WorldWideScience

Sample records for sosub 2-induced cooling

  1. SO/sub 2/ injury to forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hontvedt, R

    1970-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide is one of the most important of the air pollutants which has produced damage to trees and other vegetation. This article gives some examples of SO/sub 2/ damage to forests: At Rjukan in Norway, at Naerkes-Kvarntorp in Sweden and in German industrial regions. Then a brief summary is given of the factors which determine the effects of SO/sub 2/ on plants. Significant differences in SO/sub 2/ resistance exist, both between species and between individuals of the same species. Deciduous trees are more resistant than conifers. There appears to be a positive correlation between CO/sub 2/ assimilation and SO/sub 2/ damage in some individuals. Factors which influence co2 assimilation include, for example, the leaf development state and environmental factors (light, water, temperature, etc.). High SO/sub 2/ concentrations in the air over a brief time period are distinctly more injurious than low concentrations over a long time. Fertilization may increase the resistance of forest trees to SO/sub 2/. Some insect types predispose to SO/sub 2/, partly by increasing the number of dead and weakened trees and partially by increasing parasitization by insects.

  2. The conversion of SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} in gas turbine engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miake-Lye, R C; Anderson, M R; Brown, R C; Kolb, C E [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics; Sorokin, A A; Buriko, Y I [Scientific Research Center ` Ecolen` , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The oxidation of fuel sulfur to S(6) (SO{sub 3}+H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) in a supersonic (Concorde) and a subsonic (ATTAS) aircraft engine is estimated numerically. The results indicate between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as S(6). It is also shown that conversion in the turbine is limited by the level of atomic oxygen at the combustor exit, resulting in a higher oxidation efficiency as the sulfur mass loading is decreased. SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are the primary sulfur oxidation products, with less than 1% of fuel sulfur converted to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. For the Concorde, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was primarily formed during the supersonic expansion through the divergent nozzle. (author) 20 refs.

  3. The conversion of SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} in gas turbine engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miake-Lye, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Brown, R.C.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics; Sorokin, A.A.; Buriko, Y.I. [Scientific Research Center `Ecolen`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The oxidation of fuel sulfur to S(6) (SO{sub 3}+H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) in a supersonic (Concorde) and a subsonic (ATTAS) aircraft engine is estimated numerically. The results indicate between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as S(6). It is also shown that conversion in the turbine is limited by the level of atomic oxygen at the combustor exit, resulting in a higher oxidation efficiency as the sulfur mass loading is decreased. SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are the primary sulfur oxidation products, with less than 1% of fuel sulfur converted to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. For the Concorde, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was primarily formed during the supersonic expansion through the divergent nozzle. (author) 20 refs.

  4. Evaluation for breeding purposes of SO/sub 2/-induced damage to trees and shrubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartkowiak, S; Bialobok, S; Rachwal, L

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the response of trees and shrubs to sulfur dioxide in the vicinity of industrial plants. Studies were carried out in the neighborhood of the factories as well as in exposure chambers in the laboratory. Species investigated were Larix liptolepis, Larix potaninii, Populus simonii, Forsythia intermedia, Ligustrum vulgare, Syringa amurensis and Syringa pekinensis. Injuries ranged from virually undamaged to severe, and there was considerable variation within each genus as well as between individual trees and shrubs.

  5. Effects of SO/sub 2/ pollution on plant life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, T A; Bull, J N

    1972-01-01

    SO/sub 2/ is the most intensively studied of the air pollutants that affect plants. Some lower plants (e.g. lichens and bryophytes) are so sensitive that they cannot tolerate exposure to concentrations above 0.011 ppM. Higher plants appear to be more resistant but recent research shows that other pollutants may inter-act with SO/sub 2/ to increase their susceptibility. The physiological and biochemical effects of SO/sub 2/ are discussed, and the economic implications are briefly considered. 15 references.

  6. Conversion degree of SO{sub 2} into SO{sub 3} and SO{sub x} emissions in steam generators; Grado de conversion de SO{sub 2} en SO{sub 3} y emisiones de SO{sub x} en generadores de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza Garza, Jesus; Penna Garcia, Adriana; Huerta Espino, Mario [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    A large part of the electric energy produced in this country is obtained burning fossil fuels as primary energy source. These fuels are mainly coal, fuel oil, and natural gas. The first two have high percentages of sulfur, therefore producing and emitting to the air different amounts of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). The relationship between this two contaminants varies depending on the type of steam generator, the rated capacity, and most of all on the sulfur content in the fuel and on the combustion system operating conditions. [Espanol] Una gran parte de la energia electrica generada en el pais se obtiene utilizando combustibles fosiles como fuente primaria de energia. Estos combustibles son principalmente carbon, combustoleo y gas natural. Los dos primeros tienen altos porcentajes de azufre, con lo cual se producen y emiten a la atmosfera diferentes cantidades de dioxido de azufre (SO{sub 2}) y trioxido de azufre (SO{sub 3}). La relacion entre estos dos contaminantes varia dependiendo del tipo de generador de vapor, la capacidad nominal y, sobre todo, de la concentracion de azufre en el combustible y de las condiciones de operacion del sistema de combustion.

  7. Conversion degree of SO{sub 2} into SO{sub 3} and SO{sub x} emissions in steam generators; Grado de conversion de SO{sub 2} en SO{sub 3} y emisiones de SO{sub x} en generadores de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza Garza, Jesus; Penna Garcia, Adriana; Huerta Espino, Mario [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    A large part of the electric energy produced in this country is obtained burning fossil fuels as primary energy source. These fuels are mainly coal, fuel oil, and natural gas. The first two have high percentages of sulfur, therefore producing and emitting to the air different amounts of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). The relationship between this two contaminants varies depending on the type of steam generator, the rated capacity, and most of all on the sulfur content in the fuel and on the combustion system operating conditions. [Espanol] Una gran parte de la energia electrica generada en el pais se obtiene utilizando combustibles fosiles como fuente primaria de energia. Estos combustibles son principalmente carbon, combustoleo y gas natural. Los dos primeros tienen altos porcentajes de azufre, con lo cual se producen y emiten a la atmosfera diferentes cantidades de dioxido de azufre (SO{sub 2}) y trioxido de azufre (SO{sub 3}). La relacion entre estos dos contaminantes varia dependiendo del tipo de generador de vapor, la capacidad nominal y, sobre todo, de la concentracion de azufre en el combustible y de las condiciones de operacion del sistema de combustion.

  8. Response of eight tropical plants to enhanced ammonia deposition under field, conditions prevalent with SO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, M.V.; Khijneri, S.; Dubey, P.S.; Kumawat, D.M. [Vikram University, Ujjain (India). School of Studies in Botany

    1993-12-01

    The impact of SO{sub 2} on the deposition of ammonia and the response of eight tropical tree species to excess deposition of ammonia was investigated. This was achieved by studying physiological aspects like total sugars, protein, nitrate reductace (NR) activity, organic/inorganic nitrogen ratio, specific leaf area and foliar injury in plants growing under field conditions prevalent with SO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}. Analysis of water soluble substances present on foliar surfaces of the trees indicated enhanced NH{sub 4}{sup +} deposition and thereby result in enhanced foliar protein contents. Though the enhanced nitrogen was almost the same in different plants, the plants exhibited differential metabolic disturbances. Critical analysis of the reults indicated three distinct types of plant response. Plants like {ital Azadirachta indica}, {ital Acacia auriculiformis} and {ital Bambusa arundinaceae} maintained enhanced total sugars and NR activity and incorporated excess NH{sub 4}{sup +} into proteins, thus enabling the plant to compensate/alleviate SO{sub 2} induced injury. Ficus benghalensis and Ficus religiosa maintained unaltered total sugars and NR activity and could partly incorporate NH{sub 4}{sup +} into proteins, thus modifying rhe SO{sub 2} impact to some extent. {ital Dalbergia sissoo}, {ital Eucalyptus rostrat}a and {ital Mangifera indica} could not incorporate the excess NH{sub 4}{sup +}, mainly due to declined total sugars. The results indicate the ability of a plant to undergo species specific metabolic changes in order to cope with the excess nitrogen deposition, which may ultimately result in increasing or decreasing tolerance to SO{sub 2}. 23 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Atmospheric SO{sub 2}. Global measurements using aircraft-based CIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, V.

    2008-06-27

    Aircraft based measurements of tropospheric sulfur dioxide, SO{sub 2}, have been carried out during four campaigns in South America (TROCCINOX), Australia (SCOUT-O3), Europe (INTEX/MEGAPLUME) and Africa (AMMA). SO{sub 2} has been measured by chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS), permanently online calibrated with isotopically labelled SO{sub 2}. The measurement method is described thoroughly in this work and the measured data are presented. Moreover, the data of the different regions are compared in general and typical air mass situations with SO{sub 2} enhancement are shown. A detailed analysis of four SO{sub 2} pollution plume cases emphasizes the main features: long-range transport, SO{sub 2} from metal smelters/volcanoes or from biomass burning. The SO{sub 2} measurements are analyzed in the light of simultaneously measured trace gas, particle and meteorological data. Air mass trajectory models (FLEXPART or HYSPLIT) are employed for a determination of the pollution origin. Further going evaluations with the aerosol model AEROFOR complete the analyses and point out, that the measured SO{sub 2} mole fractions are sufficient to explain new particle formation and growth. Finally, a first comparison of the measured SO{sub 2} to results from a global circulation model (ECHAM) with implemented sulfur chemistry showed a significant underestimation of the measured SO{sub 2} mole fraction by the model in the free troposphere. (orig.)

  10. Apparatus and method for improving electrostatic precipitator performance by plasma reactor conversion of SO.sub.2 to SO.sub.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hann-Sheng; Gorski, Anthony J.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process that utilize a low temperature nonequilibrium plasma reactor, for improving the particulate removal efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) are disclosed. A portion of the flue gas, that contains a low level of SO.sub.2 O.sub.2 H.sub.2 O, and particulate matter, is passed through a low temperature plasma reactor, which defines a plasma volume, thereby oxidizing a portion of the SO.sub.2 present in the flue gas into SO.sub.3. An SO.sub.2 rich flue gas is thereby generated. The SO.sub.3 rich flue gas is then returned to the primary flow of the flue gas in the exhaust treatment system prior to the ESP. This allows the SO.sub.3 to react with water to form H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 that is in turn is absorbed by fly ash in the gas stream in order to improve the removal efficiency of the EPS.

  11. SO{sub 2} removal from flue gas by activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilgun Karatepe; Ilkun Orbak; Reha Yavuz; Ayse Ozyuguran [Istanbul Technical University, Maslak-Istanbul (Turkey). Institute of Energy

    2007-07-01

    Adsorption of sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) onto activated carbons prepared from Tuncbilek lignite with different methods was investigated. Experimental results showed that the adsorption temperature, initial SO{sub 2} concentration, particle size of the activated carbon and H{sub 2}O content in the flue gas had significantly effect on the amounts of SO{sub 2} adsorbed. Textural (BET surface area, micropore surface area, total pore volume, micropore volume and average pore size) characteristics of activated carbons also played an important role on adsorption of SO{sub 2}. 10 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Phase transformation of Ca{sub 4}[Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}]SO{sub 4} and its disordered crystal structure at 1073 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, Daisuke [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); R and D Center, Taiheiyo Cement Corporation, Chiba 285-8655 (Japan); Takeda, Seiya [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Colas, Maggy [Science des Proce' de' s Ce' ramiques et de Traitements de Surface (SPCTS), UMR 7315 CNRS, Universite' de Limoges, Centre Europe' en de la Ce' ramique, 12 Rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges Cedex (France); Asaka, Toru [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Thomas, Philippe [Science des Proce' de' s Ce' ramiques et de Traitements de Surface (SPCTS), UMR 7315 CNRS, Universite' de Limoges, Centre Europe' en de la Ce' ramique, 12 Rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges Cedex (France); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    The phase transformation of Ca{sub 4}[Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}]SO{sub 4} and the crystal structure of its high-temperature phase were investigated by differential thermal analysis, temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy and high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction (CuKα{sub 1}). We determined the starting temperature of the orthorhombic-to-cubic transformation during heating (=711 K) and that of the reverse transformation during cooling (=742 K). The thermal hysteresis was negative (=−31 K), suggesting the thermoelasticity of the transformation. The space group of the high temperature phase is I4{sup ¯}3m with the unit-cell dimensions of a=0.92426(2) nm and V=0.78955(2) nm{sup 3} (Z=2) at 1073 K. The initial structural model was derived by the direct methods and further refined by the Rietveld method. The final structural model showed the orientational disordering of SO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The maximum-entropy method-based pattern fitting method was used to confirm the validity of the split-atom model, in which conventional structure bias caused by assuming intensity partitioning was minimized. At around the transformation temperature during heating, the vibrational spectra, corresponding to the Raman-active SO{sub 4} internal stretching mode, showed the continuous and gradual change in the slope of full width at half maximum versus temperature curve. This strongly suggests that the orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transformation would be principally accompanied by the statistical disordering in orientation of the SO{sub 4} tetrahedra, without distinct dynamical reorientation. - Graphical abstract: (Left) Three-dimensional electron-density distributions of the SO{sub 4} tetrahedron with the split-atom model, and (right) a bird's eye view of electron densities on the plane parallel to (111). - Highlights: • Crystal structure of Ca{sub 4}[Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}]SO{sub 4} at 1073 K is determined by powder XRD. • The atom arrangements are represented by the split

  13. Removal of SO{sub 2} at low temperature using dead Bacillus licheniformis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lishan Jia; Hao Song; Weiping Fang; Qingbiao Li; Jing Gao; Juanjuan Li; Qian Zhang [Xiamen University, Xiamen (China). China Department of Chemical Engineering and Biochemical Engineering

    2010-03-15

    In this paper we studied the adsorption and desorption behavior of SO{sub 2} by the dead Bacillus licheniformis R08 biomass. The effects of water vapor, temperature and O{sub 2} on the removal of SO{sub 2} by the biomass were studied. FTIR and XPS were used to characterize the mechanism of the SO{sub 2} adsorption on the biomass. The experimental results showed that water vapor and temperature deeply influenced the adsorption of SO{sub 2} by the biomass. However, O{sub 2} cannot oxidize SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} on the biomass. FTIR and XPS results showed that oxygenous and nitrogenous functional groups on the cell walls of biomass may be related to the SO{sub 2} adsorption and three sulfur species were formed on the biomass in adsorption process. In the desorption process, weakly adsorbed SO{sub 2} could be desorbed by increasing temperature and the biomass can be reused for 10 cycles. 27 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. The importance of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} for sulphation of gaseous KCl - An experimental investigation in a biomass fired CFB boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassman, Haakan [Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Division of Energy Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Baefver, Linda [Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Energy Technology, Boraas (Sweden); Aamand, Lars-Erik [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Division of Energy Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2010-09-15

    This paper is based on results obtained during co-combustion of wood pellets and straw in a 12 MW circulating fluidised bed (CFB) boiler. Elemental sulphur (S) and ammonium sulphate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}) were used as additives to convert the alkali chlorides (mainly KCl) to less corrosive alkali sulphates. Their performance was then evaluated using several measurement tools including, IACM (on-line measurements of gaseous alkali chlorides), a low-pressure impactor (particle size distribution and chemical composition of extracted fly ash particles), and deposit probes (chemical composition in deposits collected). The importance of the presence of either SO{sub 2} or SO{sub 3} for gas phase sulphation of KCl is also discussed. Ammonium sulphate performed significantly better than elemental sulphur. A more efficient sulphation of gaseous KCl was achieved with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} even when the S/Cl molar ratio was less than half compared to sulphur. Thus the presence of gaseous SO{sub 3} is of greater importance than that of SO{sub 2} for the sulphation of gaseous KCl. (author)

  15. Changes in transpiration rate of SO/sub 2/-resistant and -sensitive plants with SO/sub 2/ fumigation and the participation of abscisic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, N.; Sugahara, K.

    1978-01-01

    Peanut and tomato plants were resistant to 2.0 ppm SO/sub 2/, while radish, perilla and spinach plants were sensitive. The amounts of SO/sub 2/ absorbed by peanut and tomato were obviously less than those absorbed by radish, perilla and spinach. Transpiration rates of peanut and tomato began to decrease within 5 min after the commencement of SO/sub 2/ fumigation and reached minimum levels, i.e., 10 and 50% for the initial levels, respectively, after initiation of fumigation, then declined. Those of radish and spinach did not change for about 20 and 30 min, then decreased gradually. The content of abscisic acid (ABA) was highest in peanut. The content in tomato was also high, but low in radish, perilla and spinach. Radish supplied with exogenous ABA began to decrease its transpiration rate immediately after SO/sub 2/ fumigation and was markedly resistant to SO/sub 2/. ABA in leaves may control the rapid stomatal closure following SO/sub 2/ fumigation. 26 references.

  16. Fate of SO(sub 2) During Plasma Treatment of Diesel Engine Exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusasco, R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1999-01-01

    Several catalytic aftertreatment technologies rely on the conversion of NO to NO(sub 2) to achieve efficient reduction of NO(sub x) and particulates in diesel engine exhaust. These technologies require low sulfur fuel because the catalyst component that is active in converting NO to NO(sub 2) is also active in converting SO(sub 2) to SO(sub 3). A non-thermal plasma can be used for the selective partial oxidation of NO to NO(sub 2) in the gas-phase under diesel engine exhaust conditions. This paper discusses how a non-thermal plasma can efficiently oxidize NO to NO(sub 2) without oxidizing SO(sub 2) to SO(sub 3). It is shown that the presence of hydrocarbons in the plasma is essential for enhancing the selective partial oxidation of NO and suppressing the oxidation of SO(sub 2)

  17. Results of aerosol and SO/sub 2/ measurements at Neurath fossil-fuel power plant in November 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffrath, D; Peters, W

    1975-11-01

    The structure of cooling tower plumes depends on meteorological conditions, especially on wind, temperature gradients, and turbulence. This influence of meteorological atmospheric conditions on the plumes may be quantitatively described by so-called diffusion parameters. These parameters may be determined with the aid of tracer measurements by determining tracer diffusion and, from the distribution of the tracers, calculating the diffusion parameters. At the Neurath power plant, there were three of these tracers. First, the vertical concentration distribution of the atmospheric background aerosol may yield information on the vertical stratification. Secondly, pollutants from anthropogenic sources, e.g., from the stacks of Neurath fossil-fuel power plant itself, may be used for investigation. In the present study, particle concentrations and SO/sub 2/ content of the air due to the waste gases from the power plant stacks were used for measurement.

  18. Trading of SO{sub 2} emissions to air credits in Norway. A proposal; Forslag til omsetningsordning i Norge for SO{sub 2}-utslipp til luft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-28

    This report discusses a proposal submitted to the Norwegian government to define the national bounds to Norway`s total emissions of SO{sub 2} to air. Within the national bounds the companies are given or may buy an emission permit in the form of coupons. The companies must hand in coupons when they emit SO{sub 2} in Norway or sell fuel that leads to such emissions. They can sell coupons among themselves or save them for later years but not use them in advance. It is suggested that the coupons should be made compulsory from 1998 onwards, that is, two years before the SO{sub 2} agreement takes effect. A trading arrangement for the coupons places responsibility and is a strong incentive for the companies to limit their emissions. It facilitates emission reduction measures in companies of weak economy and makes it cheaper for Norway to keep the SO{sub 2} agreement. There are two important conditions for the trading arrangement to have a meaning: It must be expected that the authorities will keep the total emission within the limits set down in the SO{sub 2} agreement, and that they will inspire confidence by not changing the basic premises of the arrangement. 91 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Mechanism of iron catalyzed oxidation of SO/sub 2/ in oxygenated solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiberg, J

    1975-01-01

    Previous experimental work concerning the iron catalyzed oxidation of SO/sub 2/ in oxygenated acid solutions failed to provide a consistent reaction mechanism and rate expression. As iron is one of the main constituents of urban atmospheric aerosols, the rate studies of heterogeneous sulphate formation in polluted city air were hampered. The present study develops a new theory for the iron catalyzed oxidation of SO/sub 2/. The resulting new rate expression is general enough to account for the results of previous experimental investigations that were performed in different ranges of SO/sub 2/ and catalyst concentrations.

  20. Modelling of trona based spray dry scrubbing of SO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Erdol-Aydin; G. Nasun-Saygili [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2007-02-15

    The paper presents a model of the reaction between SO{sub 2} and trona based slurries. Experimental findings relevant to the desulfurisation in a spray dryer were compared with the proposed mathematical model and were found in good agreement. It is observed that at high stoichiometric ratios, the diffusion of SO{sub 2} from the gas bulk to the droplet interface is dominant for absorption and with decreasing stoichiometric ratio the absorption efficiency decreases. An increase in the temperature also causes a decrease in absorption efficiency. At the stoichiometric ratio (Na/S = 2), SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was found to be around 90%.

  1. Uptake of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ by the isolated upper airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, E

    1968-01-01

    SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ concentrations were measured above and below isolated tracheas of 2 dogs and 3 rabbits. Air--gas mixtures were pumped through nose to upper trachea for 10 to 15 min at rates of 3.5 and 0.75 liters/min, respectively. Gas concentrations ranged from 7 to 87 ppM SO/sub 2/ and from 4 to 41 ppM NO/sub 2/. The rate of uptake for the isolated airways was a generally constant 93.7% for SO/sub 2/ and 42.1% for NO/sub 2/, a significant difference.

  2. Role of photophosphorylation in SO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ inhibition of photosynthesis in isolated chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerovic, Z G; Kalezic, R; Plesnicar, M

    1982-01-01

    Sulphur dioxide inhibits noncyclic photophosphorylation in isolated envelope-free chloroplasts. This inhibition was shown to be reversible and competitive with phosphate, with an inhibitor constant of K/sub i/ = 0.8 mM. The same inhibition characteristics were observed when phosphoglycerate (PGA)- or ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP)- dependent oxygen evolution was examined in a reconstituted chloroplast system in the presence of SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/. Using an ATP-regenerating system (phosphocreatine-creatine kinase), it was demonstrated that the inhibition of PGA-dependent oxygen evolution is solely the result of inhibited photophosphorylation. It is concluded that at low SO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ concentrations the inhibition of photophosphorylation is responsible for the inhibition of photosynthetic oxygen evolution.

  3. Effects of atmospheric SO[sub 2] on Azolla and Anabaena symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, J.-S.; Wellburn, A.R. (Division of Biological Sciences, Institute of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Lancaster Univ., Lancaster (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    The water fern Azolla pinnata R. Br. was fumigated for 1 week with either 25, 50 or 100 nl l[sup -1] SO[sub 2]. The symbiosis of Azolla with Anabaena azollae (spp.) was severely damaged by atmospheric SO[sub 2] even at the lowest concentration studied showing significant reductions in growth, reduction of C[sub 2]H[sub 2], NH[sub 3] assimilation, protein synthesis, and heterocyst development. These disturbances appear to be mainly responsible for the extreme sensitivity of this fern to atmospheric SO[sub 2]. Changes in violaxanthin/antheraxanthin and epoxylutein/lutein ratios also indicate that free radical products are induced by atmospheric SO[sub 2]. These results suggest that the Azolla-Anabeana symbiotic system is a very responsive and reliable lower plant model to study the detailed effects of total sulfur deposition upon the balances between various important plant metabolic processes.

  4. Mixing height and mass balance of SO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere above Great Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garland, J.A.; Branson, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the SO/sub 2/ concentration at heights ranging from 150 to 1200 m were made at Cardington, Bedfordshire, using lightweight samplers carried on the cable of the tethered balloon. A value of 1200 m for the mean mixing height for SO/sub 2/ was deduced from the measurements. This value indicates that dry deposition limits the mean lifetime of SO/sub 2/ to about 2 days. The results of the national survey of air pollution were used to derive an area-mean concentration of 36 micrograms/m3 for SO/sub 2/ over Great Britain (excluding the north of Scotland, West Wales and the South West Peninsula) and this result is used in a discussion of the mass balance of atmospheric sulphur over this area.

  5. Adsorption of SO{sub 2} on activated carbon for low gas concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P.; Wanko, H.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaften, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Adsorption experiments of SO{sub 2} on activated carbon has been carried out for low concentrations (about 100 ppm) at room temperature (15 to 33 C) with varying humidity in the air. The breakthrough curves show that at high relative humidity or relative higher SO{sub 2} concentration, the load capacity increases with respect to temperature. The humidity of the air is also of benefit to the load capacity of SO{sub 2}. When an adsorption process is interrupted and the activated carbon is kept closed for a while, the SO{sub 2} concentration at the exit of a fixed-bed adsorber is similar to that of the fresh activated carbon and begins at a very low value. It appears that the sorption potential has been refreshed after the storage period. Analysis of desorption experiments by simultaneous thermal analysis combined with mass spectrometry (MS) after loading, shows that the physisorbed SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O are desorbed at low temperatures. At higher temperatures, the MS peak of SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O occur at the same time. Compared with desorption immediately after loading, after one day, the desorption peak due to the physisorbed SO{sub 2} disappears. From this, it can be concluded that the refreshment of the loading capacity of the activated carbon after storage is mainly due to a change in the nature of the SO{sub 2} from a physisorbed state to a chemisorbed form. The same mechanism leads to a continuous refreshment of the sorption potential by means of a chemical reaction during the adsorption process. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Rapid preparation of ultrafine BaSO{sub 3} by SO{sub 2} storage material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fei; Sha, Feng; Qiao, Xian Shu; Zhao, Tian Xiang; Guo, Bo; Zhang, Jian Bin [College of Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Huhhot (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    In this work, a green and efficient process was developed for the preparation of ultrafine BaSO{sub 3} with layered nanostructure surface via the reaction of BaCl{sub 2} with a SO{sub 2} storage material (SO{sub 2}SM) at room temperature. The absorption of SO{sub 2} with equimolar ethylenediamine (EDA) and ethylene glycol (EG) afforded SO{sub 2}SM, which not only offered alkyl sulfite but also released EDA and EG that served as efficient surfactants to promote the formation of BaSO{sub 3} with spherical morphology and porous structure in the process of synthesis of ultrafine BaSO{sub 3}. The factors affecting the morphology and size of BaSO{sub 3} particle were assessed by investigating the effects of SO{sub 2}SM concentration, BaCl{sub 2} concentration, stirring time and speed. It was found that a higher SO{sub 2}SM concentration led to a higher degree of supersaturation, and the particle size of BaSO{sub 3} could be reduced by increasing SO{sub 2}SM concentration. Moreover, under the identified optimal reaction conditions, ultrafine BaSO{sub 3} was obtained with an average diameter of 450 nm. In addition, a plausible formation process of BaSO{sub 3} was proposed to explain the observed reaction results. Overall, the developed process in this work provides an efficient method for the capture, utilization, and conversion of SO{sub 2} into a valuable chemical.

  7. Simultaneous absorption of NO and SO{sub 2} into hexamminecobalt(II)/iodide solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, X.L.; Xiao, W.D.; Yuan, W.K. [East China University of Science & Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2005-05-01

    An innovative catalyst system has been developed to simultaneously remove NO and SO{sub 2} from combustion flue gas. Such catalyst system may be introduced to the scrubbing solution using ammonia solution to accomplish sequential absorption and catalytic oxidation of both NO and SO{sub 2} in the same reactor. When the catalyst system is utilized for removing NO and SO{sub 2} from the flue gas, Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2+} ions act as the catalyst and I{sup -} as the co-catalyst. Dissolved oxygen, in equilibrium with the residual oxygen in the flue gas, is the oxidant. The overall removal process is further enhanced by UV irradiation at 365 nm. More than 95% of NO is removed at a feed concentration of 250-900 ppm, and nearly 100% of SO{sub 2} is removed at a feed concentration of 800-2500 ppm. The sulfur dioxide co-existing in the flue gas is beneficial to NO absorption into hexamminecobalt(II)/iodide solution. NO and SO{sub 2} can be converted to ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate that can be used as fertilizer materials. The process described here demonstrates the feasibility of removing SO{sub 2} and NO simultaneously only by retrofitting the existing wet ammonia flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers.

  8. Nitrile-functionalized tertiary amines as highly efficient and reversible SO{sub 2} absorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yun; Kim, Heehwan; Kim, Young Jin; Jeong, Junkyo; Cheong, Minserk [Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyunjoo [Clean Energy Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoon Sik, E-mail: khs2004@khu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Je Seung, E-mail: leejs70@khu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Nitrile-functionalized tertiary amines physically and reversibly absorb SO{sub 2}. • Tertiary alkanolamines chemically and irreversibly absorb SO{sub 2} through OH group. • SO{sub 2} absorption modes were studied by spectroscopy and computational calculations. -- Abstract: Three different types of nitrile-functionalized amines, including 3-(N,N-diethylamino)propionitrile (DEAPN), 3-(N,N-dibutylamino)propionitrile (DBAPN), and N-methyl-N,N-dipropionitrile amine (MADPN) were synthesized, and their SO{sub 2} absorption performances were evaluated and compared with those of hydroxy-functionalized amines such as N,N-diethyl-N-ethanol amine (DEEA), N,N-dibutyl-N-ethanol amine (DBEA), and N-methyl-N,N-diethanol amine (MDEA). Absorption–desorption cycle experiments clearly demonstrate that the nitrile-functionalized amines are more efficient than the hydroxy-functionalized amines in terms of absorption rate and regenerability. Computational calculations with DBEA and DBAPN revealed that DBEA bearing a hydroxyethyl group chemically interacts with SO{sub 2} through oxygen atom, forming an ionic compound with a covalently bound -OSO{sub 2}{sup −} group. On the contrary, DBAPN bearing a nitrile group physically interacts with SO{sub 2} through the nitrogen and the hydrogen atoms of the two methylene groups adjacent to the amino and nitrile functionalities.

  9. Microwave catalytic NOx and SO{sub 2} removal using FeCu/zeolite as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z.S. Wei; G.H. Zeng; Z.R. Xie; C.Y. Ma; X.H. Liu; J.L. Sun; L.H. Liu [Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China). School of Environmental Science and Engineering

    2011-04-15

    Non-thermal plasma technology is a promising process for flue gas treatment. Microwave catalytic NOx and SO{sub 2} removal simultaneously has been investigated using FeCu/zeolite as catalyst. The experimental results showed that a microwave reactor with FeCu/zeolite only could be used to microwave catalytic oxidative 91.7% NOx to nitrates and 79.6% SO{sub 2} to sulfate; the reaction efficiencies of microwave catalytic reduction of NOx and SO{sub 2} in a microwave reactor with FeCu/zeolite and ammonium bicarbonate (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) as a reducing agent could be up to 95.8% and 93.4% respectively. Microwave irradiation accentuates catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} and NOx treatment, and microwave addition can increases SO{sub 2} removal efficiency from 14.5% to 18.7%, and NOx removal efficiency from 13.4% to 18.7%, separately. FeCu/zeolite catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectrum analysis (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) method. Microwave catalytic NOx and SO{sub 2} removal follows Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) kinetics. 25 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NOx by microwave with potassium permanganate over zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zai-shan Wei; He-jingying Niu; Yong-feng Ji [Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China). School of Environmental Science and Engineering

    2009-02-15

    Simultaneous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal from flue gas can be achieved with high efficiency by microwave with potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}) over zeolite. The experimental results showed that the microwave reactor could be used to oxidation of SO{sub 2} to sulfate with the best desulfurization efficiency of 96.8% and oxidize NOx to nitrates with the best NOx removal efficiency of 98.4%. Microwave accentuates catalytic oxidation treatment, and microwave addition can increase the SO{sub 2} and NOx removal efficiency by 7.2% and 12.2% separately. The addition of zeolite to microwave potassium permanganate increases from 16.5% to 43.5% the microwave removal efficiency for SO{sub 2}, and the NOx removal efficiency from 85.6% to 98.2%. The additional use of potassium permanganate to the microwave zeolite leads to the enhancement of SO{sub 2} removal efficiency up from 53.9% to 95%, and denitrification efficiency up from 85.6% to 98.2%. The optimal microwave power and empty bed residence time (EBRT) on simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification are 259 W and 0.357 s, respectively. SO{sub 2} and NOx were rapidly oxidized in microwave induced catalytic oxidation reaction using potassium permanganate with zeolite being the catalyst and microwave absorbent. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Cooling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    After an introduction to the general concepts of cooling of charged particle beams, some specific cooling methods are discussed, namely stochastic, electron and laser cooling. The treatment concentrates on the physical ideas of the cooling methods and only very crude derivations of cooling times are given. At the end three other proposed cooling schemes are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  12. Methods for the analysis of SO/sub 2/, SO/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/S in flue gas and the calculation of the acid dew point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertyn, C.H.

    1986-02-01

    Methods are given for the analysis of SO/sub 2/, SO/sub 3/, and H/sub 2/S in flue gas. Two methods are described for the determination of SO/sub 2/. The method to be used depends on whether or not H/sub 2/S is present in the gas stream. An equation for the calculation of acid dew point is given as well.

  13. Systems of Na/sup +/NO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, RbNO/sub 3/, Rb/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O and NaNO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, CsNO/sub 3/, Cs/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O at 25 and 75 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletaev, I F; Krasnenkova, L V

    1975-08-01

    Quaternary Na/sup +/, Rb/sup +///NO/sub 3/-, SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-H/sub 2/O and Nsub(+), Cs/sup +///NO/sub 3/-, SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-H/sub 2/O mutual systems have been studied isothermally. The following six fields of crystallization have been revealed in these systems at 25 deg C: Cs/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/x10H/sub 2/O, NaNO/sub 3/xNa/sub 2/SO/sub 4/x2H/sub 2/O, NaNO/sub 3/, and CsNO/sub 3/.

  14. Adsorption characteristics of SO{sub 2}, NO by steam activated biomass chars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Fei; Shu, Tong; Wang, Kuan; Lu, Ping [Nanjing Normal Univ. (China). School of Energy and Mechanical Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Wheat straw and rice husk collected from the suburb of Nanjing, China, were prepared to different kinds of steam activated biomass-based chars, and the adsorption characteristics of the biomass-based chars was carried out in a fixed bed reactor. The specific surface area and pore structure of different biomass chars were measured by nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis instrument at 77K. The effects of biomass type, pyrolysis temperature, heating rate, activation temperature and concentration of SO{sub 2}, NO on the adsorption efficiency of SO{sub 2}, NO were analyzed. The results indicated that the steam activation has significant effects on the specific surface area, total pore volume and micro-morphology of biomass chars by improving the internal structure. The adsorption efficiency of SO{sub 2}, NO increased with the decreasing of SO{sub 2}, NO concentration in the experimental range. The optimal condition of char preparation (873K, fast pyrolysis) and steam activation (1,073K) was proposed based on the adsorption efficiency and adsorption volume of SO{sub 2}, NO. It builds a theoretical basis for industrial applications of biomass.

  15. Model study of initial adsorption of SO{sub 2} on calcite and dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaga-Starzec, Katarina; Panas, Itai; Lindqvist, Oliver

    2004-01-30

    The rate of calcareous stone degradation is to a significant extent controlled by their surface chemistry with SO{sub 2}. Initial surface sulphite is converted to a harmful gypsum upon, e.g. NO{sub 2} catalysed oxidation. However, it has been observed by scanning electron microscopy that the lateral distributions of gypsum crystals differ between calcitic and dolomitic marbles. The first-principles density functional theory is employed to understand the origin of these fundamentally different morphologies. Here, the stability differences of surface sulphite at calcite CaCO{sub 3} (s) and dolomite Ca{sub x}Mg{sub 1-x}CO{sub 3} (s) are determined. A qualitative difference in surface sulphite stability, favouring the former, is reported. This is taken to imply that calcitic micro-crystals embedded in a dolomitic matrix act as sinks in the surface sulphation process, controlled by SO{sub 2} diffusion. The subsequent formation of gypsum under such conditions will not require SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (aq) ion transport. This explains the homogeneous distribution of gypsum observed on the calcitic micro-crystals in dolomite. In contrast, sulphation on purely calcitic marbles never reaches such high SO{sub 2} coverage. Rather, upon oxidation, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (aq) transport to nucleation centres, such as grain boundaries, is required for the growth of gypsum crystals.

  16. Experimental studies on SO/sub 2/ injuries in higher plants. Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, H; Takanashi, T; Yatazawa, M

    1970-01-01

    The effect of sulfur dioxide on aminoacid metabolism was examined. Wheat seedlings one month old (20 cm) were exposed to 0.5 ppm SO/sub 2/ at 22/sup 0/C, and 40% humidity for four days, only during the day. A Beckman 1200 aminoacid analyzer revealed only slight effects, but it was conjectured that the plant had some separate amino acid in its body prior to the test, and that the effect of SO/sub 2/ was relatively low. A similar wheat seedling was placed in a closed glass container and was exposed to 300 ppm carbon dioxide (14) and 100 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 30 min under 4000 lux. The first paper chromatography of 80% ethanol solubles from the leaves revealed that Ala. value had increased but sir. had decreased in half. The second paper chromatography revealed that in both test and control plants, four kinds of material in amino acid had taken in C(14), and two of the four were Ser. Ala. The total C(14) taken in by the test material under SO/sub 2/ exposure showed a noted decrease. The experiment proved that exposure of a plant to a high concentration of SO/sub 2/ produced hydroxysulfonate in metabolism and impaired its glycol acid function.

  17. Adsorption and oxidation of SO{sub 2} by graphene oxides: A van der Waals density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Huijuan [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, 650500 (China); Cen, Wanglai, E-mail: cenwanglai@scu.edu.cn [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Technology Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065 (China); Liu, Jie [Department of Environment Engineering, Chengdu University of Information Technology, Chengdu 610025 (China); Guo, Jiaxiu [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Technology Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065 (China); Yin, Huaqiang [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Technology Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065 (China); Institute of New Energy and Low Carbon Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Ning, Ping, E-mail: ningping58@sina.com [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, 650500 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydroxyl group enhances the adsorption of SO{sub 2} on graphene oxide surface. • Hydroxyl group cuts down the barrier for the oxidation of SO{sub 2} through H-bonding interaction. • A charge transfer channel, from surface hydroxyl group to adsorbed SO{sub 2} molecule, and then from the adsorbed SO{sub 2} to epoxy group, is found to underlie the promotion effects on the oxidation of SO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Carbon materials have been used for low temperature (20–150 °C) catalytic removal of SO{sub 2} from the coal-burned flue gases for a long time, but the mechanism at atomic level is still controversial. Density functional theory was used to investigate the adsorption and oxidation of SO{sub 2} on elaborated graphene oxides (GOs) to discover the insights. It is found that the hydroxyl groups on GO surface possess bi-functional effects: both enhancing the adsorption of SO{sub 2} through H-bonding interaction and reducing the reaction barrier for its oxidation to SO{sub 3}. The promotion of oxidation is related to a pre-activation of the surface epoxy group. Based on Bader population, charge difference and electron localization function analysis, a charge transfer channel is proposed to explain the pre-activation.

  18. Experimental determination and modeling of the solubility phase diagram of the ternary system (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O) at 288.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shiqiang, E-mail: wangshiqiang@tust.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Marine Resources and Chemistry, College of Marine Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Guo, Yafei [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Marine Resources and Chemistry, College of Marine Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Li, Dongchan [Engineering Research Center of Seawater Utilization Technology of Ministry of Education, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Tang, Peng; Deng, Tianlong [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Marine Resources and Chemistry, College of Marine Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2015-02-10

    Highlights: • Solubility of the ternary system Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O at 288.15 K has been measured. • Phase diagram of this system was simulated and calculated by a thermodynamic model. • Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} belongs to the incongruent double salt in this system. • Solution density was calculated using empirical equation. - Abstract: The solubility and density in the thermodynamic phase equilibria ternary system (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O) at 288.15 K and 0.1 MPa were investigated experimentally with the method of isothermal dissolution equilibrium. This system at 288.15 K consists of two invariant points, three univariant isothermal dissolution curves; and three crystallization regions. The salt Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} belongs to the incongruent double salt, and no solid solution was found. Based on the Pitzer model and its extended Harvie–Weare (HW) model, the mixing ion-interaction parameters of θ{sub Li,K}, ψ{sub Li,K,SO4} at 288.15 K and the solubility equilibrium constants K{sub sp} of solid phases Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, which are not reported in the literature were acquired. A comparison between the calculated and experimental results at 288.15 K for the ternary system shows that the calculated solubilities obtained with the extended HW model agree well with experimental data.

  19. Effects of SO/sub 2/ pollution on stomatal movements in Vicia faba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majernik, O; Mansfield, T A

    1971-01-01

    Leaves of broad bean Vicia faba L. exposed to controlled levels of SO/sub 2/ pollution in the range 0.25 to 9.0 ppm had much wider stomatal openings than control plants. The stimulation of opening relative to the controls was proportional to SO/sub 2/ concentration over the range 0.25 to 1.0 ppm. The ability of the stomata to close at night was not appreciably affected. The possible implications of this unnatural reaction of the stomata are discussed. Abnormal opening could lead to the plant's losing its usual control over transpiration, with resulting water stress. The main disadvantage, however, is that SO/sub 2/ will gain easier access to the interior of the leaf.

  20. SO/sub 2/ dose-response sensitivity classification data for crops and natural vegetation species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving, P.M.; Ballou, S.W.

    1980-09-01

    Over the past several years studies have been made on the interaction of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and vegetation by performing field research and by developing analytical procedures for applying field observation data to energy impact assessments. As a result of this work, numerous reports have been prepared on crop-pollutant interactions, such as dose-response data; on the applications of such data to screening approaches for identifying crops at risk; and on models that predict crop yield reductions from point source emissions of SO/sub 2/. Data that were used for these studies, such as the crop-at-risk screening procedure, are presented in this report. Maps are also presented that show the national distribution of SO/sub 2/-sensitive crops and natural vegetation.

  1. SO/sub 2/ and particles--synergistic effects on guinea pig lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rylander, R; Ohrstrom, M; Hellstrom, P A; Bergstrom, R

    1971-01-01

    Damage from SO/sub 2/ (5 ppM) and/or MnO/sub 2/ (5.9 mg/m/sup 3/, 90% < 0.5 ..mu..m) to guinea pigs was assessed by a phagocytosis-clearance model. The clearance of viable and killed nonpathogenic bacteria was determined in animals exposed to pollutants 6 hr/day, 5 day/wk, for 4 wk. Percent killed and viable E. coli remaining in lung after 3 hr averaged 75 and 16 for control, 79 and 19 for MnO/sub 2/, 88 and 10 for SO/sub 2/, and 118 and 28 for SO/sub 2/ plus MnO/sub 2/ (significant vs control). Synergism was thus demonstrated.

  2. Gaussian plume model for the SO{sub 2} in a thermoelectric power plant; Modelo de pluma gaussiano para el SO{sub 2} en una central termoelectrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes L, C; Munoz Ledo, C R [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1993-12-31

    The Gaussian Plume Model is an analytical extension to simulate the dispersion of the SO{sub 2} concentration at ground level as a function of the emission changes in the spot sources, as well as the pollutant dispersion in the Wind Rose, when the necessary parameters are fed. The model was elaborated in a personal computer and the results produced are generated in text form. [Espanol] El modelo de pluma gaussiano es una extension analitica para simular la dispersion de las concentraciones de SO{sub 2} a nivel del piso en funcion de los cambios de las emisiones en las fuentes puntuales, asi como, la dispersion del contaminante en la rosa de los vientos cuando se le alimentan los parametros necesarios. El modelo fue elaborado en una computadora personal y los resultados que proporciona los genera en modo texto.

  3. Gaussian plume model for the SO{sub 2} in a thermoelectric power plant; Modelo de pluma gaussiano para el SO{sub 2} en una central termoelectrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes L, C.; Munoz Ledo, C. R. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1992-12-31

    The Gaussian Plume Model is an analytical extension to simulate the dispersion of the SO{sub 2} concentration at ground level as a function of the emission changes in the spot sources, as well as the pollutant dispersion in the Wind Rose, when the necessary parameters are fed. The model was elaborated in a personal computer and the results produced are generated in text form. [Espanol] El modelo de pluma gaussiano es una extension analitica para simular la dispersion de las concentraciones de SO{sub 2} a nivel del piso en funcion de los cambios de las emisiones en las fuentes puntuales, asi como, la dispersion del contaminante en la rosa de los vientos cuando se le alimentan los parametros necesarios. El modelo fue elaborado en una computadora personal y los resultados que proporciona los genera en modo texto.

  4. Efficient absorption of SO{sub 2} with low-partial pressures by environmentally benign functional deep eutectic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai; Ren, Shuhang [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, 100029 (China); Hou, Yucui [Department of Chemistry, Taiyuan Normal University, Taiyuan, 030031 (China); Wu, Weize, E-mail: wzwu@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, 100029 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Environmentally benign deep eutectic solvents (DESs) based on betaine or L-carnitine with ethylene glycol were designed with a function and used to efficiently capture SO{sub 2} with low partial pressures. - Highlights: • Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were designed with a function to absorb low-conc. SO{sub 2}. • Betaine(Bet) and L-carnitine(L-car) with a functional group were used as H-bond acceptor. • Bet + ethylene glycol (EG) DES and L-car + EG DES are environmentally benign. • L-car + EG DES can absorb 0.644 mol SO{sub 2} per mole L-car (0.37% SO{sub 2}). • L-car + EG DES is a promising absorbent for SO{sub 2} capture. - Abstract: Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emitted from the burning of fossil fuels is one of the main air contaminants. In this work, we found that environmentally benign solvents, deep eutectic solvents (DESs) could be designed with a function to absorb low-partial pressure SO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas. Two kinds of biodegradable functional DESs based on betaine (Bet) and L-carnitine (L-car) as hydrogen bond accepters (HBA) and ethylene glycol (EG) as a hydrogen bond donor (HBD) were prepared with mole ratios of HBA to HBD from 1:3 to 1:5, and they were investigated to absorb SO{sub 2} with different partial pressures at various temperatures. The results showed that the two DESs could absorb low-partial pressure SO{sub 2} efficiently. SO{sub 2} absorption capacities of the DESs with HBA/HBD mole ratio of 1:3 were 0.332 mol SO{sub 2}/mol HBA for Bet + EG DES and 0.820 mol SO{sub 2}/mol HBA for L-car + EG DES at 40 °C with a SO{sub 2} partial pressure of 0.02 atm. In addition, the regeneration experiments demonstrated that the absorption capacities of DESs did not change after five absorption and desorption cycles. Furthermore, the absorption mechanism of SO{sub 2} by DESs was studied by FT-IR, {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C NMR spectra. It was found that there are strong acid–base interactions between SO{sub 2} and

  5. Effect of SO/sub 2/ upon the sensitization with albumin through the airway in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Y

    1968-01-01

    Rats were exposed to 400 ppM SO/sub 2/ for 30 min and then to 90 min of nebulized egg albumin and bovine serum albumin sensitizing antigens 7 times at intervals of a few days. Serum analysis was done 4 wk after final exposure-treatment. There was enhanced sensitization of rats exposed to SO/sub 2/ by 2 of 4 tests (hemagglutination and radioimmunoelectrophoresis) while other 2 tests showed no antibodies in any rat (insensitive tests). Results were possible due to slowed clearance.

  6. Inhibition of sulfate uptake by Lemna minor 1. during aeration with sublethal concentrations of SO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaerer, M; Brunold, C; Erismann, K H

    1975-01-01

    The sulfate uptake of Lemna minor l. is very rapidly inhibited by SO/sub 2/-concentrations of 0.15, 0.32 and 0.61 ppM. The sulfate concentration in the plant material is increased. At least 40% of the total sulfur in the organisms originate from SO/sub 2/.

  7. Susceptibility of various tree species to SO/sub 2/, HF and magnesite dust pollutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollanschutz, J

    1969-01-01

    The investigations covered an area polluted with SO/sub 2/ and magnesite, with SO/sub 2/ and HF, and with HF. With the aid of an increment borer, the growth of the trees was measured; in other cases, the power of endurance was estimated. In the environment of a magnesite plant magnesite dust and SO/sub 2/ pollution caused growth reduction (in decreasing order) in Abies alba, Picea abies and Pinus sylvestris. Larix decidua appeared to be by far the most resistant against both pollutants. Fagus sylvatica still showed a growth increase, though leaf burn symptoms were present; this might be due to fertilization with MgSO/sub 4/ through the leaves. When polluted with both SO/sub 2/ and HF, the (increasing) order was: Populus tremula, Fraxinus excelsior, Fagus + Acer, Picea + Pinus, Larix. Though no differences between Pinus and Picea was found here, it was striking that in the latter species the variation in susceptibility was much greater than in Pinus, which may be important for future selection work. In an atmosphere polluted solely with HF, Pinus showed a greater resistance than Picea and Abies, but it seemed that in its youth, Abies was at least as resistant as Picea. Symptoms do not always correspond with growth reduction and yield losses, and an important growth reduction may occur before any clear symptoms can be observed. Breeding for resistance should be encouraged, especially in spruce.

  8. Electricity production and SO{sub 2} emissions in Poland`s power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salay, J.

    1996-09-01

    The report analyzes how the Polish power industry`s electricity production and SO{sub 2} emissions have changed between 1988 and 1994. It examines to what extent the Polish government`s reform of air pollution control and its reorganization of the power industry affected power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions in the same period. SO{sub 2} emissions from Polish power plants fell by 37% in 1988-1994. The drop in emissions was partly a result of the fall in economic activity and electricity production in the early 1990s. The main reasons for the emission reduction were the introduction of hard budget constraints, increased coal prices, and stricter enforcement of air pollution control. These reforms created strong incentives for power plants to switch to high-quality coal with lower sulfur content and higher heating value. Improved efficiency of electricity generation also contributed to the fall in SO{sub 2} emissions. 32 refs, 15 figs, 1 tab

  9. Cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boernke, F.

    1975-01-01

    The need for the use of cooling systems in power plant engineering is dealt with from the point of view of a non-polluting form of energy production. The various cooling system concepts up to the modern natural-draught cooling towers are illustrated by examples. (TK/AK) [de

  10. Coal derivates for reduction of SO{sub 2} N0{sub x}; Derivados del Carbon para la Reduccion de SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The project was divided in two well-differentiated parts: SO{sub 2} removal and NO{sub x} reduction. In both cases, carbon materials play a unique role in the processes, either as calcium sorbent support (SO{sub 2} removal) or as catalyst support and reducing agent (NO{sub x} reduction). Removal of SO{sub 2}. This process was carried out by calcium sorbents at relatively low temperature (T<300 degree centigree), forming CaSO{sub 3} (instead of CaSO{sub 4}) that decomposes at lower temperatures, making regeneration easier. High dispersion of the active species, CaO, has been obtained using carbon materials (activated carbons, chars, etc) and other inorganic compounds as supports. The effect of oxygen, carbon dioxide and steam in the reaction atmosphere and the regeneration process have been also investigated. Thermal regeneration is possible for several cycles, however, carbon gasification also takes place. To control, and to void that effect the reaction and regeneration temperatures should be carefully controlled and carbons with low reactivity should be selected. The process was scaled (100-2000) using briquette samples obtained by physical mixture of char and Ca(OH){sub 2}. The SO{sub 2} removal levels were similar to those found in the laboratory scale. NO{sub x} reduction. The possibility of using potassium containing coal-briquettes for NO and NO{sub x} reduction has been investigated. The preparation method of briquettes presents the advantage of using a binder agent (humic acid) which contains the catalyst (potassium). The system catalyst-binder-coal stays intimately joined by a moulding stage and subsequent pyrolysis, providing proper mechanical resistance to the coal-briquettes. With the purpose to improve the briquettes activity, different variables of the preparation process have been investigated (potassium content-added with the binder and/or KOH-. rank and mineral matter content of the coal precursor, pyrolysis temperature and pressure of the

  11. Active oxygen participation in chlorophyll destruction and lipid peroxidation in SO/sub 2/-fumigated leaves of spinach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazaki, K; Sakaki, T; Sugahara, K

    1980-01-01

    Chlorophyll a and carotenoids of spinach plants began to be destroyed in 2 to 3 hr after the initiation of fumigation with 2.0 ppM sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) in light, whereas chlorophyll b was apparently undamaged during 8 hr of exposure to SO/sub 2/. The content of pheophytin a, chromatographically determined, was not changed by SO/sub 2/ fumigation. When leaf disks (phi = 10 mm), excised from the leaves fumigated with SO/sub 2/ at 2.0 ppM for 2 hr, were illuminated, chlorophyll a and carotenoids were broken down, but they were not destroyed in darkness. The destruction of chlorophyll a and carotenoids was suppressed under a stream of nitrogen. Chlorophyll a destruction was inhibited by free radical scavengers, 1,2-dihydroxbenzene-3,5-disulfonate (tiron), hydroquinone and ascorbate. The singlet oxygen scavengers, 1,4-diazabicyclo-(2,2,2)-octane (DABCO), methionine and histidine, and hydroxyl radical scavengers, benzoate and formate were without effect on the destruction of chlorophyll a. Chlorophyll a destruction was inhibited by the addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) to the homogenate of SO/sub 2/-fumigated leaves. SO/sub 2/ fumigation for 2 hr reduced the activity of superoxide dismutase to 40% without producing the significant loss of chlorophyll. From these results we concluded that chlorophyll a destruction by SO/sub 2/ was due to superoxide radicals. Moreover, malondialdehyde (MDA), an indicator of lipid peroxidation, was accumulated in SO/sub 2/-fumigated leaves in light. MDA formation was inhibited by tiron and hydroquinone, and by DABCO but was not inhibited by benzoate and formate. MDA formation was increased by D/sub 2/O. From these results it was concluded that /sup 1/O/sub 2/ was involved in lipid peroxidation in SO/sub 2/-fumigated leaves.

  12. Thaumasite formation in hydraulic mortars by atmospheric SO>2 deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco-Varela, M. T.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulphation of mortars and concretes is a function of diverse environmental factors (SO>2 aerosol, temperature, etc as well as some material characteristics. One of the phases that could be formed as consequence of the sulphation of the hydraulic binder is thaumasite. In this paper different hydraulic mortars have been exposed to laboratory exposure chambers in order to reproduce thaumasite formation due to atmospheric SO>2. Under the laboratory exposure conditions, thaumasite was formed in hydraulic lime mortars, and mortars elaborated with ordinary Portland cement as well as mineralized white portland cement. However, thaumasite was not formed in mortars made of lime and pozzolan. The first product formed as a result of the SO>2-mortar interaction was gypsum. Gypsum reacted with calcite and C-S-H gel, present in the samples, giving place to thaumasite. Low temperature promotes thaumasite formation.

    La sulfatación de morteros y hormigones depende de las condiciones ambientales (SO>2 aerosol, temperatura, etc., así como de las características del material. Una de las fases que se puede formar como consecuencia de la sulfatación de los ligantes hidráulicos es la taumasita. En este trabajo se han expuesto diferentes morteros hidráulicos en cámaras de laboratorio con el fin de reproducir la formación de taumasita por efecto del SO>2 atmosférico. Bajo las condiciones de laboratorio se formó taumasita en los morteros de cal hidráulica y en los morteros fabricados con cemento portland y cemento blanco mineralizado. Sin embargo, cuando el ligante utilizado en los morteros fue cal y puzolana, no se formó taumasita. El yeso fue el primer producto formado en la interacción entre los morteros y el SO>2. A continuación, este yeso reaccionó con la calcita y el gel C-S-H dando lugar a la formación de taumasita. Las bajas temperaturas favorecieron la formación de taumasita.

  13. Honey as a bioindicator for environmental pollution with SO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maja Ponikvar; Joze Snajder; Borka Sedej [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2005-07-01

    The authors have proved honey to be a highly sensitive bioindicator for estimation of the environmental pollution with SO{sub 2}. A bee monitoring net consisting of 32 apiaries and covering an area of about 700 km{sup 2} was configured surrounding the Sostanj coal-fired power plant. The results of investigations revealed that the amount of sulphate determined in honey from this area correlated with total yearly emissions of SO{sub 2} observed by an electronic monitoring. When exhaust gases at the power plant were purified, a corresponding decrease in the amounts of sulphate in honey was observed. The proposed bee monitoring net is an example of using biomonitoring for tracing environmental pollution, which could be also applied to estimate the impact of NOx gases or to trace other pollutants.

  14. Adsorptive removal of SO{sub 2} from coal burning by bamboo charcoal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Zengqiang; Qiu, Jianrong; Xiang, Jun; Zeng, Hancai [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Coal Combustion

    2013-07-01

    Bamboo charcoal (BC) is an environmentally friendly, low-cost and renewable bioresource with porous structure. The adsorption property of bamboo charcoal for sulfur dioxide was investigated through a parametric study conducted with a bench-scale bed and mechanism study by BET, XPS, and temperature pro-grammed desorption (TPD). The varying parameters investigated include particle size of BC, moisture, oxygen, nitric oxide. The experimental data suggest that BC has a good adsorption potential for SO{sub 2}, which removal efficiency is greatly dependent upon the operation conditions. This study provides a good reference for BC to be used for SO{sub 2} removal in the actual flue gas over a wide range of conditions and further provided the preliminary experimental studies and theoretical discussion for bamboo charcoal to be used in multiple pollutants removing.

  15. Influence of atmospheric SO/sub 2/ on the formation of goitrogenic substances in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaleny, J.; Kutacek, M.

    1970-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether SO/sub 2/ from the atmosphere, after having passed through the stoma into the tissue of the assimilating organs of plants, may incorporate into naturally occurring goitrogens, the thioglycosides, and so increase their content. Results of tests with cauliflower indicate that the sulfur does incorporate into the thioglycosides. From these results it is considered essential to propose a medical test of a sample of the population from polluted areas with regard to the pathology of the thyroid gland. The excessive supply of goitrogenic thioglycosides may lead to the disturbance of the activity of the thyroid gland in individual patients who consume excessive quantities of Brassica in areas that are strongly polluted by SO/sub 2/.

  16. Reuse of partially sulphated CFBC ash as an SO{sub 2} sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.; Jia, L.; Anthony, E.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Energy; Nobili, M.; Telesca, A. [Basilicata Univ., Potenza (Italy). Dept. of Environmental Engineering and Physics; Montagnaro, F. [Naples Univ., Naples (Italy). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-06-15

    Ash produced from circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boilers typically contains large amounts of unreacted calcium oxide (CaO) when limestone is added into the combustor for in situ removal of sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). This paper reported on a study that evaluated the reactivation of partially sulphated ash obtained from an industrial circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boiler by hydration with liquid water and steam. A pilot-scale mini-CFBC was used to evaluate the results of reactivation on the bed ash by hydrating with liquid water and admixtures of sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in solution or as powder. Re-sulphation tests on the hydrated samples were performed in a Cahn 1000 thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at 850 degrees C for 90 minutes in a simulated flue gas environment with sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) concentration at 5000 ppm. Re-sulphation was carried out on unhydrated ash at the same conditions used in the baseline test. The TGA results showed that although liquid water and steam successfully hydrate and reactivate the unreacted CaO in the bed ash, the treated ashes sulphated to widely different extents. Attempts to reactivate fly ash with hydration failed, but the fly ash by itself was extremely reactive. When the treated ash was re-injected into the combustor with the fuel, the effect on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was negligible if Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} was added as powder. Doping with aqueous solution improved SO{sub 2} removal, but to a lesser extent than if only water hydration was used. Increasing the amount of water to reactivate the ash did not improve the sulphur capture capacity in the mini-CFBC. It was concluded that reactivation by water is the most practical way to reuse the partially sulphated bed ash as a sulphur sorbent. 21 refs., 7 tabs., 3 figs.

  17. Catalysts for the reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.Q.; Chang, S.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Catalysts have been prepared for the reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by synthesis gas. A catalyst allows to obtain more than 97% yield of elemental sulfur with a single-stage reactor at 540{degrees}C. A lifetime test has been successfully performed. The mass balance of sulfur and carbon has been checked. The effect of H{sub 2}S, COS, and H{sub 2}O has been studied.

  18. Hollow fiber contractors for simultaneous SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhown, A.S.; Pakala, N.R.; Riggs, T. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Control of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions from coal-fired utility and industrial boilers is a topic of growing national and international importance. Whereas a host of commercial and semicommercial processes exist, increasingly stringent emission standards mandate that processes be low cost, highly efficient, and, ideally, produce marketable byproducts. Although a wide range of site-specific economic factors dictate the best choice of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} control, removal of SO{sub 2} by wet limestone scrubbing and removal of NO{sub x} by selective catalytic reduction (SCR) are regarded as the best commercialized technologies for this application. A typical wet limestone plant requires approximately $100 to $120 of capital investment per kilowatt of electric power generating capacity and has power and miscellaneous operating costs in the range of 5 to 6 mils per kilowatt hour (kWh). The SCR process requires approximately $70 to $100 of capital investment per kilowatt of electric power generating capacity. Its operating costs, including ammonia consumption, is in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 mils per kWh. These costs can add approximately 20% to the final cost of generated electricity, a significant burden on rate payers.

  19. Effects of the harmful gases SO/sub 2/ and HF on plant leaf structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H; Wu, Z; Wang, J; Qian, D; Li, Z

    1980-09-01

    The injury induced by SO/sub 2/ appeared progressively; cells contracted and became deformed, the protoplasm and the chloroplasts turned yellow-brown or collapsed while no effects were seen in the vascular bundles. However, the injury induced by HF were different; the cells were not deformed immediately, the protoplasm became red-brown, the mesophyll cells adjacent to stomata or vascular bundles became red-brown too, and there were no effects on chloroplasts, which did not collapse until the tissue necrosis appeared. The cells of xylem and phloem turned red-brown. The process of injury to leaf structure induced by SO/sub 2/ is discussed. It is observed that destruction of chlorophyll and the interruption of photosynthesis by SO/sub 2/ took place first in the palisade tissue, whereas the contraction and disintegration of the cells happened first in the spongy tissue. The effect of HF (the contractive collapse of chlorophyll and mesophyll) occurred after the influence on protoplasm appeared.

  20. Does SO{sub 2} fumigation change the chemical defense of woody plants: the effect of short-term SO{sub 2} fumigation on the metabolism of deciduous Salix Myrsinifolia plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julkunen-Tiitto, R.; Lavola, A.; Kainulainen, P. [University of Joensuu, Joensuu (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1995-08-01

    The effect of a moderate increase in atmospheric sulfur dioxide on the production of phenolic secondary chemicals, soluble sugars and phytomass distribution within plants was investigated in six willow ({ital Salix myrsinifolia Salisb}) clones. The plants were cultivated for 3 weeks under 0.11 ppm of SO{sub 2} (300{mu}g m{sup -3}). The production of salicin and chlorogenic acid was significantly reduced under increased SO{sub 2}. However, salicortin, 2{prime}-O-acetylsalicortin, (+)-catechin and two unknown phenolics did not show any clear trend. The increase in SO{sub 2} did not affect the glucose, fructose and sucrose contents. The final weight of the SO{sub 2}-treatment plants was significantly greater than that of the control plants: the leaf, stem and root phytomass was from 14 to 48% greater under increased SO{sub 2}. All the clones showed the same trend, although there was a significant variation in phytomass production. Results indicate, although not consistently, that even a short-term exposure of enhanced atmospheric SO{sub 2} may change moderately the accumulation pattern of willow phenolics. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Oxidation of SO{sub 2} in a trickle bed reactor packed with activated carbon at low liquid flow rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyadal, Y.; Oguz, H. [Ankara Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    In this study, the oxidation of SO{sub 2} on activated carbon (AcC) by using distilled water and air was carried out in a laboratory scale trickle bed reactor (TBR). Distilled water and air containing 1.7% (v/v) SO{sub 2} were fed co-currently downward through a fixed bed of AcC particles in a range of 1-7 cm{sup 3}/s and 10-27 cm{sup 3}/s, respectively. H{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions were the products obtained in the liqiuid phase. Steady-state experiments were performed in a column of 0.15 m packing height and 0.047 m column diameter at 20 C and atmospheric pressure. (orig.)

  2. Spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollin, Philippe.

    1975-01-01

    Spray cooling - using water spraying in air - is surveyed as a possible system for make-up (peak clipping in open circuit) or major cooling (in closed circuit) of the cooling water of the condensers in thermal power plants. Indications are given on the experiments made in France and the systems recently developed in USA, questions relating to performance, cost and environmental effects of spray devices are then dealt with [fr

  3. Effects of sub-chronic exposure to SO{sub 2} on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovati, M.R. [Institute of Pharmacological Sciences, Milan (Italy); Manzoni, C. [Institute of Pharmacological Sciences, Milan (Italy); Daldossi, M. [Institute of Pharmacological Sciences, Milan (Italy); Spolti, S. [Institute of Pharmacological Sciences, Milan (Italy); Sirtori, C.R. [Institute of Pharmacological Sciences, Milan (Italy)

    1996-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is a ubiquitous air pollutant, present in low concentrations in the urban air, and in higher concentrations in the working environment. While toxicological reports on SO{sub 2} have extensively dealt with the pulmonary system, essentially no data are available on the effects of chronic exposure to this pollutant on intermediary metabolism, although some biochemical changes in lipid metabolism have been detected. The present investigation was aimed at evaluating the effects of sub-chronic exposure to SO{sub 2} on concentrations of serum lipids/lipoproteins and on glucose metabolism, in animal models of hypercholesterolemia and diabetes. A specially designed controlinert atmosphere chamber was used, where male Sprague-Dawley rats fed on either standard or cholesterol enriched (HC) diets, as well as streptozotocin diabetics, were exposed to SO{sub 2} at 5 and 10 ppm, 24 h per day for 14 days. In rats, both on a standard diet and on a HC regimen, SO{sub 2} exposure determined a significant dose-dependent increase in plasma triglycerides, up to +363% in the 10 ppm HC exposed animals. This same gas concentration significantly reduced HDL cholesterol levels. In contrast, exposure of diabetic animals to 10 ppm SO{sub 2} resulted in a fall (-41%) of plasma and liver triglycerides and in a concomitant increase (+62%) of plasma HDL cholesterol. This discrepancy could apparently be related to diverging effects of SO{sub 2} exposure on plasma insulin levels in the different animal groups. Kinetic analyses of triglyceride synthesis carried out in rats on a standard diet revealed, in exposed animals, a significant reduction in the secretory rate, in spite of the concomitant hypertriglyceridemia. These findings suggest that SO{sub 2} exposure can markedly modify major lipid and glycemic indices, also indicating a differential response in normo/hyperlipidemic versus diabetic animals. (orig.)

  4. SO(2 ell + 1) contains ? contains SO/sub L/(3) in group chains for L-S coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.Y.; Sun, C.P.; Zhang, L.; Li, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    Racah pointed out in his 1949 article that there exists a proper subgroup of SO(7) which properly contains SO/sub L/(3) in group chains for L-S coupling. This paper investigates whether such a proper subgroup exists for SO(2l + 1) which contains SO/sub L/(3) for an arbitrary l and concludes that this subgroup exists only for the case in which l is equal to 3. 4 references

  5. Fossil fuel and biomass burning effect on climate - heating or cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, Y.J.; Fraser, R.S.; Mahoney, R.L. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Emission from burning of fossil fuels and biomass (associated with deforestation) generates a radiative forcing on the atmosphere and a possible climate change. Emitted trace gases heat the atmosphere through their greenhouse effect, while particulates formed from emitted SO{sub 2} cause cooling by increasing cloud albedos through alteration of droplet size distributions. This paper reviews the characteristics of the cooling effect and applies Twomey's theory to check whether the radiative balance favours heating or cooling for the cases of fossil fuel and biomass burning. It is also shown that although coal and oil emit 120 times as many CO{sub 2} molecules as SO{sub 2} molecules, each SO{sub 2} molecule is 50-1100 times more effective in cooling the atmosphere (through the effect of aerosol particles on cloud albedo) than a CO{sub 2} molecule is in heating it. Note that this ratio accounts for the large difference in the aerosol (3-10 days) and CO{sub 2} (7-100 years) lifetimes. It is concluded, that the cooling effect from coal and oil burning may presently range from 0.4 to 8 times the heating effect. Within this large uncertainty, it is presently more likely that fossil fuel burning causes cooling of the atmosphere rather than heating. Biomass burning associated with deforestation, on the other hand, is more likely to cause heating of the atmosphere than cooling since its aerosol cooling effect is only half that from fossil fuel burning and its heating effect is twice as large. Future increases in coal and oil burning, and the resultant increase in concentration of cloud condensation nuclei, may saturate the cooling effect, allowing the heating effect to dominate. For a doubling in the CO{sub 2} concentration due to fossil fuel burning, the cooling effect is expected to be 0.1 to 0.3 of the heating effect. 75 refs., 8 tabs.

  6. Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} by microwave with potassium permanganate over zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Zai-shan; Niu, He-jingying; Ji, Yong-feng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2009-02-15

    Simultaneous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) removal from flue gas can be achieved with high efficiency by microwave with potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}) over zeolite. The experimental results showed that the microwave reactor could be used to oxidation of SO{sub 2} to sulfate with the best desulfurization efficiency of 96.8% and oxidize NO{sub x} to nitrates with the best NO{sub x} removal efficiency of 98.4%. Microwave accentuates catalytic oxidation treatment, and microwave addition can increase the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal efficiency by 7.2% and 12.2% separately. The addition of zeolite to microwave potassium permanganate increases from 16.5% to 43.5% the microwave removal efficiency for SO{sub 2}, and the NO{sub x} removal efficiency from 85.6% to 98.2%. The additional use of potassium permanganate to the microwave zeolite leads to the enhancement of SO{sub 2} removal efficiency up from 53.9% to 95%, and denitrification efficiency up from 85.6% to 98.2%. The optimal microwave power and empty bed residence time (EBRT) on simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification are 259 W and 0.357 s, respectively. SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} were rapidly oxidized in microwave induced catalytic oxidation reaction using potassium permanganate with zeolite being the catalyst and microwave absorbent. (author)

  7. Selection of best impregnated palm shell activated carbon (PSAC) for simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NOx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumathi, S.; Bhatia, S.; Lee, K.T. [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamed, A.R., E-mail: chrahman@eng.usm.my [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2010-04-15

    This work examines the impregnated carbon-based sorbents for simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NOx from simulated flue gas. The carbon-based sorbents were prepared using palm shell activated carbon (PSAC) impregnated with several metal oxides (Ni, V, Fe and Ce). The removal of SO{sub 2} and NOx from the simulated flue gas was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor. The results showed that PSAC impregnated with CeO{sub 2} (PSAC-Ce) reported the highest sorption capacity among other impregnated metal oxides for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NOx. PSAC-Ce showed the longest breakthrough time of 165 and 115 min for SO{sub 2} and NOx, respectively. The properties of the pure and impregnated PSAC were analyzed by BET, FTIR and XRF. The physical-chemical features of the PSAC-Ce sorbent indicated a catalytic activity in both the sorption of SO{sub 2} and NOx. The formation of both sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) and nitrate (NO{sup 3-}) species on spent PSAC-Ce further prove the catalytic role played by CeO{sub 2}.

  8. Long-term stability of FeSO{sub 4} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} treated chromite ore processing residue (COPR): Importance of H{sup +} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Jingdong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wang, Linling, E-mail: wanglinling@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, Jing, E-mail: chenjing@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hou, Huijie; Yang, Jiakuan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lu, Xiaohua [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • The long-term stability of the FeSO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} treated COPR was evaluated. • Reliable long-term stability for samples curing 400 days was achieved. • H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} significantly enhanced the stabilization efficiency of COPR using FeSO{sub 4}. • H{sup +} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} both reinforced Cr(VI) release from COPR core to react with Fe(II). - Abstract: In this study, the long-term stability of Cr(VI) in the FeSO{sub 4} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (FeSO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) treated chromite ore processing residue (COPR) after 400 curing days and the stabilization mechanisms were investigated. FeSO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} treatment significantly reduced toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) Cr(VI) concentrations to lower than the regulatory limit of 1.5 mg L{sup −1} (HJ/T 301-2007, China EPA) even for the samples curing 400 days, achieving an outstanding long-term stability. Our independent leaching tests revealed that H{sup +} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} have synergistic effect on promoting the release of Cr(VI), which would make Cr(VI) easier accessed by Fe(II) during stabilization. The contributions of H{sup +} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} to Cr(VI) release ratio were 25%–44% and 19%–38%, respectively, as 5 mol H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} per kg COPR was used. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and alkaline digestion analyses were also employed to interpret the possible stabilization mechanism. Cr(VI) released from COPR solid was reduced to Cr(III) by Fe(II), and then formed stable Fe{sub x}Cr{sub (1−x)}(OH){sub 3} precipitate. This study provides a facile and reliable scheme for COPR stabilization, and verifies the excellent long-term stability of the FeSO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} treated COPR.

  9. Predictive models of circulating fluidized bed combustors: SO[sub 2] sorption in the CFB loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D.; Therdthianwong, A. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-02-01

    The overall objective of this investigation is to develop experimentally verified models for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors. Sorption of S0[sub 2] with calcined limestone was studied in a PYROFLOW type CFB loop at conditions approximating those found in a CFB combustor. Initially the CFB loop contained 150 micron CaO particles of a density of 3.3 g/cm[sup 3] and air at 1143[degrees]K and 3.25 atm. Atzero time, air containing 600 ppm SO[sub 2], was introduced into the riser bottom at 1143[degrees]K. The effect of gas velocity, sorbent inventory and inlet pressure on the sorption of SO[sub 2], were studied isothermally by running our hydrodynamic code with the S0[sub 2] sorption conservation of species equation. At a velocity of 5m/sec., reported to be a typical velocity by PYROPOWER, there is reasonably good S0[sub 2] removal. At 10 m/sec the S0[sub 2] removal is poor. The best SO[sub 2], removal is for a velocity of 5 m/s and a high bed inventory, initial bed height, H = 9m. Most of the S0[sub 2] is removed in the first two meters of the reactor. However, the S0[sub 2] removal is not complete at the bed outlet. This is due to mixing. At the left wall of the reactor (wall opposite the solids inlet) the S0[sub 2] removal was poor due to gas bypassing caused by the asymmetrical solids inlet. Simulation of the PYROPOWER loop with a symmetrical inlet gave us an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional PYROPOWER system. These results demonstrate the practical utility of the predictive model that we have developed over the last three years.

  10. High-efficiency SO{sub 2} removal in utility FGD systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gray, S.; Dekraker, D. [Radian Corporation, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have contracted with Radian Corporation to conduct full-scale testing, process modeling, and economic evaluations of six existing utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project objective is to evaluate low capital cost upgrades for achieving up to 98% sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal efficiency in a variety of FGD system types. The systems include dual-loop, packed absorbers at Tampa Electric Company`s Big Bend Station; cocurrent, packed absorbers at Hoosier Energy`s Merom Station; dual-loop absorbers with perforated-plate trays at Southwestern Electric Power Company`s Pirkey Station; horizontal spray absorbers at PSI Energy`s Gibson Station; venturi scrubbers at Duquesne Light`s Elrama Station; and open stray absorbers at New york State Electric and Gas Corporations`s (NYSEG`s) Kintigh Station. All operate in an inhibited-oxidation mode except the system at Big Bend (forced oxidation), and all use limestone reagent except the Elrama system (Mg-lime). The program was conducted to demonstrate that upgrades such as performance additives and/or mechanical modifications can increase system SO{sub 2} removal at low cost. The cost effectiveness of each upgrade has been evaluated on the basis of test results and/or process model predictions for upgraded performance and utility-specific operating and maintenance costs. Results from this upgraded performance and utility-specific operating and maintenance costs. Results from this program may lead some utilities to use SO{sub 2} removal upgrades as an approach for compliance with phase 2 of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. This paper summarizes the results of testing, modeling, and economic evaluations that have been completed since July, 1994.

  11. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state-of-the-art of ventil......This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state......-of-the-art of ventilative cooling potentials and limitations, its consideration in current energy performance regulations, available building components and control strategies and analysis methods and tools. In addition, the report provides twenty six examples of operational buildings using ventilative cooling ranging from...

  12. SO{sub 2}-ethanol-water (SEW) fractionation of lignocellulosics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iakovlev, M.

    2011-10-15

    This study deals with SO{sub 2}-ethanol-water (SEW) fractionation as a potential method for a Lignocellulosic Biorefinery to achieve high yield separation of the three important components of biomass; cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin. Representatives of all principal biomass species were successfully treated by SEW fractionation at similar rates. The kinetics of delignification, polysaccharides removal and cellulose hydrolysis at different temperatures and SO{sub 2} concentrations are described and interpreted from the viewpoint of acid-catalysed degradation of the biomass polymers. The fractionation pattern is compared to that of commercial acid sulfite cooking. The kinetics of delignification, hemicelluloses removal and cellulose hydrolysis during SEW fractionation each follow a two phase behaviour. The delignification is first order in lignin and SO{sub 2}. The observed lignin sulfonation and delignification patterns can be explained using Haegglund's consecutive fast sulfonation-slow hydrolysis scheme. During the initial phase of fractionation, the hemicelluloses removal and cellulose hydrolysis rates are related to the delignification rate, while in the following bulk phase the former two processes proceed independently from the latter. It is proposed that during the initial phase the hemicelluloses are removed together with lignin in the form of lignocarbohydrate complexes, while cellulose is protected by lignin from hydrolytic attack leading to a lower hydrolysis rate. Most hemicellulose side units as well as acetyl groups are cleaved during the first phase, while the glucomannan and xylan backbone polymers are removed at a considerably lower rate in the second (bulk) phase following first order kinetics in the residual polysaccharides. The observed polysaccharides dissolution behaviour can be interpreted in terms of low glucomannan stabilisation by crystallisation on cellulose at the applied conditions. Minimal cellulose dissolution occurs during

  13. First-principle study of SO{sub 2} molecule adsorption on Ni-doped vacancy-defected single-walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei; Lu, Xiao-Min; Li, Guo-Qing; Ma, Juan-Juan; Zeng, Peng-Yu; Chen, Jun-Fang; Pan, Zhong-Liang; He, Qing-Yu

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: These two figures reflect the orbital bonding between SO{sub 2} molecule and the SV-2-CNT and Ni-SV-2-CNT. Which indicated the feasibility of making the sensors for SO{sub 2} molecule detecting with introducing vacancies, Ni atoms or combination of them. - Highlights: • The paper reports the effects of vacancy and Ni doping vacancy on CNT adsorbing SO{sub 2}. • Vacancies and Ni doping vacancies both can improve the sensitivity of CNT to SO{sub 2}. • Vacancies and Ni-doped vacancies CNTs are candidate material for SO{sub 2} detecting. - Abstract: To explore the possible way of detecting the poisonous gas SO{sub 2}, we have investigated the interactions between SO{sub 2} molecule and modified (8,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The adsorption energies, interaction distances, changes of geometric and electronic structures were all analyzed to investigate the sensitivity of variety of models of CNTs with Ni doping, vacancies, and a combination of them toward SO{sub 2} molecule. From our investigations, we found that SO{sub 2} molecule was more likely to be absorbed on vacancy-defected CNTs with relatively higher adsorption energy and shorter binding distance compared with the perfect CNTs. In addition, after doping Ni atom on the vacancies, the modified CNTs which were not very much sensitivity to SO{sub 2} molecule could become much sensitivity to it. In other words, the number of sensitive adsorption sites increased. The partial density of states (PDOS) and the electron concentration of the adsorption systems suggested the strong electrons interaction between SO{sub 2} molecule and defected or Ni-doped defected CNTs. Therefore the vacancies and Ni-doped vacancies CNTs had the potential capacities to make the sensors for SO{sub 2} molecule detecting.

  14. Absorption of SO/sub 2/ by pecan (Carya illinoensis (Wang) K. Koch) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. ) and its effect on net photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisson, W.B.; Booth, J.A.; Throneberry, G.O.

    1981-06-01

    Absorption rates of SO/sub 2/ by pecan (Carya illinoensis (Wang) K. Koch) leaflets exposed to 2.6, 5.2, and 7.8 mg SO/sub 2/ m/sup -3/ were measured over a 2 h period. SO/sub 2/ was rapidly absorbed by the leaflets in all treatments during the initial 30-50 min; the rate of uptake decreased to a rather constant level thereafter. Total SO/sub 2/ absorbed during the 2 h period was 15.6, 25.6, and 38.9 nmol cm/sup -2/ for the low, medium, and high SO/sub 2/ concentrations, respectively. Reductions in net photosynthetic rates were proportional to ambient SO/sub 2/ concentrations and total SO/sub 2/ absorbed. Partial photosynthetic recovery occurred in all treatments during a 2 hr post-treatment period and full recovery occurred during a 12 h dark period. Exposure to SO/sub 2/ resulted in slight increases in stomatal and boundary layer resistances to CO/sub 2/ and substantial increases in residual resistances. Absorption rates of SO/sub 2/ by alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) exposed to 5.2 mg SO/sub 2/ m/sup -3/ for 1 h were approximately double those of pecan exposed to the same ambient SO/sub 2/ concentration. Alfalfa net photosynthetic rates were reduced 74% after 1 h exposure to 5.2 mg SO/sub 2/ m/sup -3/ while a depression of 42% occurred in pecan.

  15. Effects of SO/sub 2/ in atmosphere upon field crops in the Ostrava region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekovar, J

    1974-01-01

    The Ostrava branch of the Research Institute for Hydrometeorology studied three years in succession (1969, 1970 and 1971) effects of SO/sub 2/ present in the atmosphere in the Ostrava region upon the field crops. Eleven plots - all close to air pollution measuring stations - were chosen for biometric measurements and observation of plant growth. The stations sample daily air and measure the concentrations of sulfur dioxide and dust. Plants under observation were grown in special boxes. The seed, sowing time, germination conditions, composition of soil, etc.,. were strictly the same for all plots. The article deals with the results of the study, i.e. with the harmful effects of pollutants present in the air upon various field crops, i.e. barley, oats and beans. From biometric data, diagrams of growth during the vegetation period, measurements of SO/sub 3/ and fly ash concentrations, as well as yields given by plants, the author classifies the conditions in various localities. 11 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  16. High SO{sub 2} removal duct injection: A low-cost FGD alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.G. [Sorbent Technologies Corp., Twinsburg, OH (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Sorbent Technologies Corporation, of the United States, is currently developing and demonstrating a new waste free, retrofitable, high-SO{sub 2} removal duct-injection process. Up to 85 percent SO{sub 2} removal is achieved by simply injecting a new dry lime-based sorbent into the flue-gas duct, collecting the sorbent downstream in a particulate collector, and then recycling the sorbent. By avoiding large, expensive components, the process can have low capital costs, making it especially appropriate for smaller, older, less-utilized plants. The key to the new technology is the use of sorbent supports. Supported sorbents are produced by coating hydrated lime onto inexpensive mineral supports, such as exfoliated vermiculite or perlite. Consequently, there are no liquid, sludge, or solid wastes with the new technology. Once saturated with SO{sub 2}, the spent sorbent can be easily pelletized into a valuable soil-conditioning agricultural by-product, for the sustainable development that the future requires. This paper describes Sorbent Technologies` pilot demonstration of supported sorbent injection at the Ohio Edison Company`s R.E. Burger station. The Burger effort is also the first demonstration of the Electric Power Research Institute`s new {open_quotes}COHPAC{close_quotes} baghouse technology in a sorbent-injection desulfurization application.

  17. LIFAC flue gas desulfurization process an alternative SO{sub 2} control strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, J.G. [Tampella Power Corp., Atlanta, GA (United States); Vilala, J. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1995-12-01

    This paper discusses the results from two recently completed LIFAC flue gas desulfurization plants - 300 MW Shand lignite powered station owned by Saskatchewan Power Corporation and 60 MW Whitewater Valley high sulfur coal fired station owned by Richmond Powerand Light. LIFACis a dry FGD process in which limestone is injected into the upper regions of the boiler furnace and an activation reactor is used to humidify the unreacted limestone to achieve additional sulfur capture. The performance in both plants indicates that 70 to 80% sulfur is removed at a Ca/S ratio of 2. Cost performance data from these plants has shown that LI FAC both on construction cost and $/ton SO{sub 2} removed basis is very cost competitive compared to other SO{sub 2} control technologies. The Richmond plant has been realized under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology program. The Shand plant is the first commercial installation in North America. The paper also discusses highlights of operating and maintenance experience, availability and handling of the solid waste product.

  18. Determination of atmospheric SO/sub 2/ concentrations that are dangerous to plant life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratmann, H

    1963-01-01

    Controlled climate experiments indicate that the reaction of plants is not simply proportional to the project of SO/sub 2/ concentration and exposure time, and the degree of damage inflicted increases in proportion to this product as the concentration itself increases. A determining factor is the fact that plants, even when kept in a controlled climate, undergo a diurnal cycle of sensitivity. High concentrations for a shorter time do more damage than low concentrations for a longer exposure time, indicating the existence of concentration peaks. Although most cultivated plants are resistant to night exposure, a night exposure immediately following a daylight exposure causes a multiplication of damages, as does a succession of peak concentrations. It has also been discovered that plants whose leaves are not fully developed suffer a higher degree of SO damage than those whose leaves are fully matured. In the case of deciduous trees, sensitivity increases in proportion to the development of the leaves, until full leaf maturity is reached. Older trees are more resistant to SO/sub 2/.

  19. Development of the advanced coolside sorbent injection process for SO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withum, J.A.; Maskew, J.T.; Rosenhoover, W.A. [Consol, Inc., Library, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a low-capital-cost process capable of over 90% SO{sub 2} removal as an economically attractive option for compliance with the Clean Air Act. The Advanced Coolside Process uses a contactor to simultaneously remove fly ash and saturate the flue gas with water, followed by sorbent injection into the highly humid flue gas and collection of the sorbent by the existing particulate collector High sorbent utilization is achieved by sorbent recycle. The original performance targets of 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% sorbent utilization were exceeded in 1000 acfm pilot plant operations using commercial hydrated lime as the only sorbent. Process optimization simplified the process equipment, resulting in significant cost reduction. Recent accomplishments include completion of equipment testing and sorbent optimization, a waste management study, and a long-term performance test. An economic evaluation for the optimized process projects capital costs 55% to 60 % less than those of limestone forced oxidation wet FGD. The projected levelized control cost is 15% to 35% lower than wet FGD (25% lower for a 260 MWe plant burning a 2.5% sulfur coal), depending on plant size and coal sulfur content.

  20. Cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korik, L.; Burger, R.

    1992-01-01

    What is the effect of 0.6C (1F) temperature rise across turbines, compressors, or evaporators? Enthalpy charts indicate for every 0.6C (1F) hotter water off the cooling tower will require an additional 2 1/2% more energy cost. Therefore, running 2.2C (4F) warmer due to substandard cooling towers could result in a 10% penalty for overcoming high heads and temperatures. If it costs $1,250,000.00 a year to operate the system, $125,000.00 is the energy penalty for hotter water. This paper investigates extra fuel costs involved in maintaining design electric production with cooling water 0.6C (1F) to 3C (5.5F) hotter than design. If design KWH cannot be maintained, paper will calculate dollar loss of saleable electricity. The presentation will conclude with examining the main causes of deficient cold water production. State-of-the-art upgrading and methodology available to retrofit existing cooling towers to optimize lower cooling water temperatures will be discussed

  1. Study with radio-sulphur of the kinetics of the process SO{sub 2} + 0.5 O{sub 2} {r_reversible} SO{sub 3} in a state of chemical equilibrium on a platinum catalyst; Etude, a l'aide du soufre radioactif, de la cinetique de la reaction SO{sub 2} + 0,5 O{sub 2} {r_reversible} SO{sub 3} en equilibre chimique, en presence d'un catalyseur de platine; Issledovanie pri pomoshchi radioaktivnoj sery kinetiki protsessa SO{sub 2} + 0,5 O{sub 2} {r_reversible} SO{sub 3}, nakhodyashchegosya v sostoyanii khimicheskogo ravnovesiya, na platinovom katalizatore; Estudio, con ayuda de azufre radiactivo, de la cinetica de la reaccion SO{sub 2} + 0,5 O{sub 2} {r_reversible} SO{sub 3} en equilibrio quimico en presencia de un catalizador de platino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojter, V A; Stukanovskaya, N A; Kornejchuk, G P

    1962-03-15

    The authors describe an attempt to use radioisotopes in the study of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic processes in a state of equilibrium. The investigation was carried out by the circulation method. After establishment of equilibrium, a small amount of S{sup 35}O{sub 2} was introduced into the system as a tracer and its conversion rate into S{sup 35}O{sub 3} was measured. From that rate the speed of the direct and inverse processes of oxidation of SO{sub 2} on the catalyst was calculated. Possible sequence patterns for the process are suggested and discussed. (author) [French] Le memoire expose un essai d'application des radioisotopes a l'etude de la cinetique des reactions catalytiques heterogenes en equilibre chimique. Les recherches ont ete effectuees par la methode a circulation. Apres etablissement de l'equilibre, on a introduit comme indicateur une petite quantite de {sup 35}SO{sub 2} et mesure la vitesse de sa transformation en {sup 35}SO{sub 3}. En partant de cette vitesse, on a calcule celle du processus d'oxydation directe et inverse du SO{sub 2} sur le catalyseur. Les auteurs proposent et etudient differentes formules selon lesquelles la reaction peut se derouler. (author) [Spanish] Los autores describen un experimento sobre el empleo de radioisotopos en el estudio de la cinetica de procesos cataliticos heterogeneos en estado de equilibrio. La investigacion se llevo a cabo por el metodo de circulacion. Una vez establecido el equilibrio, se introdujo en el sistema una pequena cantidad de {sup 35}SO{sub 2} como trazador y se midio su indice de conversion en {sup 35}SO{sub 3}. De dicho indice se dedujo la velocidad de los procesos directo e inverso de oxidacion del SO{sub 2} en presencia del catalizador. Los autores proponen y examinan diversos tipos posibles de cinetica para el proceso. (author) [Russian] Izlagaetsya opyt primeneniya radioaktivnykh izotopov dlya izucheniya kinetiki geterogennykh kataliticheskikh protsessov, nakhodyashchikhsya v

  2. Influence of sulfur and nitrogen supply on the susceptibility of Pisum sativum to SO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, H; Jaeger, H J; Steubing, L

    1974-01-01

    The susceptibility of Pisum to SO/sub 2/ injury was examined in relation to the sulfur and nitrogen nutrition. The injury was measured by comparing the dry matter yield to control and treated plants. SO/sub 2/ effects on metabolism were established by determining the content of organic and inorganic sulfur and, indirectly, by measuring total nitrogen, amino acid nitrogen, and protein nitrogen. The plants grown in nutrient solutions deficient in sulfur or nitrogen showed a decreased sensitivity to SO/sub 2/ pollution compared to the control. The higher content of amino acid nitrogen and organic sulfur of the plants grown in a nitrogen-deficient solution suggests that an increased synthesis of sulfur containing amino acids occurs. The slighter injury of the plants deficient in sulfur may be explained by the delayed sulfur supply.

  3. Incidence of lung tumors in LX mice exposed to (1) free radicals; (2) SO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peacock, P R; Spence, J B

    1967-01-01

    60 to 65 3-month-old LX mice were exposed to either radio frequency-generated free radicals for 3 hr/day, 5 days/week, or 500 ppM SO/sub 2/ for 5 min/day, 5 days/week, for more than 2 yr (results only on mice surviving > 300 days). Incidence of primary neoplasia (adenoma) in mice exposed to SO/sub 2/ increased from 31% (control) to 54% in males and from 17% to 43% in females. Incidence of neoplasia in mice exposed to free radicals increased 10 and 6% above controls for males and females, respectively. The action of SO/sub 2/ was thought to be that of nonspecific inflammation leading to hyperplasia and lymphatic engorgement, which precede and predispose adenoma.

  4. The role of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} surface distribution in arsenic removal by iron oxy-hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresintsi, S. [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Simeonidis, K., E-mail: ksime@physics.auth.gr [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, 38334 Volos (Greece); Pliatsikas, N.; Vourlias, G.; Patsalas, P. [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Mitrakas, M. [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the contribution of chemisorbed SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in improving arsenic removal properties of iron oxy-hydroxides through an ion-exchange mechanism. An analytical methodology was developed for the accurate quantification of sulfate ion (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) distribution onto the surface and structural compartments of iron oxy-hydroxides synthesized by FeSO{sub 4} precipitation. The procedure is based on the sequential determination of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} presence in the diffuse and Stern layers, and the structure of these materials as defined by the sulfate-rich environments during the reaction and the variation in acidity (pH 3–12). Physically sorbed SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, extracted in distilled water, and physically/chemically adsorbed ions on the oxy-hydroxide's surface leached by a 5 mM NaOH solution, were determined using ion chromatography. Total sulfate content was gravimetrically measured by precipitation as BaSO{sub 4}. To validate the suggested method, results were verified by X-ray photoelectron and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that low precipitation pH-values favor the incorporation of sulfate ions into the structure and the inner double layer, while under alkaline conditions ions shift to the diffuse layer. - Graphical abstract: An analytical methodology for the accurate quantification of sulfate ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) distribution onto the diffuse layer, the Stern layer and the structure of iron oxy-hydroxides used as arsenic removal agents. - Highlights: • Quantification of sulfate ions presence in FeOOH surface compartments. • Preparation pH defines the distribution of sulfates. • XPS and FTIR verify the presence of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in the structure, the Stern layer the diffuse layer of FeOOH. • Chemically adsorbed sulfates control the arsenic removal efficiency of iron oxyhydroxides.

  5. Cooling tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbaeck, P; Heneby, H

    1976-01-22

    Cooling towers to be transported on road vehicles as a unit are not allowed to exceed certain dimensions. In order to improve the efficiency of such a cooling tower (of cross-flow design and box-type body) with given dimensions, it is proposed to arrange at least one of the scrubbing bodies displaceable within a module or box. Then it can be moved out of the casing into working position, thereby increasing the front surface available for the inlet of air (and with it the efficiency) by nearly a factor of two.

  6. Effects of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ polluted air upon the ultrastructure of chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellburn, A r; Majernik, O; Wellburn, F A.M.

    1972-01-01

    The ultrastructure of mature bean tissue exposed to air polluted by various concentrations of SO/sub 2/ or no2 at maximum stomatal aperture for short periods was compared with similar unpolluted tissue, using an electron microscope. Both pollutants caused swelling of the thylakoids within the chloroplasts, but not extra-chloroplastidic damage was detected. This thylakoid swelling could be reversed by removing the pollutant from the air flow or changing the rate of gas flow within the tissue. The phenomenon is discussed in relation to previously-reported diminution in the rate of photosynthesis when higher plants are exposed to either SO/sub 2/ or NO/sub 2/.

  7. Models for wet scrubbing of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogren, C

    1997-02-01

    Combustion of fossil fuels is the main source for emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Emission regulations and the growing environmental awareness will make great demands upon cost-effective deSO{sub 2} and deNO{sub x} techniques in the future. To be able to optimize existing techniques it is crucial to increase the understanding of the processes taking place within the scrubber, i.e. chemistry, mass transfer and fluid dynamics. Mathematical modeling is an important tool for increasing the understanding. This research work was divided into two different parts: the first part focused on identifying suitable absorbents for wet NO{sub x} removal and the second part focused on deriving a model for absorption of SO{sub 2} into a limestone slurry, wet flue gas desulfurization. The ability to absorb NO{sub x} were tested in a bubbler for the most common oxidizing agents and EDTA. Further experiments were done with the most promising absorbents, NaClO{sub 2} and KMnO{sub 4}, in a packed column where the chemistry was studied in more detail. The absorption process was modeled and rate constants describing the absorption were estimated. A model based on the penetration theory was derived to calculate the absorption of SO{sub 2} into a limestone slurry droplet. The model includes instantaneous acid-base reactions as well as reactions with finite rates, e.g. limestone dissolution, CO{sub 2} hydrolysis, etc. The model was used to quantify the extent of spatial variations in mass transfer within a spray scrubber and the impact of the reactions with finite rate on SO{sub 2} mass transfer. Due to the significance of limestone dissolution a separate model taking into account the impact of the residence time distribution of a continuous system on the particle size distribution was derived. The model was verified by dissolution experiments in a continuous stirred tank reactor. 81 refs, 34 figs, 10 tabs

  8. Stochastic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, J.; Leemann, C.

    1982-03-01

    Stochastic cooling is the damping of betatron oscillations and momentum spread of a particle beam by a feedback system. In its simplest form, a pickup electrode detects the transverse positions or momenta of particles in a storage ring, and the signal produced is amplified and applied downstream to a kicker. The time delay of the cable and electronics is designed to match the transit time of particles along the arc of the storage ring between the pickup and kicker so that an individual particle receives the amplified version of the signal it produced at the pick-up. If there were only a single particle in the ring, it is obvious that betatron oscillations and momentum offset could be damped. However, in addition to its own signal, a particle receives signals from other beam particles. In the limit of an infinite number of particles, no damping could be achieved; we have Liouville's theorem with constant density of the phase space fluid. For a finite, albeit large number of particles, there remains a residue of the single particle damping which is of practical use in accumulating low phase space density beams of particles such as antiprotons. It was the realization of this fact that led to the invention of stochastic cooling by S. van der Meer in 1968. Since its conception, stochastic cooling has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. The earliest experiments were performed at the ISR in 1974, with the subsequent ICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led to the design and construction of the Antiproton Accumulator at CERN and the beginnings of p anti p colliding beam physics at the SPS. Experiments in stochastic cooling have been performed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBL, and a design is currently under development for a anti p accumulator for the Tevatron

  9. Potentiometric determination of uranium in the presence of plutonium in Hsub(2)SOsub(4) medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, N.; Rama Rao, G.A.; Manchanda, V.K.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The potentiometric determination of uranium is widely carried out in phosphoric acid medium to suppress the interferences of plutonium by complexation. Owing to the complexity of the recycling plutonium from the phosphate based waste involving manifold stages of separation, a method is proposed which does not use phosphoric acid. Uranium and plutonium are reduced to U(IV) and Pu(III) in IM Hsub(2)SOsub(4) by Ti(III), and NaNOsub(2) is chosen to selectively oxidize Pu(III) and the excess of Ti(III). The unreacted NaNOsub(2) is destroyed by sulphamic acid and excess Fe(III) is added following dilution. The euqivalent amount of Fe(II) thus liberated is titrated against standard Ksub(2)Crsub(2)Osub(7). RSD obtained for the determination of uranium (1-2 mg) is 0.3% with plutonium present up to 4.0 mg. (author)

  10. Analysis of SO/sub 2/ absorption with oxidation in an accelerating stream of drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinstreuer, C.; Ramachandran, R.S.; Altwicker, E.R.

    1985-02-01

    Trace gas absorption with chemical reaction in falling drops is of interest for the understanding of several aspects of a variety of engineering systems including gravity spray processes, flue gas desulfurization, as well as below-cloud scavenging by rain. The main components of such systems consist of the fluid dynamics of multiple drops in a gaseous environment and trace gas mass transfer with liquid-phase reaction. Here we deal specifically with the effects of mass and momentum transfer parameters such as fluid flow velocity, drop characteristics, film resistance layers, and the residence time of an accelerating isothermal stream of drops on the absorption and oxidation rates of sulfur dioxide. Predictive results obtained with a new computer simulation model, validated with measured data points, demonstrate the importance of such system parameters on SO/sub 2/ absorption.

  11. A very cool cooling system

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The NA62 Gigatracker is a jewel of technology: its sensor, which delivers the time of the crossing particles with a precision of less than 200 picoseconds (better than similar LHC detectors), has a cooling system that might become the precursor to a completely new detector technique.   The 115 metre long vacuum tank of the NA62 experiment. The NA62 Gigatracker (GTK) is composed of a set of three innovative silicon pixel detectors, whose job is to measure the arrival time and the position of the incoming beam particles. Installed in the heart of the NA62 detector, the silicon sensors are cooled down (to about -20 degrees Celsius) by a microfluidic silicon device. “The cooling system is needed to remove the heat produced by the readout chips the silicon sensor is bonded to,” explains Alessandro Mapelli, microsystems engineer working in the Physics department. “For the NA62 Gigatracker we have designed a cooling plate on top of which both the silicon sensor and the...

  12. Properties and behaviour of SO{sub 2} adsorbents for CFBC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, I.M.

    2007-11-15

    Sulphur capture in FBC boilers usually relies on addition of limestone, which is not used efficiently. Limestones with lower sulphation capacities are undesirable because they increase the raw materials and the residues requiring management. This increases operating costs and CO{sub 2} emissions. It is preferable to use less limestone or shells instead. The performance of adsorbents varies widely and depends mainly on their morphology and microstructure rather than on their chemical properties. Adsorption mechanisms are investigated. Fragmentation and attrition are important during calcination. Sulphation is affected by boiler size, configuration, operating conditions, oxidising and reducing zones, reactions with compounds in coal ash, and attrition. Preparation and handling of limestone at the plant is examined and care has to be taken to avoid moisture in all systems. Recently designed plants achieve an SO{sub 2} capture efficiency at or over 95% with addition of adsorbent at a Ca:S molar ratio of 2-2.5 depending on the sulphur content of the fuel and the reactivity of the adsorbent. Various methods of enhancing SO{sub 2} capture are reviewed. Sorbent reactivation by pressurised steam hydration or grinding/hydration appear to be most promising but are not yet used on full-scale CFBC. Fuels and operating conditions affect emissions control and the production of residues. The adsorbent requirement may be reduced by cofiring with low sulphur high calcium fuels and by optimising the furnace temperature for different fuels. The effect of sulphur capture on other emissions ie examined. NOx and N{sub 2}O emissions may be reduced by choice of fuels and adsorbent. An increase in CO{sub 2} emissions results from minimising use of limestone or by carbonization/calcination to capture CO{sub 2} before sulphation. 110 refs., 11 figs., 10 tab.

  13. Synthesis and thermoluminescence of new Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:Eu and Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:Dy phosphors exposed to beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia H, A. R.; Bustamante L, G. A.; Castro C, A. I. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Ciencias Quimico Biologicas, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Bernal H, R. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Cruz V, C.; Burruel I, S. E. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Apdo. Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Castano M, V. M., E-mail: argh@gimmunison.com [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Apdo. Postal 1-1010, 76000 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is systematically studied for the very first concerning their dosimetric capabilities. Pellet- shaped Eu and Dy doped Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} phosphors were synthesized by sintering. Some samples were exposed to beta particle irradiation in order to investigate their thermoluminescence (Tl) features. Glow curves were obtained for 80 mg mass samples, showing that both, Tl sensitivity as well as the temperature at which the Tl maximum is recorded, depends upon the sample dopant. The glow curves of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:Eu exhibit two maxima, located at 433 and 573 K, when a 5 K/s heating rate was used, being the most intense emission that observed at 573 K. The integrated Tl increases as the radiation dose was increased in the 0.25 - 5 Gy range, with no shift of the Tl maxima being observed, meaning that first order kinetics processes are involved in the Tl emission. The normalized sensitivity recorded in ten consecutive irradiation-Tl readout cycles shows a good reusability with only 5 % variability. The integrated Tl fades as a function of the elapsed time between irradiation and the corresponding Tl readout of Eu and Dy doped Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} phosphors is obtained. From the obtained results, we conclude that Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is a promising phosphor material to develop high performance Tl dosimeters, and a long term research work focused to understand and to improve their Tl features is absolutely justified. (Author)

  14. Increase of efficiency and decrease of power consumption in SO{sub 3} recycling from the off-gas of pyrometallurgical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldin, V.Y.; Yaroshenko, Y.G. [Ural State Technical Univ., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Gordon, Y.M. [Hatch Energy Consulting, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    New energy efficient methods are urgently needed to manage metallurgical wastes in the Sverdlovsk region of Russia, where the metallurgical industry accounts for nearly 42 per cent of the total emissions of sulfur oxides, dust, nitrogen oxides and other pollutants. This paper presents the results of a pilot plant test in which sulfuric anhydrite (SO{sub 3}) was effectively recycled by producing sulphuric acid from the off-gas of pyrometallurgical operations the Krasnouralsky Copper Smelter. The parameters of the absorber design were described along with the advantages of the multi-stage plant compared to a packed column absorber and scrubber. The pilot plant tests confirmed that the total energy use and hydraulic resistance was lower in a three-stage plant compared to a two-stage configuration. This paper also described how the yield in sulphuric acid can be improved with the new Impact-Inertial Device with rectangular contact channels (IIRCh) which improves the internal circulation of liquid. In addition to reducing electricity use, the IIRCh is simple in design, small in size, low cost, highly reliable and provides simultaneous cleaning of solid, gaseous and liquid impurities. The system does not have an irrigation system and cools gases. Its efficiency is nearly 18 per cent higher that conventional Venturi Absorbers. 7 refs., 7 tabs., 2 figs.

  15. Characteristics of mordenite-type zeolite catalysts deactivated by SO{sub 2} for the reduction of NO with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M.H.; Nam, I.S.; Kim, Y.G. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology/Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-25

    The deactivation of mordenite-type zeolite catalysts for the selective reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of SO{sub 2} was examined in a packed-bed flow reactor system. The physicochemical properties of the deactivated catalysts by SO{sub 2} were extensively characterized by TGA, TPSR, XPS, Raman, XANES, the measurements of surface area and elemental analysis. Not only the surface area and sulfur content of the deactivated catalysts, but their TGA and TPSR patterns strongly suggest the formation of a sulfur species as a deactivating agent on the catalyst surface. It is also observed that the sulfur species exists in the form of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) by XPS and Raman. It mainly causes the loss of NO removal activity of the catalysts. The sulfate species formed on the deactivated catalysts by SO{sub 2} did not significantly alter the chemical environment of the copper ions contained in the zeolite catalysts such as CuHM and CuNZA. It does not exist in the form of cupric sulfate pentahydrate on the catalyst surface as revealed by Cu K-edge absorption spectra of the catalysts.

  16. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard. [SO/sub 2/ in gases by fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, L.D.; Bennett, D.W.; Davis, J.F.

    1983-05-09

    (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SI)/sub 2/NH with SO/sub 2/. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/O and a new solid compound (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/). Both (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO and (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO/sub 2/ pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/NH, whereby any SO/sub 2/ present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO/sub 2/ in the original gas sample. The solid product (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, or /sup 29/Si may be used as a reference.

  17. NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} emissions from pressurized fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, T.; Lu, Y. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Economic Energy and Power Plant Engineering

    1996-12-01

    This project continues the analysis of available data from the experimental work at the Otaniemi PFBC test rig using various solid fuels. The study concentrates on the emission and control of NO{sub x} N{sub 2}O, and SO{sub 2} under pressurized conditions. The aim of the study is to prepare the database from the available data and make empirical correlations for estimating nitrogen oxide emissions and sulfur capture from PFBC as a function of significant operating parameters and fuel properties. As the first generation of an empirical model, multiple linear regression was developed for predicting NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} emissions from PFBC. These correlations may facilitate preliminary FBC design by estimating NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} emissions. On the basis of statistical inference, the operating conditions employed and the fuel properties selected in the correlations may lend insight into the mechanisms of the formation and destruction of NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. (author)

  18. The influence of Mn species on the SO{sub 2} removal of Mn-based activated carbon catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Yi-Fan [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Guo, Jia-Xiu, E-mail: guojiaxiu@scu.edu.cn [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Technology Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065 (China); Chu, Ying-Hao [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Technology Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065 (China); Sun, Ming-Chao [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Yin, Hua-Qiang, E-mail: hqyin@scu.edu.cn [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Technology Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Using Mn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} as precursor, a series of Mn-based activated carbon catalysts were prepared by ultrasound-assisted excessive impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR). The influences of Mn species and nitric acid pretreatment on the removal role of SO{sub 2} were investigated. MnO and Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} coexist in catalysts calcined at 650 and 800 °C and exhibit best SO{sub 2} removal ability, whereas Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed in the catalyst calcined at 500 °C and shows poor activity. After treatment by nitric acid, the C=O of activated carbon support increases and the crystal size of MnO decreases, resulting in the enhancement of the catalytic activity. During reaction process, manganese oxides are gradually transferred into MnO{sub 2}. And this change directly results in a decrease of activity. But the SO{sub 2} removal rate has been maintained in the range of 30–40%, indicating that MnO{sub 2} still has a certain SO{sub 2} removal ability.

  19. Cooling pancakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J.R.; Wilson, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    In theories of galaxy formation with a damping cut-off in the density fluctuation spectrum, the first non-linear structures to form are Zeldovich pancakes in which dissipation separates gas from any collisionless dark matter then present. One-dimensional numerical simulations of the collapse, shock heating, and subsequent thermal evolution of pancakes are described. Neutrinos (or any other cool collisionless particles) are followed by direct N-body methods and the gas by Eulerian hydrodynamics with conduction as well as cooling included. It is found that the pressure is relatively uniform within the shocked region and approximately equals the instantaneous ram pressure acting at the shock front. An analytic theory based upon this result accurately describes the numerical calculations. (author)

  20. Cool Sportswear

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  1. Cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    Progress on the thermal effects project is reported with regard to physiology and distribution of Corbicula; power plant effects studies on burrowing mayfly populations; comparative thermal responses of largemouth bass from northern and southern populations; temperature selection by striped bass in Cherokee Reservoir; fish population studies; and predictive thermoregulation by fishes. Progress is also reported on the following; cause and ecological ramifications of threadfin shad impingement; entrainment project; aquaculture project; pathogenic amoeba project; and cooling tower drift project

  2. High yield and facile microwave-assisted synthesis of conductive H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doped polyanilines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizdavic-Nikolaidis, Marija R., E-mail: m.gizdavic@auckland.ac.nz [School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, 1142 (New Zealand); Faculty of Physical Chemistry, Studentski Trg 12-16, PO Box 137, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia); Jevremovic, Milutin M. [Public Company Nuclear Facilities of Serbia, 12-14 Mike Petrovica Alasa, Vinca, 11351, Belgrade (Serbia); Milenkovic, Maja [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, Studentski Trg 12-16, PO Box 137, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia); Allison, Morgan C. [School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, 1142 (New Zealand); Stanisavljev, Dragomir R. [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, Studentski Trg 12-16, PO Box 137, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia); Bowmaker, Graham A. [School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, 1142 (New Zealand); Zujovic, Zoran D. [School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, 1142 (New Zealand); MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington, 6140 (New Zealand); Institute of General and Physical Chemistry, Studentski Trg 12-16, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2016-04-15

    The microwave-assisted synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) was performed using ammonium persulphate (APS) as oxidizing agent in 0.5 M–2.5 M concentration range of aqueous sulphuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) at 93 W applied microwave power of 10 min duration. The microwave (MW) synthesized PANIs had 3 times higher yield in comparison to PANI samples prepared using a classical method, CS (0 W MW power) at the same temperature for 10 min synthesis duration period. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and UV–Vis spectroscopies confirmed the formation of PANI structure in all products. The influence of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} acid dopant on the spin concentration of MW and CS H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doped PANI samples were examined by EPR spectroscopy, while the morphological characteristics were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD results showed amorphous phases in both MW and CS H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doped PANI samples. Conductivity measurements revealed ∼1.5 times higher conductivity values for MW H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doped PANI samples in comparison with PANI samples prepared by the CS method under same condition. The influence of sulfate anion in comparison to chloride anion as a dopant on morphological, dopant levels and conductivity properties of MW PANI samples were also investigated. - Highlights: • Nanoporous microwave synthesized doped polyanilines as chemical sensor material. • Morphology and physical properties of polyanilines depend on acid concentration. • Spin concentration is determined by the nature of the polyaniline synthesis.

  3. Influences of air pollution on the growth of ornamental tree species-particularly with reference to SO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T W

    1975-01-01

    For the purpose of detecting resistance to air pollution, particularly SO/sub 2/ contamination, six ornamental tree species were selected, i.e., Ginkgo biloba, Larix leptolepis, Pinus rigida, Syringa dilatata, Hibiscus syriacus, and Forsythia koreana. The sensitivity was observed and analyzed on the basis of the area ratio of smoke injury spot to the total leaf area. According to the results, the decreasing order of SO/sub 2/ sensitivity by species could be arranged as follows: (1) Hibiscus syriacus, (2) Ginkgo biloba, (3) Forsythia koreana, (4) Syringa dilatata, (5) Larix leptolepis, and (6) Pinus rigida. In general, Hibiscus syriacus and Ginkgo biloba can be grouped as the most resistant ones and Larix leptolepis and Pinus rigida as the weakest ones and Forsythia koreana and Syringa dilatata as the intermediate. Due to the sprouting ability and the formative ability of adventitious buds, the recovery from the SO/sub 2/ fumigation was prominent in Hibiscus syriacus, Syringa dilatata and Forsythia koreana. The differences in the smoke spot color were recognized by species, namely, dirt brown in Syringa dilatata, brilliant yellow brown in Pinus rigida and Ginkgo biloba, whitish yellow in Hibiscus syriacus, and red brown in Forsythia koreana. In the case of Ginkgo biloba and Larix leptolepis, the younger leaves were more resistant to SO/sub 2/ than the old ones. The sulfur content of leaves showed that on the basis of %/dry weight, broad-leaved species contained the higher amount of sulfur than the coniferous species. 15 ornamental tree species which have been growing in Seoul city were sampled from the 19 air polluted spots. The elucidated were the heavily polluted regions and the lightly polluted regions. The SO/sub 2/ absorbing capacities by species are explained in the text. 17 references.

  4. Evaluating the performance of an integrated CALPUFF-MM5 modeling system for predicting SO{sub 2} emission from a refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul-Wahab, Sabah Ahmed [Sultan Qaboos University, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, College of Engineering, Muscat (Oman); Ali, Sappurd [National Engineering and Scientific Commission (NESCOM), Islamabad (Pakistan); Sardar, Sabir; Irfan, Naseem [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); Al-Damkhi, Ali [Public Authority for Applied Education and Training (PAAET), Department of Environmental Sciences College of Health Sciences, Salmiyah (Kuwait)

    2011-12-15

    Oil refineries are one of the proven sources of environmental pollution as they emit more than 100 chemicals into the atmosphere including sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). The dispersion patterns of SO{sub 2} from emissions of Sohar refinery was simulated by employing California Puff (CALPUFF) model integrated with state of the art meteorological Mesoscale Model (MM5). The results of this simulation were used to quantify the ground level concentrations of SO{sub 2} in and around the refinery. The evaluation of the CALPUFF and MM5 modeling system was carried out by comparing the estimated results with that of observed data of the same area. The predicted concentrations of SO{sub 2} agreed well with the observed data, with minor differences in magnitudes. In addition, the ambient air quality of the area was checked by comparing the model results with the regulatory limits for SO{sub 2} set by the Ministry of Environment and Climate Affairs (MECA) in Oman. From the analysis of results, it was found that the concentration of SO{sub 2} in the nearby communities of Sohar refinery is well within the regulatory limits specified by MECA. Based on these results, it was concluded that no health risk, due to SO{sub 2} emissions, is present in areas adjacent to the refinery. (orig.)

  5. Methanesulfonates of high-valent metals. Syntheses and structural features of MoO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2}, UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2}, ReO{sub 3}(CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}), VO(CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2}, and V{sub 2}O{sub 3}(CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 4} and their thermal decomposition under N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betke, Ulf; Neuschulz, Kai; Wickleder, Mathias S. [Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Institute of Pure and Applied Chemistry (Germany)

    2011-11-04

    Oxide methanesulfonates of Mo, U, Re, and V have been prepared by reaction of MoO{sub 3}, UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}.2 H{sub 2}O, Re{sub 2}O{sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}H or mixtures thereof with its anhydride. These compounds are the first examples of solvent-free oxide methanesulfonates of these elements. MoO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2} (Pbca, a=1487.05(4), b=752.55(2), c=1549.61(5) pm, V=1.73414(9) nm{sup 3}, Z=8) contains [MoO{sub 2}] moieties connected by [CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] ions to form layers parallel to (100). UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2} (P2{sub 1}/c, a=1320.4(1), b=1014.41(6), c=1533.7(1) pm, β=112.80(1) {sup circle}, V=1.8937(3) nm{sup 3}, Z=8) consists of linear UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ions coordinated by five [CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] ions, forming a layer structure. VO(CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2} (P2{sub 1}/c, a=1136.5(1), b=869.87(7), c=915.5(1) pm, β=113.66(1) {sup circle}, V=0.8290(2) nm{sup 3}, Z=4) contains [VO] units connected by methanesulfonate anions to form corrugated layers parallel to (100). In ReO{sub 3}(CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}) (P anti 1, a=574.0(1), b=1279.6(3), c=1641.9(3) pm, α=102.08(2), β=96.11(2), γ=99.04(2) {sup circle}, V=1.1523(4) nm{sup 3}, Z=8) a chain structure exhibiting infinite O-[ReO{sub 2}]-O-[ReO{sub 2}]-O chains is formed. Each [ReO{sub 2}]-O-[ReO{sub 2}] unit is coordinated by two bidentate [CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] ions. V{sub 2}O{sub 3}(CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 4} (I2/a, a=1645.2(3), b=583.1(1), c=1670.2(3) pm, β=102.58(3), V=1.5637(5) pm{sup 3}, Z=4) adopts a chain structure, too, but contains discrete [VO]-O-[VO] moieties, each coordinated by two bidentate [CH{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] ligands. Additional methanesulfonate ions connect the [V{sub 2}O{sub 3}] groups along [001]. Thermal decomposition of the compounds was monitored under N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} atmosphere by thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis and XRD measurements. Under N{sub 2} the decomposition proceeds

  6. Sources of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub x} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} in the air of four Spanish remote stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rua, A.; Hernandez, E.; Parras, J. de las; Martin, I.; Gimeno, L. [Complutense University, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Statistic and Operative Investigation II

    1998-09-01

    In this study we have analyzed the sources of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub x}, and NO{sub 3}{sup -} in the air of four remote Spanish stations belonging to the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) network. Information about trajectories has been used together with the conditional probability functions (CPFs). The most remarkable result is that the Mediterranean area is the main source of these pollutants in the air of the Spanish EMEP stations. Northern Africa and Central Europe are also important sources while the Atlantic Ocean and British Islands are, in general terms, low sources of these pollutants. The role of the Iberian Peninsula as a source of these pollutants in one of the stations, Logrono, is analyzed with more details using smaller regions to define CPFs. 26 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Cool snacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Brock, Steen; Brunsø, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Young people snack and their snacking habits are not always healthy. We address the questions whether it is possible to develop a new snack product that adolescents will find attractive, even though it is based on ingredients as healthy as fruits and vegetables, and we argue that developing...... such a product requires an interdisciplinary effort where researchers with backgrounds in psychology, anthropology, media science, philosophy, sensory science and food science join forces. We present the COOL SNACKS project, where such a blend of competences was used first to obtain thorough insight into young...... people's snacking behaviour and then to develop and test new, healthier snacking solutions. These new snacking solutions were tested and found to be favourably accepted by young people. The paper therefore provides a proof of principle that the development of snacks that are both healthy and attractive...

  8. Cool visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Pictured, from left to right: Tim Izo (saxophone, flute, guitar), Bobby Grant (tour manager), George Pajon (guitar). What do the LHC and a world-famous hip-hop group have in common? They are cool! On Saturday, 1st July, before their appearance at the Montreux Jazz Festival, three members of the 'Black Eyed Peas' came on a surprise visit to CERN, inspired by Dan Brown's Angels and Demons. At short notice, Connie Potter (Head of the ATLAS secretariat) organized a guided tour of ATLAS and the AD 'antimatter factory'. Still curious, lead vocalist Will.I.Am met CERN physicist Rolf Landua after the concert to ask many more questions on particles, CERN, and the origin of the Universe.

  9. Reactivity of laser-cleaned stones to a SO>2 ageing test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso, F.J.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the reaction or susceptibility of Nd:YAG laser cleaned stones to polluted atmospheres, several types of stone, both cemented (limestone and crystalline (marble, granite, were exposed to an atmosphere having simulated SO>2 pollution. The subsequent effects on the specimens were assessed for variations in surface morphology, weight and colour The main conclusion is that the application of laser irradiation to the selected stone specimens does not significantly influence their reaction to sulphur dioxide

    Con el fin de estudiar la reactividad o susceptibilidad frente a un ambiente contaminado de piedras limpiadas con radiación láser Nd:YAG, se ha sometido una serie de materiales rocosos cementados (calizas y cristalinos (mármol, granito a un ensayo de exposición a atmósfera concentrada en dióxido de azufre. Los efectos producidos en las muestras ensayadas se han valorado en función de las variaciones en la morfología superficial, en el peso y en el color. Se concluye que la aplicación de radiación láser a las muestras de piedra seleccionadas no influye, de manera significativa, en la reactividad de éstas frente al dióxido de azufre.

  10. Sulfation diffusion model for SO{sub 2} capture on the T-T sorbent at moderate temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.R.; Yang, L.Z.; You, C.F.; Qi, H.Y. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2009-07-15

    A sulfation model was developed for dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) at moderate temperatures to describe the reaction characteristics of the T-T sorbent clusters and the fine CaO particles that fall off the sorbent grains in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor. The cluster model describes the calcium conversion and reaction rate for various size sorbent clusters. The sulfation reaction is first order with respect to the SO{sub 2} concentration above 973 K. The calcium conversion and reaction rate for the CaO particles were obtained by extrapolation. In the model for CaO particle, the reaction rate is linearly related to the calcium conversion and the SO{sub 2} concentration in the rapid reaction stage and linearly related only with the calcium conversion after the product layer forms. The sulfation model accurately describes the sulfation of the T-T sorbent flowing through a CFB reactor.

  11. Adsorption of SO{sub 2} on Li atoms deposited on MgO (1 0 0) surface: DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eid, Kh.M., E-mail: Kheid98@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11757 (Egypt); Ammar, H.Y. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Najran University, Najran 1988 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-05-01

    The adsorption of sulfur dioxide molecule (SO{sub 2}) on Li atom deposited on the surfaces of metal oxide MgO (1 0 0) on both anionic and defect (F{sub s}-center) sites located on various geometrical defects (terrace, edge and corner) has been studied using density functional theory (DFT) in combination with embedded cluster model. The adsorption energy (E{sub ads}) of SO{sub 2} molecule (S-atom down as well as O-atom down) in different positions on both of O{sup -2} and F{sub s} sites is considered. The spin density (SD) distribution due to the presence of Li atom is discussed. The geometrical optimizations have been done for the additive materials and MgO substrate surfaces (terrace, edge and corner). The oxygen vacancy formation energies have been evaluated for MgO substrate surfaces. The ionization potential (IP) for defect free and defect containing of the MgO surfaces has been calculated. The adsorption properties of SO{sub 2} are analyzed in terms of the E{sub ads}, the electron donation (basicity), the elongation of S-O bond length and the atomic charges on adsorbed materials. The presence of the Li atom increases the catalytic effect of the anionic O{sup -2} site of MgO substrate surfaces (converted from physisorption to chemisorption). On the other hand, the presence of the Li atom decreases the catalytic effect of the F{sub s}-site of MgO substrate surfaces. Generally, the SO{sub 2} molecule is strongly adsorbed (chemisorption) on the MgO substrate surfaces containing F{sub s}-center.

  12. Inhibition of light modulation of chloroplast enzyme activity by sulfite. One of the lethal effects of SO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L E; Duggan, J X

    1977-01-01

    The capacity of a particulate pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaf chloroplast system for light-modulation of enzyme activity is diminished by brief exposure to sodium sulfite and, when intact seedlings are exposed to atmospheric SO/sub 2/, the same system is inactivated. The destructive effect of this pollutant on green plants may therefore be due to disruption of the mechanism for control of carbon dioxide fixation.

  13. Characterization of limestone reactivity with SO{sub 2} and sulfur capture modelling under fluidized bed combustion conditions; Bestaemning av kalkstensreaktivitet med avseende paa SO{sub 2} och modellering av avsvavling foer foerbraenning i fluidiserad baedd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattisson, T. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology and Univ. of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry; Lyngfelt, A. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Conversion

    1996-12-01

    During combustion of fossil fuels, SO{sub 2} is released to the atmosphere. Because of environmental concern with acid rain, the capture of SO{sub 2} is a very important process. Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a combustion method where limestone may be added to the furnace chamber to capture SO{sub 2} as the stable product CaSO{sub 4}. In the present work a relatively simple laboratory method has been developed for characterizing limestone reactivity with SO{sub 2}. The reactivity data from such investigations are used, together with residence time and particle size distribution, in a sulfur capture model for fluidized bed boilers that predicts the sulfur capture as a function of the Ca/S molar ratio. In addition, the model predicts the conversion of CaO to CaSO{sub 4} for all particle sizes present in a boiler. The model was developed and verified using data from two boilers, a 12 and a 40 MW circulating fluidized bed boiler, and showed reasonable agreement for both boilers. In addition to the development of a sulfur capture model, the effects of SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} concentrations, particle size, temperature variations, and reducing conditions on the sulfation reaction was studied using a fixed-bed quartz reactor. The sulfation reaction was also studied for long periods of time, up to 60 hours. This was done because of the long residence times of certain particle sizes that may exist in a fluidized bed boiler. From the parameter study it was found that particle size and variations between oxidizing and reducing conditions had a large effect on the sulfation behaviour. The investigation of long sulfation times showed that the reaction continued even at high degrees of conversion, although at a very slow rate. CO{sub 2} concentration had a moderate effect on the sulfation reaction while temperature variations showed no effect on the final conversion between CaO and CaSO{sub 4}. 29 refs, 25 figs, 4 tabs

  14. Indoor and outdoor SO{sub 2} in a community near oil sand extraction and production facilities in northern Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindzierski, W.B.; Ranganathan, H.K.S. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-07-01

    In order to examine whether the proximity to several oil sand operations in the Athabasca region has affected the air quality in nearby communities, a baseline study measuring indoor and outdoor sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) levels was conducted in Fort McKay, a small native community located in northern Alberta. The study involved deploying a passive sampling device for 96 hours at 30 randomly chosen homes over a 6 week period such that 75 per cent of homes were sampled during weekdays and 25 per cent during weekends. The common living area of each home (kitchen or family room) was sampled indoors. Outdoor passive samplers were attached to a sampling stand under a shelter in the yard. This article presented an introduction to oil sands development in the region and discussed the link between SO{sub 2} emissions and outdoor air pollution. The passive sampling monitors and study methods were described. Last, the article discussed the results of the study and provided a discussion of quality assurance and quality control; indoor and outdoor SO{sub 2} levels; and air exchange measurements. It was concluded that the results of the testing to determine accuracy and precision of the monitors were both within 35 per cent based on a 96 hour average measurement, which are considered very low and consistent with levels observed elsewhere in Alberta. 43 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.

  15. Rovibrational bound states of SO{sub 2} isotopologues. I: Total angular momentum J = 0–10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Praveen, E-mail: Praveen.Kumar@ttu.edu; Ellis, Joseph; Poirier, Bill, E-mail: Bill.Poirier@ttu.edu

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • We report calculation of the exact rovibrational energy levels of SO{sub 2} for J = 0–10. • We report sulfur isotope shifts of the SO{sub 2} isotopologues rovibrational frequencies. • Coriolis coupling is treated exactly. • All rovibrational levels are computed to a high level of numerical convergence. • All of the rovibrational data exhibit near-perfect mass-dependent fractionation. - Abstract: Isotopic variation of the rovibrational bound states of SO{sub 2} for the four stable sulfur isotopes {sup 32–34,36}S is investigated in comprehensive detail. In a two-part series, we compute the low-lying energy levels for all values of total angular momentum in the range J = 0–20. All rovibrational levels are computed, to an extremely high level of numerical convergence. The calculations have been carried out using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The present study (Paper I) examines the J = 0–10 rovibrational levels, providing unambiguous symmetry and rovibrational label assignments for each computed state. The calculated vibrational energy levels exhibit very good agreement with previously reported experimental and theoretical data. Rovibrational energy levels, calculated without any Coriolis approximations, are reported here for the first time. Among other potential ramifications, this data will facilitate understanding of the origin of mass-independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes in the Archean rock record—of great relevance for understanding the “oxygen revolution”.

  16. Divertor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Tadakazu; Hayashi, Katsumi; Handa, Hiroyuki

    1993-01-01

    Cooling water for a divertor cooling system cools the divertor, thereafter, passes through pipelines connecting the exit pipelines of the divertor cooling system and the inlet pipelines of a blanket cooling system and is introduced to the blanket cooling system in a vacuum vessel. It undergoes emission of neutrons, and cooling water in the divertor cooling system containing a great amount of N-16 which is generated by radioactivation of O-16 is introduced to the blanket cooling system in the vacuum vessel by way of pipelines, and after cooling, passes through exit pipelines of the blanket cooling system and is introduced to the outside of the vacuum vessel. Radiation of N-16 in the cooling water is decayed sufficiently with passage of time during cooling of the blanket, thereby enabling to decrease the amount of shielding materials such as facilities and pipelines, and ensure spaces. (N.H.)

  17. WORKSHOP: Beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Cooling - the control of unruly particles to provide well-behaved beams - has become a major new tool in accelerator physics. The main approaches of electron cooling pioneered by Gersh Budker at Novosibirsk and stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer at CERN, are now complemented by additional ideas, such as laser cooling of ions and ionization cooling of muons

  18. Obtention of agricultural gypsum traced on {sup 34} S (Ca{sup 34} SO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O), by chemical reaction between H{sub 2}{sup 34} SO{sub 4} and Ca(OH){sub 2}; Obtencao do gesso agricola marcado no {sup 34} S (Ca{sup 34} SO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O), por reacao quimica entre o H{sub 2}{sup 34} SO{sub 4} e Ca(OH){sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossete, Alessandra L.R.M.; Bendassolli, Jose A.; Ignoto, Raquel de Fatima; Batagello, Hugo Henrique [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis

    2002-07-01

    The gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O) has double function in the soil: as source of calcium and sulfur and reducing agent of aluminum saturation. The sulfur for the plants has acting in the vital functions and it is proven fact increase of the S deficiency in Brazilian soils. The isotope tracer {sup 34} S can elucidate important aspects in the sulfur cycle. The Ca{sup 34} SO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O was obtained by chemical reaction between Ca(OH){sub 2} and H{sub 2}{sup 34} SO{sub 4} solution. The acid was obtained by chromatography ionic change, using cationic resin Dowex 50WX8 and Na{sub 2}{sup 34} SO{sub 4} solution. The reaction was realized under slow agitation. After the reaction, the precipitate was separated and dried in ventilated stove at 60 deg C temperature. The Mass of the Ca{sup 34} SO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O produced was determined by method gravimetric. This way, a system contends resin 426 cm{sup 3}, considering volume of 2.2 liters can be obtained a solution contends 44.2 g of H{sub 2}{sup 34} SO{sub 4}, theoretically could be produced 78.0 g of Ca{sup 34} SO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O approximately. With results of the tests were verified that there was not total precipitation of the Ca{sup 34}SO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O. Were produced 73.7{+-} 0.6 g of Ca{sup 34} SO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O representing average income 94.6{+-}0.8 %. The purity of the produced CaSO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O was 98%. (author)

  19. Effects of low SO/sub 2/ concentrations on the mitotic activity and on the cell cycle of duckweed (Lemna minor L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeckli, B; Braendle, R; Erismann, K H

    1975-01-01

    Duckweed (Lemena minor) has proven to be a suitable indicator for the effects of low SO/sub 2/ concentrations. Therefore, this plant was used to study the mitotic activity as well as the cell cycle under fumigation with sublethal SO/sub 2/ concentrations although to a great extent the morphology of this plant is still unknown. It is also difficult to process this plant cytologically.

  20. Fabrication of graphene oxide enwrapped Z-scheme Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/AgBr nanoparticles with enhanced visible-light photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Yujuan; Liang, Chunyan; Xia, Yue, E-mail: xiayue_chem@126.com; Huang, Wei; Li, Zelin

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A novel GO/Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/AgBr composite was prepared via a solution method. • It showed enhanced photocatalytic performance to degrade dyes under visible light irradiation. • Its photocatalytic ability was effectively maintained for 4 cycles without sacrificial reagents. - Abstract: A novel graphene oxide (GO) enwrapped Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/AgBr (GO/Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/AgBr) composite was fabricated through a facile solution approach via electrostatic interaction and precipitation transformation reaction for the first time. The results of XRD, Raman, SEM, TEM and XPS confirmed the structure, morphology and composition of the GO/Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/AgBr composite very well. The Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/AgBr nanoparticles were found to be encapsulated by GO sheets. The photocatalytic activity of the composite was investigated by the degradation of methyl orange (MO), rhodamine B (RhB) and methylene blue (MB) in water under visible light. The incorporation of GO sheets not only significantly enhanced the photocatalytic activity but also improved the reusability of Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/AgBr nanoparticles. The photocatalytic ability of GO/Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/AgBr can be maintained at a high level for 4 times cycle experiments. The trapping experiments confirmed that holes and superoxide ion radicals were the main active species responsible for the degradation reaction. A plasmonic Z-scheme photocatalytic mechanism was proposed to illustrate the possible transferred and separated behavior of electron-hole pairs among Ag, Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 3}, AgBr and GO quaternary system under visible light irradiation.

  1. Contrasts between bryophyte and vascular plant synecological responses in an SO/sub 2/-stressed white spruce association in Central Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winner, W.E.; Bewley, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Canopy coverage analysis was used to examine the synecological changes exhibited by vascular plants and terrestrial mosses in a white spruce association exposed to SO/sub 2/ fumigation. Both these understory components were found to decline in coverage as SO/sub 2/ stress increased, but mosses were more sensitive to SO/sub 2/ in the more heavily stressed areas. This was observed along both an angle-dependent and a distance-dependent gradient of pollution stress. Diversity steadily declined with increasing SO/sub 2/ stress along the angle-dependent gradient but some localized increases in diversity occurred with increasing stress along the distance-dependent gradient. This was due to invasion of openings resulting from attrition of SO/sub 2/-sensitive species by weedy angiosperms and by vegetative growth of moss species more tolerant of pollution stress. Conclusions have been drawn about the productive strategy of vascular plants and mosses subjected to increasing concentrations of SO/sub 2/. We have elucidated the ecological consequences for community structure of the systematic removal of pollution-sensitive understory species from an otherwise stable vegetation unit.

  2. Inhibition by Ginkgo leaves extract of the corrosion of steel in HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Shuduan, E-mail: dengshuduan@163.com [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming 650224 (China); Li Xianghong [Faculty of Science, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming 650224 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ginkgo leaves extract (GLE) acts as a good inhibitor for steel in HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} media. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibition efficiency follows the order: HCl > H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorption of GLE on steel surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GLE behaves as a mixed-type inhibitor in 1.0 M HCl, while cathodic inhibitor in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. - Abstract: The inhibition effect of Ginkgo leaves extract (GLE) on the corrosion of cold rolled steel (CRS) in 1.0-5.0 M HCl and 0.5-2.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions was investigated for the first time by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. The results show that GLE is a good inhibitor, and exhibits more efficient in 1.0 M HCl than 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The adsorption of GLE on CRS surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. GLE acts as a mixed-type inhibitor in 1.0 M HCl, while a cathodic inhibitor in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}.

  3. Seawater scrubbing - reduction of SO{sub x} emissions from ship exhausts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karle, Ida-Maja; Turner, David (Dept. of Chemistry, Goeteborg Univ. (SE))

    2007-07-01

    It is shown that seawater scrubbing is a promising technology for reducing sulphur oxide emissions from ships. The marine chemical aspects of shipboard seawater scrubbing have been modelled and analysed, based on a 12 MW engine burning fuel with a 3% sulphur content. Calculations have been made for different efficiencies of sulphur scrubbing, different water temperatures, and for six different water types (open ocean, Kattegatt, Baltic Proper, Bothnian Sea, Bothnian Bay, and river freshwater). The results of the calculations give the volumes of water required for (i) uptake of SO{sub x} (the scrubbing process), (ii) dilution of the scrubbing water to achieve a pH of 6.5, (iii) further dilution to achieve a pH within 0.2 units of that in the ambient water, and no more that a 1% reduction in dissolved oxygen concentration. The volumes of water required for a given efficiency of the scrubbing process increase with decreasing salinity and with increasing water temperature. The salinity dependence is non-linear, such that operation in the Bothnian Sea, Bothnian Bay and low alkalinity river freshwater would require significantly larger water volumes for scrubbing and dilution that operation in the Baltic Proper, Kattegatt or open ocean. The calculations assume access to large volumes of unaffected, ambient water. This is reasonable for a ship under way in open water, but not in enclosed or semi-enclosed waters, which would therefore require detailed case studies. It may be possible to reduce the volumes of dilution water required by, for example, aeration of the scrubbing water and addition of base to neutralise the acidic sulphur oxides. Further studies would be needed in order to assess these options

  4. Renewable Heating And Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  5. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  6. Coal materials for the reduction of SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x}; Derivados del carbon para la reduccion de SO{sub 2}-No{sub x}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-09-01

    The project was divided in two well-differentiated parts: SO{sub 2} removal and NO{sub x} reduction. In both cases, carbon materials play a unique role in the processes, either as calcium sorbent suppor (SO{sub 2} removal) or as catalyst support and reducing agent (NO{sub x} reduction). Removal of SO{sub 2}. This process was carried out by calcium sorbents at relatively low temperature (T<300 degree centigree), forming CaSO{sub 3} (instead of CaSO{sub 4}) that decomposos at lower temperatures, making regeneration easier. High dispersion of the active species, CaO, has been obtained using carbon materials (activated carbons, chars, etc.) and other inorganic compounds as supports. The effect of oxygen, carbon dioxide and steam in the reaction atmosphere and the regeneration process have been also investigated. Thermal regeneration is possible for several cycles, however, carbon gasification also takes place. To control, and to void that effect, the reaction and regeneration temperatures should be carefully controlled and carbons with low reactivity should be selected. The process was scaled (100-2000) using briquete samples obtained by physical mixture of char and Ca(oh){sub 2}. The SO{sub 2} removal levels were similar to those found in the laboratory scale. NO{sub x} reduction. The possibility of using potassium containing coal-briquettes for NO and NO{sub x} reduction has been investigated. The preparation method of briquettes presents the advantage of using a binder agent (humic acid) which contains the catalyst (potassium). The system catalyst-binder-coal stays intimately joined by a moulding stage and subsequent pyrolysis, providing proper mechanical resistance to the coal-briquettes. With the purpose to improve the briquettesactivity, different variables of the preparation process have been investigated (potassium content-added with the binder and/or KOH-, rank and mineral matter content of the coal precursor, pyrolysis temperature and pressure of the moulding

  7. Abscisic acid-dependent changes in transpiration rate with SO/sub 2/ fumigation and the effects of sulfite and pH on stomatal aperture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, N.; Maruta, I.; Sugahara, K.

    1980-01-01

    Transpiration rate of rice plants which contained extremely large amounts of abscisic acid (ABA) decreased rapidly with 2.0 ppm SO/sub 2/ fumigation, reached 20% of the initial level after 5 min exposure, then recovered slightly and thereafter remained constant. SO/sub 2/ fumigation of alday and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. Samsun) which have a lower ABA content showed a 50% decrease in transpiration rate. Similarly, rates for wheat and tobacco (N. tabacum L. Samsun NN) which contained even smaller amounts of ABA than alday and tobacco (Samsun) decreased by 35 and 45%, respectively, 30 min after the beginning of the fumigation. In the cases of broad bean and tobacco (N. glutinosa L.) with low ABA contents, the rates slightly increased immediately after the start of the fumigation and began to decrease gradually 20 and 40 min later, respectively. The transpiration rates of corn and sorghum, in spite of their extremely low ABA contents, decreased significantly with SO/sub 2/ fumigation and reached 65 and 50% of the initial levels after 20 and 40 min exposure, respectively. Foliar application of 0.04 N HCl to peanut leaves remarkably depressed the transpiration rate, while the application of 0.04 M Na/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ decreased the rate only to the same level as water treatment. Foliar application of either HCl or Na/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ to radish leaves exerted no change in the transpiration rate. When 3 X 10/sup -4/ M ABA was applied to radish leaves prior to HCl and Na/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ treatment, the transpiration rate of radish was decreased by HCl application, but not by Na/sub 2/SO/sub 3/.

  8. Simultaneous absorption of NO and SO{sub 2} into Fe-II-EDTA solution coupled with the Fe-II-EDTA regeneration catalyzed by activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, H.S.; Mao, Y.P.; Yang, X.J.; Chen, Y.; Long, X.L.; Yuan, W.K. [East China University of Science & Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-07-30

    The simultaneous removal of NO and SO{sub 2} from flue gases can be realized with Fe(II)-ethylenediamineteraacetate (EDTA) solution. Activated carbon is used to catalyze the reduction of Fe-III-EDTA to Fe-II-EDTA to maintain the capability of removing NO of the Fe-EDTA solution. The reductant is the sulfite/bisulfite ions produced by SO{sub 2} dissolving into the aqueous solution. Experiments have been performed to determine the effects of activated carbon of coconut shell, Fe-II-EDTA concentration, Fe/EDTA molar ratio, SO{sub 2} partial pressure, NO partial pressure and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentration on the combined elimination of NO and SO{sub 2} with Fe-II-EDTA solution coupled with the Fe-II-EDTA regeneration catalyzed by activated carbon. According to the experimental results, activated carbon not only catalyzes the reduction of Fe-III-EDTA by sulfite/bisulfite greatly but also avoids the release of N{sub 2}O. The NO removal efficiency increases with the initial Fe-II-EDTA concentration and SO{sub 2} partial pressure. The ratio of Fe/EDTA and the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentration has little effect on the catalytic reduction of Fe-III-EDTA. The optimal initial NO concentration range is from 600 ppm to 900 ppm. The experimental results manifest that the Fe-II-EDTA solution coupled with catalytic regeneration of Fe-II-EDTA can maintain high nitric oxide removal efficiency for a long period of time.

  9. Cooled Water Production System,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invention refers to the field of air conditioning and regards an apparatus for obtaining cooled water . The purpose of the invention is to develop...such a system for obtaining cooled water which would permit the maximum use of the cooling effect of the water -cooling tower.

  10. Process fluid cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farquhar, N.G.; Schwab, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system of heat exchangers is disclosed for cooling process fluids. The system is particularly applicable to cooling steam generator blowdown fluid in a nuclear plant prior to chemical purification of the fluid in which it minimizes the potential of boiling of the plant cooling water which cools the blowdown fluid

  11. Predictive models of circulating fluidized bed combustors: SO{sub 2} sorption in the CFB loop. Fourteenth technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D.; Therdthianwong, A. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1993-02-01

    The overall objective of this investigation is to develop experimentally verified models for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors. Sorption of S0{sub 2} with calcined limestone was studied in a PYROFLOW type CFB loop at conditions approximating those found in a CFB combustor. Initially the CFB loop contained 150 micron CaO particles of a density of 3.3 g/cm{sup 3} and air at 1143{degrees}K and 3.25 atm. Atzero time, air containing 600 ppm SO{sub 2}, was introduced into the riser bottom at 1143{degrees}K. The effect of gas velocity, sorbent inventory and inlet pressure on the sorption of SO{sub 2}, were studied isothermally by running our hydrodynamic code with the S0{sub 2} sorption conservation of species equation. At a velocity of 5m/sec., reported to be a typical velocity by PYROPOWER, there is reasonably good S0{sub 2} removal. At 10 m/sec the S0{sub 2} removal is poor. The best SO{sub 2}, removal is for a velocity of 5 m/s and a high bed inventory, initial bed height, H = 9m. Most of the S0{sub 2} is removed in the first two meters of the reactor. However, the S0{sub 2} removal is not complete at the bed outlet. This is due to mixing. At the left wall of the reactor (wall opposite the solids inlet) the S0{sub 2} removal was poor due to gas bypassing caused by the asymmetrical solids inlet. Simulation of the PYROPOWER loop with a symmetrical inlet gave us an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional PYROPOWER system. These results demonstrate the practical utility of the predictive model that we have developed over the last three years.

  12. PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES. II. H{sub 2}S AND SO{sub 2} PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN ANOXIC ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Renyu; Seager, Sara; Bains, William, E-mail: hury@mit.edu [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-05-20

    Sulfur gases are common components in the volcanic and biological emission on Earth, and are expected to be important input gases for atmospheres on terrestrial exoplanets. We study the atmospheric composition and the spectra of terrestrial exoplanets with sulfur compounds (i.e., H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}) emitted from their surfaces. We use a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry model and radiative transfer model to investigate the sulfur chemistry in atmospheres ranging from reducing to oxidizing. The most important finding is that both H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} are chemically short-lived in virtually all types of atmospheres on terrestrial exoplanets, based on models of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} atmospheres. This implies that direct detection of surface sulfur emission is unlikely, as their surface emission rates need to be extremely high (>1000 times Earth's volcanic sulfur emission) for these gases to build up to a detectable level. We also find that sulfur compounds emitted from the surface lead to photochemical formation of elemental sulfur and sulfuric acid in the atmosphere, which would condense to form aerosols if saturated. For terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars or M stars, Earth-like sulfur emission rates result in optically thick haze composed of elemental sulfur in reducing H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres for a wide range of particle diameters (0.1-1 {mu}m), which is assumed as a free parameter in our simulations. In oxidized atmospheres composed of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, optically thick haze, composed of elemental sulfur aerosols (S{sub 8}) or sulfuric acid aerosols (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), will form if the surface sulfur emission is two orders of magnitude more than the volcanic sulfur emission of Earth. Although direct detection of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} by their spectral features is unlikely, their emission might be inferred by observing aerosol-related features in reflected light with future generation

  13. Photosynthesis under low-level SO/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ enhancement conditions in three duckweed species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loats, K V [Denison Univ., Granville, OH; Noble, R; Takemoto, B

    1981-09-01

    Following exposure to 0.5 and 0.75 ppm SO/sub 2/ fumigation for up to 2 wk, apparent photosynthesis was determined in Lemna minor, L. valdiviana, and Spirodela oligorhiza by infrared gas analysis at 300, 500, and 1,000 ppm CO/sub 2/. Net photosynthesis was inhibited in L. valdiviana and S. oligorhiza but not in L. minor. The growth rate, as measured by frond count, was not affected in L. minor and L. valdiviana and only slightly in S. oligorhiza. Short-term CO/sub 2/ enhancement appreciably increased the photosynthetic rates.

  14. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  15. Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by-product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, March 11, 1993--June 11, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sublette, K.L.

    1993-11-01

    There are two basic approaches to addressing the problem of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions: (1) desulfurize (and denitrogenate) the feedstock prior to or during combustion; or (2) scrub the resultant SO{sub 2} and oxides of nitrogen from the boiler flue gases. The flue gas processing alternative has been addressed in this project via microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} by sulfate-reducing bacteria

  16. Simultaneous treatment of NO and SO{sub 2} with aqueous NaClO{sub 2} solution in a wet scrubber combined with a plasma electrostatic precipitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun-Woo [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Regional Innovation Center for Environmental Technology of Thermal Plasma (RIC-ETTP), INHA University, 100 Inha-ro, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sooseok, E-mail: sooseok@jejunu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, Jeju National University, 102 Jejudaehak-ro, Jeju-si, Jeju Special Self-Governing Province, 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong-Wha, E-mail: dwpark@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Regional Innovation Center for Environmental Technology of Thermal Plasma (RIC-ETTP), INHA University, 100 Inha-ro, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • This study was conducted to investigate simultaneous removal of NO and SO{sub 2}. • Proposed process consists of wet chemical reactor and non-thermal plasma reactor. • In the wet chemical reactor, NO and SO{sub 2} were absorbed and oxidized by NaClO{sub 2}. • In the non-thermal plasma reactor, aerosol particles were collected on anode surface. • NO and SO{sub 2} were removed more efficiently by proposed process than other methods. - Abstract: NO and SO{sub 2} gases that are generally produced in thermal power plants and incinerators were simultaneously removed by using a wet scrubber combined with a plasma electrostatic precipitator. The wet scrubber was used for the absorption and oxidation of NO and SO{sub 2}, and non-thermal plasma was employed for the electrostatic precipitation of aerosol particles. NO and SO{sub 2} gases were absorbed and oxidized by aerosol particles of NaClO{sub 2} solution in the wet scrubber. NO and SO{sub 2} reacted with the generated NaClO{sub 2} aerosol particles, NO{sub 2} gas, and aqueous ions such as NO{sub 2}{sup −}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, HSO{sub 3}{sup −}, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}. The aerosol particles were negatively charged and collected on the surface of grounded anode in the plasma electrostatic precipitator. The NO and SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies of the proposed system were 94.4% and 100% for gas concentrations of 500 mg/m{sup 3} and a total gas flow rate of 60 Nm{sup 3}/h, when the molar flow rate of NaClO{sub 2} and the gas–liquid contact time were 50 mmol/min and 1.25 s, respectively. The total amount and number of aerosol particles in the exhaust gas were reduced to 7.553 μg/m{sup 3} and 210 /cm{sup 3} at the maximum plasma input power of 68.8 W, which are similar to the values for clean air.

  17. Modelling and experimentation of the SO{sub 2} remotion through a plasma out of thermal equilibrium; Modelacion y experimentacion de la remocion del SO{sub 2} mediante un plasma fuera de equilibrio termico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno S, H. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Pacheco P, M.; Pacheco S, J.; Cruz A, A. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: hilda_saavedra@yahoo.com.mx

    2005-07-01

    In spite of the measures that have taken for the decrease of the emitted pollution by mobile sources (''Today it doesn't Circulate'', implementation of catalysts in those exhaust pipes,...), the pollution in the Valley of Mexico area overcomes the limits fixed by Mexican standards several days each year. It is foreseen that for 2020 those emissions of pollutants will be increase considerably, as example we can mention to the sulfur oxides which will be increase a 48% with regard to 1998. The purpose of this work is of proposing a technique for the degradation of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) that consists in introducing this gas to a plasma out of thermal equilibrium where its were formed key radicals (O, OH) for its degradation. The proposed reactor has the advantage of combining the kindness of the dielectric barrier discharge and of corona discharge, besides working to atmospheric pressure and having small dimensions. The first obtained results of the modelling of the degradation of the SO{sub 2} in plasma as well as those experimentally obtained are presented. (Author)

  18. Reactivity in the removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} on Co/Mg/Al mixed oxides derived from hydrotalcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomares, A.E. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Universidad Politecnica Valencia, Avda. de los Naranjos s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Lopez-Nieto, J.M.; Corma, A. [Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica, UPV-CSIC, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Avenida de los Naranjos s/n., 46022 Valencia (Spain); Lazaro, F.J.; Lopez, A. [Instituto Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (CSIC- Universidad de Zaragoza), 50015 Zaragoza (Spain)

    1999-04-05

    Metal containing hydrotalcites, where metal oxides present redox properties and hydrotalcite shows a basic character, appear to be new important environmental catalysts for the removal of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x}. Redox and basic properties of a mixed Co/Mg/Al oxide derived from hydrotalcites are tuned in order to achieve the optimal catalytic behavior required. This sample has been characterized showing that cobalt is present in two forms, as isolated and well dispersed paramagnetic ions, and as very small Co-containing particles (in the nanometric range), with an internal antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperature. The redox properties of cobalt allow the reduction of NO with propane at high temperatures and in presence of oxygen. The reduced cobalt species are proposed as the active sites. Nevertheless, for the removal of SO{sub 2} and contrary to the case of Cu/Mg/Al samples, the addition of an oxidant as cerium oxide on Co/Mg/Al is necessary in order to oxidize SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. In this case, similar results than those obtained with previously reported catalyst, i.e. cerium or copper-cerium hydrotalcite, are obtained. These results indicate that this catalyst could be an adequate material for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in a FCC unit

  19. Electrochemical formation of GaAs honeycomb structure using a fluoride-containing (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, Yoshitaka, E-mail: morisita@cc.tuat.ac.jp; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Yokobori, Kuniyuki

    2014-04-01

    GaAs substrates were anodized in the (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte with various fluoride concentrations. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation showed that highly regular honeycomb hollows were formed on the substrates anodized in the (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte with a small amount of HF concentration. The regularity of hollows decreased with the increase of HF concentration. The average diameter of hollows increased with increasing anodizing voltage. The regularity of hollow diameters increased with the increase of anodizing time, irrespective of the anodizing voltage. Cross-sectional SEM image showed that the average depth of regular hollows was about 5 nm. In addition to the peak in the region of fundamental adsorption of GaAs with the peak wavelength at about 870 nm, photoluminescence spectra of samples anodized in the (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte with HF concentration of 0.5 ml showed several peaks at about 610, 635, 670 and 720 nm. - Highlights: • We report on the electrochemical formation of GaAs honeycomb structure. • High regular hollows were formed by anodization in HF-containing (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution. • A thin porous layer was formed by anodization in HF-containing (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution. • This process is useful for preparing patterned substrate with a thin porous layer.

  20. Physicochemical properties of metal-doped activated carbons and relationship with their performance in the removal of SO{sub 2} and NO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Xiang, E-mail: xgao1@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Liu Shaojun; Zhang Yang; Luo Zhongyang; Cen Kefa [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Cu and Fe were partly reduced by carbon during preparation. {yields} Metal-involved SO{sub 2} removal pathways were catalytic oxidation, reaction and adsorption. {yields} Good performances of SO{sub 2} and NO removal depended on the metal redox pairs. - Abstract: Several metal-doped activated carbons (Fe, Co, Ni, V, Mn, Cu and Ce) were prepared and characterized. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that some metals (Cu and Fe) were partly reduced by carbon during preparation. Activity tests for the removal of SO{sub 2} and the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia were carried out. Due to different physicochemical properties, different pathways for the SO{sub 2} removal had been put out, i.e., catalytic oxidation, direct reaction and adsorption. This classification depended on the standard reduction potentials of metal redox pairs. Samples impregnated with V, Ce and Cu showed good activity for NO reduction by NH{sub 3}, which was also ascribed to the reduction potential values of metal redox pairs. Ce seemed to be a promising alternative to V due to the higher activity in NO reduction and the nontoxic property. A metal cation which could easily convert between the two valences seemed to be crucial to the good performance of both SO{sub 2} and NO removal, just like V and Cu.

  1. Combined effects Na and SO{sub 2} in flue gas on Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH{sub 3} simulated by Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Aiyi [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing 210023 (China); Yu, Danqing [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Yang, Liu [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing 210023 (China); Sheng, Zhongyi, E-mail: 09377@njnu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was deposited on Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst to simulate the co-existing of sodium and SO{sub 2} in the flue gas. • Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} had strong and fluctuant influence on Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst’s performance in SCR of NOx with NH{sub 3}, due to the combined effect of the deactivation of sodium salts and the enhanced performance of ceria with surface sulfation. • The changes of the surface chemical species and acid sites on the Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} deposited catalysts could be considered as the main reasons for the fluctuation changes with the catalytic activity. - Abstract: A series of Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were synthesized through an impregnation method and used for low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia (NH{sub 3}). Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was added into the catalyst to simulate the combined effects of alkali metal and SO{sub 2} in the flue gas. Experimental results showed that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} had strong and fluctuant influence on the activity of Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2}, because the effect of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} included pore occlusion and sulfation effect simultaneously. When Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} loading content increased from 0 to 1 wt.%, the SCR activities of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-doped catalysts decreased greatly. With further increasing amount of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, however, the catalytic activity increased gradually. XRD results showed that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doping could induce the crystallization of MnOx phases, which were also confirmed by TEM and SEM results. BET results showed that the surface areas decreased and a new bimodal mesoporous structure formed gradually with the increasing amount of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. XPS results indicated that part of Ce{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 3+} were transferred to Ce{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} due to the sulfation after Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} deposition on the surface of the catalysts. When the doped amounts of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} increased, NH{sub 3

  2. Utilization of desulfurization gypsum to producing SO{sub 2} and CaO in multi-stage fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Zhu; Wang, Tao; Yang, Hairui; Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Zuyi [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    With emission control becomes more and more stringent, flue gas desulphurization (FGD) is commonly employed for desulfurization. However, the product of FGD, gypsum, causes the unexpected environmental problems. How to utilize the byproduct of FGD effectively and economically is a challenging task. This paper proposed the new technical process to produce SO{sub 2} and CaO by reducing the gypsum in multi-stage fluidized bed reactor with different atmosphere. In addition, some preliminary experiments were carried out in PTGA. The results show that CO concentration has little effect on the initial decomposing temperature, but affect the decomposing rate of phosphogypsum obviously. The decomposing product composed of CaS and CaO simultaneously. The ratio of the two products was determined by CO concentration. Lower CO content benefits to produce more CO product and more SO{sub 2}. The decomposition reaction of phosphogypsum in reducing atmosphere is parallel competition reaction. Therefore, it is necessary to eliminate the effect of CaS and other byproduct efficiently by the new technology, which utilize multi-atmosphere in multistage fluidized bed reactors.

  3. Resistance of various coatings to high temperature corrosion in HCl and SO{sub 2} containing environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cizner, Josef; Mlnarik, Jakub; Hruska, Jan [SVUM a.s., Prague (Czech Republic). Lab. of High Temperature Corrosion

    2010-07-01

    For high efficiency of the steam turbines it is necessary to produce steam of temperature at least 400 C, which in conjunction with specific composition of combustion gases causes fireside corrosion problems. The combustion gases contain aggressive compounds ike HCl and SO{sub 2} and some other elements which can form deposits on heat exchanging surfaces e.g. calcium, potassium salts etc. Using of high-alloy steels or nickel-based alloys is very costly and also these materials could have lower thermal conductivity. A cheaper solution is to produce a coating on low (medium)-alloy steel. Common heat-resistant steels show very short lifetime under these conditions. The solution is then to use the appropriate coatings. Some types of coatings can be applied even inside older boilers. In this work we tested many coatings composition (nickel-based, aluminium-based etc. As well as with different processing method - arc sprayed coating, weld deposits, HVOF, etc.) on 16Mo3 steel. In particular their high temperature corrosion behaviour in model atmosphere containing SO{sub 2} and HCl and also under deposit of fly ash was studied. (orig.)

  4. Feasibility study on improving SO/sub 2/ abatement economics through improvements in byproduct utilization. Final report. 2 Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-17

    This study was undertaken to assess the technical feasibility of improving SO/sub 2/ abatement economics through improvements in byproduct utilization, and to recommend the most appropriate strategy for fostering the development and commericalization of such technology. Existing byproduct technology was reviewed and the potential for new technology assessed. This was done by a literature review and a survey of individuals and organizations actively engaged in this area. The assessment is confined to technical aspects only. This phase of the study concludes that there is a wide range of abatement byproduct technology, at various stages of development, which if appropriately exploited, offers the potential of improving byproduct utility and value, and hence the economics of Canadian SO/sub 2/ abatement. The second phase of this study addresses the problem of the most effective strategy for ensuring the development and commercialization of appropriate byproduct technology. This is based on discussions with individuals and organizations involved in the field, and assessment of the motivation and potential effectiveness of alternative approaches within the context of a diverse Canadian industry, the technology status in Canada and the national need. Includes 51-page bibliography. 400 refs., 14 tabs.

  5. Restaurant Food Cooling Practices†

    Science.gov (United States)

    BROWN, LAURA GREEN; RIPLEY, DANNY; BLADE, HENRY; REIMANN, DAVE; EVERSTINE, KAREN; NICHOLAS, DAVE; EGAN, JESSICA; KOKTAVY, NICOLE; QUILLIAM, DANIELA N.

    2017-01-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study. PMID:23212014

  6. Simulation of the concentration of SO{sub 2} issued by major stationary sources in 2003 in northwestern Chiapas and central Tabasco, Mexico; Simulacion de la concentracion de SO{sub 2} emitido por fuentes fijas mayores durante 2003 en el noroeste de Chiapas y centro de Tabasco, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes Manzanilla, Arturo [Division Academica de Ciencias Biologicas, UJAT, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico)]. E-mail: avmanzanilla@hotmail.com; Fernandez Garcia, German [Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara Campus Tabasco, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico); Ramos Herrera, Sergio [Division Academica de Ciencias Biologicas, UJAT, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico); Bautista Margulis, Raul G. [Division Academica de Ciencias Biologicas, UJAT, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico)

    2008-05-15

    The CALPUFF dispersion model was used to simulate the spatial distribution of the SO{sub 2} emitted by Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) gas-processing complexes in Cactus, NW Chiapas, Nuevo PEMEX and Ciudad PEMEX, in central Tabasco, during 2003. It was found that the zone with the highest concentrations of SO{sub 2} is located SW from the PEMEX facilities. The zone, where the World Health Organization's norm for SO{sub 2} is surpassed (20 {mu}g/m{sup 3}), includes the city of Reforma, Chiapas and Ciudad PEMEX, Tabasco. [Spanish] El modelo de dispersion CALPUFF fue usado para simular la distribucion espacial de la concentracion de SO{sub 2} emitido por los complejos procesadores de gas de Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) en Cactus, en el noroeste de Chiapas, Nuevo PEMEX y Ciudad PEMEX, en el centro de Tabasco, durante 2003. Se encontro que la zona con mayor concentracion de SO{sub 2} esta localizada al suroeste de las instalaciones de la empresa petrolera. La zona, donde la norma de la Organizacion Mundial de la Salud para el SO{sub 2} es sobrepasada (20 {mu}g/m{sup 3}), incluye la ciudad de Reforma, Chiapas y Ciudad PEMEX, Tabasco.

  7. Effects of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} injections by supersonic aviation on sulfate aerosol and ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyominov, I.G.; Zadorozhny, A.M. [Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Elansky, N.F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Atmospheric Physics

    1997-12-31

    The impact of supersonic aviation on atmospheric ozone and sulfate aerosol is examined with the help of a two-dimensional dynamical/radiative/chemical model of ozonosphere including aerosol physics. For SO{sub 2} emissions from aircraft as gas, gas/particles (90%/10%) mix, and particles of 0.01 {mu}m radius the sulphate aerosol surface density at maximum of changes increases against its background value by {approx}50%, {approx}75%, and {approx}200%, respectively. This effect of SO{sub 2} emissions with insignificant NO{sub x} injection leads to a significant decrease of total ozone by 2015 in the entire atmosphere. For NO{sub x} emissions which are anticipated in future (EI(NO{sub x}) = 15) any kind of SO{sub 2} emission results in significant weakening of supersonic aviation impact on ozone layer in the Northern Hemisphere. (author) 14 refs.

  8. Interactions of methylamine and ammonia with atmospheric nucleation precursor H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and common organic acids: Thermodynamics and atmospheric implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, L.; Bai, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Nadykto, A. B., E-mail: anadykto@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Applied Mathematics, Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, Vadkovsky per. 1, Moscow 127055 (Russian Federation); Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2016-06-08

    Interactions of the two common atmospheric bases, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and methylamine MA (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}), which are considered to be important stabilizers of binary clusters in the Earth’s atmosphere, with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the key atmospheric precursor, and 14 common atmospheric organic acids (COA) (formic (CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}), acetic (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}), oxalic (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}), malonic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), succinic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 4}), glutaric acid (C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O{sub 4}), adipic (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}O{sub 4}), benzoic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}COOH), phenylacetic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}COOH), pyruvic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 3}), maleic acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), malic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 5}), tartaric (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}) and pinonic acid (C{sub 10}H{sub 16}O{sub 3})) have been studied using the composite high-accuracy G3MP2 method. The thermodynamic stability of mixed (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), (COA)(B1) and (COA)(B2) dimers and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) trimers, where B1 and B2 represent methylamine (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), respectively, have been investigated and their impacts on the thermodynamic stability of clusters containing H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} have been analyzed. It has been shown that in many cases the interactions of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} with COA, ammonia and methylamine lead to the formation of heteromolecular dimers and trimers, which are certainly more stable than (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 2} and (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 3}. It has also been found that free energies of (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})+ CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}⇔(COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})(CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) reactions exceed 10-15 kcal mol{sup −1}. This is a clear indication that mixed trimers composed of COA, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and methylamine are very stable and can thus serve as possible nucleation sites. The present study leads us to conclude that the interactions of COA coexisting with H

  9. Effects of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} injections by supersonic aviation on sulfate aerosol and ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyominov, I G; Zadorozhny, A M [Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Elansky, N F [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Atmospheric Physics

    1998-12-31

    The impact of supersonic aviation on atmospheric ozone and sulfate aerosol is examined with the help of a two-dimensional dynamical/radiative/chemical model of ozonosphere including aerosol physics. For SO{sub 2} emissions from aircraft as gas, gas/particles (90%/10%) mix, and particles of 0.01 {mu}m radius the sulphate aerosol surface density at maximum of changes increases against its background value by {approx}50%, {approx}75%, and {approx}200%, respectively. This effect of SO{sub 2} emissions with insignificant NO{sub x} injection leads to a significant decrease of total ozone by 2015 in the entire atmosphere. For NO{sub x} emissions which are anticipated in future (EI(NO{sub x}) = 15) any kind of SO{sub 2} emission results in significant weakening of supersonic aviation impact on ozone layer in the Northern Hemisphere. (author) 14 refs.

  10. The electrochemical oxidation of lead in various H/sub 2/O-H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ mixtures-II. Ring-disc electrode study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danel, V; Plichon, V

    1983-06-01

    The rotating ring-disc electrode technique was used to study the generation of soluble Pb(II) species during the anodic oxidation of the lead electrode in various H/sub 2/O-H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ media. The concentration range extended from 0.06 to 10.3 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. For every concentration it was possible to detect small cathodic ring current variation which was attributable to the reduction of Pb(II) to Pb. Quantitative measurements of the collection efficiency showed that the small cycle life of the lead-acid batter in 5.6 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ cannot be ascribed to the dissolution step.

  11. N{sub 2}O + SO{sub 2} reaction over Si- and C-doped boron nitride nanotubes: A comparative DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D., E-mail: esrafili@maragheh.ac.ir; Saeidi, Nasibeh

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • The mechanisms of N{sub 2}O + SO{sub 2} reaction are investigated over Si- and C-doped BNNTs. • Both Si- and C-doped BNNTs can be used as an efficient catalyst for the N{sub 2}O + SO{sub 2} reaction. • The 2N{sub 2}O → O{sub 2} + N{sub 2} reaction needs a large activation energy over both surfaces. - Abstract: Density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the mechanisms of N{sub 2}O reduction by SO{sub 2} over Si- and C-doped (6,0) boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). According to our results, the Si or C adatom can be strongly stabilized over the vacancy defect of the BNNT. The adsorption energy of Si and C atoms over defective BNNT is calculated to be −297.3 and −333.7 kcal/mol, respectively, indicating a strong interaction between these dopant atoms and the tube surface. The N{sub 2}O reduction reaction includes the decomposition of N{sub 2}O (i.e. N{sub 2}O → N{sub 2} + O*), followed by the reduction of O* by SO{sub 2} molecule (i.e. SO{sub 2} + O* → SO{sub 3}). The calculated energy barrier of the SO{sub 2} + O* → SO{sub 3} reaction on Si- and C-doped BNNTs is 2.4 and 5.4 kcal/mol, respectively. Moreover, the effects of tube diameter and length on the N{sub 2}O reduction are studied in detail. The disproportionation of N{sub 2}O molecules (2N{sub 2}O → 2N{sub 2} + O{sub 2}) over both surfaces needs a quite large activation energy, which indicates the impossibility of this reaction at ambient condition. The results show that both Si- and C-doped BNNTs can be viewed as an effective green catalyst for the reduction of N{sub 2}O.

  12. Water cooling coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S; Ito, Y; Kazawa, Y

    1975-02-05

    Object: To provide a water cooling coil in a toroidal nuclear fusion device, in which coil is formed into a small-size in section so as not to increase dimensions, weight or the like of machineries including the coil. Structure: A conductor arranged as an outermost layer of a multiple-wind water cooling coil comprises a hollow conductor, which is directly cooled by fluid, and as a consequence, a solid conductor disposed interiorly thereof is cooled indirectly.

  13. The Cool Colors Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, second from left, a sample from the Cool Colors Project, a roof product ) (Jeff Chiu - AP) more Cool Colors make the front page of The Sacramento Bee (3rd highest circulation newspaper in California) on 14 August 2006! Read the article online or as a PDF. The Cool Colors Project

  14. Cooling water distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  15. Cooling tower calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonkova, J.

    1988-01-01

    The problems are summed up of the dynamic calculation of cooling towers with forced and natural air draft. The quantities and relations are given characterizing the simultaneous exchange of momentum, heat and mass in evaporative water cooling by atmospheric air in the packings of cooling towers. The method of solution is clarified in the calculation of evaporation criteria and thermal characteristics of countercurrent and cross current cooling systems. The procedure is demonstrated of the calculation of cooling towers, and correction curves and the effect assessed of the operating mode at constant air number or constant outlet air volume flow on their course in ventilator cooling towers. In cooling towers with the natural air draft the flow unevenness is assessed of water and air relative to its effect on the resulting cooling efficiency of the towers. The calculation is demonstrated of thermal and resistance response curves and cooling curves of hydraulically unevenly loaded towers owing to the water flow rate parameter graded radially by 20% along the cross-section of the packing. Flow rate unevenness of air due to wind impact on the outlet air flow from the tower significantly affects the temperatures of cooled water in natural air draft cooling towers of a design with lower demands on aerodynamics, as early as at wind velocity of 2 m.s -1 as was demonstrated on a concrete example. (author). 11 figs., 10 refs

  16. Projection of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X}, NH{sub 3} and particle emissions - 2010-2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, O -K; Plejdrup, M; Winther, M; Hjorth Mikkelsen, M; Albrektsen, R; Nielsen, M; Fauser, P; Hoffmann, L; Hjelgaard, K; Gyldenkaerne, S

    2012-01-15

    This report contains a description of models and background data for projection of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NH{sub 3}, NMVOC, TSP, PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 25} for Denmark. The emissions are projected to 2030 using basic scenarios together with the expected results of a few individual policy measures. Official Danish forecasts of activity rates are used in the models for those sectors for which the forecasts are available, i.e. the latest official forecast from the Danish Energy Agency. The emission factors refer either to international guidelines or are country-specific and refer to Danish legislation, Danish research reports or calculations based on emission data from a considerable number of plants. The projection models are based on the same structure and method as the Danish emission inventories in order to ensure consistency. (Author)

  17. SO{sub 2} retention by reactivated CaO-based sorbent from multiple CO{sub 2} capture cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilije Manovic; Edward J. Anthony [CANMET Energy Technology Centre-Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Natural Resources Canada

    2007-06-15

    This paper examines the reactivation of spent sorbent, produced from multiple CO{sub 2} capture cycles, for use in SO{sub 2} capture. CaO-based sorbent samples were obtained from Kelly Rock limestone using three particle size ranges, each containing different impurities levels. Using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), the sulfation behavior of partially sulfated and unsulfated samples obtained after multiple calcination-carbonation cycles in a tube furnace (TF), following steam reactivation in a pressurized reactor, is examined. In addition, samples calcined/sintered under different conditions after hydration are also examined. The results show that suitably treated spent sorbent has better sulfation characteristics than that of the original sorbent. Thus for example, after 2 h sulfation, {gt} 80% of the CaO was sulfated. In addition, the sorbent showed significant activity even after 4 h when {gt} 95% CaO was sulfated. The results were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, which showed that, by the end of the sulfation process, samples contained CaSO{sub 4} with only traces of unreacted CaO. The superior behavior of spent reactivated sorbent appears to be due to swelling of the sorbent particles during steam hydration. The surface area morphology of sorbent after reactivation was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ca(OH){sub 2} crystals were seen, which displayed their regular shape, and their elemental composition was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. These results allow the proposal of a new process for the use of CaO-based sorbent in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) systems, which incorporates CO{sub 2} capture, sorbent reