WorldWideScience

Sample records for sound antarctica local

  1. P-band radar ice sounding in Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Kusk, Anders; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

    2012-01-01

    In February 2011, the Polarimetric Airborne Radar Ice Sounder (POLARIS) was flown in Antarctica in order to assess the feasibility of a potential space-based radar ice sounding mission. The campaign has demonstrated that the basal return is detectable in areas with up to 3 km thick cold ice...

  2. Scientific Experiences Using Argentinean Sounding Rockets in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Peña, Miguel

    2000-07-01

    Argentina in the sixties and seventies, had experience for developing and for using sounding rockets and payloads to perform scientific space experiments. Besides they have several bases in Antarctica with adequate premises and installations, also duly equipped aircrafts and trained crews to flight to the white continent. In February 1965, scientists and technical people from the "Instituto de Investigacion Aeronáutica y Espacial" (I.I.A.E.) with the cooperation of the Air Force and the Tucuman University, conducted the "Matienzo Operation" to measure X radiation and temperature in the upper atmosphere, using the Gamma Centauro rocket and also using big balloons. The people involved in the experience, the launcher, other material and equipment flew from the south tip of Argentina to the Matienzo base in Antarctica, in a C-47 aircraft equipped with skies an additional jet engine Marbore 2-C. Other experience was performed in 1975 in the "Marambio" Antartic Base, using the two stages solid propellent sounding rocket Castor, developed in Argentina. The payload was developed in cooperation with the Max Planck Institute of Germany. It consist of a special mixture including a shape charge to form a ionized cloud producing a jet of electrons travelling from Marambio base to the conjugate point in the Northern hemisphere. The cloud was observed by several ground stations in Argentina and also by a NASA aircraft with TV cameras, flying at East of New York. The objective of this experience was to study the electric and magnetic fields in altitude, the neutral points, the temperature and electrons profile. The objectives of both experiments were accomplished satisfactorily.

  3. Sound localization and occupational noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro de Lemos Menezes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of occupational noise on sound localization in different spatial planes and frequencies among normal hearing firefighters. METHOD: A total of 29 adults with pure-tone hearing thresholds below 25 dB took part in the study. The participants were divided into a group of 19 firefighters exposed to occupational noise and a control group of 10 adults who were not exposed to such noise. All subjects were assigned a sound localization task involving 117 stimuli from 13 sound sources that were spatially distributed in horizontal, vertical, midsagittal and transverse planes. The three stimuli, which were square waves with fundamental frequencies of 500, 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, were presented at a sound level of 70 dB and were randomly repeated three times from each sound source. The angle between the speaker's axis in the same plane was 45°, and the distance to the subject was 1 m. RESULT: The results demonstrate that the sound localization ability of the firefighters was significantly lower (p<0.01 than that of the control group. CONCLUSION: Exposure to occupational noise, even when not resulting in hearing loss, may lead to a diminished ability to locate a sound source.

  4. Sound Localization in Multisource Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    restricted sets of sound source locations are tested. Mounted directly in front of each loudspeaker on the sphere is a square cluster of four LEDs. 2.2.3...Stimuli The auditory stimuli employed in this experiment were 50 phonetically balanced (PB) monosyllabic words drawn from a single list of the PB50 word...5 which was subsequently used to record both detection and localization responses. An LED cluster , co-located with this reference loudspeaker, was

  5. Sea ice freeboard in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, derived by surface‐validated ICESat laser altimeter data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, Daniel; Rack, Wolfgang; Haas, Christian; Langhorne, Patricia J; Marsh, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have linked changes in the multiyear sea ice area of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, from 1213 km 2 in 2003 to 4923 km 2 in 2005, to the passage of large tabular icebergs preventing...

  6. Material sound source localization through headphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunai, Larisa; Peris-Fajarnes, Guillermo; Lengua, Ismael Lengua; Montaña, Ignacio Tortajada

    2012-09-01

    In the present paper a study of sound localization is carried out, considering two different sounds emitted from different hit materials (wood and bongo) as well as a Delta sound. The motivation of this research is to study how humans localize sounds coming from different materials, with the purpose of a future implementation of the acoustic sounds with better localization features in navigation aid systems or training audio-games suited for blind people. Wood and bongo sounds are recorded after hitting two objects made of these materials. Afterwards, they are analysed and processed. On the other hand, the Delta sound (click) is generated by using the Adobe Audition software, considering a frequency of 44.1 kHz. All sounds are analysed and convolved with previously measured non-individual Head-Related Transfer Functions both for an anechoic environment and for an environment with reverberation. The First Choice method is used in this experiment. Subjects are asked to localize the source position of the sound listened through the headphones, by using a graphic user interface. The analyses of the recorded data reveal that no significant differences are obtained either when considering the nature of the sounds (wood, bongo, Delta) or their environmental context (with or without reverberation). The localization accuracies for the anechoic sounds are: wood 90.19%, bongo 92.96% and Delta sound 89.59%, whereas for the sounds with reverberation the results are: wood 90.59%, bongo 92.63% and Delta sound 90.91%. According to these data, we can conclude that even when considering the reverberation effect, the localization accuracy does not significantly increase.

  7. An Isotopic Map of Dust Source Areas in the McMurdo Sound Sector of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakowski, M. A.; Aciego, S.; Delmonte, B.; Baroni, C.; Salvatore, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The McMurdo Sound sector of Antarctica features a unique, polar desert ecosystem characterized by low temperatures, hyper-aridity, and high-speed winds. These climatic conditions result in limited water sources, sparse vegetation, underdeveloped soils, and abundant unconsolidated sediment easily influenced by wind-driven transport. Radiogenic isotopes (87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd) provide constant signatures of dust from source- to sink-areas. Accordingly, aeolian dust derived from arid regions has been recognized in many studies as an important tracer of atmospheric circulation, as well as a tool for deciphering past climatic conditions in dust source regions. However, while major global dust sources (e.g. from South America, Africa, and Asia) are well studied and easily identifiable via distinct isotopic signatures when encountered in different depositional environments (e.g. Antarctic ice cores), local material from sources in and around the ice-free Dry Valleys and surrounding areas have remained in need of further documentation. We analyzed 40 samples of silt, sand, glacial drift, and weathered regolith material in both fine (<5μm) and coarse fractions collected from Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector, including Cape Royds, Cape Bird, and the McMurdo Ice Shelf. Here we present an ArcGIS-generated, high-precision geochemical map of Antarctic PSAs synthesized from our data and combined with geomorphological and stratigraphic information on the studied sites. We believe that our expanded isotopic catalogue and map can be used to enhance and/or prompt regional studies in a variety of disciplines, such as by providing greater constraints on models of regional dust variability and transport pathways and of the melting history of the Antarctic ice sheet, and by determining the provenance of dust archived in ice cores, lake sediment, soil records, and impurities in Antarctic sea-ice.

  8. Sound Localization Strategies in Three Predators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carr, Catherine E; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we compare some of the neural strategies for sound localization and encoding interaural time differences (ITDs) in three predatory species of Reptilia, alligators, barn owls and geckos. Birds and crocodilians are sister groups among the extant archosaurs, while geckos are lepidosaurs....... Despite the similar organization of their auditory systems, archosaurs and lizards use different strategies for encoding the ITDs that underlie localization of sound in azimuth. Barn owls encode ITD information using a place map, which is composed of neurons serving as labeled lines tuned for preferred...

  9. Eigenbeamforming array systems for sound source localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    D study aims at enhancing the performance of uniform circular ar- rays, and to a lesser extent, spherical arrays, for two- and three-dimensional localization problems, respectively. These array geometries allow to perform eigenbeamforming, beamforming based on the decomposition of the sound field......Microphone array technology has been widely used for the localization of sound sources. In particular, beamforming is a well-established signal processing method that maps the position of acoustic sources by steering the array transducers toward different directions electronically. The present Ph...... scatterer is recommended instead. A better visualization in the entire frequency range can be achieved with deconvo- lution methods, as they allow the recovery of the sound source distribution from a given beamformed map. Three efficient methods based on spectral procedures, originally conceived for planar...

  10. Second Sound for Heat Source Localization

    CERN Document Server

    Vennekate, Hannes; Uhrmacher, Michael; Quadt, Arnulf; Grosse-Knetter, Joern

    2011-01-01

    Defects on the surface of superconducting cavities can limit their accelerating gradient by localized heating. This results in a phase transition to the normal conduction state | a quench. A new application, involving Oscillating Superleak Transducers (OST) to locate such quench inducing heat spots on the surface of the cavities, has been developed by D. Hartill et al. at Cornell University in 2008. The OSTs enable the detection of heat transfer via second sound in super uid helium. This thesis presents new results on the analysis of their signal. Its behavior has been studied for dierent circumstances at setups at the University of Gottingen and at CERN. New approaches for an automated signal processing have been developed. Furthermore, a rst test setup for a single-cell Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) cavity has been prepared. Recommendations of a better signal retrieving for its operation are presented.

  11. Speech segregation based on sound localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Nicoleta; Wang, Deliang; Brown, Guy J.

    2003-10-01

    At a cocktail party, one can selectively attend to a single voice and filter out all the other acoustical interferences. How to simulate this perceptual ability remains a great challenge. This paper describes a novel, supervised learning approach to speech segregation, in which a target speech signal is separated from interfering sounds using spatial localization cues: interaural time differences (ITD) and interaural intensity differences (IID). Motivated by the auditory masking effect, the notion of an ``ideal'' time-frequency binary mask is suggested, which selects the target if it is stronger than the interference in a local time-frequency (T-F) unit. It is observed that within a narrow frequency band, modifications to the relative strength of the target source with respect to the interference trigger systematic changes for estimated ITD and IID. For a given spatial configuration, this interaction produces characteristic clustering in the binaural feature space. Consequently, pattern classification is performed in order to estimate ideal binary masks. A systematic evaluation in terms of signal-to-noise ratio as well as automatic speech recognition performance shows that the resulting system produces masks very close to ideal binary ones. A quantitative comparison shows that the model yields significant improvement in performance over an existing approach. Furthermore, under certain conditions the model produces large speech intelligibility improvements with normal listeners.

  12. Sound source localization and segregation with internally coupled ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bee, Mark A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    to their correct sources (sound source segregation). Here, we review anatomical, biophysical, neurophysiological, and behavioral studies aimed at identifying how the internally coupled ears of frogs contribute to sound source localization and segregation. Our review focuses on treefrogs in the genus Hyla......, as they are the most thoroughly studied frogs in terms of sound source localization and segregation. They also represent promising model systems for future work aimed at understanding better how internally coupled ears contribute to sound source localization and segregation. We conclude our review by enumerating...

  13. SoundCompass: A Distributed MEMS Microphone Array-Based Sensor for Sound Source Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelmer Tiete

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound source localization is a well-researched subject with applications ranging from localizing sniper fire in urban battlefields to cataloging wildlife in rural areas. One critical application is the localization of noise pollution sources in urban environments, due to an increasing body of evidence linking noise pollution to adverse effects on human health. Current noise mapping techniques often fail to accurately identify noise pollution sources, because they rely on the interpolation of a limited number of scattered sound sensors. Aiming to produce accurate noise pollution maps, we developed the SoundCompass, a low-cost sound sensor capable of measuring local noise levels and sound field directionality. Our first prototype is composed of a sensor array of 52 Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS microphones, an inertial measuring unit and a low-power field-programmable gate array (FPGA. This article presents the SoundCompass’s hardware and firmware design together with a data fusion technique that exploits the sensing capabilities of the SoundCompass in a wireless sensor network to localize noise pollution sources. Live tests produced a sound source localization accuracy of a few centimeters in a 25-m2 anechoic chamber, while simulation results accurately located up to five broadband sound sources in a 10,000-m2 open field.

  14. Stimulus coherence influences sound-field localization and fusion/segregation of leading and lagging sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Julian; van de Par, Steven; Trahiotis, Constantine

    2017-04-01

    The ability to localize sound sources in reverberant environments is dependent upon first-arriving information, an outcome commonly termed "the precedence effect." For example, in laboratory experiments, the combination of a leading (direct) sound followed by a lagging (reflected) sound is localized in the direction of the leading sound. This study was designed to measure the degree to which stimulus compactness/diffuseness (i.e., coherence as represented by interaural cross correlation) of leading and lagging sounds influences performance. The compactness/diffuseness of leading or lagging sounds was varied by either presenting a sound from a single loudspeaker or by presenting mutually uncorrelated versions of similar sounds from nine adjacent loudspeakers. In separate experiments, the listener's task was to point to the perceived location of leading and lagging 10-ms long low-pass filtered white noises or 2-s long tokens of speech. The leading and lagging stimuli were presented either from speakers located directly in front of the listeners or from speakers located ±45° to the right or left. The results indicate that leading compact (coherent) sounds influence perceived location more so than do leading diffuse (incoherent) sounds. This was true independent of whether the sounds were Gaussian noises or tokens of speech.

  15. The internal layering of Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica, from airborne radar-sounding data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Nanna Bjørnholt; Rippin, David; Vaughan, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of internal layering across Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica, as measured from airborne-radar data acquired during a survey conducted by the British Antarctic Survey and the University of Texas in the 2004/05 season. Internal layering is classified according...

  16. Processing of Horizontal Sound Localization Cues in Newborn Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Renáta; Háden, Gábor P; Török, Miklós; Winkler, István

    2015-01-01

    By measuring event-related brain potentials (ERPs), the authors tested the sensitivity of the newborn auditory cortex to sound lateralization and to the most common cues of horizontal sound localization. Sixty-eight healthy full-term newborn infants were presented with auditory oddball sequences composed of frequent and rare noise segments in four experimental conditions. The authors tested in them the detection of deviations in the primary cues of sound lateralization (interaural time and level difference) and in actual sound source location (free-field and monaural sound presentation). ERP correlates of deviance detection were measured in two time windows. Deviations in both primary sound localization cues and the ear of stimulation elicited a significant ERP difference in the early (90 to 140 msec) time window. Deviance in actual sound source location (the free-field condition) elicited a significant response in the late (290 to 340 msec) time window. The early differential response may indicate the detection of a change in the respective auditory features. The authors suggest that the late differential response, which was only elicited by actual sound source location deviation, reflects the detection of location deviance integrating the various cues of sound source location. Although the results suggest that all of the tested binaural cues are processed by the neonatal auditory cortex, utilizing the cues for locating sound sources of these cues may require maturation and learning.

  17. Assessment of legacy and emerging persistent organic pollutants in Weddell seal tissue (Leptonychotes weddellii) near McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumble, Stephen J.; Robinson, Eleanor M. [Baylor University, One Bear Place 97388, Waco, TX 76798-7388 (United States); Noren, Shawn R. [Institute of Marine Science, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Usenko, Sascha, E-mail: Sascha_Usenko@baylor.edu [Baylor University, One Bear Place 97388, Waco, TX 76798-7388 (United States); Davis, Jay [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Western Washington Fish and Wildlife Office, Lacey, WA 98503 (United States); Kanatous, Shane B. [Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1878 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Muscle samples were collected from pup, juvenile and adult Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) near McMurdo Sound, Antarctica during the austral summer of 2006. Blubber samples were collected from juvenile and adult seals. Samples were analyzed for emerging and legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including current and historic-use organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Of the 41 target analytes, 28 contaminants were recovered from the Weddell seal blubber, in this order of prevalence: p,p Prime -DDE, p,p Prime -DDT, trans-nonachlor, mirex, cis-nonachlor, PCB 153, PCB 138, dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, nonachlor III, PCB 187, oxychlordane, cis-chlordane, PCB 118, PBDE 47, PCB 156, PCB 149, PCB 180, PCB 101, PCB 170, PCB 105, o,p Prime -DDT, PCB 99, trans-chlordane, PCB 157, PCB 167, PCB 189, and PCB 114. Fewer POPs were found in the muscle samples, but were similar in the order of prevalence to that of the blubber: p,p Prime -DDE, o,p Prime -DDT, trans-nonachlor, nonachlor III, oxychlordane, p,p Prime -DDT, dieldrin, mirex, cis-nonachlor, PCB 138, and PCB 105. Besides differences in toxicant concentrations reported between the muscle and blubber, we found differences in POP levels according to age class and suggest that differences in blubber storage and/or mobilization of lipids result in age class differences in POPs. To our knowledge, such ontogenetic associations are novel. Importantly, data from this study suggest that p,p Prime -DDT is becoming less prevalent temporally, resulting in an increased proportion of its metabolite p,p Prime -DDE in the tissues of this top predator. In addition, this study is among the first to identify a PBDE congener in Weddell seals near the McMurdo Station. This may provide evidence of increased PBDE transport and encroachment in Antarctic wildlife. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PBDE measuring in Weddell seal blubber. Black

  18. Nondeterministic Sound Source Localization with Smartphones in Crowdsensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Viet Duc, Duc Viet; Kamminga, Jacob Wilhelm; Scholten, Johan; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Le, Viet Duc; Le Viet Duc, L Duc

    The proliferation of smartphones nowadays has enabled many crowd assisted applications including audio-based sensing. In such applications, detected sound sources are meaningless without location information. However, it is challenging to localize sound sources accurately in a crowd using only

  19. Measuring sound absorption using local field assumptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, E.R.

    2013-01-01

    To more effectively apply acoustically absorbing materials, it is desirable to measure angle-dependent sound absorption coefficients, preferably in situ. Existing measurement methods are based on an overall model of the acoustic field in front of the absorber, and are therefore sensitive to

  20. Ambient Sound-Based Collaborative Localization of Indeterministic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Kamminga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Localization is essential in wireless sensor networks. To our knowledge, no prior work has utilized low-cost devices for collaborative localization based on only ambient sound, without the support of local infrastructure. The reason may be the fact that most low-cost devices are indeterministic and suffer from uncertain input latencies. This uncertainty makes accurate localization challenging. Therefore, we present a collaborative localization algorithm (Cooperative Localization on Android with ambient Sound Sources (CLASS that simultaneously localizes the position of indeterministic devices and ambient sound sources without local infrastructure. The CLASS algorithm deals with the uncertainty by splitting the devices into subsets so that outliers can be removed from the time difference of arrival values and localization results. Since Android is indeterministic, we select Android devices to evaluate our approach. The algorithm is evaluated with an outdoor experiment and achieves a mean Root Mean Square Error (RMSE of 2.18 m with a standard deviation of 0.22 m. Estimated directions towards the sound sources have a mean RMSE of 17.5 ° and a standard deviation of 2.3 °. These results show that it is feasible to simultaneously achieve a relative positioning of both devices and sound sources with sufficient accuracy, even when using non-deterministic devices and platforms, such as Android.

  1. Ambient Sound-Based Collaborative Localization of Indeterministic Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Jacob Wilhelm; Le Viet Duc, L Duc; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Localization is essential in wireless sensor networks. To our knowledge, no prior work has utilized low-cost devices for collaborative localization based on only ambient sound, without the support of local infrastructure. The reason may be the fact that most low-cost devices are indeterministic and

  2. Development of a device to measure human sound localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Reinhard; Scheel, Norman

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of human sound discrimination and localization are important for basic empirical and clinical applications. After a short survey of other methods such as evoked potentials, the development of a new device to measure human sound localization is described and its use illustrated with some examples. Built from a polyacrylic hemisphere or--in a later version--from an orbicular aluminum frame, the apparatus uses multiple speakers to emit auditory stimuli. The patient sits in the middle of the perimeter and has to press a button when a sound is perceived. In addition, the participant has to identify the correct speaker as the source of the sound. With this method it is possible to map the auditory field.

  3. Observations of turbulence beneath sea ice in southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Stevens

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The first turbulence profiler observations beneath land fast sea ice which is directly adjacent to an Antarctic ice shelf are described. The stratification in the 325 m deep water column consisted of a layer of supercooled water in the upper 40 m lying above a quasi-linearly stratified water column with a sharp step in density at mid-depth. Turbulent energy dissipation rates were on average 3×10−8 m2 s−3 with peak bin-averaged values reaching 4×10−7 m2 s−3. The local dissipation rate per unit area was estimated to be 10 m Wm−2 on average with a peak of 50 m Wm−2. These values are consistent with a moderate baroclinic response to the tides. The small-scale turbulent energetics lie on the boundary between isotropy and buoyancy-affected. This will likely influence the formation and aggregation of frazil ice crystals within the supercooled layer. The data suggest that the large crystals observed in McMurdo Sound will transition from initial growth at scales smaller than the Kolmogorov lengthscale to sizes substantially (1–2 orders of magnitude greater than the Kolmogorov scale. An estimate of the experiment-averaged vertical diffusivity of mass Kρ yields a coefficient of around 2×10−4 m2s−1 although this increased by a factor of 2 near the surface. Combining this estimate of Kρ with available observations of average and maximum currents suggests the layer of supercooled water can persist for a distance of ~250 km from the front of the McMurdo Ice Shelf.

  4. Fast neuromorphic sound localization for binaural hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Paul K J; Ryu, Hyunsurk; Lee, Jun Haeng; Shin, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyoo Bin; Woo, Jooyeon; Kim, Jun-Seok; Kang, Byung Chang; Liu, Shih-Chii; Delbruck, Tobi

    2013-01-01

    We report on the neuromorphic sound localization circuit which can enhance the perceptual sensation in a hearing aid system. All elements are simple leaky integrate-and-fire neuron circuits with different parameters optimized to suppress the impacts of synaptic circuit noises. The detection range and resolution of the proposed neuromorphic circuit are 500 us and 5 us, respectively. Our results show that, the proposed technique can localize a sound pulse with extremely narrow duration (∼ 1 ms) resulting in real-time response.

  5. Binaural sound localizer for azimuthal movement detection based on diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keonwook; Choi, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Sound localization can be realized by utilizing the physics of acoustics in various methods. This paper investigates a novel detection architecture for the azimuthal movement of sound source based on the interaural level difference (ILD) between two receivers. One of the microphones in the system is surrounded by barriers of various heights in order to cast the direction dependent diffraction of the incoming signal. The gradient analysis of the ILD between the structured and unstructured microphone demonstrates the rotation directions as clockwise, counter clockwise, and no rotation of the sound source. Acoustic experiments with different types of sound source over a wide range of target movements show that the average true positive and false positive rates are 67% and 16%, respectively. Spectral analysis demonstrates that the low frequency delivers decreased true and false positive rates and the high frequency presents increases of both rates, overall.

  6. A new carnivorous shallow-water sponge from McMurdo Sound, Antarctica (Porifera, Poecilosclerida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, R.W.M.; Baker, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    A new shallow-water representative of the carnviorous sponge genus Asbestopluma is described from the southernmost Antarctic region of McMurdo Sound. Asbestopluma (Asbestopluma) vaceleti n.sp. is a white, thin, sparingly branched sponge fringed by filaments along its entire length, with a slight

  7. Modeling the utility of binaural cues for underwater sound localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jennifer N; Lloyd, David R; Banks, Patchouly N; Mercado, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    The binaural cues used by terrestrial animals for sound localization in azimuth may not always suffice for accurate sound localization underwater. The purpose of this research was to examine the theoretical limits of interaural timing and level differences available underwater using computational and physical models. A paired-hydrophone system was used to record sounds transmitted underwater and recordings were analyzed using neural networks calibrated to reflect the auditory capabilities of terrestrial mammals. Estimates of source direction based on temporal differences were most accurate for frequencies between 0.5 and 1.75 kHz, with greater resolution toward the midline (2°), and lower resolution toward the periphery (9°). Level cues also changed systematically with source azimuth, even at lower frequencies than expected from theoretical calculations, suggesting that binaural mechanical coupling (e.g., through bone conduction) might, in principle, facilitate underwater sound localization. Overall, the relatively limited ability of the model to estimate source position using temporal and level difference cues underwater suggests that animals such as whales may use additional cues to accurately localize conspecifics and predators at long distances. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multiple sound source localization using gammatone auditory filtering and direct sound componence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaiyu; Cao, Li

    2017-06-01

    In order to research multiple sound source localization with room reverberation and background noise, we analyze the shortcomings of traditional broadband MUSIC and ordinary auditory filtering based broadband MUSIC method, then a new broadband MUSIC algorithm with gammatone auditory filtering of frequency component selection control and detection of ascending segment of direct sound componence is proposed. The proposed algorithm controls frequency component within the interested frequency band in multichannel bandpass filter stage. Detecting the direct sound componence of the sound source for suppressing room reverberation interference is also proposed, whose merits are fast calculation and avoiding using more complex de-reverberation processing algorithm. Besides, the pseudo-spectrum of different frequency channels is weighted by their maximum amplitude for every speech frame. Through the simulation and real room reverberation environment experiments, the proposed method has good performance. Dynamic multiple sound source localization experimental results indicate that the average absolute error of azimuth estimated by the proposed algorithm is less and the histogram result has higher angle resolution.

  9. Sound localization, sound lateralization, and binaural masking level differences in young children with normal hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deun, Lieselot; van Wieringen, Astrid; Van den Bogaert, Tim; Scherf, Fanny; Offeciers, F Erwin; Van de Heyning, Paul H; Desloovere, Christian; Dhooge, Ingeborg J; Deggouj, Naïma; De Raeve, Leo; Wouters, Jan

    2009-04-01

    In this study, procedures for measuring sound localization, sound lateralization, and binaural masking level differences (BMLDs) in young children were developed. Sensitivity for these tasks was assessed in large groups of children between 4 and 9 yr of age to investigate potential developmental trends. Sound localization was measured in the sound field, with a broadband bell-ring presented from one of nine loudspeakers positioned in the frontal horizontal field. A group of 33 children between 4 and 6 yr of age and 5 adults took part in this experiment. Sound lateralization based on interaural time differences was measured with headphones in 49 children between 4 and 9 yr of age and 10 adults. A low-frequency stimulus containing harmonics 2 to 5 from a click train with a rate of 160 Hz was used. In the BMLD test, the same filtered click train was presented diotically or dichotically (phase reversed or time delayed) in a broadband (200 to 1000 Hz) frozen noise to 23 children between 4 and 6 yr of age and 10 adults. For comparison with literature, additional measurements with a 500-Hz sinusoid were administered to adults. All tasks were adapted to the interest and attention span of young children. Children of 5 yr of age did not perform significantly different from adults on the sound localization task, but mean absolute errors were larger for the 4-yr-olds. Also on the BMLD task, 5-yr-old children performed at the adult level, whereas the 4-yr-old children obtained significantly less binaural unmasking compared with the adults. Concerning sound lateralization, a small but significant difference between adults and children existed, but no age effects were apparent in the 4- to 9-yr-old group. Overall, the variation was relatively large in the 4-yr-old group, with some of the children performing at adult level, in all three tasks. The results of this study show that the modified procedures are suitable for testing children from the age of 4 to 5 yr. Furthermore, it

  10. Vertical-plane sound localization with distorted spectral cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Ewan A.; Sabin, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    For human listeners, the primary cues for localization in the vertical plane are provided by the direction-dependent filtering of the pinnae, head, and upper body. Vertical-plane localization generally is accurate for broadband sounds, but when such sounds are presented at near-threshold levels or at high levels with short durations (spectral notches were filled in, peaks were levelled off, or the spectral contrast of the entire profile was reduced or expanded. As notches were filled in progressively or peaks levelled progressively, elevation gain decreased in a graded manner similar to that observed as sensation level is reduced below 30dB or, for brief sounds, increased above 45dB. As spectral contrast was reduced, gain dropped only at the most extreme reduction (25% of normal). Spectral contrast expansion had little effect. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that loss of representation of spectral features contributes to reduced elevation gain at low and high sound levels. The results also suggest that perceived location depends on a correlation-like spectral matching process that is sensitive to the relative, rather than absolute, across-frequency shape of the spectral profile. PMID:24076423

  11. Vertical-plane sound localization with distorted spectral cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Ewan A; Sabin, Andrew T

    2013-12-01

    For human listeners, the primary cues for localization in the vertical plane are provided by the direction-dependent filtering of the pinnae, head, and upper body. Vertical-plane localization generally is accurate for broadband sounds, but when such sounds are presented at near-threshold levels or at high levels with short durations (headphones. Faithfully synthesized targets were interleaved with targets for which the directional transfer function spectral notches were filled in, peaks were leveled off, or the spectral contrast of the entire profile was reduced or expanded. As notches were filled in progressively or peaks leveled progressively, elevation gain decreased in a graded manner similar to that observed as sensation level is reduced below 30 dB or, for brief sounds, increased above 45 dB. As spectral contrast was reduced, gain dropped only at the most extreme reduction (25% of normal). Spectral contrast expansion had little effect. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that loss of representation of spectral features contributes to reduced elevation gain at low and high sound levels. The results also suggest that perceived location depends on a correlation-like spectral matching process that is sensitive to the relative, rather than absolute, across-frequency shape of the spectral profile. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Decadal Trends in Abundance, Size and Condition of Antarctic Toothfish in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, 1972-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainley, David G.; Nur, Nadav; Eastman, Joseph T.; Ballard. Grant; Parkinson, Claire L; Evans, Clive W.; DeVries, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    We report analyses of a dataset spanning 38 years of near-annual fishing for Antarctic toothfish Dissostichus mawsoni, using a vertical setline through the fast ice of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, 1972-2010. This constitutes one of the longest biological time series in the Southern Ocean, and certainly the longest for any fish. Fish total length, condition and catch per unit effort (CPUE) were derived from the more than 5500 fish caught. Contrary to expectation, length-frequency was dominated by fish in the upper half of the industrial catch. The discrepancy may be due to biases in the sampling capabilities of vertical (this study) versus benthic (horizontal) fishing gear (industry long lines), related to the fact that only large Antarctic toothfish (more than 100 cm TL) are neutrally buoyant and occur in the water column. Fish length and condition increased from the early 1970s to the early 1990s and then decreased, related to sea ice cover, with lags of 8 months to 5 years, and may ultimately be related to the fishery (which targets large fish) and changes in the Southern Annular Mode through effects on toothfish main prey, Antarctic silverfish Pleuragramma antarcticum. CPUE was constant through 2001 and then decreased dramatically, likely related to the industrial fishery, which began in 1996 and which concentrates effort over the Ross Sea slope, where tagged McMurdo fish have been found. Due to limited prey choices and, therefore, close coupling among mesopredators of the Ross Sea, Antarctic toothfish included, the fishery may be altering the trophic structure of the Ross Sea.

  13. The Effect of Integrated Hearing Protection Surround Levels on Sound Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Carmichael, E.L., Harris, F.P., Story, B.H.: Effects of binaural electronic hearing protectors on localization and response time to sounds in the horizontal...The effect of integrated hearing protection surround levels on sound localization Sharon M. Abel, Craig Burrell, Douglas...The effect of integrated hearing protection surround levels on sound localization Sharon M. Abel, Craig

  14. Monaural Sound Localization Based on Reflective Structure and Homomorphic Deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonseok; Choi, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The asymmetric structure around the receiver provides a particular time delay for the specific incoming propagation. This paper designs a monaural sound localization system based on the reflective structure around the microphone. The reflective plates are placed to present the direction-wise time delay, which is naturally processed by convolutional operation with a sound source. The received signal is separated for estimating the dominant time delay by using homomorphic deconvolution, which utilizes the real cepstrum and inverse cepstrum sequentially to derive the propagation response’s autocorrelation. Once the localization system accurately estimates the information, the time delay model computes the corresponding reflection for localization. Because of the structure limitation, two stages of the localization process perform the estimation procedure as range and angle. The software toolchain from propagation physics and algorithm simulation realizes the optimal 3D-printed structure. The acoustic experiments in the anechoic chamber denote that 79.0% of the study range data from the isotropic signal is properly detected by the response value, and 87.5% of the specific direction data from the study range signal is properly estimated by the response time. The product of both rates shows the overall hit rate to be 69.1%. PMID:28946625

  15. Cosmogenic evidence for limited local LGM glacial expansion, Denton Hills, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Kurt; Fink, David; Storey, Bryan; De Pascale, Gregory P.; Quigley, Mark; Fujioka, Toshiyuki

    2017-12-01

    The geomorphology of the Denton Hills provides insight into the timing and magnitude of glacial retreats in a region of Antarctica isolated from the influence of the East Antarctic ice sheet. We present 26 Beryllium-10 surface exposure ages from a variety of glacial and lacustrine features in the Garwood and Miers valleys to document the glacial history of the area from 10 to 286 ka. Our data show that the cold-based Miers, Joyce and Garwood glaciers retreated little since their maximum positions at 37.2 ± 6.9 (1σ n = 4), 35.1 ± 1.5 (1σ, n = 3) and 35.6 ± 10.1 (1σ, n = 6) ka respectively. The similar timing of advance of all three glaciers and the lack of a significant glacial expansion during the global LGM suggests a local LGM for the Denton Hills between ca. 26 and 51 ka, with a mean age of 36.0 ± 7.5 (1σ, n = 13) ka. A second cohort of exposure ages provides constraints to the behaviour of Glacial Lake Trowbridge that formerly occupied Miers Valley in the late Pleistocene. These data show active modification of the landscape from ∼20 ka until the withdrawal of ice from the valley mouths, and deposition of Ross Sea Drift, at 10-14 ka.

  16. Non-invasive and Locally Resolved Measurement of Sound Velocity by Ultrasound

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mario Wolf; Elfgard Kühnicke

    2015-01-01

      A new method to measure sound velocity and distance simultaneously and locally resolved by an ultrasound annular array is developed in media with constant sound velocity and then applied in media...

  17. Multichannel surface clutter suppression: East Antarctica P-band SAR ice sounding in the presence of grating lobes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekaert, David; Gebert, Nicolas; Lin, Chung-Chi

    2014-01-01

    with the European Space Agency's P-band POLarimetric Airborne Radar Ice Sounder (POLARIS). The 4 m long antenna of POLARIS enables simultaneous reception of up to four across-track channels. It was operated in 2011 over Antarctica at a high flight altitude of 3200 m. Different coherent weighting techniques...

  18. Three Microphones Embedded System for Single Unknown Sound Source Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviu Ilie Bob

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an embedded system for localizing a sound source in a two-dimensional plane. It uses an ensemble of three microphones placed in a straight line, and a digital signal processor for capturing and processing the signals. The controller is equipped on a development board, along with a display which shows the calculated results. The signal processing consists of a slightly modified Cross Correlation method used to obtain the delays of arrival of the three microphone signals. To obtain the distance and angle, inversed mathematical equations were used, determined in Matlab from the geometric direct equations. The obtained results show a minimal error for short distances and the error increases when the distance between the sound source and the microphones gets bigger. A large distance also shows some flaws in obtaining the right time delays, thus some erroneous results can be observed. This is caused by the limited power of the speaker used for tests, but also by the environmental noise and the reverberations. The system could be improved by using a faster approach for extracting the time delay information from the signals.

  19. The effects of distractor sounds presented through bone conduction headphones on the localization of critical environmental sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Keenan R; Walker, Bruce N

    2017-05-01

    Bone conduction headphones are devices that transmit sound through the bones of a listener's head rather than through the air in their outer ear. They have been marketed as a safer way to enjoy audio content while walking, jogging, or cycling. However, listening to distracting sounds over bone conduction may still disrupt a listener's awareness of their auditory environment. The present study investigated the nature of this interference with the faculty of sound source localization-a key prerequisite for generating situation awareness through audio. Participants sat in the middle of a circle of loudspeakers and listened for target sounds played from different directions. Each time they heard a sound, they responded by indicating what direction they judged the sound to have come from. Meanwhile, participants listened to distractor sounds played through bone conduction headphones. Participants heard (1) no distractor sounds, (2) a spoken story that they were instructed to ignore, and (3) the same spoken story that they were instructed to attend to. For conditions (2) and (3), some participants heard a version of the story with background music, while others heard the spoken story without the music. Participants had greater localization error in the distractor-present conditions. Additionally, participants who heard the spoken story with music exhibited greater localization error. However, there was no effect of whether participants ignored or attended to distractors. This pattern was attributed to masking effects, and was more pronounced for narrow-band targets compared to broadband targets. Post-hoc analyses found evidence of a 'pulling' effect, in which localization judgments were systematically biased toward the apparent direction of the bone conducted distractors. These results indicate that using bone conduction headphones can be expected to cause a decline in a person's awareness of their environment, in a subtle way that a jogger or cyclist might not be

  20. The Impact of Masker Fringe and Masker Sparial Uncertainty on Sound Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    spatial uncertainty on sound localization and to examine how such effects might be related to binaural detection and informational masking. 2 Methods...AFRL-RH-WP-TP-2012-0037 THE IMPACT OF MASKER FRINGE AND MASKER SPARIAL UNCERTAINTY ON SOUND LOCALIZATION Brian D. Simpson¹, Robert H...MASKER FRINGE AND MASKER SPARIAL UNCERTAINTY ON SOUND LOCALIZATION 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  1. Contribution of head shadow and pinna cues to chronic monaural sound localization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanrooij, M. van; Opstal, A.J. van

    2004-01-01

    Monaurally deaf people lack the binaural acoustic difference cues in sound level and timing that are needed to encode sound location in the horizontal plane (azimuth). It has been proposed that these people therefore rely on spectral pinna cues of their normal ear to localize sounds. However, the

  2. Effect of source spectrum on sound localization in an everyday reverberant room

    OpenAIRE

    Ihlefeld, Antje; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments explored how frequency content impacts sound localization for sounds containing reverberant energy. Virtual sound sources from thirteen lateral angles and four distances were simulated in the frontal horizontal plane using binaural room impulse responses measured in an everyday office. Experiment 1 compared localization judgments for one-octave-wide noise centered at either 750 Hz (low) or 6000 Hz (high). For both band-limited noises, perceived lateral angle varied monotonical...

  3. Synaptic Inhibition in Avian Interaural Level Difference Sound Localizing Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Rebecca J; Lu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition plays a fundamental role in the neural computation of the interaural level difference (ILD), an important cue for the localization of high-frequency sound. Here, we studied the inhibitory synaptic currents in the chicken posterior portion of the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (LLDp), the first binaural level difference encoder of the avian auditory pathway. Using whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we provide the first evidence confirming a monosynaptic inhibition driven by direct electrical and chemical stimulation of the contralateral LLDp, establishing the reciprocal inhibitory connection between the two LLDps, a long-standing assumption in the field. This inhibition was largely mediated by GABA A receptors; however, functional glycine receptors were also identified. The reversal potential for the Cl - channels measured with gramicidin-perforated patch recordings was hyperpolarizing (-88 mV), corresponding to a low intracellular Cl - concentration (5.2 mm). Pharmacological manipulations of KCC2 (outwardly Cl - transporter) activity demonstrate that LLDp neurons can maintain a low intracellular Cl - concentration under a high Cl - load, allowing for the maintenance of hyperpolarizing inhibition. We further demonstrate that hyperpolarizing inhibition was more effective at regulating cellular excitability than depolarizing inhibition in LLDp neurons.

  4. Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, Craig R [University at Albany, State University of New York; Santanello, Joseph A [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Gentine, Pierre [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This document presents initial analyses of the enhanced radiosonde observations obtained during the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies Field Campaign (ESLCS), which took place at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) from June 15 to August 31, 2015. During ESLCS, routine 4-times-daily radiosonde measurements at the ARM-SGP CF were augmented on 12 days (June 18 and 29; July 11, 14, 19, and 26; August 15, 16, 21, 25, 26, and 27) with daytime 1-hourly radiosondes and 10-minute ‘trailer’ radiosondes every 3 hours. These 12 intensive operational period (IOP) days were selected on the basis of prior-day qualitative forecasts of potential land-atmosphere coupling strength. The campaign captured 2 dry soil convection advantage days (June 29 and July 14) and 10 atmospherically controlled days. Other noteworthy IOP events include: 2 soil dry-down sequences (July 11-14-19 and August 21-25-26), a 2-day clear-sky case (August 15-16), and the passing of Tropical Storm Bill (June 18). To date, the ESLCS data set constitutes the highest-temporal-resolution sampling of the evolution of the daytime planetary boundary layer (PBL) using radiosondes at the ARM-SGP. The data set is expected to contribute to: 1) improved understanding and modeling of the diurnal evolution of the PBL, particularly with regard to the role of local soil wetness, and (2) new insights into the appropriateness of current ARM-SGP CF thermodynamic sampling strategies.

  5. Resonance based respiratory sound decomposition aiming at localization of crackles in noisy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulukaya, Sezer; Serbes, Gorkem; Kahya, Yasemin P

    2016-08-01

    In this work, resonance based decomposition of lung sounds that aims to separate wheeze, crackle and vesicular sounds into three individual channels while automatically localizing crackles for both synthetic and real data is presented. Previous works focus on stationary-non stationary discrimination to separate crackles and vesicular sounds disregarding wheezes which are stationary as compared to crackles. However, wheeze sounds include important cues about the underlying pathology. Using two different threshold methods and synthetic sound generation scenarios in the presence of wheezes, resonance based decomposition performs 89.5 % crackle localization recall rate for white Gaussian noise and 98.6 % crackle localization recall rate for healthy vesicular sound treated as noise at low signal-to-noise ratios. Besides, an adaptive threshold determination which is independent from the channel at which it will be applied is used and is found to be robust to noise.

  6. Sound source localization method in an environment with flow based on Amiet-IMACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Long; Li, Min; Qin, Sheng; Fu, Qiang; Yang, Debin

    2017-05-01

    A sound source localization method is proposed to localize and analyze the sound source in an environment with airflow. It combines the improved mapping of acoustic correlated sources (IMACS) method and Amiet's method, and is called Amiet-IMACS. It can localize uncorrelated and correlated sound sources with airflow. To implement this approach, Amiet's method is used to correct the sound propagation path in 3D, which improves the accuracy of the array manifold matrix and decreases the position error of the localized source. Then, the mapping of acoustic correlated sources (MACS) method, which is as a high-resolution sound source localization algorithm, is improved by self-adjusting the constraint parameter at each irritation process to increase convergence speed. A sound source localization experiment using a pair of loud speakers in an anechoic wind tunnel under different flow speeds is conducted. The experiment exhibits the advantage of Amiet-IMACS in localizing a more accurate sound source position compared with implementing IMACS alone in an environment with flow. Moreover, the aerodynamic noise produced by a NASA EPPLER 862 STRUT airfoil model in airflow with a velocity of 80 m/s is localized using the proposed method, which further proves its effectiveness in a flow environment. Finally, the relationship between the source position of this airfoil model and its frequency, along with its generation mechanism, is determined and interpreted.

  7. Challenges to Airborne and Orbital Radar Sounding in the Presence of Surface Clutter: Lessons Learned (so far) from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, J. W.; Peters, M. E.; Kempf, S. D.; Morse, D. L.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    The search for life and in-situ resources for exploration on Mars targets both liquid and solid water, whether distributed or in reservoirs. Massive surface ice may cover potential habitats or other features of great interest. Ice-rich layering in the high latitudes holds clues to the climatic history of the planet. Multiple geophysical methods will clearly be necessary to fully characterize these various states of water (and other forms of ice), but radar sounding will be a critical component of the effort. Orbital radar sounders are already being employed and plans for surface-based and suborbital, above-surface radar sounders are being discussed. The difficulties in interpreting data from each type of platform are quite different. Given the lack of existing orbital radar sounding data from any planetary body, the analysis of airborne radar sounding data is quite useful for assessing the advantages and disadvantages of above-surface radar sounding on Mars. In addition to over 300,000 line-km of data collected over the Antarctic ice sheet by airborne radar sounding, we have recently analyzed data from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica where conditions and features emulate Mars in several respects. These airborne radar sounding data were collected over an ice-free area of Taylor Valley, ice-covered lakes, Taylor Glacier, and Beacon Valley. The pulsed radar (52.5 - 67.5 MHz chirp) was coherently recorded. Pulse compression and unfocused SAR processing were applied. One of the most challenging aspects of above-surface radar sounding is the determination of echo sources. This can, of course, be problematic for surface-based radar sounders given possible subsurface scattering geometries, but it is most severe for above-surface sounders because echoes from cross-track surface topography (surface clutter) can have similar time delays to those from the subsurface. We have developed two techniques to accomplish the identification of this surface clutter in single-pass airborne

  8. Spike-timing-based computation in sound localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan F M Goodman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Spike timing is precise in the auditory system and it has been argued that it conveys information about auditory stimuli, in particular about the location of a sound source. However, beyond simple time differences, the way in which neurons might extract this information is unclear and the potential computational advantages are unknown. The computational difficulty of this task for an animal is to locate the source of an unexpected sound from two monaural signals that are highly dependent on the unknown source signal. In neuron models consisting of spectro-temporal filtering and spiking nonlinearity, we found that the binaural structure induced by spatialized sounds is mapped to synchrony patterns that depend on source location rather than on source signal. Location-specific synchrony patterns would then result in the activation of location-specific assemblies of postsynaptic neurons. We designed a spiking neuron model which exploited this principle to locate a variety of sound sources in a virtual acoustic environment using measured human head-related transfer functions. The model was able to accurately estimate the location of previously unknown sounds in both azimuth and elevation (including front/back discrimination in a known acoustic environment. We found that multiple representations of different acoustic environments could coexist as sets of overlapping neural assemblies which could be associated with spatial locations by Hebbian learning. The model demonstrates the computational relevance of relative spike timing to extract spatial information about sources independently of the source signal.

  9. Evolution of Sound Source Localization Circuits in the Nonmammalian Vertebrate Brainstem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, Peggy L; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Carr, Catherine E

    2017-01-01

    . This directional information is further enhanced by bilateral computations in the medulla and the auditory midbrain. We propose that similar direction-sensitive neurons were present in the early aquatic tetrapods and that selection for sound localization in air acted upon preexisting brain stem circuits like those...... created by external sources. The potential to identify and localize these external sources may have been a major selection force in the evolution of the early vertebrate ear and in the processing of sound in the central nervous system. The intrinsic physiological polarization of sensory hair cells...... to increased sensitivity to a broader frequency range and to modification of the preexisting circuitry for sound source localization....

  10. Diatom evidence for the onset of Pliocene cooling from AND-1B, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesselman, Christina; Dunbar, R. B.

    2013-01-01

    The late Pliocene, ~ 3.3–3.0 Ma, is the most recent interval of sustained global warmth in the geologic past. This window is the focus of climate reconstruction efforts by the U.S. Geological Survey's Pliocene Research, Interpretation, and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) Data/Model Cooperative, and may provide a useful climate analog for the coming century. Reconstructions of past surface ocean conditions proximal to the Antarctic continent are essential to understanding the sensitivity of the cryosphere to this key interval in Earth's climate evolution. An exceptional marine sediment core collected from the southwestern Ross Sea (78° S), Antarctica, during ANDRILL's McMurdo Ice Shelf Project preserves evidence of dramatic fluctuations between grounded ice and productive, open ocean conditions during the late Pliocene, reflecting orbitally-paced glacial/interglacial cycling. In this near-shore record, diatom-rich sediments are recovered from interglacial intervals; two of these diatomites, from ~ 3.2 Ma and 3.03 Ma, are within the PRISM chronologic window. The diatom assemblages identified in PRISM-age late Pliocene diatom-rich sediments are distinct from those in mid-Pliocene and later Pliocene/Pleistocene intervals recovered from AND-1B, and comprise both extant taxa with well-constrained ecological preferences and a diverse extinct flora, some members of which are previously undescribed from Antarctic sediments. Both units are dominated by Chaetoceros resting spores, an indicator of high productivity and stratification that is present at much lower abundance in materials both older and younger than the PRISM-age sediments. Newly described species of the genus Fragilariopsis, which first appear in the AND-1B record at 3.2 Ma, are the most abundant extinct members of the PRISM-age assemblages. Other extant species with established environmental affinities, such as Fragilariopsis sublinearis, F. curta, Stellarima microtrias, and Thalassiothrix antarctica, are

  11. Horizontal sound localization in cochlear implant users with a contralateral hearing aid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veugen, L.C.E.; Hendrikse, M.M.E.; van Wanrooij, M.M.; Agterberg, M.J.H.; Chalupper, J.; Mens, L.H.M; Snik, A.F.M.; Opstal, A.J. van

    2016-01-01

    Interaural differences in sound arrival time (ITD) and in level (ILD) enable us to localize sounds in the horizontal plane, and can support source segregation and speech understanding in noisy environments. It is uncertain whether these cues are also available to hearing-impaired listeners who are

  12. Spatial resolution limits for the localization of noise sources using direct sound mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comesana, D. Fernandez; Holland, K. R.; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2016-01-01

    One of the main challenges arising from noise and vibration problems is how to identify the areas of a device, machine or structure that produce significant acoustic excitation, i.e. the localization of main noise sources. The direct visualization of sound, in particular sound intensity, has exte...

  13. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Muddled about what makes music? Stuck on the study of harmonics? Dumbfounded by how sound gets around? Now you no longer have to struggle to teach concepts you really don t grasp yourself. Sound takes an intentionally light touch to help out all those adults science teachers, parents wanting to help with homework, home-schoolers seeking necessary scientific background to teach middle school physics with confidence. The book introduces sound waves and uses that model to explain sound-related occurrences. Starting with the basics of what causes sound and how it travels, you'll learn how musical instruments work, how sound waves add and subtract, how the human ear works, and even why you can sound like a Munchkin when you inhale helium. Sound is the fourth book in the award-winning Stop Faking It! Series, published by NSTA Press. Like the other popular volumes, it is written by irreverent educator Bill Robertson, who offers this Sound recommendation: One of the coolest activities is whacking a spinning metal rod...

  14. Learning to Localize Sound with a Lizard Ear Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Hallam, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    direction, and neural post-processing becomes a necessity. We implement a model of the auditory system coupled with a Cerebellar Model Articulation Controller based neural network and employ online reinforcement learning to build an accurate representation of sound direction in simulation....

  15. Multiple incoherent sound source localization using a single vector sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Bree, H.E. de; Druyvesteyn, W.F.; Wind, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    With the Microflown acoustic particle velocity sensor, broadband acoustic vector sensors in air have become available. An assembled probe version is based upon three orthogonally placed acoustic particle velocity sensors and a single sound pressure sensor. This probe has also become available as a

  16. Robust Sound Localization: An Application of an Auditory Perception System for a Humanoid Robot

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irie, Robert E

    1995-01-01

    Localizing sounds with different frequency and time domain characteristics in a dynamic listening environment is a challenging task that has not been explored in the field of robotics as much as other perceptual tasks...

  17. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Sound has the power to soothe, excite, warn, protect, and inform. Indeed, the transmission and reception of audio signals pervade our daily lives. Readers will examine the mechanics and properties of sound and provides an overview of the "interdisciplinary science called acoustics." Also covered are functions and diseases of the human ear.

  18. Detection and localization of sounds: Virtual tones and virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peter Xinya

    IPD-meter or an ITD-meter. Listeners estimated the lateral positions of 50 sine tones with IPDs ranging from -150° to +150° and with different frequencies, all in the range where signal fine structure supports lateralization. The estimates indicated that listeners lateralize sine tones on the basis of ITD and not IPD. In order to distinguish between sound sources in front and in back, listeners use spectral cues caused by the diffraction by pinna, head, neck and torso. To study this effect, the VRX technique was developed based on transaural technology. The technique was successful in presenting desired spectra into listeners' ears with high accuracy up to 16 kHz. When presented with real source and simulated virtual signal, listeners in an anechoic room could not distinguish between them. Eleven experiments on discrimination between front and back sources were carried out in an anechoic room. The results show several findings. First, the results support a multiple band comparison model, and disfavor a necessary band(s) model. Second, it was found that preserving the spectral dips was more important than preserving the spectral peaks for successful front/back discrimination. Moreover, it was confirmed that neither monaural cues nor interaural spectral level difference cues were adequate for front/back discrimination. Furthermore, listeners' performance did not deteriorate when presented with sharpened spectra. Finally, when presented with an interaural delay less than 200 mus, listeners could succeed to discriminate front from back, although the image was pulled to the side, which suggests that the localizations in azimuthal plane and in sagittal plane are independent within certain limits.

  19. Fly-ear inspired micro-sensor for sound source localization in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisiewski, A P; Liu, H J; Yu, M; Currano, L; Gee, D

    2011-05-01

    Inspired by the hearing organ of the fly Ormia ochracea, a miniature sound localization sensor is developed, which can be used to pinpoint a sound source in two dimensions described by the azimuth and elevation angles. The sensor device employs an equilateral triangle configuration consisting of three mechanically coupled circular membranes whose oscillations are detected by a fiber-optic system. The experimental results indicate that significant amplification of the directional cues and directional sensitivity can be achieved with the fly-ear inspired sensor design. This work can provide a basis for the development of miniature sound localization sensors in two dimensions.

  20. Heuristic approximations for sound fields produced by spherical waves incident on locally and non-locally reacting planar surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai Ming; Tao, Hongdan

    2014-01-01

    The classic Weyl-van der Pol (WVDP) formula is a well-known asymptotic solution for accurately predicting sound fields above a locally reacting ground surface. However, the form of the WVDP formula is inadequate for predicting sound fields in the vicinity of non-locally reacting surfaces; a correction term is often required in the formula to provide accurate numerical solutions. Even with this correction, there is a singularity in the diffraction wave term when the source is located directly above or below the receiver. This paper explores a heuristic method to remove this singularity and suggests an analytical form comparable to the WVDP formula. This improved formula offers a physically interpretable solution and allows for accurate predictions of the total sound field above locally and non-locally reacting surfaces for all geometrical configurations.

  1. Multiple sound sources localization in free field using acoustic vector sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotus, Józef

    Method and preliminary results of multiple sound sources localization in free field using the acoustic vector sensor were presented in this study. Direction of arrival (DOA) for considered source was determined based on sound intensity method supported by Fourier analysis. Obtained spectrum components for considered signal allowed to determine the DOA value for the particular frequency independently. The accuracy of the developed and practically implemented algorithm was evaluated on the basis of laboratory tests. Both synthetic acoustic signals (pure tones and noises) and real sounds were used during the measurements. Real signals had the same or different energy distribution both on time and frequency domain. The setup of the experiment and obtained results were described in details in the text. Taking the obtained results into consideration is important to emphasize that the localization of the multiple sound sources using single acoustic vector sensor is possible. The localization accuracy was the best for signals which spectral energy distribution was different.

  2. The effect of brain lesions on sound localization in complex acoustic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zündorf, Ida C; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Lewald, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Localizing sound sources of interest in cluttered acoustic environments--as in the 'cocktail-party' situation--is one of the most demanding challenges to the human auditory system in everyday life. In this study, stroke patients' ability to localize acoustic targets in a single-source and in a multi-source setup in the free sound field were directly compared. Subsequent voxel-based lesion-behaviour mapping analyses were computed to uncover the brain areas associated with a deficit in localization in the presence of multiple distracter sound sources rather than localization of individually presented sound sources. Analyses revealed a fundamental role of the right planum temporale in this task. The results from the left hemisphere were less straightforward, but suggested an involvement of inferior frontal and pre- and postcentral areas. These areas appear to be particularly involved in the spectrotemporal analyses crucial for effective segregation of multiple sound streams from various locations, beyond the currently known network for localization of isolated sound sources in otherwise silent surroundings.

  3. Looking at the ventriloquist: visual outcome of eye movements calibrates sound localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S Pages

    Full Text Available A general problem in learning is how the brain determines what lesson to learn (and what lessons not to learn. For example, sound localization is a behavior that is partially learned with the aid of vision. This process requires correctly matching a visual location to that of a sound. This is an intrinsically circular problem when sound location is itself uncertain and the visual scene is rife with possible visual matches. Here, we develop a simple paradigm using visual guidance of sound localization to gain insight into how the brain confronts this type of circularity. We tested two competing hypotheses. 1: The brain guides sound location learning based on the synchrony or simultaneity of auditory-visual stimuli, potentially involving a Hebbian associative mechanism. 2: The brain uses a 'guess and check' heuristic in which visual feedback that is obtained after an eye movement to a sound alters future performance, perhaps by recruiting the brain's reward-related circuitry. We assessed the effects of exposure to visual stimuli spatially mismatched from sounds on performance of an interleaved auditory-only saccade task. We found that when humans and monkeys were provided the visual stimulus asynchronously with the sound but as feedback to an auditory-guided saccade, they shifted their subsequent auditory-only performance toward the direction of the visual cue by 1.3-1.7 degrees, or 22-28% of the original 6 degree visual-auditory mismatch. In contrast when the visual stimulus was presented synchronously with the sound but extinguished too quickly to provide this feedback, there was little change in subsequent auditory-only performance. Our results suggest that the outcome of our own actions is vital to localizing sounds correctly. Contrary to previous expectations, visual calibration of auditory space does not appear to require visual-auditory associations based on synchrony/simultaneity.

  4. A Method for Direct Localized Sound Speed Estimates Using Registered Virtual Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byram, Brett C.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    detectors, a spherical wave is propagated. By beamforming the data, the time-offlight between the two virtual sources can be calculated. From this information, the local sound speed can be estimated. Validation of the estimator is made using phantom and simulation data. The set of test phantoms consisted......Accurate sound speed estimates are desirable in a number of fields. In an effort to increase the spatial resolution of sound speed estimates, a new method is proposed for direct measurement of sound speed between arbitrary spatial locations. The method uses the sound speed estimator developed...... by Anderson and Trahey. Their least squares fit of the received waveform’s curvature provides an estimate of the wave’s point of origin. The point of origin and the delay profile calculated from the fit are used to arrive at a spatially registered virtual detector. Between a pair of registered virtual...

  5. A novel method for direct localized sound speed measurement using the virtual source paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byram, Brett; Trahey, Gregg E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    spatial locations. The method utilizes the sound speed estimator developed by Anderson and Trahey. Their least-squares fit of the received waveform's curvature provides the wave's point of origin. The point of origin and the delay profile calculated from the fit are used to arrive at a spatially...... registered virtual detector. Between a pair of registered virtual detectors a spherical wave is propagated. By beamforming the received data the time of flight between the two virtual sources can be calculated. From this information the local sound speed can be estimated. Validation of the estimator used......Accurate sound speed estimates are desirable in a number of fields, particularly adaptive imaging, and tissue and phantom characterization. In an effort to increase the spatial resolution of sound speed estimates, a new method is proposed for direct measurement of sound speed between arbitrary...

  6. Abiotic versus biotic drivers of ocean pH variation under fast sea ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G Matson

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is expected to have a major effect on the marine carbonate system over the next century, particularly in high latitude seas. Less appreciated is natural environmental variation within these systems, particularly in terms of pH, and how this natural variation may inform laboratory experiments. In this study, we deployed sensor-equipped moorings at 20 m depths at three locations in McMurdo Sound, comprising deep (bottom depth>200 m: Hut Point Peninsula and shallow environments (bottom depth ∼25 m: Cape Evans and New Harbor. Our sensors recorded high-frequency variation in pH (Hut Point and Cape Evans only, tide (Cape Evans and New Harbor, and water mass properties (temperature and salinity during spring and early summer 2011. These collective observations showed that (1 pH differed spatially both in terms of mean pH (Cape Evans: 8.009±0.015; Hut Point: 8.020±0.007 and range of pH (Cape Evans: 0.090; Hut Point: 0.036, and (2 pH was not related to the mixing of two water masses, suggesting that the observed pH variation is likely not driven by this abiotic process. Given the large daily fluctuation in pH at Cape Evans, we developed a simple mechanistic model to explore the potential for biotic processes--in this case algal photosynthesis--to increase pH by fixing carbon from the water column. For this model, we incorporated published photosynthetic parameters for the three dominant algal functional groups found at Cape Evans (benthic fleshy red macroalgae, crustose coralline algae, and sea ice algal communities to estimate oxygen produced/carbon fixed from the water column underneath fast sea ice and the resulting pH change. These results suggest that biotic processes may be a primary driver of pH variation observed under fast sea ice at Cape Evans and potentially at other shallow sites in McMurdo Sound.

  7. Abiotic versus biotic drivers of ocean pH variation under fast sea ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Paul G; Washburn, Libe; Martz, Todd R; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification is expected to have a major effect on the marine carbonate system over the next century, particularly in high latitude seas. Less appreciated is natural environmental variation within these systems, particularly in terms of pH, and how this natural variation may inform laboratory experiments. In this study, we deployed sensor-equipped moorings at 20 m depths at three locations in McMurdo Sound, comprising deep (bottom depth>200 m: Hut Point Peninsula) and shallow environments (bottom depth ∼25 m: Cape Evans and New Harbor). Our sensors recorded high-frequency variation in pH (Hut Point and Cape Evans only), tide (Cape Evans and New Harbor), and water mass properties (temperature and salinity) during spring and early summer 2011. These collective observations showed that (1) pH differed spatially both in terms of mean pH (Cape Evans: 8.009±0.015; Hut Point: 8.020±0.007) and range of pH (Cape Evans: 0.090; Hut Point: 0.036), and (2) pH was not related to the mixing of two water masses, suggesting that the observed pH variation is likely not driven by this abiotic process. Given the large daily fluctuation in pH at Cape Evans, we developed a simple mechanistic model to explore the potential for biotic processes--in this case algal photosynthesis--to increase pH by fixing carbon from the water column. For this model, we incorporated published photosynthetic parameters for the three dominant algal functional groups found at Cape Evans (benthic fleshy red macroalgae, crustose coralline algae, and sea ice algal communities) to estimate oxygen produced/carbon fixed from the water column underneath fast sea ice and the resulting pH change. These results suggest that biotic processes may be a primary driver of pH variation observed under fast sea ice at Cape Evans and potentially at other shallow sites in McMurdo Sound.

  8. Measuring oblique incidence sound absorption using a local plane wave assumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, E.R.; Wijnant, Ysbrand H.; de Boer, Andries

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a method for the measurement of the oblique incidence sound absorption coefficient is presented. It is based on a local field assumption, in which the acoustic field is locally approximated by one incident- and one specularly reflected plane wave. The amplitudes of these waves can be

  9. Accurate Sound Localization in Reverberant Environments Is Mediated by Robust Encoding of Spatial Cues in the Auditory Midbrain

    OpenAIRE

    Devore, Sasha; Ihlefeld, Antje; Hancock, Kenneth; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    In reverberant environments, acoustic reflections interfere with the direct sound arriving at a listener’s ears, distorting the spatial cues for sound localization. Yet, human listeners have little difficulty localizing sounds in most settings. Because reverberant energy builds up over time, the source location is represented relatively faithfully during the early portion of a sound, but this representation becomes increasingly degraded later in the stimulus. We show that the directional sens...

  10. Sound localization with head movement: implications for 3-d audio displays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ian McAnally

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the accuracy of sound localization is improved if listeners are allowed to move their heads during signal presentation. This study describes the function relating localization accuracy to the extent of head movement in azimuth. Sounds that are difficult to localize were presented in the free field from sources at a wide range of azimuths and elevations. Sounds remained active until the participants’ heads had rotated through windows ranging in width of 2°, 4°, 8°, 16°, 32°, or 64° of azimuth. Error in determining sound-source elevation and the rate of front/back confusion were found to decrease with increases in azimuth window width. Error in determining sound-source lateral angle was not found to vary with azimuth window width. Implications for 3-d audio displays: The utility of a 3-d audio display for imparting spatial information is likely to be improved if operators are able to move their heads during signal presentation. Head movement may compensate in part for a paucity of spectral cues to sound-source location resulting from limitations in either the audio signals presented or the directional filters (i.e., head-related transfer functions used to generate a display. However, head movements of a moderate size (i.e., through around 32° of azimuth may be required to ensure that spatial information is conveyed with high accuracy.

  11. Laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) do not use binaural phase differences to localize sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolek, Christina M; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Rickye S; Heffner, Henry E

    2010-06-14

    The ability of Norway rats to use binaural time- and intensity-difference cues to localize sound was investigated by determining their ability to localize pure tones from 500 Hz to 32 kHz. In addition, their ability to use the binaural time cues present in the envelope of a signal was determined by presenting them with a 1-kHz tone that was amplitude modulated at either 250 or 500 Hz. Although the animals were easily able to localize tones above 2 kHz, indicating that they could use the binaural intensity-difference cue, they were virtually unable to localize the lower-frequency stimuli, indicating that they could not use the binaural phase (time) cue. Although some animals showed a residual ability to localize low-frequency tones, control tests indicated that they were using the transient interaural intensity difference in the onset of a sound that exists after it reaches the near ear but before it reaches the far ear. Thus, in contrast to earlier studies, we conclude that the Norway rat is unable to use the ongoing time cues available in low-frequency tones to localize sound, raising the possibility that the rat may not use interaural time differences to localize sound. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Perceptual factors contribute more than acoustic factors to sound localization abilities with virtual sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume eAndeol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human sound localization abilities rely on binaural and spectral cues. Spectral cues arise from interactions between the sound wave and the listener’s body (head related transfer function, HRTF. Large individual differences were reported in localization abilities, even in young normal-hearing adults. Several studies have attempted to determine whether localization abilities depend mostly on acoustic cues or on perceptual processes involved in the analysis of these cues. These studies have yielded inconsistent findings, which could result from methodological issues. Here, we measured sound localization performance with normal and modified acoustic cues (i.e., with individual and non-individual HRTFs, respectively in 20 naïve listeners. Test conditions were chosen to address most methodological issues from past studies. Procedural training was provided prior to sound localization tests. The results showed no direct relationship between behavioral results and an acoustical metric (spectral-shape prominence of individual HRTFs. Despite uncertainties due to technical issues with the normalization of the HRTFs, large acoustic differences between individual and non-individual HRTFs seemed to be needed to produce behavioral effects. A subset of 15 listeners then trained in the sound localization task with individual HRTFs. Training included either visual correct-answer feedback (for the test group or no feedback (for the control group, and was assumed to elicit perceptual learning for the test group only. Few listeners from the control group, but most listeners from the test group, showed significant training-induced learning. For the test group, learning was related to pre-training performance (the poorer the pre-training performance, the greater the learning amount and was retained after one month.The results are interpreted as being in favor of a larger contribution of perceptual factors than of acoustic factors to sound localization abilities

  13. Sound localization in reverberant environments: physiological bases of the precedence effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Miles Andrew McLean

    Localization dominance, a phenomenon of the precedence effect, refers to the dominance of directional cues conveyed by sound arriving directly from the source over cues conveyed by reflected copies on the perception of sound source location. One theory of localization dominance is that leading sounds suppress neural responses to lagging sounds (Yin, 1994 Litovsky & Yin, 1998 a, b). Neurons in auditory nuclei respond best to a leading sound and have a reduced response to a lagging sound, supporting this hypothesis. It has been proposed that GABA-ergic or glycinergic inhibition suppresses neural responses to lagging sounds (Yin, 1994 Fitzpatrick et al. 1995 Pollack & Burger, 2002). An alternative hypothesis states that cochlear processing in low-frequency hearing animals alters directional cues conveyed by the leading and lagging sound, emphasising those present in the leading sound (Tollin, 1998 Hartung & Trahiotis 2001). Responses of single neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anaesthetised guinea pigs were recorded to binaural click pair stimuli. Responses of some neurons were recorded before, during, and after iontophoresis of either the GABAa receptor antagonist gabazine, or the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine. Blocking glycine did not decrease neural suppression of the lagging click in 8/10 neurons. Blocking GAB A did not decrease neural suppression of the lagging click in 11/16 neurons. The neural representation of directional cues in the output of low-frequency neurons to the leading click of a binaural click pair differed from those actually conveyed by the stimulus in 20/20 neurons. Examination of the responses of several such neurons indicated responses to the leading click represented a direction between that conveyed by the leading and lagging click. The results supported the hypothesis that cochlear processing of binaural click pairs alters directional cues conveyed by the stimulus. Limited support was also found for the hypothesis that

  14. Sound localization in noise by normal-hearing listeners and cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Stefan; Seeber, Bernhard U

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize horizontal plane sound localization in interfering noise at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and to compare performance across normal-hearing listeners and users of unilateral and bilateral cochlear implants (CIs). CI users report difficulties with listening in noisy environments. Although their difficulties with speech understanding have been investigated in several studies, the ability to localize sounds in background noise has not extensively been examined, despite the benefits of binaural hearing being greatest in noisy situations. Sound localization is a measure of binaural processing and is thus well suited to assessing the benefit of bilateral implantation. The results will inform clinicians and implant manufacturers how to focus their efforts to improve localization with CIs in noisy situations. Six normal-hearing listeners, four unilateral, and 10 bilateral CI users indicated the perceived location of sound sources using a light pointer method. Target sounds were noise pulses played from one of 11 loudspeakers placed between -80 and +80 degrees in the frontal horizontal plane in the free field. Localization was assessed in quiet and in diffuse background noise at SNRs between +10 and -7 dB. Speech reception thresholds were measured and their relation to the localization results examined. Localization performance declined with decreasing SNR: target sounds were perceived closer to the median plane and the standard deviation of responses increased. Localization performance across groups was compared using a measure of "Spatial Resolvability" (SR). This measure gives the angular separation between two sound sources that would enable an ideal observer to correctly distinguish them 69.1% of the time. For all participants SR increased with decreasing SNR, that is, at low SNRs the spatial separation between sound sources remained distinguishable only when it was larger. Normal-hearing participants performed best, with SR

  15. Hybrid local piezoelectric and conductive functions for high performance airborne sound absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimabady, Mojtaba; Statharas, Eleftherios Christos; Yao, Kui; Sharifzadeh Mirshekarloo, Meysam; Chen, Shuting; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2017-12-01

    A concept of hybrid local piezoelectric and electrical conductive functions for improving airborne sound absorption is proposed and demonstrated in composite foam made of porous polar polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) mixed with conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). According to our hybrid material function design, the local piezoelectric effect in the PVDF matrix with the polar structure and the electrical resistive loss of SWCNT enhanced sound energy conversion to electrical energy and subsequently to thermal energy, respectively, in addition to the other known sound absorption mechanisms in a porous material. It is found that the overall energy conversion and hence the sound absorption performance are maximized when the concentration of the SWCNT is around the conductivity percolation threshold. For the optimal composition of PVDF/5 wt. % SWCNT, a sound reduction coefficient of larger than 0.58 has been obtained, with a high sound absorption coefficient higher than 50% at 600 Hz, showing their great values for passive noise mitigation even at a low frequency.

  16. Localization of self-generated synthetic footstep sounds on different walked-upon materials through headphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchet, Luca; Spagnol, Simone; Geronazzo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    typologies of surface materials: solid (e.g., wood) and aggregate (e.g., gravel). Different sound delivery methods (mono, stereo, binaural) as well as several surface materials, in presence or absence of concurrent contextual auditory information provided as soundscapes, were evaluated in a vertical...... localization task. Results showed that solid surfaces were localized significantly farther from the walker's feet than the aggregate ones. This effect was independent of the used rendering technique, of the presence of soundscapes, and of merely temporal or spectral attributes of sound. The effect...

  17. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix B : Local Generation Evaluation : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The information and data contained in this Appendix was extracted from numerous sources. The principle sources used for technical data were Bonneville Power Administration's 1990 Resource Program along with its technical appendix, and Chapter 8 of the Draft 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan. All cost data is reported 1988 dollars unless otherwise noted. This information was supplemented by other data developed by Puget Sound utilities who participated on the Local Generation Team. Identifying generating resources available to the Puget Sound area involved a five step process: (1) listing all possible resources that might contribute power to the Puget Sound area, (2) characterizing the technology/resource status, cost and operating characteristics of these resources, (3) identifying exclusion criteria based on the needs of the overall Puget Sound Electric Reliability Plan study, (4) applying these criteria to the list of resources, and (5) summarizing of the costs and characteristics of the final list of resources. 15 refs., 20 tabs.

  18. Classroom Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzard, David

    Australian company Antarctica Flights runs summer sightseeing trips out of Australian capital cities to tour the Antarctic coast. The Laby Foundation of the University of Melbourne, through its "Classroom Antarctica" program, sponsored Kent Street High School science teacher, Ms Suzy Urbaniak and 18 of her students to take the trip, to…

  19. Maximum likelihood approach to “informed” Sound Source Localization for Hearing Aid applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmani, Mojtaba; Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Most state-of-the-art Sound Source Localization (SSL) algorithms have been proposed for applications which are "uninformed'' about the target sound content; however, utilizing a wireless microphone worn by a target talker, enables recent Hearing Aid Systems (HASs) to access to an almost noise......-free sound signal of the target talker at the HAS via the wireless connection. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood (ML) approach, which we call MLSSL, to estimate the Direction of Arrival (DoA) of the target signal given access to the target signal content. Compared with other "informed......'' SSL algorithms which use binaural microphones for localization, MLSSL performs better using signals of one or more microphones placed on just one ear, thereby reducing the wireless transmission overhead of binaural hearing aids. More specifically, when the target location confined to the front...

  20. The contribution of high frequencies to human brain activity underlying horizontal localization of natural spatial sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alku Paavo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the field of auditory neuroscience, much research has focused on the neural processes underlying human sound localization. A recent magnetoencephalography (MEG study investigated localization-related brain activity by measuring the N1m event-related response originating in the auditory cortex. It was found that the dynamic range of the right-hemispheric N1m response, defined as the mean difference in response magnitude between contralateral and ipsilateral stimulation, reflects cortical activity related to the discrimination of horizontal sound direction. Interestingly, the results also suggested that the presence of realistic spectral information within horizontally located spatial sounds resulted in a larger right-hemispheric N1m dynamic range. Spectral cues being predominant at high frequencies, the present study further investigated the issue by removing frequencies from the spatial stimuli with low-pass filtering. This resulted in a stepwise elimination of direction-specific spectral information. Interaural time and level differences were kept constant. The original, unfiltered stimuli were broadband noise signals presented from five frontal horizontal directions and binaurally recorded for eight human subjects with miniature microphones placed in each subject's ear canals. Stimuli were presented to the subjects during MEG registration and in a behavioral listening experiment. Results The dynamic range of the right-hemispheric N1m amplitude was not significantly affected even when all frequencies above 600 Hz were removed. The dynamic range of the left-hemispheric N1m response was significantly diminished by the removal of frequencies over 7.5 kHz. The subjects' behavioral sound direction discrimination was only affected by the removal of frequencies over 600 Hz. Conclusion In accord with previous psychophysical findings, the current results indicate that frontal horizontal sound localization and related right

  1. Stability of central binaural sound localization mechanisms in mammals, and the Heffner hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dennis P; Quinlan, Chelsea K; Dingle, Rachel N

    2012-02-01

    Heffner (2004) provided an overview of data on the evolutionary pressures on sound localization acuity in mammals. Her most important finding was that sound localization acuity was most strongly correlated with width of field of best vision. This correlation leaves unexplained the mechanism through which evolutionary pressures affect localization acuity in different mammals. A review of the neurophysiology of binaural sound localization cue coding, and the behavioural performance it supports, led us to two hypotheses. First, there is little or no evidence that the neural mechanisms for coding binaural sound location cues, or the dynamic range of the code, vary across mammals. Rather, the neural coding mechanism is remarkably constant both across species, and within species across frequency. Second, there is no need to postulate that evolutionary pressures are exerted on the cue coding mechanism itself. We hypothesize instead that the evolutionary pressure may be on the organism's ability to exploit a 'lower envelope principle' (after Barlow, 1972). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sparsity and super-resolution in sound source localization with sensor arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) is a method for solving such undetermined problems which achieves simultaneously sparsity, thus super-resolution, and computationa...

  3. On the influence of microphone array geometry on HRTF-based Sound Source Localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmani, Mojtaba; Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The direction dependence of Head Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) forms the basis for HRTF-based Sound Source Localization (SSL) algorithms. In this paper, we show how spectral similarities of the HRTFs of different directions in the horizontal plane influence performance of HRTF-based SSL...

  4. Effect of preceding stimulation on sound localization and its representation in the auditory midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolnai, Sandra; Beutelmann, Rainer; Klump, Georg M

    2017-02-01

    Prior stimulation can influence the perception of sound source location. Some psychophysical sound localization procedures differ in the amount of prior stimulation, which may affect measures of localization accuracy. If and how particularly the number of preceding stimuli affects sound localization and the neural representation of sound source position has not been investigated so far and will be the focus of the present report. We trained Mongolian gerbils in a left/right discrimination task where the target stimulus was preceded by silence or followed a number of reference stimuli. Localization thresholds decreased with the number of references presented before the target stimulus. The smallest thresholds were found after the presentation of a train of 5 reference stimuli and after silence. We recorded from units in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anaesthetized gerbils using virtual-acoustic space stimuli mimicking the ones used in the behavioural task and applied signal detection theory to compare behavioural and neurometric thresholds. We found that neurometric thresholds based on spike rate information of single units covered a wide range of threshold values but only neurometric thresholds that were based on responses of small populations of IC units reached consistently thresholds we also observed in the behavioural experiment. Unlike behavioural thresholds, however, neurometric thresholds were independent of the number of reference stimuli suggesting that processing stages downstream from the IC might better reflect the effect of prior stimulation. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Lung sound analysis helps localize airway inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Terufumi; Obase, Yasushi; Nagasaka, Yukio; Nakano, Hiroshi; Ishimatsu, Akiko; Kishikawa, Reiko; Iwanaga, Tomoaki

    2017-01-01

    Airway inflammation can be detected by lung sound analysis (LSA) at a single point in the posterior lower lung field. We performed LSA at 7 points to examine whether the technique could identify the location of airway inflammation in patients with asthma. Breath sounds were recorded at 7 points on the body surface of 22 asthmatic subjects. Inspiration sound pressure level (ISPL), expiration sound pressure level (ESPL), and the expiration-to-inspiration sound pressure ratio (E/I) were calculated in 6 frequency bands. The data were analyzed for potential correlation with spirometry, airway hyperresponsiveness (PC20), and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). The E/I data in the frequency range of 100-400 Hz (E/I low frequency [LF], E/I mid frequency [MF]) were better correlated with the spirometry, PC20, and FeNO values than were the ISPL or ESPL data. The left anterior chest and left posterior lower recording positions were associated with the best correlations (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity: r=-0.55 and r=-0.58; logPC20: r=-0.46 and r=-0.45; and FeNO: r=0.42 and r=0.46, respectively). The majority of asthmatic subjects with FeNO ≥70 ppb exhibited high E/I MF levels in all lung fields (excluding the trachea) and V50%pred sound recordings could be used to identify sites of local airway inflammation.

  6. Acoustic space learning for sound-source separation and localization on binaural manifolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleforge, Antoine; Forbes, Florence; Horaud, Radu

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we address the problems of modeling the acoustic space generated by a full-spectrum sound source and using the learned model for the localization and separation of multiple sources that simultaneously emit sparse-spectrum sounds. We lay theoretical and methodological grounds in order to introduce the binaural manifold paradigm. We perform an in-depth study of the latent low-dimensional structure of the high-dimensional interaural spectral data, based on a corpus recorded with a human-like audiomotor robot head. A nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique is used to show that these data lie on a two-dimensional (2D) smooth manifold parameterized by the motor states of the listener, or equivalently, the sound-source directions. We propose a probabilistic piecewise affine mapping model (PPAM) specifically designed to deal with high-dimensional data exhibiting an intrinsic piecewise linear structure. We derive a closed-form expectation-maximization (EM) procedure for estimating the model parameters, followed by Bayes inversion for obtaining the full posterior density function of a sound-source direction. We extend this solution to deal with missing data and redundancy in real-world spectrograms, and hence for 2D localization of natural sound sources such as speech. We further generalize the model to the challenging case of multiple sound sources and we propose a variational EM framework. The associated algorithm, referred to as variational EM for source separation and localization (VESSL) yields a Bayesian estimation of the 2D locations and time-frequency masks of all the sources. Comparisons of the proposed approach with several existing methods reveal that the combination of acoustic-space learning with Bayesian inference enables our method to outperform state-of-the-art methods.

  7. Cosmogenic Ne-21 exposure ages of glacial boulders constrained by local bedrock erosion rates in Ong Valley, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D. J.; Balco, G.; Putkonen, J.; Bibby, T.; Giusti, C.; Ball, A. E.; Hedberg, C. P.; Diamond, M. S.; Ringger, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    In order to accurately determine the exposure age of glacial boulders with cosmogenic nuclides, we need to know something about the erosion rate of the rock and any previous exposure the boulder may have had. Commonly, the erosion rate is simply assumed, and inheritance is dealt with by both sampling strategy and removing outliers from the data. In this study, we determine the rock erosion rate by measuring the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in granite bedrock samples. This is used to constrain the exposure age of glacial boulders of the same lithology from the same locale. Ong Valley, Antarctica, (157.5 East, 83.25 South) is an ice-free valley in the Miller Range of the Central Transantarctic Mountains. The valley contains three distinct glacial drifts, and the oldest of these is well defined by an end moraine. We collected samples from six boulders on this end moraine, and six additional samples from the surrounding bedrock that is composed of the same lithology, the Hope Granite. The bedrock samples were collected from the ridge bordering the valley, well above the glacial limit. Because the bedrock samples have not been shielded by ice and have been exposed for millions of years, the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in these samples reflects only the erosion rate of the granite. We separated quartz from the granite samples following standard laboratory methods and measured the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in the quartz at the BGC Noble Gas Thermochronometry Lab. The concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in the bedrock samples is interpreted as reflecting only the erosion rate. We can then assume that the erosion rate of the bedrock is equal to the erosion rate of the glacial boulders on the end moraine because they have the same lithology and have been subjected to the same climate conditions during their exposure. With this information, we can better constrain the exposure age of the glacial boulders in Ong Valley.

  8. CROWING SOUND ANALYSIS OF GAGA??? CHICKEN: LOCAL CHICKEN FROM SOUTH SULAWESI INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Aprilita Bugiwati, Sri Rachma; Ashari, Fachri

    2008-01-01

    Gaga??? chicken was known as a local chicken at South Sulawesi Indonesia which has unique, specific, and different crowing sound, especially at the ending of crowing sound which is like the voice character of human laughing, comparing with the other types of singing chicken in the world. 287 birds of Gaga??? chicken at 3 districts at the centre habitat of Gaga??? chicken were separated into 2 groups (163 birds of Dangdut type and 124 birds of Slow type) which is based on the speed...

  9. A combined Vibroseis-Explosive survey at Halvfarryggen, a local ice dome in East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, C. M.; Diez, A.; Eisen, O.; Jansen, D.; Kristoffersen, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We carried out a combined Vibroseis-Explosive survey in combination with a snowstreamer at Halvfarryggen, a local ice dome at a triple point in the vicinity of the German Antarctic research station NeumayerIII. The Vibroseis survey was grid shaped to give spatial information about the glaciological and geological substructure. The center survey line was also surveyed with explosives and compared with the Vibroseis data. Internal ice reflections, clearly visible with explosives are not well visible in the Vibroseis data except for the strongest and deepest internal reflection. We interpret this deepest internal ice reflector as ice crystals orientated in to a single maximum. The ice bed contact we interpret as a frozen till layer overlaying bedrock. From velocity analysis derived from refractions seen in far offset data, we interpret the bedrock as igneous.

  10. Simulation and testing of a multichannel system for 3D sound localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Edward Albert

    Three-dimensional (3D) audio involves the ability to localize sound anywhere in a three-dimensional space. 3D audio can be used to provide the listener with the perception of moving sounds and can provide a realistic listening experience for applications such as gaming, video conferencing, movies, and concerts. The purpose of this research is to simulate and test 3D audio by incorporating auditory localization techniques in a multi-channel speaker system. The objective is to develop an algorithm that can place an audio event in a desired location by calculating and controlling the gain factors of each speaker. A MATLAB simulation displays the location of the speakers and perceived sound, which is verified through experimentation. The scenario in which the listener is not equidistant from each of the speakers is also investigated and simulated. This research is envisioned to lead to a better understanding of human localization of sound, and will contribute to a more realistic listening experience.

  11. Olivocochlear Efferent Control in Sound Localization and Experience-Dependent Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Samuel; Moore, David R.; Liberman, M. Charles; Sumner, Christian J.

    2012-01-01

    Efferent auditory pathways have been implicated in sound localization and its plasticity. We examined the role of the olivocochlear system (OC) in horizontal sound localization by the ferret and in localization learning following unilateral earplugging. Under anesthesia, adult ferrets underwent olivocochlear bundle section at the floor of the fourth ventricle, either at the midline or laterally (left). Lesioned and control animals were trained to localize 1 s and 40ms amplitude-roved broadband noise stimuli from one of 12 loudspeakers. Neither type of lesion affected normal localization accuracy. All ferrets then received a left earplug and were tested and trained over 10 d. The plug profoundly disrupted localization. Ferrets in the control and lateral lesion groups improved significantly during subsequent training on the 1 s stimulus. No improvement (learning) occurred in the midline lesion group. Markedly poorer performance and failure to learn was observed with the 40 ms stimulus in all groups. Plug removal resulted in a rapid resumption of normal localization in all animals. Insertion of a subsequent plug in the right ear produced similar results to left earplugging. Learning in the lateral lesion group was independent of the side of the lesion relative to the earplug. Lesions in all reported cases were verified histologically. The results suggest the OC system is not needed for accurate localization, but that it is involved in relearning localization during unilateral conductive hearing loss. PMID:21325517

  12. Asynchronous behavior of the Antarctic Ice Sheet and local glaciers during and since Termination 1, Salmon Valley, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Margaret S.; Hall, Brenda L.; Denton, George H.

    2018-01-01

    The stability of the Antarctic Ice Sheet under future warming remains an open question with broad implications for sea-level prediction and adaptation. In particular, knowledge of whether the ice sheet has the capacity for rapid drawdown or collapse, or whether it can remain stable during periods of warming, is essential for predicting its future behavior. Here we use 55 radiocarbon dates, coupled with geomorphologic mapping, to reconstruct the timing of changes in ice extent and elevation during the last ice-age termination in Salmon Valley, adjacent to McMurdo Sound in the western Ross Sea Embayment. Results indicate that a grounded ice sheet in the Ross Sea Embayment achieved its maximum elevation and extent along the headlands of Salmon Valley at ∼18,000 yr BP, during a period of increasing temperatures and accumulation over the Antarctic continent. This ice remained at or near its maximum on the headlands near the valley mouth until after ∼14,000 yr BP. Removal of grounded Ross Sea ice from Salmon Valley was complete shortly after ∼7900 yr BP, indicating that the grounding line had retreated through southern McMurdo Sound by that time. We suggest the primary driver of Ross Sea ice removal from McMurdo Sound was marine-based, either through basal melting or calving due to sea-level rise. When combined with regional data, the Salmon Valley record suggests that this sector of the Antarctic Ice Sheet did not contribute in a significant way to deglacial meltwater pulses, such as meltwater pulse 1a. In contrast to the Ross Sea ice, our work also shows that local, independent alpine glaciers in Salmon Valley have advanced through the Holocene. Land-terminating glaciers such as these elsewhere in the region show a similar pattern, and may reflect the continued influence of increased accumulation following the termination of the last ice age.

  13. Localization of Directional Sound Sources Supported by A Priori Information of the Acoustic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Radványi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Speaker localization with microphone arrays has received significant attention in the past decade as a means for automated speaker tracking of individuals in a closed space for videoconferencing systems, directed speech capture systems, and surveillance systems. Traditional techniques are based on estimating the relative time difference of arrivals (TDOA between different channels, by utilizing crosscorrelation function. As we show in the context of speaker localization, these estimates yield poor results, due to the joint effect of reverberation and the directivity of sound sources. In this paper, we present a novel method that utilizes a priori acoustic information of the monitored region, which makes it possible to localize directional sound sources by taking the effect of reverberation into account. The proposed method shows significant improvement of performance compared with traditional methods in “noise-free” condition. Further work is required to extend its capabilities to noisy environments.

  14. Encoding of natural sounds by variance of the cortical local field potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Nai; Simon, Jonathan Z; Shamma, Shihab A; David, Stephen V

    2016-06-01

    Neural encoding of sensory stimuli is typically studied by averaging neural signals across repetitions of the same stimulus. However, recent work has suggested that the variance of neural activity across repeated trials can also depend on sensory inputs. Here we characterize how intertrial variance of the local field potential (LFP) in primary auditory cortex of awake ferrets is affected by continuous natural sound stimuli. We find that natural sounds often suppress the intertrial variance of low-frequency LFP (field analysis reveals that changes in LFP variance have frequency tuning similar to multiunit activity at the same recording site, suggesting a local origin for changes in LFP variance. In summary, the spectral tuning of LFP intertrial variance and the absence of a correlation with the amplitude of the mean evoked LFP suggest substantial heterogeneity in the interaction between spontaneous and stimulus-driven activity across local neural populations in auditory cortex. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Localization of a sound source in a noisy environment by hyperbolic curves in quefrency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choon-Su; Jeon, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2014-10-01

    Time Difference of Arrivals (TDOAs) of sound waves between microphones have to do with source localization. How well a sound source can be localized depends on how precisely the TDOAs are estimated. Although many ways to estimate TDOA have been proposed, noise always prevents us from finding exact time differences more or less in practice. Cross correlation has been the most prevalent way to estimate time difference, and various cross correlations robust to noise have also been developed. Nevertheless, much remains to be done for exact TDOA estimation under noisy environments. A novel way to show time delays in quefrency domain by removing noise has been proposed, which is called Minimum Variance Cepstrum (MVC). In particular, it is practically desirable to visualize source position with as few number of sensors as possible. Once TDOAs are obtained precisely, it is enough to show the source position in a 2-D plane using hyperbolic curves with only three sensors. In this work, the MVC is adopted to accurately estimate TDOAs under noise, and a way to localize an acoustic source by intersecting hyperbolic curves using the TDOAs between three microphones is proposed. Numerical simulations on TDOA estimation and source localization with white Gaussian noise demonstrated that the proposed method worked well under the noisy environment, and we compared the results with those of other old but well-established cross correlation estimators. In addition, experiments to detect a leaking point on a pipe successfully showed where the leak sound was generated.

  16. Mechanisms of Sound Localization in Two Functionally Distinct Regions of the Auditory Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Khaleel A; Yarrow, Stuart; Brewton, Dustin

    2015-12-09

    The auditory cortex is necessary for sound localization. The mechanisms that shape bicoordinate spatial representation in the auditory cortex remain unclear. Here, we addressed this issue by quantifying spatial receptive fields (SRFs) in two functionally distinct cortical regions in the pallid bat. The pallid bat uses echolocation for obstacle avoidance and listens to prey-generated noise to localize prey. Its cortex contains two segregated regions of response selectivity that serve echolocation and localization of prey-generated noise. The main aim of this study was to compare 2D SRFs between neurons in the noise-selective region (NSR) and the echolocation region [frequency-modulated sweep-selective region (FMSR)]. The data reveal the following major differences between these two regions: (1) compared with NSR neurons, SRF properties of FMSR neurons were more strongly dependent on sound level; (2) as a population, NSR neurons represent a broad region of contralateral space, while FMSR selectivity was focused near the midline at sound levels near threshold and expanded considerably with increasing sound levels; and (3) the SRF size and centroid elevation were correlated with the characteristic frequency in the NSR, but not the FMSR. These data suggest different mechanisms of sound localization for two different behaviors. Previously, we reported that azimuth is represented by predictable changes in the extent of activated cortex. The present data indicate how elevation constrains this activity pattern. These data suggest a novel model for bicoordinate spatial representation that is based on the extent of activated cortex resulting from the overlap of binaural and tonotopic maps. Unlike the visual and somatosensory systems, spatial information is not directly represented at the sensory receptor epithelium in the auditory system. Spatial locations are computed by integrating neural binaural properties and frequency-dependent pinna filtering, providing a useful model

  17. Lung sound analysis helps localize airway inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimoda T

    2017-03-01

    sound recordings could be used to identify sites of local airway inflammation. Keywords: airway obstruction, expiration sound pressure level, inspiration sound pressure level, expiration-to-inspiration sound pressure ratio, 7-point analysis

  18. Design of UAV-Embedded Microphone Array System for Sound Source Localization in Outdoor Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Hoshiba

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In search and rescue activities, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV should exploit sound information to compensate for poor visual information. This paper describes the design and implementation of a UAV-embedded microphone array system for sound source localization in outdoor environments. Four critical development problems included water-resistance of the microphone array, efficiency in assembling, reliability of wireless communication, and sufficiency of visualization tools for operators. To solve these problems, we developed a spherical microphone array system (SMAS consisting of a microphone array, a stable wireless network communication system, and intuitive visualization tools. The performance of SMAS was evaluated with simulated data and a demonstration in the field. Results confirmed that the SMAS provides highly accurate localization, water resistance, prompt assembly, stable wireless communication, and intuitive information for observers and operators.

  19. Design of UAV-Embedded Microphone Array System for Sound Source Localization in Outdoor Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiba, Kotaro; Washizaki, Kai; Wakabayashi, Mizuho; Ishiki, Takahiro; Kumon, Makoto; Bando, Yoshiaki; Gabriel, Daniel; Nakadai, Kazuhiro; Okuno, Hiroshi G

    2017-11-03

    In search and rescue activities, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) should exploit sound information to compensate for poor visual information. This paper describes the design and implementation of a UAV-embedded microphone array system for sound source localization in outdoor environments. Four critical development problems included water-resistance of the microphone array, efficiency in assembling, reliability of wireless communication, and sufficiency of visualization tools for operators. To solve these problems, we developed a spherical microphone array system (SMAS) consisting of a microphone array, a stable wireless network communication system, and intuitive visualization tools. The performance of SMAS was evaluated with simulated data and a demonstration in the field. Results confirmed that the SMAS provides highly accurate localization, water resistance, prompt assembly, stable wireless communication, and intuitive information for observers and operators.

  20. Design of UAV-Embedded Microphone Array System for Sound Source Localization in Outdoor Environments †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiba, Kotaro; Washizaki, Kai; Wakabayashi, Mizuho; Ishiki, Takahiro; Bando, Yoshiaki; Gabriel, Daniel; Nakadai, Kazuhiro; Okuno, Hiroshi G.

    2017-01-01

    In search and rescue activities, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) should exploit sound information to compensate for poor visual information. This paper describes the design and implementation of a UAV-embedded microphone array system for sound source localization in outdoor environments. Four critical development problems included water-resistance of the microphone array, efficiency in assembling, reliability of wireless communication, and sufficiency of visualization tools for operators. To solve these problems, we developed a spherical microphone array system (SMAS) consisting of a microphone array, a stable wireless network communication system, and intuitive visualization tools. The performance of SMAS was evaluated with simulated data and a demonstration in the field. Results confirmed that the SMAS provides highly accurate localization, water resistance, prompt assembly, stable wireless communication, and intuitive information for observers and operators. PMID:29099790

  1. Effect of extreme adaptive frequency compression in bimodal listeners on sound localization and speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veugen, Lidwien C E; Chalupper, Josef; Mens, Lucas H M; Snik, Ad F M; van Opstal, A John

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to improve access to high-frequency interaural level differences (ILD), by applying extreme frequency compression (FC) in the hearing aid (HA) of 13 bimodal listeners, using a cochlear implant (CI) and conventional HA in opposite ears. An experimental signal-adaptive frequency-lowering algorithm was tested, compressing frequencies above 160 Hz into the individual audible range of residual hearing, but only for consonants (adaptive FC), thus protecting vowel formants, with the aim to preserve speech perception. In a cross-over design with at least 5 weeks of acclimatization between sessions, bimodal performance with and without adaptive FC was compared for horizontal sound localization, speech understanding in quiet and in noise, and vowel, consonant and voice-pitch perception. On average, adaptive FC did not significantly affect any of the test results. Yet, two subjects who were fitted with a relatively weak frequency compression ratio, showed improved horizontal sound localization. After the study, four subjects preferred adaptive FC, four preferred standard frequency mapping, and four had no preference. Noteworthy, the subjects preferring adaptive FC were those with best performance on all tasks, both with and without adaptive FC. On a group level, extreme adaptive FC did not change sound localization and speech understanding in bimodal listeners. Possible reasons are too strong compression ratios, insufficient residual hearing or that the adaptive switching, although preserving vowel perception, may have been ineffective to produce consistent ILD cues. Individual results suggested that two subjects were able to integrate the frequency-compressed HA input with that of the CI, and benefitted from enhanced binaural cues for horizontal sound localization.

  2. Do you hear where I hear?: Isolating the individualized sound localization cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin David Romigh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely acknowledged that individualized head-related transfer function (HRTF measurements are needed to adequately capture all of the 3D spatial hearing cues. However, many perceptual studies have shown that localization accuracy in the lateral dimension is only minimally decreased by the use of non-individualized head-related transfer functions. This evidence supports the idea that the individualized components of an HRTF could be isolated from those that are more general in nature. In the present study we decomposed the HRTF at each location into average, lateral and intraconic spectral components, along with an ITD in an effort to isolate the sound localization cues that are responsible for the inter-individual differences in localization performance. HRTFs for a given listener were then reconstructed systematically with components that were both individualized and non-individualized in nature, and the effect of each modification was analyzed via a virtual localization test where brief 250-ms noise bursts were rendered with the modified HRTFs. Results indicate that the cues important for individualization of HRTFs are contained almost exclusively in the intraconic portion of the HRTF spectra and localization is only minimally affected by introducing non-individualized cues into the other HRTF components. These results provide new insights into what specific inter-individual differences in head-related acoustical features are most relevant to sound localization, and provide a framework for how future human-machine interfaces might be more effectively generalized and/or individualized.

  3. The natural history of sound localization in mammals – a story of neuronal inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt eGrothe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Our concepts of sound localization in the vertebrate brain are widely based on the general assumption that both the ability to detect air-borne sounds and the neuronal processing are homologous in archosaurs (present day crocodiles and birds and mammals. Yet studies repeatedly report conflicting results on the neuronal circuits and mechanisms, in particular the role of inhibition, as well as the coding strategies between avian and mammalian model systems.Here we argue that mammalian and avian phylogeny of spatial hearing is characterized by a convergent evolution of hearing air-borne sounds rather than by homology. In particular, the different evolutionary origins of tympanic ears and the different availability of binaural cues in early mammals and archosaurs imposed distinct constraints on the respective binaural processing mechanisms. The role of synaptic inhibition in generating binaural spatial sensitivity in mammals is highlighted, as it reveals a unifying principle of mammalian circuit design for encoding sound position. Together, we combine evolutionary, anatomical and physiological arguments for making a clear distinction between mammalian processing mechanisms and coding strategies and those of archosaurs. We emphasize that a consideration of the convergent nature of neuronal mechanisms will significantly increase the explanatory power of studies of spatial processing in both mammals and birds.

  4. The natural history of sound localization in mammals – a story of neuronal inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothe, Benedikt; Pecka, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Our concepts of sound localization in the vertebrate brain are widely based on the general assumption that both the ability to detect air-borne sounds and the neuronal processing are homologous in archosaurs (present day crocodiles and birds) and mammals. Yet studies repeatedly report conflicting results on the neuronal circuits and mechanisms, in particular the role of inhibition, as well as the coding strategies between avian and mammalian model systems. Here we argue that mammalian and avian phylogeny of spatial hearing is characterized by a convergent evolution of hearing air-borne sounds rather than by homology. In particular, the different evolutionary origins of tympanic ears and the different availability of binaural cues in early mammals and archosaurs imposed distinct constraints on the respective binaural processing mechanisms. The role of synaptic inhibition in generating binaural spatial sensitivity in mammals is highlighted, as it reveals a unifying principle of mammalian circuit design for encoding sound position. Together, we combine evolutionary, anatomical and physiological arguments for making a clear distinction between mammalian processing mechanisms and coding strategies and those of archosaurs. We emphasize that a consideration of the convergent nature of neuronal mechanisms will significantly increase the explanatory power of studies of spatial processing in both mammals and birds. PMID:25324726

  5. Effect of wearing a ski helmet on perception and localization of sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedl, G; Kopp, M; Burtscher, M; Zorowka, P; Weichbold, V; Stephan, K; Koci, V; Seebacher, J

    2014-07-01

    Helmet use on ski slopes has steadily increased worldwide over the past years. A common reason reported for helmet non-use, however, is impaired hearing. Therefore, an intra-subject design study was conducted to compare hearing thresholds and sound source localization of 21 adults with normal hearing in an anechoic chamber when wearing a ski helmet and ski goggles or wearing a ski cap and ski goggles to the condition head bare. Hearing thresholds while wearing a ski helmet (6.8 ± 1.6 dB HL) and ski cap (5.5 ± 1.6 dB HL) were significantly different (p = 0.030, d = 0.44). Compared to head bare (2.5 ± 1.2 dB HL), a significant difference was found for the ski helmet only (p = 0.040, d = 1.57). Regarding sound source localization, correct scores in the condition head bare (90%) showed a highly significant difference compared with those of condition cap (65%) and helmet (58%), respectively (p 2.5). Compared to the ski cap, wearing the helmet significantly reduced correct scores (p = 0.020, d = 0.59) irrespective of the tested sound pressure levels. In conclusion, wearing a ski helmet impairs hearing to a small though significantly greater extent compared with a cap, the degree, however, being less than what is termed as a hearing impairment. Compared to the condition head bare, wearing a ski cap or a ski helmet significantly reduced one's ability of sound source localization. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Evaluation of Speech Intelligibility and Sound Localization Abilities with Hearing Aids Using Binaural Wireless Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Iman; Parsa, Vijay; Macpherson, Ewan; Cheesman, Margaret

    2013-01-02

    Wireless synchronization of the digital signal processing (DSP) features between two hearing aids in a bilateral hearing aid fitting is a fairly new technology. This technology is expected to preserve the differences in time and intensity between the two ears by co-ordinating the bilateral DSP features such as multichannel compression, noise reduction, and adaptive directionality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefits of wireless communication as implemented in two commercially available hearing aids. More specifically, this study measured speech intelligibility and sound localization abilities of normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners using bilateral hearing aids with wireless synchronization of multichannel Wide Dynamic Range Compression (WDRC). Twenty subjects participated; 8 had normal hearing and 12 had bilaterally symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. Each individual completed the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) and a sound localization test with two types of stimuli. No specific benefit from wireless WDRC synchronization was observed for the HINT; however, hearing impaired listeners had better localization with the wireless synchronization. Binaural wireless technology in hearing aids may improve localization abilities although the possible effect appears to be small at the initial fitting. With adaptation, the hearing aids with synchronized signal processing may lead to an improvement in localization and speech intelligibility. Further research is required to demonstrate the effect of adaptation to the hearing aids with synchronized signal processing on different aspects of auditory performance.

  7. Evaluation of speech intelligibility and sound localization abilities with hearing aids using binaural wireless technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Ibrahim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless synchronization of the digital signal processing (DSP features between two hearing aids in a bilateral hearing aid fitting is a fairly new technology. This technology is expected to preserve the differences in time and intensity between the two ears by co-ordinating the bilateral DSP features such as multichannel compression, noise reduction, and adaptive directionality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefits of wireless communication as implemented in two commercially available hearing aids. More specifically, this study measured speech intelligibility and sound localization abilities of normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners using bilateral hearing aids with wireless synchronization of multichannel Wide Dynamic Range Compression (WDRC. Twenty subjects participated; 8 had normal hearing and 12 had bilaterally symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. Each individual completed the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT and a sound localization test with two types of stimuli. No specific benefit from wireless WDRC synchronization was observed for the HINT; however, hearing impaired listeners had better localization with the wireless synchronization. Binaural wireless technology in hearing aids may improve localization abilities although the possible effect appears to be small at the initial fitting. With adaptation, the hearing aids with synchronized signal processing may lead to an improvement in localization and speech intelligibility. Further research is required to demonstrate the effect of adaptation to the hearing aids with synchronized signal processing on different aspects of auditory performance.

  8. Evaluation of speech intelligibility and sound localization abilities with hearing aids using binaural wireless technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless synchronization of the digital signal processing (DSP features between two hearing aids in a bilateral hearing aid fitting is a fairly new technology. This technology is expected to preserve the differences in time and intensity between the two ears by co-ordinating the bilateral DSP features such as multichannel compression, noise reduction, and adaptive directionality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefits of wireless communication as implemented in two commercially available hearing aids. More specifically, this study measured speech intelligibility and sound localization abilities of normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners using bilateral hearing aids with wireless synchronization of multichannel Wide Dynamic Range Compression (WDRC. Twenty subjects participated; 8 had normal hearing and 12 had bilaterally symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. Each individual completed the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT and a sound localization test with two types of stimuli. No specific benefit from wireless WDRC synchronization was observed for the HINT; however, hearing impaired listeners had better localization with the wireless synchronization. Binaural wireless technology in hearing aids may improve localization abilities although the possible effect appears to be small at the initial fitting. With adaptation, the hearing aids with synchronized signal processing may lead to an improvement in localization and speech intelligibility. Further research is required to demonstrate the effect of adaptation to the hearing aids with synchronized signal processing on different aspects of auditory performance.

  9. Accurate sound localization in reverberant environments is mediated by robust encoding of spatial cues in the auditory midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devore, Sasha; Ihlefeld, Antje; Hancock, Kenneth; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2009-04-16

    In reverberant environments, acoustic reflections interfere with the direct sound arriving at a listener's ears, distorting the spatial cues for sound localization. Yet, human listeners have little difficulty localizing sounds in most settings. Because reverberant energy builds up over time, the source location is represented relatively faithfully during the early portion of a sound, but this representation becomes increasingly degraded later in the stimulus. We show that the directional sensitivity of single neurons in the auditory midbrain of anesthetized cats follows a similar time course, although onset dominance in temporal response patterns results in more robust directional sensitivity than expected, suggesting a simple mechanism for improving directional sensitivity in reverberation. In parallel behavioral experiments, we demonstrate that human lateralization judgments are consistent with predictions from a population rate model decoding the observed midbrain responses, suggesting a subcortical origin for robust sound localization in reverberant environments.

  10. Sound localization and word discrimination in reverberant environment in children with developmental dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Castro-Camacho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Compare if localization of sounds and words discrimination in reverberant environment is different between children with dyslexia and controls. Method We studied 30 children with dyslexia and 30 controls. Sound and word localization and discrimination was studied in five angles from left to right auditory fields (-90o, -45o, 0o, +45o, +90o, under reverberant and no-reverberant conditions; correct answers were compared. Results Spatial location of words in no-reverberant test was deficient in children with dyslexia at 0º and +90o. Spatial location for reverberant test was altered in children with dyslexia at all angles, except –-90o. Word discrimination in no-reverberant test in children with dyslexia had a poor performance at left angles. In reverberant test, children with dyslexia exhibited deficiencies at -45o, -90o, and +45o angles. Conclusion Children with dyslexia could had problems when have to locate sound, and discriminate words in extreme locations of the horizontal plane in classrooms with reverberation.

  11. Near-Field Sound Localization Based on the Small Profile Monaural Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngwoong; Kim, Keonwook

    2015-11-13

    The acoustic wave around a sound source in the near-field area presents unconventional properties in the temporal, spectral, and spatial domains due to the propagation mechanism. This paper investigates a near-field sound localizer in a small profile structure with a single microphone. The asymmetric structure around the microphone provides a distinctive spectral variation that can be recognized by the dedicated algorithm for directional localization. The physical structure consists of ten pipes of different lengths in a vertical fashion and rectangular wings positioned between the pipes in radial directions. The sound from an individual direction travels through the nearest open pipe, which generates the particular fundamental frequency according to the acoustic resonance. The Cepstral parameter is modified to evaluate the fundamental frequency. Once the system estimates the fundamental frequency of the received signal, the length of arrival and angle of arrival (AoA) are derived by the designed model. From an azimuthal distance of 3-15 cm from the outer body of the pipes, the extensive acoustic experiments with a 3D-printed structure show that the direct and side directions deliver average hit rates of 89% and 73%, respectively. The closer positions to the system demonstrate higher accuracy, and the overall hit rate performance is 78% up to 15 cm away from the structure body.

  12. Sound localization and word discrimination in reverberant environment in children with developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Camacho, Wendy; Peñaloza-López, Yolanda; Pérez-Ruiz, Santiago J; García-Pedroza, Felipe; Padilla-Ortiz, Ana L; Poblano, Adrián; Villarruel-Rivas, Concepción; Romero-Díaz, Alfredo; Careaga-Olvera, Aidé

    2015-04-01

    Compare if localization of sounds and words discrimination in reverberant environment is different between children with dyslexia and controls. We studied 30 children with dyslexia and 30 controls. Sound and word localization and discrimination was studied in five angles from left to right auditory fields (-90o, -45o, 0o, +45o, +90o), under reverberant and no-reverberant conditions; correct answers were compared. Spatial location of words in no-reverberant test was deficient in children with dyslexia at 0º and +90o. Spatial location for reverberant test was altered in children with dyslexia at all angles, except –-90o. Word discrimination in no-reverberant test in children with dyslexia had a poor performance at left angles. In reverberant test, children with dyslexia exhibited deficiencies at -45o, -90o, and +45o angles. Children with dyslexia could had problems when have to locate sound, and discriminate words in extreme locations of the horizontal plane in classrooms with reverberation.

  13. Near-Field Sound Localization Based on the Small Profile Monaural Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngwoong Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic wave around a sound source in the near-field area presents unconventional properties in the temporal, spectral, and spatial domains due to the propagation mechanism. This paper investigates a near-field sound localizer in a small profile structure with a single microphone. The asymmetric structure around the microphone provides a distinctive spectral variation that can be recognized by the dedicated algorithm for directional localization. The physical structure consists of ten pipes of different lengths in a vertical fashion and rectangular wings positioned between the pipes in radial directions. The sound from an individual direction travels through the nearest open pipe, which generates the particular fundamental frequency according to the acoustic resonance. The Cepstral parameter is modified to evaluate the fundamental frequency. Once the system estimates the fundamental frequency of the received signal, the length of arrival and angle of arrival (AoA are derived by the designed model. From an azimuthal distance of 3–15 cm from the outer body of the pipes, the extensive acoustic experiments with a 3D-printed structure show that the direct and side directions deliver average hit rates of 89% and 73%, respectively. The closer positions to the system demonstrate higher accuracy, and the overall hit rate performance is 78% up to 15 cm away from the structure body.

  14. Fast Sound Source Localization Using Two-Level Search Space Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Dongsuk; Lee, Taewoo; Cho, Youngkyu

    2016-01-01

    Steered response power phase transform (SRP-PHAT) is a method that is widely used for robust sound source localization (SSL). However, since SRP-PHAT searches over a large number of candidate locations, it is too slow to run in real-time for large-scale microphone array systems. In this paper, we propose a robust two-level search space clustering method to speed-up SRP-PHAT-based SSL. The proposed method divides the candidate locations of the sound source into a set of groups and finds a small number of groups that are likely to contain the maximum power location. By searching within the small number of groups, the computational costs are reduced by 61.8% compared to a previously proposed method without loss of accuracy.

  15. In vivo coincidence detection in mammalian sound localization generates phase delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Tom P.; Roberts, Michael T.; Wei, Liting; NL, Nace L. Golding; Joris, Philip X.

    2015-01-01

    Sound localization critically depends on detection of differences in arrival time of sounds at the two ears (acoustic delay). The fundamental mechanisms are debated, but all proposals include a process of coincidence detection and a separate source of internal delay which offsets the acoustic delay and determines neural tuning. We obtained in vivo patch clamp recordings of binaural neurons in the Mongolian gerbil, combined with pharmacological manipulations, to directly compare neuronal input to output and to separate excitation from inhibition. The results cannot be accounted for by existing models and reveal that coincidence detection is not an instantaneous process but is shaped by the interaction of intrinsic conductances with preceding synaptic activity. This interaction generates an internal delay as an intrinsic part of the process of coincidence detection. The multiplication and time-shifting stages thought to extract synchronous activity in many brain areas can thus be combined in a single operation. PMID:25664914

  16. Resolution of Interaural Time Differences in the Avian Sound localization Circuit – A Modeling Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Fischer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Interaural time differences (ITDs are a main cue for sound localization and sound segregation. A dominant model to study ITD detection is the sound localization circuitry in the avian auditory brainstem. Neurons in nucleus laminaris (NL receive auditory information from both ears via the avian cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM and compare the relative timing of these inputs. Timing of these inputs is crucial, as ITDs in the microsecond range must be discriminated and encoded. We modeled ITD sensitivity of single NL neurons based on previously published data and determined the minimum resolvable ITD for neurons in NL. The minimum resolvable ITD is too large to allow for discrimination by single NL neurons of naturally occurring ITDs for very low frequencies. For high frequency NL neurons (> 1 kHz our calculated ITD resolutions fall well within the natural range of ITDs and approach values of below 10 µs. We show that different parts of the ITD tuning function offer different resolution in ITD coding, suggesting that information derived from both parts may be used for downstream processing. A place code may be used for sound location at frequencies above 500 Hz, but our data suggest the slope of the ITD tuning curve ought to be used for ITD discrimination by single NL neurons at the lowest frequencies. Our results provide an important measure of the necessary temporal window of binaural inputs for future studies on the mechanisms and development of neuronal computation of temporally precise information in this important system. In particular, our data establish the temporal precision needed for conduction time regulation along NM axons.

  17. A Pulse-type Hardware Level Difference Detection Model Based on Sound Source Localization Mechanism in Barn Owl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Tsubasa; Sekine, Yoshifumi

    Auditory information processing is very important in the darkness where vision information is extremely limited. Barn owls have excellent hearing information processing function. Barn owls can detect a sound source in the high accuracy of less than two degrees in both of the vertical and horizontal directions. When they perform the sound source localization, the barn owls use the interaural time difference for localization in the horizontal plane, and the interaural level difference for localization in the vertical plane. We are constructing the two-dimensional sound source localization model using pulse-type hardware neuron models based on sound source localization mechanism of barn owl for the purpose of the engineering application. In this paper, we propose a pulse-type hardware model for level difference detection based on sound source localization mechanism of barn owl. Firstly, we discuss the response characteristics of the mathematical model for level difference detection. Next we discuss the response characteristics of the hardware mode. As a result, we show clearly that this proposal model can be used as a sound source localization model of vertical direction.

  18. A Sr-Nd-Hf isotope characterization of dust source areas in Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakowski, Molly A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Delmonte, Barbara; Baroni, Carlo; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Sims, Kenneth W. W.

    2016-06-01

    Determining the geographical provenance of dust provides crucial insight into the global dust cycle. For the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS), the importance of Southern hemisphere potential dust sources has been thoroughly investigated using radiogenic isotopes, whereas proximal dust source areas located on the periphery of the ice sheet remain poorly documented from a geochemical standpoint. In this work, we expand the existing isotopic (Srsbnd Nd) catalogue of dust and sand-sized sediments from Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector, and incorporate Hf isotopic data to place additional constraints on dust source identification. The isotopic field for materials considered in this study is characterized by 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.703 to 0.783, εNd between -12.01 and 6.36, and εHf from -16.77 to 6.89. As reported in previous works, the data reveal close relationships between Antarctic sediments and distinct parent lithologies; in addition, our findings emphasize the background presence of very fine dusts originating from dominant global sources and regional volcanic activity as barriers to direct source-to-sink comparison of isotopic signatures. Thus, geochemical characterizations of dust sources to the Antarctic ice sheet involving multiple size fractions, including coarser-grained particles more susceptible to short-range transport, can help us to rule out global sources of dust when examining local sediment cores and ice cores.

  19. A Novel Dual-Channel Matching Method Based on Time Reversal and its Performance for Sound Source Localization in Enclosed Space

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huiying, Ma; Xiangyang, Zeng; Haitao, Wang

    2016-01-01

    For sound source localization in enclosed space, the background noise and reverberation have significant influences on traditional localization algorithms and the array, and these algorithms are usually complex...

  20. Localizing nearby sound sources in a classroom: Binaural room impulse responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.; Kopco, Norbert; Martin, Tara J.

    2005-05-01

    Binaural room impulse responses (BRIRs) were measured in a classroom for sources at different azimuths and distances (up to 1 m) relative to a manikin located in four positions in a classroom. When the listener is far from all walls, reverberant energy distorts signal magnitude and phase independently at each frequency, altering monaural spectral cues, interaural phase differences, and interaural level differences. For the tested conditions, systematic distortion (comb-filtering) from an early intense reflection is only evident when a listener is very close to a wall, and then only in the ear facing the wall. Especially for a nearby source, interaural cues grow less reliable with increasing source laterality and monaural spectral cues are less reliable in the ear farther from the sound source. Reverberation reduces the magnitude of interaural level differences at all frequencies; however, the direct-sound interaural time difference can still be recovered from the BRIRs measured in these experiments. Results suggest that bias and variability in sound localization behavior may vary systematically with listener location in a room as well as source location relative to the listener, even for nearby sources where there is relatively little reverberant energy. .

  1. How internally coupled ears generate temporal and amplitude cues for sound localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedurmudi, A P; Goulet, J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J

    2016-01-01

    In internally coupled ears, displacement of one eardrum creates pressure waves that propagate through air-filled passages in the skull and cause displacement of the opposing eardrum, and conversely. By modeling the membrane, passages, and propagating pressure waves, we show that internally coupled...... ears generate unique amplitude and temporal cues for sound localization. The magnitudes of both these cues are directionally dependent. The tympanic fundamental frequency segregates a low-frequency regime with constant time-difference magnification from a high-frequency domain with considerable...

  2. The influence of signal parameters on the sound source localization ability of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastelein, Ronald A; de Haan, Dick; Verboom, Willem C

    2007-08-01

    It is unclear how well harbor porpoises can locate sound sources, and thus can locate acoustic alarms on gillnets. Therefore the ability of a porpoise to determine the location of a sound source was determined. The animal was trained to indicate the active one of 16 transducers in a 16-m-diam circle around a central listening station. The duration and received level of the narrowband frequency-modulated signals (center frequencies 16, 64 and 100 kHz) were varied. The animal's localization performance increased when the signal duration increased from 600 to 1000 ms. The lower the received sound pressure level (SPL) of the signal, the harder the animal found it to localize the sound source. When pulse duration was long enough (approximately 1 s) and the received SPLs of the sounds were high (34-50 dB above basic hearing thresholds or 3-15 dB above the theoretical masked detection threshold in the ambient noise condition of the present study), the animal could locate sounds of the three frequencies almost equally well. The porpoise was able to locate sound sources up to 124 degrees to its left or right more easily than sounds from behind it.

  3. Three-Dimensional Sound Source Localization Using Inter-Channel Time Difference Trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmoon Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sound source localization is one of the basic and essential techniques for intelligent robots in terms of human-robot interaction and has been utilized in various engineering fields. This paper suggests a new localization method using an inter-channel time difference trajectory, which is a new localization cue for efficient 3-D localization. As one of the ways to realize the proposed cue, a two-channel rotating array is employed. Two microphones are attached on the left and right sides of the spherical head. One microphone is in a circular motion on the right side, while the other is fixed on the left side. According to the rotating motion of the array, the (source direction-dependent characteristics of the trajectories are analysed using the Ray-Tracing formula extended for 3-D models. In simulation, the synthesized signals generated by the fixed and rotating microphone signal models were used as the output signals of the two microphones. The simulation showed that the localization performance is strongly dependent on the azimuthal position of a source, which is caused by the asymmetry of the trajectory amplitude. Additionally, the experimental results of the two experiments carried out in the room environment demonstrated that the proposed system can localize a Gaussian noise source and a voice source in 3-D space.

  4. Mice Lacking the Alpha9 Subunit of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Exhibit Deficits in Frequency Difference Limens and Sound Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Clause

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sound processing in the cochlea is modulated by cholinergic efferent axons arising from medial olivocochlear neurons in the brainstem. These axons contact outer hair cells in the mature cochlea and inner hair cells during development and activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors composed of α9 and α10 subunits. The α9 subunit is necessary for mediating the effects of acetylcholine on hair cells as genetic deletion of the α9 subunit results in functional cholinergic de-efferentation of the cochlea. Cholinergic modulation of spontaneous cochlear activity before hearing onset is important for the maturation of central auditory circuits. In α9KO mice, the developmental refinement of inhibitory afferents to the lateral superior olive is disturbed, resulting in decreased tonotopic organization of this sound localization nucleus. In this study, we used behavioral tests to investigate whether the circuit anomalies in α9KO mice correlate with sound localization or sound frequency processing. Using a conditioned lick suppression task to measure sound localization, we found that three out of four α9KO mice showed impaired minimum audible angles. Using a prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response paradigm, we found that the ability of α9KO mice to detect sound frequency changes was impaired, whereas their ability to detect sound intensity changes was not. These results demonstrate that cholinergic, nicotinic α9 subunit mediated transmission in the developing cochlear plays an important role in the maturation of hearing.

  5. Speech performance and sound localization abilities in Neurelec Digisonic® SP binaural cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaert, Nicolas; Lazard, Diane S; Gnansia, Dan; Bébéar, Jean-Pierre; Romanet, Philippe; Meyer, Bernard; Péan, Vincent; Mollard, Dominique; Truy, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this prospective study the outcome of the Digisonic® SP Binaural cochlear implant (CI), a device enabling electric stimulation of both cochleae by a single receiver, was evaluated in 14 postlingually deafened adults after 12 months of use. Speech perception was tested using French disyllabic words in quiet and in speech-shaped noise at +10 dB signal-to-noise ratio. Horizontal sound localization in quiet was tested using pink noise coming from 5 loudspeakers, from -90 to +90° along the azimuth. Speech scores in quiet were 76% (±19.5 SD) in the bilateral condition, 62% (±24 SD) for the better ear alone and 43.5% (±27 SD) for the poorer ear alone. Speech scores in noise were 60% (±27.5 SD), 46% (±28 SD) and 28% (±25 SD), respectively, in the same conditions. Statistical analysis showed a significant advantage of the bilateral use in quiet and in noise (p Sound localization accuracy improved significantly when using the device in the bilateral condition with an average root mean square of 35°. Compared with published outcomes of usual bilateral cochlear implantation, this device could be a valuable alternative to two CIs. Prospective controlled trials, comparing the Digisonic SP Binaural CI with a standard bilateral cochlear implantation are mandatory to evaluate their respective advantages and cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Sound Source Localization Through 8 MEMS Microphones Array Using a Sand-Scorpion-Inspired Spiking Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Beck

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sand-scorpions and many other arachnids perceive their environment by using their feet to sense ground waves. They are able to determine amplitudes the size of an atom and locate the acoustic stimuli with an accuracy of within 13° based on their neuronal anatomy. We present here a prototype sound source localization system, inspired from this impressive performance. The system presented utilizes custom-built hardware with eight MEMS microphones, one for each foot, to acquire the acoustic scene, and a spiking neural model to localize the sound source. The current implementation shows smaller localization error than those observed in nature.

  7. The role of envelope shape in the localization of multiple sound sources and echoes in the barn owl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Caitlin S; Nelson, Brian S; Takahashi, Terry T

    2013-02-01

    Echoes and sounds of independent origin often obscure sounds of interest, but echoes can go undetected under natural listening conditions, a perception called the precedence effect. How does the auditory system distinguish between echoes and independent sources? To investigate, we presented two broadband noises to barn owls (Tyto alba) while varying the similarity of the sounds' envelopes. The carriers of the noises were identical except for a 2- or 3-ms delay. Their onsets and offsets were also synchronized. In owls, sound localization is guided by neural activity on a topographic map of auditory space. When there are two sources concomitantly emitting sounds with overlapping amplitude spectra, space map neurons discharge when the stimulus in their receptive field is louder than the one outside it and when the averaged amplitudes of both sounds are rising. A model incorporating these features calculated the strengths of the two sources' representations on the map (B. S. Nelson and T. T. Takahashi; Neuron 67: 643-655, 2010). The target localized by the owls could be predicted from the model's output. The model also explained why the echo is not localized at short delays: when envelopes are similar, peaks in the leading sound mask corresponding peaks in the echo, weakening the echo's space map representation. When the envelopes are dissimilar, there are few or no corresponding peaks, and the owl localizes whichever source is predicted by the model to be less masked. Thus the precedence effect in the owl is a by-product of a mechanism for representing multiple sound sources on its map.

  8. Reconstructing spectral cues for sound localization from responses to rippled noise stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vliegen, Joyce; Van Esch, Thamar

    2017-01-01

    Human sound localization in the mid-saggital plane (elevation) relies on an analysis of the idiosyncratic spectral shape cues provided by the head and pinnae. However, because the actual free-field stimulus spectrum is a-priori unknown to the auditory system, the problem of extracting the elevation angle from the sensory spectrum is ill-posed. Here we test different spectral localization models by eliciting head movements toward broad-band noise stimuli with randomly shaped, rippled amplitude spectra emanating from a speaker at a fixed location, while varying the ripple bandwidth between 1.5 and 5.0 cycles/octave. Six listeners participated in the experiments. From the distributions of localization responses toward the individual stimuli, we estimated the listeners’ spectral-shape cues underlying their elevation percepts, by applying maximum-likelihood estimation. The reconstructed spectral cues resulted to be invariant to the considerable variation in ripple bandwidth, and for each listener they had a remarkable resemblance to the idiosyncratic head-related transfer functions (HRTFs). These results are not in line with models that rely on the detection of a single peak or notch in the amplitude spectrum, nor with a local analysis of first- and second-order spectral derivatives. Instead, our data support a model in which the auditory system performs a cross-correlation between the sensory input at the eardrum-auditory nerve, and stored representations of HRTF spectral shapes, to extract the perceived elevation angle. PMID:28333967

  9. Sound localization: effects of reverberation time, speaker array, stimulus frequency, and stimulus rise/decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, C; Abel, S M

    1993-08-01

    This research assessed the ability of human listeners to localize one-third octave noise bands in the horizontal plane. The effects of reverberation time (absorbent versus reverberant room), stimulus center frequency (500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz), stimulus rise/decay time (5 vs 200 ms) and speaker array (frontal versus lateral) were investigated for four subjects using a forced-choice speaker-identification paradigm. Sound localization scores were consistently lower in the reverberant room than in the absorbent room. They also revealed strong frequency and azimuthal effects. The benefit of a shorter rise/decay time was small and limited to low frequencies. The identification of a speaker position depended strongly upon the array in which it was embedded, primarily because localization in the lateral array led to frequency-dependent front/back confusions and response bias. The results also illustrated the importance of choosing a coordinate system based on the auditory cone-of-confusion to analyze localization data for speaker arrays spanning the aural axis.

  10. Reconstructing spectral cues for sound localization from responses to rippled noise stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A John Van Opstal

    Full Text Available Human sound localization in the mid-saggital plane (elevation relies on an analysis of the idiosyncratic spectral shape cues provided by the head and pinnae. However, because the actual free-field stimulus spectrum is a-priori unknown to the auditory system, the problem of extracting the elevation angle from the sensory spectrum is ill-posed. Here we test different spectral localization models by eliciting head movements toward broad-band noise stimuli with randomly shaped, rippled amplitude spectra emanating from a speaker at a fixed location, while varying the ripple bandwidth between 1.5 and 5.0 cycles/octave. Six listeners participated in the experiments. From the distributions of localization responses toward the individual stimuli, we estimated the listeners' spectral-shape cues underlying their elevation percepts, by applying maximum-likelihood estimation. The reconstructed spectral cues resulted to be invariant to the considerable variation in ripple bandwidth, and for each listener they had a remarkable resemblance to the idiosyncratic head-related transfer functions (HRTFs. These results are not in line with models that rely on the detection of a single peak or notch in the amplitude spectrum, nor with a local analysis of first- and second-order spectral derivatives. Instead, our data support a model in which the auditory system performs a cross-correlation between the sensory input at the eardrum-auditory nerve, and stored representations of HRTF spectral shapes, to extract the perceived elevation angle.

  11. A functional neuroimaging study of sound localization: visual cortex activity predicts performance in early-blind individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Gougoux

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Blind individuals often demonstrate enhanced nonvisual perceptual abilities. However, the neural substrate that underlies this improved performance remains to be fully understood. An earlier behavioral study demonstrated that some early-blind people localize sounds more accurately than sighted controls using monaural cues. In order to investigate the neural basis of these behavioral differences in humans, we carried out functional imaging studies using positron emission tomography and a speaker array that permitted pseudo-free-field presentations within the scanner. During binaural sound localization, a sighted control group showed decreased cerebral blood flow in the occipital lobe, which was not seen in early-blind individuals. During monaural sound localization (one ear plugged, the subgroup of early-blind subjects who were behaviorally superior at sound localization displayed two activation foci in the occipital cortex. This effect was not seen in blind persons who did not have superior monaural sound localization abilities, nor in sighted individuals. The degree of activation of one of these foci was strongly correlated with sound localization accuracy across the entire group of blind subjects. The results show that those blind persons who perform better than sighted persons recruit occipital areas to carry out auditory localization under monaural conditions. We therefore conclude that computations carried out in the occipital cortex specifically underlie the enhanced capacity to use monaural cues. Our findings shed light not only on intermodal compensatory mechanisms, but also on individual differences in these mechanisms and on inhibitory patterns that differ between sighted individuals and those deprived of vision early in life.

  12. UAV Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, David; Stetler, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    One of the biggest problems of our time is the global warming. A direct result of this phenomena is the melting of ice of the glaciers on the north and the south pole. As this continues, the melted ice will contribute to an increase of the sea level, and may cause enormous natural disasters. To be able to prevent this, it’s important to study its affects. This reports contains a concept study of a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, a UAV, set on the coast of Antarctica by the Australian owned base Davi...

  13. Specialization for sound localization in fields A1, DZ, and PAF of cat auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chen-Chung; Middlebrooks, John C

    2013-02-01

    Cortical deactivation studies in cats have implicated the primary auditory cortex (A1), the dorsal zone (DZ), and the posterior auditory field (PAF) in sound localization behavior, and physiological studies in anesthetized conditions have demonstrated clear differences in spatial sensitivity among those areas. We trained cats to perform two listening tasks and then we recorded from cortical neurons in off-task and in both on-task conditions during single recording sessions. The results confirmed some of the results from anesthetized conditions and revealed unexpected differences. Neurons in each field showed a variety of firing patterns, including onset-only, complex onset and long latency, and suppression or offset. A substantial minority of units showed sharpening of spatial sensitivity, particularly that of onset responses, during task performance: 44 %, 35 %, and 31 % of units in areas A1, DZ, and PAF, respectively, showed significant spatial sharpening. Field DZ was distinguished by a larger percentage of neurons responding best to near-midline locations, whereas the spatial preferences of PAF neurons were distributed more uniformly throughout the contralateral hemifield. Those directional biases also were evident in measures of the accuracy with which neural spike patterns could signal sound locations. Field DZ provided the greatest accuracy for midline locations. The location dependence of accuracy in PAF was orthogonal to that of DZ, with the greatest accuracy for lateral locations. The results suggest a view of spatial representation in the auditory cortex in which DZ exhibits an overrepresentation of the frontal areas around the midline, whereas PAF provides a more uniform representation of contralateral space, including areas behind the head. Spatial preferences of area A1 neurons were intermediate between those of DZ and PAF, sharpening as needed for localization tasks.

  14. Totten Glacier, East Antarctica: How has ocean access to the ice shelf cavity shaped local elevation change patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, J. S.; Young, D. A.; Roberts, J. L.; Richter, T.; Warner, R. C.; van Ommen, T. D.; Siegert, M. J.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Totten Glacier has the largest outflow of any glacier in East Antarctica and is in mass deficit despite 40 years of anomalously high snowfall. As a result, the glacier and its floating terminus have been the focus of several geophysical studies over the last decade. In particular, the international collaborative ICECAP Project has acquired over 10,000 line-kilometers of aerogeophysical data from the grounding zone over the floating terminus and onto the inner continental shelf. Several flights in 2010 and 2012 were focused on continuing the time series of surface elevation change conducted by the ICESAT mission that ended in 2009 while other flights were flown to map the subglacial context for the observed elevation change and to determine the broad scale bathymetry beneath the ice shelf and nearby sea ice using airborne gravimetry. The gravimetry experiment was expanded in 2012 with an advanced, three-axis stabilized GT-1A gravimeter which significantly improved both data coverage and quality over previous ICECAP seasons. With the new gravimeter installed, five-km spaced coast parallel survey lines were flown from the lower reaches of the cavity to about 100km seaward of the terminus to infer the presence of sills and potential warm water pathways from the continental shelf to the deep glacier cavity. Here we present updated elevation change measurements in the context of the new bathymetry information and show that ocean access to the cavity is complicated by high bedrock near the terminus of the glacier. Verification of warm water intrusion potential will require new oceanographic observations such as those planned for the collaborative US-Australian marine survey scheduled to sail on the NB Palmer in February 2014.

  15. Age-related hearing loss and ear morphology affect vertical but not horizontal sound-localization performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, R.J.; Agterberg, M.J.H.; Wanrooij, M.M. van; Snik, A.F.M.; Opstal, A.J. van

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have attributed deterioration of sound localization in the horizontal (azimuth) and vertical (elevation) planes to an age-related decline in binaural processing and high-frequency hearing loss (HFHL). The latter might underlie decreased elevation performance of older adults. However,

  16. Sound localization in common vampire bats: Acuity and use of the binaural time cue by a small mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Rickye S.; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Passive sound-localization acuity and the ability to use binaural time and intensity cues were determined for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). The bats were tested using a conditioned suppression/avoidance procedure in which they drank defibrinated blood from a spout in the presence of sounds from their right, but stopped drinking (i.e., broke contact with the spout) whenever a sound came from their left, thereby avoiding a mild shock. The mean minimum audible angle for three bats for a 100-ms noise burst was 13.1°—within the range of thresholds for other bats and near the mean for mammals. Common vampire bats readily localized pure tones of 20 kHz and higher, indicating they could use interaural intensity-differences. They could also localize pure tones of 5 kHz and lower, thereby demonstrating the use of interaural time-differences, despite their very small maximum interaural distance of 60 μs. A comparison of the use of locus cues among mammals suggests several implications for the evolution of sound localization and its underlying anatomical and physiological mechanisms. PMID:25618037

  17. Estimating the intended sound direction of the user: toward an auditory brain-computer interface using out-of-head sound localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Nambu

    Full Text Available The auditory Brain-Computer Interface (BCI using electroencephalograms (EEG is a subject of intensive study. As a cue, auditory BCIs can deal with many of the characteristics of stimuli such as tone, pitch, and voices. Spatial information on auditory stimuli also provides useful information for a BCI. However, in a portable system, virtual auditory stimuli have to be presented spatially through earphones or headphones, instead of loudspeakers. We investigated the possibility of an auditory BCI using the out-of-head sound localization technique, which enables us to present virtual auditory stimuli to users from any direction, through earphones. The feasibility of a BCI using this technique was evaluated in an EEG oddball experiment and offline analysis. A virtual auditory stimulus was presented to the subject from one of six directions. Using a support vector machine, we were able to classify whether the subject attended the direction of a presented stimulus from EEG signals. The mean accuracy across subjects was 70.0% in the single-trial classification. When we used trial-averaged EEG signals as inputs to the classifier, the mean accuracy across seven subjects reached 89.5% (for 10-trial averaging. Further analysis showed that the P300 event-related potential responses from 200 to 500 ms in central and posterior regions of the brain contributed to the classification. In comparison with the results obtained from a loudspeaker experiment, we confirmed that stimulus presentation by out-of-head sound localization achieved similar event-related potential responses and classification performances. These results suggest that out-of-head sound localization enables us to provide a high-performance and loudspeaker-less portable BCI system.

  18. Use of the swim bladder and lateral line in near-field sound source localization by fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Allison B; Zeddies, David G; Fay, Richard R; Brown, Andrew D; Alderks, Peter W; Bhandiwad, Ashwin A; Mohr, Robert A; Gray, Michael D; Rogers, Peter H; Sisneros, Joseph A

    2014-06-15

    We investigated the roles of the swim bladder and the lateral line system in sound localization behavior by the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus). Reproductive female midshipman underwent either surgical deflation of the swim bladder or cryoablation of the lateral line and were then tested in a monopolar sound source localization task. Fish with nominally 'deflated' swim bladders performed similar to sham-deflated controls; however, post-experiment evaluation of swim bladder deflation revealed that a majority of 'deflated' fish (88%, seven of the eight fish) that exhibited positive phonotaxis had partially inflated swim bladders. In total, 95% (21/22) of fish that localized the source had at least partially inflated swim bladders, indicating that pressure reception is likely required for sound source localization. In lateral line experiments, no difference was observed in the proportion of females exhibiting positive phonotaxis with ablated (37%) versus sham-ablated (47%) lateral line systems. These data suggest that the lateral line system is likely not required for sound source localization, although this system may be important for fine-tuning the approach to the sound source. We found that midshipman can solve the 180 deg ambiguity of source direction in the shallow water of our test tank, which is similar to their nesting environment. We also found that the potential directional cues (phase relationship between pressure and particle motion) in shallow water differs from a theoretical free-field. Therefore, the general question of how fish use acoustic pressure cues to solve the 180 deg ambiguity of source direction from the particle motion vector remains unresolved. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Tuning Neuronal Hardware with Microsecond Precision: Sound Localization in the Barn Owl

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    1998-03-01

    In auditory and electrosensory neuronal systems, there seems to exist an unresolved paradox: They encode behaviorally relevant signals in the range of a few microseconds with neurons that are at least one order of magnitude slower. The barn owl's auditory system is a prominent example that may serve to provide a solution(W. Gerstner, R. Kempter, J.L. van Hemmen, and H. Wagner, Nature 383) (1996) 76--78 to the above paradox. First, neuronal output is much more accurate than the input, phprovided the presynaptic spikes arrive coherently on the average -- as they do in the adult animal. Second, this coherence in signal arrival times can be attained through unsupervised Hebbian learning (`tuning') during ontogenetic development. The learning rule governing the strength of a synapse is based on the precise timing of input as compared to output spikes. Third, the learning rule also selects the correct delays from two independent groups of input, for example, from the left and right ear and, thus, can explain the tuning to interaural time differences in the microsecond range that underlies sound localization. The relation to stochastic resonance is indicated.

  20. MEMS Biomimetic Acoustic Pressure Gradient Sensitive Structure for Sound Source Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ren

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea shows an astonishing localization ability with its tiny hearing organ. A novel MEMS biomimetic acoustic pressure gradient sensitive structure was designed and fabricated by mimicking the mechanically coupled tympana of the fly. Firstly, the analytic representation formulas of the resultant force and resultant moment of the incoming plane wave acting on the structure were derived. After that, structure modal analysis was performed and the results show that the structure has out-of-phase and in-phase vibration modes, and the corresponding eigenfrequency is decided by the stiffness of vertical torsional beam and horizontal beam respectively. Acoustic-structural coupled analysis was performed and the results show that phase difference and amplitude difference between the responses of the two square diaphragms of the sensitive structure are effectively enlarged through mechanical coupling beam. The phase difference and amplitude difference increase with increasing incident angle and can be used to distinguish the direction of sound arrival. At last, the fabrication process and results of the device is also presented.

  1. De ontdekking van Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Aristoteles bedacht de naam Antarctica, maar wie ontdekte het zevende continent? Dit eerste artikel binnen het thema Antarctica beantwoordt die vraag. Ontdekkingsreizigers als Cook, Biscoe, Amundsen en Scott komen ter sprake, naast het kartografisch werk van Finnaeus

  2. Human sound-localization behaviour after multiple changes in eye position.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootel, T.J. van; Opstal, A.J. van

    2009-01-01

    Orienting the eyes towards a peripheral sound source calls for a transformation of the head-centred sound coordinates into an oculocentric motor command, which requires an estimate of current eye position. Current models of saccadic control explain spatial accuracy by oculocentric transformations

  3. Contribution of monaural and binaural cues to sound localization in listeners with acquired unilateral conductive hearing loss: improved directional hearing with a bone-conduction device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agterberg, Martijn J H; Snik, Ad F M; Hol, Myrthe K S; Van Wanrooij, Marc M; Van Opstal, A John

    2012-04-01

    Sound localization in the horizontal (azimuth) plane relies mainly on interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs). Both are distorted in listeners with acquired unilateral conductive hearing loss (UCHL), reducing their ability to localize sound. Several studies demonstrated that UCHL listeners had some ability to localize sound in azimuth. To test whether listeners with acquired UCHL use strongly perturbed binaural difference cues, we measured localization while they listened with a sound-attenuating earmuff over their impaired ear. We also tested the potential use of monaural pinna-induced spectral-shape cues for localization in azimuth and elevation, by filling the cavities of the pinna of their better-hearing ear with a mould. These conditions were tested while a bone-conduction device (BCD), fitted to all UCHL listeners in order to provide hearing from the impaired side, was turned off. We varied stimulus presentation levels to investigate whether UCHL listeners were using sound level as an azimuth cue. Furthermore, we examined whether horizontal sound-localization abilities improved when listeners used their BCD. Ten control listeners without hearing loss demonstrated a significant decrease in their localization abilities when they listened with a monaural plug and muff. In 4/13 UCHL listeners we observed good horizontal localization of 65 dB SPL broadband noises with their BCD turned off. Localization was strongly impaired when the impaired ear was covered with the muff. The mould in the good ear of listeners with UCHL deteriorated the localization of broadband sounds presented at 45 dB SPL. This demonstrates that they used pinna cues to localize sounds presented at low levels. Our data demonstrate that UCHL listeners have learned to adapt their localization strategies under a wide variety of hearing conditions and that sound-localization abilities improved with their BCD turned on.

  4. Modelling of human low frequency sound localization acuity demonstrates dominance of spatial variation of interaural time difference and suggests uniform just-noticeable differences in interaural time difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rosanna C G; Price, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization is critical to animal survival and for identification of auditory objects. We investigated the acuity with which humans localize low frequency, pure tone sounds using timing differences between the ears. These small differences in time, known as interaural time differences or ITDs, are identified in a manner that allows localization acuity of around 1° at the midline. Acuity, a relative measure of localization ability, displays a non-linear variation as sound sources are positioned more laterally. All species studied localize sounds best at the midline and progressively worse as the sound is located out towards the side. To understand why sound localization displays this variation with azimuthal angle, we took a first-principles, systemic, analytical approach to model localization acuity. We calculated how ITDs vary with sound frequency, head size and sound source location for humans. This allowed us to model ITD variation for previously published experimental acuity data and determine the distribution of just-noticeable differences in ITD. Our results suggest that the best-fit model is one whereby just-noticeable differences in ITDs are identified with uniform or close to uniform sensitivity across the physiological range. We discuss how our results have several implications for neural ITD processing in different species as well as development of the auditory system.

  5. Modelling of human low frequency sound localization acuity demonstrates dominance of spatial variation of interaural time difference and suggests uniform just-noticeable differences in interaural time difference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna C G Smith

    Full Text Available Sound source localization is critical to animal survival and for identification of auditory objects. We investigated the acuity with which humans localize low frequency, pure tone sounds using timing differences between the ears. These small differences in time, known as interaural time differences or ITDs, are identified in a manner that allows localization acuity of around 1° at the midline. Acuity, a relative measure of localization ability, displays a non-linear variation as sound sources are positioned more laterally. All species studied localize sounds best at the midline and progressively worse as the sound is located out towards the side. To understand why sound localization displays this variation with azimuthal angle, we took a first-principles, systemic, analytical approach to model localization acuity. We calculated how ITDs vary with sound frequency, head size and sound source location for humans. This allowed us to model ITD variation for previously published experimental acuity data and determine the distribution of just-noticeable differences in ITD. Our results suggest that the best-fit model is one whereby just-noticeable differences in ITDs are identified with uniform or close to uniform sensitivity across the physiological range. We discuss how our results have several implications for neural ITD processing in different species as well as development of the auditory system.

  6. Localizing semantic interference from distractor sounds in picture naming: A dual-task study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mädebach, Andreas; Kieseler, Marie-Luise; Jescheniak, Jörg D

    2017-10-13

    In this study we explored the locus of semantic interference in a novel picture-sound interference task in which participants name pictures while ignoring environmental distractor sounds. In a previous study using this task (Mädebach, Wöhner, Kieseler, & Jescheniak, in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 43, 1629-1646, 2017), we showed that semantically related distractor sounds (e.g., BARKING dog ) interfere with a picture-naming response (e.g., "horse") more strongly than unrelated distractor sounds do (e.g., DRUMMING drum ). In the experiment reported here, we employed the psychological refractory period (PRP) approach to explore the locus of this effect. We combined a geometric form classification task (square vs. circle; Task 1) with the picture-sound interference task (Task 2). The stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between the tasks was systematically varied (0 vs. 500 ms). There were three central findings. First, the semantic interference effect from distractor sounds was replicated. Second, picture naming (in Task 2) was slower with the short than with the long task SOA. Third, both effects were additive-that is, the semantic interference effects were of similar magnitude at both task SOAs. This suggests that the interference arises during response selection or later stages, not during early perceptual processing. This finding corroborates the theory that semantic interference from distractor sounds reflects a competitive selection mechanism in word production.

  7. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Brown

    Full Text Available Hearing protection devices (HPDs such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1 sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2 speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3 tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive, including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions.

  8. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew D.; Beemer, Brianne T.; Greene, Nathaniel T.; Argo, Theodore; Meegan, G. Douglas; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement) environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1) sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2) speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3) tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive), including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control) performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions. PMID:26313145

  9. The representation of sound localization cues in the barn owl’s inferior colliculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eSingheiser

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The barn owl is a well-known model system for studying auditory processing and sound localization. This article reviews the morphological and functional organization, as well as the role of the underlying microcircuits, of the barn owl’s inferior colliculus (IC. We focus on the processing of frequency and interaural time (ITD and level differences (ILD. We first summarize the morphology of the sub-nuclei belonging to the inferior colliculus and their differentiation by antero- and retrograde labeling and by staining with various antibodies. We then focus on the response properties of neurons in the three major sub-nuclei of IC (core of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCc; lateral shell of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCls and the external nucleus of the IC (ICX. ICCc projects to ICCls, which in turn sends its information to ICX. The responses of neurons in ICCc are sensitive to changes in ITD but not to changes in ILD. The distribution of ITD sensitivity with frequency in ICCc can only partly be explained by optimal coding. We continue with the tuning properties of ICCls neurons, the first station in the midbrain where the ITD and ILD pathways merge after they have split at the level of the cochlear nucleus. The ICCc and ICCls share similar ITD and frequency tuning. By contrast, ICCls shows sigmoidal ILD tuning which is absent in ICCc. Both ICCc and ICCls project to the forebrain, and ICCls also projects to ICX, where space-specific neurons are found. Space-specific neurons exhibit side-peak suppression in ITD tuning, bell-shaped ILD tuning, and are broadly tuned to frequency. These neurons respond only to restricted positions of auditory space and form a map of two-dimensional auditory space. Finally, we briefly review major IC features, including multiplication-like computations, correlates of echo suppression, plasticity, and adaptation.

  10. The representation of sound localization cues in the barn owl's inferior colliculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singheiser, Martin; Gutfreund, Yoram; Wagner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    The barn owl is a well-known model system for studying auditory processing and sound localization. This article reviews the morphological and functional organization, as well as the role of the underlying microcircuits, of the barn owl's inferior colliculus (IC). We focus on the processing of frequency and interaural time (ITD) and level differences (ILD). We first summarize the morphology of the sub-nuclei belonging to the IC and their differentiation by antero- and retrograde labeling and by staining with various antibodies. We then focus on the response properties of neurons in the three major sub-nuclei of IC [core of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCc), lateral shell of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCls), and the external nucleus of the IC (ICX)]. ICCc projects to ICCls, which in turn sends its information to ICX. The responses of neurons in ICCc are sensitive to changes in ITD but not to changes in ILD. The distribution of ITD sensitivity with frequency in ICCc can only partly be explained by optimal coding. We continue with the tuning properties of ICCls neurons, the first station in the midbrain where the ITD and ILD pathways merge after they have split at the level of the cochlear nucleus. The ICCc and ICCls share similar ITD and frequency tuning. By contrast, ICCls shows sigmoidal ILD tuning which is absent in ICCc. Both ICCc and ICCls project to the forebrain, and ICCls also projects to ICX, where space-specific neurons are found. Space-specific neurons exhibit side peak suppression in ITD tuning, bell-shaped ILD tuning, and are broadly tuned to frequency. These neurons respond only to restricted positions of auditory space and form a map of two-dimensional auditory space. Finally, we briefly review major IC features, including multiplication-like computations, correlates of echo suppression, plasticity, and adaptation. PMID:22798945

  11. What and Where in auditory sensory processing: A high-density electrical mapping study of distinct neural processes underlying sound object recognition and sound localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria M Leavitt

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Functionally distinct dorsal and ventral auditory pathways for sound localization (where and sound object recognition (what have been described in non-human primates. A handful of studies have explored differential processing within these streams in humans, with highly inconsistent findings. Stimuli employed have included simple tones, noise bursts and speech sounds, with simulated left-right spatial manipulations, and in some cases participants were not required to actively discriminate the stimuli. Our contention is that these paradigms were not well suited to dissociating processing within the two streams. Our aim here was to determine how early in processing we could find evidence for dissociable pathways using better titrated what and where task conditions. The use of more compelling tasks should allow us to amplify differential processing within the dorsal and ventral pathways. We employed high-density electrical mapping using a relatively large and environmentally realistic stimulus set (seven animal calls delivered from seven free-field spatial locations; with stimulus configuration identical across the where and what tasks. Topographic analysis revealed distinct dorsal and ventral auditory processing networks during the where and what tasks with the earliest point of divergence seen during the N1 component of the auditory evoked response, beginning at approximately 100 ms. While this difference occurred during the N1 timeframe, it was not a simple modulation of N1 amplitude as it displayed a wholly different topographic distribution to that of the N1. Global dissimilarity measures using topographic modulation analysis confirmed that this difference between tasks was driven by a shift in the underlying generator configuration. Minimum norm source reconstruction revealed distinct activations that corresponded well with activity within putative dorsal and ventral auditory structures.

  12. Local Mechanisms for Loud Sound-Enhanced Aminoglycoside Entry into Outer Hair Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhe eLi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Loud sound exposure exacerbates aminoglycoside ototoxicity, increasing the risk of permanent hearing loss and degrading the quality of life in affected individuals. We previously reported that loud sound exposure induces temporary threshold shifts (TTS and enhances uptake of aminoglycosides, like gentamicin, by cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs. Here, we explore mechanisms by which loud sound exposure and TTS could increase aminoglycoside uptake by OHCs that may underlie this form of ototoxic synergy.Mice were exposed to loud sound levels to induce TTS, and received fluorescently-tagged gentamicin (GTTR for 30 minutes prior to fixation. The degree of TTS was assessed by comparing auditory brainstem responses before and after loud sound exposure. The number of tip links, which gate the GTTR-permeant mechanoelectrical transducer (MET channels, was determined in OHC bundles, with or without exposure to loud sound, using scanning electron microscopy.We found wide-band noise (WBN levels that induce TTS also enhance OHC uptake of GTTR compared to OHCs in control cochleae. In cochlear regions with TTS, the increase in OHC uptake of GTTR was significantly greater than in adjacent pillar cells. In control mice, we identified stereociliary tip links at ~50% of potential positions in OHC bundles. However, the number of OHC tip links was significantly reduced in mice that received WBN at levels capable of inducing TTS.These data suggest that GTTR uptake by OHCs during TTS occurs by increased permeation of surviving, mechanically-gated MET channels, and/or non-MET aminoglycoside-permeant channels activated following loud sound exposure. Loss of tip links would hyperpolarize hair cells and potentially increase drug uptake via aminoglycoside-permeant channels expressed by hair cells. The effect of TTS on aminoglycoside-permeant channel kinetics will shed new light on the mechanisms of loud sound-enhanced aminoglycoside uptake, and consequently on ototoxic

  13. Real-Time Sound Source Localization for a Mobile Robot Based on the Guided Spectral-Temporal Position Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sound source localization based on a microphone array for mobile robots faces great challenges because of factors such as uncertainty of the robot's movement, noise and reverberation, the requirements of a compact microphone array and so on. This paper studies a method for sound source localization in a dynamic environment using a cross-microphone array plane, which consists of four microphones on an intelligent mobile robot platform. Firstly, the method of spectral subtraction and campestral mean normalization is introduced to de-noise. Then GCC-PHAT-ργ and the guided spectral-temporal (ST position method are proposed to suppress noise and reverberation based on the generalized cross-correlation method to estimate time delay. Finally, the sound source is positioned by adopting the geometric location method. This system is tested by a total of 2,016 sets of experiments. Even in an intensely noisy and reverberating environment, the guided ST position method achieves angle positioning accuracy of more than 95% with a less than 15 degrees localization error. Meanwhile, all the experimental data can be processed in real-time, within 0.4s.

  14. Late Pliocene cooling, sea ice and the establishment of a Ross Sea polynya: Geochemical and diatom assemblage constraints from McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesselman, C.; Dunbar, R. B.; Sjunneskog, C. M.; Mucciarone, D. A.; Winter, D.; Olney, M.; Tuzzi, E.; McKay, R. M.; Scherer, R. P.

    2010-12-01

    The marine sediment cores collected by the Antarctic Geological Drilling (ANDRILL) Program from sites beneath the McMurdo Ice Shelf (MIS; Core AND-1B) and in Southern McMurdo Sound (SMS; Core AND-2A) represent the most complete record to date of Neogene climate evolution proximal to the Antarctic continent. Diatom-rich lithologic units alternate with glacial sediments throughout the Pliocene and early Pleistocene of AND-1B; each diatom-rich unit within this oscillating record has distinctive geochemical and diatom assemblage characteristics and most are interpreted to preserve single interglacial intervals of 40-thousand-year glacial/interglacial cycles. Though the dramatic Pliocene glacial/interglacial oscillations recorded at the MIS site are absent in the shallower SMS record, AND-2A preserves a single diverse late Pliocene diatom assemblage, providing an additional constraint on Ross Sea Pliocene climate. Here, we focus on the reconstruction of sea surface conditions from four discrete AND-1B interglacial units deposited ~3.2, 3.0, 2.9, and 2.6 Ma. Diatom assemblages record the onset of Plio-Pleistocene cooling in the Ross Sea at 3.2 Ma, intensifying at 3.0 Ma, and suggest spring blooms in a surface ocean seasonally stratified by sea ice melt. Following the initial cooling, an increase in warm-water species at 2.9 and 2.6 Ma records a temporary late Pliocene reversal in the cooling trend. The Pliocene diatom-bearing interval in AND-2A is equivalent to the 2.6 Ma diatomite, providing further evidence for late Pliocene reversion to warmer open ocean conditions. Cooling resumes in the early Pleistocene, but sea-ice related diatoms, which dominate late Pleistocene and recent Antarctic sediments, are present only as minor components throughout the ANDRILL records. Sedimentary δ13C and δ15N in the AND-1B diatomite units provide additional insights into Pliocene evolution of sea ice, stratification, and primary productivity. For AND-1B diatomite units younger than 3

  15. A "looming bias" in spatial hearing? Effects of acoustic intensity and spectrum on categorical sound source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Lisa; Olsen, Kirk N

    2017-01-01

    Continuous increases of acoustic intensity (up-ramps) can indicate a looming (approaching) sound source in the environment, whereas continuous decreases of intensity (down-ramps) can indicate a receding sound source. From psychoacoustic experiments, an "adaptive perceptual bias" for up-ramp looming tonal stimuli has been proposed (Neuhoff, 1998). This theory postulates that (1) up-ramps are perceptually salient because of their association with looming and potentially threatening stimuli in the environment; (2) tonal stimuli are perceptually salient because of an association with single and potentially threatening biological sound sources in the environment, relative to white noise, which is more likely to arise from dispersed signals and nonthreatening/nonbiological sources (wind/ocean). In the present study, we extrapolated the "adaptive perceptual bias" theory and investigated its assumptions by measuring sound source localization in response to acoustic stimuli presented in azimuth to imply looming, stationary, and receding motion in depth. Participants (N = 26) heard three directions of intensity change (up-ramps, down-ramps, and steady state, associated with looming, receding, and stationary motion, respectively) and three levels of acoustic spectrum (a 1-kHz pure tone, the tonal vowel /ә/, and white noise) in a within-subjects design. We first hypothesized that if up-ramps are "perceptually salient" and capable of eliciting adaptive responses, then they would be localized faster and more accurately than down-ramps. This hypothesis was supported. However, the results did not support the second hypothesis. Rather, the white-noise and vowel conditions were localized faster and more accurately than the pure-tone conditions. These results are discussed in the context of auditory and visual theories of motion perception, auditory attentional capture, and the spectral causes of spatial ambiguity.

  16. Sound localization and speech identification in the frontal median plane with a hear-through headset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Pablo F.; Møller, Anders Kalsgaard; Christensen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    A hear-through headset is formed by mounting miniature microphones on small insert earphones. This type of ear-wear technology enables the user to hear the sound sources and acoustics of the surroundings as close to real life as possible, with the additional feature that computer-generated audio...... signals can be superimposed via earphone reproduction. An important aspect of the hear-through headset is its transparency, i.e. how close to real life can the electronically amplied sounds be perceived. Here we report experiments conducted to evaluate the auditory transparency of a hear-through headset...

  17. Dichotic sound localization properties of duration-tuned neurons in the IC of the big brown bat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riziq eSayegh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological studies on duration-tuned neurons (DTNs from the mammalian auditory midbrain have typically evoked spiking responses from these cells using monaural or free-field acoustic stimulation focused on the contralateral ear, with fewer studies devoted to examining the electrophysiological properties of duration tuning using binaural stimulation. Because the inferior colliculus (IC receives convergent inputs from lower brainstem auditory nuclei that process sounds from each ear, many midbrain neurons have responses shaped by binaural interactions and are selective to binaural cues important for sound localization. In this study, we used dichotic stimulation to vary interaural level difference (ILD and interaural time difference (ITD acoustic cues and explore the binaural interactions and response properties of DTNs and non-DTNs from the IC of the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus. Our results reveal that both DTNs and non-DTNs can have responses selective to binaural stimulation, with a majority of IC neurons showing some type of ILD selectivity, fewer cells showing ITD selectivity, and a number of neurons showing both ILD and ITD selectivity. This study provides the first demonstration that the temporally selective responses of DTNs from the vertebrate auditory midbrain can be selective to binaural cues used for sound localization in addition to having spiking responses that are selective for stimulus frequency, amplitude, and duration.

  18. Dichotic sound localization properties of duration-tuned neurons in the inferior colliculus of the big brown bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Riziq; Aubie, Brandon; Faure, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies on duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) from the mammalian auditory midbrain have typically evoked spiking responses from these cells using monaural or free-field acoustic stimulation focused on the contralateral ear, with fewer studies devoted to examining the electrophysiological properties of duration tuning using binaural stimulation. Because the inferior colliculus (IC) receives convergent inputs from lower brainstem auditory nuclei that process sounds from each ear, many midbrain neurons have responses shaped by binaural interactions and are selective to binaural cues important for sound localization. In this study, we used dichotic stimulation to vary interaural level difference (ILD) and interaural time difference (ITD) acoustic cues and explore the binaural interactions and response properties of DTNs and non-DTNs from the IC of the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus). Our results reveal that both DTNs and non-DTNs can have responses selective to binaural stimulation, with a majority of IC neurons showing some type of ILD selectivity, fewer cells showing ITD selectivity, and a number of neurons showing both ILD and ITD selectivity. This study provides the first demonstration that the temporally selective responses of DTNs from the vertebrate auditory midbrain can be selective to binaural cues used for sound localization in addition to having spiking responses that are selective for stimulus frequency, amplitude, and duration.

  19. Sound transmission loss through metamaterial plate with lateral local resonators in the presence of external mean flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Sheng, Meiping; Qin, Qinghua

    2017-02-01

    In the context of sound incident upon a metamaterial plate, explicit formulas for sound transmission loss (STL) are derived in the presence of external mean flow. Metamaterial plate, consisting of homogeneous plate and lateral local resonators (LLRs), is homogenized by using effective medium method to obtain the effective mass density and facilitate the calculation of STL. Results show that (a) vigorously oscillating LLRs lead to higher STL compared with bare plate, (b) increasing Mach number of the external mean flow helps obtain higher STL below the coincidence frequency but decreases STL above the coincidence frequency due to the added mass effect of light fluid loading and aerodynamic damping effect, (c) the coincidence frequency shifts to higher frequency range for the refracted effect of the external mean flow. However, effects of the flow on STL within negative mass density range can be neglected because of the lateral local resonance occurring. Moreover, hysteretic damping from metamaterial can only smooth the transmission curves by lowering higher peaks and filling dips. Effects of incident angles on STL are also examined. It is demonstrated that increasing elevation angle can improve the sound insulation, while the azimuth angle does not.

  20. Ionospheric Electron Densities at Mars: Comparison of Mars Express Ionospheric Sounding and MAVEN Local Measurement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, F.; Morgan, D. D.; Fowler, C.M.; Kopf, A.J.; Andersson, L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Andrews, D.J.; Truhlík, Vladimír

    in press (2017) E-ISSN 2169-9402 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Mars * ionosphere * MARS IS * Mars Express * MAVEN * radar sounding Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JA024629/full

  1. Sound source localization using a low-cost wireless sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van H. (Henk); Salomons, E.L. (Etto); Teeuw, W.B. (Wouter)

    2013-01-01

    In the GoGreen project an intelligent home that is able to identify inhabitants and events that take place is created. The location of sounds that are being produced is an important feature for the context awareness of this system. A a wireless solution that uses low-cost sensor nodes and

  2. Behavioural sensitivity to binaural spatial cues in ferrets: evidence for plasticity in the duplex theory of sound localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Peter; Nodal, Fernando R; King, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, the duplex theory has guided our understanding of human sound localization in the horizontal plane. According to this theory, the auditory system uses interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) to localize low-frequency and high-frequency sounds, respectively. Whilst this theory successfully accounts for the localization of tones by humans, some species show very different behaviour. Ferrets are widely used for studying both clinical and fundamental aspects of spatial hearing, but it is not known whether the duplex theory applies to this species or, if so, to what extent the frequency range over which each binaural cue is used depends on acoustical or neurophysiological factors. To address these issues, we trained ferrets to lateralize tones presented over earphones and found that the frequency dependence of ITD and ILD sensitivity broadly paralleled that observed in humans. Compared with humans, however, the transition between ITD and ILD sensitivity was shifted toward higher frequencies. We found that the frequency dependence of ITD sensitivity in ferrets can partially be accounted for by acoustical factors, although neurophysiological mechanisms are also likely to be involved. Moreover, we show that binaural cue sensitivity can be shaped by experience, as training ferrets on a 1-kHz ILD task resulted in significant improvements in thresholds that were specific to the trained cue and frequency. Our results provide new insights into the factors limiting the use of different sound localization cues and highlight the importance of sensory experience in shaping the underlying neural mechanisms. © 2013 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Unconscious cross-modal priming of auditory sound localization by visual words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansorge, Ulrich; Khalid, Shah; Laback, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about the cross-modal integration of unconscious and conscious information. In the current study, we therefore tested whether the spatial meaning of an unconscious visual word, such as up, influences the perceived location of a subsequently presented auditory target. Although cross-modal integration of unconscious information is generally rare, unconscious meaning stemming from only 1 particular modality could, in principle, be available for other modalities. Also, on the basis of known influences and dependencies of meaning on sensory information processing, such an unconscious meaning-based effect could impact sensory processing in a different modality. In 3 experiments, this prediction was confirmed. We found that an unconscious spatial word, such as up, facilitated position discrimination of a spatially congruent sound (here, a sound from above) as compared to a spatially incongruent sound (here, from below). This was found even though participants did not recognize the meaning of the primes. The results show that unconscious processing extends to semantic-sensory connections between different modalities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Distinct Correlation Structure Supporting a Rate-Code for Sound Localization in the Owl’s Auditory Forebrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract While a topographic map of auditory space exists in the vertebrate midbrain, it is absent in the forebrain. Yet, both brain regions are implicated in sound localization. The heterogeneous spatial tuning of adjacent sites in the forebrain compared to the midbrain reflects different underlying circuitries, which is expected to affect the correlation structure, i.e., signal (similarity of tuning) and noise (trial-by-trial variability) correlations. Recent studies have drawn attention to the impact of response correlations on the information readout from a neural population. We thus analyzed the correlation structure in midbrain and forebrain regions of the barn owl’s auditory system. Tetrodes were used to record in the midbrain and two forebrain regions, Field L and the downstream auditory arcopallium (AAr), in anesthetized owls. Nearby neurons in the midbrain showed high signal and noise correlations (RNCs), consistent with shared inputs. As previously reported, Field L was arranged in random clusters of similarly tuned neurons. Interestingly, AAr neurons displayed homogeneous monotonic azimuth tuning, while response variability of nearby neurons was significantly less correlated than the midbrain. Using a decoding approach, we demonstrate that low RNC in AAr restricts the potentially detrimental effect it can have on information, assuming a rate code proposed for mammalian sound localization. This study harnesses the power of correlation structure analysis to investigate the coding of auditory space. Our findings demonstrate distinct correlation structures in the auditory midbrain and forebrain, which would be beneficial for a rate-code framework for sound localization in the nontopographic forebrain representation of auditory space. PMID:28674698

  5. Landscape evolution of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, S.S.R.; Sugden, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    The relative roles of fluvial versus glacial processes in shaping the landscape of Antarctica have been debated since the expeditions of Robert Scott and Ernest Shackleton in the early years of the 20th century. Here we build a synthesis of Antarctic landscape evolution based on the geomorphology of passive continental margins and former northern mid-latitude Pleistocene ice sheets. What makes Antarctica so interesting is that the terrestrial landscape retains elements of a record of change that extends back to the Oligocene. Thus there is the potential to link conditions on land with those in the oceans and atmosphere as the world switched from a greenhouse to a glacial world and the Antarctic ice sheet evolved to its present state. In common with other continental fragments of Gondwana there is a fluvial signature to the landscape in the form of the coastal erosion surfaces and escarpments, incised river valleys, and a continent-wide network of river basins. A selective superimposed glacial signature reflects the presence or absence of ice at the pressure melting point. Earliest continental-scale ice sheets formed around 34 Ma, growing from local ice caps centered on mountain massifs, and featured phases of ice-sheet expansion and contraction. These ice masses were most likely cold-based over uplands and warm-based across lowlands and near their margins. For 20 million years ice sheets fluctuated on Croll-Milankovitch frequencies. At ~14 Ma the ice sheet expanded to its maximum and deepened a preexisting radial array of troughs selectively through the coastal mountains and eroded the continental

  6. Glaciers of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    1988-01-01

    have been included. Again, these represent only a small fraction of the large number of aerial photographs now available in various national collections. The chapter is divided into five geographic sections. The first is the Transantarctic Mountains in the Ross Sea area. Some very large outlet glaciers flow from the East Antarctic ice sheet through the Transantarctic Mountains to the Ross Ice Shelf. Byrd Glacier, one of the largest in the world, drains an area of more than 1,000,000 km2. Next, images from the Indian Ocean sector are discussed. These include the Lambert Glacier- Amery Ice Shelf system, so large that about 25 images must be mosaicked to cover its complex system of tributary glaciers. Shirase Glacier, a tidal outlet glacier in the sector, flows at a speed of 2.5 km a-l. About 200 km inland and 200 km west of Shirase Glacier lie the Queen Fabiola (?Yamato?) Mountains, whose extensive exposures of `blue ice? lay claim to being the world?s most important meteorite-collecting locality, with more than 4,700 meteorite fragments discovered since 1969. The Atlantic Ocean sector is fringed by ice shelves into which flow large ice streams like Jutulstraumen, Stancomb-Wills, Slessor, and Recovery Glaciers. Filchner and Ronne Ice Shelves together cover an area two-thirds the size of Texas. From the western margin of the Ronne Ice Shelf, the north-trending arc of the Antarctic Peninsula, with its fjord and alpine landscape and fringing ice shelves, stretches towards South America. The Pacific Ocean sector begins with the Ellsworth Mountains, which include the highest peaks (Vinson Massif at 4,897 m) in Antarctica. The area between the Ellsworth Mountains and the eastern margin of the Ross Ice Shelf is fringed with small ice shelves and some major outlet glaciers. One of these, Pine Island Glacier, was found from comparing 1973 and 1975 images to have an average ice-front velocity of 2.4 km a-l. This part of Antarctica

  7. Geoethical approach to mineral activities in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talalay, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    severe not only permanent, local impact on the environment, but also will have implications for other Earth's systems as a whole. Mineral prospecting and exploration in Antarctica need to be reflected and respected in any concept of environmental sustainability. Anyway, first stage of the geological surveying should be carried purely scientific and not designed to explore for and identify mineral deposits. It's obvious that although various countries claim sovereignty in certain regions of Antarctica, the continent should be continued to be politically neutral. Efforts of scientists and politicians should respect their own responsibility for the protection of the fragile Antarctic environment and of our planet in the whole taking care for future generations.

  8. Bringing Antarctica Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constible, Juanita; Williams, Lauren; Faure, Jaime; Lee, Richard E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    When one thinks of the amazing creatures of Antarctica, an insect probably does not come to mind. But this unlikely animal, and a scientific expedition to Antarctica, was the foundation for a learning event that created a community of learners spanning kindergarten through sixth grade and extended beyond the classroom. Miami University's Antarctic…

  9. Deconvolution for the localization of sound sources using a circular microphone array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiana Roig, Elisabet; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, the aeroacoustic community has examined various methods based on deconvolution to improve the visualization of acoustic fields scanned with planar sparse arrays of microphones. These methods assume that the beamforming map in an observation plane can be approximated....... Even though these methods were originally designed for planar sparse arrays, in the present study, they are adapted to uniform circular arrays for mapping the sound over 360°. This geometry has the advantage that the beamforming output is practically independent of the focusing direction, meaning...

  10. Different spatio-temporal electroencephalography features drive the successful decoding of binaural and monaural cues for sound localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Adam; Boland, Francis M; Lalor, Edmund C

    2017-03-01

    The human ability to localize sound is essential for monitoring our environment and helps us to analyse complex auditory scenes. Although the acoustic cues mediating sound localization have been established, it remains unknown how these cues are represented in human cortex. In particular, it is still a point of contention whether binaural and monaural cues are processed by the same or distinct cortical networks. In this study, participants listened to a sequence of auditory stimuli from different spatial locations while we recorded their neural activity using electroencephalography (EEG). The stimuli were presented over a loudspeaker array, which allowed us to deliver realistic, free-field stimuli in both the horizontal and vertical planes. Using a multivariate classification approach, we showed that it is possible to decode sound source location from scalp-recorded EEG. Robust and consistent decoding was shown for stimuli that provide binaural cues (i.e. Left vs. Right stimuli). Decoding location when only monaural cues were available (i.e. Front vs. Rear and elevational stimuli) was successful for a subset of subjects and showed less consistency. Notably, the spatio-temporal pattern of EEG features that facilitated decoding differed based on the availability of binaural and monaural cues. In particular, we identified neural processing of binaural cues at around 120 ms post-stimulus and found that monaural cues are processed later between 150 and 200 ms. Furthermore, different spatial activation patterns emerged for binaural and monaural cue processing. These spatio-temporal dissimilarities suggest the involvement of separate cortical mechanisms in monaural and binaural acoustic cue processing. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Inverse problem with beamforming regularization matrix applied to sound source localization in closed wind-tunnel using microphone array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padois, Thomas; Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2014-12-01

    Microphone arrays have become a standard technique to localize and quantify source in aeroacoustics. The simplest approach is the beamforming that provides noise source maps with large main lobe and strong side lobes at low frequency. Since a decade, the focus is set on deconvolution techniques such as DAMAS or Clean-SC. While the source map is clearly improved, these methods require a large computation time. In this paper, we propose a sound source localization technique based on an inverse problem with beamforming regularization matrix called Hybrid Method. With synthetic data, we show that the side lobes are removed and the main lobe is narrower. Moreover, if the sound noise source map provided by this method is used as input in the DAMAS process, the number of DAMAS iterations is highly reduced. The Hybrid Method is applied to experimental data obtained in a closed wind-tunnel. In both cases of acoustic or aeroacoustic data, the source is correctly detected. The proposed Hybrid Method is found simple to implement and the computation time is low if the number of scan points is reasonable.

  12. Noise source separation of diesel engine by combining binaural sound localization method and blind source separation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiachi; Xiang, Yang; Qian, Sichong; Li, Shengyang; Wu, Shaowei

    2017-11-01

    In order to separate and identify the combustion noise and the piston slap noise of a diesel engine, a noise source separation and identification method that combines a binaural sound localization method and blind source separation method is proposed. During a diesel engine noise and vibration test, because a diesel engine has many complex noise sources, a lead covering method was carried out on a diesel engine to isolate other interference noise from the No. 1-5 cylinders. Only the No. 6 cylinder parts were left bare. Two microphones that simulated the human ears were utilized to measure the radiated noise signals 1 m away from the diesel engine. First, a binaural sound localization method was adopted to separate the noise sources that are in different places. Then, for noise sources that are in the same place, a blind source separation method is utilized to further separate and identify the noise sources. Finally, a coherence function method, continuous wavelet time-frequency analysis method, and prior knowledge of the diesel engine are combined to further identify the separation results. The results show that the proposed method can effectively separate and identify the combustion noise and the piston slap noise of a diesel engine. The frequency of the combustion noise and the piston slap noise are respectively concentrated at 4350 Hz and 1988 Hz. Compared with the blind source separation method, the proposed method has superior separation and identification effects, and the separation results have fewer interference components from other noise.

  13. Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission with the DXL Sounding Rocket Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F. S.; Prasai, K.; Robertson, I.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket is a NASA approved mission with a scheduled first launch in December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission of the SWCX from that of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) to improve our understanding of both. To separate the SWCX contribution from the LHB. DXL will use the SWCX signature due to the helium focusing cone at 1=185 deg, b=-18 deg, DXL uses large area propostionai counters, with an area of 1.000 sq cm and grasp of about 10 sq cm sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keY bands. Thanks to the large grasp, DXL will achieve in a 5 minule flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  14. Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies: 2015 ARM Climate Research Facility Field Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, CR [University at Albany-SUNY; Santanello, JA [NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center; Gentine, P [Columbia University

    2015-11-01

    Matching observed diurnal cycles is a fundamental yet extremely complex test for models. High temporal resolution measurements of surface turbulent heat fluxes and boundary layer properties are required to evaluate the daytime evolution of the boundary layer and its sensitivity to land-atmosphere coupling. To address this need, (12) one-day intensive observing periods (IOP) with enhanced radiosonding will be carried out at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) during summer 2015. Each IOP will comprise a single launch to correspond with the nighttime overpass of the A-Train of satellites (~0830 UTC) and hourly launches during daytime beginning from 1130 UTC and ending at 2130 UTC. At 3-hourly intervals (i.e., 1140 UTC, 1440 UTC, 1740 UTC, and 2040 UTC) a duplicate second radiosonde will be launched 10 minutes subsequent to launch of the on-hour radiosonde for the purpose of assessing horizontal atmospheric variability. In summary, each IOP will have a 14-sounding supplement to the 6-hourly operational sounding schedule at the ARM-SGP CF. The IOP days will be decided before sunset on the preceding day, according to the judgment of the PI’s and taking into consideration daily weather forecasts and the operability of complimentary ARM-SGP CF instrumentation. An overarching goal of the project is to address how ARM could better observe land-atmosphere coupling to support the evaluation and refinement of coupled weather and climate models.

  15. Sound and sound sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    There is no difference in principle between the infrasonic and ultrasonic sounds, which are inaudible to humans (or other animals) and the sounds that we can hear. In all cases, sound is a wave of pressure and particle oscillations propagating through an elastic medium, such as air. This chapter...... of these properties are dictated by simple physical relationships between the size of the sound emitter and the wavelength of emitted sound. The wavelengths of the signals need to be sufficiently short in relation to the size of the emitter to allow for the efficient production of propagating sound pressure waves...... is about the physical laws that govern how animals produce sound signals and how physical principles determine the signals’ frequency content and sound level, the nature of the sound field (sound pressure versus particle vibrations) as well as directional properties of the emitted signal. Many...

  16. 76 FR 39292 - Special Local Regulations & Safety Zones; Marine Events in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... Zones; Marine Events in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... Island Sound Zone. This action is necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during... authorized by the COTP Sector Long Island Sound. DATES: This rule is effective in the CFR on July 6, 2011...

  17. The sound of avalanches: from a global to a local perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, Florine; Lherminier, Sébastien; Planet, Ramon; Rapina, Kenny; Bunel, Félix; Vanel, Loïc; Ramos, Osvanny

    2017-06-01

    We present an experimental study aiming to understand the local origin of the acoustic bursts recorded globally during a two-dimensional shear experiment of a granular medium. In order to explain the power-law distribution of energy of these events (also called avalanches), the analysis focuses on their acoustic frequencies. Experiments with single grains have also been performed, trying to separate the contributions related to collision between neighbours from shear movements between grains. Preliminary results indicate that both frictional sliding and collision-like mechanisms are involved in the origin of the acoustic bursts. The evolution of the structure of the medium around a large acoustic burst is analysed both with high resolution and high-speed imaging. The energy of the acoustic bursts seems related to single and well-localised events with very large variations in energy. However, these local reorganisation processes may eventually bring the global relaxation of the system, which is also captured by a force drop in the resistance to shear.

  18. Further Investigations of Cosmogenic Ne-21 Exposure Ages of Glacial Boulders Constrained by Local Bedrock Erosion Rates in Ong Valley, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, C. P.; Morgan, D. J.; Cox, J.; Balco, G.; Putkonen, J.; Bibby, T.

    2014-12-01

    A history of glaciation can be tracked by determining the exposure age of boulders found in glacial drifts using the concentration of the cosmogenic nuclide Ne-21. In order to calculate exposure age, the erosion rate and previous exposure must be taken into consideration. In this study, we measured cosmogenic Ne-21 concentrations in quartz from samples of bedrock and samples taken from distinct glacial drifts in Antarctica. We determined the erosion rate using the concentrations of Ne-21 in the bedrock and then used this rate to calculate the exposure ages of the samples taken from the glacial drifts. The samples were collected from the Ong Valley, Antarctica (157.5 East, 83.25 South), an ice-free valley in the Miller Range of the Central Transantarctic Mountains that contains three distinct glacial drifts. We analyzed samples from the oldest and the youngest of these drifts, from moraines from a small alpine glacier to the east of the main valley, and from the surrounding bedrock of the valley walls above the glacial limit. The average erosion rate we calculated was 23 cm/Myrs. The six samples from the oldest glacial drift have an average exposure age of 2.1 Myrs, but have a range of 4.4 Myrs. The exposure age of samples from the middle of the youngest drift on the valley floor average 90.1 kyrs, with a range of 13.4 kyrs. Samples from a lateral moraine of this youngest drift have an average exposure age of 145 kyrs, with a range of 134 kyrs. The 7 samples taken from the alpine glacier east of Ong Valley have an average age of 1.10 Myrs, but a range of 3.87 Myrs. The high variability in ages among samples from the same glacial drift arises from prior exposure and postdepositional movement of the rocks.

  19. Living and Working in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Noel

    This source book, designed for 11- to 14-year-old students, seeks to describe what life is like in Antarctica. In spite of extreme weather conditions, people go to Antarctica to work every summer. Some of them stay there during the winter as well. This book seeks to supply answers to such questions as: How do people get to Antarctica? Why do they…

  20. Searching Sound with Sound

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Martin; Chapman, A.

    2010-01-01

    A sound installation developed to accompany Anna Chapman's sound installtion "Subjects for Melancholy Retrospection" that was presented t the Edinburgh Art Festrival in August 2010 at the National Trust for Scotland's Newhailes estate.

  1. The stability of second sound waves in a rotating Darcy-Brinkman porous layer in local thermal non-equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltayeb, I. A.; Elbashir, T. B. A.

    2017-08-01

    The linear and nonlinear stabilities of second sound waves in a rotating porous Darcy-Brinkman layer in local thermal non-equilibrium are studied when the heat flux in the solid obeys the Cattaneo law. The simultaneous action of the Brinkman effect (effective viscosity) and rotation is shown to destabilise the layer, as compared to either of them acting alone, for both stationary and overstable modes. The effective viscosity tends to favour overstable modes while rotation tends to favour stationary convection. Rapid rotation invokes a negative viscosity effect that suppresses the stabilising effect of porosity so that the stability characteristics resemble those of the classical rotating Benard layer. A formal weakly nonlinear analysis yields evolution equations of the Landau-Stuart type governing the slow time development of the amplitudes of the unstable waves. The equilibrium points of the evolution equations are analysed and the overall development of the amplitudes is examined. Both overstable and stationary modes can exhibit supercritical stability; supercritical instability, subcritical instability and stability are not possible. The dependence of the supercritical stability on the relative values of the six dimensionless parameters representing thermal non-equilibrium, rotation, porosity, relaxation time, thermal diffusivities and Brinkman effect is illustrated as regions in regime diagrams in the parameter space. The dependence of the heat transfer and the mean heat flux on the parameters of the problem is also discussed.

  2. Mutation in the kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium channel causing spinocerebellar ataxia 13 disrupts sound-localization mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Middlebrooks

    Full Text Available Normal sound localization requires precise comparisons of sound timing and pressure levels between the two ears. The primary localization cues are interaural time differences, ITD, and interaural level differences, ILD. Voltage-gated potassium channels, including Kv3.3, are highly expressed in the auditory brainstem and are thought to underlie the exquisite temporal precision and rapid spike rates that characterize brainstem binaural pathways. An autosomal dominant mutation in the gene encoding Kv3.3 has been demonstrated in a large Filipino kindred manifesting as spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13. This kindred provides a rare opportunity to test in vivo the importance of a specific channel subunit for human hearing. Here, we demonstrate psychophysically that individuals with the mutant allele exhibit profound deficits in both ITD and ILD sensitivity, despite showing no obvious impairment in pure-tone sensitivity with either ear. Surprisingly, several individuals exhibited the auditory deficits even though they were pre-symptomatic for SCA13. We would expect that impairments of binaural processing as great as those observed in this family would result in prominent deficits in localization of sound sources and in loss of the "spatial release from masking" that aids in understanding speech in the presence of competing sounds.

  3. The influenze of signal parameters on the sound source localization ability of a harbor popoise (Phocoena phocoena)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, R.A.; Haan, de D.; Verboom, W.C.

    2007-01-01

    It is unclear how well harbor porpoises can locate sound sources, and thus can locate acoustic alarms on gillnets. Therefore the ability of a porpoise to determine the location of a sound source was determined. The animal was trained to indicate the active one of 16 transducers in a 16-m-diam circle

  4. The influence of signal parameters on the sound source localization ability of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, R.A.; Haan, D.de; Verboom, W.C.

    2007-01-01

    It is unclear how well harbor porpoises can locate sound sources, and thus can locate acoustic alarms on gillnets. Therefore the ability of a porpoise to determine the location of a sound source was determined. The animal was trained to indicate the active one of 16 transducers in a 16-m -diam

  5. Antarctica: Discovery & Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoigne, Toss; Collett, Peter

    An examination of Antarctica, from the first sightings to the heroic explorations of the late 18th and early 19th centuries to modern-day research, is presented in this book. Twelve chapters are as follows: (1) The search begins; (2) Whalers and sealers: bites and nibbles; (3) The new continent: first sight; (4) Wintering: the first party; (5)…

  6. Comparison between bilateral cochlear implants and Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural cochlear implant: speech perception, sound localization and patient self-assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnard, Damien; Lautissier, Sylvie; Bosset-Audoit, Amélie; Coriat, Géraldine; Beraha, Max; Maunoury, Antoine; Martel, Jacques; Darrouzet, Vincent; Bébéar, Jean-Pierre; Dauman, René

    2013-01-01

    An alternative to bilateral cochlear implantation is offered by the Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural cochlear implant, which allows stimulation of both cochleae within a single device. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare a group of Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural implant users (denoted BINAURAL group, n = 7) with a group of bilateral adult cochlear implant users (denoted BILATERAL group, n = 6) in terms of speech perception, sound localization, and self-assessment of health status and hearing disability. Speech perception was assessed using word recognition at 60 dB SPL in quiet and in a 'cocktail party' noise delivered through five loudspeakers in the hemi-sound field facing the patient (signal-to-noise ratio = +10 dB). The sound localization task was to determine the source of a sound stimulus among five speakers positioned between -90° and +90° from midline. Change in health status was assessed using the Glasgow Benefit Inventory and hearing disability was evaluated with the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit. Speech perception was not statistically different between the two groups, even though there was a trend in favor of the BINAURAL group (mean percent word recognition in the BINAURAL and BILATERAL groups: 70 vs. 56.7% in quiet, 55.7 vs. 43.3% in noise). There was also no significant difference with regard to performance in sound localization and self-assessment of health status and hearing disability. On the basis of the BINAURAL group's performance in hearing tasks involving the detection of interaural differences, implantation with the Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural implant may be considered to restore effective binaural hearing. Based on these first comparative results, this device seems to provide benefits similar to those of traditional bilateral cochlear implantation, with a new approach to stimulate both auditory nerves. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The effect of simulated unilateral hearing loss on horizontal sound localization accuracy and recognition of speech in spatially separate competing speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asp, Filip; Jakobsson, Anne-Marie; Berninger, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Unilateral hearing loss (UHL) occurs in 25% of cases of congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Due to the unilaterally reduced audibility associated with UHL, everyday demanding listening situations may be disrupted despite normal hearing in one ear. The aim of this study was to quantify acute changes in recognition of speech in spatially separate competing speech and sound localization accuracy, and relate those changes to two levels of temporary induced UHL (UHL30 and UHL43; suffixes denote the average hearing threshold across 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) for 8 normal-hearing adults. A within-subject repeated-measures design was used (normal binaural conditions, UHL30 and UHL43). The main outcome measures were the threshold for 40% correct speech recognition and the overall variance in sound localization accuracy quantified by an Error Index (0 = perfect performance, 1.0 = random performance). Distinct and statistically significant deterioration in speech recognition (2.0 dB increase in threshold, p  0.05), while sound localization was additionally impaired (Error Index increase of 0.33, p < 0.01) with an associated large increase in individual variability. Qualitative analyses on a subject-by-subject basis showed that high-frequency audibility was important for speech recognition, while low-frequency audibility was important for horizontal sound localization accuracy. While the data might not be entirely applicable to individuals with long-standing UHL, the results suggest a need for intervention for mild-to-moderate UHL. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Measurement of the Effects of Helmet Form on Sound Source Detection and Localization Using a Portable Four-Loudspeaker Test Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    effects, simulated “ virtual ” locations were created by varying the relative contributions of an adjacent pair of loudspeakers so that the overall level at...two target signals (low and high) four times from each of the four loudspeakers and five randomly chosen “ virtual ” locations for a total of nine... Gatehouse , S.; Lever, C. Sound Localization in Noise in Hearing-Impaired Listeners. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 1999, 105, 3454–3463. Moore, B. C. J. An

  9. Ozone Hole Over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) show the progressive depletion of ozone over Antarctica from 1979 to 1999. This 'ozone hole' has extended to cover an area as large as 10.5 million square miles in September 1998. The previous record of 10.0 million square miles was set in 1996. The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year between late August and early October. Regions with higher levels of ozone are shown in red. NASA and NOAA instruments have been measuring Antarctic ozone levels since the early 1970s. Large regions of depleted ozone began to develop over Antarctica in the early 1980s. Ozone holes of substantial size and depth are likely to continue to form during the next few years, scientists hope to see a reduction in ozone loss as levels of ozone-destroying CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) are gradually reduced. Credit: Images by Greg Shirah, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

  10. DXL: A Sounding Rocket Mission for the Study of Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M.; Prasai, K.; Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Koutroumpa, D.; Porter, F. S.; Snowden, S.; Cravens, T.; Robertson, I.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy (DXL) mission is an approved sounding rocket project with a first launch scheduled around December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission generated by solar wind charge exchange from that of the local hot bubble to improve our understanding of both. With 1,000 square centimeters proportional counters and grasp of about 10 square centimeters sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keV bands, DXL will achieve in a 5-minute flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  11. Improvements of sound localization abilities by the facial ruff of the barn owl (Tyto alba) as demonstrated by virtual ruff removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Laura; von Campenhausen, Mark; Endler, Frank; Singheiser, Martin; Wagner, Hermann

    2009-11-05

    When sound arrives at the eardrum it has already been filtered by the body, head, and outer ear. This process is mathematically described by the head-related transfer functions (HRTFs), which are characteristic for the spatial position of a sound source and for the individual ear. HRTFs in the barn owl (Tyto alba) are also shaped by the facial ruff, a specialization that alters interaural time differences (ITD), interaural intensity differences (ILD), and the frequency spectrum of the incoming sound to improve sound localization. Here we created novel stimuli to simulate the removal of the barn owl's ruff in a virtual acoustic environment, thus creating a situation similar to passive listening in other animals, and used these stimuli in behavioral tests. HRTFs were recorded from an owl before and after removal of the ruff feathers. Normal and ruff-removed conditions were created by filtering broadband noise with the HRTFs. Under normal virtual conditions, no differences in azimuthal head-turning behavior between individualized and non-individualized HRTFs were observed. The owls were able to respond differently to stimuli from the back than to stimuli from the front having the same ITD. By contrast, such a discrimination was not possible after the virtual removal of the ruff. Elevational head-turn angles were (slightly) smaller with non-individualized than with individualized HRTFs. The removal of the ruff resulted in a large decrease in elevational head-turning amplitudes. The facial ruff a) improves azimuthal sound localization by increasing the ITD range and b) improves elevational sound localization in the frontal field by introducing a shift of iso-ILD lines out of the midsagittal plane, which causes ILDs to increase with increasing stimulus elevation. The changes at the behavioral level could be related to the changes in the binaural physical parameters that occurred after the virtual removal of the ruff. These data provide new insights into the function of

  12. Improvements of sound localization abilities by the facial ruff of the barn owl (Tyto alba as demonstrated by virtual ruff removal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Hausmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When sound arrives at the eardrum it has already been filtered by the body, head, and outer ear. This process is mathematically described by the head-related transfer functions (HRTFs, which are characteristic for the spatial position of a sound source and for the individual ear. HRTFs in the barn owl (Tyto alba are also shaped by the facial ruff, a specialization that alters interaural time differences (ITD, interaural intensity differences (ILD, and the frequency spectrum of the incoming sound to improve sound localization. Here we created novel stimuli to simulate the removal of the barn owl's ruff in a virtual acoustic environment, thus creating a situation similar to passive listening in other animals, and used these stimuli in behavioral tests. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HRTFs were recorded from an owl before and after removal of the ruff feathers. Normal and ruff-removed conditions were created by filtering broadband noise with the HRTFs. Under normal virtual conditions, no differences in azimuthal head-turning behavior between individualized and non-individualized HRTFs were observed. The owls were able to respond differently to stimuli from the back than to stimuli from the front having the same ITD. By contrast, such a discrimination was not possible after the virtual removal of the ruff. Elevational head-turn angles were (slightly smaller with non-individualized than with individualized HRTFs. The removal of the ruff resulted in a large decrease in elevational head-turning amplitudes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The facial ruff a improves azimuthal sound localization by increasing the ITD range and b improves elevational sound localization in the frontal field by introducing a shift of iso-ILD lines out of the midsagittal plane, which causes ILDs to increase with increasing stimulus elevation. The changes at the behavioral level could be related to the changes in the binaural physical parameters that occurred after the

  13. Dichotic sound localization properties of duration-tuned neurons in the inferior colliculus of the big brown bat

    OpenAIRE

    Sayegh, Riziq; Aubie, Brandon; Faure, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies on duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) from the mammalian auditory midbrain have typically evoked spiking responses from these cells using monaural or free-field acoustic stimulation focused on the contralateral ear, with fewer studies devoted to examining the electrophysiological properties of duration tuning using binaural stimulation. Because the inferior colliculus (IC) receives convergent inputs from lower brainstem auditory nuclei that process sounds from each ear...

  14. Three-year experience with the Sophono in children with congenital conductive unilateral hearing loss: tolerability, audiometry, and sound localization compared to a bone-anchored hearing aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelissen, Rik C; Agterberg, Martijn J H; Hol, Myrthe K S; Snik, Ad F M

    2016-10-01

    Bone conduction devices (BCDs) are advocated as an amplification option for patients with congenital conductive unilateral hearing loss (UHL), while other treatment options could also be considered. The current study compared a transcutaneous BCD (Sophono) with a percutaneous BCD (bone-anchored hearing aid, BAHA) in 12 children with congenital conductive UHL. Tolerability, audiometry, and sound localization abilities with both types of BCD were studied retrospectively. The mean follow-up was 3.6 years for the Sophono users (n = 6) and 4.7 years for the BAHA users (n = 6). In each group, two patients had stopped using their BCD. Tolerability was favorable for the Sophono. Aided thresholds with the Sophono were unsatisfactory, as they did not reach under a mean pure tone average of 30 dB HL. Sound localization generally improved with both the Sophono and the BAHA, although localization abilities did not reach the level of normal hearing children. These findings, together with previously reported outcomes, are important to take into account when counseling patients and their caretakers. The selection of a suitable amplification option should always be made deliberately and on individual basis for each patient in this diverse group of children with congenital conductive UHL.

  15. Meteorites, Ice, and Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, William A.

    2003-08-01

    Bill Cassidy led meteorite recovery expeditions in the Antarctic for fifteen years and his searches have resulted in the collection of thousands of meteorite specimens from the ice. This personal account of his field experiences on the U.S. Antarctic Search for Meteorites Project reveals the influence the work has had on our understanding of the moon, Mars and the asteroid belt. Cassidy describes the hardships and dangers of fieldwork in a hostile environment, as well as the appreciation he developed for its beauty. William Cassidy is Emeritus Professor of Geology and Planetary Science at the University of Pittsburgh. He initiated the U.S. Antarctic Search for Meteorites (ANSMET) nroject and led meteorite recovery expeditions in Antarctica in1976. His name is found attached to a mineral (cassidyite), on the map of Antarctica (Cassidy Glacier), and in the Catalog of Asteroids (3382 Cassidy). Profiled in "American Men of Science," and "Who's Who in America," he is also a recipient of The Antarctic Service Medal from the United States and has published widely in Science, Meteoritics and Planetary Science, and The Journal of Geophysical Research.

  16. A Study of Superficial Sediments and Aquifers in Parts of Uyo Local Government Area, Akwa Ibom State, Southern Nigeria, Using Electrical Sounding Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. F. Evans

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistivity sounding method using Schlumberger electrodes configuration was employed to investigate the goe-eletrical properties of the subsurface in parts of Uyo Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. Within the maximum electrode spread, the area studied show sandy beds with five layers of various thicknesses. The subsurface sediment harbours a thick aquifer buried in 20.0 m from the surface of the earth and it is exposed to earth surface at VES 13 and 14. The resistivity range for the aquifer layer is between 1,050 - 9,300 Ωm and thickness is above 80.0 m.

  17. Mineral resources potential of Antarctica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Splettstoesser, John F; Dreschhoff, Gisela A. M

    1990-01-01

    .... This volume includes not only papers that are the culmination of many years of research conducted in Antarctica by leading scientists, but also additional studies from the United States, Australia...

  18. Mineral resources potential of Antarctica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Splettstoesser, John F; Dreschhoff, Gisela A. M

    1990-01-01

    .... This volume of the Antarctic Research Series results from an attempt to assemble a summary of current factual knowledge and scientific data related to issues of mineral resources in Antarctica...

  19. Triassic amphibian from Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, P J; Baillie, R J; Colbert, E H

    1968-08-02

    A fossil bone fragment-the first record of tetrapod life from Antarctica-was found near Graphite Peak in the upper Beardmore Glacier area (85 degrees 3.3'S; 172 degrees 19'E). The fragment was embedded in a pebbly quartzose sandstone, probably of fluvial origin, in the lower part of the Triassic Fremouw Formation (as yet undefined), which contains Dicroidium in the upper part. The fossil horizon is only 76 meters, stratigraphically, above the Glossopteris-bearing Buckley Formation, a coal-bearing sequence of Permian age. The bone fragment is the back portion of a left mandibular ramus of a labyrinthodont amphibian. This identification is based on the characteristic labyrinthodont external surface sculpturing, with indications of "mucous grooves," as well as on other osteological features.

  20. Influence of Persistent Wind Scour on the Surface Mass Balance of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Indrani; Bell, Robin E.; Scambos, Ted A.; Wolovick, Michael; Creyts, Timothy T.; Studinger, Michael; Fearson, Nicholas; Nicolas, Julien P.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; vandenBroeke, Michiel R.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow accumulation over Antarctica is a key constraint for estimates of the Antarctic mass balance, as well as climatic interpretations of ice-core records. Over Antarctica, near-surface winds accelerate down relatively steep surface slopes, eroding and sublimating the snow. This wind scour results in numerous localized regions (Antarctica. The scour zones are persistent because they are controlled by bedrock topography. On the basis of our Dome A observations, we develop an empirical model to predict wind-scour zones across the Antarctic continent and find that these zones are predominantly located in East Antarctica. We estimate that approx. 2.7-6.6% of the surface area of Antarctica has persistent negative net accumulation due to wind scour, which suggests that, across the continent, the snow mass input is overestimated by 11-36.5 Gt /yr in present surface-mass-balance calculations.

  1. Atmospheric nitric oxide and ozone at the WAIS Divide deep coring site: a discussion of local sources and transport in West Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Masclin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The first measurements of atmospheric nitric oxide (NO along with observations of ozone (O3, hydroperoxides (H2O2 and MHP and snow nitrate (NO3– on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS were carried out at the WAIS Divide deep ice-coring site between 10 December 2008 and 11 January 2009. Average ±1σ mixing ratios of NO were 19 ± 31 pptv and confirmed prior model estimates for the summer boundary layer above WAIS. Mean ±1σ mixing ratios of O3 of 14 ± 4 ppbv were in the range of previous measurements from overland traverses across WAIS during summer, while average ±1σ concentrations of H2O2 and MHP revealed higher levels with mixing ratios of 743 ± 362 and 519 ± 238 pptv, respectively. An upper limit for daily average NO2 and NO emission fluxes from snow of 8.6 × 108 and 33.9 × 108 molecule cm–2 s–1, respectively, were estimated based on photolysis of measured NO3– and nitrite (NO2– in the surface snowpack. The resulting high NOx emission flux may explain the little preservation of NO3– in snow (~ 30% when compared to Summit, Greenland (75–93%. Assuming rapid and complete mixing into the overlying atmosphere, and steady state of NOx, these snow emissions are equivalent to an average (range production of atmospheric NOx of 30 (21–566 pptv h–1 for a typical atmospheric boundary-layer depth of 250 (354–13 m. These upper bounds indicate that local emissions from the snowpack are a significant source of short-lived nitrogen oxides above the inner WAIS. The net O3 production of 0.8 ppbv day–1 triggered with NO higher than 2 pptv is too small to explain the observed O3 variability. Thus, the origins of the air masses reaching WAIS Divide during this campaign were investigated with a 4-day back-trajectory analysis every 4 h. The resulting 168 back trajectories revealed that in 75% of all runs air originated from the Antarctic coastal slopes (58% and the inner WAIS (17%. For these air sources O3 levels were on average 13 ± 3

  2. Sound localization with an army helmet worn in combination with an in-ear advanced communications system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Sharon M; Boyne, Stephen; Roesler-Mulroney, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Conventional hearing protection devices result in decrements mainly in the ability to distinguish front from rearward sound sources. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of wearing an earplug with advanced communications capability, in combination with an army helmet, on horizontal plane speaker identification. Ten normal-hearing male subjects were tested in a semi-reverberant sound proof booth under eight conditions defined by combinations of two levels of ear occlusion (unoccluded and occluded by the earplug) and four levels of the helmet (head bare and fitted with the helmet modified to give no, partial and full ear coverage). Percent correct speaker identification was assessed using a horizontal array of eight loudspeakers surrounding the subject at one meter. These were positioned close to the midline and interaural axes of the head, at ear level. The stimulus was a 75-dB SPL, 300-ms broadband white noise. Both degree of ear coverage and ear occlusion significantly determined outcome. Overall percent correct ranged from 93.6% (bareheaded) to 79.7% (full ear coverage) with the ears unoccluded, and from 83.4%-77.5% with ear occlusion. Both variables affected the prevalence of mirror image confusions for positions 30 degrees apart in front and back of the interaural axis. With ear occlusion, front given back errors were more likely than back given front errors, increasing with degree of ear coverage to 49% and 25.4%, respectively. These errors also increased with ear coverage with the ears unoccluded, but were similar. Both degree of ear coverage and ear occlusion significantly impacted horizontal plane speaker identification, particularly for sources close to the interaural axis. However, overall percent correct was higher than observed in a previous study with conventional and level-dependent hearing protection devices, using the same array.

  3. Foley Sounds vs Real Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trento, Stefano; Götzen, Amalia De

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an initial attempt to study the world of sound effects for motion pictures, also known as Foley sounds. Throughout several audio and audio-video tests we have compared both Foley and real sounds originated by an identical action. The main purpose was to evaluate if sound effects...

  4. Habilidade de localização e lateralização sonora em deficientes visuais Sound localization and lateralization in individuals with visual deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaiana Lice Lopes Dias

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar o desempenho de ouvintes, cegos ou com visão subnormal, nos testes de localização sonora em cinco direções e de lateralização, comparando-o com indivíduos videntes, com sensibilidade auditiva normal, nas mesmas tarefas. MÉTODOS: Foram selecionados 21 indivíduos com sensibilidade auditiva normal, faixa etária média de 30 anos, de ambos os gêneros, reunidos pela presença cegueira e/ou visão subnormal congênita ou adquirida. Foram realizados os testes que compõem a avaliação audiológica básica, o Teste de Localização Sonora e o Teste de Lateralização com Som Verbal, nas técnicas ascendente e descendente. Os resultados obtidos com os testes realizados pelo grupo de 21 indivíduos com deficiência visual foram comparados com os de 40 adultos videntes e ouvintes normais. RESULTADOS: No grupo estudo (deficientes visuais, tanto na técnica ascendente quanto na descendente, existem diferenças estatisticamente significantes entre os limiares de lateralização sonora para as orelhas direita e esquerda. O maior limiar de lateralização foi observado na orelha esquerda em cada grupo. Em cada técnica, ascendente e descendente, não existiram diferenças estatisticamente significantes para o limiar de lateralização por orelha, em cada grupo. Comparando os dados do teste de lateralização sonora do grupo de deficientes visuais por técnica e orelha, com os dados do grupo de comparação de videntes, verificamos que existiram diferenças estatisticamente significantes em ambas as técnicas e orelhas, com exceção da orelha esquerda, na técnica ascendente. CONCLUSÃO: Os deficientes visuais avaliados têm um excelente desempenho em lateralização de sons, muito melhor do que sujeitos videntes e ouvintes típicos ou normais.PURPOSE: To verify the auditory performance of blind or subnormal sight individuals in tests for sound localization in five directions and lateralization, compared to individuals with

  5. Fairweather atmospheric electricity at Antarctica during local ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    caps. The Antarctic plateau supports a desert-like climate with clear skies and a very low atmospheric aerosol content. In summer, the prevailing winds ... The ice surface is flat and is void of any obstructions and the electri- cal conductivity of the surface ice is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the air (Cobb.

  6. Fairweather atmospheric electricity at Antarctica during local ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A total of 69 days were selected which satisfied the 'fairweather' conditions, i.e., days with absence of high winds, drifting or falling snow, clouds, and fog ... This study will help us to examine the impact of solar and geophysical phenomena like solar flares, geomagnetic storms and substorms on the global electric circuit.

  7. Auditory cortical and hippocampal local-field potentials to frequency deviant tones in urethane-anesthetized rats: An unexpected role of the sound frequencies themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruusuvirta, Timo; Lipponen, Arto; Pellinen, Eeva-Kaarina; Penttonen, Markku; Astikainen, Piia

    2015-06-01

    The human brain can automatically detect auditory changes, as indexed by the mismatch negativity of event-related potentials. The mechanisms that underlie this response are poorly understood. We recorded primary auditory cortical and hippocampal (dentate gyrus, CA1) local-field potentials to serial tones in urethane-anesthetized rats. In an oddball condition, a rare (deviant) tone (p=0.11) randomly replaced a repeated (standard) tone. The deviant tone was either lower (2200, 2700, 3200, 3700Hz) or higher (4300, 4800, 5300, 5800Hz) in frequency than the standard tone (4000Hz). In an equiprobability control condition, all nine tones were presented at random (p=0.11). Differential responses to deviant tones relative to the standard tone were found in the auditory cortex and the dentate gyrus but not in CA1. Only in the dentate gyrus, the responses were found to be standard- (i.e., oddball condition-) specific. In the auditory cortex, the sound frequencies themselves sufficed to explain their generation. These findings tentatively suggest dissociation among non-contextual afferent, contextual afferent and auditory change detection processes. Most importantly, they remind us about the importance of strict control of physical sound features in mismatch negativity studies in animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular variation of antarctic grass Deschampsia antarctica Desv. from King George Island (Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna J. Chwedorzewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deschampsia antarctica Desv. plants collected on King George Islands (Antarctica at two localities that differ in topographic and nutrition conditions exhibited morphological variation that differentiated plants of both locations. The molecular variation characteristic to individuals of both sites was tested using AFLP approach in order to verify whether morphological variation characteristic to the plants resulted from environmental factors or possibly from differences at the DNA level. Four primer pair combinations were used to generate 339 AFLP fragments, 132 of which were polymorphic and allowed evaluation of genetic relationships among D. antarctica individuals. Chi-square test revealed that only 12 signals were discriminative for the plants from both locations. Cluster analysis conducted on these AFLP fragments demonstrated that plants from the location rich in biogenes were more polymorphic than those from poor one. Our data suggest that the phenotypic variation specific to plants of both locations seem to be the result of adaptation to the environmental conditions like soil and moisture rather than reflect genetic differences.

  9. Localização sonora em usuários de aparelhos de amplificação sonora individual Sound localization by hearing aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cristina Rodrigues

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar o desempenho, no teste de localização de fontes sonoras, de usuários de aparelhos de amplificação sonora individual (AASI do tipo retroauricular e intracanal, com o desempenho de ouvintes normais, nos planos espaciais horizontal e sagital mediano, para as frequências de 500, 2.000 e 4.500 Hz; e correlacionar os acertos no teste de localização sonora com o tempo de uso dos AASI. MÉTODOS: foram testados oito ouvintes normais e 20 usuários de próteses auditivas, subdivididos em dois grupos. Um formado por 10 indivíduos usuários de próteses auditivas do tipo intracanal e o outro grupo formado por 10 usuários de próteses auditivas do tipo retroauricular. Todos foram submetidos ao teste de localização de fontes sonoras, no qual foram apresentados, aleatoriamente, três tipos de ondas quadradas, com frequências fundamentais em 0,5 kHz, 2 kHz e 4,5 kHz, na intensidade de 70 dBA. RESULTADOS: encontrou-se percentuais de acertos médios de 78,4%, 72,2% e 72,9% para os ouvintes normais, em 0,5 kHz, 2 kHz e 4,5 kHz, respectivamente e 40,1%, 39,4% e 41,7% para os usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual. Quanto aos tipos de aparelhos, os usuários do modelo intracanal acertaram a origem da fonte sonora em 47,2% das vezes e os usuários do modelo retroauricular em 37,4% das vezes. Não foi observada correlação entre o percentual de acertos no teste de localização sonora e o tempo de uso da prótese auditiva. CONCLUSÃO: ouvintes normais localizam as fontes sonoras de maneira mais eficiente que os usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual e, dentre estes, os que utilizam o modelo intracanal obtiveram melhor desempenho. Além disso, o tempo de uso não interferiu no desempenho para localizar a origem das fontes sonoras.PURPOSE: to compare the sound localization performance of hearing aids users, with the performance of normal hearing in the horizontal and sagittal planes, at 0.5, 2 and 4

  10. My IGY in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Dr Charles Bentley is the A.P. Crary Professor Emeritus of Geophysics, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Bentley joined the Arctic Institute of North America in 1956 to participate in International Geophysical Year (IGY)-related activities in the Antarctic. He wintered over consecutively in 1957 and 1958 at Byrd Station, a station in the interior of West Antarctica that housed 24 men each winter - 12 Navy support people and 12 civilian scientists/technicians. During the austral summers, he also participated in over-snow traverses, first as co-leader, then leader (the other coleader went home after the first year). These traverses consisted of six men and three vehicles, and lasted several months. These traverses covered more than 1609 kilometers (1000 miles) of largely unmapped and unphotographed terrain. During these traverses, connections to Byrd Station were by radio (daily, when the transmission conditions were good enough) and roughly every 2 weeks by resupply flight.

  11. Sound identification in human auditory cortex: Differential contribution of local field potentials and high gamma power as revealed by direct intracranial recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourski, Kirill V; Steinschneider, Mitchell; Rhone, Ariane E; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew A; McMurray, Bob

    2015-09-01

    High gamma power has become the principal means of assessing auditory cortical activation in human intracranial studies, albeit at the expense of low frequency local field potentials (LFPs). It is unclear whether limiting analyses to high gamma impedes ability of clarifying auditory cortical organization. We compared the two measures obtained from posterolateral superior temporal gyrus (PLST) and evaluated their relative utility in sound categorization. Subjects were neurosurgical patients undergoing invasive monitoring for medically refractory epilepsy. Stimuli (consonant-vowel syllables varying in voicing and place of articulation and control tones) elicited robust evoked potentials and high gamma activity on PLST. LFPs had greater across-subject variability, yet yielded higher classification accuracy, relative to high gamma power. Classification was enhanced by including temporal detail of LFPs and combining LFP and high gamma. We conclude that future studies should consider utilizing both LFP and high gamma when investigating the functional organization of human auditory cortex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pulsating star research from Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadid, Merieme

    2017-09-01

    This invited talk discusses the pulsating star research from the heart of Antarctica and the scientific polar challenges in the extreme environment of Antarctica, and how the new polar technology could cope with unresolved stellar pulsation enigmas and evolutionary properties challenges towards an understanding of the mysteries of the Universe. PAIX, the first robotic photometer Antarctica program, has been successfully launched during the polar night 2007. This ongoing program gives a new insight to cope with unresolved stellar enigmas and stellar oscillation challenges with a great opportunity to benefit from an access to the best astronomical site on Earth, Dome C. PAIX achieves astrophysical measurement time-series of stellar fields, challenging photometry from space. A continuous and an uninterrupted series of multi-color photometric observations has been collected each polar night - 150 days - without regular interruption, Earth's rotation effect. PAIX shows the first light curve from Antarctica and first step for the astronomy in Antarctica giving new insights in remote polar observing runs and robotic instruments towards a new technology.

  13. Imagining Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark; Garner, Tom Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We make the case in this essay that sound that is imagined is both a perception and as much a sound as that perceived through external stimulation. To argue this, we look at the evidence from auditory science, neuroscience, and philosophy, briefly present some new conceptual thinking on sound...... that accounts for this view, and then use this to look at what the future might hold in the context of imagining sound and developing technology....

  14. Pulsating star research from Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadid Merieme

    2017-01-01

    PAIX, the first robotic photometer Antarctica program, has been successfully launched during the polar night 2007. This ongoing program gives a new insight to cope with unresolved stellar enigmas and stellar oscillation challenges with a great opportunity to benefit from an access to the best astronomical site on Earth, Dome C. PAIX achieves astrophysical measurement time-series of stellar fields, challenging photometry from space. A continuous and an uninterrupted series of multi-color photometric observations has been collected each polar night – 150 days – without regular interruption, Earth’s rotation effect. PAIX shows the first light curve from Antarctica and first step for the astronomy in Antarctica giving new insights in remote polar observing runs and robotic instruments towards a new technology.

  15. Tidal Energy Resource Assessment for McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    McMurdo Station, Antarctica Co ld R eg io ns R es ea rc h an d En gi ne er in g La bo ra to ry Brendan A. West, Ian F. Gagnon, and Martin... Geology 162 (1): 105–120. Castro-Santo, T., and A. Haro. 2012. Survival and Behavior of Juvenile Atlantic Salmon and Adult American Shad on Exposure to a...and F. G. Hoeven. 1962. Winter Measurements of Sea Currents in McMurdo Sound. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics 5 (5): 778–789. Heath, R

  16. Physics and Psychophysics of High-Fidelity Sound. Part V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the psychophysics of sound localization and the spatial attributes of sound, attempting to explain some of the methods used to produce more realistic sound images. Topics include: direct and indirect sound; localization and sound images; precedence effect; and techniques for creating spaciousness and for sonic image enhancement. (JM)

  17. Entropic "sound" in the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Apostol, B. -F.; Stefan, S.; Apostol, M.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that small, local disturbances of entropy in the atmosphere may give rise to "sound" waves propagating with a velocity which depends on the amplitude ratio of the local relative variations of temperature and volume. This velocity is much smaller than the mean molecular velocity and the usual, adiabatic sound velocity.

  18. Whose Line Sound is it Anyway? Identifying the Vocalizer on Underwater Video by Localizing with a Hydrophone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hoffmann-Kuhnt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A new device that combined high-resolution (1080p wide-angle video and three channels of high-frequency acoustic recordings (at 500 kHz per channel in a portable underwater housing was designed and tested with wild bottlenose and spotted dolphins in the Bahamas. It consisted of three hydrophones, a GoPro camera, a small Fit PC, a set of custom preamplifiers and a high-frequency data acquisition board. Recordings were obtained to identify individual vocalizing animals through time-delay-of-arrival localizing in post-processing. The calculated source positions were then overlaid onto the video – providing the ability to identify the vocalizing animal on the recorded video. The new tool allowed for much clearer analysis of the acoustic behavior of cetaceans than was possible before.

  19. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadham, J.L.; Arndt, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304835706; Tulaczyk, S.; Stibal, M.; Tranter, M.; Telling, J.; Lis, G.P.; Lawson, E.; Ridgwell, A.; Dubnick, A.; Sharp, M.J.; Anesio, A.M.; Butler, C.E.H.

    2012-01-01

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been

  20. Unsound Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knakkergaard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the change in premise that digitally produced sound brings about and how digital technologies more generally have changed our relationship to the musical artifact, not simply in degree but in kind. It demonstrates how our acoustical conceptions are thoroughly challenged...... by the digital production of sound and, by questioning the ontological basis for digital sound, turns our understanding of the core term substance upside down....

  1. Sound Absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  2. Weather and forecasting at Wilkins ice runway, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpentier, Scott, E-mail: s.carpentier@bom.gov.a [Bureau of Meteorology, 111 Macquarie Street, Hobart, Tasmania, 7001 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    Aviation forecasts for Wilkins ice runway in East Antarctica are developed within the conceptual framework of flow against a single dome shaped hill. Forecast challenges include the sudden onset of blizzards associated with the formation of an internal gravity wave; frontal weather; transient wake vortices and mesoscale lows; temperature limitations on runway use; and snow and fog events. These key weather aspects are presented within the context of synoptic to local scale climatologies and numerical weather prediction models.

  3. Surface Clutter Suppression Techniques Applied to P-band Multi-Channel SAR Ice Sounder Data from East Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Chung-Chi; Bekaert, David; Gebert, Nicolas

    ., Lausanne, developed and built the radiator-elements of the enhanced POLARIS. Several datasets were acquired in the multi-channel configuration during the Feb. 2011 campaign over East Antarctica. The POLARIS instrument will be briefly introduced, followed by an overview of the sounding campaign. Finally...

  4. Statistics of Natural Binaural Sounds

    OpenAIRE

    Wiktor Młynarski; Jürgen Jost

    2014-01-01

    Binaural sound localization is usually considered a discrimination task, where interaural phase (IPD) and level (ILD) disparities at narrowly tuned frequency channels are utilized to identify a position of a sound source. In natural conditions however, binaural circuits are exposed to a stimulation by sound waves originating from multiple, often moving and overlapping sources. Therefore statistics of binaural cues depend on acoustic properties and the spatial configuration of the environment....

  5. Natural statistics of binaural sounds

    OpenAIRE

    Młynarski, Wiktor; Jost, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Binaural sound localization is usually considered a discrimination task, where interaural time (ITD) and level (ILD) disparities at pure frequency channels are utilized to identify a position of a sound source. In natural conditions binaural circuits are exposed to a stimulation by sound waves originating from multiple, often moving and overlapping sources. Therefore statistics of binaural cues depend on acoustic properties and the spatial configuration of the environment. In order to process...

  6. Ocean current observations near McMurdo Station, Antarctica from 1991 to 1993: Relation to wastewater discharge dispersal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, J.P. [J. P. Consulting, Monterey, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Analyses of ocean currents in the vicinity of McMurdo Station, Antarctica, are relevant to the transport and dispersal of wastewater from the McMurdo Station sewage outfall pipe. Observations of ocean currents during the initial phases of this study have been presented by Howington and McFeters. These studies, using coliform bacterial counts as an indicator of dispersion of the wastewater plume and current meters to measure flow patterns, indicated that dispersal of the plume by local currents does not effectively remove the plume from the vicinity of McMurdo Sound, under the present outfall pipe location. Moreover, these studies suggest that, although the flow pattern is generally consistent with transport of the plume away from McMurdo Station, episodes of current reversal are sufficient to transport the wastewater plume along the shore toward the southeast, eventually overlapping the seawater intake area near the McMurdo jetty. Several concerns included (a) impacts of wastewater inputs to nearshore benthic and pelagic habitats adjacent to McMurdo Station, (b) effects of wastewater input to the McMurdo Station fresh water intake source, and (c) reduction in human impacts on the McMurdo Sound ecosystem. These concerns motivated studies to characterize nearshore currents more extensively in relation to dispersal of the wastewater plume. This report discusses analysis results of current observations from November 1992 to November 1993.

  7. Measurements of Refractory Black Carbon (rBC) Aerosols in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A. L.; McMeeking, G. R.; Lyons, W. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Welch, K. A.; McKnight, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of light absorbing particles in the boundary layer of the high southern latitudes are scarce. During the 2013-2014 austral summer field season refractory black carbon (rBC) aerosols were quantified by a single particle soot photometer (SP2) in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The dark rBC particles absorb more radiation thereby increasing atmospheric heating, as well as reducing surface albedo and enhancing hydrologic melt when deposited on highly reflective surfaces such as snow and ice. Quantifying both local and long-range atmospheric transport of rBC to this region of a remote continent mostly covered by ice and snow would be useful in understanding meltwater generation as climate changes. Although the Dry Valleys are the largest ice-free region of Antarctica, they contain many alpine glaciers, some of which are fed from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). Continuous rBC measurements were collected at Lake Hoare Camp in the Taylor Valley for two months, along with shorter periods at more remote locations within the Dry Valleys. Conditions at the Lake Hoare Camp were dominated by up-valley winds from McMurdo Sound, however, winds also brought air down-valley from the EAIS polar plateau. Here we investigated periods dominated by both up and down-valley winds to explore differences in rBC concentrations, size distributions, and scattering properties. The average background rBC mass concentration was 1ng/m3, though concentrations as high as 50 ng/m3 were observed at times, likely due to local sources.

  8. Sound Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Bo; Olsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Sound zones, i.e. spatially confined regions of individual audio content, can be created by appropriate filtering of the desired audio signals reproduced by an array of loudspeakers. The challenge of designing filters for sound zones is twofold: First, the filtered responses should generate...... an acoustic separation between the control regions. Secondly, the pre- and post-ringing as well as spectral deterioration introduced by the filters should be minimized. The tradeoff between acoustic separation and filter ringing is the focus of this paper. A weighted L2-norm penalty is introduced in the sound...

  9. Sounds in context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weed, Ethan

    are colored by contextual information. This can be longterm contextual information, such as knowledge of phonological or emotional categories, but can also be short-term local expectancies, such as the previous sound heard. In this paper, I present original electrophysiological data illustrating the early...

  10. Characteristic Surface Processes Between Atmosphere, Cryosphere and Oceanic Environment Inferred from Infrasound Array Observations in Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Y.; Kanao, M.; Yamamoto, M. Y.; Kakinami, Y.; Murayama, T.; Okada, K.; Toda, S.; Matsushima, T.

    2014-12-01

    Infrasound is sub-audible sound whose frequency range is about 3 mHz to 20 Hz. Because this frequency is common between atmospheric, oceanic and solid earth vibrations, those waves are interacting with each other and interaction itself generates infrasound. At polar region, cryosphere also play an important role for generation and propagation of infrasound. The Japanese Antarctic infrasound observation started at April 2008. A sensor was installed at Syowa Station (SYO) in Lützow-Holm Bay (LHB) of East Antarctica, as a part of the International Polar Year. Characteristic infrasound waves observed at SYO demonstrate physical interaction involving environmental changes in the Antarctic region. Continuous recordings of infrasound clearly indicate existence of the hums generated by ocean-atmosphere interaction (microbaroms) with peaks of 0.1 to 0.25 Hz. Because larger amount of sea-ice extending around the LHB near SYO suppress ocean wave, the microbaroms become weak during austral winter. Following success of pilot observation, in austral summer in 2013, we extended one-sensor observation at SYO to 3-sensor arrayed observations, and installed a few field stations along the coast of the LHB. Newly established SYO array clearly detected the propagating directions and frequency contents of the microbaroms from Southern Ocean. In addition, we found harmonic signals around lowermost human audible band, however, currently unclear how and what generating hamonic signals. Those signals are recorded under windy condition. Since our system has no mechanical resonance at those frequency ranges, we speculate that the characteristic harmonic signals are probably related to local surficial phenomena such as ice sheet vibration generated by katabatic winds. Infrasound measurement at Antarctica could be a new proxy for monitoring a regional environmental change in high southern latitude. In such point of view, we will continue and improve the observations at and around SYO

  11. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  12. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  13. The noctilucent cloud (NLC display during the ECOMA/MASS sounding rocket flights on 3 August 2007: morphology on global to local scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baumgarten

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available During the ECOMA/MASS rocket campaign large scale NLC/PMC was observed by satellite, lidar and camera from polar to mid latitudes. We examine the observations from different instruments to investigate the morphology of the cloud. Satellite observations show a planetary wave 2 structure. Lidar observations from Kühlungsborn (54° N, Esrange (68° N and ALOMAR (69° N show a highly dynamic NLC layer. Under favorable solar illumination the cloud is also observable by ground-based cameras. The cloud was detected by cameras from Trondheim (63° N, Juliusruh (55° N and Kühlungsborn. We investigate planetary scale morphology and local scale gravity wave structures, important for the interpretation of the small scale rocket soundings. We compare in detail the lidar observations with the NLC structure observed by the camera in Trondheim. The ALOMAR RMR-lidar observed only a faint NLC during the ECOMA launch window, while the camera in Trondheim showed a strong NLC display in the direction of ALOMAR. Using the high resolution camera observations (t~30 s, Δx<5 km and the wind information from the meteor radar at ALOMAR we investigate the formation and destruction of NLC structures. We observe that the NLC brightness is reduced by a factor of 20–40 within 100 s which can be caused by a temperature about 15 K above the frostpoint temperature. A horizontal temperature gradient of more than 3 K/km is estimated.

  14. An emission inventory of sulfur from anthropogenic sources in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shirsat

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents first results of a comprehensive emission inventory of chemical species from anthropogenic activities (power generation, vehicles, ships and aircraft in Antarctica, covering the 2004–2005 period.

    The inventory is based on estimated emission rates of fuel consumption provided by some of the Antarctic research stations. Since the emission sources have different modes of operation and use a variety of fuel, the emission flux rate of chemical species is calculated by multiplying the fuel consumption value with the density of fuel and appropriate emission factors. A separate inventory is prepared for each anthropogenic emission source in Antarctica.

    Depending on the type of operation, emission rates of SO2, and BC (Black Carbon, from shipping only have been calculated using the above technique. However, only results of SO2 emissions from each source are presented here. Emission inventory maps of SO2 depicting the track/path taken by each mobile source are shown. The total annual SO2 is 158 Mg from power generation and vehicle operations, 3873 Mg from ships and 56 Mg from aircraft for 2004–2005 and these values undergo strong seasonality following the human activity in Antarctica. Though these figures are small when compared to the emissions at most other regions of the world, they are an indication that human presence in Antarctica leads to at least local pollution. The sources are mainly line and point sources and thus the local pollution potentially is relatively strong.

  15. Seeing 'where' through the ears: effects of learning-by-doing and long-term sensory deprivation on localization based on image-to-sound substitution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Proulx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sensory substitution devices for the blind translate inaccessible visual information into a format that intact sensory pathways can process. We here tested image-to-sound conversion-based localization of visual stimuli (LEDs and objects in 13 blindfolded participants. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Subjects were assigned to different roles as a function of two variables: visual deprivation (blindfolded continuously (Bc for 24 hours per day for 21 days; blindfolded for the tests only (Bt and system use (system not used (Sn; system used for tests only (St; system used continuously for 21 days (Sc. The effect of learning-by-doing was assessed by comparing the performance of eight subjects (BtSt who only used the mobile substitution device for the tests, to that of three subjects who, in addition, practiced with it for four hours daily in their normal life (BtSc and BcSc; two subjects who did not use the device at all (BtSn and BcSn allowed assessment of its use in the tasks we employed. The impact of long-term sensory deprivation was investigated by blindfolding three of those participants throughout the three week-long experiment (BcSn, BcSn/c, and BcSc; the other ten subjects were only blindfolded during the tests (BtSn, BtSc, and the eight BtSt subjects. Expectedly, the two subjects who never used the substitution device, while fast in finding the targets, had chance accuracy, whereas subjects who used the device were markedly slower, but showed much better accuracy which improved significantly across our four testing sessions. The three subjects who freely used the device daily as well as during tests were faster and more accurate than those who used it during tests only; however, long-term blindfolding did not notably influence performance. CONCLUSIONS: Together, the results demonstrate that the device allowed blindfolded subjects to increasingly know where something was by listening, and indicate that practice in naturalistic conditions

  16. GIS portal site of Japanese Antarctica Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Nogi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available GIS (Geographic Information Systems based on digitized spatial informations have been employed in various fields recently. GIS portal site of Japanese Antarctica research has been built under the project of transdisciplinary research integration of Research Organization of Information and Systems to make good use of Antarctic map data for researchers and the public. The map data of Antarctica that the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan and the National Institute of Polar Research hold were digitized for use on the GIS portal site Web services. Fundamental spatial information on the Antarctic region was prepared, and GIS portal site of Japanese Antarctica research provides basic map operation services on the Web. GIS portal site of Japanese Antarctica research also serves data set of the map that are available for Google Earth and the other GIS application. Although the location errors of various kind of map data should be fixed, substantial use of GIS portal site of Japanese Antarctica research are expected.

  17. A Novel Adenovirus in Chinstrap Penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Young Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica, collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1, showed nucleotide (amino acid sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5% with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1, 71% (70% with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1, 71.4% (67.6% with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3 and 61% (61.6% with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1. Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™ cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins.

  18. Mesoscale cyclogenesis dynamics over the southwestern Ross Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Jorge F.; Bromwich, David H.

    1993-07-01

    Previous work has shown that frequent mesoscale cyclogenesis adjacent to Franklin Island is linked to the strong and persistent katabatic winds from East Antarctica which funnel into Terra Nova Bay and then blow out over the southwestern Ross Sea. Four mesoscale cyclones that formed near Terra Nova Bay between February 16 and 20, 1988 are examined to more clearly define the governing mechanisms. These events are investigated using all available observations, including automatic weather station data, high-resolution satellite images, satellite soundings, and hemispheric synoptic analyses. The first two cyclones formed on low-level baroclinic zones established by the synoptic scale advection of warm moist air toward the cold continental air blowing gently from East Antarctica. In the second case, baroclinic instability of this small-scale cold front was apparently triggered by the enhanced upward vertical motion associated with the approach of a midtropospheric trough. The third mesocyclone formed shortly after on a baroclinic zone over the polar plateau; the second vortex completely disrupted the usual katabatic drainage over the plateau and forced warm moist air over the coastal slopes. All three cyclones moved to the north in the prevailing cyclonic flow, but the plateau vortex lasted for only 6 hours. The fourth mesoscale low formed in conjunction with an abrupt and intense surge of katabatic air from Terra Nova Bay which resharpened the coastal baroclinic zone. At the same time a transiting midtropospheric trough probably associated with lower tropospheric upward vertical motion apparently accelerated the katabatic winds and triggered the vortex formation. A similar katabatic wind-forced mesocyclone formed near Byrd Glacier. The two vortices moved to the east-southeast and northeast, respectively, apparently being steered by the generating katabatic airstreams, and merged just to the north of the Ross Ice Shelf. The combined vortex reintensified as another

  19. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Explorations and analysis of soundscapes have, since Canadian R. Murray Schafer's work during the early 1970's, developed into various established research - and artistic disciplines. The interest in sonic environments is today present within a broad range of contemporary art projects and in arch......Explorations and analysis of soundscapes have, since Canadian R. Murray Schafer's work during the early 1970's, developed into various established research - and artistic disciplines. The interest in sonic environments is today present within a broad range of contemporary art projects...... and in architectural design. Aesthetics, psychoacoustics, perception, and cognition are all present in this expanding field embracing such categories as soundscape composition, sound art, sonic art, sound design, sound studies and auditory culture. Of greatest significance to the overall field is the investigation...

  20. Ice megadunes on Mars: analogy with Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herny, Clémence; Massé, Marion; Bourgeois, Olivier; Carpy, Sabrina; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Appéré, Thomas; Smith, Isaac; Spiga, Aymeric; Rodriguez, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Mass and energy balance of ice sheets are driven by complex interactions between the atmosphere and the cryosphere. Feedbacks between katabatic winds and the cryosphere may lead to the formation of sedimentation waves, so-called megadunes, at the surface of ice sheets. These have been first described in Antarctica. Here we use topographic data, optical images, and spectroscopic data acquired by Mars orbiters. We show that the surface of the Martian North Polar Cap displays two superimposed sets of sedimentation waves with differing wavelengths. These sedimentation waves have similarities with Antarctic ice megadunes regarding their surface morphology, texture, grain size, and internal stratigraphic architecture. Their shallow-dipping upwind sides, their tops and the intervening troughs are covered by young ice and occasional sastrugi fields, indicative of net accumulation. On the other hand, their steep-dipping downwind sides either expose exhumed layers of dusty old ice or correspond to smooth surfaces of coarse-grained ice, indicative of net ablation or reduced net accumulation associated with sublimation and metamorphism. These surface characteristics and the internal stratigraphic architecture revealed by radar sounding are consistent with the interpretation that both sets of Martian sedimentation waves grow and migrate upwind in response to the development of periodic accumulation/ablation patterns controlled by katabatic winds. The smaller waves, characterized by reduced net accumulation on their downwind sides, are probably analogous to the Antarctic megadunes that have been described so far. On the other hand, a terrestrial equivalent remains to be discovered for the larger ones, characterized by net ablation on their downwind sides. The recognition of these sedimentation waves provides the basis for the development of a common model of ice/wind interaction at the surface of Martian and terrestrial ice sheets and for future investigations on the respective

  1. Ocean current observations near McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 1993 to 1994: Relation to wastewater discharge dispersal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, J.P. [J.P. Barry Consulting, Monterey, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This report presents analyses of current measurements from McMurdo Sound, Antarctica during December, 1993 to November, 1994, in relation to dispersal of the McMurdo Station wastewater plume. Data collected from 1991 to 1993 are also discussed here. Six current meters were deployed near McMurdo Station, Antarctica, from December 1993 to November 1994. Five functioned properly throughout the observation period, and one failed. Analyses of 5 data series include: (1) summaries of current speed and direction, (2) directional analyses of flow, (3) time series current vectors averaged over 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h, (4) principal axes of flow, (5) maps of mean seasonal flow, (6) progressive vector plots, (7) spectral analyses, and (8) low-pass filtered (30h) time series of currents at McMurdo Station. Observations of flow near McMurdo Station during 1994 were generally similar to 1993. Short term variation in flow was related principally to diurnal tidal motions. Longer period oscillations in flow such as seasonal shifts, and non-periodic changes in current speed and direction were likely related to changes in ice cover and wind stress in the vicinity of McMurdo Station or over much larger scales or both. Three distinct oceanographic {open_quote}seasons{close_quote} were apparent in time series from 1992 to 1994, from stations furthest offshore, where the effects of local topography are minimal. The spring-summer (Oct.-Jan.) period of both years was dominated by regional southward flow, which generates a counter-clockwise eddy (McMurdo Gyre) adjacent to McMurdo Station. With regard to dispersal of the wastewater plume from McMurdo Station, observations of currents during 1994 generally corroborate those from 1993, and the recommendation that the outfall pipe should be repositioned offshore of the McMurdo Gyre is supported.

  2. Sound settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund Mortensen, Peder

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice......Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  3. Second Sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 6. Second Sound - The Role of Elastic Waves. R Srinivasan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 6 June 1999 pp 15-19. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/06/0015-0019 ...

  4. Second Sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 3. Second Sound - Waves of Entropy and Temperature. R Srinivasan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 3 March 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/03/0016-0024 ...

  5. Use of binaural cues for sound localization in two species of Phyllostomidae: the Greater spear-nosed bat (Phyllostomus hastatus) and the Short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Rickye S; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E

    2010-11-01

    Unlike humans, not all mammals use both of the binaural cues for sound localization. Whether an animal uses these cues can be determined by testing its ability to localize pure tones; specifically, low frequencies are localized using time-difference cues, and high frequencies are localized using intensity-difference cues. We determined the ability to use binaural cues in 2 New World bats, Phyllostomus hastatus, large omnivores, and Carollia perspicillata, small frugivores, by testing their tone-localization ability using a conditioned avoidance procedure. Both species easily localized high-frequency tones, indicating that they could use the interaural intensity-difference cue. However, neither species was able to use the phase-difference cue to localize either low-frequency pure tones or amplitude-modulated tones (which provided an envelope for additional time analysis). We now know of 3 bat species that cannot use binaural time cues and 2 that can. Further exploration of localization in bats may provide insight into the neural analysis of time cues in species that do not hear low frequencies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Iceberg Firn Temperatures, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since November of 2005, 12 thermistors were planted in the upper 2.5 meters of the firn on iceberg C16, Antarctica. Temperature data are collected every 20 minutes...

  7. Biosecurity on thin ice in Antarctica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hulme, P. E.; Pyšek, Petr; Winter, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 336, č. 6085 (2012), s. 1101-1102 ISSN 0036-8075 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : biological invasions * Antarctica * management Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 31.027, year: 2012

  8. Unidentified Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    , contextualised and conceptualised in an era of transmission. Observing that urban sounds until late 1930es are rarely heard in Danish radio compared to German and English broadcasting, I argue that an urban and auditory aesthetics incorporating noise, heterogeneity and unpredictability did not really develop......This article investigates how urban spaces and its noises are approached by radio reporters in the first decades of public radio production in Denmark. Focussing on the period before reel tape was incorporated in production by late 1940es, I ask how urban space and urban sounds are heard...... in Danish radio until early post-war years. Yet I trace early attempts at managing noisy urban conditions and demonstrate how reporters experimented with available technological repositories and developed techniques in order to make sense in and through urban environments. Inspired by Michel Serres idea...

  9. Wind profiler installed in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsley, B. B.; Carey, J.; Woodman, R. F.; Sarango, M.; Urbina, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Ragaini, E.

    A VHF (50 MHz) wind profiler was installed in Antarctica at the Peruvian Base “Machu Picchu” on King George Island from January 21 to 26. The wind profiler will provide a first look at atmospheric dynamics over the region.The profiler—the first of its kind in Antarctica—is a National Science Foundationsponsored cooperative project of the University of Colorado, the Geophysical Institute of Peru, the University of Piura (Peru), and the Peruvian Navy. This venture was also greatly facilitated by Peru's Comision Nacional de Asuntos Antartidos and Consejo Nacional de Ciencias y Tecnologia, with additional logis tics support provided by the Argentinean Navy and the Uruguayan Air Force.

  10. Limnology of Priyadarshani Lake, Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    -17(1990). Printed in Great Britain Limnology of Priyadarshani Lake, Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica B. S. Ingole and A. H. Parulekar National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 40300, India Received December 1988 13 ABS1RACT Priyadarshani, an oligotrophic lake... in Schinnacher Oasis (Antarctica), was surveyed during the austral summers of 1984-85 and 1986-87 in limnological and benthic studies. Benthic microfaWla included seven taxonomic groups, dominated numerically by protozoa, rotifera, nematoda, turbellaria...

  11. Natural sound archives: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranft Richard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recordings of wild animals were first made in the Palearctic in 1900, in the Nearctic in 1929, in Antarctica in 1934, in Asia in 1937, and in the Neotropics in the 1940s. However, systematic collecting did not begin until the 1950s. Collections of animal sound recordings serve many uses in education, entertainment, science and nature conservation. In recent years, technological developments have transformed the ways in which sounds can be sampled, stored and accessed. Now the largest collections between them hold altogether around 0.5 million recordings with their associated data. The functioning of a major archive will be described with reference to the British Library Sound Archive. Preserving large collections for the long term is a primary concern in the digital age. While digitization and digital preservation has many advantages over analogue methods, the rate of technology change and lack of standardization are a serious problem for theworld's major audio archives. Another challenge is to make collections more easily and widely accessible via electronic networks. On-line catalogues and access to the actual sounds via the internet are already available for some collections. Case studies describing the establishment and functioning of sound libraries inMexico, Colombia and Brazil are given in individually authored sections in an Appendix.

  12. Sound source tracking device for telematic spatial sound field reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Bruno

    This research describes an algorithm that localizes sound sources for use in telematic applications. The localization algorithm is based on amplitude differences between various channels of a microphone array of directional shotgun microphones. The amplitude differences will be used to locate multiple performers and reproduce their voices, which were recorded at close distance with lavalier microphones, spatially corrected using a loudspeaker rendering system. In order to track multiple sound sources in parallel the information gained from the lavalier microphones will be utilized to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio between each performer and the concurrent performers.

  13. Intercepting a sound without vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Vercillo

    Full Text Available Visual information is extremely important to generate internal spatial representations. In the auditory modality, the absence of visual cues during early infancy does not preclude the development of some spatial strategies. However, specific spatial abilities might result impaired. In the current study, we investigated the effect of early visual deprivation on the ability to localize static and moving auditory stimuli by comparing sighted and early blind individuals' performance in different spatial tasks. We also examined perceptual stability in the two groups of participants by matching localization accuracy in a static and a dynamic head condition that involved rotational head movements. Sighted participants accurately localized static and moving sounds. Their localization ability remained unchanged after rotational movements of the head. Conversely, blind participants showed a leftward bias during the localization of static sounds and a little bias for moving sounds. Moreover, head movements induced a significant bias in the direction of head motion during the localization of moving sounds. These results suggest that internal spatial representations might be body-centered in blind individuals and that in sighted people the availability of visual cues during early infancy may affect sensory-motor interactions.

  14. Mesoscale variability in the Bransfield Strait region (Antarctica during Austral summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. García

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available The Bransfield Strait is one the best-known areas of Antarctica's oceanic surroundings. In spite of this, the study of the mesoscale variability of its local circulation has been addressed only recently. This paper focuses on the mesoscale structure of local physical oceanographic conditions in the Bransfield Strait during the Austral summer as derived from the BIOANTAR 93 cruise and auxiliary remote sensing data. Moreover, data recovered from moored current meters allow identification of transient mesoscale phenomena.

  15. Statistics of natural binaural sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Młynarski, Wiktor; Jost, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Binaural sound localization is usually considered a discrimination task, where interaural phase (IPD) and level (ILD) disparities at narrowly tuned frequency channels are utilized to identify a position of a sound source. In natural conditions however, binaural circuits are exposed to a stimulation by sound waves originating from multiple, often moving and overlapping sources. Therefore statistics of binaural cues depend on acoustic properties and the spatial configuration of the environment. Distribution of cues encountered naturally and their dependence on physical properties of an auditory scene have not been studied before. In the present work we analyzed statistics of naturally encountered binaural sounds. We performed binaural recordings of three auditory scenes with varying spatial configuration and analyzed empirical cue distributions from each scene. We have found that certain properties such as the spread of IPD distributions as well as an overall shape of ILD distributions do not vary strongly between different auditory scenes. Moreover, we found that ILD distributions vary much weaker across frequency channels and IPDs often attain much higher values, than can be predicted from head filtering properties. In order to understand the complexity of the binaural hearing task in the natural environment, sound waveforms were analyzed by performing Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Properties of learned basis functions indicate that in natural conditions soundwaves in each ear are predominantly generated by independent sources. This implies that the real-world sound localization must rely on mechanisms more complex than a mere cue extraction.

  16. Statistics of natural binaural sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiktor Młynarski

    Full Text Available Binaural sound localization is usually considered a discrimination task, where interaural phase (IPD and level (ILD disparities at narrowly tuned frequency channels are utilized to identify a position of a sound source. In natural conditions however, binaural circuits are exposed to a stimulation by sound waves originating from multiple, often moving and overlapping sources. Therefore statistics of binaural cues depend on acoustic properties and the spatial configuration of the environment. Distribution of cues encountered naturally and their dependence on physical properties of an auditory scene have not been studied before. In the present work we analyzed statistics of naturally encountered binaural sounds. We performed binaural recordings of three auditory scenes with varying spatial configuration and analyzed empirical cue distributions from each scene. We have found that certain properties such as the spread of IPD distributions as well as an overall shape of ILD distributions do not vary strongly between different auditory scenes. Moreover, we found that ILD distributions vary much weaker across frequency channels and IPDs often attain much higher values, than can be predicted from head filtering properties. In order to understand the complexity of the binaural hearing task in the natural environment, sound waveforms were analyzed by performing Independent Component Analysis (ICA. Properties of learned basis functions indicate that in natural conditions soundwaves in each ear are predominantly generated by independent sources. This implies that the real-world sound localization must rely on mechanisms more complex than a mere cue extraction.

  17. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  18. Radarsat survey provides accurate map of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    Explorers of Antarctica have trudged with dog sleds, wintered in boats trapped in ice, and daringly flown across the coldest, windiest, highest, driest, and most desolate continental expanse. Their names are legendary: Ross, Scott, Amundsen, Byrd. And now add Radarsat.Taking about 5,500 microwave images over 18 days—from September 26 through October 14—a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) on this Earth-orbiting satellite completed the first-ever, real-time and high-resolution radar survey of Antarctica last week. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) satellite, orbiting 800 km above Antarctica, accomplished this task by performing an unusual 180° yaw, or rotational maneuver, for NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  19. The Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA): A Cutting-Edge Way for Students and Teachers to Learn about Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brian; Bindschadler, Robert

    2009-01-01

    By studying Antarctica via satellite and through ground-truthing research, we can learn where the ice is melting and why. The Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA), a new and cutting-edge way for scientists, researchers, educators, students, and the public to look at Antarctica, supports this research and allows for unprecedented views of our…

  20. Acting Antarctica: science on stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Piera; Tizzoni, Paola; Pierro, Luigia

    2016-04-01

    Key-words: Polar science, Earth science, Theatre, Hands on activities The legendary Antarctic Expedition of sir E. Shackleton and his crew of 27 aboard the Endurance (1914/16) trapped in the Antarctic ice has become the starting point to learn about Polar Science and Climate Change. While the students were involved into this incredible adventure by the astonishing images of the Australian photographer Frank Hurley (who joined the crew), they discovered the world in which this story happened. Students were then involved in hands-on activities and role plays and have become the writers of the play "Uomini a scienza ai confini del mondo". They act the story of Shackelton's expedition and they tell at the same time to the audience about ice pack, ice cores and their role in understanding the past of the climate, physical and geographical characteristic of polar regions, thermal phenomena related to adaptations of polar animals, solar radiation at different latitude, day/night duration. The theater was the place to "stage" some scientific experiments and to explain the current research carried out in polar regions and their importance in climate change studies and to stress some similarities between Antarctica and space. The project was carried out from teachers of science, letters and geography and was born in collaboration with the "Piccolo Teatro di Milano" and the association "Science Under 18" with the support of a professional actor and director and was played for other schools at "EXPO 2015" in Milano (Italy). In our opinion drama activities improve reading comprehension, and both verbal and non-verbal communication skills. To be able to write and to act, students need a deep understanding of contents. Arts, including theatre, are a good key to involve emotionally students. To have an audience different from their own teachers and classmates offers a real task and the opportunity to play and let grow real skills.

  1. NASA Space Sounds API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has released a series of space sounds via sound cloud. We have abstracted away some of the hassle in accessing these sounds, so that developers can play with...

  2. Sound knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    The thesis is about the conceptualisation of knowledge associated with ‘evidence’. In the Danish society, there is a proliferating demand for ‘evidence’, which started as the basis of practices in medicine and has spread into social work, education and most policymaking arenas. The aim of the res......The thesis is about the conceptualisation of knowledge associated with ‘evidence’. In the Danish society, there is a proliferating demand for ‘evidence’, which started as the basis of practices in medicine and has spread into social work, education and most policymaking arenas. The aim...... of the research is to investigate what is considered to ‘work as evidence’ in health promotion and how the ‘evidence discourse’ influences social practices in policymaking and in research. From investigating knowledge practices in the field of health promotion, I develop the concept of sound knowledge...... as knowledge based on reflexive practices. I chose ‘health promotion’ as the field for my research as it utilises knowledge produced in several research disciplines, among these both quantitative and qualitative. I mapped out the institutions, actors, events, and documents that constituted the field of health...

  3. Sound ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  4. Phaeosphaeria deschampsii (Ascomycota): A new parasite species of Deschampsia antarctica (Poaceae) described to Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzke, Jair; Pereira, Antonio B

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the description of Phaeosphaeria deschampsii, which was found in plant communities from Half Moon Island, South Shetland Archipelago, Antarctica, in February 2014. Many patches of Deschampsia antarctica (Poaceae), the only indigenous Poaceae specie in Antarctic, were found dead, parasitized by a fungi pathogen. Based on the shape of its perithecia, with oblique neck, erumpent in the grass tissues, ascospore form and septation, the specie was identified as new to science.

  5. Read--and Walk--to Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Natalie; Doneyko, Kathleen; Lee, Richard E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The students at Crestwood Primary School proved that they have what it takes to exercise their bodies and their minds. In an effort to support their teacher's scientific expedition to Antarctica, students from kindergarten to second grade pledged to read books and do physical activity that equated to the 12,900 km (8,000-mile) journey to the…

  6. Antarctica: Is It More Than Just Ice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cheryl; Gutierrez, Melida

    2009-01-01

    The authors introduced polar science in a fourth-grade classroom by means of 3 hands-on activities that addressed (1) the melting of glaciers and ice, (2) the differences between the North and the South Pole, and (3) the geography and landforms of Antarctica. An assessment 4 months after the original activity showed that students remembered the…

  7. Physical properties of aerosols at Maitri, Antarctica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Measurements of the submicron aerosol size distribution made at the Indian Antarctic station, Maitri (70° 45′S, 11° 44′E) from January 10th to February 24th, 1997, are reported. Total aerosol concentrations normally range from 800 to 1200 particles cm-3 which are typical values for the coastal stations at Antarctica in ...

  8. First airborne transient em survey in antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Esben; Mikucki, J. J.; Sørensen, Kurt Ingvard K.I.

    2012-01-01

    A first airborne transient electromagnetic survey was flown in Antarctica in December 2011 with the SkyTEM system. This transient airborne EM system has been optimized in Denmark for almost ten years and was specially designed for ground water mapping. The SkyTEM tool is ideal for mapping...

  9. Ostracoda from Vestfold Hill lake terraces, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Six species of ostracodes are recorded from two transects of terraces of Deep Lake, Vestfold Hills, Antarctica. Two species (@iXesteleberis@@ sp. and @iBradleya dictyon@@) range from Cretaceous to Recent, @iPoseidonamicus aff. P. major@@ ranges from...

  10. Challenges in protecting the wilderness of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tina Tin; Alan Hemmings

    2011-01-01

    Since 1998, the wilderness values of Antarctica have been among those given legal recognition under the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty. Despite the legal obligation, on-the-ground implementation has attracted little interest. The term "wilderness" and its consequential operational implication, including the designation of...

  11. Calculating Speed of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Shalabh

    2017-01-01

    Sound is an emerging source of renewable energy but it has some limitations. The main limitation is, the amount of energy that can be extracted from sound is very less and that is because of the velocity of the sound. The velocity of sound changes as per medium. If we could increase the velocity of the sound in a medium we would be probably able to extract more amount of energy from sound and will be able to transfer it at a higher rate. To increase the velocity of sound we should know the speed of sound. If we go by the theory of classic mechanics speed is the distance travelled by a particle divided by time whereas velocity is the displacement of particle divided by time. The speed of sound in dry air at 20 °C (68 °F) is considered to be 343.2 meters per second and it won't be wrong in saying that 342.2 meters is the velocity of sound not the speed as it's the displacement of the sound not the total distance sound wave covered. Sound travels in the form of mechanical wave, so while calculating the speed of sound the whole path of wave should be considered not just the distance traveled by sound. In this paper I would like to focus on calculating the actual speed of sound wave which can help us to extract more energy and make sound travel with faster velocity.

  12. Electromagnetic sounding of the Earth's interior

    CERN Document Server

    Spichak, Viacheslav V

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic Sounding of the Earth's Interior 2nd edition provides a comprehensive up-to-date collection of contributions, covering methodological, computational and practical aspects of Electromagnetic sounding of the Earth by different techniques at global, regional and local scales. Moreover, it contains new developments such as the concept of self-consistent tasks of geophysics and , 3-D interpretation of the TEM sounding which, so far, have not all been covered by one book. Electromagnetic Sounding of the Earth's Interior 2nd edition consists of three parts: I- EM sounding methods, II- Forward modelling and inversion techniques, and III - Data processing, analysis, modelling and interpretation. The new edition includes brand new chapters on Pulse and frequency electromagnetic sounding for hydrocarbon offshore exploration. Additionally all other chapters have been extensively updated to include new developments. Presents recently developed methodological findings of the earth's study, including seism...

  13. Making Sound Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2007-01-01

    Sound provides and offers amazing insights into the world. Sound waves may be defined as mechanical energy that moves through air or other medium as a longitudinal wave and consists of pressure fluctuations. Humans and animals alike use sound as a means of communication and a tool for survival. Mammals, such as bats, use ultrasonic sound waves to…

  14. Multichannel Sound Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkki, Ville

    Spatial reproduction of sound is a field in which the spatial attributes of a real recording room or a virtual space are reproduced to the listener. Spatial attributes include for example directions of sound sources, directions of reflections and envelopment by reverberation. Many such systems employ more than two loudspeakers to create virtual sources. This is called multichannel sound or spatial sound reproduction.

  15. The Sound of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  16. Aerobiology over Antarctica – a new initiative for atmospheric ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Anthony Pearce

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of aerial dispersal in shaping patterns of biodiversity remains poorly understood, mainly due to a lack of coordinated efforts in gathering data at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. It has been long known that the rate of dispersal to an ecosystem can significantly influence ecosystem dynamics, and that aerial transport has been identified as an important source of biological input to remote locations. With the considerable effort devoted in recent decades to understanding atmospheric circulation in the south polar region, a unique opportunity has emerged to investigate the atmospheric ecology of Antarctica, from local to continental scales. This concept note identifies key questions in Antarctic microbial biogeography and the need for standardized sampling and analysis protocols to address such questions. A consortium of polar aerobiologists is established to bring together researchers with a common interest in the airborne dispersion of microbes and other propagules in the Antarctic, with opportunities for comparative studies in the Arctic.

  17. Multiple meteoroid impact in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihoupt, J. W.; Rice, A.; van der Hoeven, F.

    2006-12-01

    In the late 1950's, geophysical field parties undertaking gravity surveys across Antarctica observed over a large area of Wilkes Land (> 240km across) an exceptionally pronounced negative free air anomaly ((to -158.3 mgal). This area was later interpreted as a possible meteor impact site because the gravity profiles were similar to those of known impact sites (apparent rim structures, circular basins, central peaks or rings), they possessed appropriate aspect ratios (e.g., crater diameter vs crater depth), anomalously steep negative free air gravity anomaly gradients (to 4.71 mgal/km) were characteristic of impact craters and uncharacteristic of solely mantle-related or geologic crustal variations, etc. The condition of the ice covering the anomaly (heavily crevassed), the apparent lack of isostatic compensation with surrounding environs, etc suggested the impact was geologically recent and that perhaps a tektite strewn field was associated with it. The distance from the postulated impact to the Australian strewn field was appropriate as are the ages of the tektites there. This early work has been augmented with the detection of a dominant cluster of negative free air gravity anomalies crossing the continental-oceanic boundary, and the East and West Antarctic structural boundary (i.e., Transantarctic Mountains). These anomalies are coincident with complex subglacial craterform topographic features inferred from radiosounding (to -500m below MSL). The major interior positive free air gravity anomalies are associated with subglacial topographic highs. The elliptical distribution of the negative gravity anomalies resemble known multiple impact distributions (scatter ellipses with the larger anomalies forward and the lesser ones aft). This more recent information favors expanding the original proposal to that of a multiple meteoroid impact. The multiple impact hypotheses would explain aeromagnetic surveys revealing ring-shaped structures in the subglacial rock surface

  18. Little Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker M. Bani-Khair

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Spider and the Fly   You little spider, To death you aspire... Or seeking a web wider, To death all walking, No escape you all fighters… Weak and fragile in shape and might, Whatever you see in the horizon, That is destiny whatever sight. And tomorrow the spring comes, And the flowers bloom, And the grasshopper leaps high, And the frogs happily cry, And the flies smile nearby, To that end, The spider has a plot, To catch the flies by his net, A mosquito has fallen down in his net, Begging him to set her free, Out of that prison, To her freedom she aspires, Begging...Imploring...crying,  That is all what she requires, But the spider vows never let her free, His power he admires, Turning blind to light, And with his teeth he shall bite, Leaving her in desperate might, Unable to move from site to site, Tied up with strings in white, Wrapped up like a dead man, Waiting for his grave at night,   The mosquito says, Oh little spider, A stronger you are than me in power, But listen to my words before death hour, Today is mine and tomorrow is yours, No escape from death... Whatever the color of your flower…     Little sounds The Ant The ant is a little creature with a ferocious soul, Looking and looking for more and more, You can simply crush it like dead mold, Or you can simply leave it alone, I wonder how strong and strong they are! Working day and night in a small hole, Their motto is work or whatever you call… A big boon they have and joy in fall, Because they found what they store, A lesson to learn and memorize all in all, Work is something that you should not ignore!   The butterfly: I’m the butterfly Beautiful like a blue clear sky, Or sometimes look like snow, Different in colors, shapes and might, But something to know that we always die, So fragile, weak and thin, Lighter than a glimpse and delicate as light, Something to know for sure… Whatever you have in life and all these fields, You are not happier than a butterfly

  19. The influence of ski helmets on sound perception and sound localisation on the ski slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ružić, Lana; Tudor, Anton; Radman, Ivan; Kasović, Mario; Cigrovski, Vjekoslav

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether a ski helmet interferes with the sound localization and the time of sound perception in the frontal plane. Twenty-three participants (age 30.7±10.2) were tested on the slope in 2 conditions, with and without wearing the ski helmet, by 6 different spatially distributed sound stimuli per each condition. Each of the subjects had to react when hearing the sound as soon as possible and to signalize the correct side of the sound arrival. The results showed a significant difference in the ability to localize the specific ski sounds; 72.5±15.6% of correct answers without a helmet vs. 61.3±16.2% with a helmet (p ski sound clues at 73.4±5.56 m without a helmet vs. 60.29±6.34 m with a helmet (p Ski helmets might limit the ability of a skier to localize the direction of the sounds of danger and might interfere with the moment, in which the sound is firstly heard. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  20. Planetary geomorphology field studies: Iceland and Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies of terrestrial landforms and the processes that shape them provide new directions to the study of planetary features. These studies, conducted in Iceland and in Antarctica, investigated physical and chemical weathering mechanisms and rates, eolitan processes, mudflow phenomena, drainage development, and catastrophic fluvial and volcanic phenomena. Continuing investigations in Iceland fall in three main catagories: (1) catastrophic floods of the Jokulsa a Fjollum, (2) lahars associated with explosive volcanic eruptions of Askja caldera, and (3) rates of eolian abrasion in cold, volcanic deserts. The ice-free valleys of Antarctica, in particular those in South Victoria Land, have much is common with the surface of Mars. In addition to providing independent support for the application of the Iceland findings to consideration of the martian erosional system, the Antarctic observations also provide analogies to other martian phenomena. For example, a family of sand dunes in Victoria Valley are stabilized by the incorporation of snow as beds.

  1. Heat Flux Distribution of Antarctica Unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Yasmina M.; Catalán, Manuel; Jordan, Tom A.; Golynsky, Alexander; Golynsky, Dmitry; Eagles, Graeme; Vaughan, David G.

    2017-11-01

    Antarctica is the largest reservoir of ice on Earth. Understanding its ice sheet dynamics is crucial to unraveling past global climate change and making robust climatic and sea level predictions. Of the basic parameters that shape and control ice flow, the most poorly known is geothermal heat flux. Direct observations of heat flux are difficult to obtain in Antarctica, and until now continent-wide heat flux maps have only been derived from low-resolution satellite magnetic and seismological data. We present a high-resolution heat flux map and associated uncertainty derived from spectral analysis of the most advanced continental compilation of airborne magnetic data. Small-scale spatial variability and features consistent with known geology are better reproduced than in previous models, between 36% and 50%. Our high-resolution heat flux map and its uncertainty distribution provide an important new boundary condition to be used in studies on future subglacial hydrology, ice sheet dynamics, and sea level change.

  2. The oldest plesiosaur (Reptilia, Sauropterygia from Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wilhelm Armin Kellner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic plesiosaurs are known from the Upper Cretaceous López de Bertodano and Snow Hill Island formations (Campanian to upper Maastrichtian, which crop out within the James Ross Basin region of the Antarctic Peninsula. Here we describe the first plesiosaur fossils from the Lachman Crags Member of the Santa Marta Formation, north-western James Ross Island. This material constitutes the stratigraphically oldest plesiosaur occurrence presently known from Antarctica, extending the occurrence of plesiosaurians in this continent back to Santonian times (86.3–83.5 Mya. Furthermore, MN 7163-V represents the first plesiosaur from this region not referable to the Elasmosauridae nor Aristonectes, indicating a greater diversity of this group of aquatic reptiles in Antarctica than previously suspected.

  3. Antarctica - Lessons for a Mars exploration program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    The history of exploration and the international system of control of Antarctica has often been cited as a paradigm for the exploration of space. The small isolated research stations have been used to model the psychological stresses of future space missions. In addition, the programmatic structure of the U.S. Antarctic Research Program provides several possible analogs to future Mars Programs presently under discussion. These are: (1) Continued presence; (2) Civilian, military and private sector involvement; (3) Scientific activities; (4) Risk assessment and logistical support; (5) Accessibility for non-specialists; (6) Political and strategic motivations; (7) International cooperation/competition. Survival in Antarctica is contingent on advanced technology and the active transport of supplies. The scientific exploration of this remote and barren expanse without, of course, the aid and guidance of indigenous people certainly provides one of the closest analogs available to future science activities on the Martian surface.

  4. Installation of superconducting gravimeter in the Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, H. [Research Facility Center for Science and Technology Cryogenics Division, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)]. E-mail: ikeda@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Doi, K. [National Institute of Polar Research, Tokyo, Itabashi-ku 1-9-10, Kaga 173-8515 (Japan); Fukuda, Y. [Department of Geophysics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Shibuya, K. [National Institute of Polar Research, Tokyo, Itabashi-ku 1-9-10, Kaga 173-8515 (Japan); Yoshizaki, R. [Research Facility Center for Science and Technology Cryogenics Division, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    In February 2003 to January 2004, a new superconducting gravimeter with a cryocooler was installed to replace the former one in Syowa Station on the Antarctica. It has a high sensitivity of one nano-Gal to survey inside the earth in the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP network). A new type of diaphragm was confirmed to well isolate the vibration from refrigerator cold-head and to prevent the solid air contamination perfectly. Real time remote monitoring system from Japan is also established.

  5. The Ice: A Journey to Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Arthur B.

    The title is misleading for a non—“OAE” (Old Antarctic Explorer, to whom “The Ice” is Antarctica) because The Ice is about far more than just ice. It does indeed cover just about all you'd want to know (or more) about Antarctic ice, from the vast south polar sheets and glaciers to the great tabular bergs, bergy bits, brash ice, pancake ice, frazil ice, and the pack of the polar seas; but it also explores nearly every aspect of this “Last of Lands” in an unusually comprehensive coverage. From the “Heroic Ages” of early 20th-century explorers Robert Scott, Ernest Shackleton, and Roald Amundsen to the present “Cruise Ship Age,”Antarctica has produced a wealth of literature in the “Journey to…” style — which Pyne's is not. Instead, his product from one short (3-month) visit under a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship takes all readers o n a webwork journey through time, space, ice, and rocks for an appreciation of “ The Ice” in a way found in no other book. This, his fifth book (another one is Fire in America, Princeton University Press, Princeton, N.J., 1982), is a significant contribution to the literature of Antarctica. Pyne's prose cannot be paraphrased for a review, as the reader will be able to appreciate from the excerpts to follow.

  6. Synthesized size-sound sound symbolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lockwood, G.F.; Hagoort, P.; Dingemanse, M.; Papafragou, A.; Grodner, D.; Mirman, D.; Trueswell, J.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of sound symbolism have shown that people can associate sound and meaning in consistent ways when presented with maximally contrastive stimulus pairs of nonwords such as bouba/kiki (rounded/sharp) or mil/mal (small/big). Recent work has shown the effect extends to antonymic words from

  7. Errors in Sounding of the Atmosphere Using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) Kinetic Temperature Caused by Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Comas, Maya; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Bermejo-Pantaleon, D.; Marshall, Benjamin T.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Gordley, L. L.; Russell, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The vast set of near global and continuous atmospheric measurements made by the SABER instrument since 2002, including daytime and nighttime kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) from 20 to 105 km, is available to the scientific community. The temperature is retrieved from SABER measurements of the atmospheric 15 micron CO2 limb emission. This emission separates from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions in the rarefied mesosphere and thermosphere, making it necessary to consider the CO2 vibrational state non-LTE populations in the retrieval algorithm above 70 km. Those populations depend on kinetic parameters describing the rate at which energy exchange between atmospheric molecules take place, but some of these collisional rates are not well known. We consider current uncertainties in the rates of quenching of CO2 (v2 ) by N2 , O2 and O, and the CO2 (v2 ) vibrational-vibrational exchange to estimate their impact on SABER T(sub k) for different atmospheric conditions. The T(sub k) is more sensitive to the uncertainty in the latter two and their effects depend on altitude. The T(sub k) combined systematic error due to non-LTE kinetic parameters does not exceed +/- 1.5 K below 95 km and +/- 4-5 K at 100 km for most latitudes and seasons (except for polar summer) if the Tk profile does not have pronounced vertical structure. The error is +/- 3 K at 80 km, +/- 6 K at 84 km and +/- 18 K at 100 km under the less favourable polar summer conditions. For strong temperature inversion layers, the errors reach +/- 3 K at 82 km and +/- 8 K at 90 km. This particularly affects tide amplitude estimates, with errors of up to +/- 3 K.

  8. A robust bioassay to assess the toxicity of metals to the Antarctic marine microalga Phaeocystis antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissi, Francesca; Adams, Merrin S; King, Catherine K; Jolley, Dianne F

    2015-07-01

    Despite evidence of contamination in Antarctic coastal marine environments, no water-quality guidelines have been established for the region because of a paucity of biological effects data for local Antarctic species. Currently, there is limited information on the sensitivity of Antarctic microalgae to metal contamination, which is exacerbated by the lack of standard toxicity testing protocols for local marine species. In the present study, a routine and robust toxicity test protocol was developed using the Antarctic marine microalga Phaeocystis antarctica, and its sensitivity was investigated following 10-d exposures to dissolved copper, cadmium, lead, zinc, and nickel. In comparisons of 10% inhibition of population growth rate (IC10) values, P. antarctica was most sensitive to copper (3.3 μg/L), followed by cadmium (135 μg/L), lead (260 μg/L), and zinc (450 μg/L). Although an IC10 value for nickel could not be accurately estimated, the no-observed-effect concentration value for nickel was 1070 μg/L. Exposure to copper and cadmium caused changes in internal cell granularity and increased chlorophyll a fluorescence. Lead, zinc, and nickel had no effect on any of the cellular parameters measured. The present study provides valuable metal-ecotoxicity data for an Antarctic marine microalga, with P. antarctica representing one of the most sensitive microalgal species to dissolved copper ever reported when compared with temperate and tropical species. © 2015 SETAC.

  9. Sound wave transmission (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  10. Principles of underwater sound

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urick, Robert J

    1983-01-01

    ... the immediately useful help they need for sonar problem solving. Its coverage is broad-ranging from the basic concepts of sound in the sea to making performance predictions in such applications as depth sounding, fish finding, and submarine detection...

  11. Making fictions sound real

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Birger

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role that sound plays in making fictions perceptually real to film audiences, whether these fictions are realist or non-realist in content and narrative form. I will argue that some aspects of film sound practices and the kind of experiences they trigger are related...... to basic rules of human perception, whereas others are more properly explained in relation to how aesthetic devices, including sound, are used to characterise the fiction and thereby make it perceptually real to its audience. Finally, I will argue that not all genres can be defined by a simple taxonomy...... of sounds. Apart from an account of the kinds of sounds that typically appear in a specific genre, a genre analysis of sound may also benefit from a functionalist approach that focuses on how sounds can make both realist and non-realist aspects of genres sound real to audiences....

  12. Radio echo sounding data analysis of the Shackleton Ice Shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Baskaradas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, our initial results are presented for the interpretation of the radio echo sounding data collected over the Shackleton Ice Shelf and adjacent ice sheet (East Antarctica during the 2003/2004 Australian-Italian expedition. The Shackleton Ice Shelf is one of the larger ice shelves of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The radar survey provided data relating to ice thickness and bed morphology of the outlet glaciers, and thickness of their floating portions. The glacier grounding lines were determined by assessment of the basal echo characters. The information derived is compared with data from the BEDMAP database and from other sources.

  13. Broadcast sound technology

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot-Smith, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Broadcast Sound Technology provides an explanation of the underlying principles of modern audio technology. Organized into 21 chapters, the book first describes the basic sound; behavior of sound waves; aspects of hearing, harming, and charming the ear; room acoustics; reverberation; microphones; phantom power; loudspeakers; basic stereo; and monitoring of audio signal. Subsequent chapters explore the processing of audio signal, sockets, sound desks, and digital audio. Analogue and digital tape recording and reproduction, as well as noise reduction, are also explained.

  14. An Antropologist of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2015-01-01

    PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology.......PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology....

  15. Form Follows Sound

    OpenAIRE

    Caramiaux, Baptiste; Altavilla, Alessandro; Pobiner, Scott G.; Tanaka, Atau

    2015-01-01

    Sonic interaction is the continuous relationship between user actions and sound, mediated by some technology. Because interaction with sound may be task oriented or experience-based it is important to understand the nature of action-sound relationships in order to design rich sonic interactions. We propose a participatory approach to sonic interaction design that first considers the affordances of sounds in order to imagine embodied interaction, and based on this, generates interaction models...

  16. Underwater Sound Filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutger van Aalst; Ines Simic

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a possible solution to the underwater sound filtering problem, using Blind Source Separation. The problem regards splitting sound from a boat engine and the water waves to prove the possibility to extract one sound fragment from the other on the open sea. The illustrations shown

  17. Sound art and the annihilation of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Shaun

    This thesis describes the way in which sound is taken up and subsequently suppressed within the visual arts. The idealisation and development of sound as a plastic material is able to be traced within the modernist trajectory, which, reflecting a set of cultural practices and having developed its own specific terminologies, comes to regard any material, or anything conceived of as material, as appropriate and adequate to the expression of its distinctive and guiding concepts and metaphors. These concepts and metaphors are discussed as already having at their bases strongly visualist biases, the genealogies of which are traced within traditional or formal philosophies. Here, the marginalising tendency of ocularcentrism is exposed, but the very nature and contingency of marginalisation is found to work for the sound artist (where the perpetuation of the mythologised 'outsider' figure is desired) but against sound which is positioned in a purely differential and negative relation. In this epistemological and ontological reduction, sound becomes simply a visual metaphor or metonymic contraction which forecloses the possibility of producing other ways of articulating its experience or of producing any markedly alternative 'readings'. Rather than simply attempting to reverse the hierarchisation of the visual over the aural, or of prefacing sound within a range of artistic practices (each which would keep the negative tradition going) sound's ambiguous relation to the binarism of presence/absence, system and margin, is, however oddly, elaborated. The strategy which attempts to suspend sound primarily within and under the mark of the concept is interrogated and its limits exposed. The sound artist, the 'margin surfer' is revealed as a perhaps deeply conservative figure who may in the end desire the suppression of sound, and who, actually rejecting any destabilising and threatening notion of 'radical alterity' anxiously clings to the 'marginalised' modernist pretence. It is

  18. The influence of ski helmets on sound perception and sound localisation on the ski slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana Ružić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate whether a ski helmet interferes with the sound localization and the time of sound perception in the frontal plane. Material and Methods: Twenty-three participants (age 30.7±10.2 were tested on the slope in 2 conditions, with and without wearing the ski helmet, by 6 different spatially distributed sound stimuli per each condition. Each of the subjects had to react when hearing the sound as soon as possible and to signalize the correct side of the sound arrival. Results: The results showed a significant difference in the ability to localize the specific ski sounds; 72.5±15.6% of correct answers without a helmet vs. 61.3±16.2% with a helmet (p < 0.01. However, the performance on this test did not depend on whether they were used to wearing a helmet (p = 0.89. In identifying the timing, at which the sound was firstly perceived, the results were also in favor of the subjects not wearing a helmet. The subjects reported hearing the ski sound clues at 73.4±5.56 m without a helmet vs. 60.29±6.34 m with a helmet (p < 0.001. In that case the results did depend on previously used helmets (p < 0.05, meaning that that regular usage of helmets might help to diminish the attenuation of the sound identification that occurs because of the helmets. Conclusions: Ski helmets might limit the ability of a skier to localize the direction of the sounds of danger and might interfere with the moment, in which the sound is firstly heard.

  19. Analysis of environmental sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keansub

    consumer videos in conjunction with user studies. We model the soundtrack of each video, regardless of its original duration, as a fixed-sized clip-level summary feature. For each concept, an SVM-based classifier is trained according to three distance measures (Kullback-Leibler, Bhattacharyya, and Mahalanobis distance). Detecting the time of occurrence of a local object (for instance, a cheering sound) embedded in a longer soundtrack is useful and important for applications such as search and retrieval in consumer video archives. We finally present a Markov-model based clustering algorithm able to identify and segment consistent sets of temporal frames into regions associated with different ground-truth labels, and at the same time to exclude a set of uninformative frames shared in common from all clips. The labels are provided at the clip level, so this refinement of the time axis represents a variant of Multiple-Instance Learning (MIL). Quantitative evaluation shows that the performance of our proposed approaches tested on the 60h personal audio archives or 1900 YouTube video clips is significantly better than existing algorithms for detecting these useful concepts in real-world personal audio recordings.

  20. The natural horn as an efficient sound radiating system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results obtained showed that the locally made horn are efficient sound radiating systems and are therefore excellent for sound production in local musical renditions. These findings, in addition to the portability and low cost of the horns qualify them to be highly recommended for use in music making and for other purposes ...

  1. Managing Human Activities in Antarctica : Should Wilderness Protection Count?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastmeijer, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Antarctica is often described as one of the world's last wildernesses. In harmony with this general perception, the wilderness values of Antarctica received legal status with the adoption of the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty. Article 3(1) of the Protocol obliges each

  2. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady

    2011-01-01

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...... both physical and digital models at three distinct scales. The results suggest hyperboloid geometry, while difficult to fabricate, facilitates sound scattering.......The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...

  3. Priming Gestures with Sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Heller, Laurie M; Navolio, Nicole; Zúñiga-Peñaranda, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of experiments about a little-studied type of compatibility effect between a stimulus and a response: the priming of manual gestures via sounds associated with these gestures. The goal was to investigate the plasticity of the gesture-sound associations mediating this type of priming. Five experiments used a primed choice-reaction task. Participants were cued by a stimulus to perform response gestures that produced response sounds; those sounds were also used as primes before the response cues. We compared arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds (key lifts and pure tones) created during the experiment (i.e. no pre-existing knowledge) with ecological associations corresponding to the structure of the world (tapping gestures and sounds, scraping gestures and sounds) learned through the entire life of the participant (thus existing prior to the experiment). Two results were found. First, the priming effect exists for ecological as well as arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds. Second, the priming effect is greatly reduced for ecologically existing associations and is eliminated for arbitrary associations when the response gesture stops producing the associated sounds. These results provide evidence that auditory-motor priming is mainly created by rapid learning of the association between sounds and the gestures that produce them. Auditory-motor priming is therefore mediated by short-term associations between gestures and sounds that can be readily reconfigured regardless of prior knowledge.

  4. Widespread surface meltwater drainage in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingslake, J.; Ely, J.; Das, I.; Bell, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    Surface meltwater is thought to cause ice-shelf disintegration, which accelerates the contribution of ice sheets to sea-level rise. Antarctic surface melting is predicted to increase and trigger further ice-shelf disintegration during this century. These climate-change impacts could be modulated by an active hydrological network analogous to the one in operation in Greenland. Despite some observations of Antarctic surface and sub-surface hydrological systems, large-scale active surface drainage in Antarctica has rarely been studied. We use satellite imagery and aerial photography to reveal widespread active hydrology on the surface of the Antarctic Ice Sheet as far south as 85o and as high as 1800 m a.s.l., often near mountain peaks that protrude through the ice (nunataks) and relatively low-albedo `blue-ice areas'. Despite predominantly sub-zero regional air temperatures, as simulated by a regional climate model, Antarctic active drainage has persisted for decades, transporting water through surface streams and feeding vast melt ponds up to 80 km long. Drainage networks (the largest are over 100 km in length) form on flat ice shelves, steep outlet glaciers and ice-sheet flanks across the West and East Antarctica Ice Sheets. Motivated by the proximity of many drainage systems to low-albedo rock and blue-ice areas, we hypothesize a positive feedback between exposed-rock extent, BIA formation, melting and ice-sheet thinning. This feedback relies on drainage moving water long distances from areas near exposed rock, across the grounding line onto and across ice shelves - a process we observe, but had previously thought to be unlikely in Antarctica. This work highlights previously-overlooked processes, not captured by current regional-scale models, which may accelerate the retreat of the Antarctic Ice Sheet.

  5. The genus Bryoerythrophyllum (Musci, Pottiaceae in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sollman Philip

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic material of the genus Bryoerythrophyllum P. C. Chen was studied from all specimens present in KRAM. Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum (Hedw. P. C. Chen var. antarcticum L. I. Savicz & Smirnova is treated as a distinct species: B. antarcticum (L. I. Savicz & Smirnova P. Sollman, stat. nov. Three species are now known in the Antarctic region: B. antarcticum, B. recurvirostrum and B. rubrum (Jur. ex Geh. P. C. Chen. Bryoerythrophyllum rubrum is reported for the first time from the Antarctic. It is a bipolar species. A key to the taxa is given. These species are described and briefly discussed, with notes on illustrations, reproduction, habitat, world range, distribution and elevation in Antarctica.

  6. Antarctica and the strategic plan for biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Steven L; Brooks, Cassandra M; Terauds, Aleks; Le Bohec, Céline; van Klaveren-Impagliazzo, Céline; Whittington, Jason D; Butchart, Stuart H M; Coetzee, Bernard W T; Collen, Ben; Convey, Peter; Gaston, Kevin J; Gilbert, Neil; Gill, Mike; Höft, Robert; Johnston, Sam; Kennicutt, Mahlon C; Kriesell, Hannah J; Le Maho, Yvon; Lynch, Heather J; Palomares, Maria; Puig-Marcó, Roser; Stoett, Peter; McGeoch, Melodie A

    2017-03-01

    The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity, adopted under the auspices of the Convention on Biological Diversity, provides the basis for taking effective action to curb biodiversity loss across the planet by 2020-an urgent imperative. Yet, Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, which encompass 10% of the planet's surface, are excluded from assessments of progress against the Strategic Plan. The situation is a lost opportunity for biodiversity conservation globally. We provide such an assessment. Our evidence suggests, surprisingly, that for a region so remote and apparently pristine as the Antarctic, the biodiversity outlook is similar to that for the rest of the planet. Promisingly, however, much scope for remedial action exists.

  7. Antarctica and the strategic plan for biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Chown

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity, adopted under the auspices of the Convention on Biological Diversity, provides the basis for taking effective action to curb biodiversity loss across the planet by 2020-an urgent imperative. Yet, Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, which encompass 10% of the planet's surface, are excluded from assessments of progress against the Strategic Plan. The situation is a lost opportunity for biodiversity conservation globally. We provide such an assessment. Our evidence suggests, surprisingly, that for a region so remote and apparently pristine as the Antarctic, the biodiversity outlook is similar to that for the rest of the planet. Promisingly, however, much scope for remedial action exists.

  8. Sound radiation by a plane localized vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    A classical problem on small-scale fluctuations of the Rankine vortex in a compressible gas has been numerically simulated. Euler equations for a compressible gas have been solved by the CABARET method. Simulation results well predict the value of the eigenfrequency of the boundary fluctuations for the azimuthal harmonic n = 2 and almost coincide with the analytic solution. The value of the acoustic instability increment has been quantitatively predicted despite the fact that it is small and it has been revealed at a fluctuation number higher than 100.

  9. Analysis of Sound Localization and Microphone Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    El Hajj, Zena; Teesside University

    2014-01-01

    El presente trabajo es describir los principios de localización de sonido y arreglos de micrófonos destinados a la grabación espacial de señales acústicas. El trabajo presentalos principios físicos de arreglos de micrófonos y técnicas de captura multidimensional, además de proveer soluciones que los sistemas convencionales no logran. Está basado en los principios básicos de sonido envolvente, y holofonía, y presenta una solución, basada en la teoría de sistemas MIMO, de radioelectrónica....

  10. Coherent Surface Clutter Suppression Techniques with Topography Estimation for Multi-Phase-Center Radar Ice Sounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik; Dall, Jørgen; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

    2012-01-01

    Radar ice sounding enables measurement of the thickness and internal structures of the large ice sheets on Earth. Surface clutter masking the signal of interest is a major obstacle in ice sounding. Algorithms for surface clutter suppression based on multi-phase-center radars are presented. These ....... These algorithms incorporate estimation of the required topographical information, thereby making the processing independent of such external data. The algorithms are applied to data collected by ESA’s POLarimetric Airborne Radar Ice Sounder (POLARIS) over Antarctica in February 2011....

  11. Phylogeography of microbial phototrophs in the dry valleys of the high Himalayas and Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S K; Lynch, R C; King, A J; Karki, D; Robeson, M S; Nagy, L; Williams, M W; Mitter, M S; Freeman, K R

    2011-03-07

    High-elevation valleys in dry areas of the Himalayas are among the most extreme, yet least explored environments on Earth. These barren, rocky valleys are subjected to year-round temperature fluctuations across the freezing point and very low availability of water and nutrients, causing previous workers to hypothesize that no photoautotrophic life (primary producers) exists in these locations. However, there has been no work using modern biogeochemical or culture-independent molecular methods to test the hypothesis that photoautotrophs are absent from high Himalayan soil systems. Here, we show that although microbial biomass levels are as low as those of the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, there are abundant microbial photoautotrophs, displaying unexpected phylogenetic diversity, in barren soils from just below the permanent ice line of the central Himalayas. Furthermore, we discovered that one of the dominant algal clades from the high Himalayas also contains the dominant algae in culture-independent surveys of both soil and ice samples from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, revealing an unexpected link between these environmentally similar but geographically very distant systems. Phylogenetic and biogeographic analyses demonstrated that although this algal clade is globally distributed to other high-altitude and high-latitude soils, it shows significant genetic isolation by geographical distance patterns, indicating local adaptation and perhaps speciation in each region. Our results are the first to demonstrate the remarkable similarities of microbial life of arid soils of Antarctica and the high Himalayas. Our findings are a starting point for future comparative studies of the dry valleys of the Himalayas and Antarctica that will yield new insights into the cold and dry limits to life on Earth.

  12. Sound a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Sound is integral to how we experience the world, in the form of noise as well as music. But what is sound? What is the physical basis of pitch and harmony? And how are sound waves exploited in musical instruments? Sound: A Very Short Introduction looks at the science of sound and the behaviour of sound waves with their different frequencies. It also explores sound in different contexts, covering the audible and inaudible, sound underground and underwater, acoustic and electronic sound, and hearing in humans and animals. It concludes with the problem of sound out of place—noise and its reduction.

  13. The Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, R.; Vornberger, P.; Fleming, A.; Fox, A.; Mullins, J.; Binnie, D.; Paulsen, S.J.; Granneman, B.; Gorodetzky, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) is the first true-color, high-spatial-resolution image of the seventh continent. It is constructed from nearly 1100 individually selected Landsat-7 ETM+ scenes. Each image was orthorectified and adjusted for geometric, sensor and illumination variations to a standardized, almost seamless surface reflectance product. Mosaicing to avoid clouds produced a high quality, nearly cloud-free benchmark data set of Antarctica for the International Polar Year from images collected primarily during 1999-2003. Multiple color composites and enhancements were generated to illustrate additional characteristics of the multispectral data including: the true appearance of the surface; discrimination between snow and bare ice; reflectance variations within bright snow; recovered reflectance values in regions of sensor saturation; and subtle topographic variations associated with ice flow. LIMA is viewable and individual scenes or user defined portions of the mosaic are downloadable at http://lima.usgs.gov. Educational materials associated with LIMA are available at http://lima.nasa.gov.

  14. The sound of distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaglia, Cristina D; Maglio, Sam J; Krehm, Madelaine; Seok, Jin H; Trope, Yaacov

    2016-07-01

    Human languages may be more than completely arbitrary symbolic systems. A growing literature supports sound symbolism, or the existence of consistent, intuitive relationships between speech sounds and specific concepts. Prior work establishes that these sound-to-meaning mappings can shape language-related judgments and decisions, but do their effects generalize beyond merely the linguistic and truly color how we navigate our environment? We examine this possibility, relating a predominant sound symbolic distinction (vowel frontness) to a novel associate (spatial proximity) in five studies. We show that changing one vowel in a label can influence estimations of distance, impacting judgment, perception, and action. The results (1) provide the first experimental support for a relationship between vowels and spatial distance and (2) demonstrate that sound-to-meaning mappings have outcomes that extend beyond just language and can - through a single sound - influence how we perceive and behave toward objects in the world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sound insulation between dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs...... 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data collected from 24...

  16. Sound Insulation between Dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs...... 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data collected from 24...

  17. SOUNDS OF MODERN TALK AIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bysko Maxim V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The author examines the role of broadcasting from inception to the present day; he means a new historical round of mass media that links modern radio with 1920-30s radio. Art genres of broadcasting and TV news covered in the direct synthesis with information radio genres. In this case, a more organized and balanced sounding of contemporary information radio (order of texts, music-speech structure, and sound design has a more limited, local space in society. Radio is not only within national boundaries, but also within cultural, subcultural, narrow consumer boundaries. Hence the clear dominance of the road radio audience, as well as a return to the private broadcasting (mobiles, web-channels, podcasts.

  18. Orcas in Puget Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Washington. Mumford, T.F. 2007. Kelp and Eelgrass in Puget Sound. Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership Report No. 2007-05. Published by Seattle District, U.S...2006). Wild Chinook populations continue to decline due to dam con- struction, overall habitat loss , loss of prey and historical over-fishing...Sanford (2006) pointed out that current mean weight of adult Chinook salmon returning to their spawn- ing grounds in Puget Sound is only 56 percent of

  19. The anomalous tides near Broad Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Jason H.; Buchwald, V. T.; Huthnance, John M.

    Observations of tidal current and height, in conjunction with theoretical mathematical models are used to investigate the propagation of the tide near Broad Sound, a narrowing estuary situated on a wide section of continental shelf toward the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef. The observations indicate that the dense offshore reefs severely inhibit tidal flow, with the result that tides flood toward Broad Sound from the north and from the south, along the main lagoon. There is a local magnification of the semi-diurnal tides within Broad Sound itself. Models of flow across reefs confirm the effectiveness of dense, shallow, and broad reefs in acting as a barrier to the tide. The diffraction of tides through large gaps in the reef is modelled using conformal mapping techniques and with the inclusion of energy leakage, the diffraction model predicts magnification of the semi-diurnal tidal heights by a factor of about 4 and a phase lag of 3 h on the shelf near Broad Sound, these values being consistent with observation. The observed convergence of the tide close to, and within Broad Sound itself is consistent with the proximity of the semi-diurnal tidal period to the natural period for flow in Broad Sound, considered as a narrowing estuary. This results in further amplification, by an additional factor of about 1.5, so that the tides in Broad Sound are increased by a factor of between 5 and 6, altogether, compared with those elsewhere on the east Australian coast.

  20. Antioxidant Responses Induced by UVB Radiation in Deschampsia antarctica Desv.

    OpenAIRE

    K?hler, Hans; Contreras, Rodrigo A.; Pizarro, Marisol; Cort?s-Ant?quera, Rodrigo; Z??iga, Gustavo E.

    2017-01-01

    Deschampsia antarctica Desv. is one of two vascular plants that live in the Maritime Antarctic Territory and is exposed to high levels of ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation. In this work, antioxidant physiology of D. antarctica was studied in response to UVB induced oxidative changes. Samples were collected from Antarctica and maintained in vitro culture during 2 years. Plants were sub-cultured in a hydroponic system and exposed to 21.4 kJ m-2 day-1, emulating summer Antarctic conditions. Results ...

  1. Notes on Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Jones

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bonnie Jones creates improvised and composed text-sound performances that explore the fluidity and function of electronic noise (field recordings, circuit bending and text (poetry, found, spoken. She is interested in how people perceive, “read” and interact with these sounds and texts given our current technological moment.

  2. Sound propagation in cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.; Polinder, H.; Lohman, W.; Zhou, H.; Borst, H.

    2009-01-01

    A new engineering model for sound propagation in cities is presented. The model is based on numerical and experimental studies of sound propagation between street canyons. Multiple reflections in the source canyon and the receiver canyon are taken into account in an efficient way, while weak

  3. Shadow of sound

    OpenAIRE

    Prvacki, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Tiré du site Internet de Onestar Press: "Shadow of sound is a musical flip book, an attempt to move sound through pages and to measure music visually. Prvacki demonstrates that 40 seconds of Bach's Minuet in G Major fit on 150 pages.".

  4. InfoSound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Gopinath, B.; Haberman, Gary O.

    1990-01-01

    The authors explore ways to enhance users' comprehension of complex applications using music and sound effects to present application-program events that are difficult to detect visually. A prototype system, Infosound, allows developers to create and store musical sequences and sound effects with...

  5. The sounds of nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Norah; Deane, Cormac; Murphy, Padraig

    2017-07-01

    Public perceptions of nanotechnology are shaped by sound in surprising ways. Our analysis of the audiovisual techniques employed by nanotechnology stakeholders shows that well-chosen sounds can help to win public trust, create value and convey the weird reality of objects on the nanoscale.

  6. OMNIDIRECTIONAL SOUND SOURCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    A sound source comprising a loudspeaker (6) and a hollow coupler (4) with an open inlet which communicates with and is closed by the loudspeaker (6) and an open outlet, said coupler (4) comprising rigid walls which cannot respond to the sound pressures produced by the loudspeaker (6). According...

  7. Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    大矢, 健一

    2013-01-01

    Hamiltonian Algorithm (HA) is an algorithm for searching solutions is optimization problems. This paper introduces a sound synthesis technique using Hamiltonian Algorithm and shows a simple example. "Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis" uses phase transition effect in HA. Because of this transition effect, totally new waveforms are produced.

  8. Waveform analysis of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Tohyama, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    What is this sound? What does that sound indicate? These are two questions frequently heard in daily conversation. Sound results from the vibrations of elastic media and in daily life provides informative signals of events happening in the surrounding environment. In interpreting auditory sensations, the human ear seems particularly good at extracting the signal signatures from sound waves. Although exploring auditory processing schemes may be beyond our capabilities, source signature analysis is a very attractive area in which signal-processing schemes can be developed using mathematical expressions. This book is inspired by such processing schemes and is oriented to signature analysis of waveforms. Most of the examples in the book are taken from data of sound and vibrations; however, the methods and theories are mostly formulated using mathematical expressions rather than by acoustical interpretation. This book might therefore be attractive and informative for scientists, engineers, researchers, and graduat...

  9. Sound classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    National schemes for sound classification of dwellings exist in more than ten countries in Europe, typically published as national standards. The schemes define quality classes reflecting different levels of acoustical comfort. Main criteria concern airborne and impact sound insulation between...... dwellings, facade sound insulation and installation noise. The schemes have been developed, implemented and revised gradually since the early 1990s. However, due to lack of coordination between countries, there are significant discrepancies, and new standards and revisions continue to increase the diversity...... is needed, and a European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs 2009-2013, one of the main objectives being to prepare a proposal for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality...

  10. Urban Sound Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    share the characteristics of site specificity. However, this article will consider the artwork in a broader context by re-examining how sound installations relate to the urban environment. For that purpose, this article brings together ecology terms from acoustic ecology of the sound theories...... of the 1970s while developing them into recent definitions of ecology in urban studies. Finally, we unfold our framing of urban sound ecologies with three case analyses: a sound intervention in Berlin, a symphony for wind instruments in Copenhagen and a video walk in a former railway station in Kassel....... The article concludes that the ways in which recent sound installations work with urban ecologies vary. While two of the examples blend into the urban environment, the other transfers the concert format and its mode of listening to urban space. Last, and in accordance with recent soundscape research, we point...

  11. Observations of OH and HO2 radicals in coastal Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J.-B. Bauguitte

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OH and HO2 radical concentrations have been measured in the boundary layer of coastal Antarctica for a six-week period during the austral summer of 2005. The measurements were performed at the British Antarctic Survey's Halley Research Station (75° 35' S, 26° 19' W, using the technique of on-resonance laser-induced fluorescence to detect OH, with HO2 measured following chemical conversion through addition of NO. The mean radical levels were 3.9×105 molecule cm−3 for OH, and 0.76 ppt for HO2 (ppt denotes parts per trillion, by volume. Typical maximum (local noontime levels were 7.9×105 molecule cm−3 and 1.50 ppt for OH and HO2 respectively. The main sources of HOx were photolysis of O3 and HCHO, with potentially important but uncertain contributions from HONO and higher aldehydes. Of the measured OH sinks, reaction with CO and CH4 dominated, however comparison of the observed OH concentrations with those calculated via the steady state approximation indicated that additional co-reactants were likely to have been present. Elevated levels of NOx resulting from snowpack photochemistry contributed to HOx cycling and enhanced levels of OH, however the halogen oxides IO and BrO dominated the CH3O2 – HO2 – OH conversion in this environment, with associated ozone destruction.

  12. Widespread wind-scour sites reduce total surface mass balance of East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, I.; Bell, R. E.; Scambos, T.; Wolovick, M.; Nicolas, J. P.; Creyts, T. T.; Studinger, M.; Frearson, N.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate quantification of surface accumulation over Antarctica is important for mass balance estimates and climate studies based on chemical and isotopic analysis of ice cores. Significant uncertainties exist in the current compilations of surface mass balance (SMB) over East Antarctica, especially in the interior. Katabatic winds accelerating over steeper ice surface slopes erode and sublimate the surface snow and firn, producing extensive and localized (~ 10 km or less) regions of near-zero or negative surface mass balance. Surface mass balance estimates over Antarctica rely on widely scattered point measurements or atmospheric models that interpolate over large grids and do not capture these local processes, thereby overestimating the net surface accumulation. Here we use unconformities in airborne radar data combined with lidar derived surface roughness to identify extensive and persistent wind-scour zones at high elevations (>3800 m) near Dome A, Antarctica. These wind-scour zones form in areas of relatively steep surface slopes controlled by bedrock topography. Airborne data used in this study was collected during the AGAP survey in 2009. Approximately 125,500 sq. km area over Dome A was surveyed in a dense grid of 5km spacing in the along-track and 35 km in the across-track direction. The radar profile unconformities are observed in ~45 flight lines. Over a broad region (~ 200 km) surrounding the unconformities, lidar derived surface roughness is higher than the regional mean roughness. The elevated surface roughness indicates formation of microscale surface features like sastrugi and dunes due to increased wind activity. Truncation of internal layers by the unconformity in the radar images indicates ablation of near-surface firn layers. We interpret the surface projection of unconformities as wind-scour zones where the SMB is zero or negative. Using a calculated mean slope in the wind direction based on a 1 km DEM, near-surface winds and annual SMB from

  13. Real-time detection of airborne fluorescent bioparticles in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Ian; Gallagher, Martin W.; Bower, Keith N.; Choularton, Thomas W.; Flynn, Michael J.; Ruske, Simon; Listowski, Constantino; Brough, Neil; Lachlan-Cope, Thomas; Fleming, Zoë L.; Foot, Virginia E.; Stanley, Warren R.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, continuous real-time observations of airborne bio-fluorescent aerosols recorded at the British Antarctic Survey's Halley VI Research Station, located on the Brunt Ice Shelf close to the Weddell Sea coast (lat 75°34'59'' S, long 26°10'0'' W) during Antarctic summer, 2015. As part of the NERC MAC (Microphysics of Antarctic Clouds) aircraft aerosol cloud interaction project, observations with a real-time ultraviolet-light-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectrometer were conducted to quantify airborne biological containing particle concentrations along with dust particles as a function of wind speed and direction over a 3-week period. Significant, intermittent enhancements of both non- and bio-fluorescent particles were observed to varying degrees in very specific wind directions and during strong wind events. Analysis of the particle UV-induced emission spectra, particle sizes and shapes recorded during these events suggest the majority of particles were likely a subset of dust with weak fluorescence emission responses. A minor fraction, however, were likely primary biological particles that were very strongly fluorescent, with a subset identified as likely being pollen based on comparison with laboratory data obtained using the same instrument. A strong correlation of bio-fluorescent particles with wind speed was observed in some, but not all, periods. Interestingly, the fraction of fluorescent particles to total particle concentration also increased significantly with wind speed during these events. The enhancement in concentrations of these particles could be interpreted as due to resuspension from the local ice surface but more likely due to emissions from distal sources within Antarctica as well as intercontinental transport. Likely distal sources identified by back trajectory analyses and dispersion modelling were the coastal ice margin zones in Halley Bay consisting of bird colonies with likely associated high bacterial

  14. Postspreading rifting in the Adare Basin, Antarctica: Regional tectonic consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, R.; Cande, S. C.; Stock, J. M.; Davey, F. J.; Clayton, R. W.

    2010-08-01

    Extension during the middle Cenozoic (43-26 Ma) in the north end of the West Antarctic rift system (WARS) is well constrained by seafloor magnetic anomalies formed at the extinct Adare spreading axis. Kinematic solutions for this time interval suggest a southward decrease in relative motion between East and West Antarctica. Here we present multichannel seismic reflection and seafloor mapping data acquired within and near the Adare Basin on a recent geophysical cruise. We have traced the ANTOSTRAT seismic stratigraphic framework from the northwest Ross Sea into the Adare Basin, verified and tied to DSDP drill sites 273 and 274. Our results reveal three distinct periods of tectonic activity. An early localized deformational event took place close to the cessation of seafloor spreading in the Adare Basin (˜24 Ma). It reactivated a few normal faults and initiated the formation of the Adare Trough. A prominent pulse of rifting in the early Miocene (˜17 Ma) resulted in normal faulting that initiated tilted blocks. The overall trend of structures was NE-SW, linking the event with the activity outside the basin. It resulted in major uplift of the Adare Trough and marks the last extensional phase of the Adare Basin. Recent volcanic vents (Pliocene to present day) tend to align with the early Miocene structures and the on-land Hallett volcanic province. This latest phase of tectonic activity also involves near-vertical normal faulting (still active in places) with negligible horizontal consequences. The early Miocene extensional event found within the Adare Basin does not require a change in the relative motion between East and West Antarctica. However, the lack of subsequent rifting within the Adare Basin coupled with the formation of the Terror Rift and an on-land and subice extension within the WARS require a pronounced change in the kinematics of the rift. These observations indicate that extension increased southward, therefore suggesting that a major change in

  15. Iceberg Harmonic Tremor, Seismometer Data, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Seismometers were placed on a 25 km by 50 km iceberg called C16 in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, to identify the Iceberg harmonic Tremor (IHT) source mechanism and to...

  16. RAMP AMM-1 SAR Image Mosaic of Antarctica

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In 1997, the Canadian RADARSAT-1 satellite was rotated in orbit so that its Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna looked south towards Antarctica. This permitted...

  17. Alkanes in Firn Air Samples, Antarctica and Greenland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains ethane, propane, and n-butane measurements in firn air from the South Pole and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide in Antarctica, and...

  18. The Twelfth Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica: Events and achievements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.

    The twelfth Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica comprising 56 members coming from different scientific organisations/institutions and the logistic contingent from three wings of defense services was flagged off by Shri Ravi Naik, Honourable...

  19. Eocene squalomorph sharks (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Andrea; Mörs, Thomas; Reguero, Marcelo A.; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    Rare remains of predominantly deep-water sharks of the families Hexanchidae, Squalidae, Dalatiidae, Centrophoridae, and Squatinidae are described from the Eocene La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, which has yielded the most abundant chondrichthyan assemblage from the Southern Hemisphere to date. Previously described representatives of Hexanchus sp., Squalus weltoni, Squalus woodburnei, Centrophorus sp., and Squatina sp. are confirmed and dental variations are documented. Although the teeth of Squatina sp. differ from other Palaeogene squatinid species, we refrain from introducing a new species. A new dalatiid taxon, Eodalatias austrinalis gen. et sp. nov. is described. This new material not only increases the diversity of Eocene Antarctic elasmobranchs but also allows assuming that favourable deep-water habitats were available in the Eocene Antarctic Ocean off Antarctica in the Eocene. The occurrences of deep-water inhabitants in shallow, near-coastal waters of the Antarctic Peninsula agrees well with extant distribution patterns.

  20. [Microbiological studies of the Wanda Lake (Antarctica)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriss, A E; Mitskevich, I N; Rozanova, E P; Osnitskaia, L K

    1976-01-01

    The deep-water (68 m) Wanda Lake in the Antarctica is noticeable by three characteristics: a relatively high temperature in the bottom layer, elevated salinity, and the presence of H2S. Only several (less often, dozens) saprophytic microorganisms per 40 ml of water are encountered in the lake. The total number of bacteria varies from 6-10(3) to 172-10(3) cells/ml. The highest content of the total bacterial population, and saprophytes, is found in intermediate layers, 30 and 40-50 m deep, respectively. Microbial strains isolated from water and ooze belong to the genera Pseudomonas, Chromobacterium, Bacillus, and Mycobacterium. Yeast organisms were also found. Sulphate reducing bacteria were detected only at one station in ooze of the lake while thionic bacteria could not be determined at all. Photosynthetic bacteria were isolated from ooze at all four stations.

  1. Antarctica and the strategic plan for biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Steven L.; Brooks, Cassandra M.; Terauds, Aleks; Le Bohec, Céline; van Klaveren-Impagliazzo, Céline; Whittington, Jason D.; Butchart, Stuart H. M.; Coetzee, Bernard W. T.; Collen, Ben; Convey, Peter; Gaston, Kevin J.; Gilbert, Neil; Gill, Mike; Höft, Robert; Johnston, Sam; Kennicutt, Mahlon C.; Kriesell, Hannah J.; Le Maho, Yvon; Lynch, Heather J.; Palomares, Maria; Puig-Marcó, Roser; Stoett, Peter; McGeoch, Melodie A.

    2017-01-01

    The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity, adopted under the auspices of the Convention on Biological Diversity, provides the basis for taking effective action to curb biodiversity loss across the planet by 2020—an urgent imperative. Yet, Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, which encompass 10% of the planet’s surface, are excluded from assessments of progress against the Strategic Plan. The situation is a lost opportunity for biodiversity conservation globally. We provide such an assessment. Our evidence suggests, surprisingly, that for a region so remote and apparently pristine as the Antarctic, the biodiversity outlook is similar to that for the rest of the planet. Promisingly, however, much scope for remedial action exists. PMID:28350825

  2. High Resolution Spatial Mapping of Human Footprint across Antarctica and Its Implications for the Strategic Conservation of Avifauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertierra, Luis R; Hughes, Kevin A; Vega, Greta C; Olalla-Tárraga, Miguel Á

    2017-01-01

    Human footprint models allow visualization of human spatial pressure across the globe. Up until now, Antarctica has been omitted from global footprint models, due possibly to the lack of a permanent human population and poor accessibility to necessary datasets. Yet Antarctic ecosystems face increasing cumulative impacts from the expanding tourism industry and national Antarctic operator activities, the management of which could be improved with footprint assessment tools. Moreover, Antarctic ecosystem dynamics could be modelled to incorporate human drivers. Here we present the first model of estimated human footprint across predominantly ice-free areas of Antarctica. To facilitate integration into global models, the Antarctic model was created using methodologies applied elsewhere with land use, density and accessibility features incorporated. Results showed that human pressure is clustered predominantly in the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Victoria Land and several areas of East Antarctica. To demonstrate the practical application of the footprint model, it was used to investigate the potential threat to Antarctica's avifauna by local human activities. Relative footprint values were recorded for all 204 of Antarctica's Important Bird Areas (IBAs) identified by BirdLife International and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR). Results indicated that formal protection of avifauna under the Antarctic Treaty System has been unsystematic and is lacking for penguin and flying bird species in some of the IBAs most vulnerable to human activity and impact. More generally, it is hoped that use of this human footprint model may help Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting policy makers in their decision making concerning avifauna protection and other issues including cumulative impacts, environmental monitoring, non-native species and terrestrial area protection.

  3. Caloplaca coeruleofrigida sp. nova, a species from continental Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søchting, Ulrik; Seppelt, R.

    2003-01-01

    Caloplaca coeruleofrigida Søchting & Seppelt is described from Southern Victoria Land, continental Antarctica. It is characterized by vertically elongated papillae and a pale orange pigmentation on shaded parts, and black thallus and apothecia on exposed parts of the thallus......Caloplaca coeruleofrigida Søchting & Seppelt is described from Southern Victoria Land, continental Antarctica. It is characterized by vertically elongated papillae and a pale orange pigmentation on shaded parts, and black thallus and apothecia on exposed parts of the thallus...

  4. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    of sound. This issue is a part of a Ph.D. study at The Danish Design School in Copenhagen. Sound diffusion in architecture is a complex phenomenon. From the sound source the sound spreads in all directions as a sphere of wave fronts. When the sound is reflected from room boundaries or furniture, complex...... goemetry by analysing the sound pattern at a specific spot. This analysis is done theoretically with algorithmic systems and practical with waves in water. The paper describes the experiments and the findings, and explains how an analysis of sound can be catched in a textile form.......Sound is a part of architecture, and sound is complex. Upon this, sound is invisible. How is it then possible to design visual objects that interact with the sound? This paper addresses the problem of how to get access to the complexity of sound and how to make textile material revealing the form...

  5. Borehole temperatures reveal a changed energy budget at Mill Island, East Antarctica, over recent decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Roberts

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A borehole temperature record from the Mill Island (East Antarctica icecap reveals a large surface warming signal manifested as a 0.75 K temperature difference over the approximate 100 m depth in the zone of zero annual amplitude below the seasonally varying zone. The temperature profile shows a break in gradient around 49 m depth, which we model with inverse numerical simulations, indicating that surface warming started around the austral summer of 1980/81 AD ±5 yr. This warming of approximately 0.37 K per decade is consistent with trends seen in both instrumental and other reconstructions for Antarctica and, therefore, suggests that regional- rather than local-scale processes are largely responsible. Alteration of the surface energy budget arising from changes in radiation balances due to local cloud, the amount of liquid deposition and local air temperatures associated with altered air/sea exchanges also potentially plays a role at this location due to the proximity of the Shackleton Ice Shelf and sea-ice zone.

  6. Analysis of mercury and other heavy metals accumulated in lichen Usnea antarctica from James Ross Island, Antarctica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvěřina, O.; Láska, K.; Červenka, R.; Kuta, J.; Coufalík, Pavel; Komárek, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 186, č. 12 (2014), s. 9089-9100 ISSN 0167-6369 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : antarctica * heavy metal * mercury * lichen Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.679, year: 2014

  7. Categorization of environmental sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastavino, Catherine

    2007-03-01

    This paper investigates the way in which people categorize environmental sounds in their everyday lives. Previous research has shown that isolated environmental sounds are categorized on the basis of high-level semantic features when the sounds can be attributed to specific sound sources. However, in the presence of numerous sound sources, as occur in most real-world situations, the process of source identification is often hindered. In the present study, a free categorization task with open-ended verbal descriptions was used to investigate auditory categories for environmental sounds in complex real-world sonic environments. Two main categories emerged from the free-sort, reflecting the absence or presence of human activity in relation to hedonic judgments. At a subordinate level, subcategories were mediated by the participant's reported interactions with the environment through socialized activities. The spontaneous verbal descriptors collected were successful in discriminating categories. These findings indicate that complex environmental sounds are processed and categorized as meaningful events providing relevant information about the environment. The relevance of situational factors in categorization and the notion of auditory category in its relation to linguistic labeling are then discussed.

  8. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; Conley, Benjamin; Hogan, Roy; Boslough, Mark; Gonzales, Gigi; Spurný, Pavel

    2017-02-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with -11 to -13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally. Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that -12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. The photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs.

  9. Sound as artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  10. In situ sound absorption measurement: investigations on oblique incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, E.R.; Wijnant, Ysbrand H.; de Boer, Andries; Klemenz, M.

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for the measurement of sound absorption has been developed. By assuming that, in a single point, the sound field consists of an incident- and a reflected plane wave, the locally incident- and reflected intensities can be determined. To this purpose, the active intensity and the sum of

  11. Propagation of sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Magnus; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2017-01-01

    As an acoustic signal travels from the source to a receiver, it is affected by a variety of physical processes, all dictated by properties of the signal and the environment. The signal energy is weakened by geometric attenuation as well as absorption by the medium. The temporal and spectral prope...... communication sounds for airborne acoustics and bottom and surface effects for underwater sounds. Refraction becomes very important close to shadow zones. For echolocation signals, geometric attenuation and sound absorption have the largest effects on the signals....

  12. March 1964 Prince William Sound, USA Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Prince William Sound magnitude 9.2 Mw earthquake on March 28, 1964 at 03:36 GMT (March 27 at 5:36 pm local time), was the largest U.S. earthquake ever recorded...

  13. Sound Stuff? Naïve materialism in middle-school students' conceptions of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshach, Haim; Schwartz, Judah L.

    2006-06-01

    Few studies have dealt with students’ preconceptions of sounds. The current research employs Reiner et al. (2000) substance schema to reveal new insights about students’ difficulties in understanding this fundamental topic. It aims not only to detect whether the substance schema is present in middle school students’ thinking, but also examines how students use the schema’s properties. It asks, moreover, whether the substance schema properties are used as islands of local consistency or whether one can identify more global coherent consistencies among the properties that the students use to explain the sound phenomena. In-depth standardized open-ended interviews were conducted with ten middle school students. Consistent with the substance schema, sound was perceived by our participants as being pushable, frictional, containable, or transitional. However, sound was also viewed as a substance different from the ordinary with respect to its stability, corpuscular nature, additive properties, and inertial characteristics. In other words, students’ conceptions of sound do not seem to fit Reiner et al.’s schema in all respects. Our results also indicate that students’ conceptualization of sound lack internal consistency. Analyzing our results with respect to local and global coherence, we found students’ conception of sound is close to diSessa’s “loosely connected, fragmented collection of ideas.” The notion that sound is perceived only as a “sort of a material,” we believe, requires some revision of the substance schema as it applies to sound. The article closes with a discussion concerning the implications of the results for instruction.

  14. The Visibility Climatology of McMurdo Sound/Williams Field, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    fly- ing operations at MNurdo Bound and Cape Nllett, Ant- arotica, Technical note 214, New Zeland Noteorological Service, P.O. box 722, Wellington, Mw...Force and Navy aircraft carry cargo and personnel from Christchurch, New Zealand (the main staging base out- side of the Continent) over a 2,100...States C-141 Starlifter and LC-130 Hercules aircraft which fly men and women, engaged in American and New Zealand sci- entific programs, to the ice

  15. Wind Turbine Noise and Natural Sounds: Masking, Propagation and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolin, Karl

    2009-05-15

    Wind turbines are an environmentally friendly and sustainable power source. Unfortunately, the noise impact can cause deteriorated living conditions for nearby residents. The audibility of wind turbine sound is influenced by ambient sound. This thesis deals with some aspects of noise from wind turbines. Ambient sounds influence the audibility of wind turbine noise. Models for assessing two commonly occurring natural ambient sounds namely vegetation sound and sound from breaking waves are presented in paper A and B. A sound propagation algorithm has been compared to long range measurements of sound propagation in paper C. Psycho-acoustic tests evaluating the threshold and partial loudness of wind turbine noise when mixed with natural ambient sounds have been performed. These are accounted for in paper D. The main scientific contributions are the following.Paper A: A semi-empiric prediction model for vegetation sound is proposed. This model uses up-to-date simulations of wind profiles and turbulent wind fields to estimate sound from vegetation. The fluctuations due to turbulence are satisfactory estimated by the model. Predictions of vegetation sound also show good agreement to measured spectra. Paper B: A set of measurements of air-borne sound from breaking waves are reported. From these measurements a prediction method of sound from breaking waves is proposed. Third octave spectra from breaking waves are shown to depend on breaker type. Satisfactory agreement between predictions and measurements has been achieved. Paper C: Long range sound propagation over a sea surface was investigated. Measurements of sound transmission were coordinated with local meteorological measurements. A sound propagation algorithm has been compared to the measured sound transmission. Satisfactory agreement between measurements and predictions were achieved when turbulence were taken into consideration in the computations. Paper D: The paper investigates the interaction between wind

  16. Sound Art Situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    This article is an analysis of two sound art performances that took place June 2015 in outdoor public spaces in the social housing area Urbanplanen in Copenhagen, Denmark. The two performances were On the productions of a poor acoustics by Brandon LaBelle and Green Interactive Biofeedback...... Environments (GIBE) by Jeremy Woodruff. In order to investigate the complex situation that arises when sound art is staged in such contexts, the authors of this article suggest exploring the events through approaching them as ‘situations’ (Doherty 2009). With this approach it becomes possible to engage...... and combine theories from several fields. Aspects of sound art studies, performance studies and contemporary art studies are presented in order to theoretically explore the very diverse dimensions of the two sound art pieces. Visual, auditory, performative, social, spatial and durational dimensions become...

  17. Sound as Popular Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant’s gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems...... in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material......, physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider...

  18. Sounds of Web Advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Iben Bredahl; Graakjær, Nicolai Jørgensgaard

    2010-01-01

    Sound seems to be a neglected issue in the study of web ads. Web advertising is predominantly regarded as visual phenomena–commercial messages, as for instance banner ads that we watch, read, and eventually click on–but only rarely as something that we listen to. The present chapter presents...... an overview of the auditory dimensions in web advertising: Which kinds of sounds do we hear in web ads? What are the conditions and functions of sound in web ads? Moreover, the chapter proposes a theoretical framework in order to analyse the communicative functions of sound in web advertising. The main...... argument is that an understanding of the auditory dimensions in web advertising must include a reflection on the hypertextual settings of the web ad as well as a perspective on how users engage with web content....

  19. It sounds good!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Both the atmosphere and we ourselves are hit by hundreds of particles every second and yet nobody has ever heard a sound coming from these processes. Like cosmic rays, particles interacting inside the detectors at the LHC do not make any noise…unless you've decided to use the ‘sonification’ technique, in which case you might even hear the Higgs boson sound like music. Screenshot of the first page of the "LHC sound" site. A group of particle physicists, composers, software developers and artists recently got involved in the ‘LHC sound’ project to make the particles at the LHC produce music. Yes…music! The ‘sonification’ technique converts data into sound. “In this way, if you implement the right software you can get really nice music out of the particle tracks”, says Lily Asquith, a member of the ATLAS collaboration and one of the initiators of the project. The ‘LHC...

  20. Sound Art Situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh Groth, Sanne; Samson, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    and combine theories from several fields. Aspects of sound art studies, performance studies and contemporary art studies are presented in order to theoretically explore the very diverse dimensions of the two sound art pieces: Visual, auditory, performative, social, spatial and durational dimensions become......This article is an analysis of two sound art performances that took place June 2015 in outdoor public spaces in the social housing area Urbanplanen in Copenhagen, Denmark. The two performances were On the production of a poor acoustics by Brandon LaBelle and Green Interactive Biofeedback...... Environments (GIBE) by Jeremy Woodruff. In order to investigate the complex situation that arises when sound art is staged in such contexts, the authors of this article suggest exploring the events through approaching them as ‘situations’ (Doherty 2009). With this approach it becomes possible to engage...

  1. Physical Layer Definition for a Long-Haul HF Antarctica to Spain Radio Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Ma Alsina-Pagès

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available La Salle and the Observatori de l’Ebre (OE have been involved in a remote sensing project in Antarctica for the last 11 years. The OE has been monitoring the geomagnetic activity for more than twenty years and also the ionospheric activity of the last ten years in the Spanish Antarctic Station Juan Carlos I (ASJI (62.7 ° S, 299.6 ° E. La Salle is finishing the design and testing of a low-power communication system between the ASJI and Cambrils (41.0 ° N, 1.0 ° E with a double goal: (i the transmission of data from the sensors located at the ASJI and (ii the performance of an oblique ionospheric sounding of a 12,760 km HF link. Previously, La Salle has already performed sounding and modulation tests to describe the channel performance in terms of availability, Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR, Doppler spread and delay spread. This paper closes the design of the physical layer, by means of the channel error study and the synchronization performance, and concludes with a new physical layer proposal for the Oblique Ionosphere Sounder. Narrowband and wideband frames have been defined to be used when the oblique sounder performs as an ionospheric sensor. Finally, two transmission modes have been defined for the modem performance: the High Robustness Mode (HRM for low SNR hours and the High Throughput Mode (HTM for the high SNR hours.

  2. Simultaneous observations of noctilucent clouds and polar mesosphere summer echoes at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Hosokawa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports simultaneous observations of visible noctilucent clouds (NLC and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE at Syowa Station (69°01′S, 38°61′E in Antarctica. During a 1.5 h interval from 2000 to 2130 UT (2300 to 0030 LT on Feb. 11, 2009, visible NLC were observed south of Syowa Station. The oblique sounding HF radar of SuperDARN at Syowa Station simultaneously observed peculiar echoes in the closest two range gates. The echoes had a small Doppler velocity and a narrow spectral width, which are consistent with the characteristics of PMSE in the SuperDARN data. The simultaneous appearance of the visible NLC and peculiar near-range echoes observed by the HF radar suggests that the echoes were actually a signature of PMSE in the HF band. In addition, the data from the simultaneous measurements show that the spatial distributions of NLC and PMSE in the HF band were collocated with each other, which implies that oblique sounding HF radar is a useful tool for estimating the two-dimensional horizontal distribution of PMSE.

  3. Controlling mechanisms of Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroussi, H. L.; Morlighem, M.; Rignot, E. J.; Larour, E. Y.; Mouginot, J.; Khazendar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ice shelves play a major role in the stability of fast flowing ice streams in Antarctica, by exerting buttressing on inland ice and controlling the discharge of ice into the ocean. However, the mechanisms at work remain poorly understood and interactions between floating and grounded ice need to be better characterized in order to estimate the impact of climate change on the ice sheets. Thwaites glacier, in West Antarctica, features a small and heavily fractured ice shelf that provides limited back stress pressure on inland ice but is pinned on the eastern part on a prominent ridge. Thwaites glacier has maintained a consistently high velocity and negative mass balance for at least 20 years. Recent observations show a widening of its fast flowing area as well as a sustained acceleration since 2006 and a rapid retreat of its grounding line in the center of the glacier. The objective of this work is to characterize the dynamic response of Thwaites glacier to changes in its floating tongue on decadal to centennial time scales. To achieve this objective, we rely on high resolution ice flow modeling and grounding line dynamics using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). We will focus on the complex interplay between the main floating tongue of Thwaites Glacier and its eastern, slow moving ice shelf, which is pinned down by an ice rumple. The speed of the eastern ice shelf is strongly affected by the coupling with the main floating ice tongue, which results in significant fluctuations in speed of the eastern ice shelf the formation of ice shelf cracks at the grounding line during acceleration phases. Our results show that ice rigidity at the junction between the eastern and western part of the shelf controls the dynamic regime of the ice shelf and suggest that Thwaites Glacier is likely to undergo substantial changes in the coming decades. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of California Irvine

  4. Atmospheric effects on microphone array analysis of aircraft vortex sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-08

    This paper provides the basis of a comprehensive analysis of vortex sound propagation : through the atmosphere in order to assess real atmospheric effects on acoustic array : processing. Such effects may impact vortex localization accuracy and detect...

  5. Application of Schlumberger array of vertical electric sounding to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Ekpoma, headquarters of Esan West Local Government of Edo state. Schlumberger array of vertical electric sounding (VES) was employed. Interpretation of data was done initially by curve matching which made it possible to produce ...

  6. Understanding the Role of Wind in Reducing the Surface Mass Balance Estimates over East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, I.; Scambos, T. A.; Koenig, L.; Creyts, T. T.; Bell, R. E.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Lenaerts, J.; Paden, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow-accumulation over Antarctica is important for mass balance estimates and climate studies based on ice core records. An improved estimate of surface mass balance must include the significant role near-surface wind plays in the sublimation and redistribution of snow across Antarctica. We have developed an empirical model based on airborne radar and lidar observations, and modeled surface mass balance and wind fields to produce a continent-wide prediction of wind-scour zones over Antarctica. These zones have zero to negative surface mass balance, are located over locally steep ice sheet areas (>0.002) and controlled by bedrock topography. The near-surface winds accelerate over these zones, eroding and sublimating the surface snow. This scouring results in numerous localized regions (≤ 200 km2) with reduced surface accumulation. Each year, tens of gigatons of snow on the Antarctic ice sheet are ablated by persistent near-surface katabatic winds over these wind-scour zones. Large uncertainties remain in the surface mass balance estimates over East Antarctica as climate models do not adequately represent the small-scale physical processes that lead to mass loss through sublimation or redistribution over the wind-scour zones. In this study, we integrate Operation IceBridge's snow radar over the Recovery Ice Stream with a series of ice core dielectric and depth-density profiles for improved surface mass balance estimates that reflect the mass loss over the wind-scour zones. Accurate surface mass balance estimates from snow radars require spatially variable depth-density profiles. Using an ensemble of firn cores, MODIS-derived surface snow grain size, modeled accumulation rates and surface temperatures from RACMO2, we assemble spatially variable depth-density profiles and use our mapping of snow density variations to estimate layer mass and net accumulation rates from snow radar layer data. Our study improves the quantification of

  7. Comparative account of benthic community at two different locations in the continental Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Dhargalkar, V.K.

    Data on faunal communities, abundance and biomass were collected from seven stations in the Queen Maud Land shelf, Lazarev Sea, East Antarctica and three stations in Atca Ice Port, Weddell Sea, West Antarctica. The sampling depth ranged from 70...

  8. Combined Gravimetric-Seismic Crustal Model for Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Alexey; Tenzer, Robert; Bagherbandi, Mohammad

    2017-09-01

    The latest seismic data and improved information about the subglacial bedrock relief are used in this study to estimate the sediment and crustal thickness under the Antarctic continent. Since large parts of Antarctica are not yet covered by seismic surveys, the gravity and crustal structure models are used to interpolate the Moho information where seismic data are missing. The gravity information is also extended offshore to detect the Moho under continental margins and neighboring oceanic crust. The processing strategy involves the solution to the Vening Meinesz-Moritz's inverse problem of isostasy constrained on seismic data. A comparison of our new results with existing studies indicates a substantial improvement in the sediment and crustal models. The seismic data analysis shows significant sediment accumulations in Antarctica, with broad sedimentary basins. According to our result, the maximum sediment thickness in Antarctica is about 15 km under Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. The Moho relief closely resembles major geological and tectonic features. A rather thick continental crust of East Antarctic Craton is separated from a complex geological/tectonic structure of West Antarctica by the Transantarctic Mountains. The average Moho depth of 34.1 km under the Antarctic continent slightly differs from previous estimates. A maximum Moho deepening of 58.2 km under the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains in East Antarctica confirmed the presence of deep and compact orogenic roots. Another large Moho depth in East Antarctica is detected under Dronning Maud Land with two orogenic roots under Wohlthat Massif (48-50 km) and the Kottas Mountains (48-50 km) that are separated by a relatively thin crust along Jutulstraumen Rift. The Moho depth under central parts of the Transantarctic Mountains reaches 46 km. The maximum Moho deepening (34-38 km) in West Antarctica is under the Antarctic Peninsula. The Moho depth minima in East Antarctica are found under the Lambert Trench (24

  9. Combined Gravimetric-Seismic Crustal Model for Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Alexey; Tenzer, Robert; Bagherbandi, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    The latest seismic data and improved information about the subglacial bedrock relief are used in this study to estimate the sediment and crustal thickness under the Antarctic continent. Since large parts of Antarctica are not yet covered by seismic surveys, the gravity and crustal structure models are used to interpolate the Moho information where seismic data are missing. The gravity information is also extended offshore to detect the Moho under continental margins and neighboring oceanic crust. The processing strategy involves the solution to the Vening Meinesz-Moritz's inverse problem of isostasy constrained on seismic data. A comparison of our new results with existing studies indicates a substantial improvement in the sediment and crustal models. The seismic data analysis shows significant sediment accumulations in Antarctica, with broad sedimentary basins. According to our result, the maximum sediment thickness in Antarctica is about 15 km under Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. The Moho relief closely resembles major geological and tectonic features. A rather thick continental crust of East Antarctic Craton is separated from a complex geological/tectonic structure of West Antarctica by the Transantarctic Mountains. The average Moho depth of 34.1 km under the Antarctic continent slightly differs from previous estimates. A maximum Moho deepening of 58.2 km under the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains in East Antarctica confirmed the presence of deep and compact orogenic roots. Another large Moho depth in East Antarctica is detected under Dronning Maud Land with two orogenic roots under Wohlthat Massif (48-50 km) and the Kottas Mountains (48-50 km) that are separated by a relatively thin crust along Jutulstraumen Rift. The Moho depth under central parts of the Transantarctic Mountains reaches 46 km. The maximum Moho deepening (34-38 km) in West Antarctica is under the Antarctic Peninsula. The Moho depth minima in East Antarctica are found under the Lambert Trench (24

  10. Haze episodes at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichiro Hara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During our aerosol measurement program at Syowa Station, Antarctica in 2004-2007, some low visibility (haze phenomena were observed under conditions with weak wind and without drifting snow and fog in winter-spring. In the "Antarctic haze" phenomenon, the number concentration of aerosol particles and black carbon concentration increased by one-two orders higher relative to background conditions at Syowa Station, while surface O_3 concentration simultaneously dropped especially after polar sunrise. Major aerosol constituents in the haze phenomenon were sea-salts (e.g., Na^+ and Cl^-. From the trajectory analysis and NAAPS model, the plumes from biomass burning in South America and southern Africa were transported to Syowa Station, Antarctic coast, during eastward (occasionally westward approach of cyclones in the Southern Ocean. Thus, poleward flow of the plume from mid-latitudes and injection of sea-salt particles during the transport may lead to the Antarctic haze phenomenon at Syowa Station. The difference of O_3 concentration between the background and the haze conditions tended to be larger in spring (polar sunrise relative to that in winter. Because enhancement of sea-salt particles can play an important role as an additional source of reactive halogen species, the haze episodes might make a significant contribution to surface O_3 depletion during the polar sunrise on the Antarctic coast.

  11. Optical Sky Brightness at Dome C, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, S.; Storey, J. W. V.; Burton, M. G.

    2006-08-01

    Dome C, Antarctica is a prime site for astronomical observations in terms of climate, wind speeds and turbulence. The infrared and terahertz sky backgrounds are the lowest of any inhabited place on Earth. However, at present little is known about the optical sky brightness and atmospheric extinction. Using a variety of modelling techniques together with data from the South Pole, we estimate the brightness of the night sky including the contributions from scattered sunlight, moonlight, aurorae, airglow, zodiacal light and artificial sources. We compare our results to another prime astronomical site, Mauna Kea. We find moonlight has significantly less effect at Dome C than at Mauna Kea. Aurorae are expected to have a minor impact at both sites, and zodiacal light is expected to be less at Dome C than at Mauna Kea. Airglow emissions at Dome C are expected to be similar to those at temperate sites. With proper planning, artificial sources of light pollution should be non-existent. The overall atmospheric extinction, or opacity, is expected to be the minimum possible. We conclude that Dome C is a very promising site not only for infrared and terahertz astronomy, but for optical astronomy as well..

  12. Social, occupational and cultural adaptation in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Michel; Bishop, Sheryl; Weiss, Karine; Gaudino, Marvin

    2016-07-01

    Life in isolated and confined environments (ICEs, e.g., polar stations, submarine or space missions), is subject to important constraints which can generate psychosociological impaired outcomes. This study investigated psychological, social, occupational and cultural variables which are among the most important determinants in adaptation to a one-year wintering in Antarctica with 13 international participants. Our findings confirm and give further insight into the role of social (Cohesiveness, Social Support) and occupational (Implementation / Preparedness, Counterproductive Activity, Decision Latitude and Psychological Job Demands) dimensions of adaptation to ICE environments. Relationships between various social and occupational dimensions studies reflected detrimental effects ranging from decrements in cohesiveness, social support and work performance which differed across professional status and multicultural factors. These psychosocial issues have important implications for pre-mission selection and training, monitoring and support of crews during the mission and post-mission readaptation. Operational recommendations are suggested to improve adaptation, success and well-being for long-term ICE missions, e.g., to Mars and beyond.

  13. SOUND MORPHING BY FEATURE INTERPOLATION

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas Caetano, Marcelo; Rodet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The goal of sound morphing by feature interpolation is to obtain sounds whose values of features are intermediate between those of the source and target sounds. In order to do this, we should be able to resynthesize sounds that present a set of predefined feature values, a notoriously difficult problem. In this work, we present morphing techniques to obtain hybrid musical instrument sounds whose feature values correspond as close as possible to the ideal interpolated v...

  14. The oldest elasmosaurs (Sauropterygia, Plesiosauria from Antarctica, Santa Marta Formation (upper Coniacian? Santonian–upper Campanian and Snow Hill Island Formation (upper Campanian–lower Maastrichtian, James Ross Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José P. O'Gorman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Elasmosaurs are recorded for the first time in the Lachman Crags Member (Beta Member of the Santa Marta Formation (lower Campanian and in the Herbert Sound Member of the Snow Hill Island Formation (upper Campanian. These are the first elasmosaurids from James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula. These records greatly improve our knowledge of the taxonomic diversity of plesiosaurs of the Santa Marta Formation and Herbert Sound Member of the Snow Hill Island Formation, and extend the lower limit of the record of Elasmosauridae in Antarctica to the lower Campanian, making this the oldest record of an Antarctic elasmosaur.

  15. 45 CFR 674.4 - Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Antarctica. 674.4 Section 674.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ANTARCTIC METEORITES § 674.4 Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica. No person may collect meteorites in Antarctica for other than scientific research purposes. ...

  16. Progressive Cenozoic cooling and the demise of Antarctica's last refugium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John B; Warny, Sophie; Askin, Rosemary A; Wellner, Julia S; Bohaty, Steven M; Kirshner, Alexandra E; Livsey, Daniel N; Simms, Alexander R; Smith, Tyler R; Ehrmann, Werner; Lawver, Lawrence A; Barbeau, David; Wise, Sherwood W; Kulhanek, Denise K; Kulhenek, Denise K; Weaver, Fred M; Majewski, Wojciech

    2011-07-12

    The Antarctic Peninsula is considered to be the last region of Antarctica to have been fully glaciated as a result of Cenozoic climatic cooling. As such, it was likely the last refugium for plants and animals that had inhabited the continent since it separated from the Gondwana supercontinent. Drill cores and seismic data acquired during two cruises (SHALDRIL I and II) in the northernmost Peninsula region yield a record that, when combined with existing data, indicates progressive cooling and associated changes in terrestrial vegetation over the course of the past 37 million years. Mountain glaciation began in the latest Eocene (approximately 37-34 Ma), contemporaneous with glaciation elsewhere on the continent and a reduction in atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. This climate cooling was accompanied by a decrease in diversity of the angiosperm-dominated vegetation that inhabited the northern peninsula during the Eocene. A mosaic of southern beech and conifer-dominated woodlands and tundra continued to occupy the region during the Oligocene (approximately 34-23 Ma). By the middle Miocene (approximately 16-11.6 Ma), localized pockets of limited tundra still existed at least until 12.8 Ma. The transition from temperate, alpine glaciation to a dynamic, polythermal ice sheet took place during the middle Miocene. The northernmost Peninsula was overridden by an ice sheet in the early Pliocene (approximately 5.3-3.6 Ma). The long cooling history of the peninsula is consistent with the extended timescales of tectonic evolution of the Antarctic margin, involving the opening of ocean passageways and associated establishment of circumpolar circulation.

  17. A 44 kyr Paleo-Roughness Record From Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, P. R.; Wolff, E. W.; Mulvaney, R.

    2004-12-01

    Two 788 m high resolution conductivity records from ice cores drilled at Dome C, Antarctica, provide an unprecedented opportunity to examine the past roughness of the ice sheet surface. We measured the distribution of the depth differences between matched synchronous events in the cores. This enabled the mean surface height distribution to be estimated for time intervals in the past. The technique was confirmed by checking the results against the conductivity profile of a third nearby core (120m depth), enabling uncertainties to be established. The mean standard deviation of surface roughness was 0.029 m for 0 to 11.5 kyr BP and 0.031 m for 18 to 45 kyr BP in ice equivalence. A record of this nature allows us to assess the reliability of the fine scale data in an ice core record. Specifically how well the preserved information represents the mean conditions at the time of deposition and the extent to which short term events may be missing from the core. This is of particular interest when matching volcanic horizons with other paleo records and when studying rates of volcanism. We find the probability of a typical volcanic signal being indistinguishable from background noise is ~ 6% during the Holocene but ~ 26% during the last glacial period. The 44 kyr roughness record, originating from dunes and sastrugi at the ice sheet surface, is likely to be a function of past wind speed, accumulation rate and temperature. Future developments constraining this relationship should allow conclusions regarding past local wind speed to be drawn from the record.

  18. Genetic variability of Colobanthus quitensis from King George Island (Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Androsiuk Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic pearlwort (Colobanthus quitensis is one of the flowering plant species considered native to maritime Antarctica. Although the species was intensively analyzed towards its morphological, anatomical and physiological adaptation to local environment, its genetic variability is still poorly studied. In the presented study, a recently developed retrotransposon-based DNA marker system (inter Primer Binding Site – iPBS was applied to assess the genetic diversity and differentiation of C. quitensis populations from King George Island (South Shetland Islands, West Antarctic. A total of 143 scoreable bands were detected using 7 iPBS primers among 122 plant specimens representing 8 populations. 55 (38.5% bands were found polymorphic, with an average of 14.3% polymorphic fragments per primer. Nine of all observed fragments were represented as a private bands deployed unevenly among populations. Low genetic diversity (on average He = 0.040 and I = 0.061 and moderate population differentiation (FST = 0.164 characterize the analyzed material. Clustering based on PCoA revealed, that the populations located on the edges of the study area diverge from the central populations. The pattern of population differentiation corresponds well with their geographic location and the characteristics of the sampling sites. Due to the character of iPBS markers, the observed genetic variability of populations may be explained by the genome rearrangements caused by mobilization of mobile genetic elements in the response to various stress factors. Additionally, this study demonstrates the usefulness of iPBS markers for genetic diversity studies in wild species.

  19. Contrasting Photo-physiological Responses of the Haptophyte Phaeocystis Antarctica and the Diatom Pseudonitzschia sp. in the Ross Sea (Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha Tozzi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic is a unique environment in which substantial variations in irradiance occur over a number of time scales, and as a result phytoplankton need to acclimate and adapt to these changes. We conducted field and laboratory manipulations in the Ross Sea, Antarctica to examine photophysiological differences between Phaeocystis antarctica and Pseudonitzschia sp. a diatom that commonly occurrs in the Ross Sea, since these are the two functional groups that dominate abundance and productivity. Both exhibited reduced quantum yields due to high irradiances. P. antarctica, a haptophyte, displays a distinct photophysiological response to irradiance when compared to diatoms. P. antarctica showed a rapid recovery from high light exposure, as indicated by the rapid return to initial, high quantum yields, in contrast to diatoms, which responded more slowly. Absorption cross sections were high in both forms, but those in P. antarctica were significantly higher. Both organisms recovered within 24 h to initial quantum yields, suggesting that high irradiance exposure does not have a permanent effect on these organisms. Among all micronutrient additions (iron, cobalt, zinc and vitamin B12, only iron additions resulted in rapid impacts on quantum yields. Iron limitation also can result in reduced photosynthetic efficiency. Understanding these photophysiologial responses and the impact of oceanographic conditions provides constraints on modeling efforts of photosynthesis and primary productivity in the Antarctic.

  20. Predicting outdoor sound

    CERN Document Server

    Attenborough, Keith; Horoshenkov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    1. Introduction  2. The Propagation of Sound Near Ground Surfaces in a Homogeneous Medium  3. Predicting the Acoustical Properties of Outdoor Ground Surfaces  4. Measurements of the Acoustical Properties of Ground Surfaces and Comparisons with Models  5. Predicting Effects of Source Characteristics on Outdoor Sound  6. Predictions, Approximations and Empirical Results for Ground Effect Excluding Meteorological Effects  7. Influence of Source Motion on Ground Effect and Diffraction  8. Predicting Effects of Mixed Impedance Ground  9. Predicting the Performance of Outdoor Noise Barriers  10. Predicting Effects of Vegetation, Trees and Turbulence  11. Analytical Approximations including Ground Effect, Refraction and Turbulence  12. Prediction Schemes  13. Predicting Sound in an Urban Environment.

  1. Live from Antarctica: The coldest, windiest place on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this first part of a four part 'Passport to Knowledge Special', hosted by Camille Jennings from Maryland Public Television, children from Maryland and Texas schools had the opportunity to directly interact with and ask questions of scientists and researchers in Antarctica live. The physical characteristics of Antarctica are featured, along with their effects on the human and microbiological organisms living in the region. The reasons behind the clothing worn in the Antarctic and the importance of the meteorological station are featured. Interviews with Professor Ian Dolziel (U of Texas) and Lt. commander John Joseph, NSFA (the head of the Navy Meteorology Center) occur with the school children, along with actual video footage of the surrounding geological features and geography. The 'Weatherops' is located at McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

  2. Ecological Biogeography of the Terrestrial Nematodes of Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Byron J.; Wall, Diana H.; Virginia, Ross A.; Broos, Emma; Knox, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The terrestrial ecosystems of Victoria Land, Antarctica are characteristically simple in terms of biological diversity and ecological functioning. Nematodes are the most commonly encountered and abundant metazoans of Victoria Land soils, yet little is known of their diversity and distribution. Herein we present a summary of the geographic distribution, habitats and ecology of the terrestrial nematodes of Victoria Land from published and unpublished sources. All Victoria Land nematodes are endemic to Antarctica, and many are common and widely distributed at landscape scales. However, at smaller spatial scales, populations can have patchy distributions, with the presence or absence of each species strongly influenced by specific habitat requirements. As the frequency of nematode introductions to Antarctica increases, and soil habitats are altered in response to climate change, our current understanding of the environmental parameters associated with the biogeography of Antarctic nematofauna will be crucial to monitoring and possibly mitigating changes to these unique soil ecosystems. PMID:25061360

  3. Triassic tetrapods from antarctica: evidence for continental drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, D H; Colbert, E H; Breed, W J; Jensen, J A; Powell, J S

    1970-09-18

    During the austral summer of 1969-1970 bones of Lower Triassic vertebrates were excavated from coarse quartzose sandstones forming stream channel deposits of the Fremouw Formation at Coalsack Bluff, in the Transantarctic Mountains of Antarctica. This is the first assemblage of fossil tetrapods of significant geologic age to be found on the Antarctic Continent. The fossils include labyrinthodont amphibians, presumed thecodont reptiles, and therapsid reptiles, including the definitive genus, Lystrosaurus. This genus is typical of the Lower Triassic of southern Africa, and is also found in India and China. Lystrosaurus and associated vertebrates found in Antarctica were land-living animals: therefore their presence on the South Polar Continent would seem to indicate the contiguity of Antarctica, Africa, and India in Early Triassic times.

  4. Extraterrestrial sound for planetaria: A pedagogical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, T G; Banda, N; Berges, B; Joseph, P F; White, P R

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this project was to supply an acoustical simulation device to a local planetarium for use in live shows aimed at engaging and inspiring children in science and engineering. The device plays audio simulations of estimates of the sounds produced by natural phenomena to accompany audio-visual presentations and live shows about Venus, Mars, and Titan. Amongst the simulated noise are the sounds of thunder, wind, and cryo-volcanoes. The device can also modify the speech of the presenter (or audience member) in accordance with the underlying physics to reproduce those vocalizations as if they had been produced on the world under discussion. Given that no time series recordings exist of sounds from other worlds, these sounds had to be simulated. The goal was to ensure that the audio simulations were delivered in time for a planetarium's launch show to enable the requested outreach to children. The exercise has also allowed an explanation of the science and engineering behind the creation of the sounds. This has been achieved for young children, and also for older students and undergraduates, who could then debate the limitations of that method.

  5. Handbook for sound engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Ballou, Glen

    2013-01-01

    Handbook for Sound Engineers is the most comprehensive reference available for audio engineers. All audio topics are explored: if you work on anything related to audio you should not be without this book! The 4th edition of this trusted reference has been updated to reflect changes in the industry since the publication of the 3rd edition in 2002 -- including new technologies like software-based recording systems such as Pro Tools and Sound Forge; digital recording using MP3, wave files and others; mobile audio devices such as iPods and MP3 players. Over 40 topic

  6. Sound for digital video

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, Tomlinson

    2013-01-01

    Achieve professional quality sound on a limited budget! Harness all new, Hollywood style audio techniques to bring your independent film and video productions to the next level.In Sound for Digital Video, Second Edition industry experts Tomlinson Holman and Arthur Baum give you the tools and knowledge to apply recent advances in audio capture, video recording, editing workflow, and mixing to your own film or video with stunning results. This fresh edition is chockfull of techniques, tricks, and workflow secrets that you can apply to your own projects from preproduction

  7. Sound & The Senses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2012-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now technically generated and post-produced, how are they aesthetically conceptualized and how culturally dependant are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with all the other senses and their cultural, biographical and technological construction...... over time? And how is listening and sounding a deeply social activity – constructing our way of living together in cities as well as in apartment houses? A radio feature with Jonathan Sterne, AGF a.k.a Antye Greie, Jens Gerrit Papenburg & Holger Schulze....

  8. Beacons of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knakkergaard, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The chapter discusses expectations and imaginations vis-à-vis the concert hall of the twenty-first century. It outlines some of the central historical implications of western culture’s haven for sounding music. Based on the author’s study of the Icelandic concert-house Harpa, the chapter considers...... how these implications, together with the prime mover’s visions, have been transformed as private investors and politicians took over. The chapter furthermore investigates the objectives regarding musical sound and the far-reaching demands concerning acoustics that modern concert halls are required...

  9. Trace metals in Antarctica related to climate change and increasing human impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargagli, R

    2000-01-01

    Metals are natural constituents of the abiotic and biotic components of all ecosystems, and under natural conditions they are cycled within and between the geochemical spheres--the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere--at quite steady fluxes. In the second half of the twentieth century, the huge increase in energy and mineral consumption determined anthropogenic emissions of several metals exceeding those from natural sources, e.g., volcanoes and windborne soil particles. In the Northern Hemisphere, the biogeochemical cycles of Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and other metals were significantly altered, even in Arctic regions. On the contrary, available data on trace metal concentrations in abiotic matrices from continental Antarctica, summarized in this review, suggest that the biogeochemical cycle of Pb is probably the only one that has been significantly altered by anthropogenic emissions in Antarctica and elsewhere in the Southern Hemisphere, especially in the period 1950-1975. Environmental contamination by other metals from anthropogenic sources in Antarctica itself can generally only be detected in snow samples taken within a range of a few kilometers or several hundred meters from scientific stations. Local metal pollution from human activities in Antarctica may compromise studies aimed at assessing the biogeochemical cycle of trace elements and the effects of global climate change. Thus, this review focuses on concentrations of metals in atmospheric particulate, snow, surface soils, and freshwater from the Antarctic continent and surface sediments and seawater from the Southern Ocean, which can plausibly be regarded as global background values of trace elements. These baselines are also necessary in view of the construction of new stations, the expansion of existing facilities to support research, and the growth of tourism and fisheries. Despite difficulties in making comparisons with data from other remote areas of the world, concentrations of trace metals

  10. Measurement Of Solar Radiation at New Delhi, High Altitude Observatory, Hanle and Maitri Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S. L.; Arya, B. C.

    radiation at 305 nm was found to be an order of magnitude higher at Hanle and Antarctica compared to that at a low altitude station like Delhi. The effect of these intense radiation was easily seen on the faces of the local inhabitants particularly those working in open field at Hanle/Leh. The water vapour was found to be one tenth at Hanle and Maitri as compared to Delhi and therefore Hanle and Maitri are very good sites for astronomical studies. The column ozone measured at Maitri showed that the ozone hole during spring of 2002 was not as deep as that during 1997 and was for less duration while again it was very deep and for a longer duration during 2003. The variability in the ozone hole in different years is attributed to the dynamics and meteorological conditions prevailing over Antarctica. The data obtained at these experimental sites may provide base line / reference values for various environmental parameters. In the present communication the salient features of the instruments used and results obtained will be discussed in detail.

  11. Hydrocarbons in benthic marine algae of the Vestfold Hills, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.; Bhosle, N.B.

    1987-02-01

    Recently, Antarctic continent has been the center for diverse research activities. This has resulted in a large number of research and supply vessels visiting Antarctica, which may lead to the contamination of Antarctic environment due to unintentional release of petroleum products. It is, therefore, essential to monitor the concentration of various pollutants in water, sediment, flora and fauna of this region which may also serve as a baseline data for future comparison. With this in view, total hydrocarbon concentration in some marine benthic algae collected from the Vestfold Hills, Antarctica was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy.

  12. Declassified Intelligence Satellite Photography (DISP) Coverage of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Robert; Seider, Wendy

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a nine-week summer project examining all Declassified Intelligence Satellite Photography (DISP) of Antarctica. It was discovered that the data were collected in three separate missions during 1962 and 1963. The first two missions covered only the coastal areas, while the third mission covered the entire continent. Many of the 1782 frames collected were cloudy. This is especially true of West Antarctica. An optimal set of photographs covering the entire Antarctic coastline is identified along with some examples that show changes in the coastline which have occurred since the early 1960s.

  13. Deglaciation records of 17O-excess in East Antarctica: reliable reconstruction of oceanic normalized relative humidity from coastal sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stenni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured δ17O and δ18O in two Antarctic ice cores at EPICA Dome C (EDC and TALDICE (TD, respectively, and computed 17O-excess with respect to VSMOW. The comparison of our 17O-excess data with the previous record obtained at Vostok (Landais et al., 2008a revealed differences up to 35 ppm in 17O-excess mean level and evolution for the three sites. Our data show that the large increase depicted at Vostok (20 ppm during the last deglaciation is a regional and not a general pattern in the temporal distribution of 17O-excess in East Antarctica. The EDC data display an increase of 12 ppm, whereas the TD data show no significant variation from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM to the Early Holocene (EH. A Lagrangian moisture source diagnostic revealed very different source regions for Vostok and EDC compared to TD. These findings combined with the results of a sensitivity analysis, using a Rayleigh-type isotopic model, suggest that normalized relative humidity (RHn at the oceanic source region (OSR is a determining factor for the spatial differences of 17O-excess in East Antarctica. However, 17O-excess in remote sites of continental Antarctica (e.g. Vostok may be highly sensitive to local effects. Hence, we consider 17O-excess in coastal East Antarctic ice cores (TD to be more reliable as a proxy for RHn at the OSR.

  14. ABOUT SOUNDS IN VIDEO GAMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denikin Anton A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the aesthetical and practical possibilities for sounds (sound design in video games and interactive applications. Outlines the key features of the game sound, such as simulation, representativeness, interactivity, immersion, randomization, and audio-visuality. The author defines the basic terminology in study of game audio, as well as identifies significant aesthetic differences between film sounds and sounds in video game projects. It is an attempt to determine the techniques of art analysis for the approaches in study of video games including aesthetics of their sounds. The article offers a range of research methods, considering the video game scoring as a contemporary creative practice.

  15. Seasonality of microseismic signal in Antarctica, and its link to sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, A.; Grob, M.; Stutzmann, E.

    2011-12-01

    Analyses of seismic spectra ubiquitously show broad energetic peaks over a 1-20 s period band, primarily composed of Rayleigh waves, and commonly referred to as primary (10-20 s) and secondary (1-9 s) microseisms. These microseisms are due to ocean gravity wave interactions that cause pressure oscillations which in turn generate seismic waves at the ocean floor. In Antarctica, the microseismic signal is weaker in winter than in summer due to the presence of sea ice, which prevents incoming swells from reaching the coast, thereby impeding both direct coupling at the coast (responsible for primary microseisms) and swell reflection (responsible for secondary microseisms). We present the result of a systematic study of microseism spectra for seismic stations in coastal Antarctica. We show that, to first order, microseism power is anti-correlated with ice presence, which invites the possibility of recovering past trends in average ice-duration. To second order, the link between microseism power and sea ice is highly dependent on local conditions. Therefore, the coast-masking effect of sea ice gives insights into the detailed mechanisms of microseism generation.

  16. Role of Snow Deposition of Perfluoroalkylated Substances at Coastal Livingston Island (Maritime Antarctica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Paulo; Zhang, Yifeng; Martin, Jonathan W; Pizarro, Mariana; Jiménez, Begoña; Dachs, Jordi

    2017-08-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are ubiquitous in the environment, including remote polar regions. To evaluate the role of snow deposition as an input of PFAS to Maritime Antarctica, fresh snow deposition, surface snow, streams from melted snow, coastal seawater, and plankton samples were collected over a three-month period (December 2014-February 2015) at Livingston Island. Local sources of PFASs were significant for perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs) and C7-14 perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) in snow but limited to the transited areas of the research station. The concentrations of 14 ionizable PFAS (∑PFAS) in freshly deposited snow (760-3600 pg L-1) were 1 order of magnitude higher than those in background surface snow (82-430 pg L-1). ∑PFAS ranged from 94 to 420 pg L-1 in seawater and from 3.1 to 16 ng gdw-1 in plankton. Ratios of individual PFAS concentrations in freshly deposited snow relative to surface snow (CSD/CSnow), snowmelt (CSD/CSM), and seawater (CSD/CSW) were close to 1 (from 0.44 to 1.4) for all perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) isomers, suggesting that snowfall does not contribute significantly to PFOS in seawater. Conversely, these ratios for PFCAs ranged from 1 to 33 and were positively correlated with the number of carbons in the PFCA alkylated chain. These trends suggest that snow deposition, scavenging sea-salt aerosol bound PFAS, plays a role as a significant input of PFCAs to the Maritime Antarctica.

  17. Glacier advance during Marine Isotope Stage 11 in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, Kate M.; Lamp, Jennifer L.; Winckler, Gisela; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Marchant, David R.

    2017-01-01

    We mapped six distinct glacial moraines alongside Stocking Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Stocking Glacier is one of several alpine glaciers in the Dry Valleys fringed by multiple cold-based drop moraines. To determine the age of the outermost moraine, we collected 10 boulders of Ferrar Dolerite along the crest of the moraine and analyzed mineral separates of pyroxene for cosmogenic 3He. On the basis of these measurements, the exposure age for the outermost moraine is 391 ± 35 ka. This represents the first documented advance of alpine glacier ice in the Dry Valleys during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11. At this time, Stocking Glacier was ~20–30% larger than today. The cause of ice expansion is uncertain, but most likely it is related to increased atmospheric temperature and precipitation, associated with reduced ice extent in the nearby Ross Embayment. The data suggest complex local environmental response to warm climates in Antarctica and have implications for glacial response to Holocene warming. The study also demonstrates the potential for using alpine glacier chronologies in the Transantarctic Mountains as proxies for retreat of grounded glacier ice in the Ross Embayment. PMID:28139676

  18. Glacier advance during Marine Isotope Stage 11 in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, Kate M.; Lamp, Jennifer L.; Winckler, Gisela; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Marchant, David R.

    2017-01-01

    We mapped six distinct glacial moraines alongside Stocking Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Stocking Glacier is one of several alpine glaciers in the Dry Valleys fringed by multiple cold-based drop moraines. To determine the age of the outermost moraine, we collected 10 boulders of Ferrar Dolerite along the crest of the moraine and analyzed mineral separates of pyroxene for cosmogenic 3He. On the basis of these measurements, the exposure age for the outermost moraine is 391 ± 35 ka. This represents the first documented advance of alpine glacier ice in the Dry Valleys during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11. At this time, Stocking Glacier was ~20-30% larger than today. The cause of ice expansion is uncertain, but most likely it is related to increased atmospheric temperature and precipitation, associated with reduced ice extent in the nearby Ross Embayment. The data suggest complex local environmental response to warm climates in Antarctica and have implications for glacial response to Holocene warming. The study also demonstrates the potential for using alpine glacier chronologies in the Transantarctic Mountains as proxies for retreat of grounded glacier ice in the Ross Embayment.

  19. Multi-sensor observation of precipitation in a coastal region of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Alexis; Grazioli, Jacopo; Genthon, Christophe; DelGuasta, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a Italian-French-Swiss collaboration, a suite of instruments dedicated to the observation of solid precipitation was deployed at the French Antarctic station Dumont d'Urville on the coast of Adélie Land in Antarctica during (southern) summer 2015-2016. On the remote sensing side, a depolarization lidar (531 nm), a 24-GHz vertical Doppler profiler (MRR from Metek) and a scanning X-band polarimetric radar (called MXPol) were nearly collocated. For measurement at the ground level, a weather station (for local meteorological conditions), a weighing gauge (Pluvio2 from OTT, with wind shield), an optical disdrometer (Biral) and a multi-angle snowflake camera (MASC) were complementing the remote sensing instruments. In addition, daily radiosounding records collected by MeteoFrance were available. This experimental set up was built in order to investigate the added value of remote sensing for the monitoring and understanding of Antarctic precipitation (variability, microphysics), as well as to collect reference data for the evaluation of satellite precipitation products derived from CloudSat and simulated from numerical prediction weather models. Moreover, the potential of radar measurement to distinguish blowing snow from precipitation, an acute problem in the windy coastal regions of Antarctica, was also investigated. This contribution presents the motivation, the set-up and a first analysis of this unprecedented data set about Antarctic precipitation.

  20. Exploring Sound with Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Meyer, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Differences in insect morphology and movement during singing provide a fascinating opportunity for students to investigate insects while learning about the characteristics of sound. In the activities described here, students use a free online computer software program to explore the songs of the major singing insects and experiment with making…

  1. See This Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Bjørnsten

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af udstillingen See This Sound på Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz, Østrig, som markerer den foreløbige kulmination på et samarbejde mellem Lentos Kunstmuseum og Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Media.Art.Research. Udover den konkrete udstilling er samarbejdet tænkt som en ambitiøs, tværfaglig unders...

  2. The Sounds of Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    Two, I propose that this framework allows for at least a theoretical distinction between the way in which extreme metal – e.g. black metal, doom metal, funeral doom metal, death metal – relates to its sound as music and the way in which much other music may be conceived of as being constituted...

  3. Sound & The Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2014-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now socially constructed and evaluated, how are they architecturally conceptualized and how dependant on urban planning, industrial developments and political decisions are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with social interactions and their ...

  4. Neurobiology: Sounding the Alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belin, Pascal; Zatorre, Robert J

    2015-09-21

    Acoustical analysis has revealed a peculiar pattern of energy distribution in human screams; behavioral and neuroimaging data suggest that this pattern is associated with rapid and enhanced processing of sound cues signalling fear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sounds of the Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough-Brabson, Ellen; Achilles, Elayne; Ashcraft, Joan

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the program called "Sounds of the Desert" that celebrates the Southwest indigenous culture and focuses on understanding music in relation to history and culture. Emphasizes the study of Mariachi music that is being taught alongside band, orchestra, and chorus from the third grade to senior high in many Tucson (Arizona) schools.…

  6. Urban Sound Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live...

  7. Urban Sound Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    . The article concludes that the ways in which recent sound installations work with urban ecologies vary. While two of the examples blend into the urban environment, the other transfers the concert format and its mode of listening to urban space. Last, and in accordance with recent soundscape research, we point...

  8. Second sound tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jihee; Ihas, Gary G.; Ekdahl, Dan

    2017-10-01

    It is common that a physical system resonates at a particular frequency, whose frequency depends on physical parameters which may change in time. Often, one would like to automatically track this signal as the frequency changes, measuring, for example, its amplitude. In scientific research, one would also like to utilize the standard methods, such as lock-in amplifiers, to improve the signal to noise ratio. We present a complete He ii second sound system that uses positive feedback to generate a sinusoidal signal of constant amplitude via automatic gain control. This signal is used to produce temperature/entropy waves (second sound) in superfluid helium-4 (He ii). A lock-in amplifier limits the oscillation to a desirable frequency and demodulates the received sound signal. Using this tracking system, a second sound signal probed turbulent decay in He ii. We present results showing that the tracking system is more reliable than those of a conventional fixed frequency method; there is less correlation with temperature (frequency) fluctuation when the tracking system is used.

  9. Making Sense of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepika; Lankford, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    From the earliest days of their lives, children are exposed to all kinds of sound, from soft, comforting voices to the frightening rumble of thunder. Consequently, children develop their own naïve explanations largely based upon their experiences with phenomena encountered every day. When new information does not support existing conceptions,…

  10. Sound of Stockholm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2013-01-01

    Med sine kun 4 år bag sig er Sound of Stockholm relativt ny i det internationale festival-landskab. Festivalen er efter sigende udsprunget af en større eller mindre frustration over, at den svenske eksperimentelle musikscenes forskellige foreninger og organisationer gik hinanden bedene, og...

  11. The Universe of Sound

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Sound Scultor, Bill Fontana, the second winner of the Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN residency award, and his science inspiration partner, CERN cosmologist Subodh Patil, present their work in art and science at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 4 July 2013 at 19:00.

  12. On-site and in situ remediation technologies applicable to metal-contaminated sites in Antarctica and the Arctic: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Camenzuli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Effective management of contaminated land requires a sound understanding of site geology, chemistry and biology. This is particularly the case for Antarctica and the Arctic, which function using different legislative frameworks to those of industrialized, temperate environments and are logistically challenging environments to operate in. This paper reviews seven remediation technologies currently used, or demonstrating potential for on-site or in situ use at metal-contaminated sites in polar environments, namely permeable reactive barriers (PRB, chemical fixation, bioremediation, phytoremediation, electrokinetic separation, land capping, and pump and treat systems. The technologies reviewed are discussed in terms of their advantages, limitations and overall potential for the management of metal-contaminated sites in Antarctica and the Arctic. This review demonstrates that several of the reviewed technologies show potential for on-site or in situ usage in Antarctica and the Arctic. Of the reviewed technologies, chemical fixation and PRB are particularly promising technologies for metal-contaminated sites in polar environments. However, further research and relevant field trials are required before these technologies can be considered proven techniques.

  13. Reproductive biology of Perkinsiana antarctica (Kinberg (Polychaeta, Sabellidae in the Straits of Magellan (South America: Systematic and ecological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Gambi

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive biology and larval development of the polychaete Perkinsiana Antarctica (Kinberg, 1867 (Sabellidae are described of a population sampled in October 1994 and March 1997 in the type locality of this species, the Straits of Magellan (Southern Chile. Perkinsiana antarctica is a simultaneous hermaphrodite. Eggs are present in the thorax and in the anterior part of the abdomen, while sperm cells occur in the posterior abdomen. Spermatids are grouped in tetrads; mature sperm cells present an oval nucleus (length of major axis about 3 µm and the acrosome is about 2.5 µm long with a conoid shape. Mature eggs have a mean diameter of 235 µm; embryos and larvae are incubated within the branchial crown of specimens exceeding 10 mm in length. Hatching larvae have a mean length of 420 µm, with 4 segments, each bearing two notochaeta; two ocular spots and a well-developed prototroch are present at the anterior end. Both number of embryos and larvae per individual showed a relatively high range of variation (embryos from 54 to 374, mean=173; larvae from 18 to 222, mean=101. The features of reproductive biology in P. antarctica do not seem to be related to the size of the species itself, as P. antarctica represents one of the largest-sized sabellids that are brooding eggs, and producing a relatively high number of offspring. These reproductive and developmental traits seem more related to the colonization of harsh and selective habitats, such as the intertidal and shallow subtidal of the Subantarctic areas. Comparisons with the reproductive biology of other species of Perkinsiana demonstrate a high degree of variability within the genus regarding reproduction and the apparent lack of synapomorphies.

  14. MULTIMEDIA CARTOGRAPHY: MAPS WITH SOUND DESIGN AND SOUND MAPS

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Medvedev

    2013-01-01

     Today,sound maps is not so popular like other and not so interested for social oriented projects. Basically only these typesof thematic maps are use sound like the way of representation: political, zoogeographical, vegetation, ethnographic isthe most meeting application of sound registration to maps. In this article a new way of presenting the terrain with sound that is designed for interactive maps with audio support for disabled people is described. The method is based on a comparison betw...

  15. Approaches to the study of neural coding of sound source location and sound envelope in real environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Bishop, Brian; Kim, Duck O.

    2012-01-01

    The major functions of the auditory system are recognition (what is the sound) and localization (where is the sound). Although each of these has received considerable attention, rarely are they studied in combination. Furthermore, the stimuli used in the bulk of studies did not represent sound location in real environments and ignored the effects of reverberation. Another ignored dimension is the distance of a sound source. Finally, there is a scarcity of studies conducted in unanesthetized animals. We illustrate a set of efficient methods that overcome these shortcomings. We use the virtual auditory space method (VAS) to efficiently present sounds at different azimuths, different distances and in different environments. Additionally, this method allows for efficient switching between binaural and monaural stimulation and alteration of acoustic cues singly or in combination to elucidate neural mechanisms underlying localization and recognition. Such procedures cannot be performed with real sound field stimulation. Our research is designed to address the following questions: Are IC neurons specialized to process what and where auditory information? How does reverberation and distance of the sound source affect this processing? How do IC neurons represent sound source distance? Are neural mechanisms underlying envelope processing binaural or monaural? PMID:22754505

  16. Approaches to the study of neural coding of sound source location and sound envelope in real environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyuki eKuwada

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The major functions of the auditory system are recognition (what is the sound and localization (where is the sound. Although each of these has received considerable attention, rarely are they studied in combination. Furthermore, the stimuli used in the bulk of studies did not represent sound location in real environments and ignored the effects of reverberation. Another ignored dimension is the distance of a sound source. Finally, there is a scarcity of studies conducted in unanesthetized animals. We illustrate a set of efficient methods that overcome these shortcomings. We use the virtual auditory space method (VAS to efficiently present sounds at different azimuths, different distances and in different environments. Additionally, this method allows for efficient switching between binaural and monaural stimulation and alteration of acoustic cues singly or in combination to elucidate neural mechanisms underlying localization and recognition. Such procedures cannot be performed with real sound field stimulation. Our research is designed to address the following questions: Are IC neurons specialized to process what and where auditory information? How does reverberation and distance of the sound source affect this processing? How do IC neurons represent sound source distance? Are neural mechanisms underlying envelope processing binaural or monaural ?

  17. Eddy Flow during Magma Emplacement: The Basemelt Sill, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petford, N.; Mirhadizadeh, S.

    2014-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys magmatic system, Antarctica, forms part of the Ferrar dolerite Large Igneous Province. Comprising a vertical stack of interconnected sills, the complex provides a world-class example of pervasive lateral magma flow on a continental scale. The lowermost intrusion (Basement Sill) offers detailed sections through the now frozen particle macrostructure of a congested magma slurry1. Image-based numerical modelling where the intrusion geometry defines its own unique finite element mesh allows simulations of the flow regime to be made that incorporate realistic magma particle size and flow geometries obtained directly from field measurements. One testable outcome relates to the origin of rhythmic layering where analytical results imply the sheared suspension intersects the phase space for particle Reynolds and Peclet number flow characteristic of macroscopic structures formation2. Another relates to potentially novel crystal-liquid segregation due to the formation of eddies locally at undulating contacts at the floor and roof of the intrusion. The eddies are transient and mechanical in origin, unrelated to well-known fluid dynamical effects around obstacles where flow is turbulent. Numerical particle tracing reveals that these low Re number eddies can both trap (remove) and eject particles back into the magma at a later time according to their mass density. This trapping mechanism has potential to develop local variations in structure (layering) and magma chemistry that may otherwise not occur where the contact between magma and country rock is linear. Simulations indicate that eddy formation is best developed where magma viscosity is in the range 1-102 Pa s. Higher viscosities (> 103 Pa s) tend to dampen the effect implying eddy development is most likely a transient feature. However, it is nice to think that something as simple as a bumpy contact could impart physical and by implication chemical diversity in igneous rocks. 1Marsh, D.B. (2004), A

  18. Frequency Dynamics of the First Heart Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John Charles

    Cardiac auscultation is a fundamental clinical tool but first heart sound origins and significance remain controversial. Previous clinical studies have implicated resonant vibrations of both the myocardium and the valves. Accordingly, the goals of this thesis were threefold, (1) to characterize the frequency dynamics of the first heart sound, (2) to determine the relative contribution of the myocardium and the valves in determining first heart sound frequency, and (3) to develop new tools for non-stationary signal analysis. A resonant origin for first heart sound generation was tested through two studies in an open-chest canine preparation. Heart sounds were recorded using ultralight acceleration transducers cemented directly to the epicardium. The first heart sound was observed to be non-stationary and multicomponent. The most dominant feature was a powerful, rapidly-rising frequency component that preceded mitral valve closure. Two broadband components were observed; the first coincided with mitral valve closure while the second significantly preceded aortic valve opening. The spatial frequency of left ventricular vibrations was both high and non-stationary which indicated that the left ventricle was not vibrating passively in response to intracardiac pressure fluctuations but suggested instead that the first heart sound is a propagating transient. In the second study, regional myocardial ischemia was induced by left coronary circumflex arterial occlusion. Acceleration transducers were placed on the ischemic and non-ischemic myocardium to determine whether ischemia produced local or global changes in first heart sound amplitude and frequency. The two zones exhibited disparate amplitude and frequency behavior indicating that the first heart sound is not a resonant phenomenon. To objectively quantify the presence and orientation of signal components, Radon transformation of the time -frequency plane was performed and found to have considerable potential for pattern

  19. Direction-of-Arrival Estimation for Radar Ice Sounding Surface Clutter Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik; Dall, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Ice sounding radars are able to measure ice sheets by profiling their glaciological features from the surface to the bedrock. The current airborne and, in particular, future space-based systems are suffering from off-nadir surface clutter, which can mask the depth signal of interest. The most...... estimation for surface clutter signals, which includes a formulation of the mathematical foundation of spatial aliasing. DOA estimation is applied to data acquired with the P-band POLarimetric Airborne Radar Ice Sounder at the Jutulstraumen Glacier, Antarctica. The effects of spatial aliasing related...

  20. Determinants of terrestrial arthropod community composition at Cape Hallett, Antarctica

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sinclair, BJ

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and abundance of free-living arthropods from soil and under stones were surveyed at the Cape Hallett ice-free area (ASPA No. 106), North Victoria Land, Antarctica. A total of 327 samples from 67 plots yielded 11 species...

  1. Parts of Antarctica's King George Island are littered with trash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2013-02-01

    A report released 7 February by ecologists from Germany's Friedrich Schiller University Jena reveals that parts of King George Island, a logistical hub for international research in Antarctica, are home to open pits of trash, decaying field huts, and other forms of pollution.

  2. Radiocarbon analyses along the EDML ice core in Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wal, R.S.W.; Meijer, H.A.J.; van Rooij, M.; van der Veen, C.

    2007-01-01

    Samples, 17 in total, from the EDML core drilled at Kohnen station Antarctica are analysed for 14CO and 14CO2 with a dry-extraction technique in combination with accelerator mass spectrometry. Results of the in situ produced 14CO fraction show a very low concentration of in situ produced 14CO.

  3. Antarctica: Arena for South American Cooperation or Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Jack

    A number of converging circumstances suggest that Antarctica may be a major object of geopolitical attention in South America in the decade to come. The Malvinas/Falklands crisis focused geopolitical attention on the South Atlantic and the chain of Southern (Austral) Islands which link the southern tip of South America to the Antarctic Peninsula.…

  4. Mass Casualty Incident Response and Aeromedical Evacuation in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills, Christopher N

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Antarctica is one of the most remote regions on Earth. Mass casualty incident (MCI responses in Antarctica are prone to complications from multiple environmental and operational challenges. This review of the current status of MCI risks and response strategies for Antarctica focuses on aeromedical evacuation, a critical component of many possible MCI scenarios. Extreme cold and weather, a lack of medical resources and a multitude of disparate international bases all exert unique demands on MCI response planning. Increasing cruise ship traffic is also escalating the risk of MCI occurrence. To be successful, MCI response must be well coordinated and undertaken by trained rescuers, especially in the setting of Antarctica. Helicopter rescue or aeromedical evacuation of victims to off-continent facilities may be necessary. Currently, military forces have the greatest capacity for mass air evacuation. Specific risks that are likely to occur include structure collapses, vehicle incapacitations, vehicle crashes and fires. All of these events pose concomitant risks of hypothermia among both victims and rescuers. Antarctica’s unique environment requires flexible yet robust MCI response planning among the many entities in operation on the continent. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:37-42.

  5. Biomonitoring of heavy metals using Usnea antarctica lichens (extended abstract)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvěřina, O.; Coufalík, Pavel; Barták, M.; Komárek, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2016), s. 238-239 ISSN 1805-0689. [Biosciences in Polar and Alpine Research. Workshop 2016. Brno, 23.11.2016-23.11.2016] Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : heavy metal * lichen * Antarctica Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry

  6. Triassic leech cocoon from Antarctica contains fossil bell animal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomfleur, Benjamin; Kerp, Hans; Taylor, Thomas N.

    2012-01-01

    , exceptional fossil deposits that preserve soft-bodied organisms provide a rare glimpse of the true biodiversity during past periods of Earth history. We here present an extraordinary find of a fossil ciliate that is encased inside the wall layer of a more than 200 Ma leech cocoon from Antarctica...

  7. Foraminifera from the deep lake terraces, Vestfold hills, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Williams, R.; Kerry, K.R.

    Fourteen species of planktonic and forty-two species of benthonic foraminifera are identified from two transects of terraces near Deep Lake in the Vestfold Hills, Antarctica. All the planktonic and a few of the benthonic species occur on the western...

  8. Catalysis by Candida antarctica B (CALB) immobilized on natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: In this work, a lipase B from Candida antarctica strain was immobilized onto natural silica carriers via adsorption to enhance its feasibility in practical applications. Methodology and results: The biocatalyst was prepared by simple adsorption on the support whose composition was beforehand characterized and the ...

  9. DOMECair: An Airborne Campaign in Antarctica Supporting SMOS Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl

    2013-01-01

    In search for a stable, well characterized terrestrial calibration target for SMOS, an airborne campaign was carried out in January 2013 over the Dome C area of Antarctica, and the surface was measured by an L-band radiometer. The focus was on homogeneity, and an area of 350 × 350 km around...

  10. Kelp gulls Larus dominicanus nest in Antarctica, at subantarctic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Kelp gulls Larus dominicanus nest in Antarctica, at subantarctic islands, in South America, New Zealand,. Australia and in southern Africa (Burger and Gochfield. 1996). All populations, except that in southern. Africa, are of the nominate race L. d. dominicanus. That in southern Africa comprises an endemic sub- species, L. d.

  11. Aerobiology Over Antarctica-A New Initiativefor Atmospheric Ecology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pearce, D.; Alekhina, I. A.; Teraud, A.; Wilmotte, A.; Quesada, A.; Edwards, A.; Dommergue, A.; Sattler, B.; Adams, B. J.; Magalhaes, C.; Chu, W. L.; Lau, M. C. Y.; Cary, C.; Smith, D. J.; Wall, D. H.; Eguren, G.; Matcher, G.; Bradley, J. A.; de Vera, J. P.; Elster, Josef; Hughes, K. A.; Cuthbertson, L.; Benning, L. G.; Gunde-Cimerman, N.; Convey, P.; Hong, S. G.; Pointing, S.; Pellizari, V. H.; Vincent, W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, 16 February (2016), s. 1-7, č. článku 16. ISSN 1664-302X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Antarctica * biodiversity * biogeography Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.076, year: 2016

  12. Four new freshwater diatom species (Bacillariophyceae) from Antarctica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zidarova, R.; Van de Vijver, B.; Mataloni, G.; Kopalová, K.; Nedbalová, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2009), s. 295-310 ISSN 0181-1568 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Antarctica * diatoms * James Ross Island Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.574, year: 2009

  13. Antarctica – The game of great powers’ geopolitical strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta PETRICĂ

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Antarctica is a unique and valuable continent. The international community, through the Antarctic Treaty, is interested in providing efficient administration, achieving rational management of ecosystems. One of the countries located closest to Antarctica is New Zealand. This country is interested in prevention of any conflicts caused by claims on this continent. Since the end of Cold War and especially in the beginning of 21st century, this country has been interested in maintaining this continent as an important gateway used for sustainable development. While the whole world is in a state of transition, and considering that Antarctica is a continent 30% larger than Europe and 50% larger than Australia, it is a true “scientific lab” for the entire world and it contains a significant part of earth's ice cap, playing a decisive role in provision of world's climate balance, the international community establishing a set of provisions in the Antarctic Treaty System, implementing practical conditions for efficient administration and rational management of Antarctica and its dependent and associated ecosystems. (Stuart Prior, 1997

  14. Antioxidant Responses Induced by UVB Radiation in Deschampsia antarctica Desv.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Köhler

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Deschampsia antarctica Desv. is one of two vascular plants that live in the Maritime Antarctic Territory and is exposed to high levels of ultraviolet-B (UVB radiation. In this work, antioxidant physiology of D. antarctica was studied in response to UVB induced oxidative changes. Samples were collected from Antarctica and maintained in vitro culture during 2 years. Plants were sub-cultured in a hydroponic system and exposed to 21.4 kJ m-2 day-1, emulating summer Antarctic conditions. Results showed rapid and significant increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS at 3 h, which rapidly decreased. No dramatic changes were observed in photosynthetic efficiency, chlorophyll content, and level of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (MDA. The enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, SOD and total peroxidases, POD and non-enzymatic antioxidant activity (total phenolic increased significantly in response to UVB treatment. These findings suggest that tolerance of D. antarctica to UVB radiation could be attributed to its ability to activate both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems.

  15. Design and Calibration Tests of an Active Sound Intensity Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kletschkowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an active sound intensity probe that can be used for sound source localization in standing wave fields. The probe consists of a sound hard tube that is terminated by a loudspeaker and an integrated pair of microphones. The microphones are used to decompose the standing wave field inside the tube into its incident and reflected part. The latter is cancelled by an adaptive controller that calculates proper driving signals for the loudspeaker. If the open end of the actively controlled tube is placed close to a vibrating surface, the radiated sound intensity can be determined by measuring the cross spectral density between the two microphones. A one-dimensional free field can be realized effectively, as first experiments performed on a simplified test bed have shown. Further tests proved that a prototype of the novel sound intensity probe can be calibrated.

  16. A reference model for crust and uppermost mantle beneath Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, W.; Wiens, D.; Gerstoft, P.; Bromirski, P. D.; Stephen, R. A.; Aster, R. C.; Nyblade, A.; Winberry, J. P.; Huerta, A. D.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Hansen, S. E.; Wilson, T. J.; Heeszel, D.

    2016-12-01

    Since the last decade of the 20th Century, over 300 broad-band seismic stations have been deployed across the continent of Antarctica (e.g., temporary networks such as TAMSEIS, AGAP/GAMSEIS, POLENET/ANET, TAMNNET and RIS/DRIS by US geoscientists, as well as stations deployed by other countries). In this presentation, we discuss our recent effort that builds a reference crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity (Vs) model for continental Antarctica based on those seismic arrays. The data analysis for this effort consists of four steps. First, we compute ambient noise cross-correlations between all possible station pairs and use them to construct Rayleigh wave phase and group velocity maps at a continental scale. Coherence of the new maps with maps generated from teleseismic earthquake data from an earlier study (Heeszel et al., 2016) confirms the high quality of both maps and the minor difference helps quantify the map uncertainties. Second, we compute P receiver function waveforms for each station in Antarctica. Third, we collect Rayleigh waves generated by teleseismic earthquakes and measure their horizontal to vertical (H/V) ratio at each station. Fourth and finally, by combing all seismic measurements from the first three steps together with the phase velocity maps by Heeszel et al.(2016) using a non-linear Monte Carlo (MC) inversion algorithm, we built a 3-D model for the crust and uppermost mantle beneath continental Antarctica and its periphery to a depth of 150 km. This high resolution model, together with associated uncertainty estimates from the MC inversion, serve as a starting point for further improvement and geological interpretation. A variety of tectonic features, including a slower but highly heterogeneous West Antarctica and a much faster East Antarctica, are present in the 3D model. A better image of these features from the 3D model helps further investigation of the thermal and dynamic state of Antarctica's lithosphere and underlying

  17. Just How Does Sound Wave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Bob

    2006-01-01

    When children first hear the term "sound wave" perhaps they might associate it with the way a hand waves or perhaps the squiggly line image on a television monitor when sound recordings are being made. Research suggests that children tend to think sound somehow travels as a discrete package, a fast-moving invisible thing, and not something that…

  18. Product sounds : Fundamentals and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan-Vieira, E.

    2008-01-01

    Products are ubiquitous, so are the sounds emitted by products. Product sounds influence our reasoning, emotional state, purchase decisions, preference, and expectations regarding the product and the product's performance. Thus, auditory experience elicited by product sounds may not be just about

  19. Data sonification and sound visualization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.; Wiebel, E.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Illinois

    1999-07-01

    Sound can help us explore and analyze complex data sets in scientific computing. The authors describe a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis (Diass) and a program to visualize sounds in a virtual reality environment (M4Cave). Both are part of a comprehensive music composition environment that includes additional software for computer-assisted composition and automatic music notation.

  20. Sonic mediations: body, sound, technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birdsall, C.; Enns, A.

    2008-01-01

    Sonic Mediations: Body, Sound, Technology is a collection of original essays that represents an invaluable contribution to the burgeoning field of sound studies. While sound is often posited as having a bridging function, as a passive in-between, this volume invites readers to rethink the concept of

  1. Sound spectral analysis of voice-transmitted sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, R P; Loudon, R G

    1986-07-01

    There is a change in voice-generated sound heard over an area of pulmonary consolidation described as the "e" to "a" change. The lung may act as a low pass filter with properties that are changed by consolidation. We studied 5 patients with pneumonia. Using an electronic stethoscope, we recorded the voice-generated sounds "e" and "9-9-9." Sound spectral analysis using the fast Fourier transformation technique was used to characterize the frequency spectrum of the recorded sound. This technique allowed us to evaluate the filter properties of the normal and consolidated lung. We found that the normal lung allowed transmission of sound as high as 250 Hz with a gradual cutoff by 400 Hz. The consolidated lung allowed transmission of sound of a higher frequency; however, there was no significant transmission of sound with a frequency higher than 1,000 Hz.

  2. Pituitary-gonadal hormones during prolonged residency in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, R. C.; Malhotra, A. S.; Prasad, Rajendra; Pal, Karan; Kumar, Rajesh; Bajaj, A. C.

    Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin (PRL) and testosterone levels were measured in nine eugonadal men in New Delhi and during the 1st week of different months of their stay at Dakshin Gangotri in Antarctica. During their 12-month stay in Antarctica, they were exposed to a severely cold climate, long polar nights and polar days, high wind velocity, increased amounts of solar and ultraviolet radiation and geomagnetism, as well as physical and social isolation. Plasma testosterone tended to increase in March, but a significant increase (Ptestosterone levels in May, June, September and November were also significantly higher than the March or New Delhi values. The absolute values of LH, FSH and PRL did not show any month-to-month changes in Antarctica. However, when the hormone levels were expressed as a percentage of the individual annual Antarctic mean, significant differences as a percentage of the individual annual Antarctic mean, significant differences were observed. The testosterone peak in April, May and June was associated with an increase in LH. The nadirs of testosterone, LH, FSH and PRL were seen in either July or August. FSH showed the highest values in March, whereas the highest PRL values were seen in November. These observations suggest the presence of circannual variations in gonadotropin, PRL and LH in Antarctica which are independent of polar days and polar nights. It appears that factors other than the duration of daylight might be involved in regulating these changes. The significance of maintenance of testosterone levels in the supra-physiological range in Antarctica remains unknown but may be important in acclimatization/habituation to the extreme polar cold by increasing basal metabolic rate, protein synthesis and erythropoiesis.

  3. Sound for Health

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    From astronomy to biomedical sciences: music and sound as tools for scientific investigation Music and science are probably two of the most intrinsically linked disciplines in the spectrum of human knowledge. Science and technology have revolutionised the way artists work, interact, and create. The impact of innovative materials, new communication media, more powerful computers, and faster networks on the creative process is evident: we all can become artists in the digital era. What is less known, is that arts, and music in particular, are having a profound impact the way scientists operate, and think. From the early experiments by Kepler to the modern data sonification applications in medicine – sound and music are playing an increasingly crucial role in supporting science and driving innovation. In this talk. Dr. Domenico Vicinanza will be highlighting the complementarity and the natural synergy between music and science, with specific reference to biomedical sciences. Dr. Vicinanza will take t...

  4. Pitch Based Sound Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai; Kjems, U

    2006-01-01

    -max output function. Both linear and quadratic inputs are used. The model is trained on 2 hours of sound and tested on publicly available data. A test classification error below 0.05 with 1 s classification windows is achieved. Further more it is shown that linear input performs as well as a quadratic......A sound classification model is presented that can classify signals into music, noise and speech. The model extracts the pitch of the signal using the harmonic product spectrum. Based on the pitch estimate and a pitch error measure, features are created and used in a probabilistic model with soft......, and that even though classification gets marginally better, not much is achieved by increasing the window size beyond 1 s....

  5. Synchronization of sound sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Markus; Ahnert, Karsten; Bergweiler, Steffen

    2009-09-11

    Sound generation and interaction are highly complex, nonlinear, and self-organized. Nearly 150 years ago Rayleigh raised the following problem: two nearby organ pipes of different fundamental frequencies sound together almost inaudibly with identical pitch. This effect is now understood qualitatively by modern synchronization theory M. Abel et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 2467 (2006)10.1121/1.2170441]. For a detailed investigation, we substituted one pipe by an electric speaker. We observe that even minute driving signals force the pipe to synchronization, thus yielding three decades of synchronization-the largest range ever measured to our knowledge. Furthermore, a mutual silencing of the pipe is found, which can be explained by self-organized oscillations, of use for novel methods of noise abatement. Finally, we develop a reconstruction method which yields a perfect quantitative match of experiment and theory.

  6. Optimal Sound Absorbing Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Min; Fu, Caixing; Sheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Causal nature of the acoustic response, for any materials or structures, dictates an inequality that relates the absorption spectrum of the sample to its thickness. We present a general recipe for constructing sound-absorbing structures that can attain near-equality for the causal relation with very high absorption performance; such structures are denoted optimal. Our strategy involves using carefully designed acoustic metamaterials as backing to a thin layer of conventional sound absorbing material, e.g., acoustic sponge. By using this design approach, we have realized a 12 cm-thick structure that exhibits broadband, near-perfect flat absorption spectrum starting at around 400 Hz. From the causal relation, the calculated minimum sample thickness is 11.5 cm for the observed absorption spectrum. We present the theory that underlies such absorption performance, involving the evanescent waves and their interaction with a dissipative medium, and show the excellent agreement with the experiment.

  7. Synchronization of Sound Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Markus; Ahnert, Karsten; Bergweiler, Steffen

    2009-09-01

    Sound generation and interaction are highly complex, nonlinear, and self-organized. Nearly 150 years ago Rayleigh raised the following problem: two nearby organ pipes of different fundamental frequencies sound together almost inaudibly with identical pitch. This effect is now understood qualitatively by modern synchronization theory M. Abel et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 2467 (2006)JASMAN0001-496610.1121/1.2170441]. For a detailed investigation, we substituted one pipe by an electric speaker. We observe that even minute driving signals force the pipe to synchronization, thus yielding three decades of synchronization—the largest range ever measured to our knowledge. Furthermore, a mutual silencing of the pipe is found, which can be explained by self-organized oscillations, of use for novel methods of noise abatement. Finally, we develop a reconstruction method which yields a perfect quantitative match of experiment and theory.

  8. Sound in Ergonomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebreil Seraji

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The word of “Ergonomics “is composed of two separate parts: “Ergo” and” Nomos” and means the Human Factors Engineering. Indeed, Ergonomics (or human factors is the scientific discipline concerned with the understanding of interactions among humans and other elements of a system, and the profession that applies theory, principles, data and methods to design in order to optimize human well-being and overall system performance. It has applied different sciences such as Anatomy and physiology, anthropometry, engineering, psychology, biophysics and biochemistry from different ergonomics purposes. Sound when is referred as noise pollution can affect such balance in human life. The industrial noise caused by factories, traffic jam, media, and modern human activity can affect the health of the society.Here we are aimed at discussing sound from an ergonomic point of view.

  9. The contents and distributions of cadmium, mercury, and lead in Usnea antarctica lichens from Solorina Valley, James Ross Island (Antarctica)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvěřina, O.; Coufalík, Pavel; Barták, M.; Petrov, M.; Komárek, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 190, č. 1 (2018), s. 1-9, č. článku 13. ISSN 0167-6369 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : lichen * biomonitoring * Antarctica * heavy metals Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 1.687, year: 2016

  10. SoleSound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanotto, Damiano; Turchet, Luca; Boggs, Emily Marie

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the design of SoleSound, a wearable system designed to deliver ecological, audio-tactile, underfoot feedback. The device, which primarily targets clinical applications, uses an audio-tactile footstep synthesis engine informed by the readings of pressure and inertial sensors ......, and can therefore be utilized outside the laboratory setting. A first experimental evaluation indicates that the device can effectively modulate the perception of the ground surface during walking, thereby, inducing changes in the gait of healthy subjects....

  11. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island...

  12. Synaesthetic metaphors and sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Primožič

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses a phenomenon called synaesthetic metaphors, in which one sensory modality is described in terms of another (e.g. bright sound, sharp taste, sweet smell. The aim of the research, based on the contrastive analysis of Slovenian and French music reviews, is to determine which sense domains are employed for (synaesthetic description of sound, more precisely music, and how frequent they are. In this regard the paper examines the directionality principle according to which more concrete and more accessible lower senses (touch, taste, smell tend to map onto less concrete and less accessible higher senses (sound, sight. Furthermore, the analysis focuses on two other aspects: the conventionality of synaesthetic metaphors and their connotative meaning. Since the source and target domain in synaesthetic transfers belong to sense domains, the paper emphasizes the experiential – i.e. perceptive, cognitive, and sociocultural – dimension of this phenomenon, with regard to which rises the main question concerning the universal and cultural tendencies of synaesthetic metaphors.

  13. Geoacoustic inversion using combustive sound source signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potty, Gopu R; Miller, James H; Wilson, Preston S; Lynch, James F; Newhall, Arthur

    2008-09-01

    Combustive sound source (CSS) data collected on single hydrophone receiving units, in water depths ranging from 65 to 110 m, during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment clearly show modal dispersion effects and are suitable for modal geoacoustic inversions. CSS shots were set off at 26 m depth in 100 m of water. The inversions performed are based on an iterative scheme using dispersion-based short time Fourier transform in which each time-frequency tiling is adaptively rotated in the time-frequency plane, depending on the local wave dispersion. Results of the inversions are found to compare favorably to local core data.

  14. Feedback control of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaely, Boaz

    This thesis is concerned with the development an application of feedback control techniques for active sound control. Both fixed and adaptive controllers are considered. The controller design problem for active sound control is formulated as a constrained optimisation problem with an H2 performance objective, of minimising the variance of the control error, and H2 and H∞ design constraints involving control power output, disturbance enhancement, and robust stability. An Internal Model Controller with an FIR control filter is assumed. Conventional H2 design methods for feedback controllers are studied first. Although such controllers can satisfy the design constraints by employing effort terms in the quadratic cost function, they do not achieve the best possible performance, and when adapted using LMS-based algorithms, they suffer from instabilities if the plant response varies significantly. Improved H2/H∞ design methods for fixed and adaptive controllers are then developed, which achieve the best H2 performance under the design constraints, offer an improved stability when made adaptive, and in general outperform the conventional H2 controllers. The H2/H∞ design problems employ convex programming to ensure a unique solution. The Sequential Quadratic Programming methods is used for the off-line design of fixed controllers, and penalty and barrier function methods, together with frequency domain LMS-based algorithms are employed in the H2/H∞ adaptive controllers. The controllers studied and developed here were applied to three active sound control systems: a noise-reducing headset, an active headrest, and a sound radiating panel. The emphasis was put on developing control strategies that improve system performance. First, a high performance controller for the noise-reducing headset was implemented in real-time, which combines analogue and adaptive digital controllers, and can thus reject disturbances which has both broad-band and periodic components. Then

  15. FY 1994 ambient air monitoring report for McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugar, R.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the results of ambient air monitoring performed during the 1994 fiscal year (FY 1994) in the vicinity of McMurdo Station, Antarctica. Routine monitoring was performed during the 1993-1994 austral summer at three locations for airborne particulate matter less than 10 micrometers (PM-10) and at two locations for carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and nitrogen oxides (NO, NO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}). Selected PM-10 filters were analyzed for arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, and nickel. Additional air samples were collected at three McMurdo area locations and at Black Island for determination of the airborne concentration of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Sampling site selection, sampling procedures, and quality assurance procedures used were consistent with US Environmental Protection Agency guidance for local ambient air quality networks.

  16. Cloning and expression of N-glycosylation-related glucosidase from Glaciozyma antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajit, Noor Liana Mat; Kamaruddin, Shazilah; Hashim, Noor Haza Fazlin; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Murad, Abd. Munir Abd.; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Mackeen, Mukram Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    The need for functional oligosaccharides in various field is ever growing. The enzymatic approach for synthesis of oligosaccharides is advantageous over traditional chemical synthesis because of the regio- and stereo- selectivity that can be achieved without the need for protection chemistry. In this study, the α-glucosidase I protein sequence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (UniProt database) was compared using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) with Glaciozyma antarctica genome database. Results showed 33% identity and an E-value of 1 × 10-125 for α-glucosidase I. The gene was amplified, cloned into the pPICZα C vector and used to transform Pichia pastoris X-33 cells. Soluble expression of α-Glucosidase I (˜91 kDa) was achieved at 28 °C with 1.0 % of methanol.

  17. Sound exposure during outdoor music festivals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tron V Tronstad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most countries have guidelines to regulate sound exposure at concerts and music festivals. These guidelines limit the allowed sound pressure levels and the concert/festival’s duration. In Norway, where there is such a guideline, it is up to the local authorities to impose the regulations. The need to prevent hearing-loss among festival participants is self-explanatory, but knowledge of the actual dose received by visitors is extremely scarce. This study looks at two Norwegian music festivals where only one was regulated by the Norwegian guideline for concert and music festivals. At each festival the sound exposure of four participants was monitored with noise dose meters. This study compared the exposures experienced at the two festivals, and tested them against the Norwegian guideline and the World Health Organization’s recommendations. Sound levels during the concerts were higher at the festival not regulated by any guideline, and levels there exceeded both the national and the Worlds Health Organization’s recommendations. The results also show that front-of-house measurements reliably predict participant exposure.

  18. Sound exposure during outdoor music festivals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronstad, Tron V; Gelderblom, Femke B

    2016-01-01

    Most countries have guidelines to regulate sound exposure at concerts and music festivals. These guidelines limit the allowed sound pressure levels and the concert/festival's duration. In Norway, where there is such a guideline, it is up to the local authorities to impose the regulations. The need to prevent hearing-loss among festival participants is self-explanatory, but knowledge of the actual dose received by visitors is extremely scarce. This study looks at two Norwegian music festivals where only one was regulated by the Norwegian guideline for concert and music festivals. At each festival the sound exposure of four participants was monitored with noise dose meters. This study compared the exposures experienced at the two festivals, and tested them against the Norwegian guideline and the World Health Organization's recommendations. Sound levels during the concerts were higher at the festival not regulated by any guideline, and levels there exceeded both the national and the Worlds Health Organization's recommendations. The results also show that front-of-house measurements reliably predict participant exposure.

  19. Object localization in cluttered acoustical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T T; Keller, C H; Nelson, B S; Spitzer, M W; Bala, A D S; Whitchurch, E A

    2008-06-01

    In nature, sounds from objects of interest arrive at the ears accompanied by sound waves from other actively emitting objects and by reflections off of nearby surfaces. Despite the fact that all of these waveforms sum at the eardrums, humans with normal hearing effortlessly segregate one sound source from another. Our laboratory is investigating the neural basis of this perceptual feat, often called the "cocktail party effect", using the barn owl as an animal model. The barn owl, renowned for its ability to localize sounds and its spatiotopic representation of auditory space, is an established model for spatial hearing. Here, we briefly review the neural basis of sound-localization of a single sound source in an anechoic environment and then generalize the ideas developed therein to cases in which there are multiple, concomitant sound sources and acoustical reflection.

  20. Breakup of the Larsen Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Recent Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite imagery analyzed at the University of Colorado's National Snow and Ice Data Center revealed that the northern section of the Larsen B ice shelf, a large floating ice mass on the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula, has shattered and separated from the continent. This particular image was taken on March 5, 2002. The shattered ice formed a plume of thousands of icebergs adrift in the Weddell Sea. A total of about 3,250 square kilometers of shelf area disintegrated in a 35-day period beginning on January 31, 2002. Over the last five years, the shelf has lost a total of 5,700 square kilometers and is now about 40 percent the size of its previous minimum stable extent. Ice shelves are thick plates of ice, fed by glaciers, that float on the ocean around much of Antarctica. The Larsen B shelf was about 220 meters thick. Based on studies of ice flow and sediment thickness beneath the ice shelf, scientists believe that it existed for at least 400 years prior to this event and likely existed since the end of the last major glaciation 12,000 years ago. For reference, the area lost in this most recent event dwarfs Rhode Island (2,717 square kilometers) in size. In terms of volume, the amount of ice released in this short time is 720 billion tons--enough ice for about 12 trillion 10-kilogram bags. This is the largest single event in a series of retreats by ice shelves along the peninsula over the last 30 years. The retreats are attributed to a strong climate warming in the region. The rate of warming is approximately 0.5 degrees Celsius per decade, and the trend has been present since at least the late 1940s. Overall in the peninsula, the extent of seven ice shelves has declined by a total of about 13,500 square kilometers since 1974. This value excludes areas that would be expected to calve under stable conditions. Ted Scambos, a researcher with the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at

  1. Sedimentation waves on the Martian North Polar Cap: Analogy with megadunes in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herny, C.; Massé, M.; Bourgeois, O.; Carpy, S.; Le Mouélic, S.; Appéré, T.; Smith, I. B.; Spiga, A.; Rodriguez, S.

    2014-10-01

    Complex interactions between katabatic winds and the cryosphere may lead to the formation of sedimentation waves at the surface of ice sheets. These have been first described and named snow megadunes in Antarctica. Here we use topographic data, optical images, subsurface radar soundings and spectroscopic data acquired by Mars orbiters, to show that the surface of the Martian North Polar Cap displays two superimposed sets of sedimentation waves with differing wavelengths. These sedimentation waves have similarities with Antarctic snow megadunes regarding their surface morphology, texture, grain size asymmetry, and internal stratigraphic architecture. Both sets of Martian sedimentation waves present young ice and occasional sastrugi fields, indicative of net accumulation, on their shallow-dipping upwind sides, their tops and the intervening troughs. Old layers of dusty ice, indicative of net ablation, are exhumed on the steep-dipping downwind sides of the larger waves. Smooth surfaces of coarse-grained ice, indicative of reduced accumulation associated with sublimation metamorphism, cover the steep-dipping downwind sides of the smaller waves. These surface characteristics and the internal stratigraphy revealed by radar soundings are consistent with the interpretation that both sets of Martian sedimentation waves grow and migrate upwind in response to the development of periodic accumulation/ablation patterns controlled by katabatic winds. The recognition of these sedimentation waves provides the basis for the development of a common model of ice/wind interaction at the surface of Martian and terrestrial glaciers. Martian smaller waves, characterized by reduced net accumulation on their downwind sides, are analogous to Antarctic snow megadunes that have been described so far. A terrestrial equivalent remains to be discovered for the larger Martian waves, characterized by net ablation on their downwind sides.

  2. The End of the Cold Loneliness: 3D Comparison between Doto antarctica and a New Sympatric Species of Doto (Heterobranchia: Nudibranchia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Moles

    Full Text Available Although several studies are devoted to determining the diversity of Antarctic heterobranch sea slugs, new species are still being discovered. Among nudibranchs, Doto antarctica Eliot, 1907 is the single species of this genus described from Antarctica hitherto, the type locality being the Ross Sea. Doto antarctica was described mainly using external features. During our Antarctic research on marine benthic invertebrates, we found D. antarctica in the Weddell Sea and Bouvet Island, suggesting a circumpolar distribution. Species affiliation is herein supported by molecular analyses using cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, 16S rRNA, and histone H3 markers. We redescribe D. antarctica using histology, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT, and 3D-reconstruction of the internal organs. Moreover, we describe a new, sympatric species, namely D. carinova Moles, Avila & Wägele n. sp., and provide an anatomical comparison between the two Antarctic Doto species. Egg masses in both species are also described here for the first time. We demonstrate that micro-CT is a useful tool for non-destructive anatomical description of valuable specimens. Furthermore, our high resolution micro-CT data reveal that the central nervous system of both Doto species possesses numerous accessory giant cells, suggested to be neurons herein. In addition, the phylogenetic tree of all Doto species sequenced to date suggests a scenario for the evolution of the reproductive system in this genus: bursa copulatrix seems to have been reduced and the acquisition of a distal connection of the oviduct to the nidamental glands is a synapomorphy of the Antarctic Doto species. Overall, the combination of thorough morphological and anatomical description and molecular analyses provides a comprehensive means to characterize and delineate species, thus suggesting evolutionary scenarios.

  3. The opponent channel population code of sound location is an efficient representation of natural binaural sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Młynarski, Wiktor

    2015-05-01

    In mammalian auditory cortex, sound source position is represented by a population of broadly tuned neurons whose firing is modulated by sounds located at all positions surrounding the animal. Peaks of their tuning curves are concentrated at lateral position, while their slopes are steepest at the interaural midline, allowing for the maximum localization accuracy in that area. These experimental observations contradict initial assumptions that the auditory space is represented as a topographic cortical map. It has been suggested that a "panoramic" code has evolved to match specific demands of the sound localization task. This work provides evidence suggesting that properties of spatial auditory neurons identified experimentally follow from a general design principle- learning a sparse, efficient representation of natural stimuli. Natural binaural sounds were recorded and served as input to a hierarchical sparse-coding model. In the first layer, left and right ear sounds were separately encoded by a population of complex-valued basis functions which separated phase and amplitude. Both parameters are known to carry information relevant for spatial hearing. Monaural input converged in the second layer, which learned a joint representation of amplitude and interaural phase difference. Spatial selectivity of each second-layer unit was measured by exposing the model to natural sound sources recorded at different positions. Obtained tuning curves match well tuning characteristics of neurons in the mammalian auditory cortex. This study connects neuronal coding of the auditory space with natural stimulus statistics and generates new experimental predictions. Moreover, results presented here suggest that cortical regions with seemingly different functions may implement the same computational strategy-efficient coding.

  4. The opponent channel population code of sound location is an efficient representation of natural binaural sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiktor Młynarski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian auditory cortex, sound source position is represented by a population of broadly tuned neurons whose firing is modulated by sounds located at all positions surrounding the animal. Peaks of their tuning curves are concentrated at lateral position, while their slopes are steepest at the interaural midline, allowing for the maximum localization accuracy in that area. These experimental observations contradict initial assumptions that the auditory space is represented as a topographic cortical map. It has been suggested that a "panoramic" code has evolved to match specific demands of the sound localization task. This work provides evidence suggesting that properties of spatial auditory neurons identified experimentally follow from a general design principle- learning a sparse, efficient representation of natural stimuli. Natural binaural sounds were recorded and served as input to a hierarchical sparse-coding model. In the first layer, left and right ear sounds were separately encoded by a population of complex-valued basis functions which separated phase and amplitude. Both parameters are known to carry information relevant for spatial hearing. Monaural input converged in the second layer, which learned a joint representation of amplitude and interaural phase difference. Spatial selectivity of each second-layer unit was measured by exposing the model to natural sound sources recorded at different positions. Obtained tuning curves match well tuning characteristics of neurons in the mammalian auditory cortex. This study connects neuronal coding of the auditory space with natural stimulus statistics and generates new experimental predictions. Moreover, results presented here suggest that cortical regions with seemingly different functions may implement the same computational strategy-efficient coding.

  5. The Opponent Channel Population Code of Sound Location Is an Efficient Representation of Natural Binaural Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Młynarski, Wiktor

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian auditory cortex, sound source position is represented by a population of broadly tuned neurons whose firing is modulated by sounds located at all positions surrounding the animal. Peaks of their tuning curves are concentrated at lateral position, while their slopes are steepest at the interaural midline, allowing for the maximum localization accuracy in that area. These experimental observations contradict initial assumptions that the auditory space is represented as a topographic cortical map. It has been suggested that a “panoramic” code has evolved to match specific demands of the sound localization task. This work provides evidence suggesting that properties of spatial auditory neurons identified experimentally follow from a general design principle- learning a sparse, efficient representation of natural stimuli. Natural binaural sounds were recorded and served as input to a hierarchical sparse-coding model. In the first layer, left and right ear sounds were separately encoded by a population of complex-valued basis functions which separated phase and amplitude. Both parameters are known to carry information relevant for spatial hearing. Monaural input converged in the second layer, which learned a joint representation of amplitude and interaural phase difference. Spatial selectivity of each second-layer unit was measured by exposing the model to natural sound sources recorded at different positions. Obtained tuning curves match well tuning characteristics of neurons in the mammalian auditory cortex. This study connects neuronal coding of the auditory space with natural stimulus statistics and generates new experimental predictions. Moreover, results presented here suggest that cortical regions with seemingly different functions may implement the same computational strategy-efficient coding. PMID:25996373

  6. Results of monitoring for PCDDs and PCDFs in ambient air at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugar, R.M.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the results of ambient air monitoring for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) performed during the 1992-1993 austral summer in the vicinity of McMurdo Station, Antarctica. Fifteen air samples were collected from four different locations for determination of the presence and concentration of PCDD/PCDF compounds. General Metal Works Inc. PS-1 air samplers equipped with polyurethane foam (PUF) with a sample flow rate of approximately 0.27 m{sup 3}/min. were used to collect air samples. Sampling site selection, sampling procedures, and quality assurance procedures used were consistent with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidance for local ambient air quality networks. PCDD/PCDF compounds were not detected at the predominantly upwind location and at a more remote site on Black Island. Trace levels of only a few PCDD/PCDF congeners were detected sporadically at a location approximately 500 meters downwind of the station. The most frequent, most varied, and highest levels of PCDDs/PCDFs were measured at a {open_quotes}downtown{close_quotes} location, where concentrations of total PCDDs ranged from 0.27 to 1.80 pg/m{sup 3} and total PCDFs from less than 0.1 to 2.77 pg/m{sup 3}. Results from the remote Black Island site indicate that the background Antarctic air is still {open_quotes}free{close_quotes} of PCDD/PCDF compounds (not detectable at current method detection limits). The initial baseline effort demonstrated that site selection and sampling equipment performance were satisfactory, provided useful data for assessing the impact of McMurdo operations on the local ambient air quality, and provided baseline data for assessing the Antarctica continental air quality.

  7. Improving Robustness against Environmental Sounds for Directing Attention of Social Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Nicolai Bæk; Tan, Zheng-Hua; Lindberg, Børge

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-modal system for finding out where to direct the attention of a social robot in a dialog scenario, which is robust against environmental sounds (door slamming, phone ringing etc.) and short speech segments. The method is based on combining voice activity detection (VAD......) and sound source localization (SSL) and furthermore apply post-processing to SSL to filter out short sounds. The system is tested against a baseline system in four different real-world experiments, where different sounds are used as interfering sounds. The results are promising and show a clear improvement....

  8. Interpolated Sounding and Gridded Sounding Value-Added Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Toto, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Standard Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sounding files provide atmospheric state data in one dimension of increasing time and height per sonde launch. Many applications require a quick estimate of the atmospheric state at higher time resolution. The INTERPOLATEDSONDE (i.e., Interpolated Sounding) Value-Added Product (VAP) transforms sounding data into continuous daily files on a fixed time-height grid, at 1-minute time resolution, on 332 levels, from the surface up to a limit of approximately 40 km. The grid extends that high so the full height of soundings can be captured; however, most soundings terminate at an altitude between 25 and 30 km, above which no data is provided. Between soundings, the VAP linearly interpolates atmospheric state variables in time for each height level. In addition, INTERPOLATEDSONDE provides relative humidity scaled to microwave radiometer (MWR) observations.

  9. Sound of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    In my group we work with Molecular Dynamics to model several different proteins and protein systems. We submit our modelled molecules to changes in temperature, changes in solvent composition and even external pulling forces. To analyze our simulation results we have so far used visual inspection...... and statistical analysis of the resulting molecular trajectories (as everybody else!). However, recently I started assigning a particular sound frequency to each amino acid in the protein, and by setting the amplitude of each frequency according to the movement amplitude we can "hear" whenever two aminoacids...

  10. Facing Sound - Voicing Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on examples of contemporary audiovisual art, with a special focus on the Tony Oursler exhibition Face to Face at Aarhus Art Museum ARoS in Denmark in March-July 2012. My investigation involves a combination of qualitative interviews with visitors, observations of the audience......´s interactions with the exhibition and the artwork in the museum space and short analyses of individual works of art based on reception aesthetics and phenomenology and inspired by newer writings on sound, voice and listening....

  11. Handbook for sound engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Ballou, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Handbook for Sound Engineers is the most comprehensive reference available for audio engineers, and is a must read for all who work in audio.With contributions from many of the top professionals in the field, including Glen Ballou on interpretation systems, intercoms, assistive listening, and fundamentals and units of measurement, David Miles Huber on MIDI, Bill Whitlock on audio transformers and preamplifiers, Steve Dove on consoles, DAWs, and computers, Pat Brown on fundamentals, gain structures, and test and measurement, Ray Rayburn on virtual systems, digital interfacing, and preamplifiers

  12. THE SOUNDING WATERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isar, Nicoletta

    2018-01-01

    Church as harmonious moving waters. This vision is shared both by the Eastern and the Western world. With its renewed marble revetments, Aquasgrani still conveys the appearance of the Ambrosian vision of the primordial waters. The church is constructed according to propria dispositione, this is...... and non-sounding phenomena (the figures of choreography). Finally, the paper unveils a dramatization of two choreographies (one physical, another incorporeal, of the soul) unfolding in the space of Aachen which becomes the stage for a Gesamtkunstwerk performance where music and words, and each stone joins...

  13. JINGLE: THE SOUNDING SYMBOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bysko Maxim V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the role of jingles in the industrial era, from the occurrence of the regular radio broadcasting, sound films and television up of modern video games, audio and video podcasts, online broadcasts, and mobile communications. Jingles are researched from the point of view of the theory of symbols: the forward motion is detected in the process of development of jingles from the social symbols (radio callsigns to the individual signs-images (ringtones. The role of technical progress in the formation of jingles as important cultural audio elements of modern digital civilization.

  14. Neuroplasticity beyond sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reybrouck, Mark; Brattico, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    adaptations in musicians, following long-term exposure to music, are then reviewed by keeping in mind the distinct subprocesses of a musical aesthetic experience. We conclude that these neural adaptations can be conceived of as the immediate and lifelong interactions with multisensorial stimuli (having...... to the immediate demands of the sounding environment. The resulting neural adaptations in musicians closely depend on the duration of the interactions, the starting age, the involvement of attention, the amount of motor practice and the musical genre played....

  15. Looming sounds are perceived as faster than receding sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhoff, John G

    2016-01-01

    Each year thousands of people are killed by looming motor vehicles. Throughout our evolutionary history looming objects have posed a threat to survival and perceptual systems have evolved unique solutions to confront these environmental challenges. Vision provides an accurate representation of time-to-contact with a looming object and usually allows us to interact successfully with the object if required. However, audition functions as a warning system and yields an anticipatory representation of arrival time, indicating that the object has arrived when it is still some distance away. The bias provides a temporal margin of safety that allows more time to initiate defensive actions. In two studies this bias was shown to influence the perception of the speed of looming and receding sound sources. Listeners heard looming and receding sound sources and judged how fast they were moving. Listeners perceived the speed of looming sounds as faster than that of equivalent receding sounds. Listeners also showed better discrimination of the speed of looming sounds than receding sounds. Finally, close sounds were perceived as faster than distant sounds. The results suggest a prioritization of the perception of the speed of looming and receding sounds that mirrors the level of threat posed by moving objects in the environment.

  16. Do top predators cue on sound production by mesopelagic prey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann-Pickering, S.; Checkley, D. M., Jr.; Demer, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    Deep-scattering layer (DSL) organisms, comprising a variety of mesopelagic fishes, and squids, siphonophores, crustaceans, and other invertebrates, are preferred prey for numerous large marine predators, e.g. cetaceans, seabirds, and fishes. Some of the DSL species migrate from depth during daylight to feed near the surface at night, transitioning during dusk and dawn. We investigated if any DSL organisms create sound, particularly during the crepuscular periods. Over several nights in summer 2015, underwater sound was recorded in the San Diego Trough using a high-frequency acoustic recording package (HARP, 10 Hz to 100 kHz), suspended from a drifting surface float. Acoustic backscatter from the DSL was monitored nearby using a calibrated multiple-frequency (38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz) split-beam echosounder (Simrad EK60) on a small boat. DSL organisms produced sound, between 300 and 1000 Hz, and the received levels were highest when the animals migrated past the recorder during ascent and descent. The DSL are globally present, so the observed acoustic phenomenon, if also ubiquitous, has wide-reaching implications. Sound travels farther than light or chemicals and thus can be sensed at greater distances by predators, prey, and mates. If sound is a characteristic feature of pelagic ecosystems, it likely plays a role in predator-prey relationships and overall ecosystem dynamics. Our new finding inspires numerous questions such as: Which, how, and why have DSL organisms evolved to create sound, for what do they use it and under what circumstances? Is sound production by DSL organisms truly ubiquitous, or does it depend on the local environment and species composition? How may sound production and perception be adapted to a changing environment? Do predators react to changes in sound? Can sound be used to quantify the composition of mixed-species assemblages, component densities and abundances, and hence be used in stock assessment or predictive modeling?

  17. Walrus Movements in Smith Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Flora, Janne; Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck

    2017-01-01

    Fifty of 58 walruses (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) instrumented with satellite-linked transmitters in four areas in eastern Smith Sound, Northwest Greenland, during May and June of 2010 – 13 and 2015 provided data for this study. These animals departed from the feeding banks along the Greenland...... coast in June – July (average 14th June), simultaneously with the disappearance of sea ice from these areas. Most of them moved to Canadian waters in western Smith Sound. The most frequently used summering grounds were along the coasts of Ellesmere Island: on the eastern coast, the area around Alexandra...... of Jones Sound and Lancaster Sound for short periods during the summer, though this cannot be confirmed with certainty. The return migration from western Smith Sound to the wintering area in eastern Smith Sound takes place in October. The tracked walrus showed high affinity to coastal areas, while walruses...

  18. In silico analysis of glucoamylase from a psychrophilic yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Siti Nur Hasanah Mohd; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2015-09-01

    Glaciozyma antarctica has a total of 7857 putative genes and its whole genome sequence is available online in Malaysia Genome Institute. In this study, we screened for potential glycoside hydrolase family 15 genes from the G. antarctica. From G. antarctica database, two sequences have been identified as a putative genes encoded glycoside hydrolase family 15 based on its sequence similarity and present of glycoside hydrolase family 15 conserved domains. Based on the bioinformatic analysis conducted on the genome database of G. antarctica, there are two putative genes predicted to encode glycoside hydrolase family 15 protein. These genes have been represented as LAN_ 14_077 and LAN_10_097 in the database.

  19. Another bipolar deep-sea anemone: new species of Iosactis (Actiniaria, Endomyaria) from Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Estefanía

    2012-06-01

    A new species of deep-sea burrowing sea anemone is described and illustrated from Antarctica. Iosactis antarctica sp. nov. is characterised by easily deciduous tentacles with sphincters in the base, smooth column, endodermal marginal sphincter, same mesenteries proximally and distally, 24 perfect mesenteries regularly arranged, diffuse retractor musculature and basilar muscles well developed. Iosactis antarctica sp. nov. is the second species of the deep-sea abyssal genus Iosactis; it differs from I. vagabunda in internal anatomy, cnidae and geographic distribution. The description of I. antarctica sp. nov. provides the opportunity to revaluate the morphology of the proximal end of this genus.

  20. Subsurface Assessment at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Antarctica Co ld R eg io ns R es ea rc h an d En gi ne er in g La bo ra to ry Rosa T. Affleck, Seth Campbell, Samantha Sinclair, and... geology and geotech- nical information, particularly soil indices within the near-surface layer subjected to temporal fluctuations and the ice-cemented...Note the clear and speckle-free massive ice relative to the surrounding geology .............................. 40 23 A 200 MHz GPR profile (middle

  1. Mapping Antarctica using Landsat-8 - the preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X.; Hui, F.; Qi, X.

    2014-12-01

    The first Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) was released in 2009, which was created by USGS, BAS, and NASA from more than 1,000 Landsat ETM+ scenes. As the first major scientific outcome of the IPY, LIMA supports current scientific polar research, encourages new projects, and helps the general public visualize Antarctica and changes happening to this southernmost environment. As the latest satellite of Landsat mission, the Landsat-8 images the entire Earth every 16 days in an 8-day offset from Landsat-7. Data collected by the instruments onboard the satellite are available to download at no charge within 24 hours of reception. The standard Landsat 8 products provided by the USGS EROS Center consist of quantized and calibrated scaled Digital Numbers (DN) in 16-bit unsigned integer format and can be rescaled to the Top Of Atmosphere (TOA) reflectance and/or radiance. With the support of USGS portal, we searched and downloaded more than 1600 scenes of Level 1 T- Terrain Corrected Landsat 8 image products covering Antarctica from late 2013 to early 2014. These data were converted to planetary radiance for further processing. Since the distribution of clouds in these images are random and much complicated, statistics on the distribution of clouds were performed and then help to decide masking those thicker cloud to keep more useful information left and avoid observation holes. A preliminary result of the Landsat-8 mosaic of Antarctica under the joint efforts of Beijing Normal University, NSIDC and University of Maryland will be released on this AGU fall meeting. Comparison between Landsat 7 and 8 mosaic products will also be done to find the difference or advantage of the two products.

  2. Direct gravimetric determination of aerosol mass concentration in central antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibaldi, Anna; Truzzi, Cristina; Illuminati, Silvia; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In Antarctica, experimental difficulties due to extreme conditions have meant that aerosol mass has rarely been measured directly by gravimetry, and only in coastal areas where concentrations were in the range of 1-7 μg m(-3). The present work reports on a careful differential weighing methodology carried out for the first time on the plateau of central Antarctica (Dome C, East Antarctica). To solve problems of accurate aerosol mass measurements, a climatic room was used for conditioning and weighing filters. Measurements were carried out in long stages of several hours of readings with automatic recording of temperature/humidity and mass. This experimental scheme allowed us to sample from all the measurements (up to 2000) carried out before and after exposure, those which were recorded under the most stable humidity conditions and, even more importantly, as close to each other as possible. The automatic reading of the mass allowed us in any case to obtain hundreds of measurements from which to calculate average values with uncertainties sufficiently low to meet the requirements of the differential weighing procedure (±0.2 mg in filter weighing, between ±7% and ±16% both in aerosol mass and concentration measurements). The results show that the average summer aerosol mass concentration (aerodynamic size ≤10 μm) in central Antarctica is about 0.1 μg m(-3), i.e., about 1/10 of that of coastal Antarctic areas. The concentration increases by about 4-5 times at a site very close to the station.

  3. The conquest of Antarctica; A la conquista de la Antartida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tristan, R. M.

    2015-07-01

    The information obtained in the more than 15 projects designed for the XXVIII campaign to Antarctica, and in the they involved a total of 80 researchers, will serve to learn more about terrestrial magnetism, changes occurring in the climate, the behavior of the volcanoes, the evolution of the glaciers, the rate of thaw, the weather variations, characteristics of the lichens, the progress of pollution... Even know the past that remains frozen under the ice to predict what might happen in the future. (Author)

  4. Victoria Land, Ross Sea, and Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    On December 19, 2001, MODIS acquired data that produced this image of Antarctica's Victoria Land, Ross Ice Shelf, and the Ross Sea. The coastline that runs up and down along the left side of the image denotes where Victoria Land (left) meets the Ross Ice Shelf (right). The Ross Ice Shelf is the world's largest floating body of ice, approximately the same size as France. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  5. Applications of Sound Spectrum Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Timothy

    2007-02-01

    The physics of sound is often studied in introductory physics class experiments involving a tube of resonating air. In typical setups, pistons control the length of a cylindrical space or a microphone is moved within a tube. While these activities are useful and can be made very quantitative, they don't directly demonstrate the sounds that are most familiar to students, such as human voices and musical instruments. Fortunately, several sound spectrum analysis programs are available that can bridge this gap.2

  6. Sound simulaton of granular materials

    OpenAIRE

    Marko, Matej

    2013-01-01

    Title: Sound simulation of granular materials Author: Matej Marko Department: Department of Software and Computer Science Education Supervisor: doc. Ing. Jaroslav Křivánek Ph.D., Department of Software and Computer Science Education Abstract: In recent years, methods for simulating sounds of solid objects, fluids, fire and cloth have been developed. These methods extend existing methods for simulation of the visual behaviour of the respective phenomena and add physically based sounds that cor...

  7. Sounds like Team Spirit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always

  8. Psychological adaptation of Indian expeditioners during prolonged residence in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Sudhir K; Bhatia, Abhijeet; Mishra, Ashwani K

    2017-01-01

    In view of the growing human activities in Antarctica and increasing exposure of humans to prolonged isolation under extreme conditions, such as space travel and deep sea diving, it is necessary to study the psychological adaptation to such an environment. The current study aimed to assess the psychological adaptation of Indian expeditioners to prolonged residence in Antarctica. Twenty-four winter team members of 27th Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica were administered seven instruments 5 times during the expedition. The instruments measured cognition and memory, general psychological health and tobacco, and alcohol consumption. Alcohol consumption was maximum during the initial days of arrival on the continent and decreased thereafter, with another spike during the peak of the winter season. Externalized psychological reactions peaked during the midwinter period. Anxiety and insomnia peaked during the coldest period whereas depressive symptoms did not change throughout the expedition. Cognition was at its worst during the final phase of Antarctic residence. No significant change was noted in the third quarter of wintering. Each phase of Antarctic residence could be equated with a particular stage in psychological adaptation. There was no third quarter phenomenon.

  9. Ice crystal precipitation at Dome C site (East Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santachiara, G.; Belosi, F.; Prodi, F.

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, falling ice crystals were collected on glass slides covered with a thin layer of 2% formvar in chloroform at the Dome Concordia site (Dome C), Antarctica. Samplings were performed in the framework of the 27th Italian Antarctica expedition of the Italian National Program for Research in Antarctica in the period 21 February-6 August 2012. Events of clear-sky precipitations and precipitations from clouds were considered and the replicas obtained were examined under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Several shapes of ice crystals were identified, including ;diamond dust; (plates, pyramids, hollow and solid columns), and crystal aggregates varying in complexity. Single events often contained both small (10 μm to 50 μm) and large (hundreds of microns) crystals, suggesting that crystals can form simultaneously near the ground (height of a few hundred metres) and at higher layers (height of thousands of metres). Images of sampled crystal replicas showed that single bullets are not produced separately, but by the disintegration of combinations of bullets. Rimed ice crystals were absent in the Dome C samples, i.e. the only mode of crystal growth was water vapour diffusion. On considering the aerosol in the sampled crystals, we reached the conclusion that inertial impaction, interception and Brownian motion were insufficient to explain the scavenged aerosol. We therefore presume that phoretic forces play a role in scavenging during the crystal growth process.

  10. Antarctica's protected areas are inadequate, unrepresentative, and at risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine D Shaw

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Antarctica is widely regarded as one of the planet's last true wildernesses, insulated from threat by its remoteness and declaration as a natural reserve dedicated to peace and science. However, rapidly growing human activity is accelerating threats to biodiversity. We determined how well the existing protected-area system represents terrestrial biodiversity and assessed the risk to protected areas from biological invasions, the region's most significant conservation threat. We found that Antarctica is one of the planet's least protected regions, with only 1.5% of its ice-free area formally designated as specially protected areas. Five of the distinct ice-free ecoregions have no specially designated areas for the protection of biodiversity. Every one of the 55 designated areas that protect Antarctica's biodiversity lies closer to sites of high human activity than expected by chance, and seven lie in high-risk areas for biological invasions. By any measure, including Aichi Target 11 under the Convention on Biological Diversity, Antarctic biodiversity is poorly protected by reserves, and those reserves are threatened.

  11. Sound [signal] noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnsten, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses the intricate relationship between sound and signification through notions of noise. The emergence of new fields of sonic artistic practices has generated several questions of how to approach sound as aesthetic form and material. During the past decade an increased attention...... has been paid to, for instance, a category such as ‘sound art’ together with an equally strengthened interest in phenomena and concepts that fall outside the accepted aesthetic procedures and constructions of what we traditionally would term as musical sound – a recurring example being ‘noise’....

  12. Interactive Sound Propagation using Precomputation and Statistical Approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Lakulish

    Acoustic phenomena such as early reflections, diffraction, and reverberation have been shown to improve the user experience in interactive virtual environments and video games. These effects arise due to repeated interactions between sound waves and objects in the environment. In interactive applications, these effects must be simulated within a prescribed time budget. We present two complementary approaches for computing such acoustic effects in real time, with plausible variation in the sound field throughout the scene. The first approach, Precomputed Acoustic Radiance Transfer, precomputes a matrix that accounts for multiple acoustic interactions between all scene objects. The matrix is used at run time to provide sound propagation effects that vary smoothly as sources and listeners move. The second approach couples two techniques---Ambient Reverberance, and Aural Proxies---to provide approximate sound propagation effects in real time, based on only the portion of the environment immediately visible to the listener. These approaches lie at different ends of a space of interactive sound propagation techniques for modeling sound propagation effects in interactive applications. The first approach emphasizes accuracy by modeling acoustic interactions between all parts of the scene; the second approach emphasizes efficiency by only taking the local environment of the listener into account. These methods have been used to efficiently generate acoustic walkthroughs of architectural models. They have also been integrated into a modern game engine, and can enable realistic, interactive sound propagation on commodity desktop PCs.

  13. Interpolated Sounding and Gridded Sounding Value-Added Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toto, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Standard Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sounding files provide atmospheric state data in one dimension of increasing time and height per sonde launch. Many applications require a quick estimate of the atmospheric state at higher time resolution. The INTERPOLATEDSONDE (i.e., Interpolated Sounding) Value-Added Product (VAP) transforms sounding data into continuous daily files on a fixed time-height grid, at 1-minute time resolution, on 332 levels, from the surface up to a limit of approximately 40 km. The grid extends that high so the full height of soundings can be captured; however, most soundings terminate at an altitude between 25 and 30 km, above which no data is provided. Between soundings, the VAP linearly interpolates atmospheric state variables in time for each height level. In addition, INTERPOLATEDSONDE provides relative humidity scaled to microwave radiometer (MWR) observations.The INTERPOLATEDSONDE VAP, a continuous time-height grid of relative humidity-corrected sounding data, is intended to provide input to higher-order products, such as the Merged Soundings (MERGESONDE; Troyan 2012) VAP, which extends INTERPOLATEDSONDE by incorporating model data. The INTERPOLATEDSONDE VAP also is used to correct gaseous attenuation of radar reflectivity in products such as the KAZRCOR VAP.

  14. A Study of Sound Contents Development based On Analysis and Compare Foley Sound to Actual Sound of Wind

    OpenAIRE

    Ik-Soo Ahn; Seong-Geon Bae; Myung-Jin Bae

    2015-01-01

    Foley sound of wind is often used as a background sound of radio drama in early period of broadcasting. It is one of the tools that has applied the most creative and scientific theory. This research provides scientific proof on similarities and creativity of Foley sound of wind through comparison and analysis of Foley sound and the actual wind sound.

  15. Preliminary microphysical characterization of precipitation at ground over Antarctica coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Montopoli, Mario; Baldini, Luca; Dietrich, Stefano; Porcù, Federico

    2017-04-01

    The primary mass input of the Antarctic ice sheet is snow precipitation which is one of the most direct climatic indicators. Climatic model simulations of precipitations over Antarctica is an important task to assess the variation of ice sheet over long temporal scale. The main source of precipitation information in Antarctica regions derive from satellite observations. However, satellite measurements and products need to be calibrated and validated with observations from ground sensors. In spite of their key role, precipitation measurements at ground are scarce and not appropriate to provide the specific characteristic of precipitation particles that influence the scattering and absorption properties of ice particles. Recently, different stations in Antarctica (Princess Elizabeth, McMurdo, Mario Zucchelli) are equipping observatories for cloud and precipitation observations. The setup of the observatory at the Italian Station, Mario Zucchelli (MZ) plans to integrate the current instrumentation for weather measurements with other instruments specific for precipitation observations, in particular, a 24-GHz vertical pointing radar and a laser disdrometer Parsivel. The synergetic use of the set of instruments allows for characterizing precipitation and studying properties of Antarctic precipitation such as dimension, shapes, fall behavior, density of particles, particles size distribution, particles terminal velocity, reflectivity factor and including some information on their vertical extent. Last November, the OTT Parsivel disdrometer was installed on the roof of a logistic container (at 6 m of height) of the MZ station (Latitude 74° 41' 42" S; Longitude 164° 07' 23E") in the Terranova Bay. The disdrometer measures size and fall velocity of particles, passing through a laser matrix from which the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) is obtained. In addition, some products such as reflectivity factor, snow rate and snow accumulation can be inferred by properly

  16. Localization of a sound source in in a guided medium and reverberating field. Contribution to a study on leak localization in the internal wall of containment of a nuclear reactor in the case of a severe reactor accident; Localisation d`une source acoustique en milieu guide et champ reverberant. Contribution a l`etude sur la localisation de fuite de l`enceinte de confinement d`une centrale nucleaire en situation accidentelle grave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomann, F

    1996-11-28

    Basic data necessary for the localization of a leak in the internal wall of the containment are presented by studying the sound generated by gas jets coming out of (leaking fissures) as well as propagation in a guided medium. The results acquired have led us to choose the simple intercorrelation method and the matched filed processing method, both of which are likely to adequately handle our problems. Whereas the intercorrelation method appears to be limited in scope when dealing in the guided medium, the matched field processing is suited to leak localization over a surface of approximately 1000 m{sup 2} (for a total surface of 10 000 m{sup 2}). Preliminary studies on the leak signal and on replicated signals have led us to limit the frequency band to 2600 - 3000 Hz. We have succeeded in locating a leak situated in an ordinary position with a minimum amount of replicated signals and basic data. We have improved on the estimation of Bartlett and MVDE (minimum variance distortion less filter) rendering them even more effective. Afterwards, we considered the severe accident situation and showed that the system can be installed in situ. (author) 88 refs.

  17. {sup 137}Cs in marine sediments of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Paulo Alves de Lima [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil); Ribeiro, Andreza Portella, E-mail: andrezpr@usp.br [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil); Mestrado de Gestão Ambiental e Sustentabilidade, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE), Avenida Francisco Matarazzo, 612, prédio C, andar térreo, Água Branca, São Paulo, SP, 05001 100 (Brazil); Nascimento, Mylene Giseli do; Martins, Cesar de Castro [Centro de Estudos do Mar, Universidade Federal do Paraná (CEM-UFPR), Av. Beira-mar, no number, Balneário Pontal do Sul, Pontal do Paraná, PR, 83255 971 (Brazil); Mahiques, Michel Michaelovitch de; Montone, Rosalinda Carmelo; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    The radionuclide cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is produced exclusively by anthropogenic processes and primarily by nuclear explosions. This study determined the reference inventory that is {sup 137}Cs associated with the element's original input, and utilized the levels of activity of this radionuclide previously measured in five sediment profiles collected from Admiralty Bay, Antarctica, to investigate the mobility of this element in the environment. {sup 137}Cs has a half-life of 30 years. Because of this, it is environmentally persistent and has been shown to accumulate in marine organisms. The mean reference inventory of this radionuclide in Admiralty Bay sediments, determined using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry, was 20.23 ± 8.94 Bq m{sup −2}, and within the ambient {sup 137}Cs activity range. A model of {sup 137}Cs diffusion–convection was applied to data collected from 1 cm intervals in sediment cores with the aim of providing insights with respect to this element's behavior in sediments. Model results showed a significant correlation between measured and modeled values using the concentrations of {sup 137}Cs, and estimated input into the system from the global fallout of past nuclear tests and expected values based on local sedimentation rates. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the vertical diffusion of {sup 137}Cs in marine sediments when used as a tracer for environmental processes and for assessing potential bioavailability. - Highlights: ► Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is produced exclusively by anthropogenic processes. ► A model of diffusion–convection simulated {sup 137}Cs environmental behavior. ► This is important for assessing the bioavailability of this toxic element. ► In Antarctica ice cover influenced the input to the sediments.

  18. Automatic detection of subglacial lakes in radar sounder data acquired in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilisei, Ana-Maria; Khodadadzadeh, Mahdi; Dalsasso, Emanuele; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2017-10-01

    Subglacial lakes decouple the ice sheet from the underlying bedrock, thus facilitating the sliding of the ice masses towards the borders of the continents, consequently raising the sea level. This motivated increasing attention in the detection of subglacial lakes. So far, about 70% of the total number of subglacial lakes in Antarctica have been detected by analysing radargrams acquired by radar sounder (RS) instruments. Although the amount of radargrams is expected to drastically increase, from both airborne and possible future Earth observation RS missions, currently the main approach to the detection of subglacial lakes in radargrams is by visual interpretation. This approach is subjective and extremely time consuming, thus difficult to apply to a large amount of radargrams. In order to address the limitations of the visual interpretation and to assist glaciologists in better understanding the relationship between the subglacial environment and the climate system, in this paper, we propose a technique for the automatic detection of subglacial lakes. The main contribution of the proposed technique is the extraction of features for discriminating between lake and non-lake basal interfaces. In particular, we propose the extraction of features that locally capture the topography of the basal interface, the shape and the correlation of the basal waveforms. Then, the extracted features are given as input to a supervised binary classifier based on Support Vector Machine to perform the automatic subglacial lake detection. The effectiveness of the proposed method is proven both quantitatively and qualitatively by applying it to a large dataset acquired in East Antarctica by the MultiChannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder.

  19. Measurements of precipitation in Dumont d'Urville, Adélie Land, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazioli, Jacopo; Genthon, Christophe; Boudevillain, Brice; Duran-Alarcon, Claudio; Del Guasta, Massimo; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Berne, Alexis

    2017-08-01

    The first results of a campaign of intensive observation of precipitation in Dumont d'Urville, Antarctica, are presented. Several instruments collected data from November 2015 to February 2016 or longer, including a polarimetric radar (MXPol), a Micro Rain Radar (MRR), a weighing gauge (Pluvio2), and a Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC). These instruments collected the first ground-based measurements of precipitation in the region of Adélie Land (Terre Adélie), including precipitation microphysics. Microphysical observations during the austral summer 2015/2016 showed that, close to the ground level, aggregates are the dominant hydrometeor type, together with small ice particles (mostly originating from blowing snow), and that riming is a recurring process. Eleven percent of the measured particles were fully developed graupel, and aggregates had a mean riming degree of about 30 %. Spurious precipitation in the Pluvio2 measurements in windy conditions, leading to phantom accumulations, is observed and partly removed through synergistic use of MRR data. The yearly accumulated precipitation of snow (300 m above ground), obtained by means of a local conversion relation of MRR data, trained on the Pluvio2 measurement of the summer period, is estimated to be 815 mm of water equivalent, with a confidence interval ranging between 739.5 and 989 mm. Data obtained in previous research from satellite-borne radars, and the ERA-Interim reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) provide lower yearly totals: 655 mm for ERA-Interim and 679 mm for the climatological data over DDU. ERA-Interim overestimates the occurrence of low-intensity precipitation events especially in summer, but it compensates for them by underestimating the snowfall amounts carried by the most intense events. Overall, this paper provides insightful examples of the added values of precipitation monitoring in Antarctica with a synergistic use of in situ and remote sensing

  20. Soil and landform interplay in the dry valley of Edson Hills, Ellsworth Mountains, continental Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpupo, Caroline; Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto Gonçalves Reynaud; Roque, Mariane Batalha; de Faria, André Luiz Lopes; da Rosa, Katia Kellem; Thomazini, André; de Paula, Mayara Daher

    2017-10-01

    The main relief units from the dry valley of Edson Hills, Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica (79°49‧12.4″/83°40‧16.1″), were assessed, emphasizing the analysis of soil and landform interplay. Soil morphological, physical, and chemical properties; salinity; surface boulder weathering (frequency and feature); classification; and weathering stages were analyzed. Three distinct landforms summarize the geomorphology of the dry valley of Edson Hills, Ellsworth Mountains: (i) periglacial features like slightly creeping debris-mantled slopes, steep debris-mantled slopes, patterned grounds, and thermokarst; (ii) glacial features like hummocky moraines, lateral moraines (supraglacial), lakes, kettle hole (proglacial), cirques infill (subglacial), horn, and arête (erosional glacial); and (iii) nonglacial features like scree slopes and talus deposits. All these glacial and periglacial features are related to the West Antarctica ice sheet variations. Soils in the dry valley of Edson Hills are pedologically poorly developed. However, the degree of development in soils associated with patterned ground and moraine systems is remarkable. All soils present desert pavement owing to the action of severe aeolian erosion. In addition, soils accumulate salts depending on the local drainage conditions. The most expressive soil classes among the studied soils were Typic Haploturbel and Typic Anhyorthel, especially because of: (i) a general trend of ice-cemented permafrost occurrence in lower portions of the landscape, particularly in the patterned ground area and in the hummocky moraine; and (ii) the presence of dry permafrost in higher positions of the landscape, in relief units such as in debris-mantled slopes and talus deposits. Thus, a close relationship among soil characteristics and landforms were observed in the dry valley of Edson Hills.