WorldWideScience

Sample records for sound small vessels

  1. [Small vessel cerebrovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona Portela, P; Escrig Avellaneda, A

    2018-05-09

    Small vessel vascular disease is a spectrum of different conditions that includes lacunar infarction, alteration of deep white matter, or microbleeds. Hypertension is the main risk factor, although the atherothrombotic lesion may be present, particularly in large-sized lacunar infarctions along with other vascular risk factors. MRI findings are characteristic and the lesions authentic biomarkers that allow differentiating the value of risk factors and defining their prognostic value. Copyright © 2018 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. What is cerebral small vessel disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    An accumulating amount of evidence suggests that the white matter hyperintensities on T 2 weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging predict an increased risk of dementia and gait disturbance. This state has been proposed as cerebral small vessel disease, including leukoaraiosis, Binswanger's disease, lacunar stroke and cerebral microbleeds. However, the concept of cerebral small vessel disease is still obscure. To understand the cerebral small vessel disease, the precise structure and function of cerebral small vessels must be clarified. Cerebral small vessels include several different arteries which have different anatomical structures and functions. Important functions of the cerebral small vessels are blood-brain barrier and perivasucular drainage of interstitial fluid from the brain parenchyma. Cerebral capillaries and glial endfeet, take an important role for these functions. However, the previous pathological investigations on cerebral small vessels have focused on larger arteries than capillaries. Therefore little is known about the pathology of capillaries in small vessel disease. The recent discoveries of genes which cause the cerebral small vessel disease indicate that the cerebral small vessel diseases are caused by a distinct molecular mechanism. One of the pathological findings in hereditary cerebral small vessel disease is the loss of smooth muscle cells, which is an also well-recognized finding in sporadic cerebral small vessel disease. Since pericytes have similar character with the smooth muscle cells, the pericytes should be investigated in these disorders. In addition, the loss of smooth muscle cells may result in dysfunction of drainage of interstitial fluid from capillaries. The precise correlation between the loss of smooth muscle cells and white matter disease is still unknown. However, the function that is specific to cerebral small vessel may be associated with the pathogenesis of cerebral small vessel disease. (author)

  3. 76 FR 40617 - Security Zone; 2011 Seattle Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... better evaluate its effects on them and participate in the rulemaking process. Small businesses may send... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2011-0505] RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; 2011 Seattle Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, Washington AGENCY...

  4. A case of small vessel vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhulika Mahashabde

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting a case of un-specified small vessel vasculitis, which was diagnosed on the basis of positive perinuclear anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA P MPO done by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA.

  5. 75 FR 45055 - Security Zone; 2010 Seattle Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ...-AA87 Security Zone; 2010 Seattle Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard... (NCSM 710) which include all waters within 100 yards from the vessels while underway in the Puget Sound... authorized by the COTP, Puget Sound or Designated Representative. DATES: This rule is effective from 8 a.m...

  6. Autonomous radiation monitoring of small vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, K.P.; Cheriyadat, A.; Fabris, L.; Goddard, J.; Hornback, D.; Karnowski, T.; Kerekes, R.; Newby, J.

    2011-01-01

    Small private vessels are one avenue by which nuclear materials may be smuggled across international borders. While one can contemplate using the land-based approach of radiation portal monitors on the navigable waterways that lead to many ports, these systems are ill-suited to the problem. In contrast to roadways, where lanes segregate vehicles, and motion is well controlled by inspection booths; channels, inlets, and rivers present chaotic traffic patterns populated by vessels of all sizes. A unique solution to this problem is based on a portal-less portal monitor designed to handle free-flowing traffic on roadways with up to five-traffic lanes. The instrument uses a combination of visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to acquire and link radiation images to individual vehicles. This paper presents the results of a recent test of the system in a maritime setting.

  7. Report of the DHS Small Vessel Security Institute

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brownstein, Charles; Baker, John; Hull, Peter; Minogue, Nicholas; Murphy, George; Winston, Phyllis

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the National Small Vessel Security Summit (NSVSS) was to engage private, commercial and government stakeholders in discussions on a range of issues involving the security risks posed by small vessels in the U.S...

  8. Report of the DHS National Small Vessel Security Summit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brownstein, Charles; Baker, John; Hull, Peter; Minogue, Nicholas; Murphy, George; Winston, Phyllis

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the National Small Vessel Security Summit (NSVSS) was to engage private, commercial and government stakeholders in discussions on a range of issues involving the security risks posed by small vessels in the U.S...

  9. 77 FR 37600 - Safety Zone; Arctic Drilling and Support Vessels, Puget Sound, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Arctic Drilling and Support Vessels, Puget Sound, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... are underway in the Puget Sound Captain of the Port Zone. The safety zone is necessary to ensure the... Ensign Anthony P. LaBoy, Waterways Management Division, Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound; Coast Guard...

  10. 33 CFR 161.60 - Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... William Sound. 161.60 Section 161.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.60 Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound... Cape Hinchinbrook Light to Schooner Rock Light, comprising that portion of Prince William Sound between...

  11. 77 FR 44475 - Security Zones; Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ...-AA87 Security Zones; Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard... temporary rule, call or email Lieutenant Junior Grade Anthony P. LaBoy, Sector Puget Sound, Waterways Management Division, U.S. Coast Guard; telephone 206-217-6323, email SectorPugetSound[email protected] . If you...

  12. Hypercholesterolemia induced cerebral small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Peter; Schuhmann, Michael K; Garz, Cornelia; Jandke, Solveig; Urlaub, Daniela; Mencl, Stine; Zernecke, Alma; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Carare, Roxana O; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Schreiber, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    While hypercholesterolemia plays a causative role for the development of ischemic stroke in large vessels, its significance for cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) remains unclear. We thus aimed to understand the detailed relationship between hypercholesterolemia and CSVD using the well described Ldlr-/- mouse model. We used Ldlr-/- mice (n = 16) and wild-type (WT) mice (n = 15) at the age of 6 and 12 months. Ldlr-/- mice develop high plasma cholesterol levels following a high fat diet. We analyzed cerebral capillaries and arterioles for intravascular erythrocyte accumulations, thrombotic vessel occlusions, blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and microbleeds. We found a significant increase in the number of erythrocyte stases in 6 months old Ldlr-/- mice compared to all other groups (P hypercholesterolemia is related to a thrombotic CSVD phenotype, which is different from hypertension-related CSVD that associates with a hemorrhagic CSVD phenotype. Our data demonstrate a relationship between hypercholesterolemia and the development of CSVD. Ldlr-/- mice appear to be an adequate animal model for research into CSVD.

  13. Small white matter lesion detection in cerebral small vessel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoorian, Mohsen; Karssemeijer, Nico; van Uden, Inge; de Leeuw, Frank E.; Heskes, Tom; Marchiori, Elena; Platel, Bram

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common finding on magnetic resonance images of elderly people. White matter lesions (WML) are important markers for not only the small vessel disease, but also neuro-degenerative diseases including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Volumetric measurements such as the "total lesion load", have been studied and related to these diseases. With respect to SVD we conjecture that small lesions are important, as they have been observed to grow over time and they form the majority of lesions in number. To study these small lesions they need to be annotated, which is a complex and time-consuming task. Existing (semi) automatic methods have been aimed at volumetric measurements and large lesions, and are not suitable for the detection of small lesions. In this research we established a supervised voxel classification CAD system, optimized and trained to exclusively detect small WMLs. To achieve this, several preprocessing steps were taken, which included a robust standardization of subject intensities to reduce inter-subject intensity variability as much as possible. A number of features that were found to be well identifying small lesions were calculated including multimodal intensities, tissue probabilities, several features for accurate location description, a number of second order derivative features as well as multi-scale annular filter for blobness detection. Only small lesions were used to learn the target concept via Adaboost using random forests as its basic classifiers. Finally the results were evaluated using Free-response receiver operating characteristic.

  14. 46 CFR 117.207 - Survival craft-vessels operating on lakes, bays, and sounds routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft-vessels operating on lakes, bays, and... 49 PASSENGERS LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Number and Type of Survival Craft § 117.207 Survival craft—vessels operating on lakes, bays, and sounds routes. (a) Each vessel with overnight...

  15. 46 CFR 180.207 - Survival craft-vessels operating on lakes, bays, and sounds routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft-vessels operating on lakes, bays, and... Survival Craft § 180.207 Survival craft—vessels operating on lakes, bays, and sounds routes. (a) Except as... warm water is not required to carry survival craft. (d) A vessel certificated to operate on lakes, bays...

  16. Autonomous Radiation Monitoring of Small Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, Lorenzo; Hornback, Donald Eric

    2010-01-01

    Small private vessels are one avenue by which nuclear materials may be smuggled across international borders. While one can contemplate using the terrestrial approach of radiation portal monitors on the navigable waterways that lead to many ports, these systems are ill-suited to the problem. They require vehicles to pass at slow speeds between two closely-spaced radiation sensors, relying on the uniformity of vehicle sizes to space the detectors, and on proximity to link an individual vehicle to its radiation signature. In contrast to roadways where lanes segregate vehicles, and motion is well controlled by inspection booths; channels, inlets, and rivers present chaotic traffic patterns populated by vessels of all sizes. We have developed a unique solution to this problem based on our portal-less portal monitor instrument that is designed to handle free-flowing traffic on roadways with up to five-traffic lanes. The instrument uses a combination of visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to acquire and link radiation images to individual vehicles. It was recently tested in a maritime setting. In this paper we present the instrument, how it functions, and the results of the recent tests.

  17. [Clinical features of 32 patients with cutaneous small vessel vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Maturana, Donaldo; Amaro, Patricio; Segovia, Laura; Balestrini, Claudia

    2004-02-01

    The skin is a common target of small vessel vasculitis, with a wide assortment of pathological changes. This condition is usually associated to systemic diseases. To report the clinical and pathological features of patients with cutaneous small vessel vasculitis. A retrospective review of 32 patients with a pathological diagnosis of cutaneous vasculitis. Seventy two percent of patients were women. Cutaneous lesions were mainly located in the lower limbs (94%). The most common lesion was palpable purpura (62%). Connective tissue diseases and systemic vasculitis were the most commonly associated systemic diseases. Palpable purpura is the most common manifestation of cutaneous small vessel vasculitis, that is usually associated to connective tissue diseases or systemic vasculitis.

  18. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Purpose of reviews This review focuses on recent advance in the diagnosis pathogenesis and treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitis. Recent findings Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies are closely associated with Wegener's granulomatosis and

  19. Underwater sound from vessel traffic reduces the effective communication range in Atlantic cod and haddock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jenni A; Van Parijs, Sofie M; Hatch, Leila T

    2017-11-07

    Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary is located in Massachusetts Bay off the densely populated northeast coast of the United States; subsequently, the marine inhabitants of the area are exposed to elevated levels of anthropogenic underwater sound, particularly due to commercial shipping. The current study investigated the alteration of estimated effective communication spaces at three spawning locations for populations of the commercially and ecologically important fishes, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus). Both the ambient sound pressure levels and the estimated effective vocalization radii, estimated through spherical spreading models, fluctuated dramatically during the three-month recording periods. Increases in sound pressure level appeared to be largely driven by large vessel activity, and accordingly exhibited a significant positive correlation with the number of Automatic Identification System tracked vessels at the two of the three sites. The near constant high levels of low frequency sound and consequential reduction in the communication space observed at these recording sites during times of high vocalization activity raises significant concerns that communication between conspecifics may be compromised during critical biological periods. This study takes the first steps in evaluating these animals' communication spaces and alteration of these spaces due to anthropogenic underwater sound.

  20. Letter-Sound Knowledge: Exploring Gender Differences in Children When They Start School Regarding Knowledge of Large Letters, Small Letters, Sound Large Letters, and Sound Small Letters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermundur Sigmundsson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explored whether there is a gender difference in letter-sound knowledge when children start at school. 485 children aged 5–6 years completed assessment of letter-sound knowledge, i.e., large letters; sound of large letters; small letters; sound of small letters. The findings indicate a significant difference between girls and boys in all four factors tested in this study in favor of the girls. There are still no clear explanations to the basis of a presumed gender difference in letter-sound knowledge. That the findings have origin in neuro-biological factors cannot be excluded, however, the fact that girls probably have been exposed to more language experience/stimulation compared to boys, lends support to explanations derived from environmental aspects.

  1. Cloud Water Content Sensor for Sounding Balloons and Small UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, John A.

    2009-01-01

    A lightweight, battery-powered sensor was developed for measuring cloud water content, which is the amount of liquid or solid water present in a cloud, generally expressed as grams of water per cubic meter. This sensor has near-zero power consumption and can be flown on standard sounding balloons and small, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The amount of solid or liquid water is important to the study of atmospheric processes and behavior. Previous sensing techniques relied on strongly heating the incoming air, which requires a major energy input that cannot be achieved on sounding balloons or small UAVs.

  2. Study on the combustion behavior of radiolytically generated hydrogen explosion in small scale annular vessels at the reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Tatsuya; Tamauchi, Yoshikazu; Arai, Nobuyuki; Dai, Wenbin; Sakaihara, Motohiro; Kanehira, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water, etc. in process vessels in reprocessing plant. Usually, the hydrogen is scavenged by compressed air into vessels to prevent hydrogen explosion. When an earthquake beyond design based occurs, for example, the compressed air may stop and the hydrogen starts accumulating in the vessels, and under this condition, an ignition source might set off hydrogen explosion. Therefore, the explosion derived by the radiolytically generated hydrogen is designated as one of severe accidents on Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant in new regulatory requirements. It is important to understand the combustion behavior of hydrogen explosion inside a vessel for consideration of safety measures against the severe accident, because the influences of detonation are not considered in the design basis of vessels. Especially, the investigations about the combustion behavior which considered influence of interior obstacles inside the vessel are not performed yet. In order to investigate the combustion behavior comprehensively, explosion experiment, combustion analysis and structural analysis are carried out using the representative vessels (small scale annular vessel, small scale plate vessel, large scale annular vessel and large scale cylindrical vessel) selected from Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. In this paper, the results of experiments and analysis of small scale annular vessel (as one of representative vessel, imitated a pulsed column in the reprocessing plant) are reported. As imitated vessels, three vessels are manufactured with different interior obstacle arrangements as follows, A) cylindrical obstacles are faithfully reproduced and are arranged based on the actual vessel, B) cylindrical obstacles are arranged more densely than the actual vessel, and C) there are no obstacles inside the vessel. Experiments of hydrogen explosion are performed under condition of stoichiometric hydrogen-air ratio (premixed hydrogen-air is used). As a result of

  3. Towards Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) for small sea vessels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Aperture Radar (ISAR) for Small Sea Vessels M.Y. Abdul Gaffar Council for Scientific and Industrial Research University of Cape Town Slide 2 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za What is ISAR? • Technique that produces cross range...

  4. Machine Learning for Quantification of Small Vessel Disease Imaging Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghafoorian, M.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to developing fully automated methods for quantification of small vessel disease imaging bio-markers, namely WMHs and lacunes, using vari- ous machine learning/deep learning and computer vision techniques. The rest of the thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 2 describes

  5. Enviromentally Sound Timber Extracting Techniques for Small Tree Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihai Wang

    1999-01-01

    Due to large area disturbed and great deal of energy cost during-its operations, introducing or applying the appropriate timber extracting techniques could significantly reduce the impact of timber extraction operations to forest environment while pursuing the reasonable operation costs. Four environmentally sound timber extraction techniques for small tree harvesting...

  6. Small Vessel Cerebrovascular Disease: The Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Réza Behrouz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain infarction due to small vessel cerebrovascular disease (SVCD—also known as small vessel infarct (SVI or “lacunar” stroke—accounts for 20% to 25% of all ischemic strokes. Historically, SVIs have been associated with a favorable short-term prognosis. However, studies over the years have demonstrated that SVCD/SVI is perhaps a more complex and less benign phenomenon than generally presumed. The currently employed diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are based upon historical and contemporary perceptions of SVCD/SVI. What is discovered in the future will unmask the true countenance of SVCD/SVI and help furnish more accurate prognostication schemes and effective treatments for this condition. This paper is an overview of SVCD/SVI with respect to the discoveries of the past, what is known now, and what will the ongoing investigations evince in the future.

  7. Aerial Remote Radio Frequency Identification System for Small Vessel Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    technology as a tool that can benefit everyone (Warner 2008, p.144). Lippitt’s model , coupled with Vroom and Lawler’s Expectancy Theory (Miner 2005, p...Identification System for Small Vessel Monitoring 6. AUTHOR( S ) Jason Appler, Sean Finney, Michael McMellon 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING...ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING

  8. Perivascular Spaces, Glymphatic Dysfunction, and Small Vessel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mestre, Humberto; Kostrikov, Serhii; Mehta, Rupal I.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel diseases (SVD) range broadly in etiology but share a remarkably overlapping pathology. Features of SVD including enlarged perivascular spaces and formation of abluminal protein deposits cannot be completely explained by the putative pathophysiology. The recently discovered glymphatic system provides a new perspective to potentially address these gaps. This work provides a comprehensive review of the known factors that regulate glymphatic function and the disease mechanis...

  9. Report of the DHS Small Vessel Security Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-19

    Local Government Interests: LtCol Don Holway; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Maj John Fetterman , Maine Department of Marine...AWW program to help fill gaps in law enforcement patrols. 68 National Small Vessel Security Summit Major John C. Fetterman – State of Maine...Major Fetterman currently serves as Vice President of the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators and for the last 30 years has been a

  10. Observations of volcanic plumes using small balloon soundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voemel, H.

    2015-12-01

    Eruptions of volcanoes are very difficult to predict and for practical purposes may occur at any time. Any observing system intending to observe volcanic eruptions has to be ready at any time. Due to transport time scales, emissions of large volcanic eruptions, in particular injections into the stratosphere, may be detected at locations far from the volcano within days to weeks after the eruption. These emissions may be observed using small balloon soundings at dedicated sites. Here we present observations of particles of the Icelandic Grimsvotn eruption at the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg, Germany in the months following the eruption and observations of opportunity of other volcanic particle events. We also present observations of the emissions of SO2 from the Turrialba volcano at San Jose, Costa Rica. We argue that dedicated sites for routine observations of the clean and perturbed atmosphere using small sounding balloons are an important element in the detection and quantification of emissions from future volcanic eruptions.

  11. Evaluation of Sound Quality, Boominess and Boxiness in Small Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisser, Adam; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2006-01-01

    ratings. The classical bass ratio definitions showed poor correlation with all subjective ratings. The overall sound quality ratings gave different results for speech and music. For speech the preferred mean RT should be as low as possible, whereas for music there was found a preferred range between 0......The acoustics of small rooms has been studied with emphasis on sound quality, boominess and boxiness when the rooms are used for speech or music. Seven rooms with very different characteristics have been used for the study. Subjective listening tests were made using binaural recordings...... of reproduced speech and music. The test results were compared with a large number of objective acoustic parameters based on the frequency-dependent reverberation times measured in the rooms. This has led to the proposal of three new acoustic parameters, which have shown high correlation with the subjective...

  12. Reproducibility and variability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging markers in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guio, F. De; Jouvent, E.; Biessels, G.J.; Black, S.E.; Brayne, C.; Chen, C.; Cordonnier, C.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Dichgans, M.; Doubal, F.; Duering, M.; Dufouil, C.; Duzel, E.; Fazekas, F.; Hachinski, V.; Ikram, M.A.; Linn, J.; Matthews, P.M.; Mazoyer, B.; Mok, V.; Norrving, B.; O'Brien, J.T.; Pantoni, L.; Ropele, S.; Sachdev, P.; Schmidt, R.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, E.E.; Sposato, L.A.; Stephan, B.; Swartz, R.H.; Tzourio, C.; Buchem, M. van; Lugt, A. van der; Oostenbrugge, R.; Vernooij, M.W.; Viswanathan, A.; Werring, D.; Wollenweber, F.; Wardlaw, J.M.; Chabriat, H.

    2016-01-01

    Brain imaging is essential for the diagnosis and characterization of cerebral small vessel disease. Several magnetic resonance imaging markers have therefore emerged, providing new information on the diagnosis, progression, and mechanisms of small vessel disease. Yet, the reproducibility of these

  13. Reproducibility and variability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging markers in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Guio, F. (François); Jouvent, E. (Eric); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); S.E. Black (Sandra); C. Brayne (Carol); C. Chen (Christopher); C. Cordonnier (Charlotte); H.F. de Leeuw (Frank); C. Kubisch (Christian); Doubal, F. (Fergus); Duering, M. (Marco); C. Dufouil (Carole); Duzel, E. (Emrah); F. Fazekas (Franz); V. Hachinski (Vladimir); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); J. Linn (Jennifer); P.M. Matthews (P.); B. Mazoyer (Bernard); Mok, V. (Vincent); B. Norrving (Bo); O'Brien, J.T. (John T.); Pantoni, L. (Leonardo); S. Ropele (Stefan); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); S. Seshadri (Sudha); E.E. Smith (Eric); L.A. Sposato (Luciano A); B.C.M. Stephan; Swartz, R.H. (Richard H.); C. Tzourio (Christophe); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); A. van der Lugt (Aad); R.J. van Oostenbrugge (Robert); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); Viswanathan, A. (Anand); D.J. Werring (David); Wollenweber, F. (Frank); J.M. Wardlaw (J.); Chabriat, H. (Hugues)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBrain imaging is essential for the diagnosis and characterization of cerebral small vessel disease. Several magnetic resonance imaging markers have therefore emerged, providing new information on the diagnosis, progression, and mechanisms of small vessel disease. Yet, the reproducibility

  14. Compliant electrospun silk fibroin tubes for small vessel bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Benedetto; Alessandrino, Antonio; Farè, Silvia; Freddi, Giuliano; Mantovani, Diego; Tanzi, Maria Cristina

    2010-10-01

    Processing silk fibroin (SF) by electrospinning offers a very attractive opportunity for producing three-dimensional nanofibrillar matrices in tubular form, which may be useful for a biomimetic approach to small calibre vessel regeneration. Bypass grafting of small calibre vessels, with a diameter less than 6mm, is performed mainly using autografts, like the saphenous vein or internal mammary artery. At present no polymeric grafts made of SF are commercially available, mainly due to inadequate properties (low compliance and lack of endothelium cells). The aim of this work was to electrospin SF into tubular structures (Ø=6mm) for small calibre vessel grafting, characterize the morphological, chemico-physical and mechanical properties of the electrospun SF structures and to validate their potential to interact with cells. The morphological properties of electrospun SF nanofibres were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Chemico-physical analyses revealed an increase in the crystallinity of the structure of SF nanofibres on methanol treatment. Mechanical tests, i.e. compliance and burst pressure measurements, of the electrospun SF tubes showed that the inner pressure to radial deformation ratio was linear for elongation up to 15% and pressure up to 400 mm Hg. The mean compliance value between 80 and 120 mm Hg was higher than the values reported for both Goretex(R) and Dacron(R) grafts and for bovine heterografts, but still slightly lower than those of saphenous and umbilical vein, which nowadays represent the gold standard for the replacement of small calibre arteries. The electrospun tubes resisted up to 575+/-17 mmHg, which is more than four times the upper physiological pressure of 120 mmHg and more than twice the pathological upper pressures (range 180-220 mmHg). The in vitro tests showed a good cytocompatibility of the electrospun SF tubes. Therefore, the electrospun SF tubes developed within this work represent a suitable candidate for small calibre

  15. Transportable, small high-pressure preservation vessel for cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, N; Sotome, S; Shimizu, A; Nakajima, K; Yoshimura, Y

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that the survival rate of astrocytes increases under high-pressure conditions at 4 0 C. However, pressure vessels generally have numerous problems for use in cell preservation and transportation: (1) they cannot be readily separated from the pressurizing pump in the pressurized state; (2) they are typically heavy and expensive due the use of materials such as stainless steel; and (3) it is difficult to regulate pressurization rate with hand pumps. Therefore, we developed a transportable high-pressure system suitable for cell preservation under high-pressure conditions. This high-pressure vessel has the following characteristics: (1) it can be easily separated from the pressurizing pump due to the use of a cock-type stop valve; (2) it is small and compact, is made of PEEK and weighs less than 200 g; and (3) pressurization rate is regulated by an electric pump instead of a hand pump. Using this transportable high-pressure vessel for cell preservation, we found that astrocytes can survive for 4 days at 1.6 MPa and 4 0 C.

  16. Quantitative CT analysis of small pulmonary vessels in lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Katsutoshi; Tobino, Kazunori; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Kataoka, Hideyuki; Doi, Tokuhide; Hoshika, Yoshito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a destructive lung disease that share clinical, physiologic, and radiologic features with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study aims to identify those features that are unique to LAM by using quantitative CT analysis. Methods: We measured total cross-sectional areas of small pulmonary vessels (CSA) less than 5 mm 2 and 5–10 mm 2 and calculated percentages of those lung areas (%CSA), respectively, in 50 LAM and 42 COPD patients. The extent of cystic destruction (LAA%) and mean parenchymal CT value were also calculated and correlated with pulmonary function. Results: The diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide/alveolar volume (DL CO /VA %predicted) was similar for both groups (LAM, 44.4 ± 19.8% vs. COPD, 45.7 ± 16.0%, p = 0.763), but less tissue damage occurred in LAM than COPD (LAA% 21.7 ± 16.3% vs. 29.3 ± 17.0; p CO /VA %predicted, %CSA and mean parenchymal CT value were still greater for LAM than COPD (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Quantitative CT analysis revealing a correlation between cystic destruction and CSA in COPD but not LAM indicates that this approach successfully reflects different mechanisms governing the two pathologic courses. Such determinations of small pulmonary vessel density may serve to differentiate LAM from COPD even in patients with severe lung destruction.

  17. 33 CFR 165.1317 - Security and Safety Zone; Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security and Safety Zone; Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. 165.1317 Section 165.1317 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS...

  18. Dense Deposit Disease Mimicking a Renal Small Vessel Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lavleen; Bhardwaj, Swati; Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind; Dinda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Dense deposit disease is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway and frequently deviates from the classic membranoproliferative pattern of injury on light microscopy. Other patterns of injury described for dense deposit disease include mesangioproliferative, acute proliferative/exudative, and crescentic GN. Regardless of the histologic pattern, C3 glomerulopathy, which includes dense deposit disease and C3 GN, is defined by immunofluorescence intensity of C3c two or more orders of magnitude greater than any other immune reactant (on a 0–3 scale). Ultrastructural appearances distinguish dense deposit disease and C3 GN. Focal and segmental necrotizing glomerular lesions with crescents, mimicking a small vessel vasculitis such as ANCA-associated GN, are a very rare manifestation of dense deposit disease. We describe our experience with this unusual histologic presentation and distinct clinical course of dense deposit disease, discuss the pitfalls in diagnosis, examine differential diagnoses, and review the relevant literature. PMID:26361799

  19. 'Variant' angina: Evidence for small vessel coronary artery spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfisterer, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.; Cueni, T.; Luetold, B.; Burkart, F.; Basel Univ.

    1980-01-01

    A unique case of 'variant' angina pectoris has been observed in a patient with normal coronary arteries and typical chest pain appearing spontaneously at rest, and repeatedly provoked by ergonovine maleate (0.1 mg iv) associated with large transmural perfusion defects on 201 TI-imaging (after ergonovine) and a marked increase in T wave voltage despite no demonstrable spasm of a major coronary artery after the same doses of ergonovine. While saline solution could not provoke chest pain and treatment with a beta-blocking agent increased the frequency of ischemic attacks, a calcium antangonist therapy reduced and eventually eliminated the attacks. Thus, this case provides evidence for yet another aspect of a 'variant' form of angina pectoris: small vessel coronary artery spasm. (orig.) [de

  20. Perivascular spaces, glymphatic dysfunction, and small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Humberto; Kostrikov, Serhii; Mehta, Rupal I; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral small vessel diseases (SVDs) range broadly in etiology but share remarkably overlapping pathology. Features of SVD including enlarged perivascular spaces (EPVS) and formation of abluminal protein deposits cannot be completely explained by the putative pathophysiology. The recently discovered glymphatic system provides a new perspective to potentially address these gaps. This work provides a comprehensive review of the known factors that regulate glymphatic function and the disease mechanisms underlying glymphatic impairment emphasizing the role that aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-lined perivascular spaces (PVSs), cerebrovascular pulsatility, and metabolite clearance play in normal CNS physiology. This review also discusses the implications that glymphatic impairment may have on SVD inception and progression with the aim of exploring novel therapeutic targets and highlighting the key questions that remain to be answered. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Quantitative CT analysis of small pulmonary vessels in lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Katsutoshi, E-mail: kando@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Tobino, Kazunori [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Iizuka Hospital, 3-83 Yoshio-Machi, Iizuka-City, Fukuoka 820-8505 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Kurihara, Masatoshi; Kataoka, Hideyuki [Pneumothorax Center, Nissan Tamagawa Hospital, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Doi, Tokuhide [Fukuoka Clinic, 7-18-11 Umeda, Adachi-Ku, Tokyo 123-0851 (Japan); Hoshika, Yoshito [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Takahashi, Kazuhisa [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Seyama, Kuniaki [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Backgrounds: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a destructive lung disease that share clinical, physiologic, and radiologic features with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study aims to identify those features that are unique to LAM by using quantitative CT analysis. Methods: We measured total cross-sectional areas of small pulmonary vessels (CSA) less than 5 mm{sup 2} and 5–10 mm{sup 2} and calculated percentages of those lung areas (%CSA), respectively, in 50 LAM and 42 COPD patients. The extent of cystic destruction (LAA%) and mean parenchymal CT value were also calculated and correlated with pulmonary function. Results: The diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide/alveolar volume (DL{sub CO}/VA %predicted) was similar for both groups (LAM, 44.4 ± 19.8% vs. COPD, 45.7 ± 16.0%, p = 0.763), but less tissue damage occurred in LAM than COPD (LAA% 21.7 ± 16.3% vs. 29.3 ± 17.0; p < 0.05). Pulmonary function correlated negatively with LAA% (p < 0.001) in both groups, yet the correlation with %CSA was significant only in COPD (p < 0.001). When the same analysis was conducted in two groups with equal levels of LAA% and DL{sub CO}/VA %predicted, %CSA and mean parenchymal CT value were still greater for LAM than COPD (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Quantitative CT analysis revealing a correlation between cystic destruction and CSA in COPD but not LAM indicates that this approach successfully reflects different mechanisms governing the two pathologic courses. Such determinations of small pulmonary vessel density may serve to differentiate LAM from COPD even in patients with severe lung destruction.

  2. Equipment for decontamination of inner vessel surfaces featuring sound or ultrasound transducer on float inside liquid-filled vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar, J.; Straka, M.

    1982-01-01

    The equipment for the decontamination of the inner surfaces of vessels consists of an immersion float which is provided with a screw, an electric motor, a rudder and at least one float chamber, and a remotely controlled valve. The float is provided with a power source, a high frequency a.c. current generator and a control panel outside the vessel. The float is connected to parts of the equipment outside the vessel by a multi-core cable. The immersion float may also be provided with a detector for measuring the quantity of ionizing radiation whose display is placed outside the vessel being decontaminated. (B.S.)

  3. Experimental investigation of solid rocket motors for small sounding rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksila, Thada

    2018-01-01

    Experimentation and research of solid rocket motors are important subjects for aerospace engineering students. However, many institutes in Thailand rarely include experiments on solid rocket motors in research projects of aerospace engineering students, mainly because of the complexity of mixing the explosive propellants. This paper focuses on the design and construction of a solid rocket motor for total impulse in the class I-J that can be utilised as a small sounding rocket by researchers in the near future. Initially, the test stands intended for measuring the pressure in the combustion chamber and the thrust of the solid rocket motor were designed and constructed. The basic design of the propellant configuration was evaluated. Several formulas and ratios of solid propellants were compared for achieving the maximum thrust. The convenience of manufacturing and casting of the fabricated solid rocket motors were a critical consideration. The motor structural analysis such as the combustion chamber wall thickness was also discussed. Several types of nozzles were compared and evaluated for ensuring the maximum thrust of the solid rocket motors during the experiments. The theory of heat transfer analysis in the combustion chamber was discussed and compared with the experimental data.

  4. White matters - The influence of cerebral small-vessel disease on depression, cognition and functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grool, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Depression and cognitive impairment are highly prevalent in later life, and frequently co-occur. One of the possible mechanisms that may underlie both conditions is the presence of cerebral small-vessel disease. The presence of cerebral small-vessel disease is strongly associated with common

  5. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Cognition, Mood, Daily Functioning, and Imaging Findings from a Small Pilot Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease, a leading cause of cognitive decline, is considered a relatively homogeneous disease process, and it can co-occur with Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical reports of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/computed tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT imaging and neuropsychology testing for a small pilot sample of 14 patients are presented to illustrate disease characteristics through findings from structural and functional imaging and cognitive assessment. Participants showed some decreases in executive functioning, attention, processing speed, and memory retrieval, consistent with previous literature. An older subgroup showed lower age-corrected scores at a single time point compared to younger participants. Performance on a computer-administered cognitive measure showed a slight overall decline over a period of 8–28 months. For a case study with mild neuropsychology findings, the MRI report was normal while the SPECT report identified perfusion abnormalities. Future research can test whether advances in imaging analysis allow for identification of cerebral small vessel disease before changes are detected in cognition.

  6. Vitamin D Status in Small Vessel and Large Vessel Ischemic Stroke Patients: A Case–control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Manouchehri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D insufficiency is a globally widespread issue. Recent studies have reported a high prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency in Middle-East countries. Studies have shown negative effects of Vitamin D deficiency on endothelium and related diseases such as ischemic brain stroke. Here, we assessed Vitamin D status in patients with different types of ischemic brain stroke and control group. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients (49.3% small vessel, 50.7% large vessel and 75 controls, matched for age (68.01 ± 10.94 vs. 67.64 ± 10.24 and sex (42 male and 33 female were recruited. 25(OH D levels were measured by Chemiluminescence immunoassay. 25(OH D status was considered as severely, moderately, or mildly deficient and normal with 25(OH D levels of less than 5, 5-10, 10-16, and> 16 ng/ml, respectively. Results: Mean ± standard error concentration of 25(OH D in cases and controls were 17.7 ± 1.5 and 26.9 ± 1.6 (P = 0.0001, respectively. Mild, moderate, and severe Vitamin D deficiency were observed in 10.8%, 32.4%, 8.1% vs. 34.3%, 31.5%, 9.5% of small vessel and large vessel group, respectively. 21.7% of the controls were Vitamin D deficient. Vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with higher risk for ischemic stroke, (P = 0.000, OR = 7.17, 95% confidence interval: 3.36–15.29. 25(OH D levels were significantly higher in control group comparing to small vessel (26.9 ± 1.6 vs. 20.59 ± 2.6 P < 0.05 and large vessel (26.9 ± 1.6 vs. 13.4 ± 1.3 P < 0.001 stroke patients. Small vessel group had significantly higher levels of Vitamin D than large vessel (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency significantly increases the risk of ischemic stroke, favoring the types with the pathogenesis of large vessel strokes.

  7. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Muddled about what makes music? Stuck on the study of harmonics? Dumbfounded by how sound gets around? Now you no longer have to struggle to teach concepts you really don t grasp yourself. Sound takes an intentionally light touch to help out all those adults science teachers, parents wanting to help with homework, home-schoolers seeking necessary scientific background to teach middle school physics with confidence. The book introduces sound waves and uses that model to explain sound-related occurrences. Starting with the basics of what causes sound and how it travels, you'll learn how musical instruments work, how sound waves add and subtract, how the human ear works, and even why you can sound like a Munchkin when you inhale helium. Sound is the fourth book in the award-winning Stop Faking It! Series, published by NSTA Press. Like the other popular volumes, it is written by irreverent educator Bill Robertson, who offers this Sound recommendation: One of the coolest activities is whacking a spinning metal rod...

  8. A miniature research vessel: A small-scale ocean-exploration demonstration of geophysical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, S. M.; Boston, B.; Sleeper, J. D.; Cameron, M. E.; Togia, H.; Anderson, A.; Sigurdardottir, T. D.; Tree, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Graduate student members of the University of Hawaii Geophysical Society have designed a small-scale model research vessel (R/V) that uses sonar to create 3D maps of a model seafloor in real-time. A pilot project was presented to the public at the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology's (SOEST) Biennial Open House weekend in 2013 and, with financial support from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists and National Science Foundation, was developed into a full exhibit for the same event in 2015. Nearly 8,000 people attended the two-day event, including children and teachers from Hawaii's schools, home school students, community groups, families, and science enthusiasts. Our exhibit demonstrates real-time sonar mapping of a cardboard volcano using a toy size research vessel on a programmable 2-dimensional model ship track suspended above a model seafloor. Ship waypoints were wirelessly sent from a Windows Surface tablet to a large-touchscreen PC that controlled the exhibit. Sound wave travel times were recorded using an ultrasonic emitter/receiver attached to an Arduino microcontroller platform and streamed through a USB connection to the control PC running MatLab, where a 3D model was updated as the ship collected data. Our exhibit demonstrates the practical use of complicated concepts, like wave physics, survey design, and data processing in a way that the youngest elementary students are able to understand. It provides an accessible avenue to learn about sonar mapping, and could easily be adapted to talk about bat and marine mammal echolocation by replacing the model ship and volcano. The exhibit received an overwhelmingly positive response from attendees and incited discussions that covered a broad range of earth science topics.

  9. Spatial aspects of reproduced sound in small rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Søren

    1998-01-01

    and spatial aspect of the sound field, that the spectral energy above 2 kHz of the individual reflection determines the importance of the reflection for the spatial aspects, and that only the first order floor reflection will contribute to the spatial aspects. ©1998 Acoustical Society of America....

  10. Acoustic parameters of sound insulating materials investigation in small reverberation rooms on rubber plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.О. Козлітін

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available  The new method of sound insulating materials acoustic characteristics investigation in small reverberation rooms was elaborated. The research of sound insulating materials on rubber plates was done. The analysis of obtained results of acoustic parameters of materials being a part of the composite real structures of airplane was carried out.

  11. Cannulation and continuous cross-sectional area measurement of small blood vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanBavel, E.; Mooij, T.; Giezeman, M. J.; Spaan, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques have been developed for the study of isolated small arteries. To pressurize and perfuse segments of these vessels, a cannula with a low resistance to flow was developed. This cannula consisted of two concentric micropipettes. The end of a vessel segment was sucked into the inner pipette

  12. Report of the DHS National Small Vessel Security Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-19

    Fetterman , Maine Department of Marine Resources Lt Bill Krul, Marine Patrol, St. Clair County, Michigan Sgt Jim Lambert, Marine Patrol, Alameda...Major John C. Fetterman – State of Maine Major Fetterman currently serves as Vice President of the National Association of State Boating Law...or seemingly out of place vessel enters a maritime community, it will attract the attention of his officers. Major Fetterman was concerned that

  13. Measurement of flow velocity fields in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals using micro ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (micro-EPIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Ming; Niu Lili; Jiang Bo; Jin Qiaofeng; Jiang Chunxiang; Zheng Hairong; Wang Yanping

    2010-01-01

    Determining a multidimensional velocity field within microscale opaque fluid flows is needed in areas such as microfluidic devices, biofluid mechanics and hemodynamics research in animal studies. The ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV) technique is appropriate for measuring opaque flows by taking advantage of PIV and B-mode ultrasound contrast imaging. However, the use of clinical ultrasound systems for imaging flows in small structures or animals has limitations associated with spatial resolution. This paper reports on the development of a high-resolution EchoPIV technique (termed as micro-EPIV) and its application in measuring flows in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals. Phantom experiments demonstrate the validity of the technique, providing velocity estimates within 4.1% of the analytically derived values with regard to the flows in a small straight vessel-mimic phantom, and velocity estimates within 5.9% of the computationally simulated values with regard to the flows in a small stenotic vessel-mimic phantom. Animal studies concerning arterial and venous flows of living rats and rabbits show that the micro-EPIV-measured peak velocities within several cardiac cycles are about 25% below the values measured by the ultrasonic spectral Doppler technique. The micro-EPIV technique is able to effectively measure the flow fields within microscale opaque fluid flows.

  14. Measurement of flow velocity fields in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals using micro ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (micro-EPIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ming; Niu, Lili; Wang, Yanping; Jiang, Bo; Jin, Qiaofeng; Jiang, Chunxiang; Zheng, Hairong

    2010-10-21

    Determining a multidimensional velocity field within microscale opaque fluid flows is needed in areas such as microfluidic devices, biofluid mechanics and hemodynamics research in animal studies. The ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV) technique is appropriate for measuring opaque flows by taking advantage of PIV and B-mode ultrasound contrast imaging. However, the use of clinical ultrasound systems for imaging flows in small structures or animals has limitations associated with spatial resolution. This paper reports on the development of a high-resolution EchoPIV technique (termed as micro-EPIV) and its application in measuring flows in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals. Phantom experiments demonstrate the validity of the technique, providing velocity estimates within 4.1% of the analytically derived values with regard to the flows in a small straight vessel-mimic phantom, and velocity estimates within 5.9% of the computationally simulated values with regard to the flows in a small stenotic vessel-mimic phantom. Animal studies concerning arterial and venous flows of living rats and rabbits show that the micro-EPIV-measured peak velocities within several cardiac cycles are about 25% below the values measured by the ultrasonic spectral Doppler technique. The micro-EPIV technique is able to effectively measure the flow fields within microscale opaque fluid flows.

  15. Timbral aspects of reproduced sound in small rooms. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Søren

    1995-01-01

    , has been simulated using an electroacoustic setup. The model included the direct sound, 17 individual reflections, and the reverberant field. The threshold of detection and just-noticeable differences for an increase in level were measured for individual reflections using eight subjects for noise......This paper reports some of the influences of individual reflections on the timbre of reproduced sound. A single loudspeaker with frequency-independent directivity characteristics, positioned in a listening room of normal size with frequency-independent absorption coefficients of the room surfaces...... and speech. The results have shown that the first-order floor and ceiling reflections are likely to individually contribute to the timbre of reproduced speech. For a noise signal, additional reflections from the left sidewall will contribute individually. The level of the reverberant field has been found...

  16. Loss of white matter integrity is associated with gait disorders in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, K.F. de; Tuladhar, A.M.; Norden, A.G.W. van; Norris, D.G.; Zwiers, M.P.; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2011-01-01

    Gait disturbances are common in the elderly. Cerebral small vessel disease, including white matter lesions and lacunars infarcts, is thought to disrupt white matter tracts that connect important motor regions, hence resulting in gait disturbances. Pathological studies have demonstrated abnormalities

  17. Small-vessel Survey and Auction Sampling to Estimate Growth and Maturity of Eteline Snappers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Small-vessel Survey and Auction Sampling to Estimate Growth and Maturity of Eteline Snappers and Improve Data-Limited Stock Assessments. This biosampling project...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: COL4A1-related brain small-vessel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hemorrhage Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery: Intracerebral Hemorrhage Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery: Stroke MalaCards: col4a1-related brain small-vessel disease ...

  19. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D. [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model

  20. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model

  1. Small vessel vasculitis History, classification, etiology, histopathology, clinic, diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Matteson, Eric L; Restrepo, Jose Felix

    2007-01-01

    Small-vessel vasculitis is a convenient descriptor for a wide range of diseases characterized by vascular inflammation of the venules, capillaries, and/or arterioles with pleomorphic clinical manifestations. The classical clinical phenotype is leucocytoclastic vasculitis with palpable purpura, but manifestations vary widely depending upon the organs involved. Histopathologic examination in leucocytoclastic vasculitis reveals angiocentric segmental inflammation, fibrinoid necrosis, and a neutrophilic infiltrate around the blood vessel walls with erythrocyte extravasation. The etiology of small-vessel vasculitis is unknown in many cases, but in others, drugs, post viral syndromes, malignancy, primary vasculitis such as microscopic polyarteritis, and connective tissue disorders are associated, The diagnosis of small- vessel vasculitis relies on a thorough history and physical examination, as well as relevant antibody testing including antinuclear antibody and anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, hepatitis B and C serologies, assessment of complement, immunoglobulins, blood count, serum creatinine liver function tests, urinalysis, radiographic imaging and biopsy. The treatment is based primarily on corticosteroid and immunosuppressive agents

  2. Timbral aspects of reproduced sound in small rooms. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Søren

    1996-01-01

    A single loudspeaker with frequency-dependent directivity characteristics, positioned in a room of normal size with frequency-dependent absorption coefficients of the room surfaces, has been simulated using an electroacoustic setup. The model included the direct sound, seventeen individual...... reflections and the reverberant field. The threshold of detection, and just-noticeable differences for an increase in level were measured for individual reflections. The results have confirmed that the first-order floor reflection is likely to contribute individually to the timbre of reproduced noise. However......, for a speech signal none of the investigated reflections will contribute individually to the timbre. It is suggested that the threshold of detection is determined by the spectral changes in the dominant frequency range of 500 Hz to 2 kHz. For increases in the level of individual reflections, the most likely...

  3. Macular Choroidal Small-Vessel Layer, Sattler's Layer and Haller's Layer Thicknesses: The Beijing Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Ya Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Wen Bin; Xu, Liang; Jonas, Jost B

    2018-03-13

    To study macular choroidal layer thickness, 3187 study participants from the population-based Beijing Eye Study underwent spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with enhanced depth imaging for thickness measurements of the macular small-vessel layer, including the choriocapillaris, medium-sized choroidal vessel layer (Sattler's layer) and large choroidal vessel layer (Haller's layer). In multivariate analysis, greater thickness of all three choroidal layers was associated (all P  0.05) associated with the prevalence of open-angle glaucoma or diabetic retinopathy. There was a tendency (0.07 > P > 0.02) toward thinner choroidal layers in chronic angle-closure glaucoma. The ratio of small-vessel layer thickness to total choroidal thickness increased (P layer and Haller's layer thickness to total choroidal thickness decreased. A higher ratio of small-vessel layer thickness to total choroidal thickness was significantly associated with a lower prevalence of AMD (early type, intermediate type, late geographic type). Axial elongation-associated and aging-associated choroidal thinning affected Haller's and Sattler's layers more markedly than the small-vessel layer. Non-exudative and exudative AMD, except for geographic atrophy, was associated with slightly increased choroidal thickness.

  4. Neuroimaging standards for research into small vessel disease and its contribution to ageing and neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardlaw, J.M.; Smith, E.E.; Biessels, G.J.; Cordonnier, C.; Fazekas, F.; Frayne, R.; Lindley, R.I.; O'Brien, J. T.; Barkhof, F.; Benavente, O.R.; Black, S.E.; Brayne, C.; Breteler, M.; Chabriat, H.; deCarli, C.; de Leeuw, F.E.; Doubal, F.; Duering, M.; Fox, N.C.; Greenberg, S.; Hachinski, V.; Kilimann, I.; Mok, V.; van Oostenbrugge, R.; Pantoni, L.; Speck, O.; Stephan, B.C.M.; Teipel, S.; Viswanathan, A.; Werring, D.; Chen, C.; Smith, C.; van Buchem, M.; Norrving, B.; Gorelick, P.B.; Dichgans, M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common accompaniment of ageing. Features seen on neuroimaging include recent small subcortical infarcts, lacunes, white matter hyperintensities, perivascular spaces, microbleeds, and brain atrophy. SVD can present as a stroke or cognitive decline, or can have

  5. Assessing the Efficiency of Small-Scale and Bottom Trawler Vessels in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Pinello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the technical and scale efficiency of two types of Greek fishing vessels, small-scale vessels and bottom trawlers, using a bias-corrected input-oriented Data Envelopment Analysis model. Moreover, the associations between efficiency scores and vessel’s and skipper’s characteristics are also explored. The results indicate that small-scale vessels achieve a very low average technical efficiency score (0.42 but a much higher scale efficiency score (0.81. Conversely, bottom trawlers achieve lower scale but higher technical efficiency scores (0.68 and 0.73, respectively. One important finding of this study is that the technical efficiency of small-scale vessels, in contrast to trawlers, is positively associated with the experience of the skipper. In a looser context, it can be said that small-scale fisheries mainly rely on skill, whereas bottom trawlers rely more on technology. This study concludes that there is space for improvement in efficiency, mainly for small-scale vessels, which could allow the achievement of the same level of output by using reduced inputs.

  6. Perfusion by Arterial Spin labelling following Single dose Tadalafil In Small vessel disease (PASTIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauls, Mathilde M H; Clarke, Natasha; Trippier, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    vascular territories. The aim of this trial is to test the hypothesis that tadalafil increases cerebral blood flow in older people with small vessel disease. METHODS/DESIGN: Perfusion by Arterial Spin labelling following Single dose Tadalafil In Small vessel disease (PASTIS) is a phase II randomised double......-blind crossover trial. In two visits, 7-30 days apart, participants undergo arterial spin labelling to measure cerebral blood flow and a battery of cognitive tests, pre- and post-dosing with oral tadalafil (20 mg) or placebo. SAMPLE SIZE: 54 participants are required to detect a 15% increase in cerebral blood...

  7. Simulation of onboard power supply system for small hydrographic vessel «Vaygach»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. И. Паньков

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer simulation is a method resorted to more and more frequently for the development of the prospective power supply systems, in particular the vessel power supply system. It provides valuable insights into the transient processes and indicators of electric power quality in the system without building its physical model, thus significantly improving the efficiency and quality of the physical model.Nowadays MathLab package with Simulink application is used with increasing frequency for simulation of such systems.The paper presents a model of the power supply system of small hydrographic vessel ‘Vaygach’ built in MatLab environment. The system vulnerabilities and their remedies have been identified. Changes in sinusoid before and after the non-linear load on the network have been demonstrated and solutions for improving the non-linear distortion factor are proposed. The model developed for the vessel power supply system can be used for building models of different vessels.

  8. Alterations of the cerebral cortex in sporadic small vessel disease: A systematic review of in vivo MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Roxane; De Guio, François; Chabriat, Hugues; Jouvent, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel diseases of the brain are a major determinant of cognitive impairment in the elderly. In small vessel diseases, the most easily identifiable lesions, both at post-mortem evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging, lie in subcortical areas. However, recent results obtained post-mortem, particularly in severe cases, have highlighted the burden of cortex lesions such as microinfarcts and diffuse neuronal loss. The recent development of image post-processing methods allows now assessing in vivo multiple aspects of the cerebral cortex. This systematic review aimed to analyze in vivo magnetic resonance imaging studies evaluating cortex alterations at different stages of small vessel diseases. Studies assessing the relationships between small vessel disease magnetic resonance imaging markers obtained at the subcortical level and cortex estimates were reviewed both in community-dwelling elderly and in patients with symptomatic small vessel diseases. Thereafter, studies analyzing cortex estimates in small vessel disease patients compared with healthy subjects were evaluated. The results support that important cortex alterations develop along the course of small vessel diseases independently of concomitant neurodegenerative processes. Easy detection and quantification of cortex changes in small vessel diseases as well as understanding their underlying mechanisms are challenging tasks for better understanding cognitive decline in small vessel diseases. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Baseline Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Is Not Associated with Gait Decline After Five Years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Holst, Helena M.; Van Uden, Ingeborg W.M.; de Laat, Karlijn F.; Van Leijsen, Esther M.C.; van Norden, Anouk G.W.; Norris, David G.; Van DIjk, Ewoud J.; Tuladhar, Anil M.; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2017-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is cross-sectionally associated with gait disturbances, however, the relation between baseline SVD and gait decline over time is uncertain. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies on gait decline are currently lacking. Objective To

  10. Clinical and magnetic resonance observations in cerebral small-vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwa, V.I.H.

    1999-01-01

    The study reported in this thesis tried to address the following questions: 1. Is it possible to detect genetic factors and vascular risk factors that are specifically associated with the development of small- or large-vessel disease? 2. Are the different clinical and MRI manifestations, that are

  11. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenner, D.; Labreuche, J.; Pico, F.; Scheltens, P.; Poirier, O.; Cambien, F.; Amarenco, P.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) appears on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as leukoaraiosis (LA), état criblé (EC), and multiple lacunar infarctions (MLI). Although the pathophysiology of SVD is poorly understood, there is evidence of a genetic contribution. We sought to analyze

  12. Size ratio performance in detecting cerebral aneurysm rupture status is insensitive to small vessel removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauric, Alexandra; Baharoglu, Merih I; Malek, Adel M

    2013-04-01

    The variable definition of size ratio (SR) for sidewall (SW) vs bifurcation (BIF) aneurysms raises confusion for lesions harboring small branches, such as carotid ophthalmic or posterior communicating locations. These aneurysms are considered SW by many clinicians, but SR methodology classifies them as BIF. To evaluate the effect of ignoring small vessels and SW vs stringent BIF labeling on SR ruptured aneurysm detection performance in borderline aneurysms with small branches, and to reconcile SR-based labeling with clinical SW/BIF classification. Catheter rotational angiographic datasets of 134 consecutive aneurysms (60 ruptured) were automatically measured in 3-dimensional. Stringent BIF labeling was applied to clinically labeled aneurysms, with 21 aneurysms switching label from SW to BIF. Parent vessel size was evaluated both taking into account, and ignoring, small vessels. SR was defined accordingly as the ratio between aneurysm and parent vessel sizes. Univariate and multivariate statistics identified significant features. The square of the correlation coefficient (R(2)) was reported for bivariate analysis of alternative SR calculations. Regardless of SW/BIF labeling method, SR was equally significant in discriminating aneurysm ruptured status (P analysis of alternative SR had a high correlation of R(2) = 0.94 on the whole dataset, and R = 0.98 on the 21 borderline aneurysms. Ignoring small branches from SR calculation maintains rupture status detection performance, while reducing postprocessing complexity and removing labeling ambiguity. Aneurysms adjacent to these vessels can be considered SW for morphometric analysis. It is reasonable to use the clinical SW/BIF labeling when using SR for rupture risk evaluation.

  13. Relationship between diminution of small pulmonary vessels and emphysema in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Shuko; Chubachi, Shotaro; Tsutsumi, Akihiro; Kameyama, Naofumi; Sasaki, Mamoru; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Asano, Koichiro; Reilly, John J; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    To investigate the relationship between small pulmonary vessels and extent of emphysema on CT in individual lungs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Forty-nine patients were included. The percentage of cross-sectional area of vessels emphysema were assessed. Less than half of the COPD patients demonstrated an inverse correlation between %CSA <5 and percentage of low attenuation area (LAA%). In the remaining patients, %CSA <5 was homogeneously distributed. Not all patients with COPD demonstrated an inverse correlation of the distributions between %CSA <5 and LAA% in individual lungs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adult primary angiitis of the central nervous system: isolated small-vessel vasculitis represents distinct disease pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boysson, Hubert; Boulouis, Grégoire; Aouba, Achille; Bienvenu, Boris; Guillevin, Loïc; Zuber, Mathieu; Touzé, Emmanuel; Naggara, Olivier; Pagnoux, Christian

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to identify whether presentations and outcomes in adult patients with isolated small-vessel primary angiitis of the CNS (PACNS) would differ from other patients with large/medium-vessel involvement. In the French PACNS cohort, we compared the characteristics, treatments and outcomes of patients with isolated small-vessel disease (normal CT, MR and/or conventional angiograms, brain biopsy positive for vasculitis) with other patients who had large/medium-vessel involvement (vessel abnormalities on CT, MR or conventional angiograms). A good functional outcome was defined as a modified Rankin scale ⩽2 at last follow-up, regardless of the occurrence of relapse. Among the 102 patients in the cohort, 26 (25%) had isolated small-vessel PACNS, whereas the 76 others demonstrated large/medium-vessel involvement. Patients with isolated small-vessel PACNS had more seizures (P adult patients with isolated small-vessel PACNS presented some distinct disease features and relapsed more often than other PACNS patients who had large/medium-vessel involvement. Functional outcomes and mortality did not differ. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Associations Between Cerebral Small-Vessel Disease and Alzheimer Disease Pathology as Measured by Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, M.I.; Goos, J.D.C.; Teunissen, C.E.; Benedictus, M.R.; Bouwman, F.H.; Wattjes, M.P.; Barkhof, F.; Scheltens, P.; van der Flier, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: It remains unclear if and how associations between cerebral small-vessel disease and Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology lead to cognitive decline and dementia. OBJECTIVE: To determine associations between small-vessel disease and AD pathology. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

  16. Motion correction for passive radiation imaging of small vessels in ship-to-ship inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, K.P., E-mail: ziockk@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boehnen, C.B.; Ernst, J.M.; Fabris, L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hayward, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Karnowski, T.P.; Paquit, V.C.; Patlolla, D.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trombino, D.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Passive radiation detection remains one of the most acceptable means of ascertaining the presence of illicit nuclear materials. In maritime applications it is most effective against small to moderately sized vessels, where attenuation in the target vessel is of less concern. Unfortunately, imaging methods that can remove source confusion, localize a source, and avoid other systematic detection issues cannot be easily applied in ship-to-ship inspections because relative motion of the vessels blurs the results over many pixels, significantly reducing system sensitivity. This is particularly true for the smaller watercraft, where passive inspections are most valuable. We have developed a combined gamma-ray, stereo visible-light imaging system that addresses this problem. Data from the stereo imager are used to track the relative location and orientation of the target vessel in the field of view of a coded-aperture gamma-ray imager. Using this information, short-exposure gamma-ray images are projected onto the target vessel using simple tomographic back-projection techniques, revealing the location of any sources within the target. The complex autonomous tracking and image reconstruction system runs in real time on a 48-core workstation that deploys with the system.

  17. 46 CFR 42.03-35 - U.S.-flag vessels and Canadian vessels navigating on sheltered waters of Puget Sound and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... sheltered waters of Puget Sound and contiguous west coast waters of United States and Canada. 42.03-35... sheltered waters of Puget Sound and contiguous west coast waters of United States and Canada. (a) In a... were satisfied of the sheltered nature of certain waters of the west coast of North America. It was...

  18. Effects of small variations of speed of sound in optoacoustic tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speed of sound difference in the imaged object and surrounding coupling medium may reduce the resolution and overall quality of optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions obtained by assuming a uniform acoustic medium. In this work, the authors investigate the effects of acoustic heterogeneities and discuss potential benefits of accounting for those during the reconstruction procedure. Methods: The time shift of optoacoustic signals in an acoustically heterogeneous medium is studied theoretically by comparing different continuous and discrete wave propagation models. A modification of filtered back-projection reconstruction is subsequently implemented by considering a straight acoustic rays model for ultrasound propagation. The results obtained with this reconstruction procedure are compared numerically and experimentally to those obtained assuming a heuristically fitted uniform speed of sound in both full-view and limited-view optoacoustic tomography scenarios. Results: The theoretical analysis showcases that the errors in the time-of-flight of the signals predicted by considering the straight acoustic rays model tend to be generally small. When using this model for reconstructing simulated data, the resulting images accurately represent the theoretical ones. On the other hand, significant deviations in the location of the absorbing structures are found when using a uniform speed of sound assumption. The experimental results obtained with tissue-mimicking phantoms and a mouse postmortem are found to be consistent with the numerical simulations. Conclusions: Accurate analysis of effects of small speed of sound variations demonstrates that accounting for differences in the speed of sound allows improving optoacoustic reconstruction results in realistic imaging scenarios involving acoustic heterogeneities in tissues and surrounding media

  19. Stent-assisted coil embolization of aneurysms with small parent vessels: safety and efficacy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Anna Luisa; Hou, Samuel Y; Puri, Ajit S; Silva, Christine F; Gounis, Matthew J; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2016-06-01

    Stent-assisted coil embolization (SACE) is a viable therapeutic approach for wide-neck intracranial aneurysms. However, it can be technically challenging in small cerebral vessels (≤2 mm). To present our experience with stents approved for SACE in aneurysms with small parent arteries. All patients who underwent stent-assisted aneurysm treatment with either a Neuroform or an Enterprise stent device at our institution between June 2006 and October 2012 were identified. Additionally, we evaluated each patient's vascular risk factors, aneurysm characteristics (ruptured vs non-ruptured, incidental finding, recanalized) and follow-up angiography data. A total of 41 patients with 44 aneurysms met our criteria, including 31 women and 10 men. Most of the aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation (75%). Stent placement in vessels 1.2-2 mm in diameter was successful in 93.2%. Thromboembolic complications occurred in 6 cases and vessel straightening was seen in 1 case only. Initial nearly complete to complete aneurysm obliteration was achieved in 88.6%. Six-month follow-up angiography showed coil compaction in three cases, one asymptomatic in-stent stenosis and stent occlusion. Twelve to 20-months' follow-up showed stable coil compaction in two patients compared with previous follow-up, and aneurysm recanalization in two patients. Twenty-four to 36-months' follow-up showed further coil compaction in one of these patients and aneurysm recanalization in a previous case of stable coil compaction on mid-term follow-up. Our results suggest that SACE of aneurysms with small parent vessels is feasible in selected cases and shows good long-term patency rates of parent arteries. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Serum Hepatocyte Growth Factor Is Associated with Small Vessel Disease in Alzheimer’s Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is known to exert cell growth, migration and morphogenic effects in various organs, recent studies suggest that HGF may also play a role in synaptic maintenance and cerebrovascular integrity. Although increased levels of HGF have been reported in brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, it is unclear whether peripheral HGF may be associated with cerebrovascular disease (CeVD and dementia. In this study, we examined the association of baseline serum HGF with neuroimaging markers of CeVD in a cohort of pre-dementia (cognitive impaired no dementia, CIND and AD patients.Methods: Serum samples from aged, Non-cognitively impaired (NCI controls, CIND and AD subjects were measured for HGF levels. CeVD (cortical infarcts, microinfarcts, lacunes, white matter hyperintensities (WMH and microbleeds were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.Results: After controlling for covariates, higher levels of HGF were associated with both CIND and AD. Among the different CeVD MRI markers in CIND and AD, only small vessel disease, but not large vessel disease markers were associated with higher HGF levels.Conclusion: Serum HGF may be a useful peripheral biomarker for small vessel disease in subjects with cognitive impairment and AD.

  1. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruparelia, Neil; Buzzatti, Nicola; Romano, Vittorio; Longoni, Matteo; Figini, Fillipo; Montorfano, Matteo; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Spagnolo, Pietro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio; Latib, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety and short-term outcomes of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels. Background: The transfemoral (TF) route for transcatheter aortic valve (TAVI) is the default option due to associated advantages. However, this is limited due to the high prevalence of significant peripheral arterial disease and increased risk of vascular complications. Methods: Of 539 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI in a single Italian center, 23 patients underwent TF-TAVI in the presence of small peripheral vessels as defined by a minimal luminal diameter (MLD) of ≤ 5.5 mm [by computed tomography (CT)] and/or the inability to advance a large-bore sheath. Calcification was defined as being concentric if calcium extended more than 270° around the circumference of the artery. All patients underwent 30-day clinical follow-up. Results: 17 (73.9%) patients underwent peripheral vessel pre-dilatation with a semi-compliant balloon and 6 (26.1%) patients with a Solopath sheath. 6 (26.1%) patients suffered a peri-procedural complication, with 1 patient requiring surgical embolectomy for thrombotic occlusion and the remaining patients successfully managed percutaneously in the catheter laboratory. No patient suffered a vessel perforation or required implantation of a covered stent. At 30-day follow-up, all patients were free of symptoms and signs or symptoms of peripheral vascular disease, with well-functioning TAVI prostheses as evaluated by echocardiography. Conclusions: Performing TF-TAVI is feasible in patients with no other viable vascular access option in the presence of small MLD and calcification of the peripheral vasculature, with any anticipated acute vascular complication managed in the catheter laboratory with established percutaneous techniques. - Highlights: • Small peripheral vessels is regarded as contraindication to transfemoral TAVI.

  2. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruparelia, Neil [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Buzzatti, Nicola; Romano, Vittorio; Longoni, Matteo; Figini, Fillipo; Montorfano, Matteo; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Spagnolo, Pietro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Latib, Azeem, E-mail: info@emocolumbus.it [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety and short-term outcomes of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels. Background: The transfemoral (TF) route for transcatheter aortic valve (TAVI) is the default option due to associated advantages. However, this is limited due to the high prevalence of significant peripheral arterial disease and increased risk of vascular complications. Methods: Of 539 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI in a single Italian center, 23 patients underwent TF-TAVI in the presence of small peripheral vessels as defined by a minimal luminal diameter (MLD) of ≤ 5.5 mm [by computed tomography (CT)] and/or the inability to advance a large-bore sheath. Calcification was defined as being concentric if calcium extended more than 270° around the circumference of the artery. All patients underwent 30-day clinical follow-up. Results: 17 (73.9%) patients underwent peripheral vessel pre-dilatation with a semi-compliant balloon and 6 (26.1%) patients with a Solopath sheath. 6 (26.1%) patients suffered a peri-procedural complication, with 1 patient requiring surgical embolectomy for thrombotic occlusion and the remaining patients successfully managed percutaneously in the catheter laboratory. No patient suffered a vessel perforation or required implantation of a covered stent. At 30-day follow-up, all patients were free of symptoms and signs or symptoms of peripheral vascular disease, with well-functioning TAVI prostheses as evaluated by echocardiography. Conclusions: Performing TF-TAVI is feasible in patients with no other viable vascular access option in the presence of small MLD and calcification of the peripheral vasculature, with any anticipated acute vascular complication managed in the catheter laboratory with established percutaneous techniques. - Highlights: • Small peripheral vessels is regarded as contraindication to transfemoral TAVI.

  3. Reactor pressure vessel behaviour with a small crack in the cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, P.; Churier-Bossennec, H.; Faidy, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on fracture mechanic analysis of a PWR reactor pressure vessel with a 3.5 mm embedded circumferential crack in the cladding under a small lost of cooling accident transient. Different RTNDT level and effect of irradiation on material properties are considered. The study compares simplified one-dimensional and two-dimensional elastic approach and complete elastoplastic approach using J-parameter. The results show: good correlation between the different elastic approaches, important conservatism of the elastic approach compared to elastoplastic approach, no influence of irradiated material properties. The behavior of a vessel with this type of crack is acceptable for RTNDT less than 135 deg and safety injection temperature of 60 deg

  4. Hypertension-Induced Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Leading to Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Yan-Hong; Lyu, Pei-Yuan; Chen, Wei-Hong; Li, Rui

    2018-03-05

    Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia are responsible for more than 80% of dementia cases. These two conditions share common risk factors including hypertension. Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is strongly associated with both hypertension and cognitive impairment. In this review, we identify the pathophysiological changes in CSVD that are caused by hypertension and further explore the relationship between CSVD and cognitive impairment. We searched and scanned the PubMed database for recently published literatures up to December 2017. We used the keywords of "hypertension", "cerebral small vessel disease", "white matter lesions", "enlarged perivascular spaces", "lacunar infarcts", "cerebral microbleeds", and "cognitive impairment" in the database of PubMed. Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the hypertension-induced pathophysiological changes that occur in CSVD and the correlation between CSVD and cognitive impairment. In recent years, studies have demonstrated that hypertension-related changes (e.g., small vascular lesions, inflammatory reactions, hypoperfusion, oxidative stress, damage to autoregulatory processes and the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy) can occur over time in cerebral small vessels, potentially leading to lower cognitive function when blood pressure (BP) control is poor or lacking. Both isolated and co-occurrent CSVD can lead to cognitive deterioration, and this effect may be attributable to a dysfunction in either the cholinergic system or the functionality of cortical and subcortical tracts. We explore the currently available evidence about the hypertensive vasculopathy and inflammatory changes that occur in CSVD. Both are vital prognostic indicators of the development of cognitive impairment. Future studies should be performed to validate the relationship between BP levels and CSVD progression and between the numbers, volumes, and anatomical locations of CSVD and cognitive impairment.

  5. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography depicts small tumor vessels for the evaluation of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yuko; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Takaki, Akinobu; Ishida, Etsuji; Ogawa, Tsuneyoshi; Kuwaki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Kohsaku; Shiratori, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for the diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Materials and methods: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with Levovist was performed on 62 consecutive patients (53 with pancreatic cancer, 4 with islet cell tumor, 3 with inflammatory pancreatic tumor, and 2 with metastatic tumor). The vascular and perfusion image phases of the tumors were evaluated and compared with the findings of contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Results: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography showed tumor vessels around and/or in the tumor at the vascular image phase in 79% of pancreatic cancer patients (42/53). At the perfusion image phase, 96% of pancreatic cancers (51/53) were classified as hypo-enhancement type. However, tiny spotty or irregular heterogeneous enhanced lesions were found in 84% of hypo-enhanced pancreatic cancer patients (43/51). The presence of small vessels at the vascular image phase was closely correlated with the presence of these intratumor regional enhanced lesions at the perfusion image phase (κ coefficient = 0.42). The sensitivity of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (100%) for pancreatic cancer was superior to that of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (91%), but no significant difference was observed between the two (McNemar test: p = 0.063). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with Levovist successfully visualizes fine vessels and enhancement in pancreatic tumors, and is useful for evaluating pancreatic tumors

  6. So small, so loud: extremely high sound pressure level from a pygmy aquatic insect (Corixidae, Micronectinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Jérôme; Mackie, David; Windmill, James F C

    2011-01-01

    To communicate at long range, animals have to produce intense but intelligible signals. This task might be difficult to achieve due to mechanical constraints, in particular relating to body size. Whilst the acoustic behaviour of large marine and terrestrial animals has been thoroughly studied, very little is known about the sound produced by small arthropods living in freshwater habitats. Here we analyse for the first time the calling song produced by the male of a small insect, the water boatman Micronecta scholtzi. The song is made of three distinct parts differing in their temporal and amplitude parameters, but not in their frequency content. Sound is produced at 78.9 (63.6-82.2) SPL rms re 2.10(-5) Pa with a peak at 99.2 (85.7-104.6) SPL re 2.10(-5) Pa estimated at a distance of one metre. This energy output is significant considering the small size of the insect. When scaled to body length and compared to 227 other acoustic species, the acoustic energy produced by M. scholtzi appears as an extreme value, outperforming marine and terrestrial mammal vocalisations. Such an extreme display may be interpreted as an exaggerated secondary sexual trait resulting from a runaway sexual selection without predation pressure.

  7. So small, so loud: extremely high sound pressure level from a pygmy aquatic insect (Corixidae, Micronectinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Sueur

    Full Text Available To communicate at long range, animals have to produce intense but intelligible signals. This task might be difficult to achieve due to mechanical constraints, in particular relating to body size. Whilst the acoustic behaviour of large marine and terrestrial animals has been thoroughly studied, very little is known about the sound produced by small arthropods living in freshwater habitats. Here we analyse for the first time the calling song produced by the male of a small insect, the water boatman Micronecta scholtzi. The song is made of three distinct parts differing in their temporal and amplitude parameters, but not in their frequency content. Sound is produced at 78.9 (63.6-82.2 SPL rms re 2.10(-5 Pa with a peak at 99.2 (85.7-104.6 SPL re 2.10(-5 Pa estimated at a distance of one metre. This energy output is significant considering the small size of the insect. When scaled to body length and compared to 227 other acoustic species, the acoustic energy produced by M. scholtzi appears as an extreme value, outperforming marine and terrestrial mammal vocalisations. Such an extreme display may be interpreted as an exaggerated secondary sexual trait resulting from a runaway sexual selection without predation pressure.

  8. Near-Field Sound Localization Based on the Small Profile Monaural Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngwoong Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic wave around a sound source in the near-field area presents unconventional properties in the temporal, spectral, and spatial domains due to the propagation mechanism. This paper investigates a near-field sound localizer in a small profile structure with a single microphone. The asymmetric structure around the microphone provides a distinctive spectral variation that can be recognized by the dedicated algorithm for directional localization. The physical structure consists of ten pipes of different lengths in a vertical fashion and rectangular wings positioned between the pipes in radial directions. The sound from an individual direction travels through the nearest open pipe, which generates the particular fundamental frequency according to the acoustic resonance. The Cepstral parameter is modified to evaluate the fundamental frequency. Once the system estimates the fundamental frequency of the received signal, the length of arrival and angle of arrival (AoA are derived by the designed model. From an azimuthal distance of 3–15 cm from the outer body of the pipes, the extensive acoustic experiments with a 3D-printed structure show that the direct and side directions deliver average hit rates of 89% and 73%, respectively. The closer positions to the system demonstrate higher accuracy, and the overall hit rate performance is 78% up to 15 cm away from the structure body.

  9. Case of Small Vessel Disease Associated with COL4A1 Mutations following Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao McONeil Plancher

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With this case report, we would like to heighten the awareness of clinicians about COL4A1 as a single-gene disorder causing cerebral small vessel disease and describe a previously unreported pathogenic missense substitution in COL4A1 (p.Gly990Val and a new clinical presentation. We identified a heterozygous putatively pathogenic mutation of COL4A1 in a 50-year-old female with a history of congenital cataracts and glaucoma who presented with multiple diffusion-positive infarcts and areas of contrast enhancement following mild head trauma. We believe that this presentation of multiple areas of acute brain and vascular injury in the setting of mild head trauma is a new manifestation of this genetic disorder. Imaging findings of multiple acute infarcts and regions of contrast enhancement with associated asymptomatic old deep microhemorrhages and leukomalacia in adults after head trauma should raise a high suspicion for a COL4A1 genetic disorder. Radiographic patterns of significant leukoaraiosis and deep microhemorrhages can also be seen in patients with long-standing vasculopathy associated with hypertension, which our patient lacked. Our findings demonstrate the utility of genetic screening for COL4A1 mutations in young patients who have small vessel vasculopathy on brain imaging but who do not have significant cardiovascular risk factors.

  10. Ultrastructural analysis of small blood vessels in skin biopsies in CADASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lačković Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL is an inherited small- and medium-artery disease of the brain caused by mutation of the Notch3 gene. Very often, this disease is misdiagnosed. We examined skin biopsies in two members of the first discovered Serbian family affected by CADASIL. Electron microscopy showed that skin blood vessels of both patients contain numerous deposits of granular osmiophilic material (GOM around vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. We observed degeneration of VSMCs, reorganization of their cytoskeleton and dense bodies, disruption of myoendothelial contacts, and apoptosis. Our results suggest that the presence of GOM in small skin arteries represents a specific marker in diagnosis of CADASIL.

  11. Development of small solid rocket boosters for the ILR-33 sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Pawel; Okninski, Adam; Pakosz, Michal; Cieslinski, Dawid; Bartkowiak, Bartosz; Wolanski, Piotr

    2017-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of the development of a 6000 Newton-class solid rocket motor for suborbital applications. The design configuration and results of interior ballistics calculations are given. The initial use of the motor as the main propulsion system of the H1 experimental in-flight test platform, within the Polish Small Sounding Rocket Program, is presented. Comparisons of theoretical and experimental performance are shown. Both on-ground and in-flight tests are discussed. A novel composite-case manufacturing technology, which enabled to reach high propellant mass fractions, was validated and significant cost-reductions were achieved. This paper focuses on the process of adapting the design for use as the booster stage of the ILR-33 sounding rocket, under development at the Institute of Aviation in Warsaw, Poland. Parallel use of two of the flight-proven rocket motors along with the main stage is planned. The process of adapting the rocket motor for booster application consists of stage integration, aerothermodynamics and reliability analyses. The separation mechanism and environmental impact are also discussed within this paper. Detailed performance analysis with focus on propellant grain geometry is provided. The evolution of the design since the first flights of the H1 rocket is covered and modifications of the manufacturing process are described. Issues of simultaneous ignition of two motors and their non-identical performance are discussed. Further applications and potential for future development are outlined. The presented results are based on the initial work done by the Rocketry Group of the Warsaw University of Technology Students' Space Association. The continuation of the Polish Small Sounding Rocket Program on a larger scale at the Institute of Aviation proves the value of the outcomes of the initial educational project.

  12. Characterisation of creep cavitation damage in a stainless steel pressure vessel using small angle neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, P J; Treimer, W

    2002-01-01

    Grain-boundary cavitation is the dominant failure mode associated with initiation of reheat cracking, which has been widely observed in austenitic stainless steel pressure vessels operating at temperatures within the creep range (>450 C). Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments at the LLB PAXE instrument (Saclay) and the V12 double-crystal diffractometer of the HMI-BENSC facility (Berlin) are used to characterise cavitation damage (in the size range R=10-2000 nm) in a variety of creep specimens extracted from ex-service plant. Factors that affect the evolution of cavities and the cavity-size distribution are discussed. The results demonstrate that SANS techniques have the potential to quantify the development of creep damage in type-316H stainless steel, and thereby link microstructural damage with ductility-exhaustion models of reheat cracking. (orig.)

  13. Small vessel disease is linked to disrupted structural network covariance in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Sean M; Mišić, Bratislav; Ramirez, Joel; Zhao, Jiali; Graham, Simon J; Verhoeff, Nicolaas P L G; Stuss, Donald T; Masellis, Mario; Black, Sandra E

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is thought to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) through abnormalities in white matter networks. Gray matter (GM) hub covariance networks share only partial overlap with white matter connectivity, and their relationship with SVD has not been examined in AD. We developed a multivariate analytical pipeline to elucidate the cortical GM thickness systems that covary with major network hubs and assessed whether SVD and neurodegenerative pathologic markers were associated with attenuated covariance network integrity in mild AD and normal elderly control subjects. SVD burden was associated with reduced posterior cingulate corticocortical GM network integrity and subneocorticocortical hub network integrity in AD. These findings provide evidence that SVD is linked to the selective disruption of cortical hub GM networks in AD brains and point to the need to consider GM hub covariance networks when assessing network disruption in mixed disease. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Blood Pressure Control in Aging Predicts Cerebral Atrophy Related to Small-Vessel White Matter Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C. Kern

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small-vessel damage manifests as white matter hyperintensities and cerebral atrophy on brain MRI and is associated with aging, cognitive decline and dementia. We sought to examine the interrelationship of these imaging biomarkers and the influence of hypertension in older individuals. We used a multivariate spatial covariance neuroimaging technique to localize the effects of white matter lesion load on regional gray matter volume and assessed the role of blood pressure control, age and education on this relationship. Using a case-control design matching for age, gender, and educational attainment we selected 64 participants with normal blood pressure, controlled hypertension or uncontrolled hypertension from the Northern Manhattan Study cohort. We applied gray matter voxel-based morphometry with the scaled subprofile model to (1 identify regional covariance patterns of gray matter volume differences associated with white matter lesion load, (2 compare this relationship across blood pressure groups, and (3 relate it to cognitive performance. In this group of participants aged 60–86 years, we identified a pattern of reduced gray matter volume associated with white matter lesion load in bilateral temporal-parietal regions with relative preservation of volume in the basal forebrain, thalami and cingulate cortex. This pattern was expressed most in the uncontrolled hypertension group and least in the normotensives, but was also more evident in older and more educated individuals. Expression of this pattern was associated with worse performance in executive function and memory. In summary, white matter lesions from small-vessel disease are associated with a regional pattern of gray matter atrophy that is mitigated by blood pressure control, exacerbated by aging, and associated with cognitive performance.

  15. Studies of small-scale plasma inhomogeneities in the cusp ionosphere using sounding rocket data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshov, Alexander A.; Spicher, Andres; Ilyasov, Askar A.; Miloch, Wojciech J.; Clausen, Lasse B. N.; Saito, Yoshifumi; Jin, Yaqi; Moen, Jøran I.

    2018-04-01

    Microprocesses associated with plasma inhomogeneities are studied on the basis of data from the Investigation of Cusp Irregularities (ICI-3) sounding rocket. The ICI-3 rocket is devoted to investigating a reverse flow event in the cusp F region ionosphere. By numerical stability analysis, it is demonstrated that inhomogeneous-energy-density-driven (IEDD) instability can be a mechanism for the excitation of small-scale plasma inhomogeneities. The Local Intermittency Measure (LIM) method also applied the rocket data to analyze irregular structures of the electric field during rocket flight in the cusp. A qualitative agreement between high values of the growth rates of the IEDD instability and the regions with enhanced LIM is observed. This suggests that IEDD instability is connected to turbulent non-Gaussian processes.

  16. THE SECOND BLIND SPOT: SMALL RETINAL VESSEL VASCULOPATHY AFTER VACCINATION AGAINST NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS AND YELLOW FEVER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysidis, Stavros N; Koulisis, Nicole; Patel, Vivek R; Kashani, Amir H; Rao, Narsing A; Humayun, Mark S; Rodger, Damien C

    2017-01-01

    To describe a case of small retinal vessel vasculopathy postvaccination. We report the case of a 41-year-old white man who presented with a "second blind spot," describing a nasal scotoma in the right eye that started 4 days after vaccinations against Neisseria meningitidis and the yellow fever virus, and after a 2-month period of high stress and decreased sleep. Clinical examination, Humphrey visual field testing, and multimodal imaging with fundus photographs, autofluorescence, fluorescein angiography, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography and angiography were performed. Clinical examination revealed a well-circumscribed, triangular area of retinal graying of about 1-disk diameter in size, located at the border of the temporal macula. This corresponded to a deep scotoma similar in size to the physiologic blind spot on Humphrey visual field 24-2 testing. There was mild hypoautofluoresence of this lesion on autofluorescence, hypofluorescence on fluorescein angiography, and focal attenuation of a small artery just distal to the bifurcation of an artery supplying the involved area. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography through the lesion conveyed hyperreflectivity most prominent in the inner and outer plexiform layers, with extension of the hyperreflectivity into the ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography angiography demonstrated arteriolar and capillary dropout, more pronounced in the superficial retinal layer compared to the deeper retinal layer. At 1-month follow-up, his scotoma improved with monitoring, with reduction from -32 dB to -7 dB on Humphrey visual field testing. There was clinical resolution of the area of graying and decreased hyperreflectivity on spectral domain optical coherence tomography, with atrophy of the inner retina. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography angiography showed progression of arteriolar and capillary dropout, more so in the superficial than in the deep capillary

  17. Dolichoectasia and Small Vessel Disease in Young Patients With Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Vincent; Grittner, Ulrike; Fazekas, Franz; McCabe, Dominick J H; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Kessler, Christof; Martus, Peter; Norrving, Bo; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Schmidt, Reinhold; Tanislav, Christian; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Rolfs, Arndt; Enzinger, Christian

    2017-09-01

    We evaluated whether basilar dolichoectasia is associated with markers of cerebral small vessel disease in younger transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients. We used data from the SIFAP1 study (Stroke in Young Fabry Patients), a large prospective, hospital-based, screening study for Fabry disease in young (ischemic attack/stroke patients in whom detailed clinical data and brain MRI were obtained, and stroke subtyping with TOAST classification (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) was performed. Dolichoectasia was found in 508 of 3850 (13.2%) of patients. Dolichoectasia was associated with older age (odds ratio per decade, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.44), male sex (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-2.42), and hypertension (odds ratio, 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.70). Dolichoectasia was more common in patients with small infarctions (33.9% versus 29.8% for acute lesions, P =0.065; 29.1% versus 16.5% for old lesions, P ischemic attack and ischemic stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Small ships don't shine: classification of ocean vessels from low resolution, large swath area SAR acquisitions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyer, Rory GV

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available the Understanding of Our Living Planet, 10-15 July 2016, Beijing, China Small ships don't shine: Classification of ocean vessels from low resolution, large swath area SAR acquisitions R. G. V. Meyer ; W. Kleynhans ; C. P. Schwegmann Abstract: Monitoring...

  19. Causes and consequences of cerebral small vessel disease. The RUN DMC study: a prospective cohort study. Study rationale and protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norden, A.G.W. van; Laat, K.F. de; Gons, R.A.R.; Uden, I.W.M. van; Dijk, E.J. van; Oudheusden, L.J.B. van; Esselink, R.A.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Zwarts, M.J.; Tendolkar, I.; Olde-Rikkert, M.G.M.; Vlugt, M.J. van der; Zwiers, M.P.; Norris, D.G.; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a frequent finding on CT and MRI scans of elderly people and is related to vascular risk factors and cognitive and motor impairment, ultimately leading to dementia or parkinsonism in some. In general, the relations are weak, and not all subjects

  20. A multi-scale tensor voting approach for small retinal vessel segmentation in high resolution fundus images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulidis, Argyrios; Hurtut, Thomas; Tahar, Houssem Ben; Cheriet, Farida

    2016-09-01

    Segmenting the retinal vessels from fundus images is a prerequisite for many CAD systems for the automatic detection of diabetic retinopathy lesions. So far, research efforts have concentrated mainly on the accurate localization of the large to medium diameter vessels. However, failure to detect the smallest vessels at the segmentation step can lead to false positive lesion detection counts in a subsequent lesion analysis stage. In this study, a new hybrid method for the segmentation of the smallest vessels is proposed. Line detection and perceptual organization techniques are combined in a multi-scale scheme. Small vessels are reconstructed from the perceptual-based approach via tracking and pixel painting. The segmentation was validated in a high resolution fundus image database including healthy and diabetic subjects using pixel-based as well as perceptual-based measures. The proposed method achieves 85.06% sensitivity rate, while the original multi-scale line detection method achieves 81.06% sensitivity rate for the corresponding images (p<0.05). The improvement in the sensitivity rate for the database is 6.47% when only the smallest vessels are considered (p<0.05). For the perceptual-based measure, the proposed method improves the detection of the vasculature by 7.8% against the original multi-scale line detection method (p<0.05). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Apathy, but not depression, is associated with executive dysfunction in cerebral small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohner, Valerie; Brookes, Rebecca L; Hollocks, Matthew J; Morris, Robin G; Markus, Hugh S

    2017-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of apathy and depression in cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), and the relationships between both apathy and depression with cognition. To examine whether apathy is specifically related to impairment in executive functioning and processing speed. 196 patients with a clinical lacunar stroke and an anatomically corresponding lacunar infarct on MRI were compared to 300 stroke-free controls. Apathy and depression were measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale, and cognitive functioning was assessed using an SVD cognitive screening tool, the Brief Memory and Executive Test, which measures executive functioning/processing speed and memory/orientation. Path analysis and binary logistic regression were used to assess the relation between apathy, depression and cognitive impairment. 31 participants with SVD (15.8%) met criteria for apathy only, 23 (11.8%) for both apathy and depression, and 2 (1.0%) for depression only. In the SVD group the presence of apathy was related to global cognition, and specifically to impaired executive functioning/processing speed, but not memory/orientation. The presence of depression was not related to global cognition, impaired executive functioning/processing speed or memory/orientation. Apathy is a common feature of SVD and is associated with impaired executive functioning/processing speed suggesting the two may share biological mechanisms. Screening for apathy should be considered in SVD, and further work is required to develop and evaluate effective apathy treatment or management in SVD.

  2. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism and Small Vessel Cerebral Stroke in Indian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puttachandra Prabhakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypertension is an established risk factor for small-vessel cerebral stroke and the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the maintenance of blood pressure. We aimed at evaluating the contribution of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D polymorphism to the risk of small-vessel stroke in south Indian population. Materials and Methods. We investigated 128 patients diagnosed with small-vessel stroke and 236 age, and gender-matched healthy controls. ACE I/D polymorphism was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Results. Hypertension was significantly more prevalent in the patient group and was associated with 6-fold increase in risk for stroke. ACE genotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both patients and controls. Prevalence of DD, ID, and II genotypes in cases (34.4%, 43.7%, and 28% did not differ significantly from controls (31.8%, 43.2%, and 25%. The polymorphism was not associated with small-vessel stroke (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 0.52–1.55. However, diastolic blood pressure was associated with the ACE I/D genotypes in the patients. (DD; 90.2±14.2> ID; 86.2±11.9> II; 82.3±7.8 mm Hg,  P=0.047. Conclusion. Our study showed that hypertension, but not ACE I/D polymorphism, increased the risk of small-vessel stroke.

  3. Small scale features of sound velocity structure in the northern Arabian sea during February - May 1974

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Somayajulu, Y.K.; Rao, L.V.G.; Varadachari, V.V.R.

    at intermediate depths (200-400 m), influence the sound velocity structure and cause formation of an upper sound channel in the northern Arabian Sea. The Persian Gulf waters spread as tongues at 1 or 2 more levels (up to a limited extent), besides the prominent...

  4. Occupational Safety and Health Conditions Aboard Small- and Medium-Size Fishing Vessels: Differences among Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zytoon, Mohamed A; Basahel, Abdulrahman M

    2017-02-24

    Although marine fishing is one of the most hazardous occupations, research on the occupational safety and health (OSH) conditions aboard marine fishing vessels is scarce. For instance, little is known about the working conditions of vulnerable groups such as young and aging fishermen. The objective of the current paper is to study the OSH conditions of young and aging fishermen compared to middle-aged fishermen in the small- and medium-size (SM) marine fishing sector. A cross-sectional study was designed, and 686 fishermen working aboard SM fishing vessels were interviewed to collect information about their safety and health. The associations of physical and psychosocial work conditions with safety and health outcomes, e.g., injuries, illnesses and job satisfaction, are presented. The results of the current study can be utilized in the design of effective accident prevention and OSH training programs for the three age groups and in the regulation of working conditions aboard fishing vessels.

  5. Correlation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 single nucleotide polymorphisms with the risk of small vessel disease (SVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zhu, Wusheng; Yun, Wenwei; Wang, Qizhang; Cheng, Maogang; Zhang, Zhizhong; Liu, Xinfeng; Zhou, Xianju; Xu, Gelin

    2015-09-15

    Maladjustment of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) results in cerebral vasculature and blood-brain barrier dysfunction, which is associated with small vessel disease (SVD). This study was to aim at evaluating correlations between matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms and the risk of SVD. A total of 178 patients with SVD were enrolled into this study via Nanjing Stroke Registry Program (NSRP) from January 2010 to November 2011. SVD patients were further subtyped as isolated lacunar infarction (ILI, absent or with mild leukoaraiosis) and ischemic leukoaraiosis (ILA, with moderate or severe leukoaraiosis) according to the Fazekas scale. 100 age- and gender-matched individuals from outpatient medical examination were recruited as the control group. The genotypes of MMP-2-1306 T/C and MMP-9-1562 C/T were determined by the TaqMan method. Of 178 SVD patients, 86 and 92 patients were classified as ILI and ILA, respectively. Comparison analysis between SVD patients and controls revealed a significant correlation between SVD and hypertension, as well as a prevalence of hypertension in ILA. Further genotype analysis showed that the frequency of MMP-2-1306 CC genotype was higher in ILA patients than in controls (P=0.009, χ(2) test; P=0.027, the multiple test with Bonferroni correction). Finally, logistic regression analysis with adjustment of age, sex and vascular risk factors showed that the MMP-2-1306 T/C polymorphism was an independent predictor for ILA (OR: 2.605; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.067-6.364; P=0.036). Our findings suggest that the MMP-2-1306 T/C polymorphism is a direct risk factor for ILA. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Patient perceptions about illness self-management in ANCA-associated small vessel vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, C T; DeVellis, R F; Blalock, S J; Hogan, S L; Lewis, M A; DeVellis, B M

    2008-06-01

    To characterize patient perceptions, related to eight self-management behaviours relevant for adults with ANCA-associated small vessel vasculitis (ANCA-SVV), and to determine if these perceptions were associated with performance of each behaviour. Adults with ANCA-SVV (n = 202) completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed eight self-management behaviours (adherence to recommendations for medication, health service use, diet, exercise, infection avoidance and symptom monitoring; prompt reporting of symptoms and side effects; and adjusting activities in response to symptoms), perceptions about these behaviours, socio-demographics, clinical factors and social desirability bias. Descriptive statistics were generated to characterize patients' perceptions about difficulty of, importance of, and specific barriers to performing each behaviour. Regression analyses explored whether these variables were associated with performing each behaviour, controlling for potential confounders. With few exceptions, higher perceived importance and lower perceived difficulty of each behaviour were associated with more frequent performance of the behaviour. For each behaviour, several specific barriers were frequently endorsed by patients and a number of these were associated with lower levels of self-management. This study reveals that patient perceptions about the illness and its treatment influence ANCA-SVV self-management. Perceived barriers to medication, health services, diet and exercise adherence were similar to those in other illnesses. This study also provides insight into barriers experienced by patients in performing behaviours (infection avoidance, symptom monitoring, reporting symptoms and side-effects and adjusting activities) not often previously studied. How the identification of these barriers can help inform future interventions for ANCA-SVV patients is to be discussed.

  7. Prevalence, risk factors and consequences of cerebral small vessel diseases: data from three Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Saima; Mok, Vincent; Youn, Young Chul; Wong, Adrian; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian

    2017-08-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) has been suggested to be more common in Asians compared with Caucasians. However, data from population-based studies in Asia are lacking. We report on the prevalence, risk factors and consequences of SVD from contemporary studies in three Asian countries using 3-Tesla MRI for the evaluation of SVD. Clinical, cognitive and 3-Tesla brain MRI assessments were performed among participants of three studies from Singapore, Hong Kong and Korea. SVD markers include white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) using the modified Fazekas scale, lacunes and microbleeds. Cognition was assessed using the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Adjustments were made for age, sex and cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 1797 subjects were available for analysis (mean age: 70.1±6.3 years and 57% women). The prevalence of confluent WMH was 36.6%, lacunes, 24.6% and microbleeds, 26.9%. Presence of all three SVD markers showed a steeper increase with increasing age rising from 1.9% in the lowest to 46.2% in the highest 5-year age strata. The major risk factors for the increased severity of SVD markers were advancing age and hypertension. Moreover, increasing severity of SVD markers was independently associated with worse performance on MMSE and MoCA. Elderly Asians have a high burden of SVD which was associated with cognitive dysfunction. This suggests that SVD markers should be a potential target for treatment in clinical trials so as to delay progression of cerebrovascular disease and potentially cognitive decline. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Characterization of Heterozygous HTRA1 Mutations in Taiwanese Patients With Cerebral Small Vessel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Chung; Chung, Chih-Ping; Chao, Nai-Chen; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Chang, Feng-Chi; Soong, Bing-Wing; Liao, Yi-Chu

    2018-07-01

    Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in the high temperature requirement serine peptidase A1 gene ( HTRA1 ) cause cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy. However, heterozygous HTRA1 mutations were recently identified to be associated with autosomal dominant cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). The present study aims at investigating the clinical features, frequency, and spectrum of HTRA1 mutations in a Taiwanese cohort with SVD. Mutational analyses of HTRA1 were performed by Sanger sequencing in 222 subjects, selected from a cohort of 337 unrelated patients with SVD after excluding those harboring a NOTCH3 mutation. The influence of these mutations on HTRA1 protease activities was characterized. Seven novel heterozygous mutations in HTRA1 were identified, including p.Gly120Asp, p.Ile179Asn, p.Ala182Profs*33, p.Ile256Thr, p.Gly276Ala, p.Gln289Ter, and p.Asn324Thr, and each was identified in 1 single index patient. All mutations significantly compromise the HTRA1 protease activities. For the 7 index cases and another 2 affected siblings carrying a heterozygous HTRA1 mutation, the common clinical presentations include lacunar infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, cognitive decline, and spondylosis at the fifth to sixth decade of life. Among the 9 patients, 4 have psychiatric symptoms as delusion, depression, and compulsive behavior, 3 have leukoencephalopathy in anterior temporal poles, and 2 patients have alopecia. Heterozygous HTRA1 mutations account for 2.08% (7 of 337) of SVD in Taiwan. The clinical and neuroradiological features of HTRA1 -related SVD and sporadic SVD are similar. These findings broaden the mutational spectrum of HTRA1 and highlight the pathogenic role of heterozygous HTRA1 mutations in SVD. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Role of thalamic diffusion for disease differentiation between multiple sclerosis and ischemic cerebral small vessel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeztoprak, Bilge; Oeztoprak, Ibrahim; Salk, Ismail; Topalkara, Kamil; Erkoc, Mustafa F.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) both harbor multiple, T2-hyperintense white matter lesions on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).We aimed to determine the microstructural changes via diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in normal appearing thalami. We hypothesized that the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values would be different in CSVD and MS, since the extent of arterial involvement is different in these two diseases. DWI was performed for 50 patients with CSVD and 35 patients with MS along with gender- and age-matched controls whose conventional MRI revealed normal findings. DWI was done with 1.5 Tesla MR devices using echo planar imaging (EPI) for b = 0, 1000 s/mm 2 . ADC values were obtained from the thalami which appeared normal on T2-weighted and FLAIR images. Standard oval regions of interest (ROIs) of 0.5 cm 2 which were oriented parallel to the long axis of the thalamus were used for this purpose. The mean ADC value of the thalamus was (0.99 ± 0.16) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in patients with CSVD, whereas the mean ADC value was (0.78 ± 0.06) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in the control group. The mean ADC value was significantly higher in patients with CSVD compared to the controls (p < 0.001). The mean ADC values of the thalamus were (0.78 ± 0.08) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in MS patients, and (0.75 ± 0.08) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in the control group, which are not significantly different (p > 0.05). Our study revealed a difference in the diffusion of the thalami between CSVD and MS. DWI may aid in the radiological disease differentiation. (orig.)

