Upon tissue damage or infection, a sudden increase of extracellular ATP occurs, that might contribute to the crosstalk between inflammation and thrombosis. On platelets, P2X1 receptors act to amplify platelet activation and aggregation induced by other platelet agonists. These receptors critically contribute to thrombus stability in small arteries. Besides platelets, studies by our group indicate that these receptors are expressed by neutrophils. They promote neutrophil chemotaxis, both in vitro and in vivo. In a laser-induced injury mouse model of thrombosis, it appears that neutrophils are required to initiate thrombus formation and coagulation activation on inflamed arteriolar endothelia. In this model, by using P2X1−/− mice, we recently showed that P2X1 receptors, expressed on platelets and neutrophils, play a key role in thrombus growth and fibrin generation. Intriguingly, in a model of endotoxemia, P2X1−/− mice exhibited aggravated oxidative tissue damage, along with exacerbated thrombocytopenia and increased activation of coagulation, which translated into higher susceptibility to septic shock. Thus, besides its ability to recruit neutrophils and platelets on inflamed endothelia, the P2X1 receptor also contributes to limit the activation of circulating neutrophils under systemic inflammatory conditions. Taken together, these data suggest that P2X1 receptors are involved in the interplay between platelets, neutrophils and thrombosis. We propose that activation of these receptors by ATP on neutrophils and platelets represents a new mechanism that regulates thrombo-inflammation.

  1. On the Nature of the mHz X-Ray QPOs from ULX M82 X-1: Evidence for Timing-Spectral (anti) Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its energy spectral power-law index. These quantities are known to correlate in stellar mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibiting Type-C QPOs (approx 0.2-15 Hz). The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of its mHz QPOs as Type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of Type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling and identify observations in which M82 X-1 was at least as bright as source 5. Using only those observations, we detect QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which the energy spectral power-law index varied from 1.7-2.2. Interestingly, we find evidence for an anti-correlation (Pearsons correlation coefficient = -0.95) between the power-law index and the QPO centroid frequency. While such an anti-correlation is observed in StMBHs at high Type-C QPO frequencies (approx 5-15 Hz), the frequency range over which it holds in StMBHs is significantly smaller (factor of approx 1.5-3) than the QPO range reported here from M82 X-1 (factor of 6). However, it remains possible that contamination from source 5 can bias our result. Joint Chandra/XMM-Newton observations in the future can resolve this problem and confirm the timing-spectral anti-correlation reported here.

  2. Gamma rays from Cygnus X-1: Modeling and nonthermal pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermer, C.D.; Liang, E.P.

    1988-02-01

    The gamma-ray bump observed between 0.5 and 2 MeV in the spectrum of Cygnus X-1 can be interpreted as the thermal emissions from a hot (kT/approximately/400 keV) pair-dominated cloud. We argue that the X-rays and gamma rays are produced in separate emission regions, and calculate the photon-photon pair production rate from X-ray and gamma-ray interactions in the vicinity of Cyg X-1 by employing a simplified geometry for the two emitting regions

  3. Absorption dips at low x-ray energies in Cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdin, P.

    1976-01-01

    Three more looks with the Copernicus satellite at Cygnus X-1 have produced four more examples of absorption dips, decreases in the 2 to 7 keV flux from Cygnus X-1 with an increase of spectral hardness consistent with photoelectric absorption (Mason et al 1974). The nine now seen, including one by OSO-7 (Li and Clark 1974), are listed in Table 1. Their phase in the spectroscopic binary HD 226868 is also listed, calculated from a newer ephemeris than that in Mason et al (1974), adding the radial velocities by Bolton (1975) and unpublished RGO radial velocities from the 1975 season. (These elements do not differ significantly from Bolton's

  4. Radio emission from the X-ray pulsar Her X-1: a jet launched by a strong magnetic field neutron star?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eijnden, J.; Degenaar, N.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Wijnands, R.; Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Rupen, M. P.

    2018-01-01

    Her X-1 is an accreting neutron star (NS) in an intermediate-mass X-ray binary. Like low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), it accretes via Roche lobe overflow, but similar to many high-mass X-ray binaries containing a NS; Her X-1 has a strong magnetic field and slow spin. Here, we present the discovery of radio emission from Her X-1 with the Very Large Array. During the radio observation, the central X-ray source was partially obscured by a warped disc. We measure a radio flux density of 38.7 ± 4.8 μJy at 9 GHz but cannot constrain the spectral shape. We discuss possible origins of the radio emission, and conclude that coherent emission, a stellar wind, shocks and a propeller outflow are all unlikely explanations. A jet, as seen in LMXBs, is consistent with the observed radio properties. We consider the implications of the presence of a jet in Her X-1 on jet formation mechanisms and on the launching of jets by NSs with strong magnetic fields.

  5. The LVD signals during the early-mid stages of the L'Aquila seismic sequence and the radon signature of some aftershocks of moderate magnitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigolini, C.; Laiolo, M.; Coppola, D.

    2015-01-01

    The L'Aquila seismic swarm culminated with the mainshock of April 6, 2009 (M L = 5.9). Here, we report and analyze the Large Volume Detector (LVD, used in neutrinos research) low energy traces (∼0.8 MeV), collected during the early-mid stages of the seismic sequence, together with the data of a radon monitoring experiment. The peaks of LVD traces do not correlate with the evolution and magnitude of earthquakes, including major aftershocks. Conversely, our radon measurements obtained by utilizing three automatic stations deployed along the regional NW–SE faulting system, seem to be, in one case, more efficient. In fact, the timeseries collected on the NW–SE Paganica fracture recorded marked variations and peaks that occurred during and prior moderate aftershocks (with M L > 3). The Paganica monitoring station (PGN) seems to better responds to active seismicity due to the fact that the radon detector was placed directly within the bedrock of an active fault. It is suggested that future networks for radon monitoring of active seismicity should preferentially implement this setting. - Highlights: • The April 9, 2009 Aquila earthquake (ML 5.9) had a remarkable echo in the media. • We report LVD traces together with the data of a radon monitoring experiment. • Radon emissions were measured by 3 automatic stations along the main NW–SE fault. • The one that better responds to seismicity was placed in the fault's bedrock. • Future networks for earthquake radon monitoring should implement this setting

  6. Experimental surface charge density of the Si (100)-2x1H surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciston, J.; Marks, L.D.; Feidenhans'l, R.

    2006-01-01

    We report a three-dimensional charge density refinement from x-ray diffraction intensities of the Si (100) 2x1H surface. By paying careful attention to parameterizing the bulk Si bonding, we are able to locate the hydrogen atoms at the surface, which could not be done previously. In addition, we...

  7. Occupational Analysis Products: Operations Management- AFSC 3E6X1 (CD-ROM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    computer laser optical disc (CD-ROM); 4 3/4 in.; 23.4 MB. SYSTEMS DETAIL NOTE: ABSTRACT: This is a report of an occupational survey of the Operations ... Management (AFSC 3E6X1, OSSN 2560, Feb 04) career ladder, conducted by the Occupational Analysis Flight, AFOMS. The OSR reports the findings of current

  8. A 1Σ+ → X 1Σ+ bands of the isotopic lithium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.C.; Stwalley, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    In order to obtain a better understanding of the X 1 Σ + ground state and the A 1 Σ + state potential energy curves of lithium hydride and to examine in detail the concept of ''mass-reduced quantum numbers'' for both an ordinary (X 1 Σ + ) and an anomalous (A 1 Σ + ) electronic state, the emission spectra of the A 1 Σ + → X 1 Σ + bands of the isotopic lithium hydrides and deuterides ere photographed in the 3000 to 5000A region with a 3.4 meter Ebert Spectrograph. The bands found involved v'' = 0 to 7 to various v' = 0 to 17 for 6 LiH, and v'' = 0 to 7 to various v' = 1 to 16 for 6 LiD. Additional bands involving v'' = 4 and 5 were also found for 7 LiH. The vibrational-rotational spectroscopic analysis of 7 LiH, 6 LiH and 6 LiD are reported here, as are the reanalyses of the 7 LiH and 7 LiD data reported by Crawford and Jorgensen. New Rydberg-Klein-Rees (RKR) A 1 Σ + and X 1 Σ + potential curves have been constructed for each individual molecule and are reported, but detailed isotopic comparisons will be reported in subsequent publications

  9. Light Curve Periodic Variability of Cyg X-1 using Jurkevich Method ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The Jurkevich method is a useful method to explore periodic- ity in the unevenly sampled observational data. In this work, we adopted the method to the light curve of Cyg X-1 from 1996 to 2012, and found that there is an interesting period of 370 days, which appears in both low/hard and high/soft states.

  10. Light Curve Periodic Variability of Cyg X-1 using Jurkevich Method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Jurkevich method is a useful method to explore periodicity in the unevenly sampled observational data. In this work, we adopted the method to the light curve of Cyg X-1 from 1996 to 2012, and found that there is an interesting period of 370 days, which appears in both low/hard and high/soft states. That period may be ...

  11. Long term variability of Cygnus X-1. V. State definitions with all sky monitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinberg, V.; Hell, N.; Pottschmidt, K.; Böck, M.; Nowak, M.A.; Rodriguez, J.; Bodaghee, A.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Case, G.L.; Hanke, M.; Kühnel, M.; Markoff, S.; Pooley, G.G.; Rothschild, R.E.; Tomsick, J.A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Wilms, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a scheme for determining the spectral state of the canonical black hole Cyg X-1 using data from previous and current X-ray all sky monitors (RXTE-ASM, Swift-BAT, MAXI, and Fermi-GBM). Determinations of the hard/intermediate and soft state agree to better than 10% between different

  12. Accretion-induced spin-wandering effects on the neutron star in Scorpius X-1: Implications for continuous gravitational wave searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arunava; Messenger, Chris; Riles, Keith

    2018-02-01

    The LIGO's discovery of binary black hole mergers has opened up a new era of transient gravitational wave astronomy. The potential detection of gravitational radiation from another class of astronomical objects, rapidly spinning nonaxisymmetric neutron stars, would constitute a new area of gravitational wave astronomy. Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) is one of the most promising sources of continuous gravitational radiation to be detected with present-generation ground-based gravitational wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. As the sensitivity of these detectors improve in the coming years, so will power of the search algorithms being used to find gravitational wave signals. Those searches will still require integration over nearly year long observational spans to detect the incredibly weak signals from rotating neutron stars. For low mass X-ray binaries such as Sco X-1 this difficult task is compounded by neutron star "spin wandering" caused by stochastic accretion fluctuations. In this paper, we analyze X-ray data from the R X T E satellite to infer the fluctuating torque on the neutron star in Sco X-1. We then perform a large-scale simulation to quantify the statistical properties of spin-wandering effects on the gravitational wave signal frequency and phase evolution. We find that there are a broad range of expected maximum levels of frequency wandering corresponding to maximum drifts of between 0.3 - 50 μ Hz /sec over a year at 99% confidence. These results can be cast in terms of the maximum allowed length of a coherent signal model neglecting spin-wandering effects as ranging between 5-80 days. This study is designed to guide the development and evaluation of Sco X-1 search algorithms.

  13. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2015-09-01

    HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1 receptor antagonist, NF

  14. CORONA, JET, AND RELATIVISTIC LINE MODELS FOR SUZAKU/RXTE/CHANDRA-HETG OBSERVATIONS OF THE CYGNUS X-1 HARD STATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Trowbridge, Sarah N.; Davis, John E.; Hanke, Manfred; Wilms, Joern; Markoff, Sera B.; Maitra, Dipankar; Tramper, Frank; Pottschmidt, Katja; Coppi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Using Suzaku and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we have conducted a series of four simultaneous observations of the galactic black hole candidate Cyg X-1 in what were historically faint and spectrally hard 'low states'. Additionally, all of these observations occurred near superior conjunction with our line of sight to the X-ray source passing through the dense phases of the 'focused wind' from the mass donating secondary. One of our observations was also simultaneous with observations by the Chandra-High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). These latter spectra are crucial for revealing the ionized absorption due to the secondary's focused wind. Such absorption is present and must be accounted for in all four spectra. These simultaneous data give an unprecedented view of the 0.8-300 keV spectrum of Cyg X-1, and hence bear upon both corona and X-ray emitting jet models of black hole hard states. Three models fit the spectra well: coronae with thermal or mixed thermal/non-thermal electron populations and jets. All three models require a soft component that we fit with a low temperature disk spectrum with an inner radius of only a few tens of GM/c 2 . All three models also agree that the known spectral break at 10 keV is not solely due to the presence of reflection, but each gives a different underlying explanation for the augmentation of this break. Thus, whereas all three models require that there is a relativistically broadened Fe line, the strength and inner radius of such a line is dependent upon the specific model, thus making premature line-based estimates of the black hole spin in the Cyg X-1 system. We look at the relativistic line in detail, accounting for the narrow Fe emission and ionized absorption detected by HETG. Although the specific relativistic parameters of the line are continuum dependent, none of the broad line fits allow for an inner disk radius that is >40 GM/c 2 .

  15. On the Nature of the Variability Power Decay towards Soft Spectral States in X-Ray Binaries. Case Study in Cyg X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhinikov, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the Fourier Power Density Spectrum (PDS) observed from black hole X-ray binaries in low/hard and intermediate spectral states is a broad band-limited noise, characterized by a constant below some frequency (a "break" frequency) and a power law above this frequency. It has been shown that the variability of this type can be produced by the inward diffusion of the local driving perturbations in a bounded configuration (accretion disk or corona). In the framework of this model, the perturbation diffusion time to is related to the phenomenological break frequency, while the PDS power-law slope above the "break" is determined by the viscosity distribution over the configuration. The perturbation diffusion scenario explains the decay of the power of X-ray variability observed in a number of compact sources (containing black hole and neutron star) during an evolution of theses sources from low/hard to high/soft states. We compare the model predictions with the subset of data from Cyg X-1 collected by the Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE). Our extensive analysis of the Cyg X-1 PDSs demonstrates that the observed integrated power P(sub x), decreases approximately as a square root of the characteristic frequency of the driving oscillations v(sub dr). The RXTE observations of Cyg X-1 allow us to infer P(sub dr), and t(sub o) as a function of v(sub dr). We also apply the basic parameters of observed PDSs, power-law index and low frequency quasiperiodic oscillations. to infer Reynolds (Re) number from the observations using the method developed in our previous paper. Our analysis shows that Re-number increases from values about 10 in low/hard state to that about 70 during the high/soft state. Subject headings: accretion, accretion disks-black hole physics-stars:individual (Cyg X-1) :radiation mechanisms: nonthermal-physical data and processes

  16. NuSTAR discovery of a luminosity dependent cyclotron line energy in Vela X-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerst, Felix; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Joern

    2014-01-01

    of the harmonic CRSF is correlated with flux, as expected in the sub-critical accretion regime. We argue that Vela X-1 has a very narrow accretion column with a radius of around 0.4 km that sustains a Coulomb interaction dominated shock at the observed luminosities of Lx ~ 3x10^36 erg/s. Besides the prominent...... of the line energies is variable with time and deviates significantly from 2.0, also a possible consequence of photon spawning, which changes the shape of the line. During the second observation, Vela X-1 showed a short off-state in which the power-law softened and a cut-off was no longer measurable...

  17. e-EVN radio detection of Aql X-1 in outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudose, V.; Paragi, Z.; Yang, J.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Fender, R.; Garrett, M.; Rushton, A.; Spencer, R.

    2013-06-01

    The neutron star X-ray binary Aql X-1 is currently in outburst (ATel #5114, #5117, #5129, #5136, #5148). Using the European VLBI Network (e-EVN) we observed Aql X-1 at 5 GHz in two time-slots: 2013 June 18 between 19:48 - 20:36 UT (MJD 56461.825 - 56461.858), and 2013 June 19 between 02:53 - 05:54 UT (MJD 56462.120 - 56462.246). The two datasets were combined together and then calibrated. The participating radio telescopes were: Effelsberg (Germany), Jodrell Bank Mk2 (UK), Medicina (Italy), Noto (Italy), Onsala 25m (Sweden), Torun (Poland), Yebes (Spain), Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (Netherlands), Shanghai (China), Hartebeesthoek (South Africa).

  18. Swift-XRT detects X-ray burst from Circinus X-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linares, M.; Soleri, P.; Altamirano, D.; Armas-Padilla, M.; Cavecchi, Y.; Degenaar, N.; Kalamkar, M.; Kaur, R.; van der Klis, M.; Patruno, A.; Watts, A.; Wijnands, R.; Yang, Y.; Casella, P.; Rea, N.; Chakrabarty, D.; Homan, J.

    Following the recent re-brightening (ATel #2608) and RXTE-PCA detection of X-ray bursts from the peculiar X-ray binary Cir X-1 between May 15 and 25 (ATel #2643), we obtained a series of Swift-XRT observations of the field (see also ATel #2650). Swift-XRT detected an X-ray burst on 2010-05-28 at

  19. Desorption dynamics of deuterium molecules from the Si(100)-(3x1) dideuteride surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niida, T; Tsurumaki, H; Namiki, A

    2006-01-14

    We measured polar angle (theta)-resolved time-of-flight spectra of D2 molecules desorbing from the Si(100)-(3x1) dideuteride surface. The desorbing D2 molecules exhibit a considerable translational heating with mean desorption kinetic energies of approximately 0.25 eV, which is mostly independent of the desorption angles for 0 degreesdynamics of deuterium was discussed along the principle of detailed balance to predict their adsorption dynamics onto the monohydride Si surface.

  20. Adsorption of Na on Ge(001)(2x1) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, H.Y.; Zu, X.T.

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of sodium on the Ge(001)(2x1) surface at the coverage (Θ) of 0.5 and 1ML has been investigated by using ab initio total energy calculations. It was found that at Θ=0.5ML T3 and T4 sites are nearly degenerate and Na adatoms preferred to adsorb at T3 and T4 sites. This finding agrees well with Meyerheim et al.'s experimental results, but does not support theoretical investigations of Spiess et al., who found HH site was the most stable. For 1ML coverage the most stable configurations are a combination of the HH and T3 or T4 sites. Work function and dipole moment analysis showed that upon Na adsorption on Ge(001)(2x1) and Si(001)(2x1) surface the dipole-dipole repulsion is small and no depolarization effect occurs as the coverage increases from 0.5 to 1ML

  1. Optical pulstions from HZ Herculis/Hercules X-1: The self-consistent 35 day picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleditch, J.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the optical pulsation data from HZ Her shows that all of the 35 day characteristics can be interpreted in the light of episodic mass transfer every 0.81 days lasting at least 4 hr and obscuration by a tilted accretion disk which undergoes one cycle of retrograded progression every approx.35 days. The predominant systematic shifts of the optical pulsation velocities can be related to the X-ray shadowing of the phid.7 = 0.75 side of the lobe of HZ Her by the mass transfer stream and the associated disk rim structure. In the context of this new understanding of the 35 day effects, the pulsation data strongly affirm the assumptions of prograde spin for Her X-1, and aligned corotation and Roche lobe filling for HZ Her. Consideration of the accurately measured X-ray eclipse duration and the minimum orbital co-inclination required to produce the observed 35 day optical and X-ray variability may limit the Her X-1 mass to less than 1.4 M/sub sun/. A good model atmosphere for the optical pulsations could reduce the Her X-1 mass error to less than 0.10 M/sub sun/

  2. Alternative Explanations for Extreme Supersolar Iron Abundances Inferred from the Energy Spectrum of Cygnus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John A.; Parker, Michael L.; García, Javier A.; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Barret, Didier; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Fabian, Andrew; Fürst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Grinberg, Victoria; Miller, Jon M.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Walton, Dominic J.

    2018-03-01

    Here we study a 1–200 keV energy spectrum of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 taken with NuSTAR and Suzaku. This is the first report of a NuSTAR observation of Cyg X-1 in the intermediate state, and the observation was taken during the part of the binary orbit where absorption due to the companion’s stellar wind is minimal. The spectrum includes a multi-temperature thermal disk component, a cutoff power-law component, and relativistic and nonrelativistic reflection components. Our initial fits with publicly available constant density reflection models (relxill and reflionx) lead to extremely high iron abundances (>9.96 and {10.6}-0.9+1.6 times solar, respectively). Although supersolar iron abundances have been reported previously for Cyg X-1, our measurements are much higher and such variability is almost certainly unphysical. Using a new version of reflionx that we modified to make the electron density a free parameter, we obtain better fits to the spectrum even with solar iron abundances. We report on how the higher density ({n}e=({3.98}-0.25+0.12)× {10}20 cm‑3) impacts other parameters such as the inner radius and inclination of the disk.

  3. Impaired P2X1 Receptor-Mediated Adhesion in Eosinophils from Asthmatic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn; Symon, Fiona; Sylvius, Nicolas; Ran, Shaun; Bafadhel, Mona; Muessel, Michelle; Bradding, Peter; Wardlaw, Andrew; Vial, Catherine

    2016-06-15

    Eosinophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma and can be activated by extracellular nucleotides released following cell damage or inflammation. For example, increased ATP concentrations were reported in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of asthmatic patients. Although eosinophils are known to express several subtypes of P2 receptors for extracellular nucleotides, their function and contribution to asthma remain unclear. In this article, we show that transcripts for P2X1, P2X4, and P2X5 receptors were expressed in healthy and asthmatic eosinophils. The P2X receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP; 10 μM) evoked rapidly activating and desensitizing inward currents (peak 18 ± 3 pA/pF at -60 mV) in healthy eosinophils, typical of P2X1 homomeric receptors, which were abolished by the selective P2X1 antagonist NF449 (1 μM) (3 ± 2 pA/pF). α,β-meATP-evoked currents were smaller in eosinophils from asthmatic patients (8 ± 2 versus 27 ± 5 pA/pF for healthy) but were enhanced following treatment with a high concentration of the nucleotidase apyrase (17 ± 5 pA/pF for 10 IU/ml and 11 ± 3 pA/pF for 0.32 IU/ml), indicating that the channels are partially desensitized by extracellular nucleotides. α,β-meATP (10 μM) increased the expression of CD11b activated form in eosinophils from healthy, but not asthmatic, donors (143 ± 21% and 108 ± 11% of control response, respectively). Furthermore, α,β-meATP increased healthy (18 ± 2% compared with control 10 ± 1%) but not asthmatic (13 ± 1% versus 10 ± 0% for control) eosinophil adhesion. Healthy human eosinophils express functional P2X1 receptors whose activation leads to eosinophil αMβ2 integrin-dependent adhesion. P2X1 responses are constitutively reduced in asthmatic compared with healthy eosinophils, probably as the result of an increase in extracellular nucleotide concentration. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Stress and Burnout in Health-Care Workers after the 2009 L’Aquila Earthquake: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Antonella; Fiasca, Fabiana; Mazzei, Mariachiara; Necozione, Stefano; Bianchini, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Burnout is a work-related mental health impairment, which is now recognized as a real problem in the context of the helping professions due to its adverse health outcomes on efficiency. To our knowledge, the literature on the postdisaster scenario in Italy is limited by a focus on mental health professionals rather than other health-care workers. Our cross-sectional study aims to evaluate the prevalence of burnout and psychopathological distress in different categories of health-care workers, i.e., physicians, nurses, and health-care assistants, working in different departments of L’Aquila St. Salvatore General Hospital 6 years after the 2009 earthquake in order to prevent and reduce work-related burnout. With a two-stage cluster sampling, a total of 8 departments out of a total of 28 departments were selected and the total sample included 300 health-care workers. All the participants completed the following self-reporting questionnaires: a sociodemographic data form, a Maslach Burnout Inventory and a General Health Questionnaire 12 Items (GHQ-12). Statistically significant differences emerged between the total scores of the GHQ-12: post hoc analysis showed that the total average scores of the GHQ-12 were significantly higher in doctors than in health-care assistants. A high prevalence of burnout among doctors (25.97%) emerged. Using multivariate analysis, we identified a hostile relationship with colleagues, direct exposure to the L’Aquila earthquake and moderate to high levels of distress as being burnout predictors. Investigating the prevalence of burnout and distress in health-care staff in a postdisaster setting and identifying predictors of burnout development such as stress levels, time-management skills and work-life balance will contribute to the development of preventative strategies and better organization at work with a view to improving public health efficacy and reducing public health costs, given that these workers live in the disaster

  5. Stress and Burnout in Health-Care Workers after the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Antonella; Fiasca, Fabiana; Mazzei, Mariachiara; Necozione, Stefano; Bianchini, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Burnout is a work-related mental health impairment, which is now recognized as a real problem in the context of the helping professions due to its adverse health outcomes on efficiency. To our knowledge, the literature on the postdisaster scenario in Italy is limited by a focus on mental health professionals rather than other health-care workers. Our cross-sectional study aims to evaluate the prevalence of burnout and psychopathological distress in different categories of health-care workers, i.e., physicians, nurses, and health-care assistants, working in different departments of L'Aquila St. Salvatore General Hospital 6 years after the 2009 earthquake in order to prevent and reduce work-related burnout. With a two-stage cluster sampling, a total of 8 departments out of a total of 28 departments were selected and the total sample included 300 health-care workers. All the participants completed the following self-reporting questionnaires: a sociodemographic data form, a Maslach Burnout Inventory and a General Health Questionnaire 12 Items (GHQ-12). Statistically significant differences emerged between the total scores of the GHQ-12: post hoc analysis showed that the total average scores of the GHQ-12 were significantly higher in doctors than in health-care assistants. A high prevalence of burnout among doctors (25.97%) emerged. Using multivariate analysis, we identified a hostile relationship with colleagues, direct exposure to the L'Aquila earthquake and moderate to high levels of distress as being burnout predictors. Investigating the prevalence of burnout and distress in health-care staff in a postdisaster setting and identifying predictors of burnout development such as stress levels, time-management skills and work-life balance will contribute to the development of preventative strategies and better organization at work with a view to improving public health efficacy and reducing public health costs, given that these workers live in the disaster

  6. Stress and Burnout in Health-Care Workers after the 2009 L’Aquila Earthquake: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Mattei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Burnout is a work-related mental health impairment, which is now recognized as a real problem in the context of the helping professions due to its adverse health outcomes on efficiency. To our knowledge, the literature on the postdisaster scenario in Italy is limited by a focus on mental health professionals rather than other health-care workers. Our cross-sectional study aims to evaluate the prevalence of burnout and psychopathological distress in different categories of health-care workers, i.e., physicians, nurses, and health-care assistants, working in different departments of L’Aquila St. Salvatore General Hospital 6 years after the 2009 earthquake in order to prevent and reduce work-related burnout. With a two-stage cluster sampling, a total of 8 departments out of a total of 28 departments were selected and the total sample included 300 health-care workers. All the participants completed the following self-reporting questionnaires: a sociodemographic data form, a Maslach Burnout Inventory and a General Health Questionnaire 12 Items (GHQ-12. Statistically significant differences emerged between the total scores of the GHQ-12: post hoc analysis showed that the total average scores of the GHQ-12 were significantly higher in doctors than in health-care assistants. A high prevalence of burnout among doctors (25.97% emerged. Using multivariate analysis, we identified a hostile relationship with colleagues, direct exposure to the L’Aquila earthquake and moderate to high levels of distress as being burnout predictors. Investigating the prevalence of burnout and distress in health-care staff in a postdisaster setting and identifying predictors of burnout development such as stress levels, time-management skills and work-life balance will contribute to the development of preventative strategies and better organization at work with a view to improving public health efficacy and reducing public health costs, given that these workers live in the

  7. Language Learning Actions in Two 1x1 Secondary Schools in Catalonia: The Case of Online Language Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Boris Vázquez; Cassany, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper identifies and describes current attitudes towards classroom digitization and digital language learning practices under the umbrella of EduCAT 1x1, the One-Laptop-Per-Child (OLPC or 1x1) initiative in place in Catalonia. We thoroughly analyze practices worked out by six language teachers and twelve Compulsory Secondary Education (CSE)…

  8. Vibrational analysis of Fourier transform spectrum of the A3Π0–X1Σ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 73; Issue 5. Vibrational analysis of Fourier transform spectrum of the A 3 0 – X 1 ∑ + and B 3 1 – X 1 ∑ + transitions of indium monobromide. Renu Singh K N Uttam M D Saksena M N Deo. Volume 73 Issue 5 November 2009 pp 889-899 ...

  9. WAS COMET C/1945 X1 (DU TOIT) A DWARF, SOHO-LIKE KREUTZ SUNGRAZER?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekanina, Zdenek [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kracht, Rainer, E-mail: Zdenek.Sekanina@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: R.Kracht@t-online.de [Ostlandring 53, D-25335 Elmshorn, Schleswig-Holstein (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    The goal of this investigation is to reinterpret and upgrade the astrometric and other data on comet C/1945 X1, the least prominent among the Kreutz system sungrazers discovered from the ground in the twentieth century. The central issue is to appraise the pros and cons of a possibility that this object is—despite its brightness reported at discovery—a dwarf Kreutz sungrazer. We confirm Marsden’s conclusion that C/1945 X1 has a common parent with C/1882 R1 and C/1965 S1, in line with the Sekanina and Chodas scenario of their origin in the framework of the Kreutz system’s evolution. We integrate the orbit of C/1882 R1 back to the early twelfth century and then forward to around 1945 to determine the nominal direction of the line of apsides and perform a Fourier analysis to get insight into effects of the indirect planetary perturbations. To better understand the nature of C/1945 X1, its orbital motion, fate, and role in the hierarchy of the Kreutz system, as well as to attempt detecting the comet’s possible terminal outburst shortly after perihelion and answer the question in the title of this investigation, we closely examined the relevant Boyden Observatory logbooks and identified both the photographs with the comet’s known images and nearly 20 additional patrol plates, taken both before and after perihelion, on which the comet or traces of its debris will be searched for, once the process of their digitization, currently conducted as part of the Harvard College Observatory’s DASCH Project, has been completed and the scanned copies made available to the scientific community.

  10. SMM/HXRBS observations of Cygnus X-1 from 1986 December to 1988 April

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Orwig, L. E.; Dennis, B. R.; Ling, J. C.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1991-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission's Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer made 30 measurements of Cygnus X-1 from December, 1986 to April, 1988, yielding a data set of broad synoptic coverage but limited duration for each data point. The hard X-ray intensity was found to be between the gamma(2) and gamma(3) levels, with a range of fluctuations about the average intensity level. The shape of the photon spectrum was found to be closest to that reported by Ling et al. (1983, 1987) during the time of the gamma(3) level emission, although the spectral shapes reported for the gamma(2) and gamma(1) levels were not precluded.

  11. The icon of defeat: the 7x1 construction by visual plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnos Cassiano Casagrande

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the 7x1 defeat of the Brazilian team in the football World Cup 2014 by the plasticity of the image. Plastic forces acting on the image analyzed by Villafañe (2000, Arnheim (1988 and Kandinsky (1997 reconstructed the fact itself. The analysis becomes more evident the strategic collaboration of the images used in newspaper front pages, in the formation of the general directions that newspaper text intends and shows the flexibility of the iconic to represent the real through visual elements such as color, point, textures and dimension.

  12. Vibration-rotation spectrum of BH X1Σ+ by Fourier transform emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianalto, F. S.; O'Brien, L. C.; Keller, P. C.; Bernath, P. F.

    1988-06-01

    The vibration-rotation emission spectrum of the BH X1Σ+ state was observed with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer at Kitt Peak. The 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 bands were observed in a microwave discharge of B2H6 in He. Spectroscopic constants of the individual vibrational levels and equilibrium molecular constants were determined. An RKR potential curve was calculated from the equilibrium constants. Alfred P. Sloan Fellow; Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar.

  13. Spin-resolved photoemission of surface states of W(110)-(1x1)H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochstrasser, M.; Tobin, J.G.; Rotenberg, Eli; Kevan, S.D.

    2002-01-01

    The surface electronic states of W(110)-(1x1)H have been measured using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission. We directly demonstrate that the surface bands are both split and spin-polarized by the spin-orbit interaction in association with the loss of inversion symmetry near a surface. We observe 100 percent spin polarization of the surface states, with the spins aligned in the plane of the surface and oriented in a circular fashion relative to the S-bar symmetry point. In contrast, no measurable polarization of nearby bulk states is observed

  14. X-ray and UV spectroscopy of Cygnus X-1 = HDE226868

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdo, S. H.; White, N. E.; Kondo, Y.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Mccluskey, B. G.

    1980-01-01

    Observations are presented of Cygnus X-1 with the solid-state spectrometer on the Einstein Observatory. The X-ray spectra of two intensity dips viewed near superior conjunction did not exhibit increased photoelectric absorption. Rather the data support a model in which an increase in the electron scattering optical depth modifies both the observed spectrum and the intensity. The characteristic temperature of the intervening material is greater than 5 x 10 to the 7th power K. These measurements were in part simultaneous with observations by IUE. The ultra violet spectrum and intensity remained relatively constant during an X-ray intensity dip.

  15. All-fiber 7x1 signal combiner for incoherent laser beam combining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordegraaf, Danny; Maack, Martin D.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an all-fiber 7x1 signal combiner for incoherent laser beam combining. This is a potential key component for reaching several kW of stabile laser output power. The combiner couples the output from 7 single-mode (SM) fiber lasers into a single multi-mode (MM) fiber. The input signal ...... in device temperature is observed. At an intermediate power level of 600 W a beam parameter product (BPP) of 2.22 mm x mrad is measured, corresponding to an M2 value of 6.5. These values are approaching the theoretical limit dictated by brightness conservation....

  16. An extended X-ray low state from Hercules X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, A.N.; White, N.E.; Barr, P.; Pietsch, W.; Truemper, J.; Voges, W.; McKechnie, S.

    1985-01-01

    Hercules X-1 exhibits a 35-day cycle in its X-ray intensity in addition to its pulsar rotational and orbital periodicities of 1.24s and 1.7 days respectively. The authors report here observations made with the EXOSAT Observatory between 1983 June and August that failed to detect the expected 35-day variation in X-ray intensity, although low-level extended X-ray emission was seen. The EXOSAT observations suggest that a temporary change in the disk structure may have occurred such that the disk was in the line of sight throughout. (author)

  17. Long-term gamma-ray spectral variability of Cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, J.C.; Mahoney, W.A.; Wheaton, WM.A.; Jacobson, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Data from HEAO 3 observations of 0.05-10-MeV gamma-ray emission from Cyg X-1 during two 90-d periods (in fall 1979 and spring 1980) are compiled in tables and graphs and analyzed statistically to determine the temporal and spectral variability. It is found that a steady increase in 100-keV emission is accompanied by a decrease (and eventual disappearance) of MeV emission. The mechanisms which could theoretically be responsible for these phenomena are discussed. 28 references

  18. Free electron laser for the 2 x 1 TeV photon collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantsev, V.P.; Yurkov, M.V.; Saldin, E.L.; Shnejdmiller, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The two-cascade scheme of a free electron laser (FEL) of the 2 x 1 TeV photon collider is suggested. The FEL-generator having peak power of ∼ 10 MW which is amplified up to 5 x 10 11 W in the FEL-amplifier with variable parameters is used as a driving laser. Requirements for parameters of electron beam and the FEL-amplifier magnetic system are formulated on the base of calculations. 19 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  19. The icon of defeat: the 7x1 construction by visual plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Magnos Cassiano Casagrande; Fabiano Maggioni

    2016-01-01

    The study investigates the 7x1 defeat of the Brazilian team in the football World Cup 2014 by the plasticity of the image. Plastic forces acting on the image analyzed by Villafañe (2000), Arnheim (1988) and Kandinsky (1997) reconstructed the fact itself. The analysis becomes more evident the strategic collaboration of the images used in newspaper front pages, in the formation of the general directions that newspaper text intends and shows the flexibility of the iconic to represent the real th...

  20. The mass of the black hole in the X-ray binary LMC X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubekerov, M. K.; Antokhina, E. A.; Gostev, N. Yu.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Shimansky, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    A dynamical estimate of the mass of the black hole in the LMC X-1 binary system is obtained in the framework of a Roche model for the optical star, based on fitting of the He I 4471 Å and He II 4200 Å absorption lines assuming LTE. The mass of the black hole derived from the radial-velocity curve for the He II 4200 Å line is m x = 10.55 M ⊙, close to the value found earlier based on a model with two point bodies [1].

  1. Observation of Hercules X-1 at energies above 50 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingus, B.L.; Chang, C.Y.; Goodman, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A search for emission from Hercules X-1 at energies above 50 TeV during the calendar period April 1986 to July 1987 yielded two significant bursts, on UT 24 July 1986. The events during these bursts were pulsed with a period of 1.2357 s, significantly different from estimates of the contemporaneous x-ray period. The probability that this represents random statistical fluctuations of the background is estimated to be 1/70000. The muon content of the burst events is anomalous when compared with expectations from gamma-ray showers. 11 refs., 1 fig

  2. Gender differences in the relationship between maladaptive behaviours and post-traumatic stress disorder. A study on 900 L’Aquila 2009 earthquake survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana eDell'Osso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD represents one of the most frequently psychiatric sequelae to earthquake exposure. Increasing evidence suggests the onset of maladaptive behaviors among veterans and adolescents with PTSD, with specific gender differences emerging in the latter. Aims of the present study were to investigate the relationships between maladaptive behaviours and PTSD in earthquake survivors, besides the gender differences in the type and prevalence of maladaptive behaviours and their association with PTSD. Methods: 900 residents of the town of L’Aquila who experienced the earthquake of April 6th 2009 (Richter Magnitude 6.3 were assessed by means of the Trauma and Loss Spectrum Self Report (TALS-SR.Results: Significantly higher maladaptive behaviour prevalence rates were found among subjects with PTSD. A statistically significant association was found between male gender and the presence of at least one maladaptive behaviour among PTSD survivors. In the latter, significant correlations emerged between maladaptive coping and symptoms of re-experiencing, avoidance and numbing and arousal in women, while only between maladaptive coping and avoidance and numbing in men. Conclusions: Our results show high rates of maladaptive behaviours among earthquake survivors with PTSD suggesting a greater severity among men. Interestingly, post-traumatic stress symptomatology appears to be a better correlate of these behaviours among women than among men, suggesting the need for further studies based on a gender approach.

  3. Gender Differences in the Relationship between Maladaptive Behaviors and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. A Study on 900 L' Aquila 2009 Earthquake Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'osso, Liliana; Carmassi, Claudia; Stratta, Paolo; Massimetti, Gabriele; Akiskal, Kareen K; Akiskal, Hagop S; Maremmani, Icro; Rossi, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) represents one of the most frequently psychiatric sequelae to earthquake exposure. Increasing evidence suggests the onset of maladaptive behaviors among veterans and adolescents with PTSD, with specific gender differences emerging in the latter. Aims of the present study were to investigate the relationships between maladaptive behaviors and PTSD in earthquake survivors, besides the gender differences in the type and prevalence of maladaptive behaviors and their association with PTSD. 900 residents of the town of L'Aquila who experienced the earthquake of April 6th 2009 (Richter Magnitude 6.3) were assessed by means of the Trauma and Loss Spectrum-Self Report (TALS-SR). Significantly higher maladaptive behavior prevalence rates were found among subjects with PTSD. A statistically significant association was found between male gender and the presence of at least one maladaptive behavior among PTSD survivors. Further, among survivors with PTSD significant correlations emerged between maladaptive coping and symptoms of re-experiencing, avoidance and numbing, and arousal in women, while only between maladaptive coping and avoidance and numbing in men. Our results show high rates of maladaptive behaviors among earthquake survivors with PTSD suggesting a greater severity among men. Interestingly, post-traumatic stress symptomatology appears to be a better correlate of these behaviors among women than among men, suggesting the need for further studies based on a gender approach.

  4. Optical observations of binary X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boynton, P.E.

    1975-01-01

    The contribution to the recent progress in astronomy made by optical observations is pointed out. The optical properties of X-ray sources help to establish the physical nature of these objects. The current observational evidence on the binary X-ray sources HZ Her/Her X-1 and HDE 226868/Cyg X-1 is reported. (P.J.S.)

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of boron implanted into diamond (0 0 1) 2 x 1 reconstruction surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Rongbin; Dai Yongbin; Hu Xiaojun; Sheng Heshen; He Xianchang

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations, utilizing the Tersoff many-body potential, are used to investigate the microscopic processes of a single boron atom with energy of 500 eV implanted into the diamond (0 0 1) 2 x 1 reconstruction surface. The lifetime of thermal spike created by B bombardment is about 0.18 ps by calculating the variation of the mean coordination numbers with time. The formation of the split-interstitial composed of projectile and lattice atom (B-C) is observed. The total potential energy of the system decreases about 0.56 eV with a stable B split-interstitial in diamond. The lattice relaxations in the diamond (0 0 1) 2 x 1 reconstruction surface or near surface of simulated have been discussed. The outermost layer atoms tend to move inward, and the other atoms move outward. The interplanar distance between the outermost layer and the second layer has been shortened by 15% compared with its starting interplanar distance. Stress distribution in the calculated diamond configuration is inhomogeneous. After boron implanted into diamond with the energy of 500 eV, there is an excess of compressively stressed atoms in the lattice, which induces the total stress being compressive

  6. X1: A Robotic Exoskeleton for In-Space Countermeasures and Dynamometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Rochelle; Beck, Christopher; Rovekamp, Roger; Diftler, Myron; Neuhaus, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Bone density loss and muscle atrophy are among the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) highest concerns for crew health in space. Countless hours are spent maintaining an exercise regimen aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to counteract the effect of zero-gravity. Looking toward the future, NASA researchers are developing new compact and innovative exercise technologies to maintain crew health as missions increase in length and take humans further out into the solar system. The X1 Exoskeleton, initially designed for assisted mobility on Earth, was quickly theorized to have far-reaching potential as both an in-space countermeasures device and a dynamometry device to measure muscle strength. This lower-extremity device has the ability to assist or resist human movement through the use of actuators positioned at the hips and knees. Multiple points of adjustment allow for a wide range of users, all the while maintaining correct joint alignment. This paper discusses how the X1 Exoskeleton may fit NASA's onorbit countermeasures needs.

  7. Optical pulsation from the HZ Her/Her X-1 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical model for the observed optical pulsation from the x-ray binary HZ Her/Her X-1 is presented. Its foundation is a general computer code for an x-ray illuminated stellar atmosphere. Detailed results are given for several atmospheres applicable to HZ Her. A formalism is developed to calculate the amount of pulsed optical radiation emergent from these atmospheres if they are exposed to pulsed x rays. This formalism is used to calculate the pulsed and unpulsed optical light curves for HZ Her. The calculated optical pulsation agrees with the observed amplitude. A nonuniform x-ray beam can cause the amplitude and velocity of the optical pulsation to vary by more than a factor of two for fixed system parameters. The presence of soft x rays (0.1 to 1 keV) can significantly affect the calculated pulsation amplitude. The model places explicit limits on the system parameters; in particular, if corotation is assumed, 0.8 M/sub sun/ less than or equal to M/sub Her X-1/ less than or equal to 1.7 M/sub sun/

  8. Water Induced Surface Reconstruction of the Oxygen (2x1) covered Ru(0001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Sabine; Cabrera-Sanfelix, Pepa; Stass, Ingeborg; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Arnau, Andres; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-08-06

    Low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) were used to study the adsorption of water on a Ru(0001) surface covered with half monolayer of oxygen. The oxygen atoms occupy hcp sites in an ordered structure with (2x1) periodicity. DFT predicts that water is weakly bound to the unmodified surface, 86 meV compared to the ~;;200 meV water-water H-bond. Instead, we found that water adsorption causes a shift of half of the oxygen atoms from hcp sites to fcc sites, creating a honeycomb structure where water molecules bind strongly to the exposed Ru atoms. The energy cost of reconstructing the oxygen overlayer, around 230 meV per displaced oxygen atom, is more than compensated by the larger adsorption energy of water on the newly exposed Ru atoms. Water forms hydrogen bonds with the fcc O atoms in a (4x2) superstructure due to alternating orientations of the molecules. Heating to 185 K results in the complete desorption of the water layer, leaving behind the oxygen honeycomb structure, which is metastable relative to the original (2x1). This stable structure is not recovered until after heating to temperatures close to 260K.

  9. The Nature and Cause of Spectral Variability in LMC X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlen, L.; Smith, D. M.; Scank, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a long-term observation campaign of the extragalactic wind-accreting black-hole X-ray binary LMC X-1, using the Proportional Counter Array on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The observations show that LMC X-1's accretion disk exhibits an anomalous temperature-luminosity relation. We use deep archival RXTE observations to show that large movements across the temperature-luminosity space occupied by the system can take place on time scales as short as half an hour. These changes cannot be adequately explained by perturbations that propagate from the outer disk on a viscous timescale. We propose instead that the apparent disk variations reflect rapid fluctuations within the Compton up-scattering coronal material, which occults the inner parts of the disk. The expected relationship between the observed disk luminosity and apparent disk temperature derived from the variable occultation model is quantitatively shown to be in good agreement with the observations. Two other observations support this picture: an inverse correlation between the flux in the power-law spectral component and the fitted inner disk temperature, and a near-constant total photon flux, suggesting that the inner disk is not ejected when a lower temperature is observed.

  10. Optical spectrum of HDE 226868 = Cygnus X-1. II. Spectrophotometry and mass estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gies, D.R.; Bolton, C.T.

    1986-01-01

    In part I of this series, Gies and Bolton (1982) have presented the results of radial velocity measures of 78 high-dispersion spectrograms of HDE 226868 = Cyg X-1. For the present study, 55 of the best plates considered by Gies and Bolton were selected to form 10 average spectra. An overall mean spectrum with S/N ratio = 300 was formed by coadding the 10 averaged spectra. There is no evidence for statistically significant variations of the spectral type about the mean value of 09.7 Iab, and all the absorption line strengths are normal for the spectral type. Evidence is presented that the He II lambda 4846 emission line is formed in the stellar wind above the substellar point on the visible star. Probable values regarding the mass for the visible star and its companion are 33 and 16 solar masses, respectively. Theoretical He II lambda 4686 emission line profiles are computed for the focused stellar wind model for the Cyg X-1 system considered by Friend and Castor (1982). 105 references

  11. The high-energy pulsed X-ray spectrum of Hercules X-1 as observed with OSO 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, G. S.; Dennis, B. R.; Coe, M. J.; Crannell, C. J.; Dolan, J. F.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Cutler, E. P.

    1979-01-01

    Hercules X-1 was observed from August 30 to September 10, 1977, by using the high-energy X-ray scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO 8 satellite. The observation, during which the source was monitored continually for nearly an entire ON-state, covered the energy range from 16 to 280 keV. Pulsed-flux measurements as a function of binary orbit and binary phase are presented for energies between 16 and 98 keV. The pulsed flux between 16 and 33 keV exhibited a sharp decrease following the fourth binary orbit and was consistent with zero pulsed flux thereafter. Only weak evidence was found for temporal variation in the pulsed flux between 33 and 98 keV. The pulsed spectrum has been fitted with a power law, a thermal spectrum without features, and a thermal spectrum with a superposed Gaussian centered at 55 keV. The latter fit has the smallest value of chi-square per degree of freedom, and the resulting integrated line intensity is approximately 0.0015 photon/sec per sq cm for a width of 3.1 (+9.1, -2.6) keV. This result, while of low statistical significance, agrees with the value observed by Truemper (1978) during the same ON-state.

  12. Isolation and characterization of the first xylanolytic hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon Thermococcus sp. strain 2319x1 and its unusual multidomain glycosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N Gavrilov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes from (hyperthermophiles Thermozymes offer a great potential for biotechnological applications. Thermophilic adaptation does not only provide stability towards high temperature but is also often accompanied by a higher resistance to other harsh physicochemical conditions, which are also frequently employed in industrial processes, such as the presence of e.g. denaturing agents as well as low or high pH of the medium. In order to find new thermostable, xylan degrading hydrolases with potential for biotechnological application we used an in situ enrichment strategy incubating Hungate tubes with xylan as the energy substrate in a hot vent located in the tidal zone of Kunashir Island (Kuril archipelago. Using this approach a hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon, designated Thermococcus sp. strain 2319x1, growing on xylan as sole energy and carbon source was isolated. The organism grows optimally at 85°C and pH 7.0 on a variety of natural polysaccharides including xylan, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC, amorphous cellulose (AMC, xyloglucan, and chitin. The protein fraction extracted from the cells surface with Twin 80 exhibited endoxylanase, endoglucanase and xyloglucanase activities. The genome of Thermococcus sp. strain 2319x1 was sequenced and assembled into one circular chromosome. Within the newly sequenced genome, a gene, encoding a novel type of glycosidase (143 kDa with a unique five-domain structure, was identified. It consists of three glycoside hydrolase (GH domains and two carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM with the domain order GH5-12-12-CBM2-2 (N- to C-terminal direction. The full length protein, as well as truncated versions, were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and their activity was analyzed. The full length multidomain glycosidase (MDG was able to hydrolyze various polysaccharides, with the highest activity for barley β-glucan (β-1,3/1,4-glucoside, followed by that for carboxymethyl cellulose (β-1,4-glucoside

  13. Identification of Human P2X1 Receptor-interacting Proteins Reveals a Role of the Cytoskeleton in Receptor Regulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalo, Ulyana; Roberts, Jonathan A.; Evans, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    P2X1 receptors are ATP-gated ion channels expressed by smooth muscle and blood cells. Carboxyl-terminally His-FLAG-tagged human P2X1 receptors were stably expressed in HEK293 cells and co-purified with cytoskeletal proteins including actin. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D inhibited P2X1 receptor currents with no effect on the time course of the response or surface expression of the receptor. Stabilization of the cytoskeleton with jasplakinolide had no effect on P2X1 receptor currents but decreased receptor mobility. P2X2 receptor currents were unaffected by cytochalasin, and P2X1/2 receptor chimeras were used to identify the molecular basis of actin sensitivity. These studies showed that the intracellular amino terminus accounts for the inhibitory effects of cytoskeletal disruption similar to that shown for lipid raft/cholesterol sensitivity. Stabilization of the cytoskeleton with jasplakinolide abolished the inhibitory effects of cholesterol depletion on P2X1 receptor currents, suggesting that lipid rafts may regulate the receptor through stabilization of the cytoskeleton. These studies show that the cytoskeleton plays an important role in P2X1 receptor regulation. PMID:21757694

  14. An integrated neuro-robotic interface for stroke rehabilitation using the NASA X1 powered lower limb exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongtian; Nathan, Kevin; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Rovekamp, Roger; Beck, Christopher; Ozdemir, Recep; Francisco, Gerard E; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2014-01-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of disability, limiting independent ambulation in survivors, and consequently affecting quality of life (QOL). Recent technological advances in neural interfacing with robotic rehabilitation devices are promising in the context of gait rehabilitation. Here, the X1, NASA's powered robotic lower limb exoskeleton, is introduced as a potential diagnostic, assistive, and therapeutic tool for stroke rehabilitation. Additionally, the feasibility of decoding lower limb joint kinematics and kinetics during walking with the X1 from scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) signals--the first step towards the development of a brain-machine interface (BMI) system to the X1 exoskeleton--is demonstrated.

  15. Validation of X1 motorcycle model in industrial plant layout by using WITNESSTM simulation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzas, M. F. M. A.; Bareduan, S. A.; Zakaria, M. Z.; Tan, W. J.; Zairi, S.

    2017-09-01

    This paper demonstrates a case study on simulation, modelling and analysis for X1 Motorcycles Model. In this research, a motorcycle assembly plant has been selected as a main place of research study. Simulation techniques by using Witness software were applied to evaluate the performance of the existing manufacturing system. The main objective is to validate the data and find out the significant impact on the overall performance of the system for future improvement. The process of validation starts when the layout of the assembly line was identified. All components are evaluated to validate whether the data is significance for future improvement. Machine and labor statistics are among the parameters that were evaluated for process improvement. Average total cycle time for given workstations is used as criterion for comparison of possible variants. From the simulation process, the data used are appropriate and meet the criteria for two-sided assembly line problems.

  16. The smooth cyclotron line in her x-1 as seen with nuclear spectroscopic telescope array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Staubert, Ruediger

    2013-01-01

    , and a CRSF. We find that the CRSF has a very smooth and symmetric shape, in all observations and at all pulse-phases. We compare the residuals of a line with a Gaussian optical depth profile to a Lorentzian optical depth profile and find no significant differences, strongly constraining the very smooth shape....... We observed Her X-1 three times, coordinated with Suzaku, during one of the high flux intervals of its 35d super-orbital period. This paper focuses on the shape and evolution of the hard X-ray spectrum. The broad-band spectra can be fitted with a powerlaw with a high-energy cutoff, an iron line...... of the line. Even though the line energy changes dramatically with pulse phase, we find that its smooth shape does not. Additionally, our data show that the continuum is only changing marginally between the three observations. These changes can be explained with varying amounts of Thomson scattering...

  17. The smooth cyclotron line in Her X-1 as seen with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Staubert, Ruediger

    2013-01-01

    , and a CRSF. We find that the CRSF has a very smooth and symmetric shape, in all observations and at all pulse-phases. We compare the residuals of a line with a Gaussian optical depth profile to a Lorentzian optical depth profile and find no significant differences, strongly constraining the very smooth shape....... We observed Her X-1 three times, coordinated with Suzaku, during one of the high flux intervals of its 35d super-orbital period. This paper focuses on the shape and evolution of the hard X-ray spectrum. The broad-band spectra can be fitted with a powerlaw with a high-energy cutoff, an iron line...... of the line. Even though the line energy changes dramatically with pulse phase, we find that its smooth shape does not. Additionally, our data show that the continuum is only changing marginally between the three observations. These changes can be explained with varying amounts of Thomson scattering...

  18. Adsorption Mechanisms of NH3 on Chlorinated Si(100)-2 x 1 Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Soon; Choi, Cheol Ho

    2012-01-01

    The potential energy surfaces of ammonia molecule adsorptions on the symmetrically chlorinated Si(100)- 2 x 1 surface were explored with SIMOMM:MP2/6-31G(d). It was found that the initial nucleophilic attack by ammonia nitrogen to the surface Si forms a S N 2 type transition state, which eventually leads to an HCl molecular desorption. The second ammonia molecule adsorption requires much less reaction barrier, which can be rationalized by the surface cooperative effect. In general, it was shown that the surface Si-Cl bonds can be easily subjected to the substitution reactions by ammonia molecules yielding symmetric surface Si-NH 2 bonds, which can be a good initial template for subsequent surface chemical modifications. The ammonia adsorptions are in general more facile than the corresponding water adsorption, since ammonia is better nucleophile

  19. Mass-reduced quantum numbers: application to the isotopic lithium hydrides (X1B+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.C.; Stwalley, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    The massed-reduced quantum number (MRQN) method of combining isotopic data is applied to the lithium hydride X 1 Σ + ground state. The ΔG(eta) = μ/sup 1 / 2 / ΔG(v), B(eta) = μB(v) and D(eta) = μ 2 D(v) isotopically-combined functions are obtained. An isotopically-combined Rydberg-Klein Rees (ICRKR) potential is constructed using the G(eta) and B(eta) functions. Evidence for breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is presented and examined. The Dunham, Simons-Parr-Finlan, and Thakkar methods of potential expansion are also applied to lithium hydride and compared to the RKR Potential

  20. RAPID PENUMBRA AND LORENTZ FORCE CHANGES IN AN X1.0 SOLAR FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhe; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayang; Yang, Bo; Bi, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the violent changes in photospheric magnetic structures associated with an X1.1 flare, which occurred in a compact δ-configuration region in the following part of AR 11890 on 2013 November 8. In both central and peripheral penumbra regions of the small δ sunspot, these changes took place abruptly and permanently in the reverse direction during the flare: the inner/outer penumbra darkened/disappeared, where the magnetic fields became more horizontal/vertical. Particularly, the Lorentz force (LF) changes in the central/peripheral region had a downward/upward and inward direction, meaning that the local pressure from the upper atmosphere was enhanced/released. It indicates that the LF changes might be responsible for the penumbra changes. These observations can be well explained as the photospheric response to the coronal field reconstruction within the framework of the magnetic implosion theory and the back reaction model of flares

  1. Three-color photometry of HDE 226868: The optical counterpart of cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, D.F.; Nolt, I.G.; Stearns, S.A.; Straton, P.; Radostitz, J.V.

    1976-01-01

    The results of UBV photoelectric observations of HDE 226868 (Cyg X-1) obtained on fifty nights during 1974 are presented. These observations show a light curve with the following characteristics: two unequal light maxima and minima during the 5/sup d/.6 orbital period which exhibit a peak-to-peak magnitude change of approx.0.07 mag in all colors;a small phase-dependent color variation which results in a reddening in both color indices of approx.0.003 mag at times of light minima; erratic light variability on a general time scale of days with an amplitude of +- 0.01 to 0.02 mag and no apparent color dependence

  2. Atomistic Frictional Properties of the C(1002x1-H Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Jones

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory- (DFT- based ab initio calculations were used to investigate the surface-to-surface interaction and frictional behavior of two hydrogenated C(100 dimer surfaces. A monolayer of hydrogen atoms was applied to the fully relaxed C(1002x1 surface having rows of C=C dimers with a bond length of 1.39 Å. The obtained C(1002x1-H surfaces (C–H bond length 1.15 Å were placed in a large vacuum space and translated toward each other. A cohesive state at a surface separation of 4.32 Å that is stabilized by approximately 0.42 eV was observed. An increase in the charge separation in the surface dimer was calculated at this separation having a 0.04 e transfer from the hydrogen atom to the carbon atom. The Mayer bond orders were calculated for the C–C and C–H bonds and were found to be 0.962 and 0.947, respectively. σ C–H bonds did not change substantially from the fully separated state. A significant decrease in the electron density difference between the hydrogen atoms on opposite surfaces was seen and assigned to the effects of Pauli repulsion. The surfaces were translated relative to each other in the (100 plane, and the friction force was obtained as a function of slab spacing, which yielded a 0.157 coefficient of friction.

  3. Short term variation of Cyg X-1 in the hard x-ray region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Kosei [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Space and Aeronautical Science

    1978-08-01

    Cyg X-1 is a peculiar celestial body considered to be a close binary system of a black hole and a blue super-giant star. It is presently known that the time fluctuation of Cyg X-1 is considerably complex, ranging from seconds to days or months. Of these variation, attention has been paid to the short time variation in relation to the black hole theory. Observations of fluctuations in the order of second have been limited to soft X-ray (20 keV or more) so far, because great technical difficulties are involved due to the low intensity of hard X-ray. The present investigation is based on the fluctuations in the order of second in hard X-ray, and was conducted by employing an unprecedented large area X-ray telescope. The text describes on the brief history of the short time fluctuation, explains the experimental plan, X-ray detecting system, flight of a balloon and the analyses and discussions of fluctuation factor by variation function method, and gives the analysis data and conclusion. The observations resulted in the fact that the fluctuations in the order of second were small at 20 to 30 keV, but become large when energy is higher or lower than this value. The most natural explanation available for this result may be that it is essentially spectrum fluctuation, being inverse correlation in higher and lower energies. Physical meaning of such spectrum fluctuation is considered in connection with precipitating disk model around a black hole.

  4. The smooth cyclotron line in Her X-1 as seen with nuclear spectroscopic telescope array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Bellm, Eric C.; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristin K.; Walton, Dominic J. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Staubert, Rüdiger; Klochkov, Dmitry [Institut für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universität Tübingen (IAAT), D-72076 Tübingen (Germany); Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse (France); Chenevez, Jerome; Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Pottschmidt, Katja [CRESST, UMBC, and NASA GSFC, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wilms, Jörn [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Sternwartstr. 7, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany); William Zhang [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Her X-1, one of the brightest and best studied X-ray binaries, shows a cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) near 37 keV. This makes it an ideal target for a detailed study with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), taking advantage of its excellent hard X-ray spectral resolution. We observed Her X-1 three times, coordinated with Suzaku, during one of the high flux intervals of its 35 day superorbital period. This paper focuses on the shape and evolution of the hard X-ray spectrum. The broadband spectra can be fitted with a power law with a high-energy cutoff, an iron line, and a CRSF. We find that the CRSF has a very smooth and symmetric shape in all observations and at all pulse phases. We compare the residuals of a line with a Gaussian optical-depth profile to a Lorentzian optical-depth profile and find no significant differences, strongly constraining the very smooth shape of the line. Even though the line energy changes dramatically with pulse phase, we find that its smooth shape does not. Additionally, our data show that the continuum only changes marginally between the three observations. These changes can be explained with varying amounts of Thomson scattering in the hot corona of the accretion disk. The average, luminosity-corrected CRSF energy is lower than in past observations and follows a secular decline. The excellent data quality of NuSTAR provides the best constraint on the CRSF energy to date.

  5. Comparison of Knee and Ankle Dynamometry between NASA's X1 Exoskeleton and Biodex System 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, K. L.; Newby, N. J.; Hackney, K. J.; DeWitt, J. K.; Beck, C. E.; Rovekamp, R. N.; Rea, R. L.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Pre- and post-flight dynamometry is performed on International Space Station crewmembers to characterize microgravity-induced strength changes. Strength is not assessed in flight due to hardware limitations and there is poor understanding of the time course of in-flight changes. PURPOSE: To assess the reliability of a prototype dynamometer, the X1 Exoskeleton (EXO) and its agreement with a Biodex System 4 (BIO). METHODS: Eight subjects (4 M/4 F) completed 2 counterbalanced testing sessions of knee extension/flexion (KE/KF), 1 with BIO and 1 with EXO, with repeated measures within each session in normal gravity. Test-retest reliability (test 1 and 2) and device agreement (BIO vs. EXO) were evaluated. Later, to assess device agreement for ankle plantarflexion (PF), 10 subjects (4 M/6 F) completed 3 test conditions (BIO, EXO, and BIOEXO); BIOEXO was a hybrid condition comprised of the Biodex dynamometer motor and the X1 footplate and ankle frame. Ankle comparisons were: BIO vs. BIOEXO (footplate differences), BIOEXO vs. EXO (motor differences), and BIO vs. EXO (all differences). Reliability for KE/KF was determined by intraclass correlation (ICC). Device agreement was assessed with: 1) repeated measures ANOVA, 2) a measure of concordance (rho), and 3) average difference. RESULTS: ICCs for KE/KF were 0.99 for BIO and 0.96 to 0.99 for EXO. Agreement was high for KE (concordance: 0.86 to 0.95; average differences: -7 to +9 Nm) and low to moderate for KF (concordance: 0.64 to 0.78; average differences: -4 to -29 Nm, Pexoskeleton to perform portable dynamometry for large muscle groups of the lower body.

  6. Short term variation of Cyg X-1 in the hard x-ray region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Kosei

    1978-01-01

    Cyg X-1 is a peculiar celestial body considered to be a close binary system of a black hole and a blue super-giant star. It is presently known that the time fluctuation of Cyg X-1 is considerably complex, ranging from seconds to days or months. Of these variation, attention has been paid to the short time variation in relation to the black hole theory. Observations of fluctuations in the order of second have been limited to soft X-ray (20 keV or more) so far, because great technical difficulties are involved due to the low intensity of hard X-ray. The present investigation is based on the fluctuations in the order of second in hard X-ray, and was conducted by employing an unprecedented large area X-ray telescope. The text describes on the brief history of the short time fluctuation, explains the experimental plan, X-ray detecting system, flight of a balloon and the analyses and discussions of fluctuation factor by variation function method, and gives the analysis data and conclusion. The observations resulted in the fact that the fluctuations in the order of second were small at 20 to 30 keV, but become large when energy is higher or lower than this value. The most natural explanation available for this result may be that it is essentially spectrum fluctuation, being inverse correlation in higher and lower energies. Physical meaning of such spectrum fluctuation is considered in connection with precipitating disk model around a black hole. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration (HVAC/R), AFSC 3E1X1. OSSN 2368

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    Survey Coverage: The Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration (HVAC/R) career ladder, AFSC 3E1X1, was surveyed to gather data needed to guide the development and evaluation of training...

  8. Hbim Challenge among the Paradigm of Complexity, Tools and Preservation: the Basilica DI Collemaggio 8 Years after the Earthquake (l'aquila)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumana, R.; Della Torre, S.; Oreni, D.; Previtali, M.; Cantini, L.; Barazzetti, L.; Franchi, A.; Banfi, F.

    2017-08-01

    In December 2012 ENIservizi (the Italian multi-national energy agency operating in many countries), after the Earthquake that occurred in April 2009, decided to undertake the project `Re-start from Collemaggio' with the aim of giving new hope to the L'Aquila community, funding around 14 million Euro to restore the Basilica di Collemaggio. The Superintendence Office carried on the restoration project with the scientific support of the Università degli Studi de L'Aquila and the Università La Sapienza di Roma, under the coordination of the Politecnico di Milano. ENIservizi, aware of the BIM potential in the complex building and infrastructure domain in the world, required an advanced HBIM from the laser scanner and photogrammetric surveying to support the diagnostic analysis, the design project, the tender and the restoration itself, today still on course. Plans and vertical sections were delivered (2012) starting from the surveying campaigns (February and June 2013), together with the first HBIM advancement from the end of 2012 in support of the preliminary-definitive-executive steps of the restoration design project (2013-14-15). Five years later, this paper tries to make a synthesis of the different lessons learnt, in addition to the positive and critical aspects relating HBIM feasibility, sustainability and usefulness to the challenging restoration work. In particular, the Collemaggio BIM experience anticipated the new Italian Public Procurement Legislation (D.Lgs 50/2016, Nuovo Codice degli Appalti pubblici) aligned with to the EUPPD 24/2014: the EU Directive on Public Procurement asked all the 28 EU countries to adopt building informative modelling by February 2016 in order to support the whole LCM (Life Cycle Management), starting from the project and the intervention, through rewarding scores or mandatory regulations. Many analyses foresees to save from around 5% to 15% of the overall investment by adopting mature BIM (Level 3 to 5), particularly 4D remotely

  9. HBIM CHALLENGE AMONG THE PARADIGM OF COMPLEXITY, TOOLS AND PRESERVATION: THE BASILICA DI COLLEMAGGIO 8 YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE (L’AQUILA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Brumana

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In December 2012 ENIservizi (the Italian multi-national energy agency operating in many countries, after the Earthquake that occurred in April 2009, decided to undertake the project ‘Re-start from Collemaggio’ with the aim of giving new hope to the L’Aquila community, funding around 14 million Euro to restore the Basilica di Collemaggio. The Superintendence Office carried on the restoration project with the scientific support of the Università degli Studi de L’Aquila and the Università La Sapienza di Roma, under the coordination of the Politecnico di Milano. ENIservizi, aware of the BIM potential in the complex building and infrastructure domain in the world, required an advanced HBIM from the laser scanner and photogrammetric surveying to support the diagnostic analysis, the design project, the tender and the restoration itself, today still on course. Plans and vertical sections were delivered (2012 starting from the surveying campaigns (February and June 2013, together with the first HBIM advancement from the end of 2012 in support of the preliminary-definitive-executive steps of the restoration design project (2013-14-15. Five years later, this paper tries to make a synthesis of the different lessons learnt, in addition to the positive and critical aspects relating HBIM feasibility, sustainability and usefulness to the challenging restoration work. In particular, the Collemaggio BIM experience anticipated the new Italian Public Procurement Legislation (D.Lgs 50/2016, Nuovo Codice degli Appalti pubblici aligned with to the EUPPD 24/2014: the EU Directive on Public Procurement asked all the 28 EU countries to adopt building informative modelling by February 2016 in order to support the whole LCM (Life Cycle Management, starting from the project and the intervention, through rewarding scores or mandatory regulations. Many analyses foresees to save from around 5% to 15% of the overall investment by adopting mature BIM (Level 3 to 5

  10. A neural network potential energy surface for the NaH2 system and dynamics studies on the H(2S) + NaH(X1Σ+) → Na(2S) + H2(X1Σg+) reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shufen; Yuan, Jiuchuang; Li, Huixing; Chen, Maodu

    2017-08-02

    In order to study the dynamics of the reaction H( 2 S) + NaH(X 1 Σ + ) → Na( 2 S) + H 2 (X 1 Σ g + ), a new potential energy surface (PES) for the ground state of the NaH 2 system is constructed based on 35 730 ab initio energy points. Using basis sets of quadruple zeta quality, multireference configuration interaction calculations with Davidson correction were carried out to obtain the ab initio energy points. The neural network method is used to fit the PES, and the root mean square error is very small (0.00639 eV). The bond lengths, dissociation energies, zero-point energies and spectroscopic constants of H 2 (X 1 Σ g + ) and NaH(X 1 Σ + ) obtained on the new NaH 2 PES are in good agreement with the experiment data. On the new PES, the reactant coordinate-based time-dependent wave packet method is applied to study the reaction dynamics of H( 2 S) + NaH(X 1 Σ + ) → Na( 2 S) + H 2 (X 1 Σ g + ), and the reaction probabilities, integral cross-sections (ICSs) and differential cross-sections (DCSs) are obtained. There is no threshold in the reaction due to the absence of an energy barrier on the minimum energy path. When the collision energy increases, the ICSs decrease from a high value at low collision energy. The DCS results show that the angular distribution of the product molecules tends to the forward direction. Compared with the LiH 2 system, the NaH 2 system has a larger mass and the PES has a larger well at the H-NaH configuration, which leads to a higher ICS value in the H( 2 S) + NaH(X 1 Σ + ) → Na( 2 S) + H 2 (X 1 Σ g + ) reaction. Because the H( 2 S) + NaH(X 1 Σ + ) → Na( 2 S) + H 2 (X 1 Σ g + ) reaction releases more energy, the product molecules can be excited to a higher vibrational state.

  11. Effects of three-dimensional crustal structure and smoothing constraint on earthquake slip inversions: Case study of the Mw6.3 2009 L'Aquila earthquake

    KAUST Repository

    Gallovič, František; Imperatori, Walter; Mai, Paul Martin

    2015-01-01

    Earthquake slip inversions aiming to retrieve kinematic rupture characteristics typically assume 1-D velocity models and a flat Earth surface. However, heterogeneous nature of the crust and presence of rough topography lead to seismic scattering and other wave propagation phenomena, introducing complex 3-D effects on ground motions. Here we investigate how the use of imprecise Green's functions - achieved by including 3-D velocity perturbations and topography - affect slip-inversion results. We create sets of synthetic seismograms, including 3-D heterogeneous Earth structure and topography, and then invert these synthetics using Green's functions computed for a horizontally layered 1-D Earth model. We apply a linear inversion, regularized by smoothing and positivity constraint, and examine in detail how smoothing effects perturb the solution. Among others, our tests and resolution analyses demonstrate how imprecise Green's functions introduce artificial slip rate multiples especially at shallow depths and that the timing of the peak slip rate is hardly affected by the chosen smoothing. The investigation is extended to recordings of the 2009 Mw6.3 L'Aquila earthquake, considering both strong motion and high-rate GPS stations. We interpret the inversion results taking into account the lessons learned from the synthetic tests. The retrieved slip model resembles previously published solutions using geodetic data, showing a large-slip asperity southeast of the hypocenter. In agreement with other studies, we find evidence for fast but subshear rupture propagation in updip direction, followed by a delayed propagation along strike. We conjecture that rupture was partially inhibited by a deep localized velocity-strengthening patch that subsequently experienced afterslip.

  12. [Neural activity related to emotional and empathic deficits in subjects with post-traumatic stress disorder who survived the L'Aquila (Central Italy) 2009 earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Monica; Pino, Maria Chiara; Tempesta, Daniela; Catalucci, Alessia; Masciocchi, Carlo; Ferrara, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a chronic anxiety disorder. The continued efforts to control the distressing memories by traumatized individuals, together with the reduction of responsiveness to the outside world, are called Emotional Numbing (EN). The EN is one of the central symptoms in PTSD and it plays an integral role not only in the development and maintenance of post-traumatic symptomatology, but also in the disability of emotional regulation. This disorder shows an abnormal response of cortical and limbic regions which are normally involved in understanding emotions since the very earliest stages of the development of processing ability. Patients with PTSD exhibit exaggerated brain responses to emotionally negative stimuli. Identifying the neural correlates of emotion regulation in these subjects is important for elucidating the neural circuitry involved in emotional and empathic dysfunction. We showed that PTSD patients, all survivors of the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake, have a higher sensitivity to negative emotion and lower empathy levels. These emotional and empathic deficits are accompanied by neural brain functional correlates. Indeed PTSD subjects exhibit functional abnormalities in brain regions that are involved in stress regulation and emotional responses. The reduced activation of the frontal areas and a stronger activation of the limbic areas when responding to emotional stimuli could lead the subjects to enact coping strategies aimed at protecting themselves from the re-experience of pain related to traumatic events. This would result in a dysfunctional hyperactivation of subcortical areas, which may cause emotional distress and, consequently, impaired social relationships often reported by PTSD patients.

  13. Effects of three-dimensional crustal structure and smoothing constraint on earthquake slip inversions: Case study of the Mw6.3 2009 L'Aquila earthquake

    KAUST Repository

    Gallovič, František

    2015-01-01

    Earthquake slip inversions aiming to retrieve kinematic rupture characteristics typically assume 1-D velocity models and a flat Earth surface. However, heterogeneous nature of the crust and presence of rough topography lead to seismic scattering and other wave propagation phenomena, introducing complex 3-D effects on ground motions. Here we investigate how the use of imprecise Green\\'s functions - achieved by including 3-D velocity perturbations and topography - affect slip-inversion results. We create sets of synthetic seismograms, including 3-D heterogeneous Earth structure and topography, and then invert these synthetics using Green\\'s functions computed for a horizontally layered 1-D Earth model. We apply a linear inversion, regularized by smoothing and positivity constraint, and examine in detail how smoothing effects perturb the solution. Among others, our tests and resolution analyses demonstrate how imprecise Green\\'s functions introduce artificial slip rate multiples especially at shallow depths and that the timing of the peak slip rate is hardly affected by the chosen smoothing. The investigation is extended to recordings of the 2009 Mw6.3 L\\'Aquila earthquake, considering both strong motion and high-rate GPS stations. We interpret the inversion results taking into account the lessons learned from the synthetic tests. The retrieved slip model resembles previously published solutions using geodetic data, showing a large-slip asperity southeast of the hypocenter. In agreement with other studies, we find evidence for fast but subshear rupture propagation in updip direction, followed by a delayed propagation along strike. We conjecture that rupture was partially inhibited by a deep localized velocity-strengthening patch that subsequently experienced afterslip.

  14. The Bacterial Effector HopX1 Targets JAZ Transcriptional Repressors to Activate Jasmonate Signaling and Promote Infection in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Boter, Marta; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chini, Andrea; Rathjen, John P.; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae is dependent on a type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of virulence effector proteins into the host cytoplasm, and the production of a number of toxins such as coronatine (COR), which is a mimic of the plant hormone jasmonate-isoleuce (JA-Ile). Inside the plant cell, effectors target host molecules to subvert the host cell physiology and disrupt defenses. However, despite the fact that elucidating effector action is essential to understanding bacterial pathogenesis, the molecular function and host targets of the vast majority of effectors remain largely unknown. Here, we found that effector HopX1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) 11528, a strain that does not produce COR, interacts with and promotes the degradation of JAZ proteins, a key family of JA-repressors. We show that hopX1 encodes a cysteine protease, activity that is required for degradation of JAZs by HopX1. HopX1 associates with JAZ proteins through its central ZIM domain and degradation occurs in a COI1-independent manner. Moreover, ectopic expression of HopX1 in Arabidopsis induces the expression of JA-dependent genes, represses salicylic acid (SA)-induced markers, and complements the growth of a COR-deficient P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 strain during natural bacterial infections. Furthermore, HopX1 promoted susceptibility when delivered by the natural type III secretion system, to a similar extent as the addition of COR, and this effect was dependent on its catalytic activity. Altogether, our results indicate that JAZ proteins are direct targets of bacterial effectors to promote activation of JA-induced defenses and susceptibility in Arabidopsis. HopX1 illustrates a paradigm of an alternative evolutionary solution to COR with similar physiological outcome. PMID:24558350

  15. LONG-TERM EVOLUTION OF THE MAIN-ON STATES IN HERCULES X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šimon, Vojtech, E-mail: simon@asu.cas.cz [Astronomical Institute, The Czech Academy of Sciences, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-sky Monitor (RXTE ASM) observations and American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) optical data were used for a time-series analysis of the long-term activity of Her X-1. The problem of measuring the long-term evolution of the X-ray intensity in the light curve which consists only of separated intense spikes was addressed. For this purpose, the fluence of each Main-On state was determined. The fluences vary generally (not only in the transitions into/from anomalous low states (ALSs)) by tens of percent on timescales of at least several epochs of the cycle length of the superorbital cycle (but without any stable cycle) while irradiation of the donor producing the optical modulation remains considerably more stable. ALS1 and ALS2 are extensions of the tail in the statistical distribution of these fluences. In this interpretation, the variations of the fluences are caused by the changes of the structure of the inner disk region, which produces variable obscuration of the beams (emitting in the ASM band) at the neutron star. A small change of obscuration of these beams by the inner disk region suffices to change the fluences largely. However, the irradiation of the donor is changed significantly less because this inner disk region (which emits beyond the ASM band and acts as the occulting region of the beams) also irradiates the donor.

  16. The pure rotational spectrum of ZnS (X 1Σ +)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zack, L. N.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2009-10-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of ZnS (X 1Σ +) has been measured using direct-absorption millimeter/sub-millimeter techniques in the frequency range 372-471 GHz. This study is the first spectroscopic investigation of this molecule. Spectra originating in four zinc isotopologues ( 64ZnS, 66ZnS, 68ZnS, and 67ZnS) were recorded in natural abundance in the ground vibrational state, and data from the v = 1 state were also measured for the two most abundant zinc species. Spectroscopic constants have been subsequently determined, and equilibrium parameters have been estimated. The equilibrium bond length was calculated to be re ˜ 2.0464 Å, which agrees well with theoretical predictions. In contrast, the dissociation energy of DE ˜ 3.12 eV calculated for ZnS, assuming a Morse potential, was significantly higher than past experimental and theoretical estimates, suggesting diabatic interaction with other potentials that lower the effective dissociation energy. Although ZnS is isovalent with ZnO, there appear to be subtle differences in bonding between the two species, as suggested by their respective force constants and bond length trends in the 3d series.

  17. Light curve and pulse profile of the x-ray pulsar Vela X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Fumiaki; Hayakawa, Satio; Makino, Fumiyoshi; Sato, Naohisa; Makishima, Kazuo.

    1983-01-01

    The following properties of the X-ray binary pulsar Vela X-1 are presented by reference to its observations in March 1980. The light curve shows a high state and a low state in the first and second halves of an orbital period, respectively, but they may rather be defined as a soft state and hard state, respectively, since the intensity above 9 keV does not appreciably change between these two states. The energy spectra in these states indicate the presence of circumstellar absorption. The pulse profiles at high (9-22 keV) and low (1-9 keV) energies are different, indicating the absorption by cold matter which is probably in the accretion column. The absorber which is responsible for the soft and hard states is attributed to the stellar wind whose flow pattern is consistent with that obtained from optical absorption spectra. The orbital period is obtained by a combined analysis of X-ray data since 1972. No appreciable change of the period gives a constraint on the dynamical behavior of the binary system. (author)

  18. Investigation of split-off dimers on the Si(001)2x1 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, S.R.; O'Brien, J.L.; Curson, N.J.; Simmons, M.Y.; Clark, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A detailed knowledge of the nature of crystalline defects on the Si(001)2x1 surface is becoming increasingly important as more research effort is dedicated to producing atomic-scale electronic devices. Here we present high-resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) images and ab initio pseudopotential calculations of an unusual defect of the silicon (001) surface called the split-off dimer. In high-resolution filled-state images, split-off dimers appear as a pair of protrusions, in contrast to the surrounding surface dimers that appear as 'bean-shaped' protrusions. We show that π-bonding does not exist between the atoms of the split-off dimer, but instead, the dimer atoms form π-bonds with two second layer atoms as part of a tetramer bonding arrangement. We discuss the strain associated with split-off dimer defects and describe how this strain significantly affects the bonding arrangements and local density of states around these defects

  19. American X-Vehicles: An Inventory X-1 to X-50 Centennial of Flight Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Dennis R.; Landis, Tony; Miller, Jay

    2003-01-01

    For a while, it seemed the series of experimental aircraft sponsored by the U. S. government had run its course. Between the late 1940s and the late 1970s, almost thirty designations had been allocated to aircraft meant to explore new flight regimes or untried technologies. Then, largely, it ended. But there was a resurgence in the mid- to late- 1990s, and as we enter the fourth year of the new millennia, the designations are up to x-50. Many have a misconception that X-vehicles have always explored the high-speed and high-altitude flight regimes - something popularized by Chuck Yeager in the original X-1 and the exploits of the twelve men that flew the X-15. Although these flight regimes have always been in the spotlight, many others have been explored by X-vehicles. The little Bensen X-25 never exceeded 85 mph, and others were limited to speeds of several hundred mph. There has been some criticism that the use of X designations has been corrupted somewhat by including what are essentially prototypes of future operational aircraft, especially the two JSF demonstrators. But this is not new-the X-11 and X-12 from the 1950s were going to be prototypes of the Atlas intercontinental ballistic missile, and the still-born Lockheed X-27 was always intended as a prototype of a production aircraft. So although this practice does not represent the best use of 'X' designations, it is not without precedent.

  20. All-fiber 7x1 signal combiner for incoherent laser beam combining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordegraaf, D.; Maack, M. D.; Skovgaard, P. M. W.; Johansen, J.; Becker, F.; Belke, S.; Blomqvist, M.; Laegsgaard, J.

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate an all-fiber 7x1 signal combiner for incoherent laser beam combining. This is a potential key component for reaching several kW of stabile laser output power. The combiner couples the output from 7 single-mode (SM) fiber lasers into a single multi-mode (MM) fiber. The input signal fibers have a core diameter of 17 μm and the output MM fiber has a core diameter of 100 μm. In a tapered section light gradually leaks out of the SM fibers and is captured by a surrounding fluorine-doped cladding. The combiner is tested up to 2.5 kW of combined output power and only a minor increase in device temperature is observed. At an intermediate power level of 600 W a beam parameter product (BPP) of 2.22 mm x mrad is measured, corresponding to an M2 value of 6.5. These values are approaching the theoretical limit dictated by brightness conservation.

  1. RAPID SPECTRAL CHANGES OF CYGNUS X-1 IN THE LOW/HARD STATE WITH SUZAKU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, S.; Makishima, K. [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Negoro, H. [Department of Physics, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Torii, S.; Noda, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Mineshige, S. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-20

    Rapid spectral changes in the hard X-ray on a timescale down to {approx}0.1 s are studied by applying a ''shot analysis'' technique to the Suzaku observations of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1, performed on 2008 April 18 during the low/hard state. We successfully obtained the shot profiles, covering 10-200 keV with the Suzaku HXD-PIN and HXD-GSO detector. It is notable that the 100-200 keV shot profile is acquired for the first time owing to the HXD-GSO detector. The intensity changes in a time-symmetric way, though the hardness changes in a time-asymmetric way. When the shot-phase-resolved spectra are quantified with the Compton model, the Compton y-parameter and the electron temperature are found to decrease gradually through the rising phase of the shot, while the optical depth appears to increase. All the parameters return to their time-averaged values immediately within 0.1 s past the shot peak. We have not only confirmed this feature previously found in energies below {approx}60 keV, but also found that the spectral change is more prominent in energies above {approx}100 keV, implying the existence of some instant mechanism for direct entropy production. We discuss possible interpretations of the rapid spectral changes in the hard X-ray band.

  2. INITIATION PROCESSES FOR THE 2013 MAY 13 X1.7 LIMB FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Jinhua; Wang, Ya; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-01-01

    For the X1.7 class flare on 2013 May 13 (SOL2013-05-13T01:53), its initiation process was well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory and the Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) on board STEREO-B . The initiation process incorporates the following phenomena: an X-ray precursor that started ∼9 minutes before flare onset, two hot magnetic loops (as seen with AIA hot channels) forming a sigmoidal core magnetic structure (as seen with the EUVI), a rapidly formed magnetic flux rope (MFR) that expands outward, and a flare loop that contracts inward. The two hot magnetic loops were activated after the occurrence of the X-ray precursor. After activation, magnetic reconnection occurred between the two hot magnetic loops (inside the sigmoid structure), which produced the expanding MFR and the contracting flare loop (CFL). The MFR and CFL can only be seen with AIA hot and cool channels, respectively. For this flare, the real initiation time can be regarded as being from the starting time of the precursor, and its impulsive phase started when the MFR began its fast expansion. In addition, the CFL and the growing postflare magnetic loops are different loop systems, and the CFL was the product of magnetic reconnection between sheared magnetic fields that also produced the MFR.

  3. INITIATION PROCESSES FOR THE 2013 MAY 13 X1.7 LIMB FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jinhua [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, CAS, 830011, Urumqi (China); Wang, Ya; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng, E-mail: jihs@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing, 210008 (China)

    2017-01-20

    For the X1.7 class flare on 2013 May 13 (SOL2013-05-13T01:53), its initiation process was well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory and the Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) on board STEREO-B . The initiation process incorporates the following phenomena: an X-ray precursor that started ∼9 minutes before flare onset, two hot magnetic loops (as seen with AIA hot channels) forming a sigmoidal core magnetic structure (as seen with the EUVI), a rapidly formed magnetic flux rope (MFR) that expands outward, and a flare loop that contracts inward. The two hot magnetic loops were activated after the occurrence of the X-ray precursor. After activation, magnetic reconnection occurred between the two hot magnetic loops (inside the sigmoid structure), which produced the expanding MFR and the contracting flare loop (CFL). The MFR and CFL can only be seen with AIA hot and cool channels, respectively. For this flare, the real initiation time can be regarded as being from the starting time of the precursor, and its impulsive phase started when the MFR began its fast expansion. In addition, the CFL and the growing postflare magnetic loops are different loop systems, and the CFL was the product of magnetic reconnection between sheared magnetic fields that also produced the MFR.

  4. A new species of Endecous Saussure, 1878 (Orthoptera, Gryllidae) from northeast Brazil with the first X1X20 chromosomal sex system in Gryllidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zefa, Edison; Redü, Darlan Rutz; Da Costa, Maria Kátia Matiotti; Fontanetti, Carmem S; Gottschalk, Marco Silva; Padilha, Giovanna Boff; Fernandes e Silva, Anelise; Martins, Luciano De P

    2014-08-06

    In this paper we describe a new species of Luzarinae cricket collected from the cave "Gruta de Ubajara, municipality of Ubajara, State of Ceará, Brazil, highlighting phallic sclerites morphology and chromosome complement as diagnostic characters. We presented meiotic and mitotic characterization in order to define the karyotype with 2n = 12 + X1X2♂/12 + X1X1X2X2♀. This represents the first record of X1X20 chromosomal sex system in Gryllidae.

  5. Search for gravitational redshifted absorption lines in LMXB Serpens X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Hiroki; Done, Chris; Paerels, Frits; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin

    2018-04-01

    The equation of state for ultradense matter can be tested from observations of the ratio of mass to radius of neutron stars. This could be measured precisely from the redshift of a narrow line produced on the surface. X-rays bursts have been intensively searched for such features, but so far without detection. Here instead we search for redshifted lines in the persistent emission, where the accretion flow dominates over the surface emission. We discuss the requirements for narrow lines to be produced, and show that narrow absorption lines from highly ionized iron can potentially be observable in accreting low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs; low B field) that have either low spin or low inclination so that Doppler broadening is small. This selects Serpens X-1 as the only potential candidate persistent LMXB due to its low inclination. Including surface models in the broad-band accretion flow model predicts that the absorption line from He-like iron at 6.7 keV should be redshifted to ˜5.1-5.7 keV (10-15 km for 1.4 M⊙) and have an equivalent width of 0.8-8 eV for surface temperatures of 7-10 × 106 K. We use the high-resolution Chandra grating data to give a firm upper limit of 2-3 eV for an absorption line at ˜5 keV. We discuss possible reasons for this lack of detection (the surface temperature and the geometry of the boundary layer etc.). Future instruments with better sensitivity are required in order to explore the existence of such features.

  6. Understanding the Long-Term Spectral Variability of Cygnus X-1 from BATSE and ASM Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Poutanen, Juri; Paciesas, William S.; Wen, Linqing; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a spectral analysis of observations of Cygnus X-1 by the RXTE/ASM (1.5-12 keV) and CGRO/BATSE (20-300 keV), including about 1200 days of simultaneous data. We find a number of correlations between intensities and hardnesses in different energy bands from 1.5 keV to 300 keV. In the hard (low) spectral state, there is a negative correlation between the ASM 1.5-12 keV flux and the hardness at any energy. In the soft (high) spectral state, the ASM flux is positively correlated with the ASM hardness (as previously reported) but uncorrelated with the BATSE hardness. In both spectral states, the BATSE hardness correlates with the flux above 100 keV, while it shows no correlation with the flux in the 20-100 keV range. At the same time, there is clear correlation between the BATSE fluxes below and above 100 keV. In the hard state, most of the variability can be explained by softening the overall spectrum with a pivot at approximately 50 keV. The observations show that there has to be another, independent variability pattern of lower amplitude where the spectral shape does not change when the luminosity changes. In the soft state, the variability is mostly caused by a variable hard (Comptonized) spectral component of a constant shape superimposed on a constant soft blackbody component. These variability patterns are in agreement with the dependence of the rms variability on the photon energy in the two states. We interpret the observed correlations in terms of theoretical Comptonization models. In the hard state, the variability appears to be driven mostly by changing flux in seed photons Comptonized in a hot thermal plasma cloud with an approximately constant power supply. In the soft state, the variability is consistent with flares of hybrid, thermal/nonthermal, plasma with variable power above a stable cold disk. Also, based on broadband pointed observations simultaneous with those of the ASM and BATSE, we find the intrinsic bolometric luminosity increases by a

  7. DISAPPEARANCE OF COMET C/2010 X1 (ELENIN): GONE WITH A WHIMPER, NOT A BANG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; Jewitt, David, E-mail: jli@igpp.ucla.edu [Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles (United States)

    2015-04-15

    We examine the rise and sudden demise of comet C/2010 X1 (Elenin) on its approach to perihelion. Discovered inbound at 4.2 AU, this long-period comet was predicted to become very bright when near perihelion, at 0.48 AU on 2011 September 10. Observations starting 2011 February (heliocentric distance ∼3.5 AU) indeed show the comet to brighten by about 11 mag, with most of the increase occurring inside 1 AU from the Sun. The peak brightness reached m{sub R} = 6 on UT 2011 August 12.95 ± 0.50, when at ∼0.83 AU from the Sun. Thereafter, the comet faded even as the heliocentric distance continued to decrease. We find that most of the surge in brightness in mid-August resulted from dust-particle forward scattering, not from a sudden increase in the activity. A much smaller (∼3 mag) brightening began on UT 2011 August 18 ± 1 (heliocentric distance 0.74 AU), reached a maximum on UT 2011 August 30 ± 1 (at 0.56 AU), and reflects the true breakup of the nucleus. This second peak was matched by a change in the morphology from centrally condensed to diffuse. The estimated cross section of the nucleus when at 1 AU inbound was ∼1 km{sup 2}, corresponding to an equal-area circle of radius 0.6 km. Observations were taken after the second peak using the Canada–France–Hawaii 3.6 m telescope to search for surviving fragments of the nucleus. None were found to a limiting red magnitude r′ = 24.4, corresponding to radii ≲40 m (red geometric albedo = 0.04 assumed). The brightening, the progressive elongation of the debris cloud, and the absence of a central condensation in data taken after UT 2011 August 30 are consistent with disintegration of the nucleus into a power law size distribution of fragments with index q = 3.3 ± 0.2 combined with the action of radiation pressure. In such a distribution, the largest particles contain most of the mass while the smallest particles dominate the scattering cross section and apparent brightness. We speculate about physical

  8. Long term variability of Cygnus X-1. VI. Energy-resolved X-ray variability 1999-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinberg, V.; Pottschmidt, K.; Böck, M.; Schmid, C.; Nowak, M.A.; Uttley, P.; Tomsick, J.A.; Rodriguez, J.; Hell, N.; Markowitz, A.; Bodaghee, A.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Rothschild, R.E.; Wilms, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the most extensive analysis of Fourier-based X-ray timing properties of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 to date, based on 12 years of bi-weekly monitoring with RXTE from 1999 to 2011. Our aim is a comprehensive study of timing behavior across all spectral states, including the elusive

  9. The Soft State of Cygnus X-1 Observed With NuSTAR: A Variable Corona and a Stable Inner Disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Tomsick, J. A.; Madsen, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-epoch hard X-ray analysis of Cygnus X-1 in its soft state based on four observations with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Despite the basic similarity of the observed spectra, there is clear spectral variability between epochs. To investigate this variabilit...

  10. Search for gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1 in the first Advanced LIGO observing run with a hidden Markov model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G; Allocca, A.; Almoubayyed, H.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bawaj, M.; Bazzan, M.; Becsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Etienne, Z. B.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, D J; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blari, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, H. -P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, Laura; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Deelman, E; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M. Di; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Alvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Duncan, J.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fong, H.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gabel, M.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.J.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, A.S.P.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.E.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, W.; Kim, S.W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kramer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang-Cheol, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, W. H.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lovelace, G.; Luck, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana Hernandez, I.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magana Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mayani, R.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P.G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Castro-Perez, J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rudiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Rynge, M.; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schonbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shao, L.P.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahi, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y. -F.; Wang, Y. -F.; Ward, L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, G.W.K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y. -H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Suvorova, S.; Moran, W.; Evans, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    Results are presented from a semicoherent search for continuous gravitational waves from the brightest low-mass X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1, using data collected during the first Advanced LIGO observing run. The search combines a frequency domain matched filter (Bessel-weighted F-statistic) with a

  11. Theoretical study on photon-phonon coupling at (001)-(2 x 1) surfaces of Ge and {alpha}-Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Sanchez, F.L. [Escuela de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma ' ' Benito Juarez' ' de Oaxaca, Av. Universidad S/N, Ex-Hacienda de Cinco Senores, Ciudad Universitaria, Oaxaca de Juarez, Oax., 68120 (Mexico); Perez-Rodriguez, F. [Instituto de Fisica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apdo. Post. J-48, Puebla, Pue. 72570 (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    We present a study of the far-infrared reflectance anisotropy spectra for (001) surfaces of Ge and {alpha}-Sn in the (2 x 1) asymmetric dimer geometry, which exhibit a resonance structure associated with the excitation of surface phonon modes. We have employed a theoretical formalism, based on the adiabatic bond-charge model (ABCM), for computing the far-infrared reflectance anisotropy spectra. In comparison with previous theoretical results for silicon and diamond surfaces, the resonance structure in the reflectance anisotropy spectrum for Ge(001)-(2 x 1) turns out to be similar to that observed in the spectrum for the Si(001)-(2 x 1) surface, whereas the spectrum for {alpha}-Sn(001)-(2 x 1) surface is noticeably different from the others. We have established a trend of far-infrared reflectance anisotropy spectra for IV(001) surfaces: the weaker dimer strength, the stronger resonances of low-frequency surface phonons. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Metal-insulator transition in Si(111)-(4 x 1)/(8 x 2)-In studied by optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speiser, E.; Hinrichs, K.; Cobet, C.; Esser, N. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften - ISAS - e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Chandola, S. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften - ISAS - e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin 2 (Ireland); Gensch, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Wippermann, S.; Schmidt, W.G. [Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Paderborn (Germany); Bechstedt, F. [Institut fuer Festkoerpertheorie und -Optik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena (Germany); Richter, W. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Fleischer, K.; McGilp, J.F. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-08-15

    Measurements of the surface vibrational modes and optical response of Si(111)-(4 x 1)/(8 x 2)-In are compiled and a comparison to ab initio calculations performed within DFT-LDA formalism is given. Surface resonant Raman spectroscopy allows identifying a number of surface phonons with high spectral precision. The phase transition of the (4 x 1)-(8 x 2) surface structure is found to be accompanied by characteristic changes of the surface phonons, which are discussed with respect to various structural models suggested. The optical anisotropy of the (8 x 2) phase shows that the anisotropic Drude tail of the (4 x 1) phase is replaced by two peaks at 0.50 and 0.72 eV. The spectroscopic signatures of the (4 x 1) and (8 x 2) phases agree with a metal-insulator transition. The mid-IR-anisotropic optical response of the insulating (8 x 2) phase is interpreted in terms of electronic single particle excitations between surface electronic bands related to the In-nanowire surface. Comparison of the measured optical transitions with DFT ab initio calculations for the hexagon model and the trimer model of the (8 x 2) structure shows evidence for the existence of the hexagon structure. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Energy consumption of ProTaper Next X1 after glide path with PathFiles and ProGlider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berutti, Elio; Alovisi, Mario; Pastorelli, Michele Angelo; Chiandussi, Giorgio; Scotti, Nicola; Pasqualini, Damiano

    2014-12-01

    Instrument failure caused by excessive torsional stress can be controlled by creating a manual or mechanical glide path. The ProGlider single-file system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) was recently introduced to perform a mechanical glide path. This study was designed to compare the effect of a glide path performed with PathFiles (Dentsply Maillefer) and ProGlider on torque, time, and pecking motion required for ProTaper Next X1 (Dentsply Maillefer) to reach the full working length in simulated root canals. Forty Endo Training Blocks (Dentsply Maillefer) were used. Twenty were prepared with a mechanical glide path using PathFiles 1 and 2 (the PathFile group), and 20 were prepared with a mechanical glide path using a ProGlider single file (the ProGlider group). All samples were shaped with ProTaper Next X1 driven by an endodontic motor connected to a digital wattmeter. The required torque for root canal instrumentation was analyzed by evaluating the electrical power consumption of the endodontic engine. Electric power consumption (mW/h), elapsed time (seconds), and number of pecking motions required to reach the full working length with ProTaper Next X1 were calculated. Differences among groups were analyzed with the parametric Student t test for independent data (P < .05). Elapsed time and electric power consumption were significantly different between groups (P = .0001 for both). ProGlider appears to perform more efficiently than PathFiles in decreasing electric power consumption of ProTaper Next X1 to reach the full working length. This study confirmed the ability of ProGlider to reduce stress in ProTaper Next X1 during shaping through a glide path and preliminary middle and coronal preflaring. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. P2X1 receptors localized in lipid rafts mediate ATP motor responses in the human vas deferens longitudinal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, María Verónica; Norambuena, Andrés; Navarrete, Camilo; Poblete, Inés; Velasco, Alfredo; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2014-02-01

    To assess the role of the P2X1 receptors (P2X1R) in the longitudinal and circular layers of the human vas deferens, ex vivo-isolated strips or rings were prepared from tissue biopsies to record isometric contractions. To ascertain its membrane distribution, tissue extracts were analyzed by immunoblotting following sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. ATP, alpha,beta-methylene ATP, or electrical field stimulation elicited robust contractions of the longitudinal layer but not of the circular layer which demonstrated inconsistent responses. Alpha,beta-methylene ATP generated stronger and more robust contractions than ATP. In parallel, prostatic segments of the rat vas deferens were examined. The motor responses in both species were not sustained but decayed within the first minute, showing desensitization to additional applications. Cross-desensitization was established between alpha,beta-methylene ATP or ATP-evoked contractions and electrical field stimulation-induced contractions. Full recovery of the desensitized motor responses required more than 30 min and showed a similar pattern in human and rat tissues. Immunoblot analysis of the human vas deferens extracts revealed a P2X1R oligomer of approximately 200 kDa under nonreducing conditions, whereas dithiothreitol-treated extracts showed a single band of approximately 70 kDa. The P2X1R was identified in ultracentrifugation fractions containing 15%-29% sucrose; the receptor localized in the same fractions as flotillin-1, indicating that it regionalized into smooth muscle lipid rafts. In conclusion, ATP plays a key role in human vas deferens contractile responses of the longitudinal smooth muscle layer, an effect mediated through P2X1Rs.

  15. Avistamientos recientes del águila real (Aquila chrysaetos en la Reserva de la Biosfera Sierra Gorda de Guanajuato, México, y sus implicaciones en el plan de manejo de la reserva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ismael Campos-Rodríguez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Documentamos por primera vez la presencia del águila real (Aquila chrysaetos dentro de la Reserva de la Biosfera Sierra Gorda de Guanajuato (rbsgg en el estado de Guanajuato, México. En mayo de 2015 observamos una pareja de águila real cazando en la localidad de Mesita del Tigre, municipio de Victoria, Guanajuato. Nuestro registro tiene implicaciones en las políticas de uso de suelo contenidas en el Plan de Manejo de la rbsgg, donde sugerimos incluir medidas explícitas de protección del hábitat de la especie y el establecimiento de programas de monitoreo en aquellas subzonas donde se ha registrado al águila real o existe potencial para la anidación de la especie.

  16. Discovery of a 7 mHz X-Ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillation from the Most Massive Stellar-Mass Black Hole IC 10 X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of an approx.. = 7 mHz X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the eclipsing, high-inclination black hole binary IC 10 X-1. The QPO is significant at >4.33 sigma confidence level and has a fractional amplitude (% rms) and a quality factor, Q is identical with nu/delta nu, of approx. = 11 and 4, respectively. The overall X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) power spectrum in the frequency range 0.0001-0.1 Hz can be described by a power-law with an index of approx. = -2, and a QPO at 7 mHz. At frequencies approx. > 0.02 Hz there is no evidence for significant variability. The fractional amplitude (rms) of the QPO is roughly energy-independent in the energy range of 0.3-1.5 keV. Above 1.5 keV the low signal-to-noise ratio of the data does not allow us to detect the QPO. By directly comparing these properties with the wide range of QPOs currently known from accreting black hole and neutron stars, we suggest that the 7 mHz QPO of IC 10 X-1 may be linked to one of the following three categories of QPOs: (1) the "heartbeat" mHz QPOs of the black hole sources GRS 1915+105 and IGR J17091-3624, or (2) the 0.6-2.4 Hz "dipper QPOs" of high-inclination neutron star systems, or (3) the mHz QPOs of Cygnus X-3.

  17. Search for very high-energy gamma-ray emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-1 with the MAGIC telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Arcaro, C.; Babić, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Bhattacharyya, W.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Carosi, R.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Engelkemeier, M.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hassan, T.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Ishio, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Kuveždić, D.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Maggio, C.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Minev, M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moreno, V.; Moretti, E.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Ninci, D.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Righi, C.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schroeder, S.; Schweizer, T.; Sitarek, J.; Šnidarić, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Torres-Albà, N.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Zarić, D.; MAGIC Collaboration; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Pooley, G. G.; Trushkin, S. A.; Zanin, R.

    2017-12-01

    The microquasar Cygnus X-1 displays the two typical soft and hard X-ray states of a black hole transient. During the latter, Cygnus X-1 shows a one-sided relativistic radio-jet. Recent detection of the system in the high energy (HE; E ≳ 60 MeV) gamma-ray range with Fermi-LAT associates this emission with the outflow. Former MAGIC observations revealed a hint of flaring activity in the very high-energy (VHE; E ≳ 100 GeV) regime during this X-ray state. We analyse ∼97 h of Cygnus X-1 data taken with the MAGIC telescopes between July 2007 and October 2014. To shed light on the correlation between hard X-ray and VHE gamma rays as previously suggested, we study each main X-ray state separately. We perform an orbital phase-folded analysis to look for variability in the VHE band. Additionally, to place this variability behaviour in a multiwavelength context, we compare our results with Fermi-LAT, AGILE, Swift-BAT, MAXI, RXTE-ASM, AMI and RATAN-600 data. We do not detect Cygnus X-1 in the VHE regime. We establish upper limits for each X-ray state, assuming a power-law distribution with photon index Γ = 3.2. For steady emission in the hard and soft X-ray states, we set integral upper limits at 95 per cent confidence level for energies above 200 GeV at 2.6 × 10-12 photons cm-2 s-1 and 1.0 × 10-11 photons cm-2 s-1, respectively. We rule out steady VHE gamma-ray emission above this energy range, at the level of the MAGIC sensitivity, originating in the interaction between the relativistic jet and the surrounding medium, while the emission above this flux level produced inside the binary still remains a valid possibility.

  18. The theoretical character of the X1Σ+ and A1Σ+ states of ScN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng-Juan, Bai; Chuan-Lu, Yang; Qi, Qian; Ling, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    This paper calculates the potential energy curves (PECs) of the ground state (X 1 Σ + ) and excited state (A 1 Σ + ) of ScN molecule by multireference configuration interaction method. The correct character of the PECs has been gripped while they had been improperly reported in the literature. Based on the PECs, the spectroscopic parameters and vibrational energy levels are determined, and compared with experimental data and other theoretical works available at the present. (atomic and molecular physics)

  19. Polarized Gamma-Ray Emission from the Galactic Black Hole Cygnus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, P.; Rodriquez, J.; Wilms, J.; Bel, M. Cadolle; Pottschmidt, K.; Grinberg, V.

    2011-01-01

    Because of their inherently high flux allowing the detection of clear signals, black hole X-ray binaries are interesting candidates for polarization studies, even if no polarization signals have been observed from them before. Such measurements would provide further detailed insight into these sources' emission mechanisms. We measured the polarization of the gamma-ray emission from the black hole binary system Cygnus X-I with the INTEGRAL/IBIS telescope. Spectral modeling ofthe data reveals two emission mechanisms: The 250-400 keY data are consistent with emission dominated by Compton scattering on thermal electrons and are weakly polarized. The second spectral component seen in the 400keV-2MeV band is by contrast strongly polarized, revealing that the MeV emission is probably related to the jet first detected in the radio band.

  20. A NICER Look at the Aql X-1 Hard State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bult, Peter; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Cackett, Edward M.

    2018-01-01

    of good exposure. The spectral and timing properties of the source correspond to that of a (hard) extreme island state in the atoll classification. We find that the fractional amplitude of the low-frequency (limited noise shows a dramatic turnover as a function of energy: it peaks at 0.5 ke......V with nearly 25% rms, drops to 12% rms at 2 keV, and rises to 15% rms at 10 keV. Through the analysis of covariance spectra, we demonstrate that band-limited noise exists in both the soft thermal emission and the power-law emission. Additionally, we measure hard time lags, indicating the thermal emission at 0...

  1. Infrared observations of HDE 226868/Cyg X-1 and HDE 245770/AO535+26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persi, P.; Toniolo, M.F.; Spada, G.

    1979-01-01

    It is known from Copernicus ultraviolet observations that all O type stars are losing mass by stellar wind. The ionized expanding circumstellar envelope formed by the stellar wind is emitting through free-free and bound-free radiation processes. This radiation is detectable at the infrared wavelengths where the stellar continuum is negligible. The measurement of the IR excess (defined as the difference between the total flux and the stellar continuum at a given wavelength) and the knowledge of the terminal velocity of the envelope, allow one to derive for OB stars the mass loss rate. From the analysis of Ir observations of two O stars, HDE 226868 and HDE 245770, identified as optical counterpart of X-ray sources, an estimate is given of their mass loss rate. (Auth.)

  2. Adsorption of RuSex (x =1–5) cluster on Se-doped graphene: First principle calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Üzengi Aktürk, O.; Tomak, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electronic properties of adsorption of RuSe x (x =1–5) cluster on Se-doped graphene are investigated. • It is found that RuSe, RuSe 4 , RuSe 5 adsorbate make substrate metallic. • RuSe 2 makes it half metallic and RuSe 3 makes semiconductor. - Abstract: We have investigated the adsorption of RuSe x (x =1–5) cluster on Se-doped graphene. The change of the adsorption energy with the number of Se atoms and magnetization values are investigated. Electronic properties of adsorption of RuSe x (x =1–5) cluster on Se-doped graphene are investigated. The highest adsorption energy belongs to RuSe adsorbate. The biggest magnetization value belongs to RuSe 2 adsorbate. This adsorbate makes the substrate half metallic. This property is important in electronic device applications. It is observed that substitutional Se atom changes the electronic properties of graphene. This substitution makes graphene metallic. While RuSe, RuSe 4 , RuSe 5 adsorbate make substrate metallic, RuSe 3 makes it semiconducting. Generally, it is found that there is a charge transfer from the substrate to clusters within the Löwdin analysis. This is in line with the charge difference results

  3. Features of Microwave Radiation and Magnetographic Characteristics of Solar Active Region NOAA 12242 Before the X1.8 Flare on December 20, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov-Maximov, V. E.; Borovik, V. N.; Opeikina, L. V.; Tlatov, A. G.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2017-12-01

    This paper continues the cycle of authors' works on the detection of precursors of large flares (M5 and higher classes) in active regions (ARs) of the Sun by their microwave radiation and magnetographic characteristics. Generalization of the detected precursors of strong flares can be used to develop methods for their prediction. This paper presents an analysis of the development of NOAA AR 12242, in which an X1.8 flare occurred on December 20, 2014. The analysis is based on regular multiazimuth and multiwavelength observations with the RATAN-600 radio telescope in the range 1.65-10 cm with intensity and circular polarization analysis and data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). It was found that a new component appeared in the AR microwave radiation two days before the X-flare. It became dominant in the AR the day before the flare and significantly decreased after the flare. The use of multiazimuth observations from RATAN-600 and observations at 1.76 cm from the Nobeyama Radioheliograph made it possible to identify the radio source that appeared before the X-flare with the site of the closest convergence of opposite polarity fields near the neutral line in the AR. It was established that the X-flare occurred 20 h after the total gradient of the magnetic field of the entire region calculated from SDO/HMI data reached its maximum value. Analysis of the evolution of the microwave source that appeared before the X-flare in AR 12242 and comparison of its parameters with the parameters of other components of the AR microwave radiation showed that the new source can be classified as neutral line associated sources (NLSs), which were repeatedly detected by the RATAN-600 and other radio telescopes 1-3 days before the large flares.

  4. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 1990 GLOBAL INVENTORY FOR SO(X) AND NO(X) ON A 1(DEGREE) X 1(DEGREE) LATITUDE-LONGITUDE GRID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN HEYST, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    Sulfur and nitrogen oxides emitted to the atmosphere have been linked to the acidification of water bodies and soils and perturbations in the earth's radiation balance. In order to model the global transport and transformation of SO(sub x) and NO(sub x), detailed spatial and temporal emission inventories are required. Benkovitz et al. (1996) published the development of an inventory of 1985 global emissions of SO(sub x) and NO(sub x) from anthropogenic sources. The inventory was gridded to a 1(degree) x 1(degree) latitude-longitude grid and has served as input to several global modeling studies. There is now a need to provide modelers with an update of this inventory to a more recent year, with a split of the emissions into elevated and low level sources. This paper describes the development of a 1990 update of the SO(sub x) and NO(sub x) global inventories that also includes a breakdown of sources into 17 sector groups. The inventory development starts with a gridded global default EDGAR inventory (Olivier et al, 1996). In countries where more detailed national inventories are available, these are used to replace the emissions for those countries in the global default. The gridded emissions are distributed into two height levels (0-100m and and gt;100m) based on the final plume heights that are estimated to be typical for the various sectors considered. The sources of data as well as some of the methodologies employed to compile and develop the 1990 global inventory for SO(sub x) and NO(sub x) are discussed. The results reported should be considered to be interim since the work is still in progress and additional data sets are expected to become available

  5. Energy-dependent evolution in IC10 X-1: hard evidence for an extended corona and implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, R.; Steiner, J. F.; Prestwich, A. F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CFA), Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stevens, I. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Clark, J. S.; Kolb, U. C. [The Open University, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-10

    We have analyzed a ∼130 ks XMM-Newton observation of the dynamically confirmed black hole + Wolf-Rayet (BH+WR) X-ray binary (XB) IC10 X-1, covering ∼1 orbital cycle. This system experiences periodic intensity dips every ∼35 hr. We find that energy-independent evolution is rejected at a >5σ level. The spectral and timing evolution of IC10 X-1 are best explained by a compact disk blackbody and an extended Comptonized component, where the thermal component is completely absorbed and the Comptonized component is partially covered during the dip. We consider three possibilities for the absorber: cold material in the outer accretion disk, as is well documented for Galactic neutron star (NS) XBs at high inclination; a stream of stellar wind that is enhanced by traveling through the L1 point; and a spherical wind. We estimated the corona radius (r {sub ADC}) for IC10 X-1 from the dip ingress to be ∼10{sup 6} km, assuming absorption from the outer disk, and found it to be consistent with the relation between r {sub ADC} and 1-30 keV luminosity observed in Galactic NS XBs that spans two orders of magnitude. For the other two scenarios, the corona would be larger. Prior BH mass (M {sub BH}) estimates range over 23-38 M {sub ☉}, depending on the inclination and WR mass. For disk absorption, the inclination, i, is likely to be ∼60-80°, with M {sub BH} ∼ 24-41 M {sub ☉}. Alternatively, the L1-enhanced wind requires i ∼ 80°, suggesting ∼24-33 M {sub ☉}. For a spherical absorber, i ∼ 40°, and M {sub BH} ∼ 50-65 M {sub ☉}.

  6. Análisis estructural, sísmico y geotécnico de la iglesia de Sant' Agostino en L'aquila (Italia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cennamo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A menudo, las construcciones existentes en albañilería son el resultado de construcciones, cambios y modificaciones que se han ido desarrollando durante siglos. Por lo tanto, las adaptaciones y mejoras de las edificaciones en albañilería deben ir acompañadas de un nivel adecuado de conocimiento de su historia. Las trágicas consecuencias de los recientes terremotos ocurridos en Italia y otros países, han llevado a pensar que, a veces, la causa del daño sísmico podría ser justamente una errada intervención de la mejora o adaptación que se les ha realizado. En la mayoría de los casos, este hecho es atribuible a las modificaciones realizadas sin tener los conocimientos necesarios sobre las normas constructivas de esa edificación. El estudio de caso presentado en este trabajo se refiere al análisis sísmico de la iglesia de Sant' Agostino en L'Aquila (gravemente dañada por el sismo ocurrido en abril de 2009, y considera en profundidad los tres niveles de evaluación de la seguridad sísmica establecidos en el Código Italiano para la evaluación y reducción del riesgo sísmico del patrimonio cultural Eurocode 8: Design of structures for earthquake resistance, (2003, Decreto Legislativo (2004, Norme tecniche per le costruzioni, DM. (2005, Norme tecniche per le costruzioni, DM. (2008, Circolare n. (2010, Direttiva del Presidente del Consiglio dei ministri per la valutazione e la riduzione del rischio sismico del patrimonio culturale con riferimento alle Norme Tecniche per le Costruzioni. G.U. (2008. Así, para el LV1 (Nivel de evaluación 1 se realizaron todos los análisis exigidos en los anexos de la Directiva del 10 de diciembre de 2007, comenzando por el Módulo A que corresponde al "registro de identificación", continuando con el Módulo B que se refiere al estudio de los "factores de sensibilidad" y finalizando con el Módulo C que considera la "morfología de los elementos". A partir de esta evaluación, hemos concluido que la

  7. Atomic structure of a stable high-index Ge surface: G2(103)-(4x1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seehofer, L.; Bunk, O.; Falkenberg, G.

    1997-01-01

    Based on scanning tunneling microscopy and surface X-ray diffraction, we propose a complex structural model for the Ge(103)-(4 x 1) reconstruction. Each unit cell contains two (103) double steps, which gives rise to the formation of stripes of Ge atoms oriented in the [] direction....... The stripes and the spaces between them are covered with threefold-coordinated Ge adatoms. Charge is transferred from the bulk-like edge atoms of the double steps to the adatoms. The formation of the reconstruction can be explained in terms of stress relief, charge transfer, and minimization of the dangling...

  8. Spectral Study of A 1Π–X 1Σ+ Transitions of CO Relevant to Interstellar Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Junxia; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Xinlu

    2018-05-01

    Highly correlated ab initio calculations were performed for an accurate determination of the A 1Π–X 1Σ+ system of the CO molecule. A highly accurate multi-reference configuration interaction approach was used to investigate the potential energy curves (PECs) and the transition dipole moment curve (TDMC). The resultant PECs and TDMC found by using the aug-cc-pV5Z (aV5Z) basis set and 5330 active spaces are in good agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, the Einstein A coefficients, lifetimes, ro-vibrational intensities, absorption oscillator strengths, and integrated cross sections are calculated so that the vibrational bands include v″ = 0–39 \\to v‧ = 0–23. For applications in the atmosphere and interstellar clouds, we studied the transition lineshapes to Gaussian and Lorentzian profiles at different temperatures and pressures. The intensities were calculated at high temperature that was used to satisfy some astrophysical applications, such as in planetary atmospheres. The results are potentially useful for important SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System and databases such as HITRAN, HITEMP, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Because the results from many laboratory techniques and our calculations now agree, analyses of interstellar CO based on absorption from A 1Π–X 1Σ+ are no longer hindered by present spectral parameters.

  9. Hydroxyl group induced adsorption of four-nitro benzoic acid on Si(100) 2x1 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihm, K.; Kang, T.-H.; Hwang, C.C.; Kim, K.-J.; Hwang, H.-N.; Kim, H.-D.; Han, J.H.; Moon, S.; Kim, B.; POSTECH

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A number of studies have been conducted on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in order to study the adhesion of polymer films on various substrates. Recently, the studies on SAMs on the semiconductor substrate are more motivated because of their possible application to nanoscale devices. For the electronic and chemical properties suitable for various applications, the aromatic ring has been used as a building block of various molecules forming SAMs. Here, we used four-nitro benzoic acid (4-NBA) as a model planar aromatic compound, in which the phenyl ring, the carboxylic functional group, and NO2 are on the same plane. The adsorption mechanism of 4-NBA on the in-situ prepared OH/Si(100) 2x1 surface was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption e structure. The results revealed that the 4-NBA molecule reacts with the hydroxyl group on the Si(100) 2x1 surface through deprotonation of the carboxyl group. The saturation coverage of 4-NBA estimated by the O 1s ratio is 1/2 ML. Additionally, we could observe the desorption of the oxygen atom from the NO2 moiety of the 4-NBA upon irradiating the surface by photons of 500 eV

  10. On the Composition and Neutrix Composition of the Delta Function and the Function cosh^{-1}(|x|^{1/r}+1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Fisher

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Let $F$ be a distribution in $\\mathcal{D'}$ and let $f$ be a locally summable function. The composition $F(f(x$ of $F$ and $f$ is said to exist and be equal to the distribution $h(x$ if the limit of the sequence $\\{ F_{n}(f(x\\}$ is equal to $h(x$, where $F_n(x =F(x*\\delta _n(x$ for $n=1,2, \\ldots$ and $\\{\\delta_n(x\\}$ is a certain regular sequence converging to the Dirac delta function. It is proved that the neutrix composition $ \\delta^{(s}[\\cosh^{-1} (x_+^{1/r}+1] $ exists and \\beqa \\delta^{(s}[\\cosh^{-1} (x_+^{1/r}+1] = - \\sum _{k=0} ^{M-1} \\sum_{i=0}^{kr+r} {k \\choose i}{(-1^{i+k}rc_{r,s,k} \\over (kr+rk!}\\delta ^{(k}(x, for $s =M-1,M, M+1,\\ldots$ and $r=1,2,\\ldots,$ where $$c_{r,s,k}=\\sum _{j=0}^{i} {i \\choose j}{ (-1^{kr+r-i}(2j-i^{s+1}\\over 2^{s+i+1} },$$ $M$ is the smallest integer for which $s-2r+1 < 2Mr$ and $r\\le s/(2M+2.$ Further results are also proved.

  11. THE NuSTAR X-RAY SPECTRUM OF HERCULES X-1: A RADIATION-DOMINATED RADIATIVE SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Michael T.; Wood, Kent S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Becker, Peter A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030-4444 (United States); Gottlieb, Amy M.; Marcu-Cheatham, Diana M.; Pottschmidt, Katja [Department of Physics and Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Fürst, Felix [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hemphill, Paul B. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Wilms, Jörn [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Sternwartstr, 7, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2016-11-10

    We report on new spectral modeling of the accreting X-ray pulsar Hercules X-1. Our radiation-dominated radiative shock model is an implementation of the analytic work of Becker and Wolff on Comptonized accretion flows onto magnetic neutron stars. We obtain a good fit to the spin-phase-averaged 4–78 keV X-ray spectrum observed by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array during a main-on phase of the Her X-1 35 day accretion disk precession period. This model allows us to estimate the accretion rate, the Comptonizing temperature of the radiating plasma, the radius of the magnetic polar cap, and the average scattering opacity parameters in the accretion column. This is in contrast to previous phenomenological models that characterized the shape of the X-ray spectrum, but could not determine the physical parameters of the accretion flow. We describe the spectral fitting details and discuss the interpretation of the accretion flow physical parameters.

  12. Spectral and temporal properties of the X-ray pulsar SMC X-1 at hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, M.; Gruber, D. E.; Kendziorra, E .; Kretschmar, P.; Maisack, M.; Mony, B.; Staubert, R.; Doebereiner, S.; Englhauser, J.; Pietsch, W.

    1993-01-01

    The binary X-ray pulsar SMC X- 1 has been observed at hard X-rays with the High Energy X-Ray Experiment (HEXE) on nine occasions between Nov. 1987 and March 1989. A thin thermal bremsstrahlung fit to the phase averaged spectrum yields a plasma temperature (14.4 +/- 1.3) keV and a luminosity above (1.1 +/- 0.1) x 10 exp 38 erg/s in the 20-80 keV band. Pulse period values have been established for three observations, confirming the remarkably stable spin-up trend of SMC X-1. In one of the three observations the pulse profile was seen to deviate from a dominant double pulsation, while at the same time the pulsed fraction was unusually large. For one observation we determined for the first time the pulsed fraction in narrow energy bands. It increases with photon energy from about 20 percent up to over 60 percent in the energy range from 20 to 80 keV.

  13. Investigation on spectroscopic parameters and molecular constants of BeS(X1Σ+) using MRCI theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Xing Wei; Shi Deheng; Sun Jinfeng

    2012-01-01

    The potential energy curve (PEC) of BeS(X 1 Σ + ) molecule has been studied using MRCI approach with Davidson modification in conjunction with the cc-pV5Z basis set. Effects on the PECs by the core-valence correlation corrections and relativistic effects have been taken into account. The way to consider the relativistic effects is to use the second-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation. With the PEC including the core-valence correlation corrections and relativistic effects, the spectroscopic parameters of BeS(X 1 Σ + ) have been determined. These parameters are compared in detail with those of previous studies reported in the literature, and excellent agreement has been found between the available experimental data and the present ones. With the PEC corrected, the first 40 vibrational states for the non-rotating BeS are computed, and the vibrational level, inertial rotation and centrifugal distortion constants for each vibrational state are predicted. (authors)

  14. Studies of optical pulsations from HZ Herculis/Hercules X-1: A determination of the mass of the neutron star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleditch, J.; Nelson, J.

    1976-01-01

    In 500 hours of optical observations of this binary system we have repeatedly detected optical pulsations at the 0.1--0.3 percent level. These pulsations are present only for particular well-defined values of the binary and 35-day phases. Position of the pulsation-emitting regions, projected onto the orbital plane, have been measured, and three distinct regions have been resolved. A simple model is put forth which accounts for the observed binary behavior, which gives a direct determination of the mass ratio, M/sub HZHer//M/sub HerX-/ 1 =1.68 +- 0.10 and which establishes that the spin of the pulsar is prograde. Additionally, it is shown that Hz Her fills its Roche lobe. Using the above, the known X-ray eclipse duration, and the mass function, we calculate the orbital inclination to be i=87degree +- 3degree and the masses to be M/sub HerX-/ 1 =1.30 +- 0.14 M/sub sun/ and M/sub HZHer/=2.18 +- 0.11 M/sub sun/

  15. FAST TIMING ANALYSIS OF CYGNUS X-1 USING THE SPECTROMETER ON THE INTERNATIONAL GAMMA-RAY ASTROPHYSICS LABORATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabanac, Clement; Roques, Jean-Pierre; Jourdain, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    We report for the first time the high-frequency analysis of Cyg X-1 up to hard X-ray using the spectrometer on International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL). After analyzing the possible contribution from the background, and using the INTEGRAL archive from 2005 March to 2008 May, power density spectra were obtained up to 130 keV. First, we show that their overall shape is very similar to that observed at lower energies as they are well described by sets of Lorentzians. The strength of this fast variability (up to 40 Hz) does not drop at high energy since we show that it remains at ∼25% rms, even in the highest energy bands. Second, the hard X-ray variability patterns of Cyg X-1 are state dependent: the softer the spectrum (or the lower the hardness ratio), the lower the total fractional variability and the higher the typical frequencies observed. The strength of the total variability as a function of energy and state is then investigated. By comparison with simultaneous and published RXTE/Proportional Counter Array data, we show that in the hard state it remains quite constant in the 2-130 keV energy range. In the softer state it is also flat up to 50 keV and may increase at higher energy. The implications of this behavior on the models are then discussed.

  16. The high-energy pulsed X-ray spectrum of HER X-1 as observed with OSO-8. Ph.D. Thesis - Catholic Univ. of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, G. S.; Dennis, B. R.; Coe, M. J.; Crannell, C. J.; Cutler, E. P.; Dolan, J. F.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    Her X-1 was observed from 1977 August 30 to September 10 using the High-Energy X-Ray Scintillation Spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite. The observation, during which the source was monitored continually for nearly an entire ON-state, covered the energy range from 16 to 280 keV. Pulsed flux measurements as a function of binary orbit and binary phase are presented for energies between 16 and 98 keV. The pulsed flux between 16 and 33 keV exhibited a sharp decrease following the fourth binary orbit and was consistent with zero pulsed flux thereafter. The pulsed spectrum was fitted with a power law, a thermal spectrum without features, and a thermal spectrum with a superposed gaussian centered at 55 keV. The latter fit has the smallest value of chi - squared per degree of freedom, and the resulting integrated line intensity is 1.5 superscript + 4.1 subscript - 1.4 x .001 photons s superscript-1 cm superscript-2 for a width of 3.1 superscript + 9.1 subscript -2.6 keV. This result, while of low statistical significance, agrees with the value observed by Trumper (1978) during the same On-state.

  17. [Influence and mechanism of PinX1 gene on the chemotherapy sensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells in response to Cisplatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Congxiang; Liu, Yanhui; Wen, Zhong; Yang, Keke; Li, Guanxue; Zhang, Shenhua; Zhang, Xinyu

    2015-06-23

    To explore the influence and mechanism of PinX1 gene on the chemotherapy sensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells in response to Cisplatin. Transfected nasopharyngeal carcinoma 5-8F cell lines with pCDH-CMV-PinX1-copGFP vector constructed by lentivirus to generate Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cells containing PinX1 gene, using Lenti-Ctrl-5-8F cell (blank vector without PinX1 gene was used to transfect 5-8F cell lines) and 5-8F cell as controls. Expression of PinX1 gene, telomerase activity, the inhibition of cancer cells proliferation, combined anticancer effect with Cisplatin and the expression of lung resistance protein (LRP) and Bcl-2 were detected with fluorescent quantitation polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry, thiazolyl blue (MTT) method, areole test, Western blot and drug sensitivity test, respectively, in four groups (Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cell + Cisplatin, Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cell, Cisplatin and 5-8F cell) so as to explore the influence and mechanism of PinX1 gene on the chemotherapy sensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells in response to Cisplatin. The telomerase activity in Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cell (0.146 ± 0.004) was lower than those in the other two control cells (Lenti-Ctrl-5-8F cell: 0.967 ± 0.016, 5-8F cell: 1.000 ± 0.034, both P Cisplatin after lower level telomerase activity induced by PinX1 gene. Proliferation index (PI) (%) in Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cell + Cisplatin (14.39 ± 3.66) was also less than the other groups (Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cell, Cisplatin and 5-8F cell groups, 32.97 ± 3.00, 31.18 ± 4.24 and 47.19 ± 4.19, all P Cisplatin, which may be mediated by the down-regulation of telomerase activity and the inhibition of LRP and Bcl-2 gene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

  18. Photoluminescence of Eu{sup 2+}-doped CaMgSi{sub 2x}O{sub 6+2x} (1.00{<=}x{<=}1.20) phosphors in UV-VUV region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhiya [Department of Materials Science, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Yuhua [Department of Materials Science, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: wyh@lzu.edu.cn

    2008-03-15

    Alkaline-earth silicate phosphors CaMgSi{sub 2x}O{sub 6+2x}:Eu{sup 2+} (1.00{<=}x{<=}1.20) were prepared by traditional solid-state reaction. The phosphors showed an intense blue emission centered around 453 nm, with both 254 and 147 nm excitations. The host absorption below 200 nm in the excitation spectra consisted of two bands around 160 and 190 nm. The band around 160 nm was ascertained to be associated with the SiO{sub 4}-tetrahedra and MgO{sub 6}-polyhedra, and that around 190 nm was due to the CaO{sub 8}-polyhedra or some impurities. The incorporation of excess Si of less than 15% would not lead to formation of impurities and the results indicated that an appropriate Si excess could improve the Photoluminescence (PL) intensity in both ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regions.

  19. Millimeter/submillimeter Spectroscopy of PH2CN ({\\tilde{X}} 1A') and CH3PH2 ({\\tilde{X}} 1A'): Probing the Complexity of Interstellar Phosphorus Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfen, D. T.; Clouthier, D. J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2014-11-01

    Millimeter/submillimeter spectra of PH2CN ({\\tilde{X}} 1A') and CH3PH2 ({\\tilde{X}} 1A') have been recorded for the first time using direct absorption techniques. This work extends previous measurements of both molecules beyond the 10-50 GHz range. Both species were created in the presence of an AC discharge by the reaction of phosphorus vapor and either cyanogen and hydrogen (PH2CN) or methane (CH3PH2). Twelve rotational transitions of PH2CN were recorded over the region 305-422 GHz for asymmetry components Ka = 0 through 8. For CH3PH2, eight rotational transitions were measured from 210-470 GHz with Ka = 0 through 16; these spectra exhibited greater complexity due to the presence of internal rotation, which splits the Ka = 1, 2, and 3 asymmetry components into A and E states. Combined analyses of the millimeter/submillimeter and previous microwave data were performed for both molecules. For PH2CN, the spectra were fit with a Watson S-reduced asymmetric top Hamiltonian, resulting in more accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. In the case of CH3PH2, an asymmetric top internal-rotation Hamiltonian was employed in the analysis, significantly improving the rotational and torsional parameters over previous microwave estimates. Searches for both molecules were subsequently conducted toward Sgr B2(N), using the 12 m telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Neither species was identified, with abundance upper limits, relative to H2, of f (PH2CN/H2) PH2/H2) 2 and >200, respectively.

  20. Measurement of the energetics of metal film growth on a semiconductor: Ag/ Si(100)-2x1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starr, D.E.; Ranney, J.T.; Larsen, Jane Hvolbæk

    2001-01-01

    The first direct calorimetric measurements of the energetics of metal film growth on a semiconductor surface are presented. The heat of adsorption of Ag on Si(100)-(2 x 1) at 300 K decreases from similar to 347 to 246 kJ/mol with coverage in the first monolayer (ML) due to overlap of substrate...... strain from nearby Ag islands. It then rises quickly toward the bulk sublimation enthalpy (285 kJ/mol) as 3D particles grow. A wetting layer grows to 1.0 ML, but is metastable above similar to0.55 ML and dewets when kinetics permit. This may be common when adsorbate islands induce a large strain...

  1. Analysis of the dimerized Sb/Si(001)-(2x1) surface by x-ray standing waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, P.F.; Qian, Y.; Bedzyk, M.J.

    1994-12-01

    X-ray standing wave measurements were undertaken to study the bonding position of Sb adatoms on the Sb-saturated Si(001)-(2x1) surface. Using the (004) and (022) Bragg reflections, the authors find that the Sb atoms form dimers, and that the center of the Sb ad-dimers lies 1.64 angstrom above the bulk-like Si(004) surface atomic plane. These in-plane results are compared to two structural models consisting of dimers whose bonds are parallel to the surface plane and whose centers are either shifted or unshifted (parallel to the dimer bond direction) relative to the underlying substrate planes. The authors thus find two special cases consistent with these data: one with symmetric (unshifted) dimers having a dimer bond length of 2.81 angstrom, and the other with midpoint-shifted dimers, having a bond length of 2.88 angstrom and a lateral shift of 0.21 angstrom

  2. Protic ionic liquids based on the dimeric and oligomeric anions: [(AcO)xH(x-1)]-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K M; Izgorodina, E I; Forsyth, M; MacFarlane, D R; Seddon, K R

    2008-05-28

    We describe a fluidity and conductivity study as a function of composition in N-methylpyrrolidine-acetic acid mixtures. The simple 1 : 1 acid-base mixture appears to form an ionic liquid, but its degree of ionicity is quite low and such liquids are better thought of as poorly dissociated mixtures of acid and base. The composition consisting of 3 moles acetic acid and 1 mole N-methylpyrrolidine is shown to form the highest ionicity mixture in this binary due to the presence of oligomeric anionic species [(AcO)(x)H(x-1)](-) stabilised by hydrogen bonds. These oligomeric species, being weaker bases than the acetate anion, shift the proton transfer equilibrium towards formation of ionic species, thus generating a higher degree of ionicity than is present at the 1 : 1 composition. A Walden plot analysis, thermogravimetric behaviour and proton NMR data, as well as ab initio calculations of the oligomeric species, all support this conclusion.

  3. The crystal structure of a new ternary antimonide: TmCu4-xSb2 (x 1.065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedyna, L.O.; Bodak, O.I.; Fedorchuk, A.O.; Tokaychuk, Ya.O.

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structure of the new ternary compound TmCu 4-x Sb 2 (x 1.065) was determined by direct methods from X-ray powder data (diffractometer DRON-3M, Cu Kα-radiation). It crystallizes with the orthorhombic structure type ErFe 4 Ge 2 (low-temperature modification) and is the first representative of this structure type among known antimonides: space group Pnnm, Pearson code oP14-2.13, a = 7.00565(6) A, b = 7.83582(6) A, c = 4.25051(3) A, Z = 2. Investigated structure is an orthorhombically deformed derivative of the ZrFe 4 Si 2 structure type

  4. Control of in-plane orientation of phthalocyanine molecular columns using vicinal Si(001)-(2x1)-H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Masakazu; Matsunobe, Takeshi; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    In-plane crystal orientation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) films formed by organic molecular-beam epitaxy have been successfully controlled by using vicinal Si(001)-(2x1)-H as a substrate, containing atomic steps of an approximately 4 nm period. A continuous film was grown at 60 degree C and the film thickness ranged between 5 and 8 molecular layers. By observing a frictional force image of the film, 90% of the molecular columns were found to align across the substrate step rows. The preferential orientation is considered to be induced by artificial surface lattices, which result from the striped effective contact area between the rigid CuPc crystals and the stair-like surfaces. The anisotropic optical properties of the film have been also confirmed by polarized reflection measurements. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  5. Observational test for the existence of a rotating black hole in Cyg X-1. [Gravitatinal effects, polarization properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, R F; Connors, P A [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astrophysics

    1977-03-31

    It is stated that the degree and plane of linear polarisation of the radiation from Cyg X-1 are being investigated by X-ray satellite experiments. This radiation can be explained as coming from an accretion disk around a black hole, the polarisation of the X-rays being due to electron scattering in the hotter inner regions of the disk. Existing predictions of the polarisation properties, as a function of energy, have been based on a Newtonian approximation, thus neglecting gravitational effects on the rays as they propagate from the surface of the disk to an observer at infinity. Preliminary results are here given of a full general relativistic calculation that shows that gravitational effects completely alter the polarisation properties, and provide a sensitive test of the existence of a black hole. It is found that for a rapidly rotating black hole the general relativistic effects on the polarisation properties are an order of magnitude greater than for a slowly rotating black hole, or for a neutron star. The degree of linear polarisation of the rays as they leave the disk will also differ from the Newtonian value, and gravitational bending of the light will alter the angle at which a ray leaves the surface of the disk. The large general relativistic variation of the polarisation plane with energy is illustrated graphically. The very large general relativistic rotations in the plane of polarisation provide an opportunity for testing the black hole hypothesis for Cyg X-1. In order to observe these effects X-ray satellite experiments will be required with more sensitive polarimetry across a wider energy range than is available at present.

  6. Structure determination of Ga As (110) p (1 x 1) - Sb using scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascolani, H.; Asensio, M.C.; Fritzsche, W.

    1996-01-01

    Photoelectron diffraction (PD) in the scanned-energy mode has proven to be a powerfull tool for structural determination of the first few surface layers. The scanned-energy mode involves the measurement of the intensity of photoelectrons emitted from a core level as a function of the incident photon energy for different emission directions. The atom specificity of PD allows the investigation of the local structure of adsorbed atoms without interference of the substrate. In addition, if a measurable chemical shift exists, this technique is also able to discriminate between atoms of the same species adsorbed in inequivalent sites. The Ga As (110) p (1x1)-Sb (1 ML) surface represents a prototype system to study atom adsorption on III-V semiconductors. The epitaxial continued layer structure (ECLS) is generally accepted as the geometry corresponding to this surface, although some authors have claimed that the p 3 model forms a stable geometry equivalent to the ECLS, and that it provides an equally good description of their experimental results. So far, the conclusions about the atomic structure of this surface had been derived on the basis of indirect methods. This work exploits to the utmost the possibilities of analysis offered by the scanned-energy PD technique, namely, chemical shift analysis and direct inversion. The energy spectrum of Sb-4d photoelectrons emitted from the Ga As (110)-p (1x1) Sb surface has two chemically-shifted components. We have inverted the scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction data corresponding to these two components to obtain the positions of the Ga and As atoms which are nearest neighbors of two inequivalent Sb atoms. Our results contradict various models proposed for this surface and are consistent only with the ECLS. For a more detailed atomic structure determination, the best fit between experiment and multiple-scattering calculations was determined by a trial-and-error procedure. (author)

  7. A Multiwavelength Study of Cygnus X-1: The First Mid-Infrared Spectroscopic Detection of Compact Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahoui, Farid; Lee, Julia C.; Heinz, Sebastian; Hines, Dean C.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Joern

    2011-01-01

    We report on a Spitzer/IRS (mid-infrared), RXTE /PCA+HEXTE (X-ray), and Ryle (radio) simultaneous multi-wavelength study of the micro quasar Cygnus X-I, which aimed at an investigation of the origin of its mid-infrared emission. Compact jets were present in two out of three observations, and we show that they strongly contribute to the mid-infrared continuum. During the first observation, we detect the spectral break - where the transition from the optically thick to the optically thin regime takes place - at about 2.9 x 10(exp 13) Hz. We then show that the jet's optically thin synchrotron emission accounts for the Cygnus X-1's emission beyond 400 keY, although it cannot alone explain its 3-200 keV continuum. A compact jet was also present during the second observation, but we do not detect the break, since it has likely shifted to higher frequencies. In contrast, the compact jet was absent during the last observation, and we show that the 5-30 micron mid-infrared continuum of Cygnus X-I stems from the blue supergiant companion star HD 226868. Indeed, the emission can then be understood as the combination of the photospheric Raleigh-Jeans tail and the bremsstrahlung from the expanding stellar wind. Moreover, the stellar wind is found to be clumpy, with a filling factor f(sub infinity) approx.= 0.09-0.10. Its bremsstrahlung emission is likely anti-correlated to the soft X-ray emission, suggesting an anticorrelation between the mass-loss and mass-accretion rates. Nevertheless, we do not detect any mid-infrared spectroscopic evidence of interaction between the jets and the Cygnus X-1's environment and/or companion star's stellar wind.

  8. A PROPELLER-EFFECT INTERPRETATION OF MAXI/GSC LIGHT CURVES OF 4U 1608-52 AND Aql X-1 AND APPLICATION TO XTE J1701-462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Serino, M. [MAXI Team, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nakahira, S. [ISS Science Project Office, ISAS, JAXA, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Negoro, H. [Department of Physics, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamaoka, K., E-mail: kazumi@crab.riken.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2013-08-20

    We present the luminosity dwell-time distributions during the hard states of two low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS), 4U 1608-52 and Aql X-1, observed with MAXI/GSC. The luminosity distributions show a steep cutoff on the low-luminosity side at {approx}1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1} in both sources. The cutoff implies a rapid luminosity decrease in their outburst decay phases and this decrease can be interpreted as being due to the propeller effect. We estimate the surface magnetic field of 4U 1608-52 to be (0.5-1.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} G and Aql X-1 to be (0.6-1.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} G from the cutoff luminosity and apply the same propeller mechanism to the similar rapid luminosity decrease observed in the transient Z source, XTE J1701-462, with RXTE/ASM. Assuming that the spin period of the NS is on the order of milliseconds, the observed cutoff luminosity implies a surface magnetic field on the order of 10{sup 9} G.

  9. Wide-field 12CO (J=2-1) and 13CO (J=2-1) Observations toward the Aquila Rift and Serpens Molecular Cloud Complexes. I. Molecular Clouds and Their Physical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Onishi, Toshikazu

    2017-03-01

    We present the results of wide-field 12CO (J=2{--}1) and 13CO (J=2{--}1) observations toward the Aquila Rift and Serpens molecular cloud complexes (25^\\circ < l< 33^\\circ and 1^\\circ < b< 6^\\circ ) at an angular resolution of 3.‧4 (≈ 0.25 pc) and at a velocity resolution of 0.079 km s-1 with velocity coverage of -5 {km} {{{s}}}-1< {V}{LSR}< 35 {km} {{{s}}}-1. We found that the 13CO emission better traces the structures seen in the extinction map, and derived the {X}{13{CO}}-factor of this region. Applying SCIMES to the 13CO data cube, we identified 61 clouds and derived their mass, radii, and line widths. The line width-radius relation of the identified clouds basically follows those of nearby molecular clouds. The majority of the identified clouds are close to virial equilibrium, although the dispersion is large. By inspecting the 12CO channel maps by eye, we found several arcs that are spatially extended to 0.°2-3° in length. In the longitude-velocity diagrams of 12CO, we also found two spatially extended components that appear to converge toward Serpens South and the W40 region. The existence of two components with different velocities and arcs suggests that large-scale expanding bubbles and/or flows play a role in the formation and evolution of the Serpens South and W40 cloud.

  10. Investigation of Relationship between High-energy X-Ray Sources and Photospheric and Helioseismic Impacts of X1.8 Solar Flare of 2012 October 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Zimovets, I. V. [Space Research Institute (IKI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kosovichev, A. G.; Sadykov, V. M. [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States); Myshyakov, I. I., E-mail: ivan.sharykin@phystech.edu [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Research (ISTP) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-01

    The X-class solar flare of 2012 October 23 generated continuum photospheric emission and a strong helioseismic wave (“sunquake”) that points to an intensive energy release in the dense part of the solar atmosphere. We study properties of the energy release with high temporal and spatial resolutions, using photospheric data from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board Solar Dynamics Observatory , and hard X-ray observations made by RHESSI . For this analysis we use level-1 HMI data (filtergrams), obtained by scanning the Fe i line (6731 Å) with the time cadence of ∼3.6 s and spatial resolution of ∼0.″5 per pixel. It is found that the photospheric disturbances caused by the flare spatially coincide with the region of hard X-ray emission but are delayed by ≲4 s. This delay is consistent with predictions of the flare hydrodynamics RADYN models. However, the models fail to explain the magnitude of variations observed by the HMI. The data indicate that the photospheric impact and helioseismic wave might be caused by the electron energy flux, which is substantially higher than that in the current flare radiative hydrodynamic models.

  11. OMI/Aura Near UV Aerosol Optical Depth and Single Scattering Albedo Daily L3 Global 1x1 deg Lat/Lon Grid V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The OMI-Aura level-3 daily global gridded (1x1 deg) near-UV Aerosol data product OMAERUVd based on the enhanced algorithm is available from the NASA Goddard Earth...

  12. The trypanosome Rab-related proteins RabX1 and RabX2 play no role in intracellular trafficking but may be involved in fly infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Kumar A Natesan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Rab GTPases constitute the largest subgroup of the Ras superfamily and are primarily involved in vesicle targeting. The full extent of Rab family function is unexplored. Several divergent Rab-like proteins are known but few have been characterized. In Trypanosoma brucei there are sixteen Rab genes, but RabX1, RabX2 and RabX3 are divergent within canonical sequence regions. Where known, trypanosome Rab functions are broadly conserved when orthologous relationships may be robustly established, but specific functions for RabX1, X2 and X3 have yet to be determined. RabX1 and RabX2 originated via tandem duplication and subcellular localization places RabX1 at the endoplasmic reticulum, while RabX2 is at the Golgi complex, suggesting distinct functions. We wished to determine whether RabX1 and RabX2 are involved in vesicle transport or other cellular processes.Using comparative genomics we find that RabX1 and RabX2 are restricted to trypanosomatids. Gene knockout indicates that RabX1 and RabX2 are non-essential. Simultaneous RNAi knockdown of both RabX1 and RabX2, while partial, was also non-lethal and may suggest non-redundant function, consistent with the distinct locations of the proteins. Analysis of the knockout cell lines unexpectedly failed to uncover a defect in exocytosis, endocytosis or in the morphology or location of multiple markers for the endomembrane system, suggesting that neither RabX1 nor RabX2 has a major role in intracellular transport. However, it was apparent that RabX1 and RabX2 knockout cells displayed somewhat enhanced survival within flies.RabX1 and RabX2, two members of the trypanosome Rab subfamily, were shown to have no major detectable role in intracellular transport, despite the localization of each gene product to highly specific endomembrane compartments. These data extend the functional scope of Rab proteins in trypanosomes to include non-canonical roles in differentiation-associated processes in protozoa.

  13. Approximate Fixed Point Theorems for the Class of Almost S-KKM&#x1D49E; Mappings in Abstract Convex Uniform Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Huei Chang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a concept of abstract convexity to define the almost S-KKM&#x1D49E; property, al-S-KKM&#x1D49E;(X,Y family, and almost Φ-spaces. We get some new approximate fixed point theorems and fixed point theorems in almost Φ-spaces. Our results extend some results of other authors.

  14. Sp1/3 and NF-1 mediate basal transcription of the human P2X1 gene in megakaryoblastic MEG-01 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennion Steven J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P2X1 receptors play an important role in platelet function as they can induce shape change, granule centralization and are also involved in thrombus formation. As platelets have no nuclei, the level of P2X1 expression depends on transcriptional regulation in megakaryocytes, the platelet precursor cell. Since nothing is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating megakaryocytic P2X1 expression, this study aimed to identify and functionally characterize the P2X1 core promoter utilized in the human megakaryoblastic cell line MEG-01. Results In order to identify cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation of P2X1 expression, the ability of 4.7 kb P2X1 upstream sequence to drive luciferase reporter gene expression was tested. Low promoter activity was detected in proliferating MEG-01 cells. This activity increased 20-fold after phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA induced differentiation. A transcription start site was detected 365 bp upstream of the start codon by primer extension. Deletion analysis of reporter constructs indicated a core promoter located within the region -68 to +149 bp that contained two Sp1 sites (named Sp1a and Sp1b and an NF-1 site. Individual mutations of Sp1b or NF-1 binding sites severely reduced promoter activity whereas triple mutation of Sp1a, Sp1b and NF-1 sites completely abolished promoter activity in both untreated and PMA treated cells. Sp1/3 and NF-1 proteins were shown to bind their respective sites by EMSA and interaction of Sp1/3, NF-1 and TFIIB with the endogenous P2X1 core promoter in MEG-01 cells was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Alignment of P2X1 genes from human, chimp, rat, mouse and dog revealed consensus Sp1a, Sp1b and NF-1 binding sites in equivalent positions thereby demonstrating evolutionary conservation of these functionally important sites. Conclusion This study has identified and characterized the P2X1 promoter utilized in MEG-01 cells and

  15. Quasi-static three-dimensional magnetic field evolution in solar active region NOAA 11166 associated with an X1.5 flare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vemareddy, P.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2014-01-01

    We study the quasi-static evolution of coronal magnetic fields constructed from the non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) approximation aiming to understand the relation between the magnetic field topology and ribbon emission during an X1.5 flare in active region (AR) NOAA 11166. The flare with a quasi-elliptical and two remote ribbons occurred on 2011 March 9 at 23:13 UT over a positive flux region surrounded by negative flux at the center of the bipolar AR. Our analysis of the coronal magnetic structure with potential and NLFFF solutions unveiled the existence of a single magnetic null point associated with a fan-spine topology and is co-spatial with the hard X-ray source. The footpoints of the fan separatrix surface agree with the inner edge of the quasi-elliptical ribbon and the outer spine is linked to one of the remote ribbons. During the evolution, the slow footpoint motions stressed the field lines along the polarity inversion line and caused electric current layers in the corona around the fan separatrix surface. These current layers trigger magnetic reconnection as a consequence of dissipating currents, which are visible as cusp-shaped structures at lower heights. The reconnection process reorganized the magnetic field topology whose signatures are observed at the separatrices/quasi-separatrix layer structure in both the photosphere and the corona during the pre-to-post flare evolution. In agreement with previous numerical studies, our results suggest that the line-tied footpoint motions perturb the fan-spine system and cause null point reconnection, which eventually causes the flare emission at the footpoints of the field lines.

  16. Detection of Reflection Features in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1 with NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlam, R. M.; Miller, J. M.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Bult, P. M.; Cackett, E. M.; Chakrabarty, D.; Enoto, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Gendreau, K. C.; Guillot, S.; Homan, J.; Jaisawal, G. K.; Keek, L.; La Marr, B.; Malacaria, C.; Markwardt, C. B.; Steiner, J. F.; Strohmayer, T. E.

    2018-05-01

    We present Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) observations of the neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 during the early mission phase in 2017. With the high spectral sensitivity and low-energy X-ray passband of NICER, we are able to detect the Fe L line complex in addition to the signature broad, asymmetric Fe K line. We confirm the presence of these lines by comparing the NICER data to archival observations with XMM-Newton/Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and NuSTAR. Both features originate close to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO). When modeling the lines with the relativistic line model RELLINE, we find that the Fe L blend requires an inner disk radius of {1.4}-0.1+0.2 R ISCO and Fe K is at {1.03}-0.03+0.13 R ISCO (errors quoted at 90%). This corresponds to a position of {17.3}-1.2+2.5 km and {12.7}-0.4+1.6 km for a canonical NS mass ({M}NS}=1.4 {M}ȯ ) and dimensionless spin value of a = 0. Additionally, we employ a new version of the RELXILL model tailored for NSs and determine that these features arise from a dense disk and supersolar Fe abundance.

  17. Fabrication of 1m x 1m readout strips panel and quality verification of new set of SFS dielectric material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Pandey, A.; Sogarwal, Hariom; Marimuthu, N.; Singh, V.; Subrahmanyam, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    India based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is going to use ∼ 30,000 Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) as an active detector. Resistive Plate chambers are parallel plate fast gaseous detector made up of high resistivity (10"1"2 ohm) of glass or bakelite. Glass plates work as electrodes of positive and negative potential. When a charged particle passes through chamber it ionizes the gas and charge move towards opposite electrodes. The pick-up panels pick these signals. Signals are sent to front end electronics. The characteristic impedance of the strips of the panels should be matched with front end electronics which helps in minimizing the reflected signal. Since INO is an underground laboratory, all material used in it must be fireproof. Since ∼ 60,000 pick-up panels are going to be used in INO hence it should be cheaper also. We recently received a new set of Silicon Fiber Sheets - a dielectric material, of 25 pieces of 1m x 0.5m having thickness 05 mm. We fabricated a set of readout strips panel of dimension 1m x 1m. We will present this work in detail

  18. The existence of a temperature-driven solid solution in LixFePO4 for 0 <= x <= 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacourt, Charles; Poizot, Philippe; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Masquelier, Christian

    2005-03-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized the powering of portable electronics. Electrode reactions in these electrochemical systems are based on reversible insertion/deinsertion of Li+ ions into the host electrode material with a concomitant addition/removal of electrons into the host. If such batteries are to find a wider market such as the automotive industry, less expensive positive electrode materials will be required, among which LiFePO4 is a leading contender. An intriguing fundamental problem is to understand the fast electrochemical response from the poorly electronic conducting two-phase LiFePO4/FePO4 system. In contrast to the well-documented two-phase nature of this system at room temperature, we give the first experimental evidence of a solid solution LixFePO4 (0 <= x <= 1) at 450 °C, and two new metastable phases at room temperature with Li0.75FePO4 and Li0.5FePO4 composition. These experimental findings challenge theorists to improve predictive models commonly used in the field. Our results may also lead to improved performances of these electrodes at elevated temperatures.

  19. Study of structure and potential energy curve for ground state X1Σ+ of LaF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Linhong; Shang Rencheng

    2002-01-01

    The equilibrium geometry, harmonic frequency and dissociation energy of the molecule LaF have been calculated on several kinds of computation levels with energy-consistent relativistic effective core potentials and valence basis sets including polarization functions 4f2g and diffuse functions 1s1p1d. The possible electronic state and its reasonable dissociation limit for the ground state of LaF are determined based on Atomic and Molecular Reaction Statics (AMRS). The potential energy curve scan for the ground state X 1 Σ + has been carried out with B3LYP method of density functional theory. Murrell-Sorbie analytic potential energy function and its Dunham expansion around equilibrium position have been also derived with a nonlinear least-square fit. The calculated spectroscopic constants are in good agreement with the experimental results of vibrational spectra. The analytical function obtained here is of great realistic importance due to its use in calculating fine transitional structure of vibrational spectra and the reaction dynamic process between atoms and molecules

  20. Image of the Black Hole, Cygnus X-1, Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    This image of the suspected Black Hole, Cygnus X-1, was the first object seen by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory. According to the theories to date, one concept of a black hole is a star, perhaps 10 times more massive than the Sun, that has entered the last stages of stelar evolution. There is an explosion triggered by nuclear reactions after which the star's outer shell of lighter elements and gases is blown away into space and the heavier elements in the stellar core begin to collapse upon themselves. Once this collapse begins, the inexorable force of gravity continues to compact the material until it becomes so dense it is squeezed into a mere point and nothing can escape from its extreme gravitational field, not even light. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy.

  1. Spatial structure determination of (√3 x √3)R30 degrees and (1.5 x 1.5)R18 degrees CO on Cu(111) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors report a study of the spatial structure of (√3 x √3)R30 degrees (low coverage) and (1.5 x 1.5)R18 degrees (intermediate coverage) CO adsorbed on Cu(111), using the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) technique at beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The CO molecule adsorbs on an atop site for both adsorption phases. Full multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) calculations were used to extract the C-Cu. bond length and the first Cu-Cu layer spacing for each adsorption phase. The authors find that the C-Cu bond length remains unchanged with increasing coverage, but the 1st Cu-Cu layer spacing contracts at the intermediate coverage. They calculate the bending mode force constant in the (1.5 x 1.5)R18 degrees phase to be K δ = 2.2 (1) x 10 -12 dyne-cm/rad from their experimentally determined bond lengths combined with previously published infra-red absorption frequencies

  2. Spatial structure determination of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees}CO on Cu(111) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors report a study of the spatial structure of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} (low coverage) and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} (intermediate coverage) CO adsorbed on Cu(111), using the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) technique at beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The CO molecule adsorbs on an atop site for both adsorption phases. Full multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) calculations were used to extract the C-Cu. bond length and the first Cu-Cu layer spacing for each adsorption phase. The authors find that the C-Cu bond length remains unchanged with increasing coverage, but the 1st Cu-Cu layer spacing contracts at the intermediate coverage. They calculate the bending mode force constant in the (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} phase to be K{sub {delta}} = 2.2 (1) x 10{sup {minus}12} dyne-cm/rad from their experimentally determined bond lengths combined with previously published infra-red absorption frequencies.

  3. Triggering Process of the X1.0 Three-ribbon Flare in the Great Active Region NOAA 12192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamba, Yumi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS)/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Inoue, Satoshi; Kusano, Kanya; Shiota, Daikou, E-mail: y-bamba@nagoya-u.jp [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research (ISEE)/Nagoya University Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    The solar magnetic field in a flare-producing active region (AR) is much more complicated than theoretical models, which assume a very simple magnetic field structure. The X1.0 flare, which occurred in AR 12192 on 2014 October 25, showed a complicated three-ribbon structure. To clarify the trigger process of the flare and to evaluate the applicability of a simple theoretical model, we analyzed the data from Hinode /Solar Optical Telescope and the Solar Dynamics Observatory /Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. We investigated the spatio-temporal correlation between the magnetic field structures, especially the non-potentiality of the horizontal field, and the bright structures in the solar atmosphere. As a result, we determined that the western side of the positive polarity, which is intruding on a negative polarity region, is the location where the flare was triggered. This is due to the fact that the sign of the magnetic shear in that region was opposite that of the major shear of the AR, and the significant brightenings were observed over the polarity inversion line (PIL) in that region before flare onset. These features are consistent with the recently proposed flare-trigger model that suggests that small reversed shear (RS) magnetic disturbances can trigger solar flares. Moreover, we found that the RS field was located slightly off the flaring PIL, contrary to the theoretical prediction. We discuss the possibility of an extension of the RS model based on an extra numerical simulation. Our result suggests that the RS field has a certain flexibility for displacement from a highly sheared PIL, and that the RS field triggers more flares than we expected.

  4. CONSTRAINTS ON THE NEUTRON STAR AND INNER ACCRETION FLOW IN SERPENS X-1 USING NuSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1046 (United States); Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, The University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Tendulkar, S.; Harrison, F. A.; Rana, V. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bachetti, M.; Barret, D. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Toulouse (France); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Tomsick, J. A. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chakrabarty, D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [Danish Technical University, Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, C. J.; Paerels, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory and Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Natalucci, L. [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (INAF), Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, Roma I-00133 (Italy); Stern, D. K. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, W. W., E-mail: jonmm@umich.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    We report on an observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1, made with NuSTAR. The extraordinary sensitivity afforded by NuSTAR facilitated the detection of a clear, robust, relativistic Fe K emission line from the inner disk. A relativistic profile is required over a single Gaussian line from any charge state of Fe at the 5σ level of confidence, and any two Gaussians of equal width at the same confidence. The Compton back-scattering ''hump'' peaking in the 10-20 keV band is detected for the first time in a neutron star X-ray binary. Fits with relativistically blurred disk reflection models suggest that the disk likely extends close to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) or stellar surface. The best-fit blurred reflection models constrain the gravitational redshift from the stellar surface to be z {sub NS} ≥ 0.16. The data are broadly compatible with the disk extending to the ISCO; in that case, z {sub NS} ≥ 0.22 and R {sub NS} ≤ 12.6 km (assuming M {sub NS} = 1.4 M {sub ☉} and a = 0, where a = cJ/GM {sup 2}). If the star is as large or larger than its ISCO, or if the effective reflecting disk leaks across the ISCO to the surface, the redshift constraints become measurements. We discuss our results in the context of efforts to measure fundamental properties of neutron stars, and models for accretion onto compact objects.

  5. CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN X1.0 FLARE ON 2014 MARCH 29 OBSERVED WITH IRIS AND EIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Qiu, J. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Cheng, J. X., E-mail: yingli@nju.edu.cn [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-09-20

    Chromospheric evaporation refers to dynamic mass motions in flare loops as a result of rapid energy deposition in the chromosphere. These motions have been observed as blueshifts in X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral lines corresponding to upward motions at a few tens to a few hundreds of km s{sup −1}. Past spectroscopic observations have also revealed a dominant stationary component, in addition to the blueshifted component, in emission lines formed at high temperatures (∼10 MK). This is contradictory to evaporation models predicting predominant blueshifts in hot lines. The recently launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provides high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations that focus on the chromosphere and transition region in the UV passband. Using the new IRIS observations, combined with coordinated observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer, we study the chromospheric evaporation process from the upper chromosphere to the corona during an X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29. We find evident evaporation signatures, characterized by Doppler shifts and line broadening, at two flare ribbons that are separating from each other, suggesting that chromospheric evaporation takes place in successively formed flaring loops throughout the flare. More importantly, we detect dominant blueshifts in the high-temperature Fe xxi line (∼10 MK), in agreement with theoretical predictions. We also find that, in this flare, gentle evaporation occurs at some locations in the rise phase of the flare, while explosive evaporation is detected at some other locations near the peak of the flare. There is a conversion from gentle to explosive evaporation as the flare evolves.

  6. Hematopoietic Substrate-1-Associated Protein X-1 Regulates the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Through Akt Pathway Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin-Bin; Deng, Xin; Wei, Ying

    2018-03-01

    Endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) are involved in vasculogenesis of various physiological and pathological processes. The proliferation and survival mechanism of EPCs needs to be explored further for the purpose of developing an effective glioma treatment. Hematopoietic substrate-1-associated protein X-1 (HAX-1) has been reported as an anti-apoptotic protein that plays an important role in several malignant tumors. However, the effect and mechanism of HAX-1 on EPCs remains unknown. This study aims to investigate the effect of HAX-1 on the proliferation and apoptosis of EPCs and explore its mechanism. According to our results, HAX-1 was overexpressed in EPCs. The results of clone formation and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation assay showed that HAX-1 promoted multiplication of EPCs. Flow cytometry showed HAX-1 knockout cell cycle arrest mainly in G0/G1 phase. Apoptosis analysis showed that HAX-1 could protect EPCs from apoptosis in oxidative stress. Western blot assay indicated that HAX-1 could inhibit the activation of caspase cascade and reduce the expression of p21, Bcl-2-associated X protein, and p53. HAX-1 also enhanced the degradation rate and ubiquitination of p53 through the promotion of phosphorylation of proteins MDM-2 and Akt1. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescent colocalization assays were performed to test the influence of HAX-1 on the interaction between Akt1 and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which is crucial for the activity of Akt1. In conclusion, this novel study suggests that HAX-1 could facilitate the Akt1 pathway through Hsp90, which led to a decline in the levels of p53, and finally promoted the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of EPCs. Stem Cells 2018;36:406-419. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  7. LMC X-1: A New Spectral Analysis of the O-star in the Binary and Surrounding Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, E. A.; Russell, D. M.; Ritter, A.; Filipović, M. D.; Kaper, L.; Grieve, K.; O'Brien, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    We provide new observations of the LMC X-1 O star and its extended nebula structure using spectroscopic data from VLT/UVES as well as Hα imaging from the Wide Field Imager on the Max Planck Gesellschaft/European Southern Observatory 2.2 m telescope and ATCA imaging of the 2.1 GHz radio continuum. This nebula is one of the few known to be energized by an X-ray binary. We use a new spectrum extraction technique that is superior to other methods used to obtain both radial velocities and fluxes. This provides an updated spatial velocity of ≃ 21.0 +/- 4.8 km s-1 for the O star. The slit encompasses both the photo-ionized and shock-ionized regions of the nebula. The imaging shows a clear arc-like structure reminiscent of a wind bow shock in between the ionization cone and shock-ionized nebula. The observed structure can be fit well by the parabolic shape of a wind bow shock. If an interpretation of a wind bow shock system is valid, we investigate the N159-O1 star cluster as a potential parent of the system, suggesting a progenitor mass of ˜60 M ⊙ for the black hole. We further note that the radio emission could be non-thermal emission from the wind bow shock, or synchrotron emission associated with the jet-inflated nebula. For both wind- and jet-powered origins, this would represent one of the first radio detections of such a structure.

  8. DATA-DRIVEN RADIATIVE HYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE 2014 MARCH 29 X1.0 SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Fatima Rubio da; Petrosian, Vahé [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kleint, Lucia [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Liu, Wei [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, 625 2nd Street, Suite 209, Petaluma, CA 94952-5159 (United States); Allred, Joel C., E-mail: frubio@stanford.edu [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Spectroscopic observations of solar flares provide critical diagnostics of the physical conditions in the flaring atmosphere. Some key features in observed spectra have not yet been accounted for in existing flare models. Here we report a data-driven simulation of the well-observed X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 that can reconcile some well-known spectral discrepancies. We analyzed spectra of the flaring region from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) in Mg ii h and k, the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST/IBIS) in H α 6563 Å and Ca ii 8542 Å, and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager ( RHESSI ) in hard X-rays. We constructed a multithreaded flare loop model and used the electron flux inferred from RHESSI data as the input to the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response. We then synthesized various chromospheric emission lines and compared them with the IRIS and IBIS observations. In general, the synthetic intensities agree with the observed ones, especially near the northern footpoint of the flare. The simulated Mg ii line profile has narrower wings than the observed one. This discrepancy can be reduced by using a higher microturbulent velocity (27 km s{sup −1}) in a narrow chromospheric layer. In addition, we found that an increase of electron density in the upper chromosphere within a narrow height range of ≈800 km below the transition region can turn the simulated Mg ii line core into emission and thus reproduce the single peaked profile, which is a common feature in all IRIS flares.

  9. Structure determination of the Si(001)-(2 x 1)-H reconstruction by surface X-ray diffraction: Weakening of the dimer bond by the addition of hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, E.M.; Baker, J.; Nielsen, M.

    2000-01-01

    The atomic structure of the monohydride Si(001)-(2 x 1)-H reconstruction has been investigated by surface X-ray diffraction. Atomic relaxations down to the eighth layer have been determined. The bond length of the hydrogenated silicon dimers was found to be 2.47 +/- 0.02 Angstrom. which is longer...... than the dimer bond of the clean (2 x 1)-reconstructed Si(001) surface and also 5% longer than the bulk bond length of 2.35 Angstrom. The differences to the (2 x 1) structure of the clean surface are discussed in terms of the elimination of the weak pi-bond character of the dimer bond by the addition...

  10. Experimental and theoretical study of the B(2)2Σ+ → X(1)2Σ+ system in the KSr molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepkowski, Jacek; Grochola, Anna; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Dulieu, Olivier; Guérout, Romain; Żuchowski, Piotr S.; Jastrzebski, Włodzimierz

    2018-05-01

    Spectral bands for the B(2)2Σ+ → X(1)2Σ+ electronic transition in the doubly-polar open-shell KSr molecule are recorded at moderate resolution using the thermoluminescence technique. The spectra are simulated using three kinds of advanced electronic structure calculations, allowing for an assessment of their accuracy on one hand, and for the derivation of fundamental spectroscopic constants of the X(1)2Σ+ KSr ground state and the excited electronic state B(2)2Σ+ , on the other hand. These results should facilitate further studies aiming at creating ultracold bosonic or fermionic KSr molecules.

  11. Expression and Functions of Immediate Early Response Gene X-1 (IEX-1 in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Morinobu

    Full Text Available In rheumatoid arthritis (RA, synovial fibroblasts (RA-SFs accumulate in affected joints, where they play roles in inflammation and joint destruction. RA-SFs exhibit tumor-like proliferation and are resistant to apoptosis. Although RA-SF activation is well described, negative regulators of RA-SF activation are unknown. We previously reported that histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors facilitate apoptosis in RA-SFs. Here we found that RA-SFs treated with the HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA exhibited an upregulation of the immediate early response gene X-1 (IEX-1. IEX-1 has roles in apoptosis sensitivity, cell-cycle progression, and proliferation, and is reported to be involved in immune responses, inflammation, and tumorigenesis, and to have anti-arthritic properties. To investigate IEX-1's role in RA-SFs, we used in vitro-cultured synovial fibroblasts from RA and osteoarthritis (OA patients. We confirmed that TSA upregulated the IEX-1 protein and mRNA expressions in RA-SFs by western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR. Inhibiting HDAC1, 2, and 3 (but not 6 or 8 also upregulated IEX-1. The IEX-1 mRNA levels were higher in RA-SFs than in OA-SFs, and were further upregulated in RA-SFs by the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β. The staining of surgical specimens showed that IEX-1 was present in the pannus from affected RA joints. Si-RNA-mediated IEX-1 knockdown upregulated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced expression of TNFα and various chemokine mRNAs, indicating that IEX-1 downregulates TNFα and chemokines. Furthermore, apoptosis analysis showed that IEX-1 knockdown protected RA-SFs from apoptosis induced by TSA or by an anti-Fas mAb, indicating that IEX-1 is pro-apoptotic in RA-SFs. Collectively, our results showed that IEX-1 is induced by TNFα and IL-1β in RA-SFs, in which it suppresses TNFα and chemokine production and induces apoptosis; thus, IEX-1 negatively regulates RA-SF activation. Further investigation of IEX1's functions

  12. TOMS/Nimbus-7 Total Column Ozone Monthly L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Nimbus-7 Total Column Ozone Monthly L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. The Total Ozone Mapping...

  13. TOMS/Nimbus-7 UV Aerosol Index Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Nimbus-7 UV Aerosol Index Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. The Total Ozone Mapping...

  14. TOMS/Earth Probe UV Reflectivity Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Earth Probe UV Reflectivity Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. (The shortname for this Level-3...

  15. TOMS/Earth Probe UV Aerosol Index Monthly L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Earth Probe UV Aerosol Index Monthly L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. (The shortname for this...

  16. TOMS/Nimbus-7 UV Aerosol Index Monthly L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Nimbus-7 UV Aerosol Index Monthly L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. The Total Ozone Mapping...

  17. TOMS/Earth Probe UV-B Erythemal Local Noon Irradiance Monthly L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Earth Probe UV-B Erythemal Local Noon Irradiance Monthly L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. (The...

  18. TOMS/Earth Probe Total Column Ozone Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Earth Probe Total Column Ozone Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. (The shortname for this...

  19. TOMS/Nimbus-7 UV-B Erythemal Local Noon Irradiance Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Nimbus-7 UV-B Erythemal Local Noon Irradiance Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. The Total Ozone...

  20. Nucleotide sequence of pOLA52: a conjugative IncX1 plasmid from Escherichia coli which enables biofilm formation and multidrug efflux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Hansen, Lars H.; She, Qunxin

    2008-01-01

    . The plasmid was also classified as IncX1 with incompatibility testing. The conjugal transfer and plasmid maintenance regions of pOLA52 therefore seem to represent IncX1 orthologues of the well-characterized IncX2 plasmid R6K. Sequence homology searches in GenBank also suggested a considerably higher...... of type 3 fimbriae (mrkABCDF). The plasmid was found to be 51,602 bp long with 68 putative genes. About half of the plasmid constituted a conserved IncX1-type backbone with predicted regions for conjugation, replication and partitioning, as well as a toxin/antitoxin (TA) plasmid addiction system...... prevalence of IncX1 group plasmids than IncX2. The 21 kb 'genetic load' region of pOLA52 was shown to consist of a mosaic, among other things a fragmented Tn3 transposon encoding ampicillin resistance. Most notably the oqxAB and mrkABCDF cassettes were contained within two composite transposons (Tn6010...

  1. Potential energy curves and spectroscopic constants for the X1μ+ and A1μ+ states of the BeH+ Molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornellas, F.R.

    1982-02-01

    Using a 1322-term configuration interaction wavefunction potential energy curves are computed for the ground (X 1 μ + ) and first excited (A 1 μ + ) states of the BeH + molecule. Spectroscopic constants are obtained by means of a Dunham analysis. (Author) [pt

  2. Electric field dependent structural and vibrational properties of the Si(100)-H(2 x 1) surface and its implications for STM induced hydrogen desorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt

    1999-01-01

    We report a first principles study of the structure and the vibrational properties of the Si(100)-H(2 x 1) surface in an electric field. The calculated vibrational parameters are used to model the vibrational modes in the presence of the electric field corresponding to a realistic scanning...

  3. TOMS/Nimbus-7 Total Column Ozone Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Nimbus-7 Total Column Ozone Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. The Total Ozone Mapping...

  4. Spin reorientation and magnetic anisotropy in Y2Co17-xCr x (x 1.17-3.0) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuquan, B.; Tegus, O.; Dagula, W.; Brueck, E.; Boer, F.R. de; Buschow, K.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Spin reorientation transitions and magnetic anisotropy in Y 2 Co 17-x Cr x (x = 1.17-3.0) compounds have been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. The powder X-ray diffraction patterns show that most samples crystallize as a single phase with the rhombohedral Th 2 Zn 17 -type structure. However, in the compound Y 2 Co 14 Cr 3 the Th 2 Zn 17 phase coexist with the hexagonal Th 2 Ni 17 -type phase. The lattice parameters a and c hardly change and the unit cell volume V increases slightly with increasing Cr content. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the aligned powder of the samples have confirmed that at room temperature the compound with x = 1.17 has planar anisotropy, but the compounds with x = 1.76, 2.34 and 3.00 have uniaxial anisotropy. Spin reorientation phenomena occur in all of the compounds. With increasing Cr content, the Curie temperature, the spin reorientation temperature, the spontaneous magnetization, and the anisotropy constant K 2 of the Y 2 Co 17-x Cr x (x = 1.17-3.0) compounds decrease strongly while the anisotropy constant K 1 increases in the range of x from 1.17 to 2.34 and then decreases in the range of x from 2.34 to 3.00

  5. Upper Limits on Gravitational Waves from Scorpius X-1 from a Model-based Cross-correlation Search in Advanced LIGO Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bawaj, M.; Bazzan, M.; Becsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Chatziioannou, K.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. -P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Deelman, E.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Alvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Duncan, J.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gabel, M.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Galloway, D. K.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Gonzlez, G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y. -M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krmer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Luck, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Hernandez, I. Magana; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magaa; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mayani, R.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Prrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Rynge, M.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Tayra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahi, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; Van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y. -F.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y. -H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Steeghs, D.; Wang, L.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a semicoherent search for continuous gravitational waves from the low-mass X-ray binary Scorpius X-1, using data from the first Advanced LIGO observing run. The search method uses details of the modeled, parametrized continuous signal to combine coherently data separated by

  6. Detection of Reflection Features in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1 with NICER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludlam, R. M.; Miller, J. M.; Arzoumanian, Z.

    2018-01-01

    We present Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) observations of the neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 during the early mission phase in 2017. With the high spectral sensitivity and low-energy X-ray passband of NICER, we are able to detect the Fe L line complex in a...

  7. Exotic Metal Molecules in Oxygen-rich Envelopes: Detection of AlOH (X1Σ+) in VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2010-03-01

    A new interstellar molecule, AlOH, has been detected toward the envelope of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa), an oxygen-rich red supergiant. Three rotational transitions of AlOH were observed using the facilities of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The J = 9 → 8 and J = 7 → 6 lines at 1 mm were measured with the ARO Submillimeter Telescope, while the J = 5 → 4 transition at 2 mm was observed with the ARO 12 m antenna on Kitt Peak. The AlOH spectra exhibit quite narrow line widths of 16-23 km s-1, as found for NaCl in this source, indicating that the emission arises from within the dust acceleration zone of the central circumstellar outflow. From a radiative transfer analysis, the abundance of AlOH relative to H2 was found to be ~1 × 10-7 for a source size of 0.26'' or 22 R* . In contrast, AlCl was not detected with f VY CMa is ~17. Therefore, AlOH appears to be the dominant gas-phase molecular carrier of aluminum in this oxygen-rich shell. Local thermodynamic equilibrium calculations predict that the monohydroxides should be the major carriers of Al, Ca, and Mg in O-rich envelopes, as opposed to the oxides or halides. The apparent predominance of aluminum-bearing molecules in VY CMa may reflect proton addition processes in H-shell burning.

  8. Pulse periods and the long-term variations of the X-ray pulsars VELA X-1 and Centaurus X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    The paper reports recent determinations of the pulse period for two X-ray pulsars, Vela X-1 and Cen X-3, made in 1987 with the All Sky Monitor (ASM) on board the Ginga satellite. The heliocentric pulse periods are 283.09 + or - 0.01 s and 4.8229 + or - 0.0001 s, respectively. These are the longest and shortest values in their respective observational histories. The random walk model for the Vela X-1 pulsar can explain this result as well as those obtained previously. It is also noted that the pulse-period change for the Cen X-3 system shows a 9-yr periodicity. This is probably due to the activity of the companion star rather than to Doppler-shift variations due to a third body or the precession of the neutron star.

  9. Ab initio pseudopotential calculations for the electronic and geometric structures of hydrogen covered Si(1 1 4)-(2x1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smardon, R.D.; Srivastava, G.P.

    2004-01-01

    Using a first principles pseudopotential method we have studied the adsorption of H on the high index Si(1 1 4)-(2x1) surface within the local density approximation. This stable surface is found to be both chemically and electronically passivated by two different coverages of hydrogen: 1.0 ML and 1.5 ML. For the 1.0 ML coverage all the A- and B-type dimer bond lengths have equalised to 2.40 Angst and the rebonded lengths are slightly longer at 2.48 Angst. Hydrogen passivation, for both coverages, leads the surface bands of the clean Si(1 1 4)-(2x1) surface to move into the bulk valence and conduction bands. Differences in the density of states for the clean, 1.0 ML and 1.5 ML coverages were observed and are discussed

  10. Bismuth on copper (110): analysis of the c(2x2) and p(4x1) structures by surface x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottermoser, L.; Buslaps, T.; Johnson, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Surface X-ray diffraction has been used to analyze the atomic structures of the Cu(110)-c(2 x 2)-Bi and Cu(110)-p(4 x 1)-Bi reconstructions with submonolayer coverages. A quasi-hexagonal c(2 x 2) adlayer structure is formed when half a monolayer of bismuth is deposited; the coverage corresponds...... to 1.08 x 10(-15) atoms cm(-2). There is one Bi atom per c(2 x 2) surface unit cell, and the nearest-neighbor distance on the planar overlayer was found to be 4.43 Angstrom. In the case of the p(4 x 1) reconstruction formed at a coverage of 0.75 monolayers, both the in-plane and out-of-plane data...

  11. Zn{sub x-1}Cu{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinels; synthesis, structural characterization and electrical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez M, F.; Lima, E.; Bosch, P.; Pfeiffer, H. [UNAM, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gonzalez, F., E-mail: pfeiffer@iim.unam.m [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    This work presents the structural characterization and electrical evaluation of Zn{sub x-1}Cu{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinels, which are materials presented as secondary phases into the vari stor ceramic systems. Samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy. Although, the addition of copper to the ZnMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel did not produce morphological changes, the structure and electrical behaviors changed considerably. Structurally, copper addition induced the formation of partial inverse spinels, and its addition increases significantly the electrical conductivity. Therefore, the formation of Zn{sub x-1}Cu{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinels, as secondary phases into the vari stor materials, may compromise significantly the vari stor efficiency. (Author)

  12. EXOTIC METAL MOLECULES IN OXYGEN-RICH ENVELOPES: DETECTION OF AlOH (X1Σ+) IN VY CANIS MAJORIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    A new interstellar molecule, AlOH, has been detected toward the envelope of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa), an oxygen-rich red supergiant. Three rotational transitions of AlOH were observed using the facilities of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The J = 9 → 8 and J = 7 → 6 lines at 1 mm were measured with the ARO Submillimeter Telescope, while the J = 5 → 4 transition at 2 mm was observed with the ARO 12 m antenna on Kitt Peak. The AlOH spectra exhibit quite narrow line widths of 16-23 km s -1 , as found for NaCl in this source, indicating that the emission arises from within the dust acceleration zone of the central circumstellar outflow. From a radiative transfer analysis, the abundance of AlOH relative to H 2 was found to be ∼1 x 10 -7 for a source size of 0.26'' or 22 R * . In contrast, AlCl was not detected with f ≤ 5 x 10 -8 . AlOH is likely formed just beyond the photosphere via thermodynamic equilibrium chemistry and then disappears due to dust condensation. The AlOH/AlO abundance ratio found in VY CMa is ∼17. Therefore, AlOH appears to be the dominant gas-phase molecular carrier of aluminum in this oxygen-rich shell. Local thermodynamic equilibrium calculations predict that the monohydroxides should be the major carriers of Al, Ca, and Mg in O-rich envelopes, as opposed to the oxides or halides. The apparent predominance of aluminum-bearing molecules in VY CMa may reflect proton addition processes in H-shell burning.

  13. Source Water Protection Contaminant Sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Simplified aggregation of potential contaminant sources used for Source Water Assessment and Protection. The data is derived from IDNR, IDALS, and US EPA program...

  14. The spectral and temporal behavior of the variable X-ray binary star Cyg X-1 in the hard region of X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinle, H.

    1981-01-01

    In the present work the measurements of the X-ray spectrum of Cyg X-1 in the energy range 15 to 160 keV in the years 1975, 1976, 1977 are investigated. The measurements are of such a good quality, that a simple power spectrum as the best fit of a model to the data of Cyg X-1 can be excluded because the spectrum breaks off in the range 70-100 keV. The model of Sunyaev and Titarchuk which describes the comptonizing of protons will low energy in a hot plasma is used first time for filling to the Cyg X-1 spectra and it is seen, that the shape of the spectrum is represented in an excellent manner. From the parameters of the best fit to the spectrum from 1977 an electron temperature of 3.4 x 10 8 K and an optical depth tau = 5 for the plasma in which the photons are scattered are found. (orig./WB) [de

  15. Magic clusters and (2x1) local structure formed in a half-unit cell of the Si(1 1 1)-(7x7) surface by Tl adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocan, P.; Visikovskiy, A.V.; Ohira, Y.; Yoshimura, M.; Ueda, K.; Tochihara, H.

    2008-01-01

    Formation of a (2x1) local structure is found at submonolayer growth of Tl on the Si(1 1 1)-(7x7) surface by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At low coverages, the (7x7) grid remains and the (2x1) structure is formed inside of the half-unit cells of the (7x7). The (2x1) coexists with other structures, such as of 'magic' clusters observed in the case of all other group III metals. Based on our STM observations we propose an atomic arrangement of the (2x1) structure

  16. Some observational aspects of compact galactic X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, J.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis contains the following observations of compact galactic X-ray sources: i) the X-ray experiments onboard the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite ANS, ii) a rocket-borne ultra soft X-ray experiment and iii) the Objective Grating Spectrometer onboard the EINSTEIN observatory. In Chapter I the various types of compact galactic X-ray sources are reviewed and put into the perspective of earlier and following observations. In Chapter II the author presents some of the observations of high luminosity X-ray sources, made with ANS, including the detection of soft X-rays from the compact X-ray binary Hercules X-1 and the ''return to the high state'' of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1. Chapter III deals with transient X-ray phenomena. Results on low luminosity galactic X-ray sources are collected in Chapter IV. (Auth.)

  17. On the Determination of the Spin of the Black Hole in Cyg X-1 from X-Ray Reflection Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, A. C.; Wilkins, D.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Cackett, E. M.; Nowak, M. A.; Pooley, G.; Pottschmidt, K.; Sanders, J. S.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The spin of Cygnus X-I is measured by fitting reflection models to Suzaku data covering the energy band 0.9-400 keY. The inner radius of the accretion disc is found to lie within 2 gravitational radii (rg = GM/c(exp 2)) and a value for the dimensionless black hole spin is obtained of 0.97(sup .0.14) (sup -0.02). This agrees with recent measurements using the continuum fitting method by Gou et al. and of the broad iron line by Duro et al. The disc inclination is measured at 23.7(sup +6.7) (sup -5.4) deg. which is consistent with the recent optical measurement of the binary system inclination by Orosz et al of 27+/- 0.8 deg. We pay special attention to the emissivity profile caused by irradiation of the inner disc by the hard power-law source. 1be X-ray observations and simulations show that the index q of that profile deviates from the commonly used, Newtonian, value of 3 within 3r(sub g), steepening considerably within 2r(sub g). as expected in the strong gravity regime.

  18. Exotic Metal Molecules in Oxygen-Rich Envelopes: Detection of AlOH (X1Σ^+) in VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2010-06-01

    A new interstellar molecule, AlOH, has been detected toward the envelope of VY Canis Majoris, an oxygen-rich red supergiant. Three rotational transitions of AlOH were observed using the facilities of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The J = 9 → 8 and J = 7 → 6 lines at 1 mm were measured with the ARO Submillimeter Telescope (SMT), while the J = 5 → 4 transition at 2 mm was observed with the ARO 12 m antenna on Kitt Peak. The AlOH spectra exhibit quite narrow line widths, indicating that the emission arises from within the dust acceleration zone of the central circumstellar outflow. From a radiative transfer analysis, the abundance of AlOH relative to H_2 was found to be 1x10-7 for a source size of 0.26'' or 22 R_*. AlOH is likely formed just beyond the photosphere via thermodynamic equilibrium chemistry, and then disappears due to dust condensation. The AlOH/AlO abundance ratio found in VY CMa is ˜17. LTE calculations predict the monohydroxides should be the major carriers of Al, Ca, and Mg in O-rich envelopes, as opposed to the oxides or halides.

  19. Positron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, R.

    1994-01-01

    A tentative survey of positron sources is given. Physical processes on which positron generation is based are indicated and analyzed. Explanation of the general features of electromagnetic interactions and nuclear β + decay makes it possible to predict the yield and emittance for a given optical matching system between the positron source and the accelerator. Some kinds of matching systems commonly used - mainly working with solenoidal field - are studied and the acceptance volume calculated. Such knowledge is helpful in comparing different matching systems. Since for large machines, a significant distance exists between the positron source and the experimental facility, positron emittance has to be preserved during beam transfer over large distances and methods used for that purpose are indicated. Comparison of existing positron sources leads to extrapolation to sources for future linear colliders. Some new ideas associated with these sources are also presented. (orig.)

  20. Sources management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoux, H.; Gourmelon; Scanff, P.; Fournet, F.; Murith, Ch.; Saint-Paul, N.; Colson, P.; Jouve, A.; Feron, F.; Haranger, D.; Mathieu, P.; Paycha, F.; Israel, S.; Auboiroux, B.; Chartier, P.

    2005-01-01

    Organized by the section of technical protection of the French society of radiation protection ( S.F.R.P.), these two days had for objective to review the evolution of the rule relative to the sources of ionising radiations 'sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, electric generators'. They addressed all the actors concerned by the implementation of the new regulatory system in the different sectors of activities ( research, medicine and industry): Authorities, manufacturers, and suppliers of sources, holders and users, bodies involved in the approval of sources, carriers. (N.C.)

  1. Modification of H2O adsorbed Si(100)-(2 x 1) surface by photon and electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, S.W.; Chung, S.M.; Hwang, C.C.; Ihm, K.W.; Kang, T.-H.; Chen, C.H.; Park, C.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Oxidation of silicon has been the subject of intense scientific and technological interest due to the several uses of thin oxide films as insulating layers in microelectronic devices. The great strides have been made in understanding about the formation and thermal evolution of the Si/SiO 2 interface. In this presentation, we provide synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES) and photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) results, showing how a H 2 O adsorbed Si(100) surface evolves into an ultra-thin silicon oxide m when exposed to monochromatized synchrotron radiation and electron beam at room temperature. All SRPES, PEEM experiments have been performed at the beam line, 4B1, of Pohang Light Source (PLS) in Korea. Water dissociates into OH(a) and H(a) species upon adsorption on the Si(100)-(2 - 1) at room temperature. The bonding (b 2 ) and antibonding (a 1 ) OH orbital and the oxygen lone pair orbital (b 1 ) from the dissociated OH and H species has been identified in ultraviolet photoemission spectra (UPS). These structures gradually changed and a new silicon oxide peak appeared with the photon/E-beam irradiation. This indicates that the H 2 O adsorbed on Si surface transforms into a thin silicon oxide film by photon/E-beam irradiation. We have shown in our PEEM images that one can make micro-patterns on silicon surface by using the photon induced surface modification. The fabricated patterns can be clearly identified through the inverse contrast images between photon exposed region and unexposed one. The near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) results revealed that the OH adsorbed Si surface transforms into a thin silicon oxide film by photon irradiation

  2. Sourcing Excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi

    2011-01-01

    Sourcing Excellence is one of the key performance indicators (KPIs) in this world of ever changing sourcing strategies. Manufacturing companies need to access and diagnose the reliability and competencies of existing suppliers in order to coordinate and develop them. This would help in managing...

  3. Positron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, R.

    1989-01-01

    A tentative survey of positron sources is given. Physical processes on which positron generation is based are indicated and analyzed. Explanation of the general features of electromagnetic interactions and nuclear β + decay makes it possible to predict the yield and emittance for a given optical matching system between the positron source and the accelerator. Some kinds of matching systems commonly used - mainly working with solenoidal fields - are studied and the acceptance volume calculated. Such knowledge is helpful in comparing different matching systems. Since for large machines, a significant distance exists between the positron source and the experimental facility, positron emittance has to be preserved during beam transfer over large distances and methods used for that purpose are indicated. Comparison of existing positron sources leads to extrapolation to sources for future linear colliders

  4. Quasi-classical trajectory approach to the O(1D)+HBr→OH+Br reaction stereo-dynamics on X1A' potential energy surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Zheng Bin; Yin Ji-Qing; Meng Qing-Tian

    2011-01-01

    The vector properties of reaction O( 1 D)+HBr→OH+Br on the potential energy surface (PES) of X 1 A' ground singlet state are studied by using the quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) theory. The polarization-dependent differential cross sections (PDDCSs), the average rotational alignment factor 2 (j' · k)>, as well as the distributions reflecting vector correlations are also computed. The analysis of the results shows that the alignment and the orientation distribution of the rotation angular momentum vector of product molecule OH is influenced by both the effect of heavy—light—heavy (HLH) type mass combination and the deep well of PES. (atomic and molecular physics)

  5. Endovascular Irradiations with beta sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scmidt, W F.O.; Hawliczek, R [Inst of Radiooncology IRO, Donauspital, Vienna (Austria); Mueck, K [Austrian Research Centre, Siebersdorf ARCS (Austria); Lehmann, D [Inst of Radiotherapy, Univ. Dresden (Germany); Pichler, L [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Endovascular Radiotherapy, Donauspital, Vienna (Austria)

    1999-12-31

    For treatment of restenoses tubes (inner/outer diameter 1 and 2 mm; length 3 or 5 mm) with Y-90 foils, shielded by Ti-layers on all sides have been developed (activity 0.5 - 2 GBq). Quality checks with plastic scintillators have been developed and are correlated to absolute dose measurements performed with TLDs (1x1 mm2; 40 mg/cm2). TLD-handling and calibration for beta-dosimetry are described. Additional measurements for depth-dose and dose distribution around the tubes were done with GAFCHROMIC- films and compared to Monte-Carlo calculations with the MCNP4-code, yielding a half-value depth of 0.8 mm from the tube-surface. Manufacturing and delivery of the sources including leakage tests has been standardized, treatments (irradiation times <5min; irradiation length <30mm) are planned to start in spring `98. (authors) 1 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Nance-Horan syndrome in females due to a balanced X;1 translocation that disrupts the NHS gene: Familial case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Laguna, Laura; Martínez-Herrera, Alejandro; Reyes-de la Rosa, Alejandra Del Pilar; García-Delgado, Constanza; Nieto-Martínez, Karem; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Valderrama-Atayupanqui, Tania Yanet; Morales-Jiménez, Ariadna Berenice; Villa-Morales, Judith; Kofman, Susana; Cervantes, Alicia; Morán-Barroso, Verónica Fabiola

    2018-01-01

    The Nance-Horan syndrome is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataract, facial features, microcornea, microphthalmia, and dental anomalies; most of the cases are due to NHS gene mutations on Xp22.13. Heterozygous carrier females generally present less severe features, and up to 30% of the affected males have intellectual disability. We describe two patients, mother and daughter, manifesting Nance-Horan syndrome. The cytogenetic and molecular analyses demonstrated a 46,X,t(X;1)(p22.13;q22) karyotype in each of them. No copy-number genomic imbalances were detected by high-density microarray analysis. The mother had a preferential inactivation of the normal X chromosome; expression analysis did not detect any mRNA isoform of NHS. This is the first report of Nance-Horan syndrome due to a skewed X chromosome inactivation resulting from a balanced translocation t(X;1) that disrupts the NHS gene expression, with important implications for clinical presentation and genetic counseling.

  7. On the Evolution of the Inner Disk Radius with Flux in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chia - Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of approx. 8 R(sub G), which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L/L(sub Edd) approx. 0.4-0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  8. ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE INNER DISK RADIUS WITH FLUX IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY SERPENS X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 W. Hancock, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1046 (United States); Bhattacharyya, Sudip [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Strohmayer, Tod E., E-mail: ft8320@wayne.edu [X-Ray Astrophysics Lab, Astrophysics Science Division, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of ∼8 R {sub G}, which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L / L {sub Edd} ∼ 0.4–0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  9. A TEST OF THE NATURE OF THE FE K LINE IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY SERPENS X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Cackett, Edward M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 W. Hancock, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI48109-1046 (United States); Barret, Didier [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Toulouse (France); Fabian, Andy C.; Parker, Michael L. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); D’Aì, Antonino [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo, via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy); Bhattacharyya, Sudip [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Burderi, Luciano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, SP Monserrato-Sestu, KM 0.7, I-09042 Monserrato (Italy); Salvo, Tiziana Di; Iaria, Rosario [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Universitá di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Egron, Elise [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, via della Scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Homan, Jeroen [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue 37-582D, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lin, Dacheng [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Miller, M. Coleman, E-mail: ft8320@wayne.edu [Department of Astronomy and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Broad Fe K emission lines have been widely observed in the X-ray spectra of black hole systems as well as in neutron star systems. The intrinsically narrow Fe K fluorescent line is generally believed to be part of the reflection spectrum originating in an illuminated accretion disk which is broadened by strong relativistic effects. However, the nature of the lines in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) has been a matter of debate. We therefore obtained the longest, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a neutron star LMXB to date with a 300 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) observation of Serpens X-1. The observation was taken under the “continuous clocking” mode, and thus was free of photon pile-up effects. We carry out a systematic analysis and find that the blurred reflection model fits the Fe line of Serpens X-1 significantly better than a broad Gaussian component does, implying that the relativistic reflection scenario is much preferred. Chandra HETGS also provides a highest spectral resolution view of the Fe K region and we find no strong evidence for additional narrow lines.

  10. INTEGRAL SPI Observations of Cygnus X-1 in the Soft State: What about the Jet Contribution in Hard X-Rays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, E.; Roques, J. P.; Chauvin, M.

    2014-07-01

    During the first 7 yr of the INTEGRAL mission (2003-2009), Cyg X-1 has essentially been detected in its hard state (HS), with some incursions in intermediate HSs. This long, spectrally stable period allowed in particular the measurement of the polarization of the high-energy component that has long been observed above 200 keV in this peculiar object. This result strongly suggests that here we see the contribution of the jet, known to emit a strong synchrotron radio emission. In 2010 June, Cyg X-1 underwent a completed transition toward a soft state (SS). It gave us the unique opportunity to study in detail the corona emission in this spectral state, and to investigate in particular the behavior of the jet contribution. Indeed, during the SS, the hard X-ray emission decreases drastically, with its maximum energy shifted toward lower energy and its flux divided by a factor of ~5-10. Interestingly, the radio emission follows a similar drop, supporting the correlation between the jet emission and the hard component, even though the flux is too low to quantify the polarization characteristics. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data center funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland), the Czech Republic and Poland with the participation of Russia and USA.

  11. Structure and magnetic properties of Gd2Co17-xCr x (1.17 ≤ x ≤ 3.0) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuquan, B.; Tegus, O.; Dagula, W.; Brueck, E.; Klaasse, J.C.P.; Buschow, K.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The structure and magnetic properties of Gd 2 Co 17-x Cr x (1.17 ≤ x ≤ 3.0) compounds have been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetization measurements. The powder X-ray diffraction patterns show that all samples crystallize as a single phase with the rhombohedral Th 2 Zn 17 -type structure. The lattice parameters a and the unit cell volume V increases slightly with increasing Cr content, but the c parameter varies in a less simple way with increasing Cr content. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the magnetically aligned samples show that all compounds investigated have uniaxial anisotropy. Spin reorientation phenomena occur in all of the compounds. The Curie temperature T C , the spin reorientation temperature T sr , the spontaneous magnetization M 0 and the saturation magnetization M s decrease with the increasing Cr content. The anisotropy constant K 1 and the anisotropy field B a of the compounds at room temperature reach a maximum for x = 1.76. The M 0 and M s increase with increasing temperature from 5 K to 300 K. The easy-axis anisotropy of all compounds changes to easy-plane anisotropy at low temperatures and the spin reorientation phenomena are more pronounced for low Cr concentration

  12. Evaluation of the difference in the rate coefficients of F2 + NOx (x = 1 or 2) → F + FNOx by the stereochemical arrangement using the density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Satomi; Hayashi, Toshio; Hori, Masaru

    2015-02-26

    The rate coefficient of F2 + NO → F + FNO is 2 to 5 orders of magnitude higher than that of F2 + NO2 → F + FNO2 even though bond energies of FNO and FNO2 only differ by ∼0.2 eV. To understand the cause of having different rate coefficients of these two reactions, the change in total energies was calculated by varying the stereochemical arrangement of F2 with respect to NOx (x = 1 or 2) by the density functional theory (DFT), using CAM-B3LYP/6-311 G+(d) in the Gaussian program. The permitted approaching angle between the x-axis and the plane consisting of O, N, F, and ϕ plays a key role to restrict the reaction of NO2 and F2 compared to the reaction of NO and F2. This restriction in the reaction space is considered to be the main cause of different rate coefficients depending on the selection of x = 1 or 2 of the reaction of F2 + NOx → F + FNOx, which was also confirmed by the difference in Si etch rate using the F formed by those reactions.

  13. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves B-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Marshall W; Riegman, Adriaan R A; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg(-/-) mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin(-)) cells or Il2rg(-/-) Lin(-) cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning.

  14. Neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap

  15. Crowd Sourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has contributed new words and slang to our daily vernacular. A few terms, such as tweeting, texting, sexting, blogging, and googling, have become common in most vocabularies and in many languages, and are now included in the dictionary. A new buzzword making the rounds in industry is crowd sourcing, which involves outsourcing an activity, task, or problem by sending it to people or groups outside a business or a practice. Crowd sourcing allows doctors and practices to tap the wisdom of many instead of relying only on the few members of their close-knit group. This article defines "crowd sourcing," offers examples, and explains how to get started with this approach that can increase your ability to finish a task or solve problems that you don't have the time or expertise to accomplish.

  16. Energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, Gy.

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive review is presented of the available sources of energy in the world is presented. About 80 percent of primary energy utilization is based on fossile fuels, and their dominant role is not expected to change in the foreseeable future. Data are given on petroleum, natural gas and coal based power production. The role and economic aspects of nuclear power are analyzed. A brief summary of renewable energy sources is presented. The future prospects of the world's energy resources are discussed, and the special position of Hungary regarding fossil, nuclear and renewable energy and the country's energy potential is evaluated. (R.P.)

  17. The structure and band gap design of high Si doping level Ag1−xGa1−xSixSe2 (x=1/2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shiyan; Mei, Dajiang; Du, Xin; Lin, Zheshuai; Zhong, Junbo; Wu, Yuandong; Xu, Jingli

    2016-01-01

    Ag 1−x Ga 1−x Si x Se 2 solutions with high Si doping level (x=1/2) are considered and new compound AgGaSiSe 4 has been synthesized. It crystallizes in space group Aea2 and possesses very long axis of a=63.06(1)Å. The three-dimensional framework in AgGaSiSe 4 is composed of AgSe 3 trigonal planar units, AgSe 4 tetrahedra and MSe 4 (M=Si, Ga) tetrahedra. AgGaSiSe 4 is a congruently melting compound with the melt temperature of 759 °C. The diffuse reflectance measurements reveal the band gap of 2.63 eV in AgGaSiSe 4 and the value is 0.33 eV larger than that of Ag 3 Ga 3 SiSe 8 (2.30 eV). - Graphical abstract: The Ag 1−x Ga 1−x Si x Se 2 with high Si doping level (x=1/2) has been studied and the new compound AgGaSiSe 4 was synthesized for the first time. AgGaSiSe 4 crystallizes in a new structure type in space group Aea2 and adopts a three-dimensional framework consisting of AgSe 3 trigonal planar units, AgSe 4 tetrahedra and MSe 4 (M=Si, Ge) tetrahedra. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Study of Ag 1−x Ga 1−x Si x Se 2 with high Si doping level (x=1/2). • Successful synthesis of new compound named AgGaSiSe 4 . • AgGaSiSe 4 crystallizes in space group Aea2 and adopts a three-dimensional framework. • The energy band gap of AgGaSiSe 4 is enlarged compared with Ag 3 Ga 3 SiSe 8 .

  18. Exploring the Power of Heterogeneous Information Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    set of movies derived from two information sources: movie genres and users. The genre information may indicate that two movies that are “ animations ...are more similar than two movies one of which is an “ animation ” and one of which is a “romance” movie. Similarly, movies watched by the same set of...grown- ups ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ X1-The Lion King; X2-Toy Story; X3-Kungfu Panda ; X4-Wall-E; X5-Casablanca; X6-Titanic; X7-The Notebook kids Figure 6.2: A

  19. Ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The specifications of a set of point-shape electrodes of non-corrodable material that can hold a film of liquid material of equal thickness is described. Contained in a jacket, this set forms an ion source. The electrode is made of tungsten with a glassy carbon layer for insulation and an outer layer of aluminium-oxide ceramic material

  20. ACCURATE LABORATORY WAVELENGTHS OF THE e 3 Σ-(ν' = 5) - X 1 Σ+(ν'' = 0) BAND OF 12C16O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickenson, G. D.; Nortje, A. C.; Steenkamp, C. M.; Rohwer, E. G.; Du Plessis, A.

    2010-01-01

    The forbidden singlet-triplet transitions of carbon monoxide (CO) are important in the interpretation of vacuum ultraviolet interstellar absorption spectra and in particular for the measurement of large CO column densities. Twenty rovibronic lines of the e 3 Σ - (ν' = 5) - X 1 Σ + (ν'' = 0) band of 12 C 16 O for which laboratory wavelengths were previously unavailable were identified in laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectra. Wavelengths were assigned to five rovibronic transitions to an average accuracy of 0.0028 A. A further 15 lines could not be fully resolved and average wavelengths were measured for these groups of closely spaced lines. A wavelength difference of 0.011 ± 0.0028 A between the measured wavelengths and the calculated wavelengths in the atlas of Eidelsberg and Rostas demonstrates the need for more experimental data on CO.

  1. Accurate Laboratory Wavelengths of the e 3 Σ-(ν' = 5) - X 1 Σ+(ν'' = 0) Band of 12C16O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, G. D.; Nortje, A. C.; Steenkamp, C. M.; Rohwer, E. G.; Du Plessis, A.

    2010-05-01

    The forbidden singlet-triplet transitions of carbon monoxide (CO) are important in the interpretation of vacuum ultraviolet interstellar absorption spectra and in particular for the measurement of large CO column densities. Twenty rovibronic lines of the e 3Σ-(ν' = 5) - X 1Σ+(ν'' = 0) band of 12 C 16O for which laboratory wavelengths were previously unavailable were identified in laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectra. Wavelengths were assigned to five rovibronic transitions to an average accuracy of 0.0028 Å. A further 15 lines could not be fully resolved and average wavelengths were measured for these groups of closely spaced lines. A wavelength difference of 0.011 ± 0.0028 Å between the measured wavelengths and the calculated wavelengths in the atlas of Eidelsberg & Rostas demonstrates the need for more experimental data on CO.

  2. Analysis of discrete and continuous laser induced fluorescence spectra of the A 1Σsub(u)+-X 1Σsub(g)+ band system of Sr2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.; Moeller, R.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectra of the gaseous Sr 2 excimer molecule have been measured. The spectra contain discrete molecular fluorescence series, regularly modulated continuous fluorescence and an unstructured continuum. Analysis of the molecular line spectra yields for the first time Dunham coefficients for the X 1 Σsub(g) + ground state and the A 1 Σsub(u) + excited state. Using the intensity distribution of the modulated continuum which is associated with bound-free transitions the repulsive potential of the ground state up to 3000 cm -1 above the dissociation limit has been determined. The unstructured continuum can be analyzed as due to two types of continuous fluorescence. The dissociation energy of Sr 2 has been determined to Dsub(e)(X) = 965 +- 45 cm -1 . (Auth.)

  3. Analysis of discrete and continuous laser induced fluorescence spectra of the A 1μ+sub(u) - X 1μ+sub(g) band system of SR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.; Moeller, R.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectra of the gaseous Sr 2 excimer molecule have been measured. The spectra contain discrete molecular fluorescence series, regularly modulated continuous fluorescence and an unstructured continuum. Analysis of the molecular line spectra yields for the first time Dunham coefficients for the X 1 μ + sub(g) ground state and the A 1 μ + sub(u) excited state. Using the intensity distribution of the modulated continuum which is associated with bound-free transitions the repulsive potential of the ground state up to 3000 cm - 1 above the dissociation limit has been determined. The unstructured continuum can be analyzed as due to two types of continuous fluorescence. The dissociation energy of Sr 2 has been determined to Dsub(e) (X) = 965 +- 45 cm - 1 . (Author)

  4. Thermodynamic study of binary mixture of x1[C6mim][BF4] + x21-propanol: Measurements and molecular modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermanpour, F.; Sharifi, T.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Densities and viscosities for binary mixture of {x 1 [C 6 mim][BF 4 ] + x 2 1-propanol} were measured at different temperatures. ► The excess molar functions were calculated from the obtained experimental data. ► These data were correlated with the Redlich–Kister equation and PFP model to obtain the coefficients and standard deviations. - Abstract: Densities, ρ, and viscosities, η, of pure 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazoliumtetrafluoro borate ([C 6 mim][BF 4 ]) and 1-propanol, and their binary mixture {x 1 [C 6 mim][BF 4 ] + x 2 1-propanol} were measured at atmospheric pressure and in the temperature range of 293.15–333.15 K. The excess molar volumes, V m E , thermal expansion coefficients, α, and their excess values, α E , isothermal coefficient of excess molar enthalpy, (∂H m E /∂p) T,x and excess viscosities, η E , were calculated from the experimental values of densities and viscosities. The excess molar volumes of the binary mixture are negative over the entire mole fraction range and increase with increasing temperature. Excess viscosities are negative over the entire mole fraction range of the mixture and decrease with increasing temperature. The obtained excess molar volumes and excess viscosities were correlated with the Redlich–Kister equation. The experimental results have also been used to examine the applicability of Prigogine–Flory–Patterson (PFP) theory in predicting the excess molar volume of the binary mixture. It is indicated that agreement between excess molar volumes calculated via PFP theory and the experimental results is good in all temperatures.

  5. Study on Precursor Activity of the X1.6 Flare in the Great AR 12192 with SDO , IRIS , and Hinode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamba, Yumi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS)/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Lee, Kyoung-Sun [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Imada, Shinsuke; Kusano, Kanya, E-mail: y-bamba@nagoya-u.jp [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research (ISEE)/Nagoya University Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)

    2017-05-10

    The physical properties and their contribution to the onset of a solar flare are still uncleare even though chromospheric brightening is considered a precursor phenomenon of a flare. Many studies suggested that photospheric magnetic field changes cause destabilization of large-scale coronal structure. We aim to understand how a small photospheric change contributes to a flare and to reveal how the intermediary chromosphere behaves in the precursor phase. We analyzed the precursor brightening of the X1.6 flare on 2014 October 22 in the AR 12192 using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) and Hinode /EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data. We investigated a localized jet with the strong precursor brightening, and compared the intensity, Doppler velocity, and line width in C ii, Mg ii k, and Si iv lines by IRIS and He ii, Fe xii, and Fe xv lines by Hinode /EIS. We also analyzed the photospheric magnetic field and chromospheric/coronal structures using the Solar Dynamics Observatory ( SDO )/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. We found a significant blueshift (∼100 km s{sup −1}), which is related to the strong precursor brightening over a characteristic magnetic field structure, and the blueshift was observed at all of the temperatures. This might indicate that the flow is accelerated by Lorentz force. Moreover, the large-scale coronal loop that connects the foot points of the flare ribbons was destabilized just after the precursor brightening with the blueshift. It suggests that magnetic reconnection locally occurred in the lower chromosphere and it triggered magnetic reconnection of the X1.6 flare in the corona.

  6. Aragonite saturation state gridded to 1x1 degree latitude and longitude at depth levels of 0, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 meters in the global oceans (NCEI Accession 0139360)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains gridded data of aragonite saturation state across the global oceans (spatial distributions with a resolution of 1x1 degree latitude...

  7. Orphan sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pust, R.; Urbancik, L.

    2008-01-01

    The presentation describes how the stable detection systems (hereinafter referred to as S DS ) have contributed to reveal the uncontrolled sources of ionizing radiation on the territory of the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) Brno Regional Centre (RC Brno). It also describes the emergencies which were solved by or in which the workers from the Brno. Regional Centre participated in. The contribution is divided into the following chapters: A. SDS systems installed on the territory of SONS RC Brno; B. Selected unusual emergencies; C. Comments to individual emergencies; D. Aspects of SDS operation in term of their users; E. Aspects of SDS operation and related activities in term of radiation protection; F. Current state of orphan sources. (authors)

  8. Tritium sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glodic, S.; Boreli, F.

    1993-01-01

    Tritium is the only radioactive isotope of hydrogen. It directly follows the metabolism of water and it can be bound into genetic material, so it is very important to control levels of contamination. In order to define the state of contamination it is necessary to establish 'zero level', i.e. actual global inventory. The importance of tritium contamination monitoring increases with the development of fusion power installations. Different sources of tritium are analyzed and summarized in this paper. (author)

  9. Source rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakr F. Makky

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available West Beni Suef Concession is located at the western part of Beni Suef Basin which is a relatively under-explored basin and lies about 150 km south of Cairo. The major goal of this study is to evaluate the source rock by using different techniques as Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Vitrinite reflectance (%Ro, and well log data of some Cretaceous sequences including Abu Roash (E, F and G members, Kharita and Betty formations. The BasinMod 1D program is used in this study to construct the burial history and calculate the levels of thermal maturity of the Fayoum-1X well based on calibration of measured %Ro and Tmax against calculated %Ro model. The calculated Total Organic Carbon (TOC content from well log data compared with the measured TOC from the Rock-Eval pyrolysis in Fayoum-1X well is shown to match against the shale source rock but gives high values against the limestone source rock. For that, a new model is derived from well log data to calculate accurately the TOC content against the limestone source rock in the study area. The organic matter existing in Abu Roash (F member is fair to excellent and capable of generating a significant amount of hydrocarbons (oil prone produced from (mixed type I/II kerogen. The generation potential of kerogen in Abu Roash (E and G members and Betty formations is ranging from poor to fair, and generating hydrocarbons of oil and gas prone (mixed type II/III kerogen. Eventually, kerogen (type III of Kharita Formation has poor to very good generation potential and mainly produces gas. Thermal maturation of the measured %Ro, calculated %Ro model, Tmax and Production index (PI indicates that Abu Roash (F member exciting in the onset of oil generation, whereas Abu Roash (E and G members, Kharita and Betty formations entered the peak of oil generation.

  10. Radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabkina, L.E.; Mazurek, V.; Myascedov, D.N.; Prokhorov, P.; Kachalov, V.A.; Ziv, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    A radioactive layer in a radioactive source is sealed by the application of a sealing layer on the radioactive layer. The sealing layer can consist of a film of oxide of titanium, tin, zirconium, aluminum, or chromium. Preferably, the sealing layer is pure titanium dioxide. The radioactive layer is embedded in a finish enamel which, in turn, is on a priming enamel which surrounds a substrate

  11. Muon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2001-01-01

    A full high energy muon collider may take considerable time to realize. However, intermediate steps in its direction are possible and could help facilitate the process. Employing an intense muon source to carry out forefront low energy research, such as the search for muon-number non-conservation, represents one interesting possibility. For example, the MECO proposal at BNL aims for 2 x 10 -17 sensitivity in their search for coherent muon-electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. To reach that goal requires the production, capture and stopping of muons at an unprecedented 10 11 μ/sec. If successful, such an effort would significantly advance the state of muon technology. More ambitious ideas for utilizing high intensity muon sources are also being explored. Building a muon storage ring for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams is particularly exciting.We present an overview of muon sources and example of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Factory at BNL with various detector location possibilities

  12. The dynamics of TiN{sub x} (x = 1–3) admolecule interlayer and intralayer transport on TiN/TiN(001) islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edström, D., E-mail: daned@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Sangiovanni, D.G.; Hultman, L. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Petrov, I.; Greene, J.E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and the Materials Science Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chirita, V. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-08-31

    It has been shown both experimentally and by density functional theory calculations that the primary diffusing species during the epitaxial growth of TiN/TiN(001) are Ti and N adatoms together with TiN{sub x} complexes (x = 1, 2, 3), in which the dominant N-containing admolecule species depends upon the incident N/Ti flux ratio. Here, we employ classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations to probe the dynamics of TiN{sub x} (x = 1–3) admolecules on 8 × 8 atom square, single-atom-high TiN islands on TiN(001), as well as pathways for descent over island edges. The simulations are carried out at 1000 K, a reasonable epitaxial growth temperature. We find that despite their lower mobility on infinite TiN(001) terraces, both TiN and TiN{sub 2} admolecules funnel toward descending steps and are incorporated into island edges more rapidly than Ti adatoms. On islands, TiN diffuses primarily via concerted translations, but rotation is the preferred diffusion mechanism on infinite terraces. TiN{sub 2} migration is initiated primarily by rotation about one of the N admolecule atoms anchored at an epitaxial site. TiN admolecules descend from islands by direct hopping over edges and by edge exchange reactions, while TiN{sub 2} trimers descend exclusively by hopping. In contrast, TiN{sub 3} admolecules are essentially stationary and serve as initiators for local island growth. Ti adatoms are the fastest diffusing species on infinite TiN(001) terraces, but on small TiN/TiN(001) islands, TiN dimers provide more efficient mass transport. The overall results reveal the effect of the N/Ti precursor flux ratio on TiN(001) surface morphological evolution and growth modes. - Highlights: • Classical MD is used to model TiN{sub x} admolecule dynamics on TiN/TiN(001) islands. • TiN{sub x} admolecules descend from islands by both direct hopping and exchange reactions. • TiN and TiN{sub 2} exhibit surprisingly high diffusivities on TiN/TiN(001) islands. • TiN{sub 3} tetramers are

  13. New Insights on the Uncertainties in Finite-Fault Earthquake Source Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Razafindrakoto, Hoby

    2015-04-01

    New Insights on the Uncertainties in Finite-Fault Earthquake Source Inversion Hoby Njara Tendrisoa Razafindrakoto Earthquake source inversion is a non-linear problem that leads to non-unique solutions. The aim of this dissertation is to understand the uncertainty and reliability in earthquake source inversion, as well as to quantify variability in earthquake rupture models. The source inversion is performed using a Bayesian inference. This technique augments optimization approaches through its ability to image the entire solution space which is consistent with the data and prior information. In this study, the uncertainty related to the choice of source-time function and crustal structure is investigated. Three predefined analytical source-time functions are analyzed; isosceles triangle, Yoffe with acceleration time of 0.1 and 0.3 s. The use of the isosceles triangle as source-time function is found to bias the finite-fault source inversion results. It accelerates the rupture to propagate faster compared to that of the Yoffe function. Moreover, it generates an artificial linear correlation between parameters that does not exist for the Yoffe source-time functions. The effect of inadequate knowledge of Earth’s crustal structure in earthquake rupture models is subsequently investigated. The results show that one-dimensional structure variability leads to parameters resolution changes, with a broadening of the posterior 5 PDFs and shifts in the peak location. These changes in the PDFs of kinematic parameters are associated with the blurring effect of using incorrect Earth structure. As an application to real earthquake, finite-fault source models for the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake are examined using one- and three-dimensional crustal structures. One- dimensional structure is found to degrade the data fitting. However, there is no significant effect on the rupture parameters aside from differences in the spatial slip extension. Stable features are maintained for both

  14. Glassy behavior in the layered perovskites La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 4}(1.1{<=}x{<=}1.3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, S., E-mail: sanseb68@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, University of Burdwan, Burdwan 713104 (India); Mukherjee, Rajarshi [Department .of Physics, University of Burdwan, Burdwan 713104 (India); Banerjee, S.; Ranganathan, R. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Kumar, Uday [Department of Physical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research - Kolkata, Mohonpur 741252 (India)

    2012-03-15

    The glassy behavior of the phase segregated state in the layered cobaltite La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 4} has been studied. The role of the inter-cluster interactions as well as the disordered spins at the paramagnetic-ferromagnetic interface, behind the observed glassy behavior have been investigated. The disordered spins at the interface appear to be strongly pinned, and they contribute little to the observed glassy behavior. On the other hand, the inter-cluster interactions play the key role. Both the Co{sup 4+} and Co{sup 3+} ions are in the intermediate spin state. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase segregated state of cobaltite La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 4} for (1.1{<=}x{<=}1.3) to find the origin of the observed glassy behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Result of the frequency dependent ac susceptibility measurement excludes the possibility of any spin glass phase, hints strong inter-cluster interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relaxation experiments confirm the system to be a collection of clusters with two preferred sizes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The glassy behavior originates from strong inter-cluster interactions.

  15. HBr Formation from the Reaction between Gas-phase Bromine Atom and Vibrationally Excited Chemisorbed Hydrogen Atoms on a Si(001)-(2 x 1) Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ree, J.; Yoon, S. H.; Park, K. G.; Kim, Y. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have calculated the probability of HBr formation and energy disposal of the reaction exothermicity in HBr produced from the reaction of gas-phase bromine with highly covered chemisorbed hydrogen atoms on a Si (001)-(2 x 1) surface. The reaction probability is about 0.20 at gas temperature 1500 K and surface temperature 300 K. Raising the initial vibrational state of the adsorbate(H)-surface(Si) bond from the ground to v = 1, 2 and 3 states causes the vibrational, translational and rotational energies of the product HBr to increase equally. However, the vibrational and translational motions of product HBr share most of the reaction energy. Vibrational population of the HBr molecules produced from the ground state adsorbate-surface bond (vHSi = 0) follows the Boltzmann distribution, but it deviates seriously from the Boltzmann distribution when the initial vibrational energy of the adsorbate-surface bond increases. When the vibration of the adsorbate-surface bond is in the ground state, the amount of energy dissipated into the surface is negative, while it becomes positive as vHSi increases. The energy distributions among the various modes weakly depends on surface temperature in the range of 0-600 K, regardless of the initial vibrational state of H(ad)-Si(s) bond

  16. 3D Doppler Tomography of the X-Ray Binary System Cygnus X-1 from Spectral Observations in 2007 in the HeII λ 4686 Å Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonov, M. I.; Karitskaya, E. A.; Sharova, O. I.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Zharikov, S. V.; Butenko, G. Z.; Bondar', A. V.; Sidorov, M. Yu.

    2018-02-01

    The results of a 3D Doppler tomography analysis for the X-ray binary system Cyg X-1 in the HeII λ 4686 Å line are presented. Information about the motions of gaseous flows outside the orbital plane has been obtained for the first time. Line profiles obtained in June 2007 on the 2-m telescope of the Terskol Branch of the Institute of Astronomy (Russia) and on the 2.1-m telescope of the National Astronomical Observatory of Mexico were used. A detailed analysis of these spectral data is presented: the distribution of the data in time, distribution of orbital phases for the projections, comparison of the line profile shapes for the data from two observatories. The geometry of the total transfer function obtained in the reconstruction is considered. The possibility of applying the profiles obtained to realize 3D tomography is justified. The resolution of the constructed 3D tomogram in velocity space is 60 × 60 × 40 km/s for V x , V y , V z . Fifteen cross sections for 15 different V z values perpendicular to the orbital plane are presented. The intensity distributions corresponding to the velocities of gaseous structures in the binary system are obtained. The reconstruction was realized using the radio-astronomical approach, developed for solving problems in tomography with a limited number of projections.

  17. Cross sections for the vibrational excitation of the H2 X 1Σ+g(v) levels generated by electron collisional excitation of the higher singlet states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation cross sections, σ(v,v double-prime), for an H 2 molecule initially in any one of the 15 vibrational levels, v belonging to the ground electronic state and excited to a final vibrational level, v double-prime are evaluated for direct excitations via all members of the excited electronic singlet spectrum. Account is taken of predissociation, autoionization, and radiative decay of the excited electronic spectrum that leads to a final population distribution for the ground electronic state, X 1 Σ + g (v double-prime). For v=0, account is taken explicitly of transitions via the B, C, B', and D electronic states in evaluating the cross sections. The additional contribution of excitations via all Rydberg states lying above the D state enhances these cross sections by approximately 10%. For v>0, cross sections are evaluated taking explicit account of transitions through the B and C states; higher singlet excitations enhance these values by 25%. The choice of the reference total cross sections remains a subjective one, causing the values calculated here to have a possible uncertainty of +20% -30% . For excitations occurring within a hydrogen discharge, collisional excitation-ionization events among the intermediate singlet states will effectively quench the v, v double-prime excitation process for discharge densities in excess of the range 10 15 --10 16 electrons/cm -3

  18. Optimum Operating Conditions of (PbxX1−x(ZryTizY1−y−z Piezoelectric Transducer for Vibrational Energy Harvesting Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrical energy production capability of bimorph (PbxX1-x(ZryTizY1-y-z fiber composite piezoelectric transducer has been investigated for energy harvesting applications. The material has been analyzed under different frequencies, bending amounts, and temperatures. The operating conditions for maximum electrical energy outcome have been determined. The natural frequencies of oscillations in the macro dimensions have been found to be inversely proportional to the length of the material. On the other hand, the voltage output with respect to the oscillation frequency exhibits an interesting behavior such that the characteristic curve shifts to higher frequencies as the bending radius is decreased. This behavior has been interpreted as a result of possible overtone transitions of the oscillations to a stiffer mode. The increasing temperature has been observed to have a negative effect on the piezoelectric energy harvesting property. When the determined optimum conditions were utilized, the amount of electrical energy stored in 6300 s by an energy harvester circuitry has been found to be 0.8 J.

  19. A computational study on the adsorption configurations and reactions of SiHx(x = 1-4) on clean and H-covered Si(100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thong N.-M.; Raghunath, P.; Huynh, Lam K.; Lin, M. C.

    2016-11-01

    Possible adsorption configurations of H and SiHx (x = 1 - 4) on clean and H-covered Si(100) surfaces are determined by using spin-polarized DFT calculations. The results show that, on the clean surface, the gas-phase hydrogen atom and SiH3 radicals effectively adsorb on the top sites, while SiH and SiH2 prefer the bridge sites of the first layer. Another possibility for SiH is to reside on the hollow sites with a triple-bond configuration. For a partially H-coverd Si(100) surface, the mechanism is similar but with higher adsorption energies in most cases. This suggests that the surface species become more stable in the presence of surface hydrogens. The minimum energy paths for the adsorption/migration and reactions of H/SiHx species on the surfaces are explored using the climbing image-nudged elastic band method. The competitive surface processes for Si thin-film formation from SiHx precursors are also predicted. The study reveals that the migration of hydrogen adatom is unimportant with respect to leaving open surface sites because of its high barriers (>29.0 kcal/mol). Alternatively, the abstraction of hydrogen adatoms by H/SiHx radicals is more favorable. Moreover, the removal of hydrogen atoms from adsorbed SiHx, an essential step for forming Si layers, is dominated by abstraction rather than the decomposition processes.

  20. Computational investigation of CO adsorbed on Aux, Agx and (AuAg)x nanoclusters (x = 1 - 5, 147) and monometallic Au and Ag low-energy surfaces*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Anna L.; Catlow, C. Richard A.; Logsdail, Andrew J.

    2018-02-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the use of CO as a probe molecule for the determination of the structure and composition of Au, Ag and AuAg nanoparticles. For very small nanoclusters (x = 1 - 5), the CO vibrational frequencies can be directly correlated to CO adsorption strength, whereas larger 147-atom nanoparticles show a strong energetic preference for CO adsorption at a vertex position but the highest wavenumbers are for the bridge positions. We also studied CO adsorption on Au and Ag (100) and (111) surfaces, for a 1 monolayer coverage, which proves to be energetically favourable on atop only and bridge positions for Au (100) and atop for Ag (100); vibrational frequencies of the CO molecules red-shift to lower wavenumbers as a result of increased metal coordination. We conclude that CO vibrational frequencies cannot be solely relied upon in order to obtain accurate compositional analysis, but we do propose that elemental rearrangement in the core@shell nanoclusters, from Ag@Au (or Au@Ag) to an alloy, would result in a shift in the CO vibrational frequencies that indicate changes in the surface composition. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Shaping Nanocatalysts", edited by Francesca Baletto, Roy L. Johnston, Jochen Blumberger and Alex Shluger.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2017-80280-7

  1. Franck-Condon factors perturbed by damped harmonic oscillators: Solvent enhanced X 1Ag ↔ A1B1u absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chen-Wen; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Lin, Sheng-Hsien; Yang, Ling; Yu, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Damped harmonic oscillators are utilized to calculate Franck-Condon factors within displaced harmonic oscillator approximation. This is practically done by scaling unperturbed Hessian matrix that represents local modes of force constants for molecule in gaseous phase, and then by diagonalizing perturbed Hessian matrix it results in direct modification of Huang–Rhys factors which represent normal modes of solute molecule perturbed by solvent environment. Scaling parameters are empirically introduced for simulating absorption and fluorescence spectra of an isolated solute molecule in solution. The present method is especially useful for simulating vibronic spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in which hydrogen atom vibrations in solution can be scaled equally, namely the same scaling factor being applied to all hydrogen atoms in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present method is demonstrated in simulating solvent enhanced X 1 A g ↔ A 1 B 1u absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene (medium-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) in benzene solution. It is found that one of six active normal modes v 10 is actually responsible to the solvent enhancement of spectra observed in experiment. Simulations from all functionals (TD) B3LYP, (TD) B3LYP35, (TD) B3LYP50, and (TD) B3LYP100 draw the same conclusion. Hence, the present method is able to adequately reproduce experimental absorption and fluorescence spectra in both gas and solution phases

  2. Vibrational and rotational excitation effects of the N(2D) + D2(X1Σg +) → ND(X3Σ+) + D(2S) reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziliang; Wang, Haijie; Wang, Xiquan; Shi, Yanying

    2018-05-01

    The effects of the rovibrational excitation of reactants in the N(2D) + D2(X1Σg+) → ND(X3Σ+) + D(2S) reaction are calculated in a collision energy range from the threshold to 1.0 eV using the time-dependent wave packet approach and a second-order split operator. The reaction probability, integral cross-section, differential cross-section and rate constant of the title reaction are calculated. The integral cross-section and rate constant of the initial states v = 0, j = 0, 1, are in good agreement with experimental data available in the literature. The rotational excitation of the D2 molecule has little effect on reaction probability, integral cross-section and the rate constant, but it increased the sideways and forward scattering signals. The vibrational excitation of the D2 molecule reduced the threshold and broke up the forward-backward symmetry of the differential cross-section; it also increased the forward scattering signals. This may be because the vibrational excitation of the D2 molecule reduced the lifetime of the intermediate complex.

  3. Precision spectroscopy of the X1Σg+, v=0→1(J=0-2) rovibrational splittings in H2, HD and D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, M. L.; Salumbides, E. J.; Dickenson, G. D.; Eikema, K. S. E.; Ubachs, W.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate experimental values for the vibrational ground tone or fundamental vibrational energy splitting of H2, HD, and D2 are presented. Absolute accuracies of 2×10-4 cm-1 are obtained from Doppler-free laser spectroscopy applied in a collisionless environment. The vibrational splitting frequencies are derived from the combination difference between separate electronic excitations from the X1Σg+, v=0, J and v=1, J vibrational states to a common EF1Σg+, v=0, J state. The present work on rotational quantum states J=1,2 extends the results reported by Dickenson et al. on J=0 [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 (2013) 193601]. The experimental procedures leading to this high accuracy are discussed in detail. A comparison is made with full ab initio calculations encompassing Born-Oppenheimer energies, adiabatic and non-adiabatic corrections, as well as relativistic corrections and QED-contributions. The present agreement between the experimental results and the calculations provides a stringent test on the application of quantum electrodynamics in molecules. Furthermore, the combined experimental-theoretical uncertainty can be interpreted to provide bounds to new interactions beyond the Standard Model of Physics or fifth forces between hadrons.

  4. Permeability and giant magnetoimpedance in Co69Fe4.5X1.5Si10B15 (X=Cr, Mn, Ni) amorphous ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byon, Kwang Seok; Yu, Seong-Cho; Kim, Cheol Gi

    2001-01-01

    The magnetoimpedance (MI) has been measured in the amorphous ribbons of the soft ferromagnetic alloy Co 69 Fe 4.5 X 1.5 Si 10 B 15 (X=Cr, Mn, Ni) as functions of frequency (f). For all of the three samples, at low frequency, f≤5MHz, the MI ratio increases with increasing frequency, but the MI ratio decreases at high frequency, f≥5MHz. The MI profiles are not changed at low frequency regions of f≤1MHz in the amorphous ribbons. The MI ratio at high frequency of f=5MHz becomes 57% in Co 69 Fe 4.5 Cr 1.5 Si 10 B 15 , but the MI ratio becomes 30% in Co 69 Fe 4.5 Mn 1.5 Si 10 B 15 and Co 69 Fe 4.5 Ni 1.5 Si 10 B 15 . The MI ratio at f=10MHz becomes 45% in Co 69 Fe 4.5 Cr 1.5 Si 10 B 15 and the MI ratio becomes 23% in Co 69 Fe 4.5 Mn 1.5 Si 10 B 15 and Co 69 Fe 4.5 Ni 1.5 Si 10 B 15 , respectively. The maximum values of field sensitivity are 2.7(X=Cr), 2.5(X=Mn), 2.2(X=Ni)%/Oe for f=5MHz. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  5. Synthesis of Nanocrystalline SnOx (x = 1–2 Thin Film Using a Chemical Bath Deposition Method with Improved Deposition Time, Temperature and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkarnain Zainal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline SnOx (x = 1–2 thin films were prepared on glass substrates by a simple chemical bath deposition method. Triethanolamine was used as complexing agent to decrease time and temperature of deposition and shift the pH of the solution to the noncorrosive region. The films were characterized for composition, surface morphology, structure and optical properties. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that SnOx thin films consist of a polycrystalline structure with an average grain size of 36 nm. Atomic force microscopy studies show a uniform grain distribution without pinholes. The elemental composition was evaluated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average O/Sn atomic percentage ratio is 1.72. Band gap energy and optical transition were determined from optical absorbance data. The film was found to exhibit direct and indirect transitions in the visible spectrum with band gap values of about 3.9 and 3.7 eV, respectively. The optical transmittance in the visible region is 82%. The SnOx nanocrystals exhibit an ultraviolet emission band centered at 392 nm in the vicinity of the band edge, which is attributed to the well-known exciton transition in SnOx. Photosensitivity was detected in the positive region under illumination with white light.

  6. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares. I. Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Adam F. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, 2000 Colorado Ave, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cauzzi, Gianna [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: Adam.Kowalski@lasp.colorado.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2017-02-10

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager . We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from the stationary beam-heated layers just below the condensation. A model producing two flaring regions (a condensation and stationary layers) in the lower atmosphere is also consistent with the asymmetric Fe ii chromospheric emission line profiles observed in the impulsive phase.

  7. High-field magnetostriction in CeNiSn{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} (0<=x<=1) strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, A. del, E-mail: delmoral@unizar.e [Laboratorio de Magnetismo de Solidos, Departamento de Fisica de Materia Condensada and ICMA, Universidad de Zaragoza and CSIC, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Fuente, C. de la [Laboratorio de Magnetismo de Solidos, Departamento de Fisica de Materia Condensada and ICMA, Universidad de Zaragoza and CSIC, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Magnetization (down to 1.8 K and up to 9 T) and magnetostriction (down to 4.2 K and up to 30 T) measurements have been performed in the series of polycrystalline intermetallics CeNiSn{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} (0<=x<=1), which show a crossover from Kondo-lattice to fluctuating valence behaviors with x increase. Magnetostriction observed can be denominated as 'colossal' for a paramagnet (up to 0.68% at 150 K and 30 T), with no sign of saturation. Field, H, induced metamagnetic transitions associated to a change in Ce valence are observed. Three kinds of analysis of magnetostriction have been performed to ascertain the magnetostriction origin. At relatively low field and low temperatures these systems follow well the standard theory of magnetostriction (STM), revealing single-ion crystal field and exchange origins, and a determination of the alpha-symmetry microscopic magnetoelastic parameters have been performed. The valence transition is well explained in terms of the interconfigurational model, which needs an extension up to power H{sup 4}. Application of the scaling (thermodynamics corresponding low states) allows the obtainment of the Grueneisen constant, which increases with x. Needed elastic constants measurements are also reported.

  8. The (p, ρ, T, x) properties of (x1 propane + x2n-butane) with x1 (0.0000, 0.2729, 0.5021, and 0.7308) over the temperature range from (280 to 440) K at pressures from (1 to 200) MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Uematsu, M.

    2008-01-01

    The (p, ρ, T, x) properties for (x 1 propane + x 2 n-butane) with x 1 = (0.0000, 0.2729, 0.5021, and 0.7308) in the compressed liquid phase were measured by means of a metal-bellows variable volumometer over the temperature range from (280 to 440) K at pressures from (1 to 200) MPa. The mole fraction purities of the propane and n-butane used in the measurements were 0.9999 and 0.9997, respectively. The expanded uncertainties (k = 2) in temperature, pressure, density, and composition measurements have been estimated to be less than ±3 mK; 1.4 kPa (p ≤ 7 MPa), 0.06% (7 MPa 150 MPa); 0.09%; and 4.4 . 10 -4 , respectively. In the region above 100 MPa at T = (280 and 440) K, the uncertainty in density measurements increases from 0.09% to 0.13% and 0.22%, respectively. Comparisons of the available equation of state with the present measurements are reported. On the basis of the present results, the excess molar volume v m E of the mixtures was calculated and illustrated as a function of temperature and pressure

  9. Measurement of the masses of the neutron star, Her X-1, and its binary companion, HZ Her, as derived from the study of 1.24-second optical pulsations from the Hz Her - Her X-1 binary system and the x ray-to-optical reprocessing reflection and transmission mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleditch, J.

    1975-10-01

    Intermittent optical pulsations at the 0.1--0.3 percent level have been detected from this binary system in over 500 hours of optical observations. These pulsations are present only for well defined values of the 1.7-day (binary) and 35-day phases. Positions of the pulsation-emitting regions, projected onto the orbital plane, have been measured and three distinct regions have been resolved. A simple model is put forth which accounts for the observed binary behavior, which gives a direct determination of the mass ratio, M/sub HZ Her//M/sub Her X-1/ = 1.69 +- 0.05, and which establishes that the spin of the pulsar is prograde. Additionally it is shown that HZ Her fills its critical Roche lobe. Using the above, the known x ray eclipse duration, and the mass function, the orbital inclination is calculated to be i = 85 0 +- 5 0 and the masses to be M/sub Her X-1/ = 1.28 +- 0.08 M/sub solar/ and M/sub HZ Her/ = 2.16 +- 0.07 M/sub solar/. Constraints on the physical parameters of the accretion stream and disk are derived from the data. The nature of the 35-day modulation of the data is discussed in relation to various models

  10. Pion source parameters in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, K.M.; Bistirlich, J.A.; Bossingham, R.R.

    1984-12-01

    Following the early work of Goldhaber, Lee, and Pais, many experiments have used the momentum correlations between identical bosons to determine the space-time extent of the pion source for various reactions between elementary hadrons. This technique, known as intensity interferometry, has recently been applied to nuclear collisions at both intermediate and very high energies. Here we report on measurements of the radius and lifetime of the pion source in the reactions 1.8 A GeV 40 Ar + KCl → 2π/sup +-/ + X, 1.8 A GeV 20 Na + NaF → 2π - + X, and 1.71 A GeV 56 Fe + Fe → 2π - + X. 11 references

  11. ''Anomalous'' air showers from point sources: Mass limits and light curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domokos, G.; Elliott, B.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a method to obtain upper limits on the mass of the primaries of air showers associated with point sources. One also obtains the UHE pulse shape of a pulsar if its period is observed in the signal. As an example, we analyze the data obtained during a recent burst of Hercules-X1

  12. Detection of subsurface core-level shifts in Si 2p core-level photoemission from Si(111)-(1x1):As

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggel, J.J. [Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Hasselblatt, M.; Horn, K. [Fritz-Haber Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschraft, Berlin (Germany)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The (7 x 7) reconstruction of the Si(111) surface arises from a lowering energy through the reduction of the number of dangling bonds. This reconstruction can be removed by the adsorption of atoms such as hydrogen which saturate the dangling bonds, or by the incorporation of atoms, such as arsenic which, because of the additional electron it possesses, can form three bonds and a nonreactive lone pair orbital from the remaining two electrons. Core and valence level photoemission and ion scattering data have shown that the As atoms replace the top silicon atoms. Previous core level spectra were interpreted in terms of a bulk and a single surface doublet. The authors present results demonstrate that the core level spectrum contains two more lines. The authors assign these to subsurface silicon layers which also experience changes in the charge distribution when a silicon atom is replaced by an arsenic atom. Subsurface core level shifts are not unexpected since the modifications of the electronic structure and/or of photohole screening are likely to decay into the bulk and not just to affect the top-most substrate atoms. The detection of subsurface components suggests that the adsorption of arsenic leads to charge flow also in the second double layer of the Si(111) surface. In view of the difference in atomic radius between As and Si, it was suggested that the (1 x 1): As surface is strained. The presence of charge rearrangement up to the second double layer implies that the atomic coordinates also exhibit deviations from their ideal Si(111) counterparts, which might be detected through a LEED I/V or photoelectron diffraction analysis.

  13. A computational study on the energetics and mechanisms for the dissociative adsorption of SiHx(x = 1-4) on W(1 1 1) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. H.; Raghunath, P.; Lin, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption and dissociation mechanisms of SiHx(x = 1-4) species on W(1 1 1) surface have been investigated by using the periodic density functional theory with the projector-augmented wave approach. The adsorption of all the species on four surface sites: top (T), bridge (B), shallow (S), and deep (D) sites have been analyzed. For SiH4 on a top site, T-SiH4(a), it is more stable with an adsorption energy of 2.6 kcal/mol. For SiH3, the 3-fold shallow site is most favorable with adsorption energy of 46.0 kcal/mol. For SiH2, its adsorption on a bridge site is most stable with 73.0 kcal/mol binding energy, whereas for SiH and Si the most stable adsorption configurations are on 3-fold deep sites with very high adsorption energies, 111.8 and 134.7 kcal/mol, respectively. The potential energy surfaces for the dissociative adsorption of all SiHx species on the W(1 1 1) surface have been constructed using the CINEB method. The barriers for H-atom migration from SiHx(a) to its neighboring W atoms, preferentially on B-sites, were predicted to be 0.4, 1.0, 4.5 and, 8.0 kcal/mol, respectively, for x = 4, 3, 2, and 1, respectively. The adsorption energy of the H atom on a bridge site on the clean W(1 1 1) surface was predicted to be 65.9 kcal/mol, which was found to be slightly affected by the co-adsorption of SiHx-1 within ± 1 kcal/mol.

  14. High-pressure syntheses of lanthanide polysulfides and polyselenides LnX_1_._9 (Ln = Gd-Tm, X = S, Se)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Carola J.; Schwarz, Ulrich; Doert, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The polysulfides LnS_1_._9 and polyselenides LnSe_1_._9 of the lanthanide metals from gadolinium to thulium were prepared by high-pressure high-temperature synthesis. The compounds adopt the tetragonal CeSe_1_._9 structure type in space group P4_2/n (No. 86) with lattice parameters of 8.531 Aa ≤ a ≤ 8.654 Aa and 15.563 Aa ≤ c ≤ 15.763 Aa for the sulfides and 8.869 Aa ≤ a ≤ 9.076 Aa and 16.367 Aa ≤ c ≤ 16.611 Aa for the selenides. The atomic pattern consists of puckered double slabs [LnX]"+ and planar chalcogenide layers with ten possible chalcogen positions, of which eight are occupied by chalcogen atoms forming dinuclear X_2"2"- dianions, one by a single X"2"- ion and one remaining vacant. This resembles a √5 x √5 x 2 superstructure of the ZrSSi aristotype. Structural relationships to the aristotype and the related lanthanide polychalcogenides LnX_2_-_δ (Ln = La-Tm, X = S-Te, δ = 0 - 0.3) are discussed. The samples synthesized under high-pressure conditions (p > 1 GPa) decompose slowly under release of sulfur or selenium at ambient conditions. The crystal structure of a partially degraded thulium-polysulfide sample can be described as an incommensurate variant of the original TmS_1_._9 motif. Additionally, the isostructural ternary compound Gd(S_1_-_xSe_x)_1_._9 was synthesized and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Generalized valence bond description of the ground states (X(1)Σg(+)) of homonuclear pnictogen diatomic molecules: N2, P2, and As2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu T; Dunning, Thom H

    2015-06-09

    The ground state, X1Σg+, of N2 is a textbook example of a molecule with a triple bond consisting of one σ and two π bonds. This assignment, which is usually rationalized using molecular orbital (MO) theory, implicitly assumes that the spins of the three pairs of electrons involved in the bonds are singlet-coupled (perfect pairing). However, for a six-electron singlet state, there are five distinct ways to couple the electron spins. The generalized valence bond (GVB) wave function lifts this restriction, including all of the five spin functions for the six electrons involved in the bond. For N2, we find that the perfect pairing spin function is indeed dominant at Re but that it becomes progressively less so from N2 to P2 and As2. Although the perfect pairing spin function is still the most important spin function in P2, the importance of a quasi-atomic spin function, which singlet couples the spins of the electrons in the σ orbitals while high spin coupling those of the electrons in the π orbitals on each center, has significantly increased relative to N2 and, in As2, the perfect pairing and quasi-atomic spin couplings are on essentially the same footing. This change in the spin coupling of the electrons in the bonding orbitals down the periodic table may contribute to the rather dramatic decrease in the strengths of the Pn2 bonds from N2 to As2 as well as in the increase in their chemical reactivity and should be taken into account in more detailed analyses of the bond energies in these species. We also compare the spin coupling in N2 with that in C2, where the quasi-atomic spin coupling dominants around Re.

  16. Petals of Crocus sativus L. as a potential source of the antioxidants crocin and kaempferol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeka, Keti; Ruparelia, Ketan C; Continenza, Maria A; Stagos, Dimitrios; Vegliò, Francesco; Arroo, Randolph R J

    2015-12-01

    Saffron from the province of L'Aquila, in the Abruzzo region of Italy, is highly prized and has been awarded a formal recognition by the European Union with EU Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status. Despite this, the saffron regions are abandoned by the younger generations because the traditional cultivation of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is labour intensive and yields only one crop of valuable saffron stamens per year. Petals of the saffron Crocus have had additional uses in traditional medicine and may add value to the crops for local farmers. This is especially important because the plant only flowers between October and November, and farmers will need to make the best use of the flowers harvested in this period. Recently, the petals of C. sativus L., which are considered a waste material in the production of saffron spice, were identified as a potential source of natural antioxidants. The antioxidants crocin and kaempferol were purified by flash column chromatography, and identified by thin layer chromatography (TLC), HPLC-DAD, infrared (IR), and nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H &(13)C NMR) spectroscopy. The antioxidant activity was determined with the ABTS and DPPH tests. The antioxidant activities are mainly attributed to carotenoid and flavonoid compounds, notably glycosides of crocin and kaempferol. We found in dried petals 0.6% (w/w) and 12.6 (w/w) of crocin and kaempferol, respectively. Petals of C. sativus L. have commercial potential as a source for kaempferol and crocetin glycosides, natural compounds with antioxidant activity that are considered to be the active ingredients in saffron-based herbal medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. UHE γ-rays from point sources based on GRAPES-I observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Sreekantan, B.V.; Srivatsan, R.; Tonwar, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    An experiment called GRAPES I (Gamma Ray Astronomy at PeV EnergieS) was set up in 1984 at Ooty in India, using 24 scintillation counters, to detect Extensive Air Showers (EAS) produced in the atmosphere by the primary cosmic radiation. The goal of the experiment has been to search for Ultra High Energy (UHE) γ-rays (E≥10 14 eV) from point sources in the sky. Here we discuss the results on X-ray binaries CYG X-3, HER X-1 and SCO X-1 obtained with GRAPES I experiment which covers the period 1984--87

  18. Observations of variable and transient X-ray sources with the Ariel V Sky Survey Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pounds, K.A.; Cooke, B.A.; Ricketts, M.J.; Turner, M.J.; Peacock, A.; Eadie, G.

    1976-01-01

    Results obtained during the first six months in orbit of Aerial V with the Leicester Sky Survey are reviewed. Among 80 sources found by a scan of the Milky Way, 16 are new, and 11 UHURU sources in the scanned region are not detected. Some of these sources may be transient. The light curve of Cen X-3 in a binary cycle shows a dip between phase 0.5 and 0.75, and a secondary maximum at the centre of the dip. The dip and the maximum get progressively weaker in the succeeding cycles. These features are interpreted in terms of the stellar wind accretion model. Cyg X-1 observation for 14 days gives a broad minimum around superior conjunction. Four bright transient sources of nova-like light curves have been observed. The light curves and the spectra are given for TrA X-1 (A1524-62) and Tau X-T (A0535+26). (Auth.)

  19. The Sun: the Earth light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Giovannelli, Luca; Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Catena, Liu` Maria; Amicucci, Giordano; Vittorio, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    We have implemented at Department of Physics of University of Rome Tor Vergata a project called "The Sun: the Earth light source". The project obtained the official endorsement from the IAU Executive Committee Working Group for the International Year of Light. The project, specifically designed for high school students, is focused on the "scientific" study of Sun light by means of a complete acquisition system based on "on the shelf" appropriately CMOS low-cost sensor with free control s/w and self-assembled telescopes. The project (hereafter stage) plan is based on a course of two weeks (60 hours in total). The course contains 20 hours of theoretical lectures, necessary to learn basics about Sun, optics, telescopes and image sensors, and 40 hours of laboratory. During the course, scientists and astronomers share with high schools students, work activities in real research laboratories. High schools teachers are intensely involved in the project. Their role is to share activities with university teachers and realize outreach actions in the home institutions. Simultaneously, they are introduced to innovative teaching methods and the project in this way is regarded as a professional development course. Sun light analysis and Sun-Earth connection through light are the main scientific topics of this project. The laboratory section of the stage is executed in two phases (weeks): First phase aims are the realization of a keplerian telescope and low-cost acquisition system. During this week students are introduced to astronomical techniques used to safety collect and acquire solar light; Second phase aims is the realization of a low-cost instrument to analyse sunlight extracting information about the solar spectrum, solar irradiance and Sun-Earth connection. The proposed stage has been already tested in Italy reached the fifth edition in 2014. Since 2010, the project has been a cornerstone outreach program of the University of Rome Tor Vergata, the Italian Ministry of

  20. Ab initio chemical kinetics for SiH3 reactions with Si(x)H2x+2 (x = 1-4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, P; Lin, M C

    2010-12-30

    Gas-phase kinetics and mechanisms of SiH(3) reactions with SiH(4), Si(2)H(6), Si(3)H(8), and Si(4)H(10), processes of relevance to a-Si thin-film deposition, have been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital and transition-state theory (TST) calculations. Geometric parameters of all the species involved in the title reactions were optimized by density functional theory at the B3LYP and BH&HLYP levels with the 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set. The potential energy surface of each reaction was refined at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. The results show that the most favorable low energy pathways in the SiH(3) reactions with these silanes occur by H abstraction, leading to the formation of SiH(4) + Si(x)H(2x+1) (silanyl) radicals. For both Si(3)H(8) and n-Si(4)H(10) reactions, the lowest energy barrier channels take place by secondary Si-H abstraction, yielding SiH(4) + s-Si(3)H(7) and SiH(4) + s-Si(4)H(9), respectively. In the i-Si(4)H(10) reaction, tertiary Si-H abstraction has the lowest barrier producing SiH(4) + t-Si(4)H(9). In addition, direct SiH(3)-for-X substitution reactions forming Si(2)H(6) + X (X = H or silanyls) can also occur, but with significantly higher reaction barriers. A comparison of the SiH(3) reactions with the analogous CH(3) reactions with alkanes has been made. The rate constants for low-energy product channels have been calculated for the temperature range 300-2500 K by TST with Eckart tunneling corrections. These results, together with predicted heats of formation of various silanyl radicals and Si(4)H(10) isomers, have been tabulated for modeling of a-Si:H film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

  1. IR emission and electrical conductivity of Nd/Nb-codoped TiO{sub x} (1.5 < x < 2) thin films grown by pulsed-laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchiffo-Tameko, C.; Cachoncinlle, C. [GREMI, UMR 7344 CNRS-Université Orléans, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Perriere, J. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, UMR 7588, INSP, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7588, INSP, 75005 Paris (France); Nistor, M. [NILPRP, L 22 P.O. Box MG-36, 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Petit, A.; Aubry, O. [GREMI, UMR 7344 CNRS-Université Orléans, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Pérez Casero, R. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Millon, E., E-mail: eric.millon@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, UMR 7344 CNRS-Université Orléans, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Nd/Nb-codoped TiO{sub 2} PLD films are electrically insulating and transparent in the UV visible NIR spectral domain. • Nd/Nb-codoped oxygen deficient TiO{sub x} (x ≈ 1.5) films are conductive and absorbent. • IR emission of Nd{sup 3+} in codoped TiO{sub x} films is quenched due to oxygen deficiency. • High Nb-doping rate decreases the IR emission of Nd{sup 3+} in Nd/Nb-codoped TiO{sub 2} films. - Abstract: The effect of the co-doping with Nd and Nb on electrical and optical properties of TiO{sub x} films is reported. The role of oxygen vacancies on the physical properties is also evidenced. The films are grown by pulsed-laser deposition onto (001) sapphire and (100) silicon substrates. The substrate temperature was fixed at 700 °C. To obtain either stoichiometric (TiO{sub 2}) or highly oxygen deficient (TiO{sub x} with x < 1.6) thin films, the oxygen partial pressure was adjusted at 10{sup −1} and 10{sup −6} mbar, respectively. 1%Nd-1%Nb, 1%Nd-5%Nb and 5%Nd-1%Nb co-doped TiO{sub 2} were used as bulk ceramic target. Composition, structural and morphological properties of films determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, are correlated to their optical (UV–vis transmission and photoluminescence) and electrical properties (resistivity at room temperature). The most intense Nd{sup 3+} emission in the IR domain is obtained for stoichiometric films. Codoping Nd-TiO{sub x} films by Nb{sup 5+} ions is found to decrease the photoluminescence efficiency. The oxygen pressure during the growth allows to tune the optical and electrical properties: insulating and highly transparent (80% in the visible range) Nd/Nb codoped TiO{sub 2} films are obtained at high oxygen pressure, while conductive and absorbent films are grown under low oxygen pressure (10{sup −6} mbar).

  2. Extraction of UO22+ by two highly sterically hindered (X1) (X2) PO(OH) extractants from an aqueous chloride phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, G.W.; Lewey, S.M.; Gilles, D.M.; Peppard, D.F.

    1978-01-01

    The comparative extraction behaviour of tracer-level UO 2 2+ into benzene solutions of two highly sterically hindered extractants, di(2,6-di-iso-propylphenyl) phosphoric acid, HD(2,6-i-PPHI)P and di-tertiary-butyl phosphinic acid, H[Dt-BP], vs an aqueous 1.0 F (NaCl + HCl) phase was studied. The extraction of UO 2 2+ in both systems is directly second-power dependent upon extractant concentration and inversely second-power dependent upon hydrogen ion concentration, the stoichiometry of extraction being UOsub(2A) 2+ + 2(HY)sub(2O) = UO 2 (HY 2 )sub(2O) + 2Hsub(A) + . The expression for the distribution ratio, K is K = Ksub(s)F 2 /[H + ] 2 the general expression for the extraction of any metallic species being K - Ksub(s)Fsup(a)/[H + ]sup(b) where Ksub(s) is a constant characteristic of the system, F the concentration in formality units of extractant in the organic phase, [H + ] the concentration of hydrogen ion in the aqueous phase, and a and b the respective extractant and hydrogen-ion dependencies. Both extractants have a high degree of steric hindrance. The HD(2,6-i-PPHI)P is the more highly acidic, the pKsub(A) value, in 75% ethanol, being 3.2. The pKsub(A), previously reported, for H[Dt-BP] is 6.26. The Ksub(s) for UO 2 2+ in the system HY in benzene diluent vs an aqueous 1.0 F (NaCl + HCl) phase is 2 x 10 4 for H[Dt-BP] and 3 x 10 -1 for HD(2,6-i-PPHI)P; the ratio of the Ksub(s) values nearly 7 x 10 3 , favours the less acidic extractant. For comparative purposes, the Ksub(s) values for UO 2 2+ and for Am 3+ and Eu 3+ in other (X 1 )(X 2 )PO(OH), in benzene diluent, vs 1.0 F (NaCl + HCl) systems are presented. The variations are discussed in terms of the pKsub(A) of the extractant and the steric hindrance within the extractant. (author)

  3. Far infrared near normal specular reflectivity of Nix(SiO2)1-x (x = 1.0, 0.84, 0.75, 0.61, 0.54, 0.28) granular films

    KAUST Repository

    Massa, Né stor E.; Denardin, Juliano C.; Socolovsky, Leandro M.; Knobel, Marcelo; De La Cruz, Fernando Pablo; Zhang, Xixiang

    2010-01-01

    of transition metal granular films with different metal fractions against what is known for conducting oxides. Films for Nix(SiO2)1-x (x = 1.0, 0.84, 0.75, 0.61, 0.54, 0.28) were studied by temperature dependent far infrared measurements. While for pure Ni

  4. Facilitating open global data use in earthquake source modelling to improve geodetic and seismological approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhaus, Henriette; Heimann, Sebastian; Steinberg, Andreas; Isken, Marius; Vasyura-Bathke, Hannes

    2017-04-01

    rupture models. 1d-layered medium models are implemented for both near- and far-field data predictions. A highlight of our approach is a weak dependence on earthquake bulletin information: hypocenter locations and source origin times are relatively free source model parameters. We present this harmonized source modelling environment based on example earthquake studies, e.g. the 2010 Haiti earthquake, the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake and others. We discuss the benefit of combined-data non-linear modelling on the resolution of first-order rupture parameters, e.g. location, size, orientation, mechanism, moment/slip and rupture propagation. The presented studies apply our newly developed software tools which build up on the open-source seismological software toolbox pyrocko (www.pyrocko.org) in the form of modules. We aim to facilitate a better exploitation of open global data sets for a wide community studying tectonics, but the tools are applicable also for a large range of regional to local earthquake studies. Our developments therefore ensure a large flexibility in the parametrization of medium models (e.g. 1d to 3d medium models), source models (e.g. explosion sources, full moment tensor sources, heterogeneous slip models, etc) and of the predicted data (e.g. (high-rate) GPS, strong motion, tilt). This work is conducted within the project "Bridging Geodesy and Seismology" (www.bridges.uni-kiel.de) funded by the German Research Foundation DFG through an Emmy-Noether grant.

  5. The Chandra Source Catalog : Automated Source Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Roger; Evans, I. N.; Evans, J. D.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Anderson, C. S.; Bonaventura, N. R.; Chen, J. C.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E.; Gibbs, D. G.; Grier, J. D.; Hall, D. M.; Harbo, P. N.; He, X.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Lauer, J.; McCollough, M. L.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Nichols, J. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Plummer, D. A.; Primini, F. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Rots, A. H.; Siemiginowska, A. L.; Sundheim, B. A.; Tibbetts, M. S.; Van Stone, D. W.; Winkelman, S. L.; Zografou, P.

    2009-01-01

    Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) master source pipeline processing seeks to automatically detect sources and compute their properties. Since Chandra is a pointed mission and not a sky survey, different sky regions are observed for a different number of times at varying orientations, resolutions, and other heterogeneous conditions. While this provides an opportunity to collect data from a potentially large number of observing passes, it also creates challenges in determining the best way to combine different detection results for the most accurate characterization of the detected sources. The CSC master source pipeline correlates data from multiple observations by updating existing cataloged source information with new data from the same sky region as they become available. This process sometimes leads to relatively straightforward conclusions, such as when single sources from two observations are similar in size and position. Other observation results require more logic to combine, such as one observation finding a single, large source and another identifying multiple, smaller sources at the same position. We present examples of different overlapping source detections processed in the current version of the CSC master source pipeline. We explain how they are resolved into entries in the master source database, and examine the challenges of computing source properties for the same source detected multiple times. Future enhancements are also discussed. This work is supported by NASA contract NAS8-03060 (CXC).

  6. Temperature dependence of the photodissociation of CO2 from high vibrational levels: 205-230 nm imaging studies of CO(X1Σ+) and O(3P, 1D) products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, S.; Samanta, B. R.; Samanta, A. K.; Reisler, H.

    2017-07-01

    The 205-230 nm photodissociation of vibrationally excited CO2 at temperatures up to 1800 K was studied using Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) and time-sliced Velocity Map Imaging (VMI). CO2 molecules seeded in He were heated in an SiC tube attached to a pulsed valve and supersonically expanded to create a molecular beam of rotationally cooled but vibrationally hot CO2. Photodissociation was observed from vibrationally excited CO2 with internal energies up to about 20 000 cm-1, and CO(X1Σ+), O(3P), and O(1D) products were detected by REMPI. The large enhancement in the absorption cross section with increasing CO2 vibrational excitation made this investigation feasible. The internal energies of heated CO2 molecules that absorbed 230 nm radiation were estimated from the kinetic energy release (KER) distributions of CO(X1Σ+) products in v″ = 0. At 230 nm, CO2 needs to have at least 4000 cm-1 of rovibrational energy to absorb the UV radiation and produce CO(X1Σ+) + O(3P). CO2 internal energies in excess of 16 000 cm-1 were confirmed by observing O(1D) products. It is likely that initial absorption from levels with high bending excitation accesses both the A1B2 and B1A2 states, explaining the nearly isotropic angular distributions of the products. CO(X1Σ+) product internal energies were estimated from REMPI spectroscopy, and the KER distributions of the CO(X1Σ+), O(3P), and O(1D) products were obtained by VMI. The CO product internal energy distributions change with increasing CO2 temperature, suggesting that more than one dynamical pathway is involved when the internal energy of CO2 (and the corresponding available energy) increases. The KER distributions of O(1D) and O(3P) show broad internal energy distributions in the CO(X1Σ+) cofragment, extending up to the maximum allowed by energy but peaking at low KER values. Although not all the observations can be explained at this time, with the aid of available theoretical studies of CO2 VUV

  7. Fossil landscapes and youthful seismogenic sources in the central Apennines: excerpts from the 24 August 2016, Amatrice earthquake and seismic hazard implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Valensise

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We show and discuss the similarities among the 2016 Amatrice (Mw 6.0, 1997 Colfiorito-Sellano (Mw 6.0-5.6 and 2009 L’Aquila (Mw 6.3 earthquakes. They all occurred along the crest of the central Apennines and were caused by shallow dipping faults between 3 and 10 km depth, as shown by their characteristic InSAR signature. We contend that these earthquakes delineate a seismogenic style that is characteristic of this portion of the central Apennines, where the upward propagation of seismogenic faults is hindered by the presence of pre-existing regional thrusts. This leads to an effective decoupling between the deeper seismogenic portion of the upper crust and its uppermost 3 km.The decoupling implies that active faults mapped at the surface do not connect with the seismogenic sources, and that their evolution may be controlled by passive readjustments to coseismic strains or even by purely gravitational motions. Seismic hazard analyses and estimates based on such faults should hence be considered with great caution as they may be all but representative of the true seismogenic potential.

  8. Study of TiO2(1 1 0)-p(1x1), p(1x2) and p(1x3) surface structures by impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, E.; Souda, R.

    2000-01-01

    The surface structure of TiO 2 (1 1 0)-p(1x1), p(1x2) and p(1x3) were studied using impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS). We found that (i) the height of bridging oxygen for the p(1x1) is comparative to that of bulk structure, (ii) the p(1x2) surface has the added Ti 2 O 3 unit rows proposed by Onishi et al. and also the oxygen atoms rows between Ti 2 O 3 unit rows and (iii) the p(1x3) surface is constructed with the same added Ti 2 O 3 unit rows as that in the p(1x2) surface, but the bridging oxygen rows exist between the Ti 2 O 3 unit rows

  9. M1 distributions for {sup 163}Dy and {sup 157}Gd in the SU{sup BF}{sub sdg}(3) and SU{sup BF}{sub sd}(3) x 1g limits of pn-sdgIBFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devi, Y.D. [Saha Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta (India); Kota, V.K.B. [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India)

    1996-04-01

    The SU{sup BF}{sub sdg}(3) limit of pn-sdgIBFM, which was developed earlier, is applied with success in analyzing the recently observed M1 data in the {sup 163}Dy nucleus. As new experiments are being planned for {sup 157}Gd nucleus and that {sup 156}Gd is known to be a good SU{sub sd}(3) x 1g nucleus, in the second part of the paper a formalism for M1 distributions in the SU{sup BF}{sub sd}(3) x 1g limit is developed. In both these analytically solvable limiting situations, predictions are made for M1 distributions in the {sup 157}Gd nucleus. (orig.).

  10. Silica-supported tungsten carbynes (≡SiO)xW(≡CH)(Me)y (x = 1, y = 2; X = 2, y = 1): New efficient catalysts for alkyne cyclotrimerization

    KAUST Repository

    Riache, Nassima

    2015-02-23

    The activity of silica-supported tungsten carbyne complexes (≡SiO)xW(≡CH)(Me)y (x = 1, y = 2; x = 2, y = 1) toward alkynes is reported. We found that they are efficient precatalysts for terminal alkyne cyclotrimerization with high TONs. We also demonstrate that this catalyst species is active for alkyne cyclotrimerization without the formation of significant alkyne metathesis products. Additional DFT calculations highlight the importance of the W coordination sphere in supporting this experimental behavior.

  11. Electrical conductivity, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance studies of n-CxH(2x+1)OSO3Li (x = 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Satoru; Morimoto, Yoshiaki; Honda, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Electrical conductivity (σ), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of n-C x H (2x+1) OSO 3 Li (x= 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20) crystals were performed as a function of temperature. In addition, σ, DSC, and XRD observations of n-C x H (2x+1) OSO 3 Na and n-C x H (2x+1) OSO 3 K (x= 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20) crystals were carried out for comparison. DSC results of the salts revealed several solid-solid phase transitions with large entropy changes (ΔS). For n-C 18 H 37 OSO 3 Li and n-C 20 H 41 OSO 3 Li salts, each melting point produced a small ΔS mp value compared with the total entropy change in the solid phases (ΔS tr1 +ΔS tr2 ). Additionally, Li + ion diffusion was detected in the highest temperature solid phases. For K salts, larger σ values were detected for potassium alkylsulfates compared with those reported for alkyl carboxylate. 7 Li NMR spectra of n-C 18 H 37 OSO 3 Li crystals recorded in the low-temperature phase showed large asymmetry parameters, suggesting the Li + ions are localized at asymmetric sites in the crystals

  12. Electrical conductivity, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance studies of n-C x H(2 x+1)OSO3Li ( x = 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Satoru; Morimoto, Yoshiaki; Honda, Hisashi

    2015-04-01

    Electrical conductivity ( σ), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of n-C x H (2 x+1) OSO 3Li ( x= 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20) crystals were performed as a function of temperature. In addition, σ, DSC, and XRD observations of n-C x H (2 x+1) OSO 3Na and n-C x H (2 x+1) OSO 3K ( x= 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20) crystals were carried out for comparison. DSC results of the salts revealed several solid-solid phase transitions with large entropy changes (Δ S). For n-C 18 H 37 OSO 3Li and n-C 20 H 41 OSO 3Li salts, each melting point produced a small Δ S mp value compared with the total entropy change in the solid phases (Δ S tr1+Δ S tr2). Additionally, Li + ion diffusion was detected in the highest temperature solid phases. For K salts, larger σ values were detected for potassium alkylsulfates compared with those reported for alkyl carboxylate. 7Li NMR spectra of n-C 18 H 37 OSO 3Li crystals recorded in the low-temperature phase showed large asymmetry parameters, suggesting the Li + ions are localized at asymmetric sites in the crystals.

  13. Sources of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, L.

    1983-01-01

    Various sources of polarized neutrons are reviewed. Monoenergetic source produced with unpolarized or polarized beams, white sources of polarized neutrons, production by transmissions through polarized hydrogen targets and polarized thermal neutronsare discussed, with appropriate applications included. (U.K.)

  14. Pacemakers lower sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greatbatch, W.

    1984-01-01

    Energy sources for cardiac facing are considered including radioisotope sources, in a broad conceptual and historical framework.The main guidelines for future development of energy sources are assessed

  15. Sources management; La gestion des sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansoux, H.; Gourmelon; Scanff, P.; Fournet, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Murith, Ch. [Office Federal de la SantePublique (Switzerland); Saint-Paul, N. [NOVAR, 75 - Paris (France); Colson, P. [Electricite de France (EDF/DPN), 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Jouve, A.; Feron, F. [Direction Generale de al Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France); Haranger, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Mathieu, P. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France); Paycha, F. [CHU Louis Mourier, Unitede Medecine Nucleaire Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, 92 - Colombes (France); Israel, S. [CEGELEC NDT et la gestion des sources radioactives (France); Auboiroux, B. [APAVE (France); Chartier, P. [DRIRE de Basse-Normandie, Div. Surete Nucleaire et Radioprotection, 14 - Caen (France)

    2005-07-01

    Organized by the section of technical protection of the French society of radiation protection ( S.F.R.P.), these two days had for objective to review the evolution of the rule relative to the sources of ionising radiations 'sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, electric generators'. They addressed all the actors concerned by the implementation of the new regulatory system in the different sectors of activities ( research, medicine and industry): Authorities, manufacturers, and suppliers of sources, holders and users, bodies involved in the approval of sources, carriers. (N.C.)

  16. Neuropharmacology of Purinergic Receptors in Human Submucous Plexus: Involvement of P2X1, P2X2, P2X3 Channels, P2Y and A3 Metabotropic Receptors in Neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liñán-Rico, A.; Wunderlich, JE.; Enneking, JT.; Tso, DR.; Grants, I.; Williams, KC.; Otey, A.; Michel, K.; Schemann, M.; Needleman, B.; Harzman, A.; Christofi, FL.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale The role of purinergic signaling in the human ENS is not well understood. We sought to further characterize the neuropharmacology of purinergic receptors in human ENS and test the hypothesis that endogenous purines are critical regulators of neurotransmission. Experimental Approach LSCM-Fluo-4-(Ca2+)-imaging of postsynaptic Ca2+ transients (PSCaTs) was used as a reporter of neural activity. Synaptic transmission was evoked by fiber tract electrical stimulation in human SMP surgical preparations. Pharmacological analysis of purinergic signaling was done in 1,556 neurons from 234 separate ganglia 107 patients; immunochemical labeling for P2XRs of neurons in ganglia from 19 patients. Real-time MSORT (Di-8-ANEPPS) imaging was used to test effects of adenosine on fast excitatory synaptic potentials (fEPSPs). Results Synaptic transmission is sensitive to pharmacological manipulations that alter accumulation of extracellular purines. Apyrase blocks PSCaTs in a majority of neurons. An ecto-NTPDase-inhibitor 6-N,N-diethyl-D-β,γ-dibromomethyleneATP or adenosine deaminase augments PSCaTs. Blockade of reuptake/deamination of eADO inhibits PSCaTs. Adenosine inhibits fEPSPs and PSCaTs (IC50=25μM), sensitive to MRS1220-antagonism (A3AR). A P2Y agonist ADPβS inhibits PSCaTs (IC50=111nM) in neurons without stimulatory ADPβS responses (EC50=960nM). ATP or a P2X1,2,2/3 (α,β-MeATP) agonist evokes fast, slow, biphasic Ca2+ transients or Ca2+ oscillations (EC50=400μM). PSCaTs are sensitive to P2X1 antagonist NF279. Low (20nM) or high (5μM) concentrations of P2X antagonist TNP-ATP block PSCaTs in different neurons; proportions of neurons with P2XR-ir follow the order P2X2>P2X1≫P2X3; P2X1+ P2X2 and P2X3+P2X2 are co-localized. RT-PCR identified mRNA-transcripts for P2X1-7,P2Y1,2,12-14R. Responsive neurons were also identified by HuC/D-ir. Conclusions Purines are critical regulators of neurotransmission in the human enteric nervous system. Purinergic signaling involves

  17. Hydrogenation Properties of Mg-5 wt.% TiCr_10NbX (x=1,3,5) Composites by Mechanical Alloying Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyeong-Il; Hong, Tae-Whan

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen and hydrogen energy have been recognized as clean energy sources and high energy carrier. Mg and Mg alloys are attractive hydrogen storage materials because of their lightweight and low cost materials with high hydrogen capacity (about 7.6 wt.%). However, the commercial applications of the Mg hydrides are currently hinder by its high absorption/desorption temperature, and very slow reaction kinetics. However, Ti and Ti based hydrogen storage alloys have been thought to be the third generation of alloys with a high hydrogen capacity, which makes it difficult to handle because of high reactivity. One of the most methods to develop kinetics was addition of transition metal. Therefore, Mg-Ti-Cr-Nb alloy was fabricated to add TiCrNb by hydrogen induced mechanical alloying. TiCrNb systems have included transition metals, low operating temperatures and hydrogen storage materials. As-received specimens were characterized using X-ray Diffraction analysis (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Thermo Gravimetric analysis/Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TG/DSC). Mg-TiCr_10Nb systems were evaluated for hydrogen kinetics by Sievert’s type Pressure-Composition-Isotherm (PCI) equipment. The operating temperature range was 473, 523, 573 and 623 K.

  18. Binary energy source of the HH 250 outflow and its circumstellar environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerón, Fernando; Reipurth, Bo; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Connelley, Michael S.

    2018-04-01

    Aims: Herbig-Haro flows are signposts of recent major accretion and outflow episodes. We aim to determine the nature and properties of the little-known outflow source HH 250-IRS, which is embedded in the Aquila clouds. Methods: We have obtained adaptive optics-assisted L-band images with the NACO instrument on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), together with N- and Q-band imaging with VISIR also on the VLT. Using the SINFONI instrument on the VLT we carried out H- and K-band integral field spectroscopy of HH 250-IRS, complemented with spectra obtained with the SpeX instrument at the InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) in the JHKL bands. Finally, the SubMillimeter Array (SMA) interferometer was used to study the circumstellar environment of HH 250-IRS at 225 and 351 GHz with CO (2-1) and CO (3-2) maps and 0.9 mm and 1.3 mm continuum images. Results: The HH 250-IRS source is resolved into a binary with 0.''53 separation, corresponding to 120 AU at the adopted distance of 225 pc. The individual components show heavily veiled spectra with weak CO absorption indicative of late-type stars. Both are Class I sources, but their spectral energy distributions between 1.5 μm and 19 μm differ markedly and suggest the existence of a large cavity around one of the components. The millimeter interferometric observations indicate that the gas mainly traces a circumbinary envelope or disk, while the dust emission is dominated by one of the circumstellar envelopes. Conclusions: HH 250-IRS is a new addition to the handful of multiple systems where the individual stellar components, the circumstellar disks and a circumbinary disk can be studied in detail, and a rare case among those systems in which a Herbig-Haro flow is present. Based on observations obtained with the VLT (Cerro Paranal, Chile) in programs 089.C-0196(A), 095.C-0488(A), and 095.C-0488(B), as well as with IRTF (Mauna Kea, Hawaii), SMA (Mauna Kea, Hawaii), and the Nordic Optical Telescope (La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain

  19. The Chandra Source Catalog: Source Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Michael; Rots, A. H.; McCollough, M. L.; Primini, F. A.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Bonaventura, N. R.; Chen, J. C.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Evans, J. D.; Evans, I.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E. C.; Gibbs, D. G., II; Grier, J. D.; Hain, R.; Hall, D. M.; Harbo, P. N.; He, X.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Lauer, J.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Nichols, J. S.; Plummer, D. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Siemiginowska, A. L.; Sundheim, B. A.; Tibbetts, M. S.; van Stone, D. W.; Winkelman, S. L.; Zografou, P.

    2009-09-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) contains fields of view that have been studied with individual, uninterrupted observations that span integration times ranging from 1 ksec to 160 ksec, and a large number of which have received (multiple) repeat observations days to years later. The CSC thus offers an unprecedented look at the variability of the X-ray sky over a broad range of time scales, and across a wide diversity of variable X-ray sources: stars in the local galactic neighborhood, galactic and extragalactic X-ray binaries, Active Galactic Nuclei, etc. Here we describe the methods used to identify and quantify source variability within a single observation, and the methods used to assess the variability of a source when detected in multiple, individual observations. Three tests are used to detect source variability within a single observation: the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and its variant, the Kuiper test, and a Bayesian approach originally suggested by Gregory and Loredo. The latter test not only provides an indicator of variability, but is also used to create a best estimate of the variable lightcurve shape. We assess the performance of these tests via simulation of statistically stationary, variable processes with arbitrary input power spectral densities (here we concentrate on results of red noise simulations) at variety of mean count rates and fractional root mean square variabilities relevant to CSC sources. We also assess the false positive rate via simulations of constant sources whose sole source of fluctuation is Poisson noise. We compare these simulations to an assessment of the variability found in real CSC sources, and estimate the variability sensitivities of the CSC.

  20. Effect of the La/Mg ratio on the structure and electrochemical properties of La xMg 3- xNi 9 ( x=1.6-2.2) hydrogen storage electrode alloys for nickel-metal hydride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, B.; Lei, Y. Q.; Chen, L. X.; Lu, G. L.; Pan, H. G.; Wang, Q. D.

    Effect of La/Mg ratio on the structure and electrochemical properties of La xMg 3- xNi 9 ( x=1.6-2.2) ternary alloys was investigated. All alloys are consisted of a main phase with hexagonal PuNi 3-type structure and a few impurity phases (mainly LaNi 5 and MgNi 2). The increase of La/Mg ratio in the alloys leads to an increase in both the cell volume and the hydride stability. The discharge capacity of the alloys at 100 mA/g increases with the increase of La/Mg ratio and passes though a maximum of 397.5 mAh/g at x=2.0. As the La/Mg ratio increases, the high-rate dischargeability of the alloy electrodes at 1200 mA/g HRD 1200 decreases from 66.7% ( x=1.6) to 26.5% ( x=2.2). The slower decrease of HRD 1200 (from 66.7 to 52.7%) of the alloys with x=1.6-2.0 is mainly attributed to the decrease of electrocatalytic activity of the alloys for charge-transfer reaction, the more rapid decrease of HRD 1200 of the alloys with x>2.0 is mainly attributed to the lowering of the hydrogen diffusion rate in the bulk of alloy. The cycling capacity degradation of the alloys is rather fast for practical application due to the corrosion of La and Mg and the large VH in the hydride phase.

  1. THE CHANDRA SOURCE CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Ian N.; Primini, Francis A.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Doe, Stephen M.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G.; Grier, John D.; Hain, Roger M.; Harbo, Peter N.; He Xiangqun; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Davis, John E.; Houck, John C.; Hall, Diane M.

    2010-01-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents ∼<30''. The catalog (1) provides access to the best estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources, with good scientific fidelity, and directly supports scientific analysis using the individual source data; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to calibrated observational data and ancillary data products for individual X-ray sources, so that users can perform detailed further analysis using existing tools. The catalog includes real X-ray sources detected with flux estimates that are at least 3 times their estimated 1σ uncertainties in at least one energy band, while maintaining the number of spurious sources at a level of ∼<1 false source per field for a 100 ks observation. For each detected source, the CSC provides commonly tabulated quantities, including source position, extent, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics, derived from the observations in which the source is detected. In addition to these traditional catalog elements, for each X-ray source the CSC includes an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra from each observation in which a

  2. The Chandra Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ian N.; Primini, Francis A.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Davis, John E.; Doe, Stephen M.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Grier, John D.; Hain, Roger M.; Hall, Diane M.; Harbo, Peter N.; He, Xiangqun Helen; Houck, John C.; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Miller, Joseph B.; Mitschang, Arik W.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Plummer, David A.; Refsdal, Brian L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sundheim, Beth A.; Tibbetts, Michael S.; Van Stone, David W.; Winkelman, Sherry L.; Zografou, Panagoula

    2010-07-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents lsim30''. The catalog (1) provides access to the best estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources, with good scientific fidelity, and directly supports scientific analysis using the individual source data; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to calibrated observational data and ancillary data products for individual X-ray sources, so that users can perform detailed further analysis using existing tools. The catalog includes real X-ray sources detected with flux estimates that are at least 3 times their estimated 1σ uncertainties in at least one energy band, while maintaining the number of spurious sources at a level of lsim1 false source per field for a 100 ks observation. For each detected source, the CSC provides commonly tabulated quantities, including source position, extent, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics, derived from the observations in which the source is detected. In addition to these traditional catalog elements, for each X-ray source the CSC includes an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra from each observation in which a

  3. 2011 NATA - Emissions Sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes all emissions sources that were modeled in the 2011 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA), inlcluding point, nonpoint, and mobile sources, and...

  4. Biogenic Emission Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic emissions sources come from natural sources and need to accounted for in photochemical grid models. They are computed using a model which utilizes spatial information on vegetation and land use.

  5. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a next-generation spallation neutron source for neutron scattering that is currently the most powerful neutron source in...

  6. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  7. Dioxin emissions and sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The papers presented at the seminar discussed dioxin emissions and sources, dioxin pollution of soils, waste water and sewage sludge, stocktaking of emission sources, and exposure and risk analyses for dioxin and other pollutants. (EF) [de

  8. Sealed radioactive source management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources have been used in a wide range of application in medicine, agriculture, geology, industry and other fields. Since its utilization many sources have become out of use and became waste but no proper management. This has lead to many accidents causing deaths and serious radiation injuries worldwide. Spent sources application is expanding but their management has seen little improvements. Sealed radioactive sources have become a security risk calling for prompt action. Source management helps to maintain sources in a good physical status and provide means of source tracking and control. It also provides a well documented process of the sources making any future management options safe, secure and cost effective. Last but not least good source management substantially reduces the risk of accidents and eliminates the risk of malicious use. The International Atomic Energy Agency assists Member States to build the infrastructure to properly manage sealed radioactive sources. The assistance includes training of national experts to handle, condition and properly store the sources. For Member States that do not have proper facilities, we provide the technical assistance to design a proper facility to properly manage the radioactive sources and provide for their proper storage. For Member States that need to condition their sources properly but don't have the required infrastructure we provide direct assistance to physically help them with source recovery and provide an international expert team to properly condition their sources and render them safe and secure. We offer software (Radioactive Waste Management Registry) to properly keep a complete record on the sources and provide for efficient tracking. This also helps with proper planning and decision making for long term management

  9. Digital intelligence sources transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhen; Wang Renbo

    2011-01-01

    It presents from the collection of particle-ray counting, infrared data communication, real-time monitoring and alarming, GPRS and other issues start to realize the digital management of radioactive sources, complete the real-time monitoring of all aspects, include the storing of radioactive sources, transporting and using, framing intelligent radioactive sources transporter, as a result, achieving reliable security supervision of radioactive sources. (authors)

  10. Spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.S.; Bartholomew, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The principles and theory of spallation neutron sources are outlined and a comparison is given with other types of neutron source. A summary of the available accelerator types for spallation neutron sources and their advantages and disadvantages is presented. Suitable target materials are discussed for specific applications, and typical target assemblies shown. (U.K.)

  11. Global Sourcing of Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.; Petersen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    The global sourcing of services offers high returns but is also associated with high risks. The extent to which firms engage in ‘transformational’ global sourcing (i.e., global sourcing implying considerable changes in the home organization) chiefly depends on management's comfort zone which...

  12. Sources of pulsed radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of various sources of pulsed radiation are examined from the viewpoint of their importance to the radiation chemist, and some examples of uses of such sources are mentioned. A summary is given of the application of methods of physical dosimetry to pulsed sources, and the calibration of convenient chemical dosimeters by physical dosimetry is outlined. 7 figures, 1 table

  13. Investigating Primary Source Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Joanne; Hanlon, Ann M.; Levine, Jennie A.

    2009-01-01

    Primary source research requires students to acquire specialized research skills. This paper presents results from a user study testing the effectiveness of a Web guide designed to convey the concepts behind "primary source literacy". The study also evaluated students' strengths and weaknesses when conducting primary source research. (Contains 3…

  14. Open Source Business Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This analyses the Open source movement. Open source development process and management is seen different from the classical point of view. This focuses on characteristics and software market tendencies for the main Open source initiatives. It also points out the labor market future evolution for the software developers.

  15. Argonne inverted sputter source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yntema, J.L.; Billquist, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The emittance of the inverted sputter source with immersion lenses was measured to be about 5π mm mrad MeV/sup 1/2/ at the 75% level over a wide range of beam intensities. The use of the source in experiments with radioactive sputter targets and hydrogen loaded targets is described. Self contamination of the source is discussed

  16. Surface-site-selective study of valence electronic structures of clean Si(100)-2x1 using Si-L23VV Auger electron-Si-2p photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Inform