  10. Pattern and Rate of Cognitive Decline in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: A Prospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Lawrence

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment, predominantly affecting processing speed and executive function, is an important consequence of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD. To date, few longitudinal studies of cognition in SVD have been conducted. We determined the pattern and rate of cognitive decline in SVD and used the results to determine sample size calculations for clinical trials of interventions reducing cognitive decline.121 patients with MRI confirmed lacunar stroke and leukoaraiosis were enrolled into the prospective St George's Cognition And Neuroimaging in Stroke (SCANS study. Patients attended one baseline and three annual cognitive assessments providing 36 month follow-up data. Neuropsychological assessment comprised a battery of tests assessing working memory, long-term (episodic memory, processing speed and executive function. We calculated annualized change in cognition for the 98 patients who completed at least two time-points.Task performance was heterogeneous, but significant cognitive decline was found for the executive function index (p<0.007. Working memory and processing speed decreased numerically, but not significantly. The executive function composite score would require the smallest samples sizes for a treatment trial with an aim of halting decline, but this would still require over 2,000 patients per arm to detect a 30% difference with power of 0.8 over a three year follow-up.The pattern of cognitive decline seen in SVD over three years is consistent with the pattern of impairments at baseline. Rates of decline were slow and sample sizes would need to be large for clinical trials aimed at halting decline beyond initial diagnosis using cognitive scores as an outcome measure. This emphasizes the importance of more sensitive surrogate markers in this disease.

  11. Role of thalamic diffusion for disease differentiation between multiple sclerosis and ischemic cerebral small vessel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztoprak, Bilge; Oeztoprak, Ibrahim; Salk, Ismail [Cumhuriyet University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sivas (Turkey); Topalkara, Kamil [Bayindir Hospital, Department of Neurology, Ankara (Turkey); Erkoc, Mustafa F. [Bozok University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yozgat (Turkey)

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) both harbor multiple, T2-hyperintense white matter lesions on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).We aimed to determine the microstructural changes via diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in normal appearing thalami. We hypothesized that the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values would be different in CSVD and MS, since the extent of arterial involvement is different in these two diseases. DWI was performed for 50 patients with CSVD and 35 patients with MS along with gender- and age-matched controls whose conventional MRI revealed normal findings. DWI was done with 1.5 Tesla MR devices using echo planar imaging (EPI) for b = 0, 1000 s/mm{sup 2}. ADC values were obtained from the thalami which appeared normal on T2-weighted and FLAIR images. Standard oval regions of interest (ROIs) of 0.5 cm{sup 2} which were oriented parallel to the long axis of the thalamus were used for this purpose. The mean ADC value of the thalamus was (0.99 ± 0.16) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in patients with CSVD, whereas the mean ADC value was (0.78 ± 0.06) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in the control group. The mean ADC value was significantly higher in patients with CSVD compared to the controls (p < 0.001). The mean ADC values of the thalamus were (0.78 ± 0.08) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in MS patients, and (0.75 ± 0.08) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in the control group, which are not significantly different (p > 0.05). Our study revealed a difference in the diffusion of the thalami between CSVD and MS. DWI may aid in the radiological disease differentiation. (orig.)

  12. Application of Texture Analysis to Study Small Vessel Disease and Blood–Brain Barrier Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del C. Valdés Hernández

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesWe evaluate the alternative use of texture analysis for evaluating the role of blood–brain barrier (BBB in small vessel disease (SVD.MethodsWe used brain magnetic resonance imaging from 204 stroke patients, acquired before and 20 min after intravenous gadolinium administration. We segmented tissues, white matter hyperintensities (WMH and applied validated visual scores. We measured textural features in all tissues pre- and post-contrast and used ANCOVA to evaluate the effect of SVD indicators on the pre-/post-contrast change, Kruskal–Wallis for significance between patient groups and linear mixed models for pre-/post-contrast variations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF with Fazekas scores.ResultsTextural “homogeneity” increase in normal tissues with higher presence of SVD indicators was consistently more overt than in abnormal tissues. Textural “homogeneity” increased with age, basal ganglia perivascular spaces scores (p < 0.01 and SVD scores (p < 0.05 and was significantly higher in hypertensive patients (p < 0.002 and lacunar stroke (p = 0.04. Hypertension (74% patients, WMH load (median = 1.5 ± 1.6% of intracranial volume, and age (mean = 65.6 years, SD = 11.3 predicted the pre/post-contrast change in normal white matter, WMH, and index stroke lesion. CSF signal increased with increasing SVD post-contrast.ConclusionA consistent general pattern of increasing textural “homogeneity” with increasing SVD and post-contrast change in CSF with increasing WMH suggest that texture analysis may be useful for the study of BBB integrity.

  13. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Burden Is Associated With Poststroke Depressive Symptoms: A 15-Month Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: All types of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD markers including lacune, white matter hyperintensities (WMH, cerebral microbleeds, and perivascular spaces were found to be associated with poststroke depressive symptoms (PDS. This study explored whether the combination of the four markers constituting an overall SVD burden was associated with PDS.Methods: A cohort of 563 patients with acute ischemic stroke were followed over a 15-month period after the index stroke. A score of ≥7 on the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale was defined as clinically significant PDS. Scores of the four SVD markers ascertained on magnetic resonance imaging were summed up to represent total SVD burden. The association between SVD burden and PDS was assessed with generalized estimating equation models.Results: The study sample had a mean age of 67.0 ± 10.2 years and mild-moderate stroke [National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score: 3, interquartile, 1–5]. PDS were found in 18.3%, 11.6%, and 12.3% of the sample at 3, 9, and 15 months after stroke, respectively. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, vascular risk factors, social support, stroke severity, physical and cognitive functions, and size and locations of stroke, the SVD burden was associated with an increased risk of PDS [odds ratio = 1.30; 95% confidence interval = 1.07–1.58; p = 0.010]. Other significant predictors of PDS were time of assessment, female sex, smoking, number of acute infarcts, functional independence, and social support.Conclusion: SVD burden was associated with PDS examined over a 15-month follow-up in patients with mild to moderate acute ischemic stroke.

  14. [Management of cerebral small vessel disease for the diagnosis and treatment of dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Masafumi

    2013-07-01

    With the demographic shift in life expectancy inexorably increasing in developed countries, dementia is set to become one of the most important health problems worldwide. In recent years, cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) has received much attention as an important cause of dementia. The reason for this is twofold: firstly, arteriosclerosis (type 1 SVD) is the leading cause of vascular cognitive impairment, and secondly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA; type 2 SVD) is an almost invariable accompaniment of Alzheimer's disease. SVD is known to induce a variety of pathological changes; for example, type 1 SVD results in lacunar infarction, deep microbleeds, and white matter damage, while type 2 SVD leads to cortical microinfarcts, lobar microbleeds, and white matter damage. SVD is considered a spectrum of abnormalities, with the majority of patients experiencing symptoms from both type 1 and type 2 SVD as the disease progresses. The discouraging results of immunotherapy clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease have shifted the scientific attention from the classical neuron-centric approach towards a novel neurovascular approach. As arteries stiffen with age or with other co-morbid factors such as life-related diseases, amyloid β (Aβ) synthesis becomes upregulated, resulting in the deposition of insoluble Aβ not only in the parenchyma as senile plaques but also in the perivascular drainage pathways as CAA. Therefore, therapeutic strategies such as vasoactive drugs that enhance the patency of this Aβ drainage pathway may facilitate Aβ removal and help prevent cognitive decline in the elderly. Based on this emerging paradigm, clinical trials are warranted to investigate whether a neurovascular therapeutic approach can effectively halt cognitive decline and act as a preemptive medicine for patients at risk of dementia.

  15. Mass optimization of a small pressure vessel using metal/FRP (fiber reinforced polymers) hybrid structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisar, J.A.; Abdullah, A.N.; Iqbal, N.

    2004-01-01

    In hybrid pressure vessels, composite (Fiber) is wound over a metallic liner (Steel/Aluminum) in hoop direction. In this concept of hybrid pressure vessel structure, metallic liner takes all the axial loads and fiber reinforced polymers (FRP/sub s/) takes load in circumferential (Hoop) direction. Hybrid structures combine the relatively high shear stiffness and ductility of metal alloy with high specific stiffness, strength and fatigue properties of FRP/sub s/. The relatively simple methods for producing hybrid structures circumvent the need for the complex and expensive equipment that is used for advanced composites processing. This paper presents an efficient way of designing a hybrid pressure vessel where prime concern is weight reduction over an equivalent aluminum structure and investigates various methodologies regarding combinations of metals and FRP/sub s/ for optimization of a given pressure vessel. For this purpose we adopted two different methods of simulation one is computer simulation using ANSYS and other is experimental verification by hydrostatic testing of manufactured pressure vessel. Two different pressure vessels one with aluminum liner and other with steel liner were fabricated. Kevlar 49/epoxy was wrapped around the liners in hoop direction. Both the pressure vessels were put into hydrostatic test. Strains were measured during the test and then converted into corresponding stresses. Results of hydrostatic test were quite in favor of the ANSYS results. In this way we have successfully designed, manufactured and tested the Hybrid pressure vessel saving almost 40% weight in case of aluminum liner and 43.6% in case of steel liner. (author)

  16. Quantitative assessment of cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels in patients with COPD using inspiratory and expiratory MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Yukiko; Kawata, Naoko; Yanagawa, Noriyuki; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Sakurai, Yoriko; Sato, Misuzu; Iesato, Ken; Terada, Jiro; Sakao, Seiichiro; Tada, Yuji; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Yoichi; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Structural and functional changes in pulmonary vessels are prevalent at the initial stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These vascular alterations can be assessed using cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels. However, neither in non-COPD smokers nor in COPD patients it has been defined whether the structural changes of pulmonary vessels detected by paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans are associated with emphysematous changes. We quantified the CSA and low attenuation area (LAA) and evaluated the changes in these parameters in the inspiratory and expiratory phases. Materials and methods: Fifty consecutive non-COPD smokers and COPD patients were subjected to multi detector-row CT and the percentage of vessels with a CSA less than 5 mm 2 as well as the percentage LAA for total lung area (%CSA < 5, %LAA, respectively) were calculated. Results: The %CSA < 5 correlated negatively with %LAA. The %CSA < 5 was lower in COPD patients with emphysema as compared with non-COPD smokers and COPD patients with or without mild emphysema. In addition, the %CSA < 5 was lower in the no/mild emphysema subgroup as compared with non-COPD smokers. The respiratory phase change of %CSA < 5 in COPD patients was greater than that in non-COPD smokers. Conclusion: The percentage of small pulmonary vessels decreased as emphysematous changes increase, and this decrease was observed even in patients with no/mild emphysema. Furthermore, respiratory phase changes in CSA were higher in COPD patients than in non-COPD smokers

  17. Quantitative assessment of cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels in patients with COPD using inspiratory and expiratory MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Yukiko, E-mail: matsuyuki_future@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Kawata, Naoko, E-mail: chumito_03@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Yanagawa, Noriyuki, E-mail: yanagawa@ho.chiba-u.ac.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sugiura, Toshihiko, E-mail: sugiura@js3.so-net.ne.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sakurai, Yoriko, E-mail: yoliri@nifty.com [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sato, Misuzu, E-mail: mis_misuzu@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Iesato, Ken, E-mail: iesato_k@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Terada, Jiro, E-mail: jirotera@chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sakao, Seiichiro, E-mail: sakao@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tada, Yuji, E-mail: ytada@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tanabe, Nobuhiro, E-mail: ntanabe@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Suzuki, Yoichi, E-mail: ysuzuki@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tatsumi, Koichiro, E-mail: tatsumi@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    Objectives: Structural and functional changes in pulmonary vessels are prevalent at the initial stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These vascular alterations can be assessed using cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels. However, neither in non-COPD smokers nor in COPD patients it has been defined whether the structural changes of pulmonary vessels detected by paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans are associated with emphysematous changes. We quantified the CSA and low attenuation area (LAA) and evaluated the changes in these parameters in the inspiratory and expiratory phases. Materials and methods: Fifty consecutive non-COPD smokers and COPD patients were subjected to multi detector-row CT and the percentage of vessels with a CSA less than 5 mm{sup 2} as well as the percentage LAA for total lung area (%CSA < 5, %LAA, respectively) were calculated. Results: The %CSA < 5 correlated negatively with %LAA. The %CSA < 5 was lower in COPD patients with emphysema as compared with non-COPD smokers and COPD patients with or without mild emphysema. In addition, the %CSA < 5 was lower in the no/mild emphysema subgroup as compared with non-COPD smokers. The respiratory phase change of %CSA < 5 in COPD patients was greater than that in non-COPD smokers. Conclusion: The percentage of small pulmonary vessels decreased as emphysematous changes increase, and this decrease was observed even in patients with no/mild emphysema. Furthermore, respiratory phase changes in CSA were higher in COPD patients than in non-COPD smokers.

  18. The Changing Role of Sound-Symbolism for Small Versus Large Vocabularies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, James; Monaghan, Padraic; Walker, Peter

    2017-12-12

    Natural language contains many examples of sound-symbolism, where the form of the word carries information about its meaning. Such systematicity is more prevalent in the words children acquire first, but arbitrariness dominates during later vocabulary development. Furthermore, systematicity appears to promote learning category distinctions, which may become more important as the vocabulary grows. In this study, we tested the relative costs and benefits of sound-symbolism for word learning as vocabulary size varies. Participants learned form-meaning mappings for words which were either congruent or incongruent with regard to sound-symbolic relations. For the smaller vocabulary, sound-symbolism facilitated learning individual words, whereas for larger vocabularies sound-symbolism supported learning category distinctions. The changing properties of form-meaning mappings according to vocabulary size may reflect the different ways in which language is learned at different stages of development. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Cognitive Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Cognitive Science Society.

  19. Sound localization in common vampire bats: Acuity and use of the binaural time cue by a small mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Rickye S.; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Passive sound-localization acuity and the ability to use binaural time and intensity cues were determined for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). The bats were tested using a conditioned suppression/avoidance procedure in which they drank defibrinated blood from a spout in the presence of sounds from their right, but stopped drinking (i.e., broke contact with the spout) whenever a sound came from their left, thereby avoiding a mild shock. The mean minimum audible angle for three bats for a 100-ms noise burst was 13.1°—within the range of thresholds for other bats and near the mean for mammals. Common vampire bats readily localized pure tones of 20 kHz and higher, indicating they could use interaural intensity-differences. They could also localize pure tones of 5 kHz and lower, thereby demonstrating the use of interaural time-differences, despite their very small maximum interaural distance of 60 μs. A comparison of the use of locus cues among mammals suggests several implications for the evolution of sound localization and its underlying anatomical and physiological mechanisms. PMID:25618037

  20. Brain regions for sound processing and song release in a small grasshopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvantray Bhavsar, Mit; Stumpner, Andreas; Heinrich, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    We investigated brain regions - mostly neuropils - that process auditory information relevant for the initiation of response songs of female grasshoppers Chorthippus biguttulus during bidirectional intraspecific acoustic communication. Male-female acoustic duets in the species Ch. biguttulus require the perception of sounds, their recognition as a species- and gender-specific signal and the initiation of commands that activate thoracic pattern generating circuits to drive the sound-producing stridulatory movements of the hind legs. To study sensory-to-motor processing during acoustic communication we used multielectrodes that allowed simultaneous recordings of acoustically stimulated electrical activity from several ascending auditory interneurons or local brain neurons and subsequent electrical stimulation of the recording site. Auditory activity was detected in the lateral protocerebrum (where most of the described ascending auditory interneurons terminate), in the superior medial protocerebrum and in the central complex, that has previously been implicated in the control of sound production. Neural responses to behaviorally attractive sound stimuli showed no or only poor correlation with behavioral responses. Current injections into the lateral protocerebrum, the central complex and the deuto-/tritocerebrum (close to the cerebro-cervical fascicles), but not into the superior medial protocerebrum, elicited species-typical stridulation with high success rate. Latencies and numbers of phrases produced by electrical stimulation were different between these brain regions. Our results indicate three brain regions (likely neuropils) where auditory activity can be detected with two of these regions being potentially involved in song initiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Utilization of self-expanding stents in the treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic disease in the distal small cerebral vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turk, Aquilla S.; Niemann, David B.; Aagaard-Kienitz, Beverly; Ahmed, Azam; Brooks, Nathaniel; Levine, Ross L.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, endovascular treatment of stenosis related to intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAD) involving arteries measuring less than 2 mm in diameter was limited. To our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature addressing stent placement for treatment of stenosis in arteries of this size. Four patients aged 33 to 80 years (mean 57.5 years) with medically refractory ICAD underwent angioplasty and stenting of small (<2 mm) distal intracerebral arteries. Vessel location and length of follow-up were anterior cerebral artery (ACA) A1 segment (5 months), ACA A2 segment (18 months), middle cerebral artery M1 segment (18 months), and posterior cerebral artery P1 segment (8 months) with vessel calibers ranging from 1.2 to 1.8 mm. Clinical and imaging follow-up ranged from 5 to 18 months. All procedures were successfully performed without complications. Follow-up out to 18 months demonstrated one vessel that went on to occlusion while the other stented vessel segments remained patent. One patient died 8 months after stenting, but the death was not related to neurological disease. The remaining patients experienced resolution of the presenting symptomatology and remained asymptomatic throughout follow-up. In this small series, stenoses of distal (<2 mm) cerebral arteries were amenable to treatment using new self-expanding stents. We safely and successfully treated four arteries smaller than 2 mm in diameter with newer self-expanding stents. All patients remained clinically asymptomatic. One stent occluded at 5 months and the others remained patent during follow-up. Longer term clinical follow-up is required to determine the durability and viability of this therapy. (orig.)

  2. The influence of residual stresses on small through-clad cracks in pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deLorenzi, H.G.; Schumacher, B.I.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of cladding residual stresses on the crack driving force for shallow cracks in the wall of a nuclear pressure vessel is investigated. Thermo-elastic-plastic analyses were carried out on long axial through-clad and sub-clad flaws on the inside of the vessel. The depth of the flaws were one and three times the cladding thickness, respectively. An analysis of a semielliptical axial through-clad flaw was also performed. It was assumed that the residual stresses arise due to the difference in the thermal expansion between the cladding and the base material during the cool down from stress relieving temperature to room temperature and due to the subsequent proof test before the vessel is put into service. The variation of the crack tip opening displacement during these loadings and during a subsequent thermal shock on the inside wall is described. The analyses for the long axial flaws suggest that the crack driving force is smaller for this type of flaw if the residual stresses in the cladding are taken into account than if one assumes that the cladding has no residual stresses. However, the analysis of the semielliptical flaw shows significantly different results. Here the crack driving force is higher than when the residual stresses are not taken into account and is maximum in the cladding at or near the clad/base material interface. This suggests that the crack would propagate along the clad/base material interface before it would penetrate deeper into the wall. The elastic-plastic behavior found in the analyses show that the cladding and the residual stresses in the cladding should be taken into acocunt when evaluating the severity of shallow surface cracks on the inside of a nuclear pressure vessel

  3. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties and Medical Applications of Polycaprolactone Small Diameter Artificial Blood Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnazsadat Mirbagheri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the cardiovascular diseases and decreasing the possibility of autograft surgery are important factors that cause the choice of artificial vascular graft as an alternative treatment method. In this regard, producing artificial grafts similar to natural vessels is an important purpose that has long been followed as a gold standard by many researchers worldwide. In addition, mechanical properties including strength, long patency, bio-compatibility and hydrophobicity are necessary properties to achieve ideal vascular grafts. Hence there are various factors such as polymer type and preparation methods, which contribute to suitable mechanical properties. The electrospinning as an optimized method on one side and biocompatible, degradable and semicrystalline polycaprolactone (PCL on the other side are used for their acceptable mechanical properties to manufacture synthetic vessels. In this study, PCL vascular grafts have been reviewed and a wide range of parameters affecting the improvement of mechanical properties and their performance have been described along with clinical applications. Therefore, by investigating and comparing single and composite PCL vascular grafts, we achieved acceptable results in the field of cell growth and adhesion as well as implanting grafts in animals such as rat and rabbit. By reviewing other studies, it was revealed that synthetic composite vessels made of PCL and natural polymers such as collagen and chitosan and synthetic polymers such as polyurethane (PU for long patency and acceptable cell adhesion have shown good clinical results.

  4. EEG in Silent Small Vessel Disease : sLORETA Mapping Reveals Cortical Sources of Vascular Cognitive Impairment No Dementia in the Default Mode Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheorajpanday, Rishi V. A.; Marien, Peter; Weeren, Arie J. T. M.; Nagels, Guy; Saerens, Jos; van Putten, Michel J. A. M.; De Deyn, Peter P.

    Introduction: Vascular cognitive impairment, no dementia (vCIND) is a prevalent and potentially preventable disorder. Clinical presof the small vessel subcortical subtype may be insidious and difficult to diagnose in the initial stage. We investigated electroencephalographic sources of subcortical

  5. Development of in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism for a innovative small reactor (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Although the control rod drive mechanism of an existing large scale light water reactor is generally installed outside the reactor vessel, an in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism (INV-CRDM) is installed inside the reactor vessel. The INV-CRDM contributes to compactness and simplicity of the reactor system, and it can eliminate the possibility of a rod ejection accident. Therefore, INV-CRDM is an important technology adopted in an innovative small reactor. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has developed this type of CRDM driven by an electric motor, which can work under high temperature and high pressure water for the advanced marine reactor. On the basis of this research result, a driving motor coil and a bearing were developed to be used under the high temperature steam, severe condition for an innovative small reactor. About the driving motor, we manufactured the driving motor available for high temperature steam and carried out performance test under room temperature atmosphere to confirm the electric characteristic and coolability of the driving coil. With these test results and the past test results under high temperature water, we analyzed and evaluated the electric performance and coolability of the driving coil under high temperature steam. Concerning bearing, we manufactured the test pieces using some candidate material for material characteristic test and carried out the rolling wear test under high temperature steam to select the material. Consequently, we confirmed that performance of the driving coil for the advanced type driving motor, is enough to be used under high temperature steam. And, we evaluated the performance of the bearing and selected the material of the bearing, which can be used under high temperature steam. From these results, we have obtained the prospect that the INV-CRDM can be used for an innovative small reactor under steam atmosphere could be developed. (author)

  6. Acute hypertensive encephalopathy with widespread small-vessel disease at MRI in a diabetic patient: pathogenetic hypotheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, F. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Department of Radiology, Pierre Benite (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, CREATIS, UMR CNRS (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Laennec (France); Kamoun, S.; Rety-Jacob, F.; Tran-Minh, V.A. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Department of Radiology, Pierre Benite (France); Nighoghossian, N. [Hopital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical, Department of Neurology, Bron (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, CREATIS, UMR CNRS (France); Hermier, M. [Hopital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical, Department of Neuroradiology and MRI, Bron (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, CREATIS, UMR CNRS (France)

    2005-08-01

    We report unusual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a diabetic patient with neglected hypertension and hyperglycemia, presenting with seizures and coma. Outcome was fatal despite intensive care. The MRI findings included bilateral insular and temporo-occipital grey and white matter involvement, and numerous, scattered, lacunar-like lesions involving the peripheral and deep white matter, basal ganglia grey matter, and brainstem. Lesions had a low apparent diffusion coefficient, and some enhanced following contrast injection. Hypertensive encephalopathy with widespread and severe acute small-vessel disease was considered. Pathophysiology is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Acute hypertensive encephalopathy with widespread small-vessel disease at MRI in a diabetic patient: pathogenetic hypotheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotton, F.; Kamoun, S.; Rety-Jacob, F.; Tran-Minh, V.A.; Nighoghossian, N.; Hermier, M.

    2005-01-01

    We report unusual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a diabetic patient with neglected hypertension and hyperglycemia, presenting with seizures and coma. Outcome was fatal despite intensive care. The MRI findings included bilateral insular and temporo-occipital grey and white matter involvement, and numerous, scattered, lacunar-like lesions involving the peripheral and deep white matter, basal ganglia grey matter, and brainstem. Lesions had a low apparent diffusion coefficient, and some enhanced following contrast injection. Hypertensive encephalopathy with widespread and severe acute small-vessel disease was considered. Pathophysiology is discussed. (orig.)

  8. About a mechanism of the influence of shear stress for viscosity of the blood in vessels of small diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Лев Николаевич Катюхин

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed a physiological and experimentally confirmed explanation of Fåhraeus-Lindqvist-effect in capillaries using the profile analyses of osmotic deformability of red blood cells. It was shown the dose-dependent change of the erythrocytes deformability in the stage of isotropic spheres after forming artificial water pores (nystatin and occlusion (PbCl2 of available pores. The Sigma-effect reducing of hematocrit and viscosity in a shear flow of blood through the vessels of a small diameter was conditioned by the interchange of liquid phase between the erythrocyte and the plasma.

  9. Application of small specimens to fracture mechanics characterization of irradiated pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, M.A.; Wallin, K.; McCabe, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN) specimens were used to characterize the fracture toughness of unirradiated and irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels in the transition region by means of three-point static bending. Fracture toughness at cleavage instability was calculated in terms of elastic-plastic K Jc values. A statistical size correction based upon weakest-link theory was performed. The concept of a master curve was applied to analyze fracture toughness properties. Initially, size-corrected PCVN data from A 533 grade B steel, designated HSST Plate O2, were used to position the master curve and a 5% tolerance bound for K Jc data. By converting PCVN data to IT compact specimen equivalent K Jc data, the same master curve and 5% tolerance bound curve were plotted against the Electric Power Research Institute valid linear-elastic K Jc database and the ASME lower bound K Ic curve. Comparison shows that the master curve positioned by testing several PCVN specimens describes very well the massive fracture toughness database of large specimens. These results give strong support to the validity of K Jc with respect to K Ic in general and to the applicability of PCVN specimens to measure fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels in particular. Finally, irradiated PCVN specimens of other materials were tested, and the results are compared to compact specimen data. The current results show that PCVNs demonstrate very good capacity for fracture toughness characterization of reactor pressure vessel steels. It provides an opportunity for direct measurement of fracture toughness of irradiated materials by means of precracking and testing Charpy specimens from surveillance capsules. However, size limits based on constraint theory restrict the operational test temperature range for K Jc data from PCVN specimens. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  10. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Frenzel

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities.The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model "Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool" (CaTSiT to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model.According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels' geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor's therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior.Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry of the primary tumor.

  11. [Telescopic adhesive anastomosis of small blood vessel applied in formation of arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G; Leng, Y; Rong, G

    1997-03-01

    The formation of an arteriovenous fistual for dialysis by routine interrupted sutures anastomosing the vein and artery is difficult to perform and time-consuming. A new method, telescopic adhesive anastomosis was studied and applied in 10 hemodialysis patients, who were in need of an arteriovenous fistula. The external diameter of the vessels anastomosed was 2.40 +/- 0.20 mm (radial artery) or 2.40 +/- 0.35 mm (cephalic vein). After thorough debridement of the vascular ends, the arterial end was put in the venous lumen. In order to fix the telescopic vessels, two stitches were applied 180 degrees apart from each other and tied. Each stitch was inserted from vein (penetrating the whole wall) to artery (just through the adventitia and partial thickness of the media vasorum). The distance from the stitch to the edge of the vein was 0.5 mm, and that of the artery was approximated to the external diameter of the vessle. The medical adhesive was then applied for sealing the anastomotic adventitia. Ten seconds were given for the solidification of the adhesive. The patients were followed up for 8 months. The patency rate was 100%, and the rate of blood flow was more than 300 ml/min (measured by ultrasonography). It was shown that this method could be managed easily and quickly, and the so-formed fistula would fulfill the need of hemodialysis.

  12. Detection of small surface vessels in near, medium, and far infrared spectral bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulski, R.; Milewski, S.; Kastek, M.; Trzaskawka, P.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Zyczkowski, M.

    2011-11-01

    Protection of naval bases and harbors requires close co-operation between security and access control systems covering land areas and those monitoring sea approach routes. The typical location of naval bases and harbors - usually next to a large city - makes it difficult to detect and identify a threat in the dense regular traffic of various sea vessels (i.e. merchant ships, fishing boats, tourist ships). Due to the properties of vessel control systems, such as AIS (Automatic Identification System), and the effectiveness of radar and optoelectronic systems against different targets it seems that fast motor boats called RIB (Rigid Inflatable Boat) could be the most serious threat to ships and harbor infrastructure. In the paper the process and conditions for the detection and identification of high-speed boats in the areas of ports and naval bases in the near, medium and far infrared is presented. Based on the results of measurements and recorded thermal images the actual temperature contrast delta T (RIB / sea) will be determined, which will further allow to specify the theoretical ranges of detection and identification of the RIB-type targets for an operating security system. The data will also help to determine the possible advantages of image fusion where the component images are taken in different spectral ranges. This will increase the probability of identifying the object by the multi-sensor security system equipped additionally with the appropriate algorithms for detecting, tracking and performing the fusion of images from the visible and infrared cameras.

  13. Experimental and numerical study on density stratification erosion phenomena with a vertical buoyant jet in a small vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Satoshi, E-mail: abe.satoshi@jaea.go.jp; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • This paper shows results of a small scale experiment and CFD analyses on a density stratification erosion with a vertical buoyant jet. • The particle image velocimetry (PIV) and quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with a multiport rotating valve were applied. • Two typical well-used RANS models were applied. • The simulated stratification erosion was in agreement with the experimental result, which suggested that the turbulence mixing occurred only in the jet impinging region. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project to investigate thermal hydraulic phenomena in a reactor containment vessel during a severe accident. The hydrogen distribution in the vessel is one of significant safety issues in discussing a potential of hydrogen combustion in the containment. Density stratification and its break-up are important phenomena affecting the hydrogen distribution. This paper focuses on a density stratification erosion and break-up mechanism with a vertical buoyant jet promoting the turbulent helium transport. Small scale experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were carried out for investigating this phenomena. In the experiment, a rectangular vessel made with acrylic plates with a width of 1.5 m, a length of 1.5 m and a height of 1.8 m was used for visualizing flow field with particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system with a multiport rotating valve was applied for measuring gaseous concentration at 20 elevation points. In CFD analysis with OpenFOAM, two typical well-used turbulence models were used: low-Reynolds number type k–ε model and SST k–ω model, with a turbulence model modification to consider the buoyant effect in the stratification. As a result, the stratification erosion in the CFD analyses with the modified turbulence model agreed well with the experimental data, indicating importance of the turbulence damping by the buoyant effect.

  14. Experimental and numerical study on density stratification erosion phenomena with a vertical buoyant jet in a small vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Satoshi; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper shows results of a small scale experiment and CFD analyses on a density stratification erosion with a vertical buoyant jet. • The particle image velocimetry (PIV) and quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with a multiport rotating valve were applied. • Two typical well-used RANS models were applied. • The simulated stratification erosion was in agreement with the experimental result, which suggested that the turbulence mixing occurred only in the jet impinging region. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project to investigate thermal hydraulic phenomena in a reactor containment vessel during a severe accident. The hydrogen distribution in the vessel is one of significant safety issues in discussing a potential of hydrogen combustion in the containment. Density stratification and its break-up are important phenomena affecting the hydrogen distribution. This paper focuses on a density stratification erosion and break-up mechanism with a vertical buoyant jet promoting the turbulent helium transport. Small scale experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were carried out for investigating this phenomena. In the experiment, a rectangular vessel made with acrylic plates with a width of 1.5 m, a length of 1.5 m and a height of 1.8 m was used for visualizing flow field with particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system with a multiport rotating valve was applied for measuring gaseous concentration at 20 elevation points. In CFD analysis with OpenFOAM, two typical well-used turbulence models were used: low-Reynolds number type k–ε model and SST k–ω model, with a turbulence model modification to consider the buoyant effect in the stratification. As a result, the stratification erosion in the CFD analyses with the modified turbulence model agreed well with the experimental data, indicating importance of the turbulence damping by the buoyant effect.

  15. Small specimen measurements of dynamic fracture toughness of heavy section steels for nuclear pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Iwadate, T.; Suzuki, K.

    1987-01-01

    This study presents the dynamic fracture toughness properties (KId) of 12 heats of RPV steels measured using small specimens and analysed based on the current research. The correlation between the KId test and other engineering small specimen tests such as Charpy test and drop weight test are also discussed and a method to predict the KId value is presented. (orig./HP)

  16. Small vessel vasculitis History, classification, etiology, histopathology, clinic, diagnosis and treatment; Vasculitis de pequenos vasos. Historia, clasificacion, etiologia, histopatologia, clinica, diagnostico y tratamiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Matteson, Eric L; Restrepo, Jose Felix

    2007-07-01

    Small-vessel vasculitis is a convenient descriptor for a wide range of diseases characterized by vascular inflammation of the venules, capillaries, and/or arterioles with pleomorphic clinical manifestations. The classical clinical phenotype is leucocytoclastic vasculitis with palpable purpura, but manifestations vary widely depending upon the organs involved. Histopathologic examination in leucocytoclastic vasculitis reveals angiocentric segmental inflammation, fibrinoid necrosis, and a neutrophilic infiltrate around the blood vessel walls with erythrocyte extravasation. The etiology of small-vessel vasculitis is unknown in many cases, but in others, drugs, post viral syndromes, malignancy, primary vasculitis such as microscopic polyarteritis, and connective tissue disorders are associated, The diagnosis of small- vessel vasculitis relies on a thorough history and physical examination, as well as relevant antibody testing including antinuclear antibody and anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, hepatitis B and C serologies, assessment of complement, immunoglobulins, blood count, serum creatinine liver function tests, urinalysis, radiographic imaging and biopsy. The treatment is based primarily on corticosteroid and immunosuppressive agents.

  17. Effects of JPEG data compression on magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of small vessels ischemic lesions of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriki, Paulo Eduardo de Aguiar; Abdala, Nitamar; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Szejnfeld, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to establish the maximum achievable JPEG compression ratio without affecting quantitative and qualitative magnetic resonance imaging analysis of ischemic lesion in small vessels of the brain. Material and method: fifteen DICOM images were converted to JPEG with a compression ratio of 1:10 to 1:60 and were assessed together with the original images by three neuro radiologists. The number, morphology and signal intensity of the lesions were analyzed. Results: lesions were properly identified up to a 1:30 ratio. More lesions were identified with a 1:10 ratio then in the original images. Morphology and edges were properly evaluated up toa 1:40 ratio. Compression did not affect signal. Conclusion: small lesions were identified ( < 2 mm ) and in all compression ratios the JPEG algorithm generated image noise that misled observers to identify more lesions in JPEG images then in DICOM images, thus generating false-positive results.(author)

  18. Small-target leak detection for a closed vessel via infrared image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling; Yang, Hongjiu

    2017-03-01

    This paper focus on a leak diagnosis and localization method based on infrared image sequences. Some problems on high probability of false warning and negative affect for marginal information are solved by leak detection. An experimental model is established for leak diagnosis and localization on infrared image sequences. The differential background prediction is presented to eliminate the negative affect of marginal information on test vessel based on a kernel regression method. A pipeline filter based on layering voting is designed to reduce probability of leak point false warning. A synthesize leak diagnosis and localization algorithm is proposed based on infrared image sequences. The effectiveness and potential are shown for developed techniques through experimental results.

  19. [Small vessel-childhood primary angiitis of the central nervous system: a case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, J; Fang, F; Wang, X H; Ge, M; He, L J; Zhang, N

    2018-02-02

    Objective: To summarize the clinical and pathological features of small vessel-childhood primary angiitis of the central nervous system (SV-cPACNS), discuss the immune therapy and increase the attention to brain biopsy in SV-cPACNS. Methods: The clinical data, pathology of brain biopsy, treatment and outcome of an SV-cPACNS patient hospitalized in Beijing Children's Hospital in February 2016 were analyzed retrospectively. The cases reported at Pubmed, CNKI and Wanfang databases from 2007 to 2017 were searched, the clinical and pathological features, immunotherapy and prognosis of the disease were summarized according to the literature review. Results: A 70 months old girl had 6 times relapses during 5 months' disease course. Symptoms included convulsions, limb paralysis, blurred vision and speech difficulty. Multiple cortical lesions were found successively in brain MRI but CT angiography was negative. The pathology of brain biopsy revealed thickening of small vessel walls together with lymphocytic infiltration. After the treatment with rituximab, remission was achieved and remained stable without recurrence in 1 year follow up. A total of 44 pathologically confirmed cases reported in nearly 10 years were retrieved. Male to female ratio was 1∶3.5. The average onset age was 9.8 years. Clinical manifestations included seizures (37/45, 82%), headache (35/45, 78%), cognitive decline (28/45, 62%), speech regression(20/45, 44%), paralysis (15/45, 33%), and so on; 70% (19/27) patients experienced relapses. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein slightly elevated, antinuclear antibody and other autoimmune antibodies were mostly negative. Mild lymphocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid was found in 67%(29/43) patients. 53%(23/43) patients had elevated CSF protein level, several had elevated IgG and positive oligoclonal band. Bilateral multifocal lesions were revealed in 80% (36/45) brain MRIs, meanwhile all angiographies were unremarkable. The pathology showed

  20. Small-sized reverberation chamber for the measurement of sound absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, R. del; Alba, J.; Bertó, L.; Gregori, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design, construction, calibration and automation of a reverberation chamber for small samples. A balance has been sought between reducing sample size, to reduce the manufacturing costs of materials, and finding the appropriate volume of the chamber, to obtain reliable values at high and mid frequencies. The small-sized reverberation chamber, that was built, has a volume of 1.12 m3 and allows for the testing of samples of 0.3 m2. By using diffusers, to improve the diffusion degree, and automating measurements, we were able to improve the reliability of the results, thus reducing test errors. Several comparison studies of the measurements of the small-sized reverberation chamber and the standardised reverberation chamber are shown, and a good degree of adjustment can be seen between them, within the range of valid frequencies. This paper presents a small laboratory for comparing samples and making decisions before the manufacturing of larger sizes. [es

  1. Limitations of quantitative photoacoustic measurements of blood oxygenation in small vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Mathangi; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhang, Hao F; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of obtaining accurate quantitative information, such as local blood oxygenation level (sO 2 ), with a spatial resolution of about 50 μm from spectral photoacoustic (PA) measurements. The optical wavelength dependence of the peak values of the PA signals is utilized to obtain the local blood oxygenation level. In our in vitro experimental models, the PA signal amplitude is found to be linearly proportional to the blood optical absorption coefficient when using ultrasonic transducers with central frequencies high enough such that the ultrasonic wavelengths are shorter than the light penetration depth into the blood vessels. For an optical wavelength in the 578-596 nm region, with a transducer central frequency that is above 25 MHz, the sensitivity and accuracy of sO 2 inversion is shown to be better than 4%. The effect of the transducer focal position on the accuracy of quantifying blood oxygenation is found to be negligible. In vivo oxygenation measurements of rat skin microvasculature yield results consistent with those from in vitro studies, although factors specific to in vivo measurements, such as the spectral dependence of tissue optical attenuation, dramatically affect the accuracy of sO 2 quantification in vivo

  2. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticle targeting in a simplified model of small vessel aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzababaei, S.N. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gorji, Tahereh B., E-mail: gorji.tahereh@stu.nit.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baou, M.; Gorji-Bandpy, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fatouraee, Nasser [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    An in simulacra study was conducted to investigate the capture efficiency (CE) of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in aneurysm model, under the effect of a bipolar permanent magnetic system positioned at the vicinity of the model vessel. The bipolar magnetic system with an active space of 9 cm was designed by FEMM software. The MNPs were magnetite nanoparticles synthesized by the hydrothermal method which were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and magnetometer measurements. Ferrofluid velocity, magnetic field strength, and aneurysm volume all proved to be important parameters which affect the capturing of MNPs. Overall, the results of this in simulacra study confirmed the effectiveness of magnetic targeting for possible aneurysm embolization. - Highlights: • An in simulacra investigation of the magnetic targeting in mechanical aneurysm embolization was conducted. • A bipolar permanent magnetic system with an active space of 9 cm was designed by FEMM software. • Magnetic nanofluid was synthetized and applied in an experimental setup to study the effect of different flow, magnetic field and geometry parameters on the capture efficiency of the magnetic particles acting as a dug carrier agent.

  3. FMCW radar system for detection and classification of small vessels in high sea state conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasselin, J.-P.; Mazuel, S.; Itcia, E.; Huizing, A.G.; Theil, A.

    2012-01-01

    The ROCKWELL COLLINS France radar department is currently developing a FMCW radar system for the detection and the classification of small maritime targets in the frame of the SISMARIS, SARGOS & I2C projects. Several test campaigns have been conducted since 2009 to develop a sensor as well as an

  4. Evaluation of ductile-brittle transition behavior with neutron irradiation in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels using small punch test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. C.; Lee, B. S.; Oh, Y. J.

    2003-01-01

    A Small Punch (SP) test was performed to evaluate the ductile-brittle transition temperature before and after neutron irradiation in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels produced by different manufacturing (refining) processes. The results were compared to the standard transition temperature shifts from the Charpy test and Master Curve fracture toughness test in accordance with the ASTM standard E1921. The samples were taken from 1/4t location of the vessel thickness and machined into a 10x10x0.5mm dimension. Irradiation of the samples was carried out in the research reactor at KAERI (HANARO) at about 290 .deg. C of the different fluence levels respectively. SP tests were performed in the temperature range of RT to -196 .deg. C using a 2.4mm diameter ball. For the materials before and after irradiation, SP transition temperatures (T sp ), which are determined at the middle of the upper and lower SP energies, showed a linear correlation with the Charpy index temperature, T 41J . T sp from the irradiated samples was increased as the fluence level increased and was well within the deviation range of the unirradiated data. The TSP had a correlation with the reference temperature (T 0 ) from the master curve method using a pre-cracked Charpy V-notched (PCVN) specimen

  5. Marine biodiesel use in the Puget Sound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, N. [Northwest Biofuels Association, Portland, OR (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This presentation explored the use of marine biodiesel in the Puget Sound region. Marine vessels are now adopting biodiesel fuels as a means of expressing corporate commitments to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the environmental impacts of hydrocarbons released into marine environments. Various biodiesel blends have been designed for use in small commercial, recreational, and research vessels. Biodiesel has also been adopted by charter and whale watching vessels in the Puget Sound. The Guemes Island Ferry has recently been re-configured to use biodiesel fuels, with 2 fuel tanks capable of receiving 2200 gallons at a time. The ferry adopted biodiesel after receiving soot complaints from marinas, and hopes to serve as a model for other vessels in the region. Four fueling docks supply the biodiesel blend to marine vessels. The sale of biodiesel has doubled in some marinas over the last 5 years. Deterrents to biodiesel use include parts incompatibilities and warranty problems. Some marinas have stopped selling biodiesel as a result of low sales and high prices. It was concluded that educational programs are needed to ensure the widespread adoption of biodiesel in the Puget Sound. refs., tabs., figs.

  6. Marine biodiesel use in the Puget Sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, N.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation explored the use of marine biodiesel in the Puget Sound region. Marine vessels are now adopting biodiesel fuels as a means of expressing corporate commitments to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the environmental impacts of hydrocarbons released into marine environments. Various biodiesel blends have been designed for use in small commercial, recreational, and research vessels. Biodiesel has also been adopted by charter and whale watching vessels in the Puget Sound. The Guemes Island Ferry has recently been re-configured to use biodiesel fuels, with 2 fuel tanks capable of receiving 2200 gallons at a time. The ferry adopted biodiesel after receiving soot complaints from marinas, and hopes to serve as a model for other vessels in the region. Four fueling docks supply the biodiesel blend to marine vessels. The sale of biodiesel has doubled in some marinas over the last 5 years. Deterrents to biodiesel use include parts incompatibilities and warranty problems. Some marinas have stopped selling biodiesel as a result of low sales and high prices. It was concluded that educational programs are needed to ensure the widespread adoption of biodiesel in the Puget Sound. refs., tabs., figs

  7. Sound and sound sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    There is no difference in principle between the infrasonic and ultrasonic sounds, which are inaudible to humans (or other animals) and the sounds that we can hear. In all cases, sound is a wave of pressure and particle oscillations propagating through an elastic medium, such as air. This chapter...... is about the physical laws that govern how animals produce sound signals and how physical principles determine the signals’ frequency content and sound level, the nature of the sound field (sound pressure versus particle vibrations) as well as directional properties of the emitted signal. Many...... of these properties are dictated by simple physical relationships between the size of the sound emitter and the wavelength of emitted sound. The wavelengths of the signals need to be sufficiently short in relation to the size of the emitter to allow for the efficient production of propagating sound pressure waves...

  8. The Effect of Pulsatile Flow on bMSC-Derived Endothelial-Like Cells in a Small-Sized Artificial Vessel Made by 3-Dimensional Bioprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Woog Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of small-sized vessels is still challenging. This study is aimed at investigating the possibility of small-sized artificial vessels made by 3-dimensional bioprinting and the effect of pulsatile flow on bMSC-derived endothelial-like cells. Cells were harvested from rabbit bone marrow and primary cultured with or without growth factors. Endothelial differentiation was confirmed by the Matrigel tube formation assay, Western blot, and qRT-PCR. In addition, embedment of endothelial-like cells in an artificial vessel was made by 3-dimensional bioprinting, and the pulsatile flow was performed. For pumped and nonpumped groups, qRT-PCR was performed on CD31 and VE-cadherin gene expression. Endothelial-like cells showed increased gene expression of CD31 and VE-cadherin, and tube formation is observed at each week. Endothelial-like cells grow well in a small-sized artificial vessel made by 3-dimensional bioprinting and even express higher endothelial cell markers when they undergo pulsatile flow condition. Moreover, the pulsatile flow condition gives a positive effect for cell observation not only on the sodium alginate hydrogel layer but also on the luminal surface of the artificial vessel wall. We have developed an artificial vessel, which is a mixture of cells and carriers using a 3-dimensional bioprinting method, and applied pulsatile flow using a peristaltic pump, and we also demonstrated cell growth and differentiation into endothelial cells. This study suggests guidelines regarding a small-sized artificial vessel in the field of tissue engineering.

  9. Proton density differences in signal characteristics of multiple sclerosis plaques versus white matter lesions of small vessel disease and vasculitis on high-field strength MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyster, R.G.; Siegal, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines if variations in signal intensity characteristics on multi-spin-echo images obtained with a high-field-strength magnet can be useful in differentiating demyelinating plaques of multiple sclerosis from other pathologic white matter processes due to small vessel disease and vasculities. Using the first of two multi-spin-echo images obtained with a General Electric 1.5-T magnet, the investigators compared signal intensity characteristics in 30 patients with a firm clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis versus a control group of 30 patients with a known clinical history of small-vessel disease and vasculitis are isodense to gray matter on proton-density images

  10. Changes in cross-sectional area of pulmonary vessels on chest computed tomography after chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayama, Masato; Inui, Naoki; Kusagaya, Hideki; Suzuki, Seiichiro; Inoue, Yusuke; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy is associated with a risk of vascular damage. Novel anti-angiogenic agents, which can directly affect tumor angiogenesis, are increasingly being used. However, the effects of these agents on normal vasculature are not well understood. Here, we evaluated the effects of chemotherapy in general, and the anti-angiogenic agent bevacizumab, more specifically, on the pulmonary vasculature in patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For this, we used the cross-sectional area of pulmonary vessels (CSA), which is an easily measurable indicator of small pulmonary vasculature on non-contrast chest computed tomography (CT). We retrospectively reviewed CT scans of the lungs of 75 chemo-naïve patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC, for measurement of CSA, before and after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, using a semi-automatic image-processing program. Measured vessels were classified in two groups: small vessels with CSA area (%CSAsmall-diameter vessels, with a significant decrease in %CSAsmall pulmonary vascular damage. Use of bevacizumab does not enhance the reduction in area of pulmonary vessels.

  11. Focal and diffuse papillary muscle fibrosis and small vessel sclerosis of the heart. A clinical-pathologic study of 375 autopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, A; Danzig, M D; Robertson, T L; Kawashima, T; Nakashima, T; Lee, K K

    1975-01-01

    A retrospective clinical-pathologic study was made of papillary muscle fibrosis and small vessel sclerosis of the heart in 375 autopsies from the ABCC-JNIH Adult Health Study sample in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The histopathologic findings were correlated with clinical diagnoses which included hypertension, hypertensive heart disease, myocardial infarction, and diabetes mellitus. (7 tables, 5 figures) (auth)

  12. Porous hybrid structures based on P(DLLA-co-TMC) and collagen for tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttafoco, L.; Boks, Niels P.; Engbers-Buijtenhuijs, P.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Poot, Andreas A.; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Vermes, I.; Feijen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Poly (D,L-lactide)-7co-(1,3-trimethylene carbonate) [P(DLLA-co-TMC)] (83 mol % DLLA) was used to produce matrices suitable for tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels. The copolymer was processed into tubular structures with a porosity of 98% by melt spinning and fiber winding, thus

  13. Progress Towards a Core Set of Outcome Measures in Small-vessel Vasculitis. Report from OMERACT 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    MERKEL, PETER A.; HERLYN, KAREN; MAHR, ALFRED D.; NEOGI, TUHINA; SEO, PHILIP; WALSH, MICHAEL; BOERS, MAARTEN; LUQMANI, RAASHID

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has seen a substantial increase in the number and quality of clinical trials of new therapies for vasculitis, including randomized, controlled, multicenter trials that have successfully incorporated measures of disease activity and toxicity. However, because current treatment regimens for severe disease effectively induce initial remission and reduce mortality, future trials will focus on any of several goals including: (a) treatment of mild—moderate disease; (b) prevention of chronic damage; (c) reduction in treatment toxicity; or (d) more subtle differences in remission induction or maintenance. Thus, new trials will require outcome measure instruments that are more precise and are better able to detect effective treatments for different disease states and measure chronic manifestations of disease. The OMERACT Vasculitis Working Group comprises international clinical investigators with expertise in vasculitis who, since 2002, have worked collaboratively to advance the refinement of outcome measures in vasculitis, create new measures to address domains of illness not covered by current research approaches, and harmonize outcome assessment in vasculitis. The focus of the OMERACT group to date has been on outcome measures in small-vessel vasculitis with an overall goal of creating a core set of outcome measures for vasculitis, each of which fulfills the OMERACT filter of truth, discrimination, feasibility, and identifying additional domains requiring further research. This process has been informed by several ongoing projects providing data on outcomes of disease activity, disease-related damage, multidimensional health-related quality of life, and patient-reported ratings of the burden of vasculitis. PMID:19820226

  14. Vitamin D status and vascular dementia due to cerebral small vessel disease in the elderly Asian Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Puttachandra; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Supriya, Manjunath; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Prasad, Chandrajit; Christopher, Rita

    2015-12-15

    Vitamin D plays vital roles in human health and recent studies have shown its beneficial effect on brain functioning. The present study was designed to evaluate the association of vitamin D with vascular dementia (VaD) due to cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) in Asian Indian population. 140 VaD patients aged ≥ 60 years with neuroimaging evidence of SVD, and 132 age and gender-matched controls, were investigated. Vitamin D status was estimated by measuring serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D. Logistic regression model revealed that deficient levels of vitamin D (vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency (12-20 ng/ml), the odds were increased to 31.6-fold and 14.4-fold, respectively. However, in hypertensives with vitamin D sufficiency (>20 ng/ml), the odds of VaD were increased by 3.8-fold only. Pearson correlation showed that serum vitamin D was inversely associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r=-0.401 and -0.411, pvitamin D-deficient subjects. Since the combined presence of hypertension and vitamin D deficiency increases the probability of developing VaD, screening for vitamin D status in addition to regular monitoring of blood pressure, could reduce the risk of VaD associated with cerebral SVD in the elderly Asian Indian subjects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Association of Chronic Kidney Disease and Cerebral Small Vessel Disease with Cognitive Impairment in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshitaka Umemura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In recent years, the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD and cognitive impairment has been attracting attention. Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD is also associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. However, it is still unknown whether CKD markers are associated with cognitive impairment independently of SVD in elderly diabetic patients. Methods: Seventy-nine type 2 diabetic patients (mean age, 76.0 years were enrolled in the present study. CKD was defined as the presence of albuminuria and/or a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR 2. SVD was evaluated by the presence and severity of silent brain infarcts (SBIs and white matter lesions (WMLs on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Neuropsychological tests were assessed using four validated cognitive instruments. Results: In multiple linear regression analyses, albuminuria was associated with worse modified Stroop Color Word scores (β = 0.284, p = 0.017 and low eGFR was associated with reduced Digit Symbol Substitution scores (β = -0.224, p = 0.026 after adjustment for age, sex, education years, diabetes duration, hypertension, multiple SBIs, and advanced WMLs. In contrast, there were no significant associations between CKD markers and Mini-Mental State Examination or Word Recall scores. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that albuminuria and low eGFR are associated with frontal lobe dysfunction independently of SVD in elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

  16. Neuroimaging Characteristics of Small-Vessel Disease in Older Adults with Normal Cognition, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Mimenza-Alvarado

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral small-vessel disease (SVD represents the most frequent type of vascular brain lesions, often coexisting with Alzheimer disease (AD. By quantifying white matter hyperintensities (WMH and hippocampal and parietal atrophy, we aimed to describe the prevalence and severity of SVD among older adults with normal cognition (NC, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and probable AD and to describe associated risk factors. Methods: This study included 105 older adults evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging and clinical and neuropsychological tests. We used the Fazekas scale (FS for quantification of WMH, the Scheltens scale (SS for hippocampal atrophy, and the Koedam scale (KS for parietal atrophy. Logistic regression models were performed to determine the association between FS, SS, and KS scores and the presence of NC, MCI, or probable AD. Results: Compared to NC subjects, SVD was more prevalent in MCI and probable AD subjects. After adjusting for confounding factors, logistic regression showed a positive association between higher scores on the FS and probable AD (OR = 7.6, 95% CI 2.7–20, p < 0.001. With the use of the SS and KS (OR = 4.5, 95% CI 3.5–58, p = 0.003 and OR = 8.9, 95% CI 1–72, p = 0.04, respectively, the risk also remained significant for probable AD. Conclusions: These results suggest an association between severity of vascular brain lesions and neurodegeneration.

  17. Short-Term Blood Pressure Variability Relates to the Presence of Subclinical Brain Small Vessel Disease in Primary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filomena, Josefina; Riba-Llena, Iolanda; Vinyoles, Ernest; Tovar, José L; Mundet, Xavier; Castañé, Xavier; Vilar, Andrea; López-Rueda, Antonio; Jiménez-Baladó, Joan; Cartanyà, Anna; Montaner, Joan; Delgado, Pilar

    2015-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) variability is associated with stroke risk, but less is known about subclinical cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD). We aimed to determine whether CSVD relates to short-term BP variability independently of BP levels and also, whether they improve CSVD discrimination beyond clinical variables and office BP levels. This was a cohort study on asymptomatic hypertensives who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Office and average 24-hour, daytime and nighttime BP levels, and several metrics of BP variability (SD, weighted SD, coefficient of variation, and average real variability [ARV]) were calculated. Definition of CSVD was based on the presence of lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensity grades. Multivariate analysis and integrated discrimination improvement were performed to assess whether BP variability and levels were independently associated with CSVD and improved its discrimination. Four hundred eighty-seven individuals participated (median age, 64; 47% women). CSVD was identified in 18.9%, related to age, male sex, diabetes mellitus, use of treatment, ambulatory BP monitoring-defined BP levels, and ARV of systolic BP at any period. The highest prevalence (33.7%) was found in subjects with both 24-hour BP levels and ARV elevated. BP levels at any period and ARV (24 hours and nocturnal) emerged as independent predictors of CSVD, and discrimination was incrementally improved although not to a clinically significant extent (integrated discrimination improvement, 5.31%, 5.17% to 5.4%). Ambulatory BP monitoring-defined BP levels and ARV of systolic BP relate to subclinical CSVD in hypertensive individuals. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Impact of Strategically Located White Matter Hyperintensities on Cognition in Memory Clinic Patients with Small Vessel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroek, J Matthijs; Weaver, Nick A; Hilal, Saima; Kuijf, Hugo J; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Xu, Xin; Tan, Boon Yeow; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Postma, Albert; Biessels, Geert Jan; Chen, Christopher P L H

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the impact of small vessel disease (SVD) on cognition generally focus on white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume. The extent to which WMH location relates to cognitive performance has received less attention, but is likely to be functionally important. We examined the relation between WMH location and cognition in a memory clinic cohort of patients with sporadic SVD. A total of 167 patients with SVD were recruited from memory clinics. Assumption-free region of interest-based analyses based on major white matter tracts and voxel-wise analyses were used to determine the association between WMH location and executive functioning, visuomotor speed and memory. Region of interest-based analyses showed that WMHs located particularly within the anterior thalamic radiation and forceps minor were inversely associated with both executive functioning and visuomotor speed, independent of total WMH volume. Memory was significantly associated with WMH volume in the forceps minor, independent of total WMH volume. An independent assumption-free voxel-wise analysis identified strategic voxels in these same tracts. Region of interest-based analyses showed that WMH volume within the anterior thalamic radiation explained 6.8% of variance in executive functioning, compared to 3.9% for total WMH volume; WMH volume within the forceps minor explained 4.6% of variance in visuomotor speed and 4.2% of variance in memory, compared to 1.8% and 1.3% respectively for total WMH volume. Our findings identify the anterior thalamic radiation and forceps minor as strategic white matter tracts in which WMHs are most strongly associated with cognitive impairment in memory clinic patients with SVD. WMH volumes in individual tracts explained more variance in cognition than total WMH burden, emphasizing the importance of lesion location when addressing the functional consequences of WMHs.

  19. Cerebral White Matter Hypoperfusion Increases with Small-Vessel Disease Burden. Data From the Third International Stroke Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba, Francesco; Mair, Grant; Carpenter, Trevor; Sakka, Eleni; Sandercock, Peter A G; Lindley, Richard I; Inzitari, Domenico; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2017-07-01

    Leukoaraiosis is associated with impaired cerebral perfusion, but the effect of individual and combined small-vessel disease (SVD) features on white matter perfusion is unclear. We studied patients recruited with perfusion imaging in the Third International Stroke Trial. We rated individual SVD features (leukoaraiosis, lacunes) and brain atrophy on baseline plain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Separately, we assessed white matter at the level of the lateral ventricles in the cerebral hemisphere contralateral to the stroke for visible areas of hypoperfusion (present or absent) on 4 time-based perfusion imaging parameters. We examined associations between SVD features (individually and summed) and presence of hypoperfusion using logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, hypertension, and diabetes. A total of 115 patients with median (interquartile range) age of 81 (72-86) years, 78 (52%) of which were male, had complete perfusion data. Hypoperfusion was most frequent on mean transit time (MTT; 63 patients, 55%) and least frequent on time to maximum flow (19 patients, 17%). The SVD score showed stronger independent associations with hypoperfusion (e.g., MTT, odds ratio [OR] = 2.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.56-5.03) than individual SVD markers (e.g., white matter hypoattenuation score, MTT, OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.09-2.04). Baseline blood pressure did not differ by presence or absence of hypoperfusion or across strata of SVD score. Presence of white matter hypoperfusion increased with SVD summed score. The SVD summed score was associated with hypoperfusion more consistently than individual SVD features, providing validity to the SVD score concept. Increasing SVD burden indicates worse perfusion in the white matter. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. NADPH Oxidase Activity in Cerebral Arterioles Is a Key Mediator of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease—Implications for Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark F. McCarty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD, a common feature of brain aging, is characterized by lacunar infarcts, microbleeds, leukoaraiosis, and a leaky blood-brain barrier. Functionally, it is associated with cognitive decline, dementia, depression, gait abnormalities, and increased risk for stroke. Cerebral arterioles in this syndrome tend to hypertrophy and lose their capacity for adaptive vasodilation. Rodent studies strongly suggest that activation of Nox2-dependent NADPH oxidase activity is a crucial driver of these structural and functional derangements of cerebral arterioles, in part owing to impairment of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activity. This oxidative stress may also contribute to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier seen in SVD. Hypertension, aging, metabolic syndrome, smoking, hyperglycemia, and elevated homocysteine may promote activation of NADPH oxidase in cerebral arterioles. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with phycocyanobilin from spirulina, as well as high-dose statin therapy, may have potential for prevention and control of SVD, and high-potassium diets merit study in this regard. Measures which support effective eNOS activity in other ways—exercise training, supplemental citrulline, certain dietary flavonoids (as in cocoa and green tea, and capsaicin, may also improve the function of cerebral arterioles. Asian epidemiology suggests that increased protein intakes may decrease risk for SVD; conceivably, arginine and/or cysteine—which boosts tissue glutathione synthesis, and can be administered as N-acetylcysteine—mediate this benefit. Ameliorating the risk factors for SVD—including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, hyperglycemia, smoking, and elevated homocysteine—also may help to prevent and control this syndrome, although few clinical trials have addressed this issue to date.

  1. NADPH Oxidase Activity in Cerebral Arterioles Is a Key Mediator of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease-Implications for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2015-04-15

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), a common feature of brain aging, is characterized by lacunar infarcts, microbleeds, leukoaraiosis, and a leaky blood-brain barrier. Functionally, it is associated with cognitive decline, dementia, depression, gait abnormalities, and increased risk for stroke. Cerebral arterioles in this syndrome tend to hypertrophy and lose their capacity for adaptive vasodilation. Rodent studies strongly suggest that activation of Nox2-dependent NADPH oxidase activity is a crucial driver of these structural and functional derangements of cerebral arterioles, in part owing to impairment of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. This oxidative stress may also contribute to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier seen in SVD. Hypertension, aging, metabolic syndrome, smoking, hyperglycemia, and elevated homocysteine may promote activation of NADPH oxidase in cerebral arterioles. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with phycocyanobilin from spirulina, as well as high-dose statin therapy, may have potential for prevention and control of SVD, and high-potassium diets merit study in this regard. Measures which support effective eNOS activity in other ways-exercise training, supplemental citrulline, certain dietary flavonoids (as in cocoa and green tea), and capsaicin, may also improve the function of cerebral arterioles. Asian epidemiology suggests that increased protein intakes may decrease risk for SVD; conceivably, arginine and/or cysteine-which boosts tissue glutathione synthesis, and can be administered as N-acetylcysteine-mediate this benefit. Ameliorating the risk factors for SVD-including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, hyperglycemia, smoking, and elevated homocysteine-also may help to prevent and control this syndrome, although few clinical trials have addressed this issue to date.

  2. Cortical changes in cerebral small vessel diseases: a 3D MRI study of cortical morphology in CADASIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouvent, E.; Bousser, M.G.; Chabriat, H.; Jouvent, E.; Bousser, M.G.; Chabriat, H.; Porcher, R.; Viswanathan, A.; Viswanathan, A.; Viswanathan, A.; O'Sullivan, M.; Dichgans, M.; Guichard, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Brain atrophy represents a key marker of disease progression in cerebrovascular disorders. The 3D changes of cortex morphology occurring during the course of small vessel diseases of the brain (SVDB) remain poorly understood. The objective of this study was to assess the changes affecting depth and surface area of cortical sulci and their clinical and radiological correlates in a cohort of patients with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriolopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic SVDB. Data were obtained from a series of 69 CADASIL patients. Validated methods were used to determine depth and surface area of four cortical sulci. The ratio of brain to intracranial cavity volumes (brain parenchymal fraction-BPF), volume of lacunar lesions (LL) and of white matter hyper-intensities, number of cerebral micro-haemorrhages, and mean apparent diffusion coefficient were also measured. Association between depth and surface area of the cortical sulci and BPF, clinical status and subcortical MRI lesions were tested. Depth and surface area of cortical sulci obtained in 54 patients were strongly correlated with both cognitive score and disability scales. Depth was related to the extent of subcortical lesions, surface area was related only to age. In additional analyses, the depth of the cingular sulcus was independently associated with the volume of LL (P 0.001), and that of the superior frontal sulcus with the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (P 0.003). In CADASIL, important morphological changes of cortical sulci occur in association with clinical worsening,extension of subcortical tissue damage and progression of global cerebral atrophy. These results suggest that the examination of cortical morphology may be of high clinical relevance in SVDB. (authors)

  3. Causes and consequences of cerebral small vessel disease. The RUN DMC study: a prospective cohort study. Study rationale and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Vlugt Maureen J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD is a frequent finding on CT and MRI scans of elderly people and is related to vascular risk factors and cognitive and motor impairment, ultimately leading to dementia or parkinsonism in some. In general, the relations are weak, and not all subjects with SVD become demented or get parkinsonism. This might be explained by the diversity of underlying pathology of both white matter lesions (WML and the normal appearing white matter (NAWM. Both cannot be properly appreciated with conventional MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI provides alternative information on microstructural white matter integrity. The association between SVD, its microstructural integrity, and incident dementia and parkinsonism has never been investigated. Methods/Design The RUN DMC study is a prospective cohort study on the risk factors and cognitive and motor consequences of brain changes among 503 non-demented elderly, aged between 50-85 years, with cerebral SVD. First follow up is being prepared for July 2011. Participants alive will be included and invited to the research centre to undergo a structured questionnaire on demographics and vascular risk factors, and a cognitive, and motor, assessment, followed by a MRI protocol including conventional MRI, DTI and resting state fMRI. Discussion The follow up of the RUN DMC study has the potential to further unravel the causes and possibly better predict the consequences of changes in white matter integrity in elderly with SVD by using relatively new imaging techniques. When proven, these changes might function as a surrogate endpoint for cognitive and motor function in future therapeutic trials. Our data could furthermore provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of cognitive and motor disturbances in elderly with SVD. The execution and completion of the follow up of our study might ultimately unravel the role of SVD on the microstructural integrity of the white

  4. Causes and consequences of cerebral small vessel disease. The RUN DMC study: a prospective cohort study. Study rationale and protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Norden, Anouk Gw; de Laat, Karlijn F; Gons, Rob Ar; van Uden, Inge Wm; van Dijk, Ewoud J; van Oudheusden, Lucas Jb; Esselink, Rianne Aj; Bloem, Bastiaan R; van Engelen, Baziel Gm; Zwarts, Machiel J; Tendolkar, Indira; Olde-Rikkert, Marcel G; van der Vlugt, Maureen J; Zwiers, Marcel P; Norris, David G; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2011-02-28

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a frequent finding on CT and MRI scans of elderly people and is related to vascular risk factors and cognitive and motor impairment, ultimately leading to dementia or parkinsonism in some. In general, the relations are weak, and not all subjects with SVD become demented or get parkinsonism. This might be explained by the diversity of underlying pathology of both white matter lesions (WML) and the normal appearing white matter (NAWM). Both cannot be properly appreciated with conventional MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides alternative information on microstructural white matter integrity. The association between SVD, its microstructural integrity, and incident dementia and parkinsonism has never been investigated. The RUN DMC study is a prospective cohort study on the risk factors and cognitive and motor consequences of brain changes among 503 non-demented elderly, aged between 50-85 years, with cerebral SVD. First follow up is being prepared for July 2011. Participants alive will be included and invited to the research centre to undergo a structured questionnaire on demographics and vascular risk factors, and a cognitive, and motor, assessment, followed by a MRI protocol including conventional MRI, DTI and resting state fMRI. The follow up of the RUN DMC study has the potential to further unravel the causes and possibly better predict the consequences of changes in white matter integrity in elderly with SVD by using relatively new imaging techniques. When proven, these changes might function as a surrogate endpoint for cognitive and motor function in future therapeutic trials. Our data could furthermore provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of cognitive and motor disturbances in elderly with SVD. The execution and completion of the follow up of our study might ultimately unravel the role of SVD on the microstructural integrity of the white matter in the transition from "normal" aging to cognitive and

  5. Total Cerebral Small Vessel Disease MRI Score Is Associated With Cognitive Decline In Executive Function In Patients With Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renske Uiterwijk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hypertension is a major risk factor for white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds and perivascular spaces, which are MRI markers of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD. Studies have shown associations between these individual MRI markers and cognitive functioning and decline. Recently, a total SVD score was proposed in which the different MRI markers were combined into one measure of SVD, to capture total SVD-related brain damage. We investigated if this SVD score was associated with cognitive decline over 4 years in patients with hypertension. Methods: In this longitudinal cohort study, 130 hypertensive patients (91 patients with uncomplicated hypertension and 39 hypertensive patients with a lacunar stroke were included. They underwent a neuropsychological assessment at baseline and after 4 years. The presence of white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, and perivascular spaces were rated on baseline MRI. Presence of each individual marker was added to calculate the total SVD score (range 0-4 in each patient. Results: Uncorrected linear regression analyses showed associations between SVD score and decline in overall cognition (p=0.017, executive functioning (p<0.001 and information processing speed (p=0.037, but not with memory (p=0.911. The association between SVD score and decline in overall cognition and executive function remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, education, anxiety and depression score, potential vascular risk factors, patient group and baseline cognitive performance.Conclusions: Our study shows that a total SVD score can predict cognitive decline, specifically in executive function, over 4 years in hypertensive patients. This emphasizes the importance of considering total brain damage due to SVD.

  6. Halifax Sound Range Trials (DE0301, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radiated sound measurements of vessels are important for monitoring the noise characteristics of fishing and research vessels. A vessel's radiated noise can have...

  7. Intravenous thrombolysis of large vessel occlusions is associated with higher hospital costs than small vessel strokes: a rationale for developing stroke severity-based financial models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ansaar T; Evans, Kim; Riggs, Jack E; Hobbs, Gerald R

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their severity, large vessel occlusion (LVO) strokes may be associated with higher costs that are not reflected in current coding systems. This study aimed to determine whether intravenous thrombolysis costs are related to the presence or absence of LVO. Patients who had undergone intravenous thrombolysis over a 9-year period were divided into LVO and no LVO (nLVO) groups based on admission CT angiography. The primary outcome was hospital cost per admission. Secondary outcomes included admission duration, 90-day clinical outcome, and discharge destination. 119 patients (53%) had LVO and 104 (47%) had nLVO. Total mean±SD cost per LVO patient was $18,815±14,262 compared with $15,174±11,769 per nLVO patient (p=0.04). Hospital payments per admission were $17,338±13,947 and $15,594±16,437 for LVO and nLVO patients, respectively (p=0.4). A good outcome was seen in 33 LVO patients (27.7%) and in 69 nLVO patients (66.4%) (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.3, pregression analysis after controlling for comorbidities showed the presence of LVO to be an independent predictor of higher total hospital costs. The presence or absence of LVO is associated with significant differences in hospital costs, outcomes, admission duration, and home discharge. These differences can be important when developing systems of care models for acute ischemic stroke. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Association of Aortic Compliance and Brachial Endothelial Function with Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: Assessment with High-Resolution MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the possible association of aortic compliance and brachial endothelial function with cerebral small vessel disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 patients by using 3.0 T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. Sixty-two clinically confirmed DM2 patients (25 women and 37 men; mean age: 56.8±7.5 years were prospectively enrolled for noninvasive MR examinations of the aorta, brachial artery, and brain. Aortic arch pulse wave velocity (PWV, flow-mediated dilation (FMD of brachial artery, lacunar brain infarcts, and periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities (WMHs were assessed. Pearson and Spearman correlation analysis were performed to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with clinical data and biochemical test results. Univariable logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with cerebral small vessel disease. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to find out the independent predictive factors of cerebral small vessel disease. Results. Mean PWV was 6.73±2.00 m/s and FMD was 16.67±9.11%. After adjustment for compounding factors, PWV was found significantly associated with lacunar brain infarcts (OR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.14–3.2; P<0.05 and FMD was significantly associated with periventricular WMHs (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71–0.95; P<0.05. Conclusions. Quantitative evaluation of aortic compliance and endothelial function by using high-resolution MRI may be potentially useful to stratify DM2 patients with risk of cerebral small vessel disease.

  9. Vessel Operating Units (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for vessels that are greater than five net tons and have a current US Coast Guard documentation number. Beginning in1979, the NMFS...

  10. Characterizing large river sounds: Providing context for understanding the environmental effects of noise produced by hydrokinetic turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S; Deng, Z Daniel; Scherelis, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Underwater noise associated with the installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in rivers and tidal zones presents a potential environmental concern for fish and marine mammals. Comparing the spectral quality of sounds emitted by hydrokinetic turbines to natural and other anthropogenic sound sources is an initial step at understanding potential environmental impacts. Underwater recordings were obtained from passing vessels and natural underwater sound sources in static and flowing waters. Static water measurements were taken in a lake with minimal background noise. Flowing water measurements were taken at a previously proposed deployment site for hydrokinetic turbines on the Mississippi River, where sounds created by flowing water are part of all measurements, both natural ambient and anthropogenic sources. Vessel sizes ranged from a small fishing boat with 60 hp outboard motor to an 18-unit barge train being pushed upstream by tugboat. As expected, large vessels with large engines created the highest sound levels, which were, on average, 40 dB greater than the sound created by an operating hydrokinetic turbine. A comparison of sound levels from the same sources at different distances using both spherical and cylindrical sound attenuation functions suggests that spherical model results more closely approximate observed sound attenuation.

  11. An everolimus-eluting stent versus a paclitaxel-eluting stent in small vessel coronary artery disease: a pooled analysis from the SPIRIT II and SPIRIT III trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartorelli, Antonio L; Serruys, Patrick W; Miquel-Hébert, Karine; Yu, Shui; Pierson, Wes; Stone, Gregg W

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the XIENCE V everolimus-eluting stent compared to the TAXUS paclitaxel-eluting stent in small vessels. The XIENCE V everolimus-eluting stent (EES) has been shown to improve angiographic and clinical outcomes after percutaneous myocardial revascularization, but its performance in small coronary arteries has not been investigated. In this pooled analysis, we studied a cohort of 541 patients with small coronary vessels (reference diameter SPIRIT II and SPIRIT III studies. TAXUS Express (73% of lesions) and TAXUS Liberté (27% of lesions) paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) were used as controls in SPIRIT II. In SPIRIT III, Taxus Express(2) PES was the control. Mean angiographic in-stent and in-segment late loss was significantly less in the EES group compared with the PES group, (0.15 +/- 0.37 mm vs. 0.30 +/- 0.44 mm; P = 0.011 for in-stent; 0.10 +/- 0.38 mm vs. 0.21 +/- 0.34 mm; P = 0.034 for in-segment). EES also resulted in a significant reduction in composite major adverse cardiac events at 1 year (19/366 [5.2%] vs. 17/159 [10.7%]; P = 0.037), due to fewer non-Q-wave myocardial infarctions and target lesion revascularizations. At 1 year, the rate of non-Q-wave myocardial infarction was significantly lower in the EES group compared with that of the PES group (6/366 [1.6%] vs. 8/159 [5.0%]; P = 0.037). In patients with small vessel coronary arteries, the XIENCE V EES was superior to the TAXUS PES. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Sound algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    De Götzen , Amalia; Mion , Luca; Tache , Olivier

    2007-01-01

    International audience; We call sound algorithms the categories of algorithms that deal with digital sound signal. Sound algorithms appeared in the very infancy of computer. Sound algorithms present strong specificities that are the consequence of two dual considerations: the properties of the digital sound signal itself and its uses, and the properties of auditory perception.

  13. Rare variants of the 3’-5’ DNA exonuclease TREX1 in early onset small vessel stroke [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McGlasson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monoallelic and biallelic mutations in the exonuclease TREX1 cause monogenic small vessel diseases (SVD. Given recent evidence for genetic and pathophysiological overlap between monogenic and polygenic forms of SVD, evaluation of TREX1 in small vessel stroke is warranted. Methods: We sequenced the TREX1 gene in an exploratory cohort of patients with lacunar stroke (Edinburgh Stroke Study, n=290 lacunar stroke cases. We subsequently performed a fully blinded case-control study of early onset MRI-confirmed small vessel stroke within the UK Young Lacunar Stroke Resource (990 cases, 939 controls. Results: No patients with canonical disease-causing mutations of TREX1 were identified in cases or controls. Analysis of an exploratory cohort identified a potential association between rare variants of TREX1 and patients with lacunar stroke. However, subsequent controlled and blinded evaluation of TREX1 in a larger and MRI-confirmed patient cohort, the UK Young Lacunar Stroke Resource, identified heterozygous rare variants in 2.1% of cases and 2.3% of controls. No association was observed with stroke risk (odds ratio = 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-1.65 p=0.74. Similarly no association was seen with rare TREX1 variants with predicted deleterious effects on enzyme function (odds ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-2.61 p=0.91. Conclusions: No patients with early-onset lacunar stroke had genetic evidence of a TREX1-associated monogenic microangiopathy. These results show no evidence of association between rare variants of TREX1 and early onset lacunar stroke. This includes rare variants that significantly affect protein and enzyme function. Routine sequencing of the TREX1 gene in patients with early onset lacunar stroke is therefore unlikely to be of diagnostic utility, in the absence of syndromic features or family history.

  14. White matter microstructural damage in small vessel disease is associated with Montreal cognitive assessment but not with mini mental state examination performances: vascular mild cognitive impairment Tuscany study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasi, Marco; Salvadori, Emilia; Poggesi, Anna; Ciolli, Laura; Del Bene, Alessandra; Marini, Sandro; Nannucci, Serena; Pescini, Francesca; Valenti, Raffaella; Ginestroni, Andrea; Toschi, Nicola; Diciotti, Stefano; Mascalchi, Mario; Inzitari, Domenico; Pantoni, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) has been proposed as a screening tool in vascular cognitive impairment. Diffusion tensor imaging is sensitive to white matter microstructural damage. We investigated if diffusion tensor imaging-derived indices are more strongly associated with performances on MoCA or on the widely used mini mental state examination in patients with mild cognitive impairment and small vessel disease. Mild cognitive impairment patients with moderate/severe degrees of white matter hyperintensities on MRI were enrolled. Lacunar infarcts, cortical atrophy, medial temporal lobe atrophy and median values of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy of the cerebral white matter were studied and correlated with cognitive tests performances. Seventy-six patients (mean age 75.1±6.8 years, mean years of education 8.0±4.3) were assessed. In univariate analyses, a significant association of both MoCA and mini mental state examination scores with age, education, cortical atrophy, and medial temporal lobe atrophy was found, whereas mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were associated with MoCA. In partial correlation analyses, adjusting for all demographic and neuroimaging variables, both mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were associated only with MoCA (mean diffusivity: r= -0.275, P=0.023; fractional anisotropy: r=0.246, P=0.043). In patients with mild cognitive impairment and small vessel disease, diffusion tensor imaging-measured white matter microstructural damage is more related to MoCA than mini mental state examination performances. MoCA is suited for the cognitive screening of patients with small vessel disease. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Blood-Vessel Mimicking Structures by Stereolithographic Fabrication of Small Porous Tubes Using Cytocompatible Polyacrylate Elastomers, Biofunctionalization and Endothelialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Huber

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessel reconstruction is still an elusive goal for the development of in vitro models as well as artificial vascular grafts. In this study, we used a novel photo-curable cytocompatible polyacrylate material (PA for freeform generation of synthetic vessels. We applied stereolithography for the fabrication of arbitrary 3D tubular structures with total dimensions in the centimeter range, 300 µm wall thickness, inner diameters of 1 to 2 mm and defined pores with a constant diameter of approximately 100 µm or 200 µm. We established a rinsing protocol to remove remaining cytotoxic substances from the photo-cured PA and applied thio-modified heparin and RGDC-peptides to functionalize the PA surface for enhanced endothelial cell adhesion. A rotating seeding procedure was introduced to ensure homogenous endothelial monolayer formation at the inner luminal tube wall. We showed that endothelial cells stayed viable and adherent and aligned along the medium flow under fluid-flow conditions comparable to native capillaries. The combined technology approach comprising of freeform additive manufacturing (AM, biomimetic design, cytocompatible materials which are applicable to AM, and biofunctionalization of AM constructs has been introduced as BioRap® technology by the authors.

  16. Foley Sounds vs Real Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trento, Stefano; Götzen, Amalia De

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an initial attempt to study the world of sound effects for motion pictures, also known as Foley sounds. Throughout several audio and audio-video tests we have compared both Foley and real sounds originated by an identical action. The main purpose was to evaluate if sound effects...

  17. Sounding Cratonic Fill in Small Buried Craters Using Ground Penetrating Radar: Analog Study to the Martian Case

    OpenAIRE

    Heggy , Essam; Paillou , Philippe

    2006-01-01

    We report results from a 270 MHz GPR survey performed on a recently discovered impact field in the southwestern Egyptian desert. The investigation suggests the ability of radar techniques to detect small-buried craters and probe their filling

  18. ASTM international symposium on small specimen test techniques and their applications to pressure vessel annealing and plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L.; Heinisch, H.L.; Kumar, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Miniature sheet-type tensile specimens are currently being used in a variety of radiation damage studies conducted in a number of different reactors. Although these specimens are very small, they have proven successful in addressing issues encountered in both thermal reactors and anticipated fusion reactors. This paper reviews the results of a number of recent studies that illustrate the range of applicability of these small specimens. When combined with other types of specimens and other types of measurements made prior to tensile testing, miniature tensile specimens have been found to serve as very useful tools for application to both fundamental studies and alloy screening studies

  19. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    The role of the research vessels as a tool for marine research and exploration is very important. Technical requirements of a suitable vessel and the laboratories needed on board are discussed. The history and the research work carried out...

  20. Study on operation conditions and an operation system of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, 'report of working group on application of a very small nuclear reactor to an ocean research'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ura, Tamaki; Takamasa, Tomoji; Nishimura, Hajime

    2001-07-01

    JAERI has studied on design of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, which will navigate under sea mainly in the Arctic Ocean, as a part of the design activity of advanced marine reactors. This report describes operation conditions and an operating system of the vessel, which were discussed by the specialists of hull design, sound positioning, ship motions and oceanography, etc. The design conditions on ship motions for submersible vessels were surveyed considering regulations in our country, and ship motions were evaluated in the cases of underwater and surface navigations taking account of observation activities in the Arctic Ocean. The effect of ship motions on the compact nuclear reactor SCR was assessed. A submarine transponder system and an on-ice communication buoy system were examined as a positioning and communication system, supposing the activity under ice. The interval between transponders or communication buoys was recommended as 130 km. Procedures to secure safety of nuclear powered submersible research vessel were discussed according to accidents on the hull or the nuclear reactor. These results were reflected to the concept of the nuclear powered submersible research vessel, and subjects to be settled in the next step were clarified. (author)

  1. Study on operation conditions and an operation system of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, 'report of working group on application of a very small nuclear reactor to an ocean research'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ura, Tamaki [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Takamasa, Tomoji [Tokyo Univ. of Mercantile Marine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Hajime [Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (JP)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    JAERI has studied on design of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, which will navigate under sea mainly in the Arctic Ocean, as a part of the design activity of advanced marine reactors. This report describes operation conditions and an operating system of the vessel, which were discussed by the specialists of hull design, sound positioning, ship motions and oceanography, etc. The design conditions on ship motions for submersible vessels were surveyed considering regulations in our country, and ship motions were evaluated in the cases of underwater and surface navigations taking account of observation activities in the Arctic Ocean. The effect of ship motions on the compact nuclear reactor SCR was assessed. A submarine transponder system and an on-ice communication buoy system were examined as a positioning and communication system, supposing the activity under ice. The interval between transponders or communication buoys was recommended as 130 km. Procedures to secure safety of nuclear powered submersible research vessel were discussed according to accidents on the hull or the nuclear reactor. These results were reflected to the concept of the nuclear powered submersible research vessel, and subjects to be settled in the next step were clarified. (author)

  2. Imagining Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark; Garner, Tom Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We make the case in this essay that sound that is imagined is both a perception and as much a sound as that perceived through external stimulation. To argue this, we look at the evidence from auditory science, neuroscience, and philosophy, briefly present some new conceptual thinking on sound...... that accounts for this view, and then use this to look at what the future might hold in the context of imagining sound and developing technology....

  3. Nuclear reactor plant with a small gas-cooled HT reactor accommodated in a steel pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Elter, C.

    1986-01-01

    The plant has a small HT reactor and an He/He heat exchanger situated above this, with preferably two parallel circulating blowers connected after it. It also has at least one post-shutdown heat removal system, which is situated after the He/He heat exchanger in the direction of flow and which always has the total quantity of primary helium flowing through it. In one version of the design, the heat exchanger consists of two concentric bundles of helices connected after one another, which have primary helium flowing in one direction and secondary helium in the opposite direction. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Evaluation of fracture toughness of vessel materials using small-size specimens and full stress-strain curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, A A; Chausov, N G [Akademyiya Nauk Ukrayini, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1994-12-31

    Physically substantiated dependences between crack resistance characteristics determined by the parameters of descending sections of full stress-strain curves and stressed state rigidity at crack initiation moment, have been experimentally obtained. The possibility of crack resistance reliable estimation based on full stress-strain obtained using small-size specimens with different concentrators, has thus been experimentally substantiated. Results obtained by the method and actual temperature dependence of irradiated steel 15X2NMFA crack resistance characteristics, agreed well. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Evaluating the auralization of a small room in a virtual sound environment using objective room acoustic measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrens, Axel; Marschall, Marton; Dau, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    To study human auditory perception in realistic environments, loudspeaker-based reproduction techniques have recently become state-of-the-art. To evaluate the accuracy of a simulation-based room auralization of a small room, objective measures, such as early-decay-time (EDT), reverberation time...... of the room. The auralizations were generated using the loudspeaker-based room auralization toolbox (LoRA; Favrot and Buchholz, 2010) and reproduced in a 64-channel loudspeaker array, set up in an anechoic chamber. Differences between the objective measures evaluated in the real and the virtual room were......, clarity, interaural cross-correlation (IACC), and the speech transmission index were measured in an IEC listening room for 28 source-receiver combinations. The room was then modeled in the room acoustics software ODEON, and the same objective measures were also evaluated for the auralized version...

  6. Graywater Discharges from Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    metals (e.g., cadmium, chromium, lead, copper , zinc, silver, nickel, and mercury), solids, and nutrients (USEPA, 2008b; USEPA 2010). Wastewater from... flotation ), and disinfection (using ultraviolet light) as compared to traditional Type II MSDs that use either simple maceration and chlorination, or...Coliform Naval Vessels Oceanographic Vessels Small Cruise Ships 25a Vendor 2 Hamann AG Biological Treatment with Dissolved Air Flotation and

  7. Unsound Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knakkergaard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the change in premise that digitally produced sound brings about and how digital technologies more generally have changed our relationship to the musical artifact, not simply in degree but in kind. It demonstrates how our acoustical conceptions are thoroughly challenged...... by the digital production of sound and, by questioning the ontological basis for digital sound, turns our understanding of the core term substance upside down....

  8. Sound Absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  9. Age-Specific Associations of Renal Impairment With Magnetic Resonance Imaging Markers of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bian; Lau, Kui Kai; Li, Linxin; Lovelock, Caroline; Liu, Ming; Kuker, Wilhelm; Rothwell, Peter M

    2018-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) and chronic renal impairment may be part of a multisystem small-vessel disorder, but their association may simply be as a result of shared risk factors (eg, hypertension) rather than to a systemic susceptibility to premature SVD. However, most previous studies were hospital based, most had inadequate adjustment for hypertension, many were confined to patients with lacunar stroke, and none stratified by age. In a population-based study of transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke (OXVASC [Oxford Vascular Study]), we evaluated the magnetic resonance imaging markers of cerebral SVD, including lacunes, white matter hyperintensities, cerebral microbleeds, and enlarged perivascular space. We studied the age-specific associations of renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ) and total SVD burden (total SVD score) adjusting for age, sex, vascular risk factors, and premorbid blood pressure (mean blood pressure during 15 years preevent). Of 1080 consecutive patients, 1028 (95.2%) had complete magnetic resonance imaging protocol and creatinine measured at baseline. Renal impairment was associated with total SVD score (odds ratio [OR], 2.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.69-2.75; P <0.001), but only at age <60 years (<60 years: OR, 3.97; 95% CI, 1.69-9.32; P =0.002; 60-79 years: OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.72-1.41; P =0.963; ≥80 years: OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.59-1.54; P =0.832). The overall association of renal impairment and total SVD score was also attenuated after adjustment for age, sex, history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and premorbid average systolic blood pressure (adjusted OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.56-1.02; P =0.067), but the independent association of renal impairment and total SVD score at age <60 years was maintained (adjusted OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 1.21-7.98; P =0.018). Associations of renal impairment and SVD were consistent for each SVD marker at age <60 years but

  10. Sound generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2008-01-01

    A sound generator, particularly a loudspeaker, configured to emit sound, comprising a rigid element (2) enclosing a plurality of air compartments (3), wherein the rigid element (2) has a back side (B) comprising apertures (4), and a front side (F) that is closed, wherein the generator is provided

  11. Sound generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2010-01-01

    A sound generator, particularly a loudspeaker, configured to emit sound, comprising a rigid element (2) enclosing a plurality of air compartments (3), wherein the rigid element (2) has a back side (B) comprising apertures (4), and a front side (F) that is closed, wherein the generator is provided

  12. Sound generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2007-01-01

    A sound generator, particularly a loudspeaker, configured to emit sound, comprising a rigid element (2) enclosing a plurality of air compartments (3), wherein the rigid element (2) has a back side (B) comprising apertures (4), and a front side (F) that is closed, wherein the generator is provided

  13. Study of white matter at the centrum semiovale level with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging in cerebral small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L A; Ling, X Y; Li, C; Zhang, S J; Chi, G B; Xu, A D

    2014-04-08

    White matter lesion (WML) in magnetic resonance imaging is commonly observed in patients with cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), but the pathological mechanism of WML in SVD is still unclear. We observed the metabolism and microscopic anatomy of white matter in SVD patients. Twelve subjects clinically diagnosed with SVD and 6 normal control subjects were examined with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The white matter at the centrum semiovale level was selected as the region of interest (ROI). The ROI metabolism parameters, including N-acetyl-l-aspartic acid (NAA), creatine (Cr), and choline (Cho) were measured by MRS. Microscopic parameters such as mean diffusion (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in ROI were obtained by DTI. Compared with the normal control group, bilateral MD values in the SVD group were significantly elevated, whereas bilateral FA values in SVD were decreased, but the difference was not statistically significant. Additionally, NAA/Cho, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cr showed no significant statistical differences. Our study suggests that the mechanisms of the SVD cognitive impairment are related to damage of the white matter structures rather than to brain metabolism.

  14. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 {+-} 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 {+-} 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  15. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de; Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 ± 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 ± 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  16. Experimental study on secondary depressurization action for PWR vessel bottom small break LOCA with HPI failure and gas inflow (ROSA-V/LSTF test SB-PV-03)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Asaka, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2005-06-01

    A small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) experiment was conducted at the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) of ROSA-V program to study effects of accident management (AM) measures on core cooling, which is important in case of high pressure injection (HPI) system failure during an SBLOCA at a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The LSTF is a full-height and 1/48 volume-scaled facility simulating 4-loop Westinghouse-type PWR (3423 MWt). The experiment, SB-PV-03, simulated a PWR vessel bottom SBLOCA with a rupture of ten instrument-tubes which is equivalent to 0.2% cold leg break. Total HPI failure, non-condensable gas inflow from accumulator injection system (AIS) and operator AM actions on steam generator (SG) secondary depressurization at a rate of -55 K/h and auxiliary feedwater (AFW) supply for 30 minutes were assumed as experiment conditions. It is clarified that the AM actions are effective on primary system depressurization until the end of AIS injection at 1.6 MPa, but thereafter become less effective due to inflow of the non-condensable gas, resulting in delay of low pressure injection (LPI) actuation and whole core heatup under continuous water discharge through the bottom break. The report describes these thermohydraulic phenomena related with transient primary coolant mass and AM actions in addition to estimation of non-condensable gas behavior which affected primary-to-secondary heat transfer. (author)

  17. An experimental study on effective depressurization actions for PWR vessel bottom small break LOCA with HPI failure and gas inflow (ROSA-V test SB-PV-04)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Asaka, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2006-03-01

    A small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) experiment was conducted at the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) of ROSA-V program to study effects of accident management (AM) measures on core cooling, which are important in case of total failure of high pressure injection (HPI) system during an SBLOCA at a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The LSTF is a full-height and 1/48 volume-scaled facility simulating a 4-loop Westing-house-type PWR (3423 MWt). The experiment, SB-PV-04, simulated a PWR vessel bottom SBLOCA with a rupture of ten instrument-tubes which is equivalent to 0.2% cold leg break. It is clarified that AM actions with steam generator (SG) rapid depressurization by fully opening relief valves and auxiliary feedwater supply are effective to avoid core uncovery by actuating the low pressure injection (LPI) system though the primary depressurization is degraded by non-condensable gas inflow to the primary loops from the accumulator injection system. The effective core cooling was established by the rapid depressurization which contributed to preserve larger primary coolant mass than in the previous experiment (SB-PV-03) which was conducted with smaller primary cooling rate of -55 K/h as AM actions. (author)

  18. Mechanisms of cognitive impairment in cerebral small vessel disease: multimodal MRI results from the St George's cognition and neuroimaging in stroke (SCANS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Lawrence

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD is a common cause of vascular cognitive impairment. A number of disease features can be assessed on MRI including lacunar infarcts, T2 lesion volume, brain atrophy, and cerebral microbleeds. In addition, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is sensitive to disruption of white matter ultrastructure, and recently it has been suggested that additional information on the pattern of damage may be obtained from axial diffusivity, a proposed marker of axonal damage, and radial diffusivity, an indicator of demyelination. We determined the contribution of these whole brain MRI markers to cognitive impairment in SVD. Consecutive patients with lacunar stroke and confluent leukoaraiosis were recruited into the ongoing SCANS study of cognitive impairment in SVD (n = 115, and underwent neuropsychological assessment and multimodal MRI. SVD subjects displayed poor performance on tests of executive function and processing speed. In the SVD group brain volume was lower, white matter hyperintensity volume higher and all diffusion characteristics differed significantly from control subjects (n = 50. On multi-predictor analysis independent predictors of executive function in SVD were lacunar infarct count and diffusivity of normal appearing white matter on DTI. Independent predictors of processing speed were lacunar infarct count and brain atrophy. Radial diffusivity was a stronger DTI predictor than axial diffusivity, suggesting ischaemic demyelination, seen neuropathologically in SVD, may be an important predictor of cognitive impairment in SVD. Our study provides information on the mechanism of cognitive impairment in SVD.

  19. Significance of Haemodynamic and Haemostatic Factors in the Course of Different Manifestations of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: The SHEF-CSVD Study—Study Rationale and Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Staszewski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. This paper describes the rationale and design of the SHEF-CSVD Study, which aims to determine the long-term clinical and radiological course of cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD and to evaluate haemostatic and haemodynamic prognostic factors of the condition. Design. This single-centre, prospective, non-interventional cohort study will follow 150 consecutive patients with different clinical manifestations of CSVD (lacunar ischaemic stroke, vascular dementia, vascular parkinsonism or spontaneous deep, intracerebral haemorrhage and 50 age- and sex-matched controls over a period of 24 months. The clinical and radiological course will be evaluated basing on a detailed neurological, neuropsychological and MRI examinations. Haemodynamic (cerebral vasoreactivity, 24 h blood pressure control and haemostatic factors (markers of endothelial and platelet dysfunction, brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation test will be determined. Discussion. The scheduled study will specifically address the issue of haemodynamic and haemostatic prognostic factors and their course over time in various clinical manifestations of CSVD. The findings may aid the development of prophylactic strategies and individualised treatment plans, which are critical during the early stages of the disease.

  20. G-CSF and cognitive dysfunction in elderly diabetic mice with cerebral small vessel disease: Preventive intervention effects and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhu-Fei; Tao, Ying-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Guo, Qi-Lin; Liu, Ying-Chao; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yan-Mei; Ji, Gang; Wu, Guo-Feng; Wang, Na-Na; Yang, Hao; Yu, Zhong-Yu; Guo, Jing-Chun; Zhou, Hou-Guang

    2017-06-01

    Although cognitive dysfunction is a common neurological complication in elderly patients with diabetes, the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear, and effective preventive interventions have yet to be developed. Thus, this study investigated the preventive effects and mechanisms of action associated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on cognitive dysfunction in elderly diabetic mice with cerebral small vessel disease. This study included 40 male db/db diabetic and wild-type (WT) mice that were categorized into the following four groups at the age of 3 weeks: db/db group (DG), db/db+G-CSF group (DGG), WT group (WG), and WT+G-CSF group (WGG). The mice were fed normal diets for 4 months and then given G-CSF (75 μg/kg) via intraperitoneal injections for 1 month. At 7.5 months of age, the cognitive abilities of the mice were assessed with the Y-maze test and the Social Choice Test; body weight, blood pressure (BP), and blood glucose measurements were obtained throughout the study. Brain imaging and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging analyses were performed with a small animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, autophagosome levels were detected with a transmission electron microscope (TEM), hippocampal neurons were assessed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, and protein expressions and distributions were evaluated using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. (i) The body weight and blood glucose levels of the DG and DGG mice were significantly higher than those of the WG and WGG mice; (ii) social choice and spatial memory capabilities were significantly reduced in DG mice but were recovered by G-CSF in DGG mice; (iii) the MRI scans revealed multiple lacunar lesions and apparent hippocampal atrophy in the brains of DG mice, but G-CSF reduced the number of lacunar lesions and ameliorated hippocampal atrophy; (iv) the MRI-BOLD scans showed a downward trend in whole-brain activity and reductions

  1. Sound Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Bo; Olsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Sound zones, i.e. spatially confined regions of individual audio content, can be created by appropriate filtering of the desired audio signals reproduced by an array of loudspeakers. The challenge of designing filters for sound zones is twofold: First, the filtered responses should generate...... an acoustic separation between the control regions. Secondly, the pre- and post-ringing as well as spectral deterioration introduced by the filters should be minimized. The tradeoff between acoustic separation and filter ringing is the focus of this paper. A weighted L2-norm penalty is introduced in the sound...

  2. Características generales de 29 pacientes con vasculitis de pequeños vasos General characteristics of 29 patients with small vessel vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Di Benedetto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta serie fue describir las características generales y manifestaciones clínicas de pacientes con vasculitis de pequeños vasos que concurrieron al servicio de autoinmunidad de un hospital de la comunidad y compararlas con la literatura. Se revisaron de manera retrospectiva las historias clínicas archivadas bajo el rótulo de vasculitis en un período de 16 años. Se seleccionaron aquellos pacientes que cumplieran criterios diagnósticos de vasculitis de pequeños vasos. Se extrajeron los datos de interés y se constató la supervivencia mediante contacto telefónico. Posteriormente se realizó una búsqueda bibliográfica y se compararon los resultados. Se incluyeron 13 pacientes con granulomatosis de Wegener, 6 con síndrome de Churg Strauss y 10 con poliangeítis microscópica. El 55% (16 fueron menores de 55 años al diagnóstico y hubo predominio del sexo femenino (2.6:1. La demora diagnóstica fue mayor a un año en el 46% de los casos. Los sistemas más frecuentemente afectados fueron respiratorio y otorrinolaringológico. El 79% presentó anticuerpos anti-citoplasma de neutrófilos (ANCA positivos. La mortalidad fue del 24% (7/29. Al comparar las características de los pacientes incluidos en esta serie con lo descripto en la literatura, se hallaron diferencias en cuanto a la forma de presentación, sistemas comprometidos y porcentaje de pacientes ANCA positivos; además se observó que el resultado negativo de este marcador parece asociarse con mayor demora diagnóstica y en consecuencia peor pronóstico, lo que remarca su importancia como herramienta adicional no invasiva al momento del diagnóstico.The objective of this series was to describe the general characteristics and clinical manifestations of patients with small vessel vasculitis who were assisted in the autoimmunity department of a community public hospital and to compare the results with the literature. Clinical records under the label of vasculitis in a

  3. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  4. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  5. Chronic kidney disease, 24-h blood pressure and small vessel diseases are independently associated with cognitive impairment in lacunar infarct patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasumasa; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Tanaka, Eijiro; Morii, Fukiko; Koizumi, Takashi; Akiguchi, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Although the relationships between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cognitive impairment (CI) have been highlighted, the etiology of CI in CKD remains uncertain. Subjects comprised 224 consecutive patients with symptomatic lacunar infarction who underwent magnetic resonance imaging and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Diurnal blood pressure (BP) patterns were categorized into three groups: dippers, non-dippers and risers. Lacunar infarcts (LIs), including both symptomatic and silent and diffuse white matter lesions (WMLs), were graded into three grades according to their degree. The results of kidney function were evaluated using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), categorized into three groups: stage 1, >60; stage 2, 30-60; and stage 3, -1 per 1.73 m 2 . There were 44 patients with CI. Confluent WMLs, including WML 2 and WML 3, were found in 36 patients (81.8%), and multiple lacunae including LI 2 and LI 3 were found in 30 patients (68.1%) with CI. Age >75 years (odds ratio (OR), 5.5; P -1 per 1.73 m 2 (OR, 2.9; P -1 per 1.73 m 2 (OR, 23.8; P 75 years (OR, 4.1; P -1 per 1.73 m 2 (OR, 3.7; P -1 per 1.73 m 2 (OR, 8.7; P<0.05) were independently associated with WML grade 3. Extensive small vessel diseases, CKD and non-dipping status were independently associated with CI. CKD appears to mainly contribute to vascular CI, whereas possibilities of overlapping with other mechanisms such as degenerative CI cannot be excluded. Strict night time BP control and renoprotective treatment may be warranted to prevent CI. (author)

  6. Accumulation of MRI markers of cerebral small vessel disease is associated with decreased cognitive function. A study in first-ever lacunar stroke and hypertensive patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein eHuijts

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background – White matter lesions (WMLs, asymptomatic lacunar infarcts, brain microbleeds (BMBs and enlarged perivascular spaces (EPVS have been identified as silent lesions due to cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD. All these markers have been individually linked to cognitive functioning, but are also strongly correlated with each other. The combined effect of these markers on cognitive function has never been studied and would possibly provide more useful information on the effect on cognitive function. Methods – Brain MRI and extensive neuropsychological assessment were performed in 189 patients at risk for cSVD (112 hypertensive patients and 77 first-ever lacunar stroke patients. We rated the presence of any asymptomatic lacunar infarct, extensive WMLs, any deep BMB, and moderate to extensive EPVS in the basal ganglia. The presence of each marker was summed to an ordinal score between 0 and 4. Associations with domains of cognitive function (memory, executive function, information processing speed and overall cognition were analyzed with correlation analyses. Results – Correlation analyses revealed significant associations between accumulating cSVD burden and decreased performance on all cognitive domains (all p≤.001. Results remained significant for information processing speed (r=-.181, p=.013 and overall cognition (r=-.178, p=.017, after correction for age and sex. Testing of trend using linear regression analyses revealed the same results. Discussion – We tested a new approach to capture total brain damage resulting from cSVD and found that accumulation of MRI burden of cSVD is associated with decreased performance on tests of information processing speed and overall cognition, implying that accumulating brain damage is accompanied by worse cognitive functioning.

  7. What is the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus status and the neuroradiological correlates of cerebral small vessel disease in adults? Protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funnell, Clark; Doyle-Waters, Mary M; Yip, Samuel; Field, Thalia

    2017-01-17

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a common cause of stroke, dementia, and functional decline. In recent years, neuroradiologic correlates of CSVD have been identified. These imaging findings, best characterized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), include some combination of white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, enlarged perivascular spaces, and cerebral atrophy. Though some cohorts have reported that participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), an important risk factor for CSVD, may have a distinct neuroradiologic phenotype, this relationship is not well-characterized. Adults with diabetes mellitus have a two- to threefold higher incidence of ischemic stroke compared to controls and are an increasingly important population given global trends of increasing diabetes prevalence. This study aims to determine if adults with CSVD and T2DM have a distinct neuroradiologic phenotype. A systematic search of the literature will be conducted to find articles that report the MRI features of CSVD in a cohort of participants including those with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A number of databases will be searched including MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and Web of Science. Proceedings and abstracts from key conferences will also be reviewed and relevant journals hand searched for additional papers. The references from selected papers will be scanned. Screening of potential articles, data extraction, and quality appraisal will be performed in duplicate by independent reviewers. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the presence versus absence of each neuroradiologic correlate of interest from each included study will be calculated. If sufficient homogeneity exists among studies, a meta-analysis will be performed for each neuroradiologic correlate of CSVD. If heterogeneity of studies precludes data pooling, results will be presented in narrative form. Determining whether a distinct neuroradiologic phenotype of CSVD exists in

  8. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on a small part of the research taking place in the textile field. The article describes an ongoing PhD research project on textiles and sound and outlines the project's two main questions: how sound can be shaped by textiles and conversely how textiles can...

  9. 46 CFR 28.875 - Radar, depth sounding, and auto-pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar, depth sounding, and auto-pilot. 28.875 Section 28.875 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.875 Radar, depth sounding, and auto-pilot...

  10. An automated vessel segmentation of retinal images using multiscale vesselness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Abdallah, M.; Malek, J.; Tourki, R.; Krissian, K.

    2011-01-01

    The ocular fundus image can provide information on pathological changes caused by local ocular diseases and early signs of certain systemic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension. Automated analysis and interpretation of fundus images has become a necessary and important diagnostic procedure in ophthalmology. The extraction of blood vessels from retinal images is an important and challenging task in medical analysis and diagnosis. In this paper, we introduce an implementation of the anisotropic diffusion which allows reducing the noise and better preserving small structures like vessels in 2D images. A vessel detection filter, based on a multi-scale vesselness function, is then applied to enhance vascular structures.

  11. Positron annihilation spectroscopy and small angle neutron scattering characterization of nanostructural features in high-nickel model reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glade, Stephen C. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)]. E-mail: bdwirth@nuc.berkeley.edu; Odette, G. Robert [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Asoka-Kumar, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Irradiation embrittlement in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels results from the hardening by a high number density of nanometer scale features. In steels with more than {approx}0.10% Cu, the dominant features are often Cu-rich precipitates typically alloyed with Mn, Ni and Si. At low-Cu and low-to-intermediate Ni levels, so-called matrix hardening features are believed to be vacancy-solute cluster complexes, or their remnants. However, Mn-Ni-Si rich precipitates, with Mn plus Ni contents greater than Cu, can form at high alloy Ni contents and are promoted at irradiation temperatures lower than the nominal 290 deg. C. Even at very low-Cu levels, late blooming Mn-Ni-Si rich precipitates are a significant concern due to their potential to form large volume fractions of hardening features. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and small angle neutron scattering neutron (SANS) measurements were used to characterize the fine-scale microstructure in split-melt A533B steels with varying Ni and Cu contents, irradiated at selected conditions from 270 to 310 deg. C between {approx}0.04 and 1.6 x 10{sup 23} n m{sup -2}. The objective was to assess the character, composition and magnetic properties of Cu-rich precipitates, as well as to gain insight on the matrix features. The results suggest that the irradiated very low-Cu and intermediate Ni steel contains small vacancy-Mn-Ni-Si cluster complexes, but not large, well-formed and highly enriched Mn-Ni-Si phases. The hardening features in steels containing 0.2% and 0.4% Cu, and 0.8% and 1.6% Ni are consistent with well-formed, non-magnetic Cu-Ni-Mn precipitates. The precipitate number densities and volume fractions increase, while their sizes decrease, with increasing Ni and decreasing irradiation temperature. The precipitates evolve with fluence in stages of nucleation, growth and limited coarsening.

  12. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Explorations and analysis of soundscapes have, since Canadian R. Murray Schafer's work during the early 1970's, developed into various established research - and artistic disciplines. The interest in sonic environments is today present within a broad range of contemporary art projects and in arch......Explorations and analysis of soundscapes have, since Canadian R. Murray Schafer's work during the early 1970's, developed into various established research - and artistic disciplines. The interest in sonic environments is today present within a broad range of contemporary art projects...... and in architectural design. Aesthetics, psychoacoustics, perception, and cognition are all present in this expanding field embracing such categories as soundscape composition, sound art, sonic art, sound design, sound studies and auditory culture. Of greatest significance to the overall field is the investigation...

  13. Sound Settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peder Duelund; Hornyanszky, Elisabeth Dalholm; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice......Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  14. Nuclear sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambach, J.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclei, like more familiar mechanical systems, undergo simple vibrational motion. Among these vibrations, sound modes are of particular interest since they reveal important information on the effective interactions among the constituents and, through extrapolation, on the bulk behaviour of nuclear and neutron matter. Sound wave propagation in nuclei shows strong quantum effects familiar from other quantum systems. Microscopic theory suggests that the restoring forces are caused by the complex structure of the many-Fermion wavefunction and, in some cases, have no classical analogue. The damping of the vibrational amplitude is strongly influenced by phase coherence among the particles participating in the motion. (author)

  15. Gold nanoparticles administration induces disarray of heart muscle, hemorrhagic, chronic inflammatory cells infiltrated by small lymphocytes, cytoplasmic vacuolization and congested and dilated blood vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhalim Mohamed Anwar K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite significant research efforts on cancer therapy, diagnostics and imaging, many challenges remain unsolved. There are many unknown details regarding the interaction of nanoparticles (NPs and biological systems. The structure and properties of gold nanoparticles (GNPs make them useful for a wide array of biological applications. However, for the application of GNPs in therapy and drug delivery, knowledge regarding their bioaccumulation and associated local or systemic toxicity is necessary. Information on the biological fate of NPs, including distribution, accumulation, metabolism, and organ specific toxicity is still minimal. Studies specifically dealing with the toxicity of NPs are rare. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of intraperitoneal administration of GNPs on histological alterations of the heart tissue of rats in an attempt to identify and understand the toxicity and the potential role of GNPs as a therapeutic and diagnostic tool. Methods A total of 40 healthy male Wistar-Kyoto rats received 50 μl infusions of 10, 20 and 50 nm GNPs for 3 or 7 days. Animals were randomly divided into groups: 6 GNP-treated rats groups and one control group (NG. Groups 1, 2 and 3 received infusions of 50 μl GNPs of size 10 nm (3 or 7 days, 20 nm (3 or 7 days and 50 nm (3 or 7 days, respectively. Results In comparison with the respective control rats, exposure to GNPs doses produced heart muscle disarray with a few scattered chronic inflammatory cells infiltrated by small lymphocytes, foci of hemorrhage with extravasation of red blood cells, some scattered cytoplasmic vacuolization and congested and dilated blood vessels. None of the above alterations were observed in the heart muscle of any member of the control group. Conclusions The alterations induced by intraperitoneal administration of GNPs were size-dependent, with smaller ones inducing greater affects, and were also related to the time exposure to

  16. Hemorrhage recurrence risk factors in cerebral amyloid angiopathy: Comparative analysis of the overall small vessel disease severity score versus individual neuroimaging markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulouis, Gregoire; Charidimou, Andreas; Pasi, Marco; Roongpiboonsopit, Duangnapa; Xiong, Li; Auriel, Eitan; van Etten, Ellis S; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Ayres, Alison; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin M; Rosand, Jonathan; Goldstein, Joshua N; Gurol, M Edip; Greenberg, Steven M; Viswanathan, Anand

    2017-09-15

    An MRI-based score of total small vessel disease burden (CAA-SVD-Score) in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) has been demonstrated to correlate with severity of pathologic changes. Evidence suggests that CAA-related intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) recurrence risk is associated with specific disease imaging manifestations rather than overall severity. We compared the correlation between the CAA-SVD-Score with the risk of recurrent CAA-related lobar ICH versus the predictive role of each of its components. Consecutive patients with CAA-related ICH from a single-center prospective cohort were analyzed. Radiological markers of CAA related SVD damage were quantified and categorized according to the CAA-SVD-Score (0-6 points). Subjects were followed prospectively for recurrent symptomatic ICH. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate associations between the CAA-SVD-Score as well as each of the individual MRI signatures of CAA and the risk of recurrent ICH. In 229 CAA patients with ICH, a total of 56 recurrent ICH events occurred during a median follow-up of 2.8years [IQR 0.9-5.4years, 781 person-years). Higher CAA-SVD-Score (HR=1.26 per additional point, 95%CI [1.04-1.52], p=0.015) and older age were independently associated with higher ICH recurrence risk. Analysis of individual markers of CAA showed that CAA-SVD-Score findings were due to the independent effect of disseminated superficial siderosis (HR for disseminated cSS vs none: 2.89, 95%CI [1.47-5.5], p=0.002) and high degree of perivascular spaces enlargement (RR=3.50-95%CI [1.04-21], p=0.042). In lobar CAA-ICH patients, higher CAA-SVD-Score does predict recurrent ICH. Amongst individual elements of the score, superficial siderosis and dilated perivascular spaces are the only markers independently associated with ICH recurrence, contributing to the evidence for distinct CAA phenotypes singled out by neuro-imaging manifestations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sound Settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peder Duelund; Hornyanszky, Elisabeth Dalholm; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  18. Second Sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 6. Second Sound - The Role of Elastic Waves. R Srinivasan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 6 June 1999 pp 15-19. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/06/0015-0019 ...

  19. Musical Sound, Instruments, and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photinos, Panos

    2017-12-01

    'Musical Sound, Instruments, and Equipment' offers a basic understanding of sound, musical instruments and music equipment, geared towards a general audience and non-science majors. The book begins with an introduction of the fundamental properties of sound waves, and the perception of the characteristics of sound. The relation between intensity and loudness, and the relation between frequency and pitch are discussed. The basics of propagation of sound waves, and the interaction of sound waves with objects and structures of various sizes are introduced. Standing waves, harmonics and resonance are explained in simple terms, using graphics that provide a visual understanding. The development is focused on musical instruments and acoustics. The construction of musical scales and the frequency relations are reviewed and applied in the description of musical instruments. The frequency spectrum of selected instruments is explored using freely available sound analysis software. Sound amplification and sound recording, including analog and digital approaches, are discussed in two separate chapters. The book concludes with a chapter on acoustics, the physical factors that affect the quality of the music experience, and practical ways to improve the acoustics at home or small recording studios. A brief technical section is provided at the end of each chapter, where the interested reader can find the relevant physics and sample calculations. These quantitative sections can be skipped without affecting the comprehension of the basic material. Questions are provided to test the reader's understanding of the material. Answers are given in the appendix.

  20. Containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbirohowski-Koscia, K.F.; Roberts, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    A concrete containment vessel for nuclear reactors is disclosed that is spherical and that has prestressing tendons disposed in first, second and third sets, the tendons of each set being all substantially concentric and centred around a respective one of the three orthogonal axes of the sphere; the tendons of the first set being anchored at each end at a first anchor rib running around a circumference of the vessel, the tendons of the second set being anchored at each end at a second anchor rib running around a circumference of the sphere and disposed at 90 0 to the first rib, and the tendons of the third set being anchored some to the first rib and the remainder to the second rib. (author)

  1. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    The modern theory of aerodynamic sound originates from Lighthill's two papers in 1952 and 1954, as is well known. I have heard that Lighthill was motivated in writing the papers by the jet-noise emitted by the newly commercialized jet-engined airplanes at that time. The technology of aerodynamic sound is destined for environmental problems. Therefore the theory should always be applied to newly emerged public nuisances. This issue of Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) reflects problems of environmental sound in present Japanese technology. The Japanese community studying aerodynamic sound has held an annual symposium since 29 years ago when the late Professor S Kotake and Professor S Kaji of Teikyo University organized the symposium. Most of the Japanese authors in this issue are members of the annual symposium. I should note the contribution of the two professors cited above in establishing the Japanese community of aerodynamic sound research. It is my pleasure to present the publication in this issue of ten papers discussed at the annual symposium. I would like to express many thanks to the Editorial Board of FDR for giving us the chance to contribute these papers. We have a review paper by T Suzuki on the study of jet noise, which continues to be important nowadays, and is expected to reform the theoretical model of generating mechanisms. Professor M S Howe and R S McGowan contribute an analytical paper, a valuable study in today's fluid dynamics research. They apply hydrodynamics to solve the compressible flow generated in the vocal cords of the human body. Experimental study continues to be the main methodology in aerodynamic sound, and it is expected to explore new horizons. H Fujita's study on the Aeolian tone provides a new viewpoint on major, longstanding sound problems. The paper by M Nishimura and T Goto on textile fabrics describes new technology for the effective reduction of bluff-body noise. The paper by T Sueki et al also reports new technology for the

  2. Little Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker M. Bani-Khair

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Spider and the Fly   You little spider, To death you aspire... Or seeking a web wider, To death all walking, No escape you all fighters… Weak and fragile in shape and might, Whatever you see in the horizon, That is destiny whatever sight. And tomorrow the spring comes, And the flowers bloom, And the grasshopper leaps high, And the frogs happily cry, And the flies smile nearby, To that end, The spider has a plot, To catch the flies by his net, A mosquito has fallen down in his net, Begging him to set her free, Out of that prison, To her freedom she aspires, Begging...Imploring...crying,  That is all what she requires, But the spider vows never let her free, His power he admires, Turning blind to light, And with his teeth he shall bite, Leaving her in desperate might, Unable to move from site to site, Tied up with strings in white, Wrapped up like a dead man, Waiting for his grave at night,   The mosquito says, Oh little spider, A stronger you are than me in power, But listen to my words before death hour, Today is mine and tomorrow is yours, No escape from death... Whatever the color of your flower…     Little sounds The Ant The ant is a little creature with a ferocious soul, Looking and looking for more and more, You can simply crush it like dead mold, Or you can simply leave it alone, I wonder how strong and strong they are! Working day and night in a small hole, Their motto is work or whatever you call… A big boon they have and joy in fall, Because they found what they store, A lesson to learn and memorize all in all, Work is something that you should not ignore!   The butterfly: I’m the butterfly Beautiful like a blue clear sky, Or sometimes look like snow, Different in colors, shapes and might, But something to know that we always die, So fragile, weak and thin, Lighter than a glimpse and delicate as light, Something to know for sure… Whatever you have in life and all these fields, You are not happier than a butterfly

  3. Reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use

  4. Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaoudi, R

    1998-07-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels in performed in support of the RVP integrity assessment. Its main objectives are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate the applied methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  5. Clinical study on the value of combining neuropsychological tests with auditory event-related potential P300 for cognitive assessment in elderly patients with cerebral small vessel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-ling ZHAO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the value of combining neuropsychological tests with auditory event-related potential (ERP P300 for cognitive assessment in elderly patients with cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD.  Methods A total of 183 elderly patients with cSVD were enrolled in this study. They were divided into 3 groups according to brain MRI: lacunar infarct (LACI group (N = 62, white matter hyperintensity (WMH group (N = 60 and LACI + WMH group (N = 61. A total of 50 brain MRI normal persons were selected as control group. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Chinese version was used to evaluate the cognitive function, and the amplitude and latency of P300 were measured in each group.  Results Compared with control group, the MoCA total score in LACI, WMH and LACI + WMH groups were significantly lower (P = 0.042, 0.015, 0.000, and the score in LACI + WMH group was significantly lower than that in LACI and WMH groups (P = 0.001, 0.042. In the eight cognitive domains of MoCA scale, the visual space and executive function (P = 0.006, 0.041, 0.035, delayed memory (P = 0.006, 0.012, 0.048, language (P = 0.001, 0.032, 0.047 and calculation (P = 0.009, 0.001, 0.003 in LACI + WMH group were significantly lower than those in control, LACI and WMH groups. The delayed memory in LACI group was significantly lower than that in control group (P = 0.037. The delayed memory (P = 0.005 and language (P = 0.047 in WMH group were significantly lower than those in control group. Compared with control group, the amplitudes of P300 (P = 0.025, 0.033, 0.000 in LACI, WMH and LACI + WMH groups were significantly decreased, and the latencies (P = 0.018, 0.000, 0.000 were significantly prolonged. The amplitude of P300 in LACI + WMH group was significantly lower than that in LACI and WMH groups (P = 0.041, 0.018, and the latency was significantly prolonged (P = 0.000, 0.022.  Conclusions Elderly patients of cSVD all suffer from different degrees of cognitive impairment

  6. Sound Visualisation

    OpenAIRE

    Dolenc, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contains a description of a construction of subwoofer case that has an extra functionality of being able to produce special visual effects and display visualizations that match the currently playing sound. For this reason, multiple lighting elements made out of LED (Light Emitting Diode) diodes were installed onto the subwoofer case. The lighting elements are controlled by dedicated software that was also developed. The software runs on STM32F4-Discovery evaluation board inside a ...

  7. Hemodynamics in stenotic vessels of small diameter under steady state conditions: Effect of viscoelasticity and migration of red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimakopoulos, Yannis; Kelesidis, George; Tsouka, Sophia; Georgiou, Georgios C; Tsamopoulos, John

    2015-01-01

    In microcirculation, the non-Newtonian behavior of blood and the complexity of the microvessel network are responsible for the high flow resistance and the large reduction of the blood pressure. Red blood cell aggregation along with inward radial migration are two significant mechanisms determining the former. Yet, their impact on hemodynamics in non-straight vessels is not well understood. In this study, the steady state blood flow in stenotic rigid vessels is examined, employing a sophisticated non-homogeneous constitutive law. The effect of red blood cells migration on the hydrodynamics is quantified and the constitutive model's accuracy is evaluated. A numerical algorithm based on the two-dimensional mixed finite element method and the EVSS/SUPG technique for a stable discretization of the mass and momentum conservation equations in addition to the constitutive model is employed. The numerical simulations show that a cell-depleted layer develops along the vessel wall with an almost constant thickness for slow flow conditions. This causes the reduction of the drag force and the increase of the pressure gradient as the constriction ratio decreases. Viscoelastic effects in blood flow were found to be responsible for steeper decreases of tube and discharge hematocrits as decreasing function of constriction ratio.

  8. Gammatography of thick lead vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, V.M.; Bhatnagar, P.K.; Sundaram, V.M.

    1979-01-01

    Radiography, scintillation and GM counting and dose measurements using ionisation chamber equipment are commonly used for detecting flaws/voids in materials. The first method is mostly used for steel vessels and to a lesser extent thin lead vessels also and is essentially qualitative. Dose measuring techniques are used for very thick and large lead vessels for which high strength radioactive sources are required, with its inherent handling problems. For vessels of intermediate thicknesses, it is ideal to use a small strength source and a GM or scintillation counter assembly. At the Reactor Research Centre, Kalpakkam, such a system was used for checking three lead vessels of thicknesses varying from 38mm to 65mm. The tolerances specified were +- 4% variation in lead thickness. The measurements also revealed the non concentricity of one vessel which had a thickness varying from 38mm to 44mm. The second vessel was patently non-concentric and the dimensional variation was truly reproduced in the measurements. A third vessel was fabricated with careful control of dimensions and the measurements exhibited good concentricity. Small deviations were observed, attributable to imperfect bondings between steel and lead. This technique has the following advantages: (a) weaker sources used result in less handling problems reducing the personnel exposures considerably; (b) the sensitivity of the instrument is quite good because of better statistics; (c) the time required for scanning a small vessel is more, but a judicious use of a scintillometer for initial fast scan will help in reducing the total scanning time; (d) this method can take advantage of the dimensional variations themselves to get the calibration and to estimate the deviations from specified tolerances. (auth.)

  9. Fourth sound of holographic superfluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarom, Amos

    2009-01-01

    We compute fourth sound for superfluids dual to a charged scalar and a gauge field in an AdS 4 background. For holographic superfluids with condensates that have a large scaling dimension (greater than approximately two), we find that fourth sound approaches first sound at low temperatures. For condensates that a have a small scaling dimension it exhibits non-conformal behavior at low temperatures which may be tied to the non-conformal behavior of the order parameter of the superfluid. We show that by introducing an appropriate scalar potential, conformal invariance can be enforced at low temperatures.

  10. Current meter components and other data from XCP casts from VARIOUS SMALL VESSELS and other platforms from the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the OCEAN DUMPING and other projects from 01 December 1990 to 01 June 1991 (NODC Accession 9300076)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter components and other data were collected from XCP casts from VARIOUS SMALL VESSELS and other platforms in the North Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected...

  11. Sound knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    as knowledge based on reflexive practices. I chose ‘health promotion’ as the field for my research as it utilises knowledge produced in several research disciplines, among these both quantitative and qualitative. I mapped out the institutions, actors, events, and documents that constituted the field of health...... of the research is to investigate what is considered to ‘work as evidence’ in health promotion and how the ‘evidence discourse’ influences social practices in policymaking and in research. From investigating knowledge practices in the field of health promotion, I develop the concept of sound knowledge...... result of a rigorous and standardized research method. However, this anthropological analysis shows that evidence and evidence-based is a hegemonic ‘way of knowing’ that sometimes transposes everyday reasoning into an epistemological form. However, the empirical material shows a variety of understandings...

  12. Effects of JPEG data compression on magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of small vessels ischemic lesions of the brain; Efeitos da compressao de dados JPEG na avaliacao de lesoes vasculares cerebrais isquemicas de pequenos vasos em ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriki, Paulo Eduardo de Aguiar; Abdala, Nitamar; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: paulokuriki@gmail.com

    2006-01-15

    Objective: to establish the maximum achievable JPEG compression ratio without affecting quantitative and qualitative magnetic resonance imaging analysis of ischemic lesion in small vessels of the brain. Material and method: fifteen DICOM images were converted to JPEG with a compression ratio of 1:10 to 1:60 and were assessed together with the original images by three neuro radiologists. The number, morphology and signal intensity of the lesions were analyzed. Results: lesions were properly identified up to a 1:30 ratio. More lesions were identified with a 1:10 ratio then in the original images. Morphology and edges were properly evaluated up toa 1:40 ratio. Compression did not affect signal. Conclusion: small lesions were identified ( < 2 mm ) and in all compression ratios the JPEG algorithm generated image noise that misled observers to identify more lesions in JPEG images then in DICOM images, thus generating false-positive results.(author)

  13. 33 CFR 81.20 - Lights and sound signal appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights and sound signal appliances. 81.20 Section 81.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... appliances. Each vessel under the 72 COLREGS, except the vessels of the Navy, is exempt from the requirements...

  14. 46 CFR 32.15-10 - Sounding machines-T/OCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sounding machines-T/OCL. 32.15-10 Section 32.15-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Navigation Equipment § 32.15-10 Sounding machines—T/OCL. All mechanically propelled vessels in...

  15. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  16. NASA Space Sounds API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has released a series of space sounds via sound cloud. We have abstracted away some of the hassle in accessing these sounds, so that developers can play with...

  17. Vessel Operator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operator cards are required for any operator of a charter/party boat and or a commercial vessel (including carrier and processor vessels) issued a vessel permit from...

  18. Effects of the Distance from a Diffusive Surface on the Objective and Perceptual Evaluation of the Sound Field in a Small Simulated Variable-Acoustics Hall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louena Shtrepi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of the acoustic effects that diffusive surfaces have on the objective acoustic parameters and on sound perception have not yet been fully understood. To this end, acoustic simulations have been performed in Odeon in the model of a variable-acoustic concert hall. This paper is presented as a follow-up study to a previous paper that dealt with in-field measurements only. As in measurements, a diffusive and a reflective condition of one of the lateral walls have been considered in the room models. Two modeling alternatives of the diffusive condition, that is, (a a flat surface with high scattering coefficient applied; and (b a triangular relief modeled including edge diffraction, have been investigated. Objective acoustic parameters, such as early decay time (EDT, reverberation time (T30, clarity (C80, definition (D50, and interaural cross correlation (IACC, have been compared between the two conditions. Moreover, an auditory experiment has been performed to determine the maximum distance from a diffusive surface at which the simulated acoustic scattering effects are still audible. Although the simulated objective results showed a good match with measured values, the subjective results showed that the differences between the diffuse and reflective conditions become significant when model (b is used.

  19. 76 FR 15246 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ...-AA01 Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Rhode Island Sound south of Brenton Point, Rhode Island, for use by vessels waiting to enter... Sound that under current informal practice is routinely used by mariners as an anchorage while waiting...

  20. Flaw distribution development from vessel ISI data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Basin, S.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    Previous attempts to develop flaw distributions for use in the structural integrity evaluation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels have aimed at the estimation of a ''generic'' distribution applicable to all vessels. In contrast, this paper describes the analysis of vessel-specific in-service inspection (ISI) data for the development of a flaw distribution reliably representative of the condition of the particular vessel inspected. The application of the methodology may be extended to other vessels, but has been primarily developed for PWR reactor vessels. For this study, the flaw data analyzed included data obtained from three recently performed PWR vessel ISIs and from laboratory inspection of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor vessel. The variability in both the character of the reviewed data (size range of flaws, number of flaws) and the UT (ultrasonic test) inspection system performance identified a need for analyzing the inspection results on a vessel-, or data set-specific basis. For this purpose, traditional histogram-based methods were inadequate, and a new methodology that can accept a very small number of flaws (typical of vessel-specific ISI results) and that includes consideration of inspection system flaw detection reliability, flaw sizing accuracy and flaw detection threshold, was developed. Results of the application of the methodology to each of the four PWR reactor vessel cases studied are presented and discussed

  1. Vacuum vessel for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Kurita, Gen-ichi; Onozuka, Masaki; Suzuki, Masaru.

    1997-01-01

    Heat of inner walls of a vacuum vessel that receive radiation heat from plasmas by way of first walls is removed by a cooling medium flowing in channels for cooling the inner walls. Nuclear heat generation of constitutional materials of the vacuum vessel caused by fast neutrons and γ rays is removed by a cooling medium flowing in cooling channels disposed in the vacuum vessel. Since the heat from plasmas and the nuclear heat generation are removed separately, the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling inner walls is increased for cooling a great amount of heat from plasmas while the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling the inside of the vacuum vessel is reduced for cooling the small amount of nuclear heat generation. Since the amount of the cooling medium can thus be optimized, the capacity of the facilities for circulating the cooling medium can be reduced. In addition, since the channels for cooling the inner walls and the channels of cooling medium formed in the vacuum vessel are disposed to the inner walls of the vacuum vessel on the side opposite to plasmas, integrity of the channels relative to leakage of the cooling medium can be ensured. (N.H.)

  2. Vacuum vessel for thermonuclear device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Kurita, Gen-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Onozuka, Masaki; Suzuki, Masaru

    1997-07-31

    Heat of inner walls of a vacuum vessel that receive radiation heat from plasmas by way of first walls is removed by a cooling medium flowing in channels for cooling the inner walls. Nuclear heat generation of constitutional materials of the vacuum vessel caused by fast neutrons and {gamma} rays is removed by a cooling medium flowing in cooling channels disposed in the vacuum vessel. Since the heat from plasmas and the nuclear heat generation are removed separately, the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling inner walls is increased for cooling a great amount of heat from plasmas while the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling the inside of the vacuum vessel is reduced for cooling the small amount of nuclear heat generation. Since the amount of the cooling medium can thus be optimized, the capacity of the facilities for circulating the cooling medium can be reduced. In addition, since the channels for cooling the inner walls and the channels of cooling medium formed in the vacuum vessel are disposed to the inner walls of the vacuum vessel on the side opposite to plasmas, integrity of the channels relative to leakage of the cooling medium can be ensured. (N.H.)

  3. The Sound of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  4. Sounds Exaggerate Visual Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Timothy D.; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    While perceiving speech, people see mouth shapes that are systematically associated with sounds. In particular, a vertically stretched mouth produces a /woo/ sound, whereas a horizontally stretched mouth produces a /wee/ sound. We demonstrate that hearing these speech sounds alters how we see aspect ratio, a basic visual feature that contributes…

  5. Making Sound Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2007-01-01

    Sound provides and offers amazing insights into the world. Sound waves may be defined as mechanical energy that moves through air or other medium as a longitudinal wave and consists of pressure fluctuations. Humans and animals alike use sound as a means of communication and a tool for survival. Mammals, such as bats, use ultrasonic sound waves to…

  6. Offshore dredger sound: source levels, sound maps and risk assessment (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.F. de; Ainslie, M.A.; Heinis, F.; Janmaat, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Port of Rotterdam is expanding to meet the growing demand to accommodate large cargo vessels. One of the licensing conditions was the monitoring of the underwater sound produced during its construction, with an emphasis on the establishment of acoustic source levels of the Trailing Suction

  7. Performance improvements of the BNC tubes from unique double-silicone-tube bioreactors by introducing chitosan and heparin for application as small-diameter artificial blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Tang, Jingyu; Bao, Luhan; Chen, Lin; Hong, Feng F

    2017-12-15

    In order to improve property of bacterial nano-cellulose (BNC) to achieve the requirements of clinical application as small caliber vascular grafts, chitosan (CH) was deposited into the fibril network of the BNC tubes fabricated in unique Double-Silicone-Tube bioreactors. Heparin (Hep) was then chemically grafted into the BNC-based tubes using EDC/NHS crosslinking to improve performance of anticoagulation and endothelialization. Physicochemical and mechanical property, blood compatibility, and cytocompatibility were compared before and after compositing. The results indicated that strength at break was increased but burst pressure decreased slightly after compositing. Performance of the BNC tubes was improved remarkably after introducing chitosan and heparin. The EDC/NHS crosslinking catalyzed both amide bonds and ester bonds formation in the BNC/CH-Hep composites. Three-dimensional surface structure and roughness were firstly obtained and discussed in relation to the hemocompatibility of BNC-based tubes. This work demonstrates the heparinized BNC-based tubes have great potential in application as small-diameter vascular prosthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multiple shell pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described of fabricating a pressure vessel comprising the steps of: attaching a first inner pressure vessel having means defining inlet and outlet openings to a top flange, placing a second inner pressure vessel, having means defining inlet and outlet opening, concentric with and spaced about the first inner pressure vessel and attaching the second inner pressure vessel to the top flange, placing an outer pressure vessel, having inlet and outlet openings, concentric with and spaced apart about the second inner pressure vessel and attaching the outer pressure vessel to the top flange, attaching a generally cylindrical inner inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical inner outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet openings in the first inner pressure vessel, attaching a generally cylindrical outer inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical outer outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet opening in the second inner pressure vessel, heating the assembled pressure vessel to a temperature above the melting point of a material selected from the group, lead, tin, antimony, bismuth, potassium, sodium, boron and mixtures thereof, filling the space between the first inner pressure vessel and the second inner pressure vessel with material selected from the group, filling the space between the second inner pressure vessel and the outer pressure vessel with material selected from the group, and pressurizing the material filling the spaces between the pressure vessels to a predetermined pressure, the step comprising: pressurizing the spaces to a pressure whereby the wall of the first inner pressure vessel is maintained in compression during steady state operation of the pressure vessel

  9. 75 FR 78063 - Passenger Weight and Inspected Vessel Stability Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... for determining the maximum passenger capacity of small passenger pontoon vessels either by: Dividing.... 176.110 explicitly calling attention to the OCMI's prerogative to consider a vessel's suitability for... factors to which vessel masters should give special attention in both sections, and a requirement in Sec...

  10. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  11. Sound wave transmission (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  12. Making fictions sound real

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Birger

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role that sound plays in making fictions perceptually real to film audiences, whether these fictions are realist or non-realist in content and narrative form. I will argue that some aspects of film sound practices and the kind of experiences they trigger are related...... to basic rules of human perception, whereas others are more properly explained in relation to how aesthetic devices, including sound, are used to characterise the fiction and thereby make it perceptually real to its audience. Finally, I will argue that not all genres can be defined by a simple taxonomy...... of sounds. Apart from an account of the kinds of sounds that typically appear in a specific genre, a genre analysis of sound may also benefit from a functionalist approach that focuses on how sounds can make both realist and non-realist aspects of genres sound real to audiences....

  13. Principles of underwater sound

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urick, Robert J

    1983-01-01

    ... the immediately useful help they need for sonar problem solving. Its coverage is broad-ranging from the basic concepts of sound in the sea to making performance predictions in such applications as depth sounding, fish finding, and submarine detection...

  14. Improvement to reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The vessel described includes a prestressed concrete vessel containing a chamber and a removable cover closing this chamber. The cover is in concrete and is kept in its closed position by main and auxiliary retainers, comprising fittings integral with the concrete of the vessel. The auxiliary retainers pass through the concrete of the cover. This improvement may be applied to BWR, PWR and LMFBR type reactor vessel [fr

  15. An Antropologist of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2015-01-01

    PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology.......PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology....

  16. Broadcast sound technology

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot-Smith, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Broadcast Sound Technology provides an explanation of the underlying principles of modern audio technology. Organized into 21 chapters, the book first describes the basic sound; behavior of sound waves; aspects of hearing, harming, and charming the ear; room acoustics; reverberation; microphones; phantom power; loudspeakers; basic stereo; and monitoring of audio signal. Subsequent chapters explore the processing of audio signal, sockets, sound desks, and digital audio. Analogue and digital tape recording and reproduction, as well as noise reduction, are also explained.

  17. Propagation of sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Magnus; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2017-01-01

    properties can be modified by sound absorption, refraction, and interference from multi paths caused by reflections.The path from the source to the receiver may be bent due to refraction. Besides geometrical attenuation, the ground effect and turbulence are the most important mechanisms to influence...... communication sounds for airborne acoustics and bottom and surface effects for underwater sounds. Refraction becomes very important close to shadow zones. For echolocation signals, geometric attenuation and sound absorption have the largest effects on the signals....

  18. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  19. Abnormal sound detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji.

    1995-01-01

    Only components synchronized with rotation of pumps are sampled from detected acoustic sounds, to judge the presence or absence of abnormality based on the magnitude of the synchronized components. A synchronized component sampling means can remove resonance sounds and other acoustic sounds generated at a synchronously with the rotation based on the knowledge that generated acoustic components in a normal state are a sort of resonance sounds and are not precisely synchronized with the number of rotation. On the other hand, abnormal sounds of a rotating body are often caused by compulsory force accompanying the rotation as a generation source, and the abnormal sounds can be detected by extracting only the rotation-synchronized components. Since components of normal acoustic sounds generated at present are discriminated from the detected sounds, reduction of the abnormal sounds due to a signal processing can be avoided and, as a result, abnormal sound detection sensitivity can be improved. Further, since it is adapted to discriminate the occurrence of the abnormal sound from the actually detected sounds, the other frequency components which are forecast but not generated actually are not removed, so that it is further effective for the improvement of detection sensitivity. (N.H.)

  20. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady

    2011-01-01

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...... both physical and digital models at three distinct scales. The results suggest hyperboloid geometry, while difficult to fabricate, facilitates sound scattering....

  1. Power Management of Small Naval Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    Nernst Equation (an equation which can be used to determine the equilibrium. The current controlled voltage source,/^/) represents the overall effect of...the effective partial pressures of both hydrogen and oxygen. The effective pressures are used in the Nernst equation to find PEMFC output voltage...used to set up the model for the system. MathCAD® and MATLAB® were involved in order to achieve system transfer function for both inputs. Equations

  2. Small Ro/Pax Vessel stability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Henrik; Kristensen, Hans Otto Holmegaard; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2015-01-01

    In 2009 new damage stability requirements for passenger ships based on a probabilistic method were adopted by IMO and are now part of the current SOLAS Chapter II-1 regulations (SOLAS 2009). The mandate from IMO was to keep the same safety level as inherent in the old deterministic damage stabili...

  3. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented...... is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited....

  4. Clinical manifestations of small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major health problem worldwide. However, the mortality risk in patients with cardiovascular disease has decreased due to early detection of the disease and improved treatment possibilities. The downside of increased survival rates are higher rates of long-term functional

  5. Method of burying vessel containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Yoshihito.

    1989-01-01

    A float having an inert gas sealed therein is attached to a tightly closed vessel containing radioactive wastes. The vessel is inserted and kept in a small hole for burying the tightly closed vessel in an excavated shaft in rocks such as of granite or rock salts, while filling bentonite as shielding material therearound. In this case, the float is so adjusted that the apparent specific gravity is made equal or nearer between the tightly closed vessel and the bentonite, so that the rightly closed vessel does not sink and cause direct contact with the rocks even if bentonite flows due to earthquakes, etc. This can prevent radioactivity contamination through water in the rocks. (S.K.)

  6. Probabilistic atlas based labeling of the cerebral vessel tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Giessen, Martijn; Janssen, Jasper P.; Brouwer, Patrick A.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2015-03-01

    Preoperative imaging of the cerebral vessel tree is essential for planning therapy on intracranial stenoses and aneurysms. Usually, a magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or computed tomography angiography (CTA) is acquired from which the cerebral vessel tree is segmented. Accurate analysis is helped by the labeling of the cerebral vessels, but labeling is non-trivial due to anatomical topological variability and missing branches due to acquisition issues. In recent literature, labeling the cerebral vasculature around the Circle of Willis has mainly been approached as a graph-based problem. The most successful method, however, requires the definition of all possible permutations of missing vessels, which limits application to subsets of the tree and ignores spatial information about the vessel locations. This research aims to perform labeling using probabilistic atlases that model spatial vessel and label likelihoods. A cerebral vessel tree is aligned to a probabilistic atlas and subsequently each vessel is labeled by computing the maximum label likelihood per segment from label-specific atlases. The proposed method was validated on 25 segmented cerebral vessel trees. Labeling accuracies were close to 100% for large vessels, but dropped to 50-60% for small vessels that were only present in less than 50% of the set. With this work we showed that using solely spatial information of the vessel labels, vessel segments from stable vessels (>50% presence) were reliably classified. This spatial information will form the basis for a future labeling strategy with a very loose topological model.

  7. 78 FR 13869 - Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ...-123-LNG; 12-128-NG; 12-148-NG; 12- 158-NG] Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; CE FLNG, LLC; Consolidated...-NG Puget Sound Energy, Inc Order granting long- term authority to import/export natural gas from/to...

  8. Modeling and measurement of the motion of the DIII-D vacuum vessel during vertical instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, E.; Blevins, R.D.; Jensen, T.H.; Luxon, J.L.; Petersen, P.I.; Strait, E.J.

    1991-11-01

    The motions of the D3-D vacuum vessel during vertical instabilities of elongated plasmas have been measured and studied over the past five years. The currents flowing in the vessel wall and the plasma scrapeoff layer were also measured and correlated to a physics model. These results provide a time history load distribution on the vessel which were input to a dynamic analysis for correlation to the measured motions. The structural model of the vessel using the loads developed from the measured vessel currents showed that the calculated displacement history correlated well with the measured values. The dynamic analysis provides a good estimate of the stresses and the maximum allowable deflection of the vessel. In addition, the vessel motions produce acoustic emissions at 21 Hertz that are sufficiently loud to be felt as well as heard by the D3-D operators. Time history measurements of the sounds were correlated to the vessel displacements. An analytical model of an oscillating sphere provided a reasonable correlation to the amplitude of the measured sounds. The correlation of the theoretical and measured vessel currents, the dynamic measurements and analysis, and the acoustic measurements and analysis show that: (1) The physics model can predict vessel forces for selected values of plasma resistivity. The model also predicts poloidal and toroidal wall currents which agree with measured values; (2) The force-time history from the above model, used in conjunction with an axisymmetric structural model of the vessel, predicts vessel motions which agree well with measured values; (3) The above results, input to a simple acoustic model predicts the magnitude of sounds emitted from the vessel during disruptions which agree with acoustic measurements; (4) Correlation of measured vessel motions with structural analysis shows that a maximum vertical motion of the vessel up to 0.24 in will not overstress the vessel or its supports. 11 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  9. High-Speed Vessel Noises in West Hong Kong Waters and Their Contributions Relative to Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins (Sousa chinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Q. Sims

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The waters of West Hong Kong are home to a population of Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins (Sousa chinensis that use a variety of sounds to communicate. This area is also dominated by intense vessel traffic that is believed to be behaviorally and acoustically disruptive to dolphins. While behavioral changes have been documented, acoustic disturbance has yet to be shown. We compared the relative sound contributions of various high-speed vessels to nearby ambient noise and dolphin social sounds. Ambient noise levels were also compared between areas of high and low traffic. We found large differences in sound pressure levels between high traffic and no traffic areas, suggesting that vessels are the main contributors to these discrepancies. Vessel sounds were well within the audible range of dolphins, with sounds from 315–45,000 Hz. Additionally, vessel sounds at distances ≥100 m exceeded those of dolphin sounds at closer distances. Our results reaffirm earlier studies that vessels have large sound contributions to dolphin habitats, and we suspect that they may be inducing masking effects of dolphin sounds at close distances. Further research on dolphin behavior and acoustics in relation to vessels is needed to clarify impacts.

  10. Gas-liquid flow filed in agitated vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormazi, F.; Alaie, M.; Dabir, B.; Ashjaie, M.

    2001-01-01

    Agitated vessels in form of sti reed tank reactors and mixed ferment ors are being used in large numbers of industry. It is more important to develop good, and theoretically sound models for scaling up and design of agitated vessels. In this article, two phase flow (gas-liquid) in a agitated vessel has been investigated numerically. A two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model, is used to predict the gas-liquid flow. The effects of gas phase, varying gas flow rates and variation of bubbles shape on flow filed of liquid phase are investigated. The numerical results are verified against the experimental data

  11. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  12. Sound a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Sound is integral to how we experience the world, in the form of noise as well as music. But what is sound? What is the physical basis of pitch and harmony? And how are sound waves exploited in musical instruments? Sound: A Very Short Introduction looks at the science of sound and the behaviour of sound waves with their different frequencies. It also explores sound in different contexts, covering the audible and inaudible, sound underground and underwater, acoustic and electronic sound, and hearing in humans and animals. It concludes with the problem of sound out of place—noise and its reduction.

  13. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  14. Sound Insulation between Dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs...... 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data collected from 24...

  15. Maury Journals - German Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — German vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  16. The velocity of sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the work carried out on the velocity of sound in liquid alkali metals. The experimental methods to determine the velocity measurements are described. Tables are presented of reported data on the velocity of sound in lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium. A formula is given for alkali metals, in which the sound velocity is a function of shear viscosity, atomic mass and atomic volume. (U.K.)

  17. Fouling in your own nest: vessel noise increases biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jenni A; Wilkens, Serena L; Jeffs, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Globally billions of dollars are spent each year on attempting to reduce marine biofouling on commercial vessels, largely because it results in higher fuel costs due to increased hydrodynamic drag. Biofouling has been long assumed to be primarily due to the availability of vacant space on the surface of the hull. Here, it is shown that the addition of the noise emitted through a vessel's hull in port increases the settlement and growth of biofouling organisms within four weeks of clean surfaces being placed in the sea. More than twice as many bryozoans, oysters, calcareous tube worms and barnacles settled and established on surfaces with vessel noise compared to those without. Likewise, individuals from three species grew significantly larger in size in the presence of vessel noise. The results demonstrate that vessel noise in port is promoting biofouling on hulls and that underwater sound plays a much wider ecological role in the marine environment than was previously considered possible.

  18. Michael Jackson's Sound Stages

    OpenAIRE

    Morten Michelsen

    2012-01-01

    In order to discuss analytically spatial aspects of recorded sound William Moylan’s concept of ‘sound stage’ is developed within a musicological framework as part of a sound paradigm which includes timbre, texture and sound stage. Two Michael Jackson songs (‘The Lady in My Life’ from 1982 and ‘Scream’ from 1995) are used to: a) demonstrate the value of such a conceptualisation, and b) demonstrate that the model has its limits, as record producers in the 1990s began ignoring the conventions of...

  19. What is Sound?

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    What is sound? This question is posed in contradiction to the every-day understanding that sound is a phenomenon apart from us, to be heard, made, shaped and organised. Thinking through the history of computer music, and considering the current configuration of digital communi-cations, sound is reconfigured as a type of network. This network is envisaged as non-hierarchical, in keeping with currents of thought that refuse to prioritise the human in the world. The relationship of sound to musi...

  20. Light and Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Karam, P Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Our world is largely defined by what we see and hear-but our uses for light and sound go far beyond simply seeing a photo or hearing a song. A concentrated beam of light, lasers are powerful tools used in industry, research, and medicine, as well as in everyday electronics like DVD and CD players. Ultrasound, sound emitted at a high frequency, helps create images of a developing baby, cleans teeth, and much more. Light and Sound teaches how light and sound work, how they are used in our day-to-day lives, and how they can be used to learn about the universe at large.

  1. Sounding rockets explore the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendillo, M.

    1990-01-01

    It is suggested that small, expendable, solid-fuel rockets used to explore ionospheric plasma can offer insight into all the processes and complexities common to space plasma. NASA's sounding rocket program for ionospheric research focuses on the flight of instruments to measure parameters governing the natural state of the ionosphere. Parameters include input functions, such as photons, particles, and composition of the neutral atmosphere; resultant structures, such as electron and ion densities, temperatures and drifts; and emerging signals such as photons and electric and magnetic fields. Systematic study of the aurora is also conducted by these rockets, allowing sampling at relatively high spatial and temporal rates as well as investigation of parameters, such as energetic particle fluxes, not accessible to ground based systems. Recent active experiments in the ionosphere are discussed, and future sounding rocket missions are cited

  2. Early Sound Symbolism for Vowel Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrinne Spector

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Children and adults consistently match some words (e.g., kiki to jagged shapes and other words (e.g., bouba to rounded shapes, providing evidence for non-arbitrary sound–shape mapping. In this study, we investigated the influence of vowels on sound–shape matching in toddlers, using four contrasting pairs of nonsense words differing in vowel sound (/i/ as in feet vs. /o/ as in boat and four rounded–jagged shape pairs. Crucially, we used reduplicated syllables (e.g., kiki vs. koko rather than confounding vowel sound with consonant context and syllable variability (e.g., kiki vs. bouba. Toddlers consistently matched words with /o/ to rounded shapes and words with /i/ to jagged shapes (p < 0.01. The results suggest that there may be naturally biased correspondences between vowel sound and shape.

  3. Containment vessel stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harstead, G.A.; Morris, N.F.; Unsal, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    The stability analysis for a steel containment shell is presented herein. The containment is a freestanding shell consisting of a vertical cylinder with a hemispherical dome. It is stiffened by large ring stiffeners and relatively small longitudinal stiffeners. The containment vessel is subjected to both static and dynamic loads which can cause buckling. These loads must be combined prior to their use in a stability analysis. The buckling loads were computed with the aid of the ASME Code case N-284 used in conjunction with general purpose computer codes and in-house programs. The equations contained in the Code case were used to compute the knockdown factors due to shell imperfections. After these knockdown factors were applied to the critical stress states determined by freezing the maximum dynamic stresses and combining them with other static stresses, a linear bifurcation analysis was carried out with the aid of the BOSOR4 program. Since the containment shell contained large penetrations, the Code case had to be supplemented by a local buckling analysis of the shell area surrounding the largest penetration. This analysis was carried out with the aid of the NASTRAN program. Although the factor of safety against buckling obtained in this analysis was satisfactory, it is claimed that the use of the Code case knockdown factors are unduly conservative when applied to the analysis of buckling around penetrations. (orig.)

  4. BY FRUSTUM CONFINING VESSEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Khazaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Helical piles are environmentally friendly and economical deep foundations that, due to environmental considerations, are excellent additions to a variety of deep foundation alternatives available to the practitioner. Helical piles performance depends on soil properties, the pile geometry and soil-pile interaction. Helical piles can be a proper alternative in sensitive environmental sites if their bearing capacity is sufficient to support applied loads. The failure capacity of helical piles in this study was measured via an experimental research program that was carried out by Frustum Confining Vessel (FCV. FCV is a frustum chamber by approximately linear increase in vertical and lateral stresses along depth from top to bottom. Due to special geometry and applied bottom pressure, this apparatus is a proper choice to test small model piles which can simulate field stress conditions. Small scale helical piles are made with either single helix or more helixes and installed in fine grained sand with three various densities. Axial loading tests including compression and tension tests were performed to achieve pile ultimate capacity. The results indicate the helical piles behavior depends essentially on pile geometric characteristics, i.e. helix configuration and soil properties. According to the achievements, axial uplift capacity of helical model piles is about equal to usual steel model piles that have the helixes diameter. Helical pile compression bearing capacity is too sufficient to act as a medium pile, thus it can be substituted other piles in special geoenvironmental conditions. The bearing capacity also depends on spacing ratio, S/D, and helixes diameter.

  5. 78 FR 25530 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BLUE DOLPHIN; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD-2013-0049] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BLUE DOLPHIN; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... DOLPHIN is: Intended Commercial Use Of Vessel: ``Skippered daysailing in Puget Sound and San Juan Islands...

  6. 46 CFR 167.20-17 - Bilge pumps, bilge piping and sounding arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bilge pumps, bilge piping and sounding arrangements. 167... Ships § 167.20-17 Bilge pumps, bilge piping and sounding arrangements. The number, capacity, and arrangement of bilge pumps and bilge piping shall be in accordance with the requirements for cargo vessels...

  7. Misconceptions About Sound Among Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejuan, Arcadi; Bohigas, Xavier; Jaén, Xavier; Periago, Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Our first objective was to detect misconceptions about the microscopic nature of sound among senior university students enrolled in different engineering programmes (from chemistry to telecommunications). We sought to determine how these misconceptions are expressed (qualitative aspect) and, only very secondarily, to gain a general idea of the extent to which they are held (quantitative aspect). Our second objective was to explore other misconceptions about wave aspects of sound. We have also considered the degree of consistency in the model of sound used by each student. Forty students answered a questionnaire including open-ended questions. Based on their free, spontaneous answers, the main results were as follows: a large majority of students answered most of the questions regarding the microscopic model of sound according to the scientifically accepted model; however, only a small number answered consistently. The main model misconception found was the notion that sound is propagated through the travelling of air particles, even in solids. Misconceptions and mental-model inconsistencies tended to depend on the engineering programme in which the student was enrolled. However, students in general were inconsistent also in applying their model of sound to individual sound properties. The main conclusion is that our students have not truly internalised the scientifically accepted model that they have allegedly learnt. This implies a need to design learning activities that take these findings into account in order to be truly efficient.

  8. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  9. Containment vessel drain system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Scott G.

    2018-01-30

    A system for draining a containment vessel may include a drain inlet located in a lower portion of the containment vessel. The containment vessel may be at least partially filled with a liquid, and the drain inlet may be located below a surface of the liquid. The system may further comprise an inlet located in an upper portion of the containment vessel. The inlet may be configured to insert pressurized gas into the containment vessel to form a pressurized region above the surface of the liquid, and the pressurized region may operate to apply a surface pressure that forces the liquid into the drain inlet. Additionally, a fluid separation device may be operatively connected to the drain inlet. The fluid separation device may be configured to separate the liquid from the pressurized gas that enters the drain inlet after the surface of the liquid falls below the drain inlet.

  10. InfoSound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Gopinath, B.; Haberman, Gary O.

    1990-01-01

    The authors explore ways to enhance users' comprehension of complex applications using music and sound effects to present application-program events that are difficult to detect visually. A prototype system, Infosound, allows developers to create and store musical sequences and sound effects with...

  11. Breaking the Sound Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tom; Boehringer, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Students in a fourth-grade class participated in a series of dynamic sound learning centers followed by a dramatic capstone event--an exploration of the amazing Trashcan Whoosh Waves. It's a notoriously difficult subject to teach, but this hands-on, exploratory approach ignited student interest in sound, promoted language acquisition, and built…

  12. Sound propagation in cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.; Polinder, H.; Lohman, W.; Zhou, H.; Borst, H.

    2009-01-01

    A new engineering model for sound propagation in cities is presented. The model is based on numerical and experimental studies of sound propagation between street canyons. Multiple reflections in the source canyon and the receiver canyon are taken into account in an efficient way, while weak

  13. OMNIDIRECTIONAL SOUND SOURCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    A sound source comprising a loudspeaker (6) and a hollow coupler (4) with an open inlet which communicates with and is closed by the loudspeaker (6) and an open outlet, said coupler (4) comprising rigid walls which cannot respond to the sound pressures produced by the loudspeaker (6). According...

  14. Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    大矢, 健一

    2013-01-01

    Hamiltonian Algorithm (HA) is an algorithm for searching solutions is optimization problems. This paper introduces a sound synthesis technique using Hamiltonian Algorithm and shows a simple example. "Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis" uses phase transition effect in HA. Because of this transition effect, totally new waveforms are produced.

  15. Poetry Pages. Sound Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fina, Allan de

    1992-01-01

    Explains how elementary teachers can help students understand onomatopoeia, suggesting that they define onomatopoeia, share examples of it, read poems and have students discuss onomatopoeic words, act out common household sounds, write about sound effects, and create choral readings of onomatopoeic poems. Two appropriate poems are included. (SM)

  16. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    Part one of a three-part series about noise pollution and its effects on humans. This section presents the background information for teachers who are preparing a unit on sound. The next issues will offer learning activities for measuring the effects of sound and some references. (SA)

  17. Waveform analysis of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Tohyama, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    What is this sound? What does that sound indicate? These are two questions frequently heard in daily conversation. Sound results from the vibrations of elastic media and in daily life provides informative signals of events happening in the surrounding environment. In interpreting auditory sensations, the human ear seems particularly good at extracting the signal signatures from sound waves. Although exploring auditory processing schemes may be beyond our capabilities, source signature analysis is a very attractive area in which signal-processing schemes can be developed using mathematical expressions. This book is inspired by such processing schemes and is oriented to signature analysis of waveforms. Most of the examples in the book are taken from data of sound and vibrations; however, the methods and theories are mostly formulated using mathematical expressions rather than by acoustical interpretation. This book might therefore be attractive and informative for scientists, engineers, researchers, and graduat...

  18. Sound classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    National schemes for sound classification of dwellings exist in more than ten countries in Europe, typically published as national standards. The schemes define quality classes reflecting different levels of acoustical comfort. Main criteria concern airborne and impact sound insulation between...... dwellings, facade sound insulation and installation noise. The schemes have been developed, implemented and revised gradually since the early 1990s. However, due to lack of coordination between countries, there are significant discrepancies, and new standards and revisions continue to increase the diversity...... is needed, and a European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs 2009-2013, one of the main objectives being to prepare a proposal for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality...

  19. Final processing vessel for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejima, Takaya; Hiraki, Akimitsu.

    1989-01-01

    An inorganic inner layer comprising dense inorganic material such as organic polymer-impregnated concretes is formed to about 10 - 50 mm in average thickness at the inside of a metal vessel. Further, the surface of the vessel is formed as a flat surface with no or only small reinforcing protrusions. Thus, if the final processing vessel should be dropped during transportation or handling by mistake, since impact shocks do not concentrate to protrusions as usual, no local stress concentration occurs to the inorganic inner liner layer. Accordingly, the risk of rapture can be reduced greatly. Further, since impact shock resistance layer put between the metal vessel and the inorganic inner liner layer absorbs shocks, a further sufficient strength can be obtained against dropping accident. (T.M.)

  20. The sound manifesto

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Michael J.; Bisnovatyi, Ilia

    2000-11-01

    Computing practice today depends on visual output to drive almost all user interaction. Other senses, such as audition, may be totally neglected, or used tangentially, or used in highly restricted specialized ways. We have excellent audio rendering through D-A conversion, but we lack rich general facilities for modeling and manipulating sound comparable in quality and flexibility to graphics. We need coordinated research in several disciplines to improve the use of sound as an interactive information channel. Incremental and separate improvements in synthesis, analysis, speech processing, audiology, acoustics, music, etc. will not alone produce the radical progress that we seek in sonic practice. We also need to create a new central topic of study in digital audio research. The new topic will assimilate the contributions of different disciplines on a common foundation. The key central concept that we lack is sound as a general-purpose information channel. We must investigate the structure of this information channel, which is driven by the cooperative development of auditory perception and physical sound production. Particular audible encodings, such as speech and music, illuminate sonic information by example, but they are no more sufficient for a characterization than typography is sufficient for characterization of visual information. To develop this new conceptual topic of sonic information structure, we need to integrate insights from a number of different disciplines that deal with sound. In particular, we need to coordinate central and foundational studies of the representational models of sound with specific applications that illuminate the good and bad qualities of these models. Each natural or artificial process that generates informative sound, and each perceptual mechanism that derives information from sound, will teach us something about the right structure to attribute to the sound itself. The new Sound topic will combine the work of computer

  1. NCSX Vacuum Vessel Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola ME; Brown T; Heitzenroeder P; Malinowski F; Reiersen W; Sutton L; Goranson P; Nelson B; Cole M; Manuel M; McCorkle D.

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this experiment is to develop a device which has the steady state properties of a traditional stellarator along with the high performance characteristics of a tokamak. A key element of this device is its highly shaped Inconel 625 vacuum vessel. This paper describes the manufacturing of the vessel. The vessel is being fabricated by Major Tool and Machine, Inc. (MTM) in three identical 120 o vessel segments, corresponding to the three NCSX field periods, in order to accommodate assembly of the device. The port extensions are welded on, leak checked, cut off within 1-inch of the vessel surface at MTM and then reattached at PPPL, to accommodate assembly of the close-fitting modular coils that surround the vessel. The 120 o vessel segments are formed by welding two 60 o segments together. Each 60 o segment is fabricated by welding ten press-formed panels together over a collapsible welding fixture which is needed to precisely position the panels. The vessel is joined at assembly by welding via custom machined 8-inch (20.3 cm) wide spacer ''spool pieces''. The vessel must have a total leak rate less than 5 X 10 -6 t-l/s, magnetic permeability less than 1.02(micro), and its contours must be within 0.188-inch (4.76 mm). It is scheduled for completion in January 2006

  2. A relationship between the integrated assessment of magnetic resonance imaging markers for cerebral small vessel disease and the clinical and functional status in the acute period of ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kulesh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD is the most common neurological pathological process and contributes to the process of aging and to the development of dementia and stroke. At the same time, the role of CSVD as a factor influencing the course of acute ischemic stroke (IS has been little studied. There is no generally accepted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scale for the integrated assessment of CSVD markers.Objective: to carry out an integrated assessment of the MRI manifestations of CSVD in acute ischemic stroke and to analyze a correlation of both individual markers and the final indicator with the clinical and functional status of patients.Patients and methods. 100 patients with acute IS were examined. All patients underwent standard clinical, laboratory and instrumental examinations, as well as brain MRI estimating the number of lacunae, visible perivascular spaces (PVSs and leukoaraiosis. The number of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs was additionally calculated in 57 patients. Integral scale scores were calculated by gradation and summation of four MRI markers of CSVD.Results. The patients with acute IS showed the high representativeness of individual markers for CSVD. The values of MRI markers for CSVD correlated with age, education level, and cardiovascular parameters in patients. An integrated CSVD severity assessment scale was developed. The overall manifestations of CSVD, which were assessed using this scale, were associated with the severity of a stenotic process in the brachycephalic arteries, with BP levels at admission, ejection fraction, hyperglycemia, and atherogenic index of blood lipids. The high CSVD score was also correlated with low mobility and more severe disability in patients being discharged from hospital. The high severity of CSVD was associated with lower neurological deficit regression during inpatient treatment. Subgroup analysis showed the greatest negative impact of CSVD on the severity of stroke in female patients

  3. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction comprising: (a) a nuclear reactor core having a bottom platform support structure; (b) a reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core; (c) a containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and having a sidewall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and having a base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall; (d) a central small diameter post anchored to the containment structure base mat and extending upwardly to the reactor vessel to axially fix the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and provide a center column support for the lower end of the reactor core; (e) annular support structure disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall and extending about the lower end of the core; (f) structural support means disposed between the containment structure base mat and bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and cooperating for supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event; (g) a bed of insulating material disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall; freely expand radially from the central post as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof; (h) a deck supported upon the wall of the containment vessel above the top open end of the reactor vessel; and (i) extendible and retractable coupling means extending between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnecting the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck

  4. Radioactive waste processing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Suzuki, Osamu; Ishizaki, Kanjiro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a vessel of a reduced weight and with no external leaching of radioactive materials. Constitution: The vessel main body is constituted, for example, with light weight concretes or foamed concretes, particularly, foamed concretes containing fine closed bubbles in the inside. Then, layers having dense texture made of synthetic resin such as polystylene, vinylchloride resin, etc. or metal plate such as stainless plate are integrally disposed to the inner surface of the vessel main body. The cover member also has the same structure. (Sekiya, K.)

  5. Tempest in a vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    As the ASN made some statements about anomalies of carbon content in the EPR vessel bottom and top, the author recalls and comments some technical issues to better understand the information published on this topic. He notably addresses the role of the vessel, briefly indicates its operating conditions, shape and structure, and mechanical components for the top, its material and mechanical properties, and test samples used to assess mechanical properties. He also comments the phenomenon of radio-induced embrittlement, the vessel manufacturing process, and evokes the applicable regulations. He quotes and comments statements made by the ASN and Areva which evoke further assessments of the concerned components

  6. Digitizing a sound archive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cone, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Danish and international artists. His methodology left us with a large collection of unique and inspirational time-based media sound artworks that have, until very recently, been inaccessible. Existing on an array of different media formats, such as open reel tapes, 8-track and 4 track cassettes, VHS......In 1990 an artist by the name of William Louis Sørensen was hired by the National Gallery of Denmark to collect important works of art – made from sound. His job was to acquire sound art, but also recordings that captured rare artistic occurrences, music, performances and happenings from both...

  7. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  8. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Performance Marine Vessels is an ideal book for student...

  9. 2011 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  10. 2011 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  11. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air

  12. 2013 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  13. Maury Journals - US Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  14. Coastal Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by vessels that have been issued a Federal permit for the Gulf of Mexico reef fish,...

  15. In-vessel tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yoshio; Ohya, Kaoru; Ashikawa, Naoko; Ito, Atsushi M.; Kato, Daiji; Kawamura, Gakushi; Takayama, Arimichi; Tomita, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Ono, Tadayoshi; Kawashima, Hisato; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Takizuka, Tomonori; Nakano, Tomohide; Nakamura, Makoto; Hoshino, Kazuo; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi; Saito, Seiki; Takagi, Ikuji; Tanaka, Yasunori; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Toma, Mitsunori; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Homma, Yuki; Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The in-vessel tritium research is closely related to the plasma-materials interaction. It deals with the edge-plasma-wall interaction, the wall erosion, transport and re-deposition of neutral particles and the effect of neutral particles on the fuel recycling. Since the in-vessel tritium shows a complex nonlinear behavior, there remain many unsolved problems. So far, behaviors of in-vessel tritium have been investigated by two groups A01 and A02. The A01 group performed experiments on accumulation and recovery of tritium in thermonuclear fusion reactors and the A02 group studied theory and simulation on the in-vessel tritium behavior. In the present article, outcomes of the research are reviewed. (author)

  16. Reactor pressure vessel support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butti, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A link and pin support system provides the primary vertical and lateral support for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel without restricting thermally induced radial and vertical expansion and contraction. (Auth.)

  17. 2013 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  18. 2013 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  19. 2013 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  20. Ocean Station Vessel

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean Station Vessels (OSV) or Weather Ships captured atmospheric conditions while being stationed continuously in a single location. While While most of the...

  1. Vessel Sewage Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessel sewage discharges are regulated under Section 312 of the Clean Water Act, which is jointly implemented by the EPA and Coast Guard. This homepage links to information on marine sanitation devices and no discharge zones.

  2. Reactor pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehl, J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 2, the general principles of reactor pressure vessel design are elaborated. Crack and fracture initiation and propagation are treated in some detail

  3. Holographic and acoustic emission evaluation of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical holographic interfereometry and acoustic emission monitoring were simultaneously used to evaluate two small, high pressure vessels during pressurization. The techniques provide pressure vessel designers with both quantitative information such as displacement/strain measurements and qualitative information such as flaw detection. The data from the holographic interferograms were analyzed for strain profiles. The acoustic emission signals were monitored for crack growth and vessel quality

  4. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  5. 77 FR 35743 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SECOND CHANCE; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2012 0067] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SECOND CHANCE; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... SECOND CHANCE is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Small group charters.'' Geographic Region...

  6. Sounds of Web Advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Iben Bredahl; Graakjær, Nicolai Jørgensgaard

    2010-01-01

    Sound seems to be a neglected issue in the study of web ads. Web advertising is predominantly regarded as visual phenomena–commercial messages, as for instance banner ads that we watch, read, and eventually click on–but only rarely as something that we listen to. The present chapter presents...... an overview of the auditory dimensions in web advertising: Which kinds of sounds do we hear in web ads? What are the conditions and functions of sound in web ads? Moreover, the chapter proposes a theoretical framework in order to analyse the communicative functions of sound in web advertising. The main...... argument is that an understanding of the auditory dimensions in web advertising must include a reflection on the hypertextual settings of the web ad as well as a perspective on how users engage with web content....

  7. Sound Art Situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh Groth, Sanne; Samson, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    and combine theories from several fields. Aspects of sound art studies, performance studies and contemporary art studies are presented in order to theoretically explore the very diverse dimensions of the two sound art pieces: Visual, auditory, performative, social, spatial and durational dimensions become......This article is an analysis of two sound art performances that took place June 2015 in outdoor public spaces in the social housing area Urbanplanen in Copenhagen, Denmark. The two performances were On the production of a poor acoustics by Brandon LaBelle and Green Interactive Biofeedback...... Environments (GIBE) by Jeremy Woodruff. In order to investigate the complex situation that arises when sound art is staged in such contexts, the authors of this article suggest exploring the events through approaching them as ‘situations’ (Doherty 2009). With this approach it becomes possible to engage...

  8. Sound as Popular Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant’s gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems...... in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material......, physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider...

  9. It sounds good!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Both the atmosphere and we ourselves are hit by hundreds of particles every second and yet nobody has ever heard a sound coming from these processes. Like cosmic rays, particles interacting inside the detectors at the LHC do not make any noise…unless you've decided to use the ‘sonification’ technique, in which case you might even hear the Higgs boson sound like music. Screenshot of the first page of the "LHC sound" site. A group of particle physicists, composers, software developers and artists recently got involved in the ‘LHC sound’ project to make the particles at the LHC produce music. Yes…music! The ‘sonification’ technique converts data into sound. “In this way, if you implement the right software you can get really nice music out of the particle tracks”, says Lily Asquith, a member of the ATLAS collaboration and one of the initiators of the project. The ‘LHC...

  10. Sound Visualization and Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Winston E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes liquid surface holograms including their application to medicine. Discusses interference and diffraction phenomena using sound wave scanning techniques. Compares focussing by zone plate to holographic image development. (GH)

  11. An holistic approach to the problem of reactor ageing. [Pressure vessel embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phythian, W.; McElroy, R.; Druce, S.; Kovan, D. (AEA Reactor Services, Harwell (United Kingdom))

    1992-12-01

    Understanding the process of ageing in reactors is essential to extending their lives beyond original design. To present a sound case -particularly regarding the level of embrittlement in reactor vessels due to radiation damage - an integrated approach using advanced assessment tools is needed. The techniques developed for the purpose involve, on the microscopic level, advanced neutron dosimetry and high resolution measurement techniques (eg advanced electron beam techniques and small angle neutron scattering) with which an analysis can be done of the radiation damage and the microstructural state of the steel test procedures (tensile, fracture toughness and Charpy impact) on standard and sub-sized specimens, the extent of radiation degradation can be characterised. finally, it is possible to predict how the degradation will evolve using physically-based models of embrittlement. (Author).

  12. FFTF and CRBRP reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor vessel and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) reactor vessel each serve to enclose a fast spectrum reactor core, contain the sodium coolant, and provide support and positioning for the closure head and internal structure. Each vessel is located in its reactor cavity and is protected by a guard vessel which would ensure continued decay heat removal capability should a major system leak develop. Although the two plants have significantly different thermal power ratings, 400 megawatts for FFTF and 975 megawatts for CRBRP, the two reactor vessels are comparable in size, the CRBRP vessel being approximately 28% longer than the FFTF vessel. The FFTF vessel diameter was controlled by the space required for the three individual In-Vessel Handling Machines and Instrument Trees. Utilization of the triple rotating plug scheme for CRBRP refueling enables packaging of the larger CRBRP core in a vessel the same diameter as the FFTF vessel

  13. Depressurization as a means of leak checking large vacuum vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callis, R.W.; Langhorn, A.; Petersen, P.I.; Ward, C.; Wesley, J.

    1985-01-01

    A common problem associated with large vacuum vessels used in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is that leak checking is hampered by the inaccessibility to most of the vacuum vessel surface. This inaccessibility is caused by the close proximity of magnetic coils, diagnostics and, for those vessels that are baked, the need to completely surround the vessel with a thermal insulation blanket. These obstructions reduce the effectiveness of the standard leak checking method of using a mass spectrometer and spraying a search gas such as helium on the vessel exterior. Even when the presence of helium is detected, its entry point into the vessel cannot always be pinpointed. This paper will describe a method of overcoming this problem. By slightly depressurizing the vessel, an influx of helium through the leak is created. The leak site can then be identified by personnel within the vessel using standard sniffing procedures. There are two conditions which make this method of leak checking practical. First, the vessel need only be depressurized 2 psi, thus allowing personnel inside to perform the sniffing operation. Second, the sniffing probe used (Leybold--Heraus ''Quick Test'') could detect a change in helium concentration as small as 100 ppb, which allows for faster scanning of the vessel inferior. Use of this technique to find an elusive 10 -3 Torrxl/s leak in the Doublet III tokamak vacuum vessel will be presented

  14. Crack propagation on spherical pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebey, J.; Roche, R.

    1975-01-01

    The risk presented by a crack on a pressure vessel built with a ductile steel cannot be well evaluated by simple application of the rules of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, which only apply to brittle materials. Tests were carried out on spherical vessels of three different scales built with the same steel. Cracks of different length were machined through the vessel wall. From the results obtained, crack initiation stress (beginning of stable propagation) and instable propagation stress may be plotted against the lengths of these cracks. For small and medium size, subject to ductile fracture, the resulting curves are identical, and may be used for ductile fracture prediction. Brittle rupture was observed on larger vessels and crack propagation occurred at lower stress level. Preceedings curves are not usable for fracture analysis. Ultimate pressure can be computed with a good accuracy by using equivalent energy toughness, Ksub(1cd), characteristic of the metal plates. Satisfactory measurements have been obtained on thin samples. The risks of brittle fracture may then judged by comparing Ksub(1cd) with the calculated K 1 value, in which corrections for vessel shape are taken into account. It is thus possible to establish the bursting pressure of cracked spherical vessels, with the help of two rules, one for brittle fracture, the other for ductile instability. A practical method is proposed on the basis of the work reported here

  15. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    Sound is a part of architecture, and sound is complex. Upon this, sound is invisible. How is it then possible to design visual objects that interact with the sound? This paper addresses the problem of how to get access to the complexity of sound and how to make textile material revealing the form...... goemetry by analysing the sound pattern at a specific spot. This analysis is done theoretically with algorithmic systems and practical with waves in water. The paper describes the experiments and the findings, and explains how an analysis of sound can be catched in a textile form....

  16. Acrylic vessel cleaning tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, D.; Hahn, R.L.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The acrylic vessel as constructed is dirty. The dirt includes blue tape, Al tape, grease pencil, gemak, the glue or residue form these tapes, finger prints and dust of an unknown composition but probably mostly acrylic dust. This dirt has to be removed and once removed, the vessel has to be kept clean or at least to be easily cleanable at some future stage when access becomes much more difficult. The authors report on the results of a series of tests designed: (a) to prepare typical dirty samples of acrylic; (b) to remove dirt stuck to the acrylic surface; and (c) to measure the optical quality and Th concentration after cleaning. Specifications of the vessel call for very low levels of Th which could come from tape residues, the grease pencil, or other sources of dirt. This report does not address the concerns of how to keep the vessel clean after an initial cleaning and during the removal of the scaffolding. Alconox is recommended as the cleaner of choice. This acrylic vessel will be used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

  17. Remembering that big things sound big: Sound symbolism and associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preziosi, Melissa A; Coane, Jennifer H

    2017-01-01

    According to sound symbolism theory, individual sounds or clusters of sounds can convey meaning. To examine the role of sound symbolic effects on processing and memory for nonwords, we developed a novel set of 100 nonwords to convey largeness (nonwords containing plosive consonants and back vowels) and smallness (nonwords containing fricative consonants and front vowels). In Experiments 1A and 1B, participants rated the size of the 100 nonwords and provided definitions to them as if they were products. Nonwords composed of fricative/front vowels were rated as smaller than those composed of plosive/back vowels. In Experiment 2, participants studied sound symbolic congruent and incongruent nonword and participant-generated definition pairings. Definitions paired with nonwords that matched the size and participant-generated meanings were recalled better than those that did not match. When the participant-generated definitions were re-paired with other nonwords, this mnemonic advantage was reduced, although still reliable. In a final free association study, the possibility that plosive/back vowel and fricative/front vowel nonwords elicit sound symbolic size effects due to mediation from word neighbors was ruled out. Together, these results suggest that definitions that are sound symbolically congruent with a nonword are more memorable than incongruent definition-nonword pairings. This work has implications for the creation of brand names and how to create brand names that not only convey desired product characteristics, but also are memorable for consumers.

  18. Radioactive liquid containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Hironobu.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling jackets are coiled around the outer circumference of a container vessel, and the outer circumference thereof is covered with a surrounding plate. A liquid of good conductivity (for example, water) is filled between the cooling jackets and the surrounding plate. A radioactive liquid is supplied to the container vessel passing through a supply pipe and discharged passing through a discharge pipe. Cooling water at high pressure is passed through the cooling water jackets in order to remove the heat generated from the radioactive liquid. Since cooling water at high pressure is thus passed through the coiled pipes, the wall thickness of the container vessel and the cooling water jackets can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost. Further, even if the radioactive liquid is leaked, there is no worry of contaminating cooling water, to prevent contamination. (I.N.)

  19. Second sound scattering in superfluid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosgen, T.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing cavities are used to study the scattering of second sound in liquid helium II. The special geometries reduce wall interference effects and allow measurements in very small test volumes. In a first experiment, a double elliptical cavity is used to focus a second sound wave onto a small wire target. A thin film bolometer measures the side scattered wave component. The agreement with a theoretical estimate is reasonable, although some problems arise from the small measurement volume and associated alignment requirements. A second cavity is based on confocal parabolas, thus enabling the use of large planar sensors. A cylindrical heater produces again a focused second sound wave. Three sensors monitor the transmitted wave component as well as the side scatter in two different directions. The side looking sensors have very high sensitivities due to their large size and resistance. Specially developed cryogenic amplifers are used to match them to the signal cables. In one case, a second auxiliary heater is used to set up a strong counterflow in the focal region. The second sound wave then scatters from the induced fluid disturbances

  20. Integral reactor vessel related to power reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widart, J.; Scailteur, A.

    1978-01-01

    Integral design applied to PWR pressure vessels allows to reach a high level of safety because: 1) it presents a better balance of the material in the geometry, resulting in an improved stress level (mainly faulted condition loadings); 2) location and geometry of the welds are designed in order to get a very sound pressure boundary of the upper part of the vessel; 3) the new location and geometry of the welds allow an easy ISI in such a way that ambiguity surrounding defect size or locaton is practically suppressed. (author)

  1. Sound & The Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2014-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now socially constructed and evaluated, how are they architecturally conceptualized and how dependant on urban planning, industrial developments and political decisions are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with social interactions and their ...... and their professional design? And how is listening and sounding a deeply social activity – constructing our way of living together in cities as well as in apartment houses? A radio feature with Nina Backmann, Jochen Bonz, Stefan Krebs, Esther Schelander & Holger Schulze......How are those sounds you hear right now socially constructed and evaluated, how are they architecturally conceptualized and how dependant on urban planning, industrial developments and political decisions are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with social interactions...

  2. Urban Sound Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live. In this pa......This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live....... In this paper, three sound works are discussed in relation to the iPod, which is considered as a more private way to explore urban environments, and as a way to control the individual perception of urban spaces....

  3. Predicting outdoor sound

    CERN Document Server

    Attenborough, Keith; Horoshenkov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    1. Introduction  2. The Propagation of Sound Near Ground Surfaces in a Homogeneous Medium  3. Predicting the Acoustical Properties of Outdoor Ground Surfaces  4. Measurements of the Acoustical Properties of Ground Surfaces and Comparisons with Models  5. Predicting Effects of Source Characteristics on Outdoor Sound  6. Predictions, Approximations and Empirical Results for Ground Effect Excluding Meteorological Effects  7. Influence of Source Motion on Ground Effect and Diffraction  8. Predicting Effects of Mixed Impedance Ground  9. Predicting the Performance of Outdoor Noise Barriers  10. Predicting Effects of Vegetation, Trees and Turbulence  11. Analytical Approximations including Ground Effect, Refraction and Turbulence  12. Prediction Schemes  13. Predicting Sound in an Urban Environment.

  4. Sound & The Senses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2012-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now technically generated and post-produced, how are they aesthetically conceptualized and how culturally dependant are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with all the other senses and their cultural, biographical and technological constructio...... over time? And how is listening and sounding a deeply social activity – constructing our way of living together in cities as well as in apartment houses? A radio feature with Jonathan Sterne, AGF a.k.a Antye Greie, Jens Gerrit Papenburg & Holger Schulze....

  5. Handbook for sound engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Ballou, Glen

    2013-01-01

    Handbook for Sound Engineers is the most comprehensive reference available for audio engineers. All audio topics are explored: if you work on anything related to audio you should not be without this book! The 4th edition of this trusted reference has been updated to reflect changes in the industry since the publication of the 3rd edition in 2002 -- including new technologies like software-based recording systems such as Pro Tools and Sound Forge; digital recording using MP3, wave files and others; mobile audio devices such as iPods and MP3 players. Over 40 topic

  6. Sound for digital video

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, Tomlinson

    2013-01-01

    Achieve professional quality sound on a limited budget! Harness all new, Hollywood style audio techniques to bring your independent film and video productions to the next level.In Sound for Digital Video, Second Edition industry experts Tomlinson Holman and Arthur Baum give you the tools and knowledge to apply recent advances in audio capture, video recording, editing workflow, and mixing to your own film or video with stunning results. This fresh edition is chockfull of techniques, tricks, and workflow secrets that you can apply to your own projects from preproduction

  7. Beacons of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knakkergaard, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The chapter discusses expectations and imaginations vis-à-vis the concert hall of the twenty-first century. It outlines some of the central historical implications of western culture’s haven for sounding music. Based on the author’s study of the Icelandic concert-house Harpa, the chapter considers...... how these implications, together with the prime mover’s visions, have been transformed as private investors and politicians took over. The chapter furthermore investigates the objectives regarding musical sound and the far-reaching demands concerning acoustics that modern concert halls are required...

  8. Neuroplasticity beyond sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reybrouck, Mark; Brattico, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Capitalizing from neuroscience knowledge on how individuals are affected by the sound environment, we propose to adopt a cybernetic and ecological point of view on the musical aesthetic experience, which includes subprocesses, such as feature extraction and integration, early affective reactions...... and motor actions, style mastering and conceptualization, emotion and proprioception, evaluation and preference. In this perspective, the role of the listener/composer/performer is seen as that of an active "agent" coping in highly individual ways with the sounds. The findings concerning the neural...

  9. Eliciting Sound Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Sensory experiences are often considered triggers of memory, most famously a little French cake dipped in lime blossom tea. Sense memory can also be evoked in public history research through techniques of elicitation. In this article I reflect on different social science methods for eliciting sound memories such as the use of sonic prompts, emplaced interviewing, and sound walks. I include examples from my research on medical listening. The article considers the relevance of this work for the conduct of oral histories, arguing that such methods "break the frame," allowing room for collaborative research connections and insights into the otherwise unarticulatable.

  10. SoleSound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanotto, Damiano; Turchet, Luca; Boggs, Emily Marie

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the design of SoleSound, a wearable system designed to deliver ecological, audio-tactile, underfoot feedback. The device, which primarily targets clinical applications, uses an audio-tactile footstep synthesis engine informed by the readings of pressure and inertial sensors...... embedded in the footwear to integrate enhanced feedback modalities into the authors' previously developed instrumented footwear. The synthesis models currently implemented in the SoleSound simulate different ground surface interactions. Unlike similar devices, the system presented here is fully portable...

  11. Historical Patterns and Drivers of Spatial Changes in Recreational Fishing Activity in Puget Sound, Washington.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne H Beaudreau

    Full Text Available Small-scale fisheries are the primary users of many coastal fish stocks; yet, spatial and temporal patterns of recreational and subsistence fishing in coastal marine ecosystems are poorly documented. Knowledge about the spatial distribution of fishing activities can inform place-based management that balances species conservation with opportunities for recreation and subsistence. We used a participatory mapping approach to document changes in spatial fishing patterns of 80 boat-based recreational anglers from 1950 to 2010 in Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Hand-drawn fishing areas for salmon, rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs were digitized and analyzed in a Geographic Information System. We found that recreational fishing has spanned the majority of Puget Sound since the 1950s, with the heaviest use limited to small areas of central and northern Puget Sound. People are still fishing in the same places they were decades ago, with relatively little change in specific locations despite widespread declines in salmon and bottomfish populations during the second half of the 20th century. While the location of core fishing areas remained consistent, the size of those areas and intensity of use changed over time. The size of fishing areas increased through the 2000s for salmon but declined after the 1970s and 1980s for rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs. Our results suggest that the spatial extent of recreational bottomfishing increased after the 1960s, when the availability of motorized vessels and advanced fish-finding technologies allowed anglers to expand their scope beyond localized angling from piers and boathouses. Respondents offered a wide range of reasons for shifts in fishing areas over time, reflecting substantial individual variation in motivations and behaviors. Changes in fishing areas were most commonly attributed to changes in residence and declines in target species and least tied to fishery regulations, despite the implementation of at

  12. Historical Patterns and Drivers of Spatial Changes in Recreational Fishing Activity in Puget Sound, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreau, Anne H.; Whitney, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale fisheries are the primary users of many coastal fish stocks; yet, spatial and temporal patterns of recreational and subsistence fishing in coastal marine ecosystems are poorly documented. Knowledge about the spatial distribution of fishing activities can inform place-based management that balances species conservation with opportunities for recreation and subsistence. We used a participatory mapping approach to document changes in spatial fishing patterns of 80 boat-based recreational anglers from 1950 to 2010 in Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Hand-drawn fishing areas for salmon, rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs were digitized and analyzed in a Geographic Information System. We found that recreational fishing has spanned the majority of Puget Sound since the 1950s, with the heaviest use limited to small areas of central and northern Puget Sound. People are still fishing in the same places they were decades ago, with relatively little change in specific locations despite widespread declines in salmon and bottomfish populations during the second half of the 20th century. While the location of core fishing areas remained consistent, the size of those areas and intensity of use changed over time. The size of fishing areas increased through the 2000s for salmon but declined after the 1970s and 1980s for rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs. Our results suggest that the spatial extent of recreational bottomfishing increased after the 1960s, when the availability of motorized vessels and advanced fish-finding technologies allowed anglers to expand their scope beyond localized angling from piers and boathouses. Respondents offered a wide range of reasons for shifts in fishing areas over time, reflecting substantial individual variation in motivations and behaviors. Changes in fishing areas were most commonly attributed to changes in residence and declines in target species and least tied to fishery regulations, despite the implementation of at least 25 marine

  13. Pressure vessel integrity 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, S.; Doney, R.O.; McDonald, M.S.; Jones, D.P.; Wilson, W.K.; Pennell, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains papers relating to the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping, with special emphasis on nuclear industry applications. The papers were prepared for technical sessions developed under the sponsorship of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Committees for Codes and Standards, Computer Technology, Design and Analysis, and Materials Fabrication. They were presented at the 1991 Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference in San Diego, California, June 23-27. The primary objective of the sponsoring organization is to provide a forum for the dissemination and discussion of information on development and application of technology for the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping. This publication includes contributions from authors from Australia, France, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The papers here are organized in six sections, each with a particular emphasis as indicated in the following section titles: Fracture Technology Status and Application Experience; Crack Initiation, Propagation and Arrest; Ductile Tearing; Constraint, Stress State, and Local-Brittle-Zones Effects; Computational Techniques for Fracture and Corrosion Fatigue; and Codes and Standards for Fatigue, Fracture and Erosion/Corrosion

  14. The reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, W.; Hajewska, E.; Szteke, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wasiak, J.; Wieczorkowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the paper the fundamental steels using in the construction of pressure vessel water reactor are discussed. The properties of these steels as well as the influence of neutron irradiation on its degradation in the time of exploitation are also done. (authors)

  15. Vacuum distilling vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reik, H

    1928-12-27

    Vacuum distilling vessel for mineral oil and the like, characterized by the ring-form or polyconal stiffeners arranged inside, suitably eccentric to the casing, being held at a distance from the casing by connecting members of such a height that in the resulting space if necessary can be arranged vapor-distributing pipes and a complete removal of the residue is possible.

  16. Visualization of vessel traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, C.M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Moving objects are captured in multivariate trajectories, often large data with multiple attributes. We focus on vessel traffic as a source of such data. Patterns appearing from visually analyzing attributes are used to explain why certain movements have occurred. In this research, we have developed

  17. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  18. Reactor vessel stud tensioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malandra, L.J.; Beer, R.W.; Salton, R.B.; Spiegelman, S.R.; Cognevich, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A quick-acting stud tensioner, for facilitating the loosening or tightening of a stud nut on a reactor vessel stud, has gripper jaws which when the tensioner is lowered into engagement with the upper end of the stud are moved inwards to grip the upper end and which when the tensioner is lifted move outward to release the upper end. (author)

  19. PDX vacuum vessel stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.

    1975-01-01

    A stress analysis of PDX vacuum vessel is described and the summary of results is presented. The vacuum vessel is treated as a toroidal shell of revolution subjected to an internal vacuum. The critical buckling pressure is calculated. The effects of the geometrical discontinuity at the juncture of toroidal shell head and cylindrical outside wall, and the concavity of the cylindrical wall are examined. An effect of the poloidal field coil supports and the vessel outside supports on the stress distribution in the vacuum vessel is determined. A method evaluating the influence of circular ports in the vessel wall on the stress level in the vessel is outlined

  20. Sound Symbolism in Basic Vocabulary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Wichmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between meanings of words and their sound shapes is to a large extent arbitrary, but it is well known that languages exhibit sound symbolism effects violating arbitrariness. Evidence for sound symbolism is typically anecdotal, however. Here we present a systematic approach. Using a selection of basic vocabulary in nearly one half of the world’s languages we find commonalities among sound shapes for words referring to same concepts. These are interpreted as due to sound symbolism. Studying the effects of sound symbolism cross-linguistically is of key importance for the understanding of language evolution.

  1. ABOUT SOUNDS IN VIDEO GAMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denikin Anton A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the aesthetical and practical possibilities for sounds (sound design in video games and interactive applications. Outlines the key features of the game sound, such as simulation, representativeness, interactivity, immersion, randomization, and audio-visuality. The author defines the basic terminology in study of game audio, as well as identifies significant aesthetic differences between film sounds and sounds in video game projects. It is an attempt to determine the techniques of art analysis for the approaches in study of video games including aesthetics of their sounds. The article offers a range of research methods, considering the video game scoring as a contemporary creative practice.

  2. Exploring Sound with Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Meyer, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Differences in insect morphology and movement during singing provide a fascinating opportunity for students to investigate insects while learning about the characteristics of sound. In the activities described here, students use a free online computer software program to explore the songs of the major singing insects and experiment with making…

  3. Second sound tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jihee; Ihas, Gary G.; Ekdahl, Dan

    2017-10-01

    It is common that a physical system resonates at a particular frequency, whose frequency depends on physical parameters which may change in time. Often, one would like to automatically track this signal as the frequency changes, measuring, for example, its amplitude. In scientific research, one would also like to utilize the standard methods, such as lock-in amplifiers, to improve the signal to noise ratio. We present a complete He ii second sound system that uses positive feedback to generate a sinusoidal signal of constant amplitude via automatic gain control. This signal is used to produce temperature/entropy waves (second sound) in superfluid helium-4 (He ii). A lock-in amplifier limits the oscillation to a desirable frequency and demodulates the received sound signal. Using this tracking system, a second sound signal probed turbulent decay in He ii. We present results showing that the tracking system is more reliable than those of a conventional fixed frequency method; there is less correlation with temperature (frequency) fluctuation when the tracking system is used.

  4. See This Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Bjørnsten

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af udstillingen See This Sound på Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz, Østrig, som markerer den foreløbige kulmination på et samarbejde mellem Lentos Kunstmuseum og Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Media.Art.Research. Udover den konkrete udstilling er samarbejdet tænkt som en ambitiøs, tværfaglig...

  5. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, Richard E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tencer, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sweatt, William C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hogan, Roy E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boslough, Mark B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spurny, Pavel [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (ASCR), Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-03-01

    High-speed photometric observations of meteor fireballs have shown that they often produce high-amplitude light oscillations with frequency components in the kHz range, and in some cases exhibit strong millisecond flares. We built a light source with similar characteristics and illuminated various materials in the laboratory, generating audible sounds. Models suggest that light oscillations and pulses can radiatively heat dielectric materials, which in turn conductively heats the surrounding air on millisecond timescales. The sound waves can be heard if the illuminated material is sufficiently close to the observer’s ears. The mechanism described herein may explain many reports of meteors that appear to be audible while they are concurrently visible in the sky and too far away for sound to have propagated to the observer. This photoacoustic (PA) explanation provides an alternative to electrophonic (EP) sounds hypothesized to arise from electromagnetic coupling of plasma oscillation in the meteor wake to natural antennas in the vicinity of an observer.

  6. Sound of Stockholm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2013-01-01

    Med sine kun 4 år bag sig er Sound of Stockholm relativt ny i det internationale festival-landskab. Festivalen er efter sigende udsprunget af en større eller mindre frustration over, at den svenske eksperimentelle musikscenes forskellige foreninger og organisationer gik hinanden bedene, og...

  7. Making Sense of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepika; Lankford, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    From the earliest days of their lives, children are exposed to all kinds of sound, from soft, comforting voices to the frightening rumble of thunder. Consequently, children develop their own naïve explanations largely based upon their experiences with phenomena encountered every day. When new information does not support existing conceptions,…

  8. The Sounds of Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    Two, I propose that this framework allows for at least a theoretical distinction between the way in which extreme metal – e.g. black metal, doom metal, funeral doom metal, death metal – relates to its sound as music and the way in which much other music may be conceived of as being constituted...

  9. The Universe of Sound

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Sound Scultor, Bill Fontana, the second winner of the Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN residency award, and his science inspiration partner, CERN cosmologist Subodh Patil, present their work in art and science at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 4 July 2013 at 19:00.

  10. Urban Sound Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    . The article concludes that the ways in which recent sound installations work with urban ecologies vary. While two of the examples blend into the urban environment, the other transfers the concert format and its mode of listening to urban space. Last, and in accordance with recent soundscape research, we point...

  11. Sounds of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    Starting in the early 1960s, spacecraft-borne plasma wave instruments revealed that space is filled with an astonishing variety of radio and plasma wave sounds, which have come to be called "sounds of space." For over forty years these sounds have been collected and played to a wide variety of audiences, often as the result of press conferences or press releases involving various NASA projects for which the University of Iowa has provided plasma wave instruments. This activity has led to many interviews on local and national radio programs, and occasionally on programs haviang world-wide coverage, such as the BBC. As a result of this media coverage, we have been approached many times by composers requesting copies of our space sounds for use in their various projects, many of which involve electronic synthesis of music. One of these collaborations led to "Sun Rings," which is a musical event produced by the Kronos Quartet that has played to large audiences all over the world. With the availability of modern computer graphic techniques we have recently been attempting to integrate some of these sound of space into an educational audio/video web site that illustrates the scientific principles involved in the origin of space plasma waves. Typically I try to emphasize that a substantial gas pressure exists everywhere in space in the form of an ionized gas called a plasma, and that this plasma can lead to a wide variety of wave phenomenon. Examples of some of this audio/video material will be presented.

  12. Parameterizing Sound: Design Considerations for an Environmental Sound Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    associated with, or produced by, a physical event or human activity and 2) sound sources that are common in the environment. Reproductions or sound...Rogers S. Confrontation naming of environmental sounds. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology . 2000;22(6):830–864. 14 VanDerveer NJ

  13. 76 FR 67255 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel KIWI CAT; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2011 0135] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel KIWI CAT; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... CAT is: INTENDED COMMERCIAL USE OF VESSEL: ``Small vessel 12 person chartering service for the San...

  14. Vessels in Transit - Web Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — A web tool that provides real-time information on vessels transiting the Saint Lawrence Seaway. Visitors may sort by order of turn, vessel name, or last location in...

  15. Direct in-vessel applications experiments at Harvard Air Cleaning Laboratory. Annual report, October 1, 1975--January 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallove, E.; Hinds, W.; First, M.W.

    1977-02-01

    Prototypes of direct in-vessel emergency air cleaning systems were evaluated for possible application in an LMFBR containment vessel after a hypothetical core disruptive accident. These were turbulence enhanced sedimentation, powder dispersal scavenging, acoustic agglomeration enhanced sedimentation, and combinations of turbulence with powder dispersal. The effect of turbulent agglomeration in enhancing the sedimentation of a sodum pool fire aerosol was experimentally demonstrated in a 90 m 3 test chamber, 4 meters high. Two hour dose reduction factors (DRF(2 hr)) from 7 to 56 were achieved in the 4 meter high chamber using fan-induced turbulent agglomeration on aerosols that varied in initial mass concentration from 1 to 12 gm/m 3 . In the same chamber, a prototype limestone powder dispersal scavenging system was tested and achieved DRF(2 hr)'s up to 10. The beneficial effect of combining turbulence with powder dispersal in a single system was demonstrated in a test which yielded a DRF(2 hr) of 20. This was greater than for either mechanism separately applied when initial aerosol mass concentration was 2 gm/m3. Acoustic agglomeration of sodium pool fire aerosols was tested in a smaller 0.65 m 3 , 75 cm high settling chamber, using an electronic siren which produced a sound pressure level of 145 dB in the reverberant chamber. The DRF(2 hr) in the small chamber with the siren operating was found to be from 17 to 31, 2 to 3 times greater than the DRF(2 hr) for unperturbed settling. Pulse-jet engines were found to be unsuitable for generating high sound levels for this application. Scaling each of the systems tested to a 30 m high containment vessel indicated no reason why one or more of the systems investigated could not be applied successfully as an emergency air cleaning system

  16. Discharge of Non-Reactive Fluids from Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Castier

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents simulations of discharges from pressure vessels that consistently account for non-ideal fluid behavior in all the required thermodynamic properties and individually considers all the chemical components present. The underlying assumption is that phase equilibrium occurs instantaneously inside the vessel and, thus, the dynamics of the fluid in the vessel comprises a sequence of equilibrium states. The formulation leads to a system of differential-algebraic equations in which the component mass balances and the energy balance are ordinary differential equations. The algebraic equations account for the phase equilibrium conditions inside the vessel and at the discharge point, and for sound speed calculations. The simulator allows detailed predictions of the condition inside the vessel and at the discharge point as a function of time, including the flow rate and composition of the discharge. The paper presents conceptual applications of the simulator to predict the effect of leaks from vessels containing mixtures of light gases and/or hydrocarbons and comparisons to experimental data.

  17. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is described for sealing a cold leg nozzle of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location comprising: at least one sealing plug for mechanically sealing the nozzle from the inside of the reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plug includes a plate and a cone assembly having an end part receptive in the nozzle, the plate being axially moveable relative to the cone assembly. The plate and cone assembly have confronting bevelled edges defining an opening therebetween. A primary O-ring is disposed about the opening and is supported on the bevelled edges, the plate being guidably mounted to the cone assembly for movement toward the cone assembly to radially expand the primary O-ring into sealing engagement with the nozzle. A means is included for providing relative movement between the outer plate and the cone assembly

  18. Mobile nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.E.; Spurrier, F.R.; Jones, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A containment vessel for use in mobile nuclear reactor installations is described. The containment vessel completely surrounds the entire primary system, and is located as close to the reactor primary system components as is possible in order to minimize weight. In addition to being designed to withstand a specified internal pressure, the containment vessel is also designed to maintain integrity as a containment vessel in case of a possible collision accident

  19. Nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, E.G.; Lofy, R.A.; Williams, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for the in situ inspection of a nuclear reactor vessel to detect the location and character of flaws in the walls of the vessel, in the welds joining the various sections of the vessel, in the welds joining attachments such as nozzles, elbows and the like to the reactor vessel and in such attachments wherein an inspection head carrying one or more ultrasonic transducers follows predetermined paths in scanning the various reactor sections, welds and attachments

  20. Reactor vessel stud closure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelman, S.R.; Salton, R.B.; Beer, R.W.; Malandra, L.J.; Cognevich, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A quick-acting stud tensioner apparatus for enabling the loosening or tightening of a stud nut on a reactor vessel stud. The apparatus is adapted to engage the vessel stud by closing a gripper around an upper end of the vessel stud when the apparatus is seated on the stud. Upon lifting the apparatus, the gripper releases the vessel stud so that the apparatus can be removed

  1. Prestressed cast iron pressure vessels as burst-proof pressure vessels for innovative nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehling, W.; Boettcher, A.; Bounin, D.; Steinwarz, W.; Geiss, M.; Trauth, M.

    2000-01-01

    The amendment to the German Atomic Energy Act from July 28, 1994 requires that events 'whose occurrence is practically excluded by the measures against damages', i.e. events of the category residual risk, must not necessitate far reaching protective measures outside the plant. For a conventional reactor pressure vessel, the residual risk consists in the very small probability of a catastrophic failure (formation of a large fracture opening, bursting of the vessel). With a prestressed cast iron vessel (PCIV), the formation of a large fracture opening or bursting of the vessel, respectively, is impossible due to its design properties. Against this background the possibility of the use of this type of pressure vessel for lightwater reactors has been studied in the frame of a 'Working Group for Innovative Nuclear Technology', founded by different research institutes and industrial companies. Furthermore, it has been studied whether the use of the PCIV support the realization of a corecatcher system. The results are presented in this report. Already many years earlier, Siempelkamp has performed industrial development and Forschungszentrum Juelich related experimental and theoretical safety research for the PCIV as an innovative, bust-proof pressure vessel concept. This development of the PCIV as well as its safety properties are also presented in a conclusive manner. (orig.) [de

  2. Phenomenological vessel burst investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hippelein, K.W.; Julisch, P.; Muz, J.; Schiedermaier, J.

    1985-07-01

    Fourteen burst experiments have been carried out using vessels with circumferential and longitudinal flaws, for investigation of the fracture behaviour, i.e. the time-related fracture opening. The vessels had dimensions (outer diameter x wall thickness = 800 x 47 mm) which correspond to the dimensions of the main coolant piping of a 1300 MW e PWR. The test specimens had been made of the base-safe material 20 MnMoNi 55 and of a special, 22 NiMoCr 37 base alloy. The experimental conditions with regard to pressure and temperature have been chosen so as to correspond to normal operating conditions of a PWR (p∝17.5 MPa, T∝300 0 C), i.e. the flaws have been so dimensioned that failure was to be expected at a pressure of p∝17.5 MPa. As a rule, water has been used as the pressure medium, or in some cases air, in order to influence the time-dependent pressure decrease. Fluid and structural dynamics calculations have also been made. In order to determine the impact of a fast propagating crack on the leak-to-fracture curve, which normally is defined by quasistationary experiments, suitable tests have been made with large-volume, cylindrical vessels (outer diameter x wall thickness x length = 3000 x 21 x 14000 mm) made of the material WSt E 43. The leak-before-fracture criterion has been confirmed. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Blood Vessels in Allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahimi, P; Liu, R; Pober, J S

    2015-07-01

    Human vascularized allografts are perfused through blood vessels composed of cells (endothelium, pericytes, and smooth muscle cells) that remain largely of graft origin and are thus subject to host alloimmune responses. Graft vessels must be healthy to maintain homeostatic functions including control of perfusion, maintenance of permselectivity, prevention of thrombosis, and participation in immune surveillance. Vascular cell injury can cause dysfunction that interferes with these processes. Graft vascular cells can be activated by mediators of innate and adaptive immunity to participate in graft inflammation contributing to both ischemia/reperfusion injury and allograft rejection. Different forms of rejection may affect graft vessels in different ways, ranging from thrombosis and neutrophilic inflammation in hyperacute rejection, to endothelialitis/intimal arteritis and fibrinoid necrosis in acute cell-mediated or antibody-mediated rejection, respectively, and to diffuse luminal stenosis in chronic rejection. While some current therapies targeting the host immune system do affect graft vascular cells, direct targeting of the graft vasculature may create new opportunities for preventing allograft injury and loss. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  4. Ionizing radiations and blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, E.I.; Stepanov, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Data on phenomenology of radiation-induced changes in blood vessels are systematized and authors' experience is generalized. Modern concepts about processes leading to vessel structure injury after irradiation is critically analyzed. Special attention is paid to reparation and compensation of X-ray vessel injury, consideration of which is not yet sufficiently elucidated in literature

  5. Ionizing radiations and blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, E.I.; Stepanov, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Data on phenomeology of radiation changes of blood vessels are systemized and the authors' experience is generalyzed. A critical analysis of modern conceptions on processes resulting in vessel structure damage after irradiation, is given. Special attention is paid to reparation and compensation of radiation injury of vessels

  6. 77 FR 23119 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Smoking the Sound; Biloxi Ship Channel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ...The Coast Guard will enforce Special Local Regulations for the Smoking the Sound boat races in the Biloxi Ship Channel, Biloxi, MS from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m. on April 28 and April 29, 2012. This action is necessary for the safeguard of participants and spectators, including all crews, vessels, and persons on navigable waters during the Smoking the Sound boat races. During the enforcement period, entry into, transiting or anchoring in the regulated area is prohibited to all vessels not registered with the sponsor as participants or official patrol vessels, unless specifically authorized by the Captain of the Port (COTP) Mobile or the designated Coast Guard Patrol Commander.

  7. Product sounds : Fundamentals and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan-Vieira, E.

    2008-01-01

    Products are ubiquitous, so are the sounds emitted by products. Product sounds influence our reasoning, emotional state, purchase decisions, preference, and expectations regarding the product and the product's performance. Thus, auditory experience elicited by product sounds may not be just about

  8. Sonic mediations: body, sound, technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birdsall, C.; Enns, A.

    2008-01-01

    Sonic Mediations: Body, Sound, Technology is a collection of original essays that represents an invaluable contribution to the burgeoning field of sound studies. While sound is often posited as having a bridging function, as a passive in-between, this volume invites readers to rethink the concept of

  9. System for actively reducing sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2005-01-01

    A system for actively reducing sound from a primary noise source, such as traffic noise, comprising: a loudspeaker connector for connecting to at least one loudspeaker for generating anti-sound for reducing said noisy sound; a microphone connector for connecting to at least a first microphone placed

  10. Seismic proving test of PWR reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, H.; Yoshikawa, T.; Tokumaru, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The seismic reliability proving tests of nuclear power plant facilities are carried out by Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC), using the large-scale, high-performance vibration of Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory, and sponsored by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). In 1982, the seismic reliability proving test of PWR containment vessel started using the test component of reduced scale 1/3.7 and the test component proved to have structural soundness against earthquakes. Subsequently, the detailed analysis and evaluation of these test results were carried out, and the analysis methods for evaluating strength against earthquakes were established. Whereupon, the seismic analysis and evaluation on the actual containment vessel were performed by these analysis methods, and the safety and reliability of the PWR reactor containment vessel were confirmed

  11. Sounds of a Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Acoustic Oscillations in Solar-Twin "Alpha Cen A" Observed from La Silla by Swiss Team Summary Sound waves running through a star can help astronomers reveal its inner properties. This particular branch of modern astrophysics is known as "asteroseismology" . In the case of our Sun, the brightest star in the sky, such waves have been observed since some time, and have greatly improved our knowledge about what is going on inside. However, because they are much fainter, it has turned out to be very difficult to detect similar waves in other stars. Nevertheless, tiny oscillations in a solar-twin star have now been unambiguously detected by Swiss astronomers François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory, using the CORALIE spectrometer on the Swiss 1.2-m Leonard Euler telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. This telescope is mostly used for discovering exoplanets (see ESO PR 07/01 ). The star Alpha Centauri A is the nearest star visible to the naked eye, at a distance of a little more than 4 light-years. The new measurements show that it pulsates with a 7-minute cycle, very similar to what is observed in the Sun . Asteroseismology for Sun-like stars is likely to become an important probe of stellar theory in the near future. The state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph , to be mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, will be able to search for oscillations in stars that are 100 times fainter than those for which such demanding observations are possible with CORALIE. PR Photo 23a/01 : Oscillations in a solar-like star (schematic picture). PR Photo 23b/01 : Acoustic spectrum of Alpha Centauri A , as observed with CORALIE. Asteroseismology: listening to the stars ESO PR Photo 23a/01 ESO PR Photo 23a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 357 x 400 pix - 96k] [Normal - JPEG: 713 x 800 pix - 256k] [HiRes - JPEG: 2673 x 3000 pix - 2.1Mb Caption : PR Photo 23a/01 is a graphical representation of resonating acoustic waves in the interior of a solar-like star. Red and blue

  12. Wood for sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2006-10-01

    The unique mechanical and acoustical properties of wood and its aesthetic appeal still make it the material of choice for musical instruments and the interior of concert halls. Worldwide, several hundred wood species are available for making wind, string, or percussion instruments. Over generations, first by trial and error and more recently by scientific approach, the most appropriate species were found for each instrument and application. Using material property charts on which acoustic properties such as the speed of sound, the characteristic impedance, the sound radiation coefficient, and the loss coefficient are plotted against one another for woods. We analyze and explain why spruce is the preferred choice for soundboards, why tropical species are favored for xylophone bars and woodwind instruments, why violinists still prefer pernambuco over other species as a bow material, and why hornbeam and birch are used in piano actions.

  13. Sounds in context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weed, Ethan

    A sound is never just a sound. It is becoming increasingly clear that auditory processing is best thought of not as a one-way afferent stream, but rather as an ongoing interaction between interior processes and the environment. Even the earliest stages of auditory processing in the nervous system...... time-course of contextual influence on auditory processing in three different paradigms: a simple mismatch negativity paradigm with tones of differing pitch, a multi-feature mismatch negativity paradigm in which tones were embedded in a complex musical context, and a cross-modal paradigm, in which...... auditory processing of emotional speech was modulated by an accompanying visual context. I then discuss these results in terms of their implication for how we conceive of the auditory processing stream....

  14. Sound for Health

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    From astronomy to biomedical sciences: music and sound as tools for scientific investigation Music and science are probably two of the most intrinsically linked disciplines in the spectrum of human knowledge. Science and technology have revolutionised the way artists work, interact, and create. The impact of innovative materials, new communication media, more powerful computers, and faster networks on the creative process is evident: we all can become artists in the digital era. What is less known, is that arts, and music in particular, are having a profound impact the way scientists operate, and think. From the early experiments by Kepler to the modern data sonification applications in medicine – sound and music are playing an increasingly crucial role in supporting science and driving innovation. In this talk. Dr. Domenico Vicinanza will be highlighting the complementarity and the natural synergy between music and science, with specific reference to biomedical sciences. Dr. Vicinanza will take t...

  15. Sound in Ergonomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebreil Seraji

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The word of “Ergonomics “is composed of two separate parts: “Ergo” and” Nomos” and means the Human Factors Engineering. Indeed, Ergonomics (or human factors is the scientific discipline concerned with the understanding of interactions among humans and other elements of a system, and the profession that applies theory, principles, data and methods to design in order to optimize human well-being and overall system performance. It has applied different sciences such as Anatomy and physiology, anthropometry, engineering, psychology, biophysics and biochemistry from different ergonomics purposes. Sound when is referred as noise pollution can affect such balance in human life. The industrial noise caused by factories, traffic jam, media, and modern human activity can affect the health of the society.Here we are aimed at discussing sound from an ergonomic point of view.

  16. Pitch Based Sound Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai; Kjems, U

    2006-01-01

    A sound classification model is presented that can classify signals into music, noise and speech. The model extracts the pitch of the signal using the harmonic product spectrum. Based on the pitch estimate and a pitch error measure, features are created and used in a probabilistic model with soft......-max output function. Both linear and quadratic inputs are used. The model is trained on 2 hours of sound and tested on publicly available data. A test classification error below 0.05 with 1 s classification windows is achieved. Further more it is shown that linear input performs as well as a quadratic......, and that even though classification gets marginally better, not much is achieved by increasing the window size beyond 1 s....

  17. Airspace: Antarctic Sound Transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Polli, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates how sound transmission can contribute to the public understanding of climate change within the context of the Poles. How have such transmission-based projects developed specifically in the Arctic and Antarctic, and how do these works create alternative pathways in order to help audiences better understand climate change? The author has created the media project Sonic Antarctica from a personal experience of the Antarctic. The work combines soundscape recordings and son...

  18. Vasculite cutânea de pequenos vasos: etiologia, patogênese, classificação e critérios diagnósticos - Parte I Small vessel cutaneous vasculitis: etiology, pathogenesis, classification and diagnostic criteria - Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert Roberto Clivati Brandt

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Vasculite é a inflamação da parede dos vasos. Pode variar em gravidade desde doença autolimitada de um único órgão até doença grave com risco de morte por falência de múltiplos órgãos. Existem várias causas, embora só se apresente por poucos padrões histológicos de inflamação vascular. Vasos de qualquer tipo e em qualquer órgão podem ser afetados, resultando em ampla variedade de sinais e sintomas. Diferentes vasculites com apresentações clínicas indistinguíveis têm evolução e tratamento muito diferentes. Essa condição representa desafio para o médico, incluindo classificação, diagnóstico, exames laboratoriais pertinentes, tratamento e seguimento adequado. Neste artigo são revistos a classificação, a etiologia, a patogênese e os critérios diagnósticos das vasculites cutâneas.Vasculitis is an inflammation of vessel walls. It may range in severity from a self-limited disorder in one single organ to a life-threatening disease due to multiple-organ failure. It has many causes, although they result in only a few histological patterns of vascular inflammation. Vessels of any type in any organ can be affected, a fact that results in a broad variety of signs and symptoms. Different vasculitides with indistinguishable clinical presentations have very different prognosis and treatments. This condition presents many challenges to physicians in terms of classification, diagnosis, appropriate laboratory workup, treatment, and the need for careful follow-up. This article reviews the classification, etiology, pathology and diagnostic criteria of cutaneous vasculitis.

  19. Parametric model to estimate containment loads following an ex-vessel steam spike

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.; Hernandez, J.; Huerta, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a relatively simple parametric model to estimate containment loads following an ex-vessel steam spike. The study was motivated because several PSAs have identified containment loads accompanying reactor vessel failures as a major contributor to early containment failure. The paper includes a detailed description of the simple but physically sound parametric model which was adopted to estimate containment loads following a steam spike into the reactor cavity. (author)

  20. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island...

  1. Characteristic sounds facilitate visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanescu, Lucica; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2008-06-01

    In a natural environment, objects that we look for often make characteristic sounds. A hiding cat may meow, or the keys in the cluttered drawer may jingle when moved. Using a visual search paradigm, we demonstrated that characteristic sounds facilitated visual localization of objects, even when the sounds carried no location information. For example, finding a cat was faster when participants heard a meow sound. In contrast, sounds had no effect when participants searched for names rather than pictures of objects. For example, hearing "meow" did not facilitate localization of the word cat. These results suggest that characteristic sounds cross-modally enhance visual (rather than conceptual) processing of the corresponding objects. Our behavioral demonstration of object-based cross-modal enhancement complements the extensive literature on space-based cross-modal interactions. When looking for your keys next time, you might want to play jingling sounds.

  2. Research on fiber Bragg grating heart sound sensing and wavelength demodulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Miao, Chang-Yun; Gao, Hua; Gan, Jing-Meng; Li, Hong-Qiang

    2010-11-01

    Heart sound includes a lot of physiological and pathological information of heart and blood vessel. Heart sound detecting is an important method to gain the heart status, and has important significance to early diagnoses of cardiopathy. In order to improve sensitivity and reduce noise, a heart sound measurement method based on fiber Bragg grating was researched. By the vibration principle of plane round diaphragm, a heart sound sensor structure of fiber Bragg grating was designed and a heart sound sensing mathematical model was established. A formula of heart sound sensitivity was deduced and the theoretical sensitivity of the designed sensor is 957.11pm/KPa. Based on matched grating method, the experiment system was built, by which the excursion of reflected wavelength of the sensing grating was detected and the information of heart sound was obtained. Experiments show that the designed sensor can detect the heart sound and the reflected wavelength variety range is about 70pm. When the sampling frequency is 1 KHz, the extracted heart sound waveform by using the db4 wavelet has the same characteristics with a standard heart sound sensor.

  3. Pressure vessel lid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Elter, C.; Becker, G.; Pertiller, S.

    1986-01-01

    The invention concerns a lid for closing openings in reactor pressure vessels containing helium, which is made as a circular casting with hollow spaces and a flat floor and is set on the opening and kept down. It consists of helium-tight metal cast material with sufficient temperature resistance. There are at least two concentric heat resistant seals let into the bottom of the lid. The bottom is in immediate contact with the container atmosphere and has hollow spaces in its inside in the area opposite to the opening. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Active sound reduction system and method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention refers to an active sound reduction system and method for attenuation of sound emitted by a primary sound source, especially for attenuation of snoring sounds emitted by a human being. This system comprises a primary sound source, at least one speaker as a secondary sound

  5. Noise detection during heart sound recording using periodicity signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, D; Carvalho, P; Paiva, R P; Henriques, J; Antunes, M

    2011-01-01

    Heart sound is a valuable biosignal for diagnosis of a large set of cardiac diseases. Ambient and physiological noise interference is one of the most usual and highly probable incidents during heart sound acquisition. It tends to change the morphological characteristics of heart sound that may carry important information for heart disease diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a new method applicable in real time to detect ambient and internal body noises manifested in heart sound during acquisition. The algorithm is developed on the basis of the periodic nature of heart sounds and physiologically inspired criteria. A small segment of uncontaminated heart sound exhibiting periodicity in time as well as in the time-frequency domain is first detected and applied as a reference signal in discriminating noise from the sound. The proposed technique has been tested with a database of heart sounds collected from 71 subjects with several types of heart disease inducing several noises during recording. The achieved average sensitivity and specificity are 95.88% and 97.56%, respectively

  6. Broadband sound blocking in phononic crystals with rotationally symmetric inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joong Seok; Yoo, Sungmin; Ahn, Young Kwan; Kim, Yoon Young

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of broadband sound blocking with rotationally symmetric extensible inclusions introduced in phononic crystals. By varying the size of four equally shaped inclusions gradually, the phononic crystal experiences remarkable changes in its band-stop properties, such as shifting/widening of multiple Bragg bandgaps and evolution to resonance gaps. Necessary extensions of the inclusions to block sound effectively can be determined for given incident frequencies by evaluating power transmission characteristics. By arraying finite dissimilar unit cells, the resulting phononic crystal exhibits broadband sound blocking from combinational effects of multiple Bragg scattering and local resonances even with small-numbered cells.

  7. Stress criteria for nuclear vessel concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1975-01-01

    Concrete nuclear vessels are submitted to prestressing forces which limit tensile stresses in concrete when the vessel is under pressure with thermal gradients. Hence, the most severe conditions for concrete appear when the vessel is prestressed and not submitted to internal pressure. The triaxial states of stress in the concrete may be computed postulating elastic or other behavior and compared with safe limits obtained from rupture tests and fatigue tests. The first part of the paper, recalls experimental rupture results and the acceptability procedures currently used. Criteria founded on the lemniscoid surfaces are proposed, parameters for which are obtained by various tests and safety considerations. In the second part, rupture tests are reported on small, thick, cylindrical vessels submitted to external hydraulic pressure simulating prestressing forces. Materials used are plain concrete, microconcrete, marble and graphite. The strengths obtained are much higher than those which could be elastically computed, triaxial rupture states being provided by previous experiments. Such results may be due to a plastic stress redistribution before fracture and to stabilizing effects of stress gradients around the more stressed areas. Fatigue tests by external hydraulic loading are reported [fr

  8. PWR pressure vessel integrity during overcooling accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Pressurized water reactors are susceptible to certain types of hypothetical accidents that under some circumstances, including operation of the reactor beyond a critical time in its life, could result in failure of the pressure vessel as a result of propagation of crack-like defects in the vessel wall. The accidents of concern are those that result in thermal shock to the vessel while the vessel is subjected to internal pressure. Such accidents, referred to as pressurized thermal shock or overcooling accidents (OCA), include a steamline break, small-break LOCA, turbine trip followed by stuck-open bypass valves, the 1978 Rancho Seco and the TMI accidents and many other postulated and actual accidents. The source of cold water for the thermal shock is either emergency core coolant or the normal primary-system coolant. ORNL performed fracture-mechanics calculations for a steamline break in 1978 and for a turbine-trip case in 1980 and concluded on the basis of the results that many more such calculations would be required. To meet the expected demand in a realistic way a computer code, OCA-I, was developed that accepts primary-system temperature and pressure transients as input and then performs one-dimensional thermal and stress analyses for the wall and a corresponding fracture-mechanics analysis for a long axial flaw. The code is briefly described, and its use in both generic and specific plant analyses is discussed

  9. Stimulating retinal blood vessel protection with hypoxia-inducible factor stabilization: identification of novel small-molecule hydrazones to inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Jonathan E; Hoppe, George

    2013-09-01

    To discover novel small molecules that inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase (PHD), a key enzyme that regulates the posttranslational stability and hence activity of HIF. NIH3T3 cell line stably transfected with firefly luciferase under a HIF-1-inducible promoter was used to screen a Chembridge library of 34,000 small molecules of molecular weight 250 to 550 Da. Positive hits were considered at 4.5-fold higher luminescence than control. Selected compounds were validated in vitro. The most effective dose was then used to treat mice expressing firefly luciferase fused to the oxygen-dependent degradation domain (lucODD) in order to determine the location of the receptor for systemic treatment with small-molecule HIF PHD inhibitors. Twenty-three novel small molecules were discovered, the majority of which were hydrazones and hydrazines. Of the 23 compounds, each had different selectivity for expression of erythropoietin or vascular endothelial growth factor, two angiogenic, HIF-regulated gene products. In addition, each showed different selectivity for hepatocytes or kidney, or both or neither, when injected intraperitoneally in an in vivo reporter gene assay. The discovery of multiple small molecules that inhibit HIF PHD identifies new reagents to develop strategies to prevent the degradation of HIF by its selective PHD. These molecules are novel hypoxia mimetics that may provide new strategies to protect retinovasculature from hyperoxia.

  10. CTD and sound speed profile data acquired in support of hydrographic multibeam surveys to meet NOAA/NOS, Office of Coast Survey charting requirements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multiple sensors are used to acquire sound speed profiles in the survey areas assigned to the ships and navigation response teams. Some vessels have CTDs and acquire...

  11. Quality assurance of the reactor pressure vessel of nuclear power plants. Determination of the fracture toughness KIC above the ductile-brittle transition region on small test specimens by means of a conformal mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, G.; Krompholz, K.

    1994-01-01

    The ''surveillance-programs'' for the determination of the mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials, as a function of the neutron dose, include impact and tensile tests for the boiling water reactor; while for pressurized water reactors additional wedge opening load specimens (WOL), for the measurement of the fracture toughness K IC at low temperatures, are utilized. While the Charpy impact toughness gives the total magnitude of energy, which indicates the change of the material state, e.g. the state of embrittlement, the fracture toughness, I IC , gives a base for mechanical calculations. This is of importance for components in which cracks or flaws are assumed. The mechanical analysis, and its relevance to safety assessments, depends on the knowledge of different parameters such as geometry of the structure and flaws, and load history of the structure. Fracture mechanical methods play an important role, if the leak-before-fracture problem is considered. Within the frame work of fracture mechanical methods, only the influence of assumed macroscopic cracks on the structural behaviour can be handled. Flaw formation processes in flaw-free structures, as well as the treatment of short flaws, can not currently be included. In the regime of low and intermediate temperatures (for ferritic and austenitic materials, normally below 400 o C), the rules of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and elasto-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) are applied, some of which are already part of the code cases. (author) 5 figs., 32 refs

  12. Magnetospheric radio sounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondoh, Tadanori; Nakamura, Yoshikatsu; Koseki, Teruo; Watanabe, Sigeaki; Murakami, Toshimitsu

    1977-01-01

    Radio sounding of the plasmapause from a geostationary satellite has been investigated to observe time variations of the plasmapause structure and effects of the plasma convection. In the equatorial plane, the plasmapause is located, on the average, at 4 R sub(E) (R sub(E); Earth radius), and the plasma density drops outwards from 10 2 -10 3 /cm 3 to 1-10/cm 3 in the plasmapause width of about 600 km. Plasmagrams showing a relation between the virtual range and sounding frequencies are computed by ray tracing of LF-VLF waves transmitted from a geostationary satellite, using model distributions of the electron density in the vicinity of the plasmapause. The general features of the plasmagrams are similar to the topside ionograms. The plasmagram has no penetration frequency such as f 0 F 2 , but the virtual range of the plasmagram increases rapidly with frequency above 100 kHz, since the distance between a satellite and wave reflection point increases rapidly with increasing the electron density inside the plasmapause. The plasmapause sounder on a geostationary satellite has been designed by taking account of an average propagation distance of 2 x 2.6 R sub(E) between a satellite (6.6 R sub(E)) and the plasmapause (4.0 R sub(E)), background noise, range resolution, power consumption, and receiver S/N of 10 dB. The 13-bit Barker coded pulses of baud length of 0.5 msec should be transmitted in direction parallel to the orbital plane at frequencies for 10 kHz-2MHz in a pulse interval of 0.5 sec. The transmitter peak power of 70 watts and 700 watts are required respectively in geomagnetically quiet and disturbed (strong nonthermal continuum emissions) conditions for a 400 meter cylindrical dipole of 1.2 cm diameter on the geostationary satellite. This technique will open new area of radio sounding in the magnetosphere. (auth.)

  13. Pressure vessels and methods of sealing leaky tubes disposed in pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to pressure vessels and to methods of sealing leaky tubes in them and is especially applicable to pressure vessels in the form of sheet-and-tube type heat exchangers constructed with a large number of relatively small diameter tubes grouped in a bundle. To seal off a leaky tube in such a heat exchanger an explosive activated plug in the form of a hollow metal body is used, inserted at each end of the tube to be sealed. Using the arrangement of pressure vessel and associated tube sheets and the explosive activated plug method of sealing a leaky tube as described in this invention it is claimed that distortion of the adjacent tubes and the tube sheets is reduced when the explosive activated plugs are detonated. (U.K.)

  14. Handbook for sound engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Ballou, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Handbook for Sound Engineers is the most comprehensive reference available for audio engineers, and is a must read for all who work in audio.With contributions from many of the top professionals in the field, including Glen Ballou on interpretation systems, intercoms, assistive listening, and fundamentals and units of measurement, David Miles Huber on MIDI, Bill Whitlock on audio transformers and preamplifiers, Steve Dove on consoles, DAWs, and computers, Pat Brown on fundamentals, gain structures, and test and measurement, Ray Rayburn on virtual systems, digital interfacing, and preamplifiers

  15. Facing Sound - Voicing Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on examples of contemporary audiovisual art, with a special focus on the Tony Oursler exhibition Face to Face at Aarhus Art Museum ARoS in Denmark in March-July 2012. My investigation involves a combination of qualitative interviews with visitors, observations of the audience´s...... interactions with the exhibition and the artwork in the museum space and short analyses of individual works of art based on reception aesthetics and phenomenology and inspired by newer writings on sound, voice and listening....

  16. JINGLE: THE SOUNDING SYMBOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bysko Maxim V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the role of jingles in the industrial era, from the occurrence of the regular radio broadcasting, sound films and television up of modern video games, audio and video podcasts, online broadcasts, and mobile communications. Jingles are researched from the point of view of the theory of symbols: the forward motion is detected in the process of development of jingles from the social symbols (radio callsigns to the individual signs-images (ringtones. The role of technical progress in the formation of jingles as important cultural audio elements of modern digital civilization.

  17. Summary of Reported Whale-Vessel Collisions in Alaskan Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L. Neilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we summarize 108 reported whale-vessel collisions in Alaska from 1978–2011, of which 25 are known to have resulted in the whale's death. We found 89 definite and 19 possible/probable strikes based on standard criteria we created for this study. Most strikes involved humpback whales (86% with six other species documented. Small vessel strikes were most common (<15 m, 60%, but medium (15–79 m, 27% and large (≥80 m, 13% vessels also struck whales. Among the 25 mortalities, vessel length was known in seven cases (190–294 m and vessel speed was known in three cases (12–19 kn. In 36 cases, human injury or property damage resulted from the collision, and at least 15 people were thrown into the water. In 15 cases humpback whales struck anchored or drifting vessels, suggesting the whales did not detect the vessels. Documenting collisions in Alaska will remain challenging due to remoteness and resource limitations. For a better understanding of the factors contributing to lethal collisions, we recommend (1 systematic documentation of collisions, including vessel size and speed; (2 greater efforts to necropsy stranded whales; (3 using experienced teams focused on determining cause of death; (4 using standard criteria for validating collision reports, such as those presented in this paper.

  18. Common-Pressure-Vessel Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Development

    OpenAIRE

    Otzinger, Burton; Wheeler, James

    1991-01-01

    The dual-cell, common-pressure vessel, nickel-hydrogen configuration has recently emerged as an option for small satellite nickel-hydrogen battery application. An important incentive is that the dual-cell, CPV configured battery presents a 30 percent reduction in volume and nearly 50 percent reduction in mounting footprint, when compared with an equivalent battery of individual pressure- vessel (IPV) cells. In addition energy density and cost benefits are significant. Eagle-Picher Industries ...

  19. Open vessel microwave digestion of food matrices (T6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, L.; LeBlanc, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Advancements in the field of open vessel microwave digestion continue to provide solutions for industries requiring acid digestion of large sample sizes. Those interesting in digesting food matrices are particularly interested in working with large amounts of sample and then diluting small final volumes. This paper will show the advantages of instantaneous regent addition and post-digestion evaporation when performing an open vessel digestion and evaporation methods for various food matrices will be presented along with analyte recovery data. (author)

  20. Sound Velocity in Soap Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gong-Tao; Lü Yong-Jun; Liu Peng-Fei; Li Yi-Ning; Shi Qing-Fan

    2012-01-01

    The velocity of sound in soap foams at high gas volume fractions is experimentally studied by using the time difference method. It is found that the sound velocities increase with increasing bubble diameter, and asymptotically approach to the value in air when the diameter is larger than 12.5 mm. We propose a simple theoretical model for the sound propagation in a disordered foam. In this model, the attenuation of a sound wave due to the scattering of the bubble wall is equivalently described as the effect of an additional length. This simplicity reasonably reproduces the sound velocity in foams and the predicted results are in good agreement with the experiments. Further measurements indicate that the increase of frequency markedly slows down the sound velocity, whereas the latter does not display a strong dependence on the solution concentration

  1. Analysis of environmental sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keansub

    Environmental sound archives - casual recordings of people's daily life - are easily collected by MPS players or camcorders with low cost and high reliability, and shared in the web-sites. There are two kinds of user generated recordings we would like to be able to handle in this thesis: Continuous long-duration personal audio and Soundtracks of short consumer video clips. These environmental recordings contain a lot of useful information (semantic concepts) related with activity, location, occasion and content. As a consequence, the environment archives present many new opportunities for the automatic extraction of information that can be used in intelligent browsing systems. This thesis proposes systems for detecting these interesting concepts on a collection of these real-world recordings. The first system is to segment and label personal audio archives - continuous recordings of an individual's everyday experiences - into 'episodes' (relatively consistent acoustic situations lasting a few minutes or more) using the Bayesian Information Criterion and spectral clustering. The second system is for identifying regions of speech or music in the kinds of energetic and highly-variable noise present in this real-world sound. Motivated by psychoacoustic evidence that pitch is crucial in the perception and organization of sound, we develop a noise-robust pitch detection algorithm to locate speech or music-like regions. To avoid false alarms resulting from background noise with strong periodic components (such as air-conditioning), a new scheme is added in order to suppress these noises in the domain of autocorrelogram. In addition, the third system is to automatically detect a large set of interesting semantic concepts; which we chose for being both informative and useful to users, as well as being technically feasible. These 25 concepts are associated with people's activities, locations, occasions, objects, scenes and sounds, and are based on a large collection of

  2. Sounds like Team Spirit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always

  3. Targeting Therapy Resistant Tumor Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Morris LS. Hysterectomy vs. resectoscopic endometrial ablation for the control of abnormal uterine bleeding . A cost-comparative study. J Reprod Med 1994;39...after the antibody treatment contain a pericyte coat, vessel architecture is normal, the diameter of the vessels is smaller (dilated, abnormal vessels...involvement of proteases from inflammatory mast cells and functionally abnormal (Carmeliet and Jain, 2000; Pasqualini (Coussens et al., 1999) and other bone

  4. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  5. Mercury in Long Island Sound sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekamp, J.C.; Buchholtz ten Brink, Marilyn R.; Mecray, E.I.; Kreulen, B.

    2000-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations were measured in 394 surface and core samples from Long Island Sound (LIS). The surface sediment Hg concentration data show a wide spread, ranging from 600 ppb Hg in westernmost LIS. Part of the observed range is related to variations in the bottom sedimentary environments, with higher Hg concentrations in the muddy depositional areas of central and western LIS. A strong residual trend of higher Hg values to the west remains when the data are normalized to grain size. Relationships between a tracer for sewage effluents (C. perfringens) and Hg concentrations indicate that between 0-50 % of the Hg is derived from sewage sources for most samples from the western and central basins. A higher percentage of sewage-derived Hg is found in samples from the westernmost section of LIS and in some local spots near urban centers. The remainder of the Hg is carried into the Sound with contaminated sediments from the watersheds and a small fraction enters the Sound as in situ atmospheric deposition. The Hg-depth profiles of several cores have well-defined contamination profiles that extend to pre-industrial background values. These data indicate that the Hg levels in the Sound have increased by a factor of 5-6 over the last few centuries, but Hg levels in LIS sediments have declined in modern times by up to 30 %. The concentrations of C. perfringens increased exponentially in the top core sections which had declining Hg concentrations, suggesting a recent decline in Hg fluxes that are unrelated to sewage effluents. The observed spatial and historical trends show Hg fluxes to LIS from sewage effluents, contaminated sediment input from the Connecticut River, point source inputs of strongly contaminated sediment from the Housatonic River, variations in the abundance of Hg carrier phases such as TOC and Fe, and focusing of sediment-bound Hg in association with westward sediment transport within the Sound.

  6. Sound therapies for tinnitus management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, Margaret M

    2007-01-01

    Many people with bothersome (suffering) tinnitus notice that their tinnitus changes in different acoustical surroundings, it is more intrusive in silence and less profound in the sound enriched environments. This observation led to the development of treatment methods for tinnitus utilizing sound. Many of these methods are still under investigation in respect to their specific protocol and effectiveness and only some have been objectively evaluated in clinical trials. This chapter will review therapies for tinnitus using sound stimulation.

  7. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M.; Idoeta, R.; Abelairas, A.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of 241 Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of 241 Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of 241 Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  8. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R., E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Abelairas, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    The adsorption of {sup 241}Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of {sup 241}Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of {sup 241}Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  9. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda, F; Herranz, M; Idoeta, R; Abelairas, A

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of (241)Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of (241)Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of (241)Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Large vessel vasculitides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morović-Vergles, Jadranka; Puksić, Silva; Gracanin, Ana Gudelj

    2013-01-01

    Large vessel vasculitis includes Giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis. Giant cell arteritis is the most common form of vasculitis affect patients aged 50 years or over. The diagnosis should be considered in older patients who present with new onset of headache, visual disturbance, polymyalgia rheumatica and/or fever unknown cause. Glucocorticoides remain the cornerstone of therapy. Takayasu arteritis is a chronic panarteritis of the aorta ant its major branches presenting commonly in young ages. Although all large arteries can be affected, the aorta, subclavian and carotid arteries are most commonly involved. The most common symptoms included upper extremity claudication, hypertension, pain over the carotid arteries (carotidynia), dizziness and visual disturbances. Early diagnosis and treatment has improved the outcome in patients with TA.

  11. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Within the framework of the IAEA extrabudgetary programme on the Safety of WWER-440/230 NPPs, a list of safety issues requiring broad studies of generic interest have been agreed upon by an Advisory Group who met in Vienna in September 1990. The list was later revised in the light of the programme findings. The information on the status of the issues, and on the amount of work already completed and under way in the various countries, needs to be compiled. Moreover, an evaluation of what further work is required to resolve each one of the issues is also necessary. In view of this, the IAEA has started the preparation of a series of status reports on the various issues. This report on the generic safety issue ''Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement'' presents a comprehensive survey of technical information available in the field and identifies those aspects which require further investigation. 39 refs, 21 figs, 4 tabs

  12. Reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kanehiro; Hayagumo, Sunao; Morikawa, Matsuo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To safety and simplify the structure in a reactor containment vessel. Constitution: Steam flow channels with steam jetting ports communicating to coolants are provided between a communication channel and coolants in a pressure suppression chamber. Upon loss of coolant accidents, pressure in a dry well will increase, then force downwards water in an annulus portion and further flow out the water through steam jetting ports into a suppression pool. Thus, the steam flow channel is filled with steams or airs present in the dry well, which are released through the steam jetting ports into the pressure suppression chamber. Even though water is violently vibrated owing to the upward movement of air bubbles and condensation of steam bubbles, the annular portion and the steam jetting ports are filled with steams or the like, direct dynamic loads onto the structures such as communication channels can be avoided. (J.P.N.)

  13. Seasonal distribution of Dall's porpoise in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, John R.; O'Dell, Matthew B.; Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Straley, Janice M.; Dickson, Danielle M. S.

    2018-01-01

    Dall's porpoise, Phocoenoides dalli, are a conspicuous predator in the Prince William Sound ecosystem, yet there has been little effort directed towards monitoring this species since the 1980s, prior to the Exxon Valdez oil spill. We used vessel-based surveys to examine the seasonal distribution of Dall's porpoise in the waters of Prince William Sound during eight years from 2007 to 2015. Over the course of 168 days and 15,653 km of survey effort, 921 Dall's porpoise were encountered in 210 groups. We estimate an encounter rate of 0.061 porpoise/km traveled or 1 porpoise encountered for every 16.5 km traveled. Dall's porpoise were found throughout the year in Prince William Sound, and used a wide range of habitats, including those not considered typical of the species, such as bays, shallow water, and nearshore waters. Dall's porpoise seasonally shifted their center of distribution from the western passages in fall to the bays of the eastern Sound in winter and spring. Dall's porpoises were widely dispersed throughout the Sound in summer. We identified potential Dall's porpoise habitat (depth, slope, and distance from shore) within Prince William Sound using generalized additive models (GAM). Dall's porpoise were found in deeper water during summer and in shallowest water during spring. We propose that their use of novel habitats is a function of reduced predation risk associated with the decline of their main predator, killer whales (Orcinus orca), following the Exxon Valdez oil spill, and the presence of overwintering and spawning Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii). While the size of the Dall's porpoise population within Prince William Sound remains unknown, our encounter rates were lower than those reported in the 1970s. Their high metabolic rate and ubiquitous presence makes them one of the more important, yet understudied, forage fish predators in the region.

  14. Sound [signal] noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnsten, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses the intricate relationship between sound and signification through notions of noise. The emergence of new fields of sonic artistic practices has generated several questions of how to approach sound as aesthetic form and material. During the past decade an increased attention...... has been paid to, for instance, a category such as ‘sound art’ together with an equally strengthened interest in phenomena and concepts that fall outside the accepted aesthetic procedures and constructions of what we traditionally would term as musical sound – a recurring example being ‘noise’....

  15. Sounding out the logo shot

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolai Jørgensgaard Graakjær

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on how sound in combination with visuals (i.e. ‘branding by’) may possibly affect the signifying potentials (i.e. ‘branding effect’) of products and corporate brands (i.e. ‘branding of’) during logo shots in television commercials (i.e. ‘branding through’). This particular focus adds both to the understanding of sound in television commercials and to the understanding of sound brands. The article firstly presents a typology of sounds. Secondly, this typology is applied...

  16. Do top predators cue on sound production by mesopelagic prey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann-Pickering, S.; Checkley, D. M., Jr.; Demer, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    Deep-scattering layer (DSL) organisms, comprising a variety of mesopelagic fishes, and squids, siphonophores, crustaceans, and other invertebrates, are preferred prey for numerous large marine predators, e.g. cetaceans, seabirds, and fishes. Some of the DSL species migrate from depth during daylight to feed near the surface at night, transitioning during dusk and dawn. We investigated if any DSL organisms create sound, particularly during the crepuscular periods. Over several nights in summer 2015, underwater sound was recorded in the San Diego Trough using a high-frequency acoustic recording package (HARP, 10 Hz to 100 kHz), suspended from a drifting surface float. Acoustic backscatter from the DSL was monitored nearby using a calibrated multiple-frequency (38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz) split-beam echosounder (Simrad EK60) on a small boat. DSL organisms produced sound, between 300 and 1000 Hz, and the received levels were highest when the animals migrated past the recorder during ascent and descent. The DSL are globally present, so the observed acoustic phenomenon, if also ubiquitous, has wide-reaching implications. Sound travels farther than light or chemicals and thus can be sensed at greater distances by predators, prey, and mates. If sound is a characteristic feature of pelagic ecosystems, it likely plays a role in predator-prey relationships and overall ecosystem dynamics. Our new finding inspires numerous questions such as: Which, how, and why have DSL organisms evolved to create sound, for what do they use it and under what circumstances? Is sound production by DSL organisms truly ubiquitous, or does it depend on the local environment and species composition? How may sound production and perception be adapted to a changing environment? Do predators react to changes in sound? Can sound be used to quantify the composition of mixed-species assemblages, component densities and abundances, and hence be used in stock assessment or predictive modeling?

  17. Sounding the Alarm: An Introduction to Ecological Sound Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Gilmurray

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a number of sound artists have begun engaging with ecological issues through their work, forming a growing movement of ˝ecological sound art˝. This paper traces its development, examines its influences, and provides examples of the artists whose work is currently defining this important and timely new field.

  18. Development of Prediction Tool for Sound Absorption and Sound Insulation for Sound Proof Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshio Kurosawa; Takao Yamaguchi

    2015-01-01

    High frequency automotive interior noise above 500 Hz considerably affects automotive passenger comfort. To reduce this noise, sound insulation material is often laminated on body panels or interior trim panels. For a more effective noise reduction, the sound reduction properties of this laminated structure need to be estimated. We have developed a new calculate tool that can roughly calculate the sound absorption and insulation properties of laminate structure and handy ...

  19. Sound, memory and interruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinder, David

    2016-01-01

    This chapter considers how art can interrupt the times and spaces of urban development so they might be imagined, experienced and understood differently. It focuses on the construction of the M11 Link Road through north-east London during the 1990s that demolished hundreds of homes and displaced...... around a thousand people. The highway was strongly resisted and it became the site of one of the country’s longest and largest anti-road struggles. The chapter addresses specifically Graeme Miller’s sound walk LINKED (2003), which for more than a decade has been broadcasting memories and stories...... of people who were violently displaced by the road as well as those who actively sought to halt it. Attention is given to the walk’s interruption of senses of the given and inevitable in two main ways. The first is in relation to the pace of the work and its deployment of slowness and arrest in a context...

  20. Recycling Sounds in Commercials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Charlotte Rørdam

    2012-01-01

    Commercials offer the opportunity for intergenerational memory and impinge on cultural memory. TV commercials for foodstuffs often make reference to past times as a way of authenticating products. This is frequently achieved using visual cues, but in this paper I would like to demonstrate how...... such references to the past and ‘the good old days’ can be achieved through sounds. In particular, I will look at commercials for Danish non-dairy spreads, especially for OMA margarine. These commercials are notable in that they contain a melody and a slogan – ‘Say the name: OMA margarine’ – that have basically...... remained the same for 70 years. Together these identifiers make OMA an interesting Danish case to study. With reference to Ann Rigney’s memorial practices or mechanisms, the study aims to demonstrate how the auditory aspects of Danish margarine commercials for frying tend to be limited in variety...

  1. The sounds of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    As scientists carefully study some aspects of the ocean environment, are they unintentionally distressing others? That is a question to be answered by Robert Benson and his colleagues in the Center for Bioacoustics at Texas A&M University.With help from a 3-year, $316,000 grant from the U.S. Office of Naval Research, Benson will study how underwater noise produced by naval operations and other sources may affect marine mammals. In Benson's study, researchers will generate random sequences of low-frequency, high-intensity (180-decibel) sounds in the Gulf of Mexico, working at an approximate distance of 1 km from sperm whale herds. Using an array of hydrophones, the scientists will listen to the characteristic clicks and whistles of the sperm whales to detect changes in the animals' direction, speed, and depth, as derived from fluctuations in their calls.

  2. Sound of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    In my group we work with Molecular Dynamics to model several different proteins and protein systems. We submit our modelled molecules to changes in temperature, changes in solvent composition and even external pulling forces. To analyze our simulation results we have so far used visual inspection...... and statistical analysis of the resulting molecular trajectories (as everybody else!). However, recently I started assigning a particular sound frequency to each amino acid in the protein, and by setting the amplitude of each frequency according to the movement amplitude we can "hear" whenever two aminoacids...... example of soundfile was obtained from using Steered Molecular Dynamics for stretching the neck region of the scallop myosin molecule (in rigor, PDB-id: 1SR6), in such a way as to cause a rotation of the myosin head. Myosin is the molecule responsible for producing the force during muscle contraction...

  3. Do medical students generate sound arguments during small group discussions in problem-based learning?: an analysis of preclinical medical students' argumentation according to a framework of hypothetico-deductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Yoon, Bo Young

    2017-06-01

    Hypothetico-deductive reasoning (HDR) is an essential learning activity and a learning outcome in problem-based learning (PBL). It is important for medical students to engage in the HDR process through argumentation during their small group discussions in PBL. This study aimed to analyze the quality of preclinical medical students' argumentation according to each phase of HDR in PBL. Participants were 15 first-year preclinical students divided into two small groups. A set of three 2-hour discussion sessions from each of the two groups during a 1-week-long PBL unit on the cardiovascular system was audio-recorded. The arguments constructed by the students were analyzed using a coding scheme, which included four types of argumentation (Type 0: incomplete, Type 1: claim only, Type 2: claim with data, and Type 3: claim with data and warrant). The mean frequency of each type of argumentation according to each HDR phase across the two small groups was calculated. During small group discussions, Type 1 arguments were generated most often (frequency=120.5, 43%), whereas the least common were Type 3 arguments (frequency=24.5, 8.7%) among the four types of arguments. The results of this study revealed that the students predominantly made claims without proper justifications; they often omitted data for supporting their claims or did not provide warrants to connect the claims and data. The findings suggest instructional interventions to enhance the quality of medical students' arguments in PBL, including promoting students' comprehension of the structure of argumentation for HDR processes and questioning.

  4. Sound waves in hadronic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Grzegorz; Włodarczyk, Zbigniew

    2018-01-01

    We argue that recent high energy CERN LHC experiments on transverse momenta distributions of produced particles provide us new, so far unnoticed and not fully appreciated, information on the underlying production processes. To this end we concentrate on the small (but persistent) log-periodic oscillations decorating the observed pT spectra and visible in the measured ratios R = σdata(pT) / σfit (pT). Because such spectra are described by quasi-power-like formulas characterised by two parameters: the power index n and scale parameter T (usually identified with temperature T), the observed logperiodic behaviour of the ratios R can originate either from suitable modifications of n or T (or both, but such a possibility is not discussed). In the first case n becomes a complex number and this can be related to scale invariance in the system, in the second the scale parameter T exhibits itself log-periodic oscillations which can be interpreted as the presence of some kind of sound waves forming in the collision system during the collision process, the wave number of which has a so-called self similar solution of the second kind. Because the first case was already widely discussed we concentrate on the second one and on its possible experimental consequences.

  5. Sound segregation via embedded repetition is robust to inattention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masutomi, Keiko; Barascud, Nicolas; Kashino, Makio; McDermott, Josh H; Chait, Maria

    2016-03-01

    The segregation of sound sources from the mixture of sounds that enters the ear is a core capacity of human hearing, but the extent to which this process is dependent on attention remains unclear. This study investigated the effect of attention on the ability to segregate sounds via repetition. We utilized a dual task design in which stimuli to be segregated were presented along with stimuli for a "decoy" task that required continuous monitoring. The task to assess segregation presented a target sound 10 times in a row, each time concurrent with a different distractor sound. McDermott, Wrobleski, and Oxenham (2011) demonstrated that repetition causes the target sound to be segregated from the distractors. Segregation was queried by asking listeners whether a subsequent probe sound was identical to the target. A control task presented similar stimuli but probed discrimination without engaging segregation processes. We present results from 3 different decoy tasks: a visual multiple object tracking task, a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) digit encoding task, and a demanding auditory monitoring task. Load was manipulated by using high- and low-demand versions of each decoy task. The data provide converging evidence of a small effect of attention that is nonspecific, in that it affected the segregation and control tasks to a similar extent. In all cases, segregation performance remained high despite the presence of a concurrent, objectively demanding decoy task. The results suggest that repetition-based segregation is robust to inattention. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This component will be larger than any nuclear reactor pressure vessel presently in service in the United States. The RPV will be taller, larger in diameter, thicker walled, heavier and most likely fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site of multiple subcomponent pieces. The pressure vessel steel can either be a conventional materials already used in the nuclear industry such as listed within ASME A508/A533 specifications or it will be fabricated from newer pressure vessel materials never before used for a nuclear reactor in the US. Each of these characteristics will present a

  7. Designing a Sound Reducing Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erk, Kendra; Lumkes, John; Shambach, Jill; Braile, Larry; Brickler, Anne; Matthys, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical engineers use their knowledge of sound to design quiet environments (e.g., classrooms and libraries) as well as to design environments that are supposed to be loud (e.g., concert halls and football stadiums). They also design sound barriers, such as the walls along busy roadways that decrease the traffic noise heard by people in…

  8. Thinking The City Through Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    n Acoutic Territories. Sound Culture and Everyday Life Brandon LaBelle sets out to charts an urban topology through sound. Working his way through six acoustic territories: underground, home, sidewalk, street, shopping mall and sky/radio LaBelle investigates tensions and potentials inherent in mo...

  9. Basic semantics of product sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan Vieira, E.; Van Egmond, R.

    2012-01-01

    Product experience is a result of sensory and semantic experiences with product properties. In this paper, we focus on the semantic attributes of product sounds and explore the basic components for product sound related semantics using a semantic differential paradigmand factor analysis. With two

  10. Measuring the 'complexity' of sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cate that specialized regions of the brain analyse different types of sounds [1]. Music, ... The left panel of figure 1 shows examples of sound–pressure waveforms from the nat- ... which is shown in the right panels in the spectrographic representation using a 45 Hz .... Plot of SFM(t) vs. time for different environmental sounds.

  11. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention applies to a pressure vessel for nuclear reactors whose shell, made of cast metal segments, has a steel liner. This liner must be constructed to withstand all operational stresses and to be easily repairable. The invention solves this problem by installing the liner at a certain distance from the inner wall of the pressure vessel shell and by filling this clearance with supporting concrete. Both the concrete and the steel liner must have a lower prestress than the pressure vessel shell. In order to avoid damage to the liner when prestressing the pressure vessel shell, special connecting elements are provided which consist of welded-on fastening elements projecting into recesses in the cast metal segments of the pressure vessel. Their design is described in detail. (TK) [de

  12. Seismic and Biological Sources of Ambient Ocean Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Simon Eric

    Sound is the most efficient radiation in the ocean. Sounds of seismic and biological origin contain information regarding the underlying processes that created them. A single hydrophone records summary time-frequency information from the volume within acoustic range. Beamforming using a hydrophone array additionally produces azimuthal estimates of sound sources. A two-dimensional array and acoustic focusing produce an unambiguous two-dimensional `image' of sources. This dissertation describes the application of these techniques in three cases. The first utilizes hydrophone arrays to investigate T-phases (water-borne seismic waves) in the Philippine Sea. Ninety T-phases were recorded over a 12-day period, implying a greater number of seismic events occur than are detected by terrestrial seismic monitoring in the region. Observation of an azimuthally migrating T-phase suggests that reverberation of such sounds from bathymetric features can occur over megameter scales. In the second case, single hydrophone recordings from coral reefs in the Line Islands archipelago reveal that local ambient reef sound is spectrally similar to sounds produced by small, hard-shelled benthic invertebrates in captivity. Time-lapse photography of the reef reveals an increase in benthic invertebrate activity at sundown, consistent with an increase in sound level. The dominant acoustic phenomenon on these reefs may thus originate from the interaction between a large number of small invertebrates and the substrate. Such sounds could be used to take census of hard-shelled benthic invertebrates that are otherwise extremely difficult to survey. A two-dimensional `map' of sound production over a coral reef in the Hawaiian Islands was obtained using two-dimensional hydrophone array in the third case. Heterogeneously distributed bio-acoustic sources were generally co-located with rocky reef areas. Acoustically dominant snapping shrimp were largely restricted to one location within the area surveyed

  13. The Aesthetic Experience of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2005-01-01

    to react on. In an ecological understanding of hearing our detection of audible information affords us ways of responding to our environment. In my paper I will address both these ways of using sound in relation to computer games. Since a game player is responsible for the unfolding of the game, his......The use of sound in (3D) computer games basically falls in two. Sound is used as an element in the design of the set and as a narrative. As set design sound stages the nature of the environment, it brings it to life. As a narrative it brings us information that we can choose to or perhaps need...... exploration of the virtual space laid out before him is pertinent. In this mood of exploration sound is important and heavily contributing to the aesthetic of the experience....

  14. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummer, Steven A. ; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales....... The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create......-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview...

  15. Frequency shifting approach towards textual transcription of heartbeat sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvin, Farshad; Doraisamy, Shyamala; Safar Khorasani, Ehsan

    2011-10-04

    Auscultation is an approach for diagnosing many cardiovascular problems. Automatic analysis of heartbeat sounds and extraction of its audio features can assist physicians towards diagnosing diseases. Textual transcription allows recording a continuous heart sound stream using a text format which can be stored in very small memory in comparison with other audio formats. In addition, a text-based data allows applying indexing and searching techniques to access to the critical events. Hence, the transcribed heartbeat sounds provides useful information to monitor the behavior of a patient for the long duration of time. This paper proposes a frequency shifting method in order to improve the performance of the transcription. The main objective of this study is to transfer the heartbeat sounds to the music domain. The proposed technique is tested with 100 samples which were recorded from different heart diseases categories. The observed results show that, the proposed shifting method significantly improves the performance of the transcription.

  16. Frequency shifting approach towards textual transcription of heartbeat sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safar Khorasani Ehsan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Auscultation is an approach for diagnosing many cardiovascular problems. Automatic analysis of heartbeat sounds and extraction of its audio features can assist physicians towards diagnosing diseases. Textual transcription allows recording a continuous heart sound stream using a text format which can be stored in very small memory in comparison with other audio formats. In addition, a text-based data allows applying indexing and searching techniques to access to the critical events. Hence, the transcribed heartbeat sounds provides useful information to monitor the behavior of a patient for the long duration of time. This paper proposes a frequency shifting method in order to improve the performance of the transcription. The main objective of this study is to transfer the heartbeat sounds to the music domain. The proposed technique is tested with 100 samples which were recorded from different heart diseases categories. The observed results show that, the proposed shifting method significantly improves the performance of the transcription.

  17. Confinement Vessel Assay System: Design and Implementation Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frame, Katherine C.; Bourne, Mark M.; Crooks, William J.; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R.; Gomez, Cipriano D.; Miko, David K.; Salazar, William R.; Stange, Sy; Vigil, Georgiana M.

    2012-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1- to 2-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. We have developed a neutron assay system for the purposes of Materials Control and Accountability (MC and A) measurements of the vessel prior to and after cleanout. We present our approach to confronting the challenges in designing, building, and testing such a system. The system was designed to meet a set of functional and operational requirements. A Monte Carlo model was developed to aid in optimizing the detector design as well as to predict the systematic uncertainty associated with confinement vessel measurements. Initial testing was performed to optimize and determine various measurement parameters, and then the system was characterized using 252 Cf placed a various locations throughout the measurement system. Measurements were also performed with a 252 Cf source placed inside of small steel and HDPE shells to study the effect of moderation. These measurements compare favorably with their MCNPX model equivalent, making us confident that we can rely on the Monte Carlo simulation to predict the systematic uncertainty due to variations in response to material that may be localized at different points within a vessel.

  18. Prestressed concrete vessels suitable for helium high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockett, G.E.; Kinkead, A.N.

    1967-02-01

    In considering prestressed concrete vessels for use with helium cooled high temperature reactors, a number of new problems arise and projected designs involve new approaches and new solutions. These reactors, having high coolant outlet temperature from the core and relatively high power densities, can be built into compact designs which permit usefully high working pressures. Consequently, steam generators and circulating units tend to be small. Although circuit activity can be kept quite low with coated particle fuels, designs which involve entry for subsequent repair are not favoured, and coupled with the preferred aim of using fully shop fabricated units within the designs with removable steam generators which involve no tube welding inside the vessel. A particular solution uses a number of slim cylindrical assemblies housed in the wall of the pressure vessel and this vessel design concept is presented. The use of helium requires very high sealing standards and one of the important requirements is a vessel design which permits leak testing during construction, so that a repair seal can be made to any faulty part in a liner seam. Very good demountable joint seals can be made without particular difficulty and Dragon experience is used to provide solutions which are suitable for prestressed concrete vessel penetrations. The concept layout is given of a vessel meeting these requirements; the basis of design is outlined and special features of importance discussed. (author)

  19. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Galiè

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 μm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes.

  20. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  1. Pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annaratone, D.

    2007-01-01

    This book guides through general and fundamental problems of pressure vessel design. It moreover considers problems which seem to be of lower importance but which turn out to be crucial in the design phase. The basic approach is rigorously scientific with a complete theoretical development of the topics treated, but the analysis is always pushed so far as to offer concrete and precise calculation criteria that can be immediately applied to actual designs. This is accomplished through appropriate algorithms that lead to final equations or to characteristic parameters defined through mathematical equations. The first chapter describes how to achieve verification criteria, the second analyzes a few general problems, such as stresses of the membrane in revolution solids and edge effects. The third chapter deals with cylinders under pressure from the inside, while the fourth focuses on cylinders under pressure from the outside. The fifth chapter covers spheres, and the sixth is about all types of heads. Chapter seven discusses different components of particular shape as well as pipes, with special attention to flanges. The eighth chapter discusses the influence of holes, while the ninth is devoted to the influence of supports. Finally, chapter ten illustrates the fundamental criteria regarding fatigue analysis. Besides the unique approach to the entire work, original contributions can be found in most chapters, thanks to the author's numerous publications on the topic and to studies performed ad hoc for this book. (orig.)

  2. Properties of sound attenuation around a two-dimensional underwater vehicle with a large cavitation number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Peng-Cheng; Pan Guang

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high speed of underwater vehicles, cavitation is generated inevitably along with the sound attenuation when the sound signal traverses through the cavity region around the underwater vehicle. The linear wave propagation is studied to obtain the influence of bubbly liquid on the acoustic wave propagation in the cavity region. The sound attenuation coefficient and the sound speed formula of the bubbly liquid are presented. Based on the sound attenuation coefficients with various vapor volume fractions, the attenuation of sound intensity is calculated under large cavitation number conditions. The result shows that the sound intensity attenuation is fairly small in a certain condition. Consequently, the intensity attenuation can be neglected in engineering. (paper)

  3. Nonlocal nonlinear coupling of kinetic sound waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Lyubchyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We study three-wave resonant interactions among kinetic-scale oblique sound waves in the low-frequency range below the ion cyclotron frequency. The nonlinear eigenmode equation is derived in the framework of a two-fluid plasma model. Because of dispersive modifications at small wavelengths perpendicular to the background magnetic field, these waves become a decay-type mode. We found two decay channels, one into co-propagating product waves (forward decay, and another into counter-propagating product waves (reverse decay. All wavenumbers in the forward decay are similar and hence this decay is local in wavenumber space. On the contrary, the reverse decay generates waves with wavenumbers that are much larger than in the original pump waves and is therefore intrinsically nonlocal. In general, the reverse decay is significantly faster than the forward one, suggesting a nonlocal spectral transport induced by oblique sound waves. Even with low-amplitude sound waves the nonlinear interaction rate is larger than the collisionless dissipation rate. Possible applications regarding acoustic waves observed in the solar corona, solar wind, and topside ionosphere are briefly discussed.

  4. Inservice inspection of Halden BWR pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerli, O.; Hernes, T.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of how the recertification inspection of the 20 years old Halden Reactor pressure vessel was carried out in accordance with the latest ASME-CODES, despite the fact that inspection accessibility was poor. As no volumetric inspection had been carried out since the preservice radiography in 1957, the ultrasonic inspection included the high flux region of all welds. In total 70% of longitudinal welds and 20% of bottom circumferential welds were inspected as well as the bottom nozzle connection. The vessel was not designed with provisions for inservice inspection, the welds are unaccessible from the outside and removal of the lid is virtually impossible. The ultrasonic probes could only be loaded through 77 mm diameter holes in the top lid and remotely positioned inside the vessel. The inspection was performed using 450C and 60OC 1 MHz angle probes and 2.25 MHz normal probes in immersion technique. In a zone around the welds, small regions with lack of bonding between the stainless steel cladding and the boiler steel were revealed. One root defect known and accepted from the preservice radiographs was examined. The defect was found to be 6x30mm as a maximum and well within acceptable limits according to the fracture mechanics analysis method recommended in ASME X1. The inspection required a period of three weeks' work in the reactor hall. (UK)

  5. Research program plan: reactor vessels. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagins, M.; Taboada, A.

    1985-07-01

    The ability of the licensing staff of the NRC to make decisions concerning the present and continuing safety of nuclear reactor pressure vessels under both normal and abnormal operating conditions is dependent upon the existence of verified analysis methods and a solid background of applicable experimental data. It is the role of this program to provide both the analytical methods and the experimental data needed. Specifically, this program develops fracture mechanics analysis methods and design criteria for predicting the stress levels and flaw sizes required for crack initiation, propagation, and arrest in LWR pressure vessels under all known and postulated operations conditions. To do this, not only must the methods be developed but they must be experimentally validated. Further, the materials data necessary for input to these analytical methods must be developed. Thus, in addition to methods development and large scale experimental verification this program also develops data to show that slow-load fracture toughness, rapid-load fracture toughness, and crack arrest toughness obtained from small laboratory specimens are truly representative of the toughness characteristics of the material behavior in pressure vessels in both the unirradiated and the irradiated conditions

  6. Cooling system for the connecting rings of a fast neutron reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.-P.; Malaval, Claude

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling system for the vessel connecting rings of a fast neutron nuclear reactor, particularly of a main vessel containing the core of the reactor and a volume of liquid metal coolant at high temperature and a safety vessel around the main vessel, both vessels being suspended to a rigid upper slab kept at a lower temperature. It is mounted in the annular space between the two vessels and includes a neutral gas circuit set up between the wall of the main vessel to be cooled and that of the safety vessel itself cooled from outer. The neutral gas system comprises a plurality of ventilators fitted in holes made through the thickness of the upper slab and opening on to the space between the two vessels. It also includes two envelopes lining the walls of these vessels, establishing with them small section channels for the circulation of the neutral gas cooled against the safety vessel and heated against the main vessel [fr

  7. PWR vessel flaw distribution development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.; Kinsman, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on PWR pressure vessels which operate under NRC rules and regulatory guides intended to prevent failure of the vessels. Plants failing to meet the operating criteria specified under these rules and regulations are required to analytically demonstrate fitness for service in order to continue operation. The initial flaw size or distribution of initial vessel flaws is a key input to the required vessel integrity analyses. However, the flaw distribution assumed in the development of the NRC Regulations and recommended for the plant specific analyses is potentially over-conservative. This is because the distribution is based on the limited amount of vessel inspection data available at the time the criteria were being developed and does not take full advantage of the more recent and reliable domestic vessel inspection results. The U.S. Department of Energy is funding an effort through Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the possibility of developing a new flaw distribution based on the increased amount and improved reliability of domestic vessel inspection data. Results of Phase I of the program indicate that state-of-the-art NDE systems' capabilities are sufficient for development of a new flaw distribution that could ultimately provide life extension benefits over the presently required operating practice

  8. Nuclear reactor vessel decontamination systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    There is disclosed in the present application, a decontamination system for reactor vessels. The system is operatable without entry by personnel into the contaminated vessel before the decontamination operation is carried out and comprises an assembly which is introduced into the vertical cylindrical vessel of the typical boiling water reactor through the open top. The assembly includes a circular track which is centered by guideways permanently installed in the reactor vessel and the track guides opposed pairs of nozzles through which water under very high pressure is directed at the wall for progressively cutting and sweeping a tenacious radioactive coating as the nozzles are driven around the track in close proximity to the vessel wall. The whole assembly is hoisted to a level above the top of the vessel by a crane, outboard slides on the assembly brought into engagement with the permanent guideways and the assembly progressively lowered in the vessel as the decontamination operation progresses. The assembly also includes a low pressure nozzle which forms a spray umbrella above the high pressure nozzles to contain radioactive particles dislodged during the decontamination

  9. Effort variation regularization in sound field reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanakis, Nick; Jacobsen, Finn; Sarris, Ioannis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, active control is used in order to reproduce a given sound field in an extended spatial region. A method is proposed which minimizes the reproduction error at a number of control positions with the reproduction sources holding a certain relation within their complex strengths......), and adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS), both under free-field conditions and in reverberant rooms. It is shown that effort variation regularization overcomes the problems associated with small spaces and with a low ratio of direct to reverberant energy, improving thus the reproduction accuracy...

  10. Contamination-free sounding rocket Langmuir probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatucci, W. E.; Schuck, P. W.; Walker, D. N.; Kintner, P. M.; Powell, S.; Holback, B.; Leonhardt, D.

    2001-04-01

    A technique for removing surface contaminants from a sounding rocket spherical Langmuir probe is presented. Contamination layers present on probe surfaces can skew the collected data, resulting in the incorrect determination of plasma parameters. Despite following the usual probe cleaning techniques that are used prior to a launch, the probe surface can become coated with layers of adsorbed neutral gas in less than a second when exposed to atmosphere. The laboratory tests reported here show that by heating the probe from the interior using a small halogen lamp, adsorbed neutral particles can be removed from the probe surface, allowing accurate plasma parameter measurements to be made.

  11. Fourth sound in relativistic superfluidity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vil'chinskij, S.I.; Fomin, P.I.

    1995-01-01

    The Lorentz-covariant equations describing propagation of the fourth sound in the relativistic theory of superfluidity are derived. The expressions for the velocity of the fourth sound are obtained. The character of oscillation in sound is determined

  12. Ichthyophonus in Puget Sound rockfish from the San Juan Islands archipelago and Puget Sound, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halos, D.; Hart, S.A.; Hershberger, P.; Kocan, R.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro explant cultures identified Ichthyophonus in 10.9% of 302 Puget Sound rockfish Sebastes emphaeus sampled from five sites in the San Juan Islands archipelago and Puget Sound, Washington, in 2003. None of the infected fish exhibited visible lesions and only a single fish was histologically positive. Significantly more females were infected (12.4%) than males (6.8%), and while infected males were only detected at two of the five sites, infected females were identified at all sites, with no significant differences in infection prevalence. Genomic sequences of Ichthyophonus isolates obtained from Puget Sound rockfish, Pacific herring Clupea pallasii, and Yukon River Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were identical in both the A and B regions of the small subunit 18S ribosomal DNA but were different from Ichthyophonus sequences previously isolated from four different species of rockfish from the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Ichthyophonus in Puget Sound rockfish may not have been previously detected because the infection is subclinical in this species and earlier investigators did not utilize in vitro techniques for diagnosis of ichthyophoniasis. However, since clinical ichthyophoniasis has recently been identified in several other species of northeast Pacific rockfishes, it is hypothesized that this either is an emerging disease resulting from changing marine conditions or the result of introduction by infected southern species that appear during periodic El Nin??o events. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  13. 30 seismic analysis of FBR vessels: Coupling between components and vessels, fluid communications, imperfections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantenbein, F.; Gibert, R.J.; Aita, S.; Durandet, E.

    1988-01-01

    The internal structures of a loop type breeder reactors such as SUPERPHENIX are composed of axisymmetrical shells separated by fluid volumes. Seismic analysis is usually performed by axisymmetric finite element model taking into account fluid structure interaction but the geometry is in fact 3D due to components, small communications between fluid volumes and imperfections in the vessels. The methods to take this 3D behaviour into account are based on Fourier decomposition of the motion and substructuration. They are briefly described in the following chapters. The influence of components and of small communications on a block reactor similar to SPX1 will also be presented. 15 refs, 20 figs

  14. EUVS Sounding Rocket Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alan S.

    1996-01-01

    During the first half of this year (CY 1996), the EUVS project began preparations of the EUVS payload for the upcoming NASA sounding rocket flight 36.148CL, slated for launch on July 26, 1996 to observe and record a high-resolution (approx. 2 A FWHM) EUV spectrum of the planet Venus. These preparations were designed to improve the spectral resolution and sensitivity performance of the EUVS payload as well as prepare the payload for this upcoming mission. The following is a list of the EUVS project activities that have taken place since the beginning of this CY: (1) Applied a fresh, new SiC optical coating to our existing 2400 groove/mm grating to boost its reflectivity; (2) modified the Ranicon science detector to boost its detective quantum efficiency with the addition of a repeller grid; (3) constructed a new entrance slit plane to achieve 2 A FWHM spectral resolution; (4) prepared and held the Payload Initiation Conference (PIC) with the assigned NASA support team from Wallops Island for the upcoming 36.148CL flight (PIC held on March 8, 1996; see Attachment A); (5) began wavelength calibration activities of EUVS in the laboratory; (6) made arrangements for travel to WSMR to begin integration activities in preparation for the July 1996 launch; (7) paper detailing our previous EUVS Venus mission (NASA flight 36.117CL) published in Icarus (see Attachment B); and (8) continued data analysis of the previous EUVS mission 36.137CL (Spica occultation flight).

  15. Uncertainty analysis of minimum vessel liquid inventory during a small-break LOCA in a B ampersand W Plant: An application of the CSAU methodology using the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M.G.; Ghan, L.S.

    1992-12-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) revised the emergency core cooling system licensing rule to allow the use of best estimate computer codes, provided the uncertainty of the calculations are quantified and used in the licensing and regulation process. The NRC developed a generic methodology called Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) to evaluate best estimate code uncertainties. The objective of this work was to adapt and demonstrate the CSAU methodology for a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) in a Pressurized Water Reactor of Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company lowered loop design using RELAP5/MOD3 as the simulation tool. The CSAU methodology was successfully demonstrated for the new set of variants defined in this project (scenario, plant design, code). However, the robustness of the reactor design to this SBLOCA scenario limits the applicability of the specific results to other plants or scenarios. Several aspects of the code were not exercised because the conditions of the transient never reached enough severity. The plant operator proved to be a determining factor in the course of the transient scenario, and steps were taken to include the operator in the model, simulation, and analyses

  16. Sound Clocks and Sonic Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Scott L.; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2017-10-01

    Sound propagation within certain non-relativistic condensed matter models obeys a relativistic wave equation despite such systems admitting entirely non-relativistic descriptions. A natural question that arises upon consideration of this is, "do devices exist that will experience the relativity in these systems?" We describe a thought experiment in which `acoustic observers' possess devices called sound clocks that can be connected to form chains. Careful investigation shows that appropriately constructed chains of stationary and moving sound clocks are perceived by observers on the other chain as undergoing the relativistic phenomena of length contraction and time dilation by the Lorentz factor, γ , with c the speed of sound. Sound clocks within moving chains actually tick less frequently than stationary ones and must be separated by a shorter distance than when stationary to satisfy simultaneity conditions. Stationary sound clocks appear to be length contracted and time dilated to moving observers due to their misunderstanding of their own state of motion with respect to the laboratory. Observers restricted to using sound clocks describe a universe kinematically consistent with the theory of special relativity, despite the preferred frame of their universe in the laboratory. Such devices show promise in further probing analogue relativity models, for example in investigating phenomena that require careful consideration of the proper time elapsed for observers.

  17. Sound localization and occupational noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro de Lemos Menezes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of occupational noise on sound localization in different spatial planes and frequencies among normal hearing firefighters. METHOD: A total of 29 adults with pure-tone hearing thresholds below 25 dB took part in the study. The participants were divided into a group of 19 firefighters exposed to occupational noise and a control group of 10 adults who were not exposed to such noise. All subjects were assigned a sound localization task involving 117 stimuli from 13 sound sources that were spatially distributed in horizontal, vertical, midsagittal and transverse planes. The three stimuli, which were square waves with fundamental frequencies of 500, 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, were presented at a sound level of 70 dB and were randomly repeated three times from each sound source. The angle between the speaker's axis in the same plane was 45°, and the distance to the subject was 1 m. RESULT: The results demonstrate that the sound localization ability of the firefighters was significantly lower (p<0.01 than that of the control group. CONCLUSION: Exposure to occupational noise, even when not resulting in hearing loss, may lead to a diminished ability to locate a sound source.

  18. Vacuum vessel for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Koji; Imura, Yasuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide constituted method for easily performing baking of vacuum vessel, using short-circuiting segments. Constitution: At the time of baking, one turn circuit is formed by the vacuum vessel and short-circuiting segments, and current transformer converting the one turn circuit into a secondary circuit by the primary coil and iron core is formed, and the vacuum vessel is Joule heated by an induction current from the primary coil. After completion of baking, the short-circuiting segments are removed. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. PWR vessel inspection performance improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair Fairbrother, D.; Bodson, Francis

    1998-01-01

    A compact robot for ultrasonic inspection of reactor vessels has been developed that reduces setup logistics and schedule time for mandatory code inspections. Rather than installing a large structure to access the entire weld inspection area from its flange attachment, the compact robot examines welds in overlapping patches from a suction cup anchor to the shell wall. The compact robot size allows two robots to be operated in the vessel simultaneously. This significantly reduces the time required to complete the inspection. Experience to date indicates that time for vessel examinations can be reduced to fewer than four days. (author)

  20. Ultrasonographic Examination of Some Vessels in Dogs and the Characteristics of Blood Flow in These Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figurová M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The examination by Doppler ultrasonography provides haemodynamic information about blood flow velocity in a respective vessel. It specifies high- and lowresistance flow patterns. The aim of our study was to record the flow in a. carotis communis, a. femoralis and aa. renales in 16 adult clinically healthy dogs of small and medium size; characterize the types of vessels and also determine the pulsatility index (PI and the resistive index (RI of these vessels. The a. femoralis is a high-resistance vessel with a pronounced three-peak waveform. The aa. renales gives a typical picture of a low-resistance flow pattern. The characteristics of a. carotis communis involves different images of its branches a. carotis interna and a. carotis externa. In the investigated groups we observed a medium degree of pulsatility (atypical highresistance flow pattern with an absence of reverse flow. The mean measured values of indices for a. carotis communis were: left side PI 1.824 and RI 0.742; right side PI 1.891 and RI 0.746, and for aa. renales: PI 1.366 ± 0.04 and RI 0.684 ± 0.05.

  1. Takete and Maluma in Action: A Cross-Modal Relationship between Gestures and Sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Kazuko; Yamauchi, Naoto; Kawahara, Shigeto; Tanaka, Hideyuki

    Despite Saussure's famous observation that sound-meaning relationships are in principle arbitrary, we now have a substantial body of evidence that sounds themselves can have meanings, patterns often referred to as "sound symbolism". Previous studies have found that particular sounds can be associated with particular meanings, and also with particular static visual shapes. Less well studied is the association between sounds and dynamic movements. Using a free elicitation method, the current experiment shows that several sound symbolic associations between sounds and dynamic movements exist: (1) front vowels are more likely to be associated with small movements than with large movements; (2) front vowels are more likely to be associated with angular movements than with round movements; (3) obstruents are more likely to be associated with angular movements than with round movements; (4) voiced obstruents are more likely to be associated with large movements than with small movements. All of these results are compatible with the results of the previous studies of sound symbolism using static images or meanings. Overall, the current study supports the hypothesis that particular dynamic motions can be associated with particular sounds. Building on the current results, we discuss a possible practical application of these sound symbolic associations in sports instructions.

  2. Takete and Maluma in Action: A Cross-Modal Relationship between Gestures and Sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Shinohara

    Full Text Available Despite Saussure's famous observation that sound-meaning relationships are in principle arbitrary, we now have a substantial body of evidence that sounds themselves can have meanings, patterns often referred to as "sound symbolism". Previous studies have found that particular sounds can be associated with particular meanings, and also with particular static visual shapes. Less well studied is the association between sounds and dynamic movements. Using a free elicitation method, the current experiment shows that several sound symbolic associations between sounds and dynamic movements exist: (1 front vowels are more likely to be associated with small movements than with large movements; (2 front vowels are more likely to be associated with angular movements than with round movements; (3 obstruents are more likely to be associated with angular movements than with round movements; (4 voiced obstruents are more likely to be associated with large movements than with small movements. All of these results are compatible with the results of the previous studies of sound symbolism using static images or meanings. Overall, the current study supports the hypothesis that particular dynamic motions can be associated with particular sounds. Building on the current results, we discuss a possible practical application of these sound symbolic associations in sports instructions.

  3. Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

    2012-03-30

    community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project

  4. Special enclosure for a pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.; Wedellsborg, U.W.

    1993-01-01

    A pressure vessel enclosure is described comprising a primary pressure vessel, a first pressure vessel containment assembly adapted to enclose said primary pressure vessel and be spaced apart therefrom, a first upper pressure vessel jacket adapted to enclose the upper half of said first pressure vessel containment assembly and be spaced apart therefrom, said upper pressure vessel jacket having an upper rim and a lower rim, each of said rims connected in a slidable relationship to the outer surface of said first pressure vessel containment assembly, mean for connecting in a sealable relationship said upper rim of said first upper pressure vessel jacket to the outer surface of said first pressure vessel containment assembly, means for connecting in a sealable relationship said lower rim of said first upper pressure vessel jacket to the outer surface of said first pressure vessel containment assembly, a first lower pressure vessel jacket adapted to enclose the lower half of said first pressure vessel containment assembly and be spaced apart therefrom, said lower pressure vessel jacket having an upper rim connected in a slidable relationship to the outer surface of said first pressure vessel containment assembly, and means for connecting in a sealable relationship said upper rim of said first lower pressure vessel jacket to the outer surface of said first pressure vessel containment assembly, a second upper pressure vessel jacket adapted to enclose said first upper pressure vessel jacket and be spaced apart therefrom, said second upper pressure vessel jacket having an upper rim and a lower rim, each of said rims adapted to slidably engage the outer surface of said first upper pressure vessel jacket, means for sealing said rims, a second lower pressure vessel jacket adapted to enclose said first lower pressure vessel jacket and be spaced apart therefrom

  5. Sound intensity as a function of sound insulation partition

    OpenAIRE

    Cvetkovic , S.; Prascevic , R.

    1994-01-01

    In the modern engineering practice, the sound insulation of the partitions is the synthesis of the theory and of the experience acquired in the procedure of the field and of the laboratory measurement. The science and research public treat the sound insulation in the context of the emission and propagation of the acoustic energy in the media with the different acoustics impedance. In this paper, starting from the essence of physical concept of the intensity as the energy vector, the authors g...

  6. The Sounds of the Little and Big Bangs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Shuryak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies on heavy ion collisions have discovered that tiny fireballs of a new phase of matter—quark gluon plasma (QGP—undergo an explosion, called the Little Bang. In spite of its small size, not only is it well described by hydrodynamics, but even small perturbations on top of the explosion turned out to be well described by hydrodynamical sound modes. The cosmological Big Bang also went through phase transitions, related with Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD and electroweak/Higgs symmetry breaking, which are also expected to produce sounds. We discuss their subsequent evolution and hypothetical inverse acoustic cascade, amplifying the amplitude. Ultimately, the collision of two sound waves leads to the formation of one gravity waves. We briefly discuss how these gravity waves can be detected.

  7. The Sounds of the Little and Big Bangs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuryak, Edward

    2017-11-01

    Studies of heavy ion collisions have discovered that tiny fireballs of new phase of matter -- quark gluon plasma (QGP) -- undergoes explosion, called the Little Bang. In spite of its small size, it is not only well described by hydrodynamics, but even small perturbations on top of the explosion turned to be well described by hydrodynamical sound modes. The cosmological Big Bang also went through phase transitions, the QCD and electroweak ones, which are expected to produce sounds as well. We discuss their subsequent evolution and hypothetical inverse acoustic cascade, amplifying the amplitude. Ultimately, collision of two sound waves leads to formation of gravity waves, with the smallest wavelength. We briefly discuss how those can be detected.

  8. An Integrated Approach to Motion and Sound

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hahn, James K; Geigel, Joe; Lee, Jong W; Gritz, Larry; Takala, Tapio; Mishra, Suneil

    1995-01-01

    Until recently, sound has been given little attention in computer graphics and related domains of computer animation and virtual environments, although sounds which are properly synchronized to motion...

  9. Sound production and pectoral spine locking in a Neotropical catfish (Iheringichthys labrosus, Pimelodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier S. Tellechea

    Full Text Available Catfishes may have two sonic organs: pectoral spines for stridulation and swimbladder drumming muscles. The aim of this study was to characterize the sound production of the catfish Iheringichthys labrosus. The I. labrosus male and female emits two different types of sounds: stridulatory sounds (655.8 + 230 Hz consisting of a train of pulses, and drumming sounds (220 + 46 Hz, which are composed of single-pulse harmonic signals. Stridulatory sounds are emitted during abduction of the pectoral spine. At the base of the spine there is a dorsal process that bears a series of ridges on its latero-ventral surface, and by pressing the ridges against the groove (with an unspecialized rough surface during a fin sweep, the animal produce a series of short pulses. Drumming sound is produced by an extrinsic sonic muscle, originated on a flat tendon of the transverse process of the fourth vertebra and inserted on the rostral and ventral surface of the swimbladder. The sounds emitted by both mechanisms are emitted in distress situation. Distress was induced by manipulating fish in a laboratory tank while sounds were recorded. Our results indicate that the catfish initially emits a stridulatory sound, which is followed by a drumming sound. Simultaneous production of stridulatory and drumming sounds was also observed. The catfish drumming sounds were lower in dominant frequency than stridulatory sounds, and also exhibited a small degree of dominant frequency modulation. Another behaviour observed in this catfish was the pectoral spine locking. This reaction was always observed before the distress sound production. Like other authors outline, our results suggest that in the catfish I. labrosus stridulatory and drumming sounds may function primarily as a distress call.

  10. 2013 West Coast Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  11. 2011 West Coast Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  12. 2013 Great Lakes Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  13. 2011 Great Lakes Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  14. 2011 East Coast Vessel Tracklines

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  15. Coastal Discard Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data on the type and amount of marine resources that are discarded or interacted with by vessels that are selected to report to the Southeast...

  16. SC/OQ Vessel Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data tables holding information for the Surf Clam/Ocean Quahog vessel and dealer/processor logbooks (negative and positive), as well as individual tag information...

  17. Vessel Permit System Data Set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GARFO issues federal fishing permits annually to owners of fishing vessels who fish in the Greater Atlantic region, as required by federal regulation. These permits...

  18. Reactor pressure vessel status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Wichman, K.; Elliot, B.

    1994-12-01

    This report gives a brief description of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), followed by a discussion of the radiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials and the two indicators for measuring embrittlement, the end-of-license (EOL) reference temperature and the EOL upper-shelf energy. It also summarizes the GL 92-01 effort and presents, for all 37 boiling water reactor plants and 74 pressurized water reactor plants in the United States, the current status of compliance with regulatory requirements related to ensuring RPV integrity. The staff has evaluated the material data needed to predict neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline materials. These data will be stored in a computer database entitled the reactor vessel integrity database (RVID). This database will be updated annually to reflect the changes made by the licensees in future submittals and will be used by the NRC staff to assess the issues related to vessel structural integrity

  19. Reactor-vessel-sectioning demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, R.A.

    1981-07-01

    A successful technical demonstration of simulated reactor vessel sectioning was completed using the combined techniques of air arc gouging and flame cutting. A 4-ft x 3-ft x 9-in. thick sample was fabricated of A36 carbon steel to simulate a reactor vessel wall. A 1/4-in layer of stainless steel (SS) was tungsten inert gas (TIG)-welded to the carbon steel. Several techniques were considered to section the simulated reactor vessel: an air arc gouger was chosen to penetrate the stainless steel, and flame cutting was selected to sever the carbon steel. After the simulated vessel was successfully cut from the SS side, another cut was made, starting from the carbon steel side. This cut was also successful. Cutting from the carbon steel side has the advantages of cost reduction since the air arc gouging step is eliminated and contamination controlled because the molten metal is blown inward

  20. [Pathophysiological changes of umbilical vessels in intrauterine growth restriction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakó, Mária; Surányi, Andrea; Kaiser, László; Domokos, Dóra; Gáspár, Róbert; Bártfai, György

    2014-12-14

    The prevalence of intrauterine growth restriction is 4-5000/100,000 births, and they give the majority of perinatal morbidity. The aim of the authors was to compare the pathomorphologic data and vasoreactivity of umbilical vessels and placenta of small for date newborns to that of the normal pregnancies. Samples of the umbilical cord and placenta were divided into case and control groups. Two 10 cm long segments were cut of the umbilical cord at placental insertion. Tissue bath experiment was performed on umbilical vessels and pathomorphologic data were collected according to the Royal College of Pathologists' protocol. After the development of basal tone, oxytocin and desmopressin did not enhance the vascular contraction, but the pathomorphological and ultrasonographic data were significantly different in the two groups. The results indicate that umbilical vessels might not have oxytocin or vasopressin receptors. The pathomorphologic and flowmetric differences could be the causes of small birth weight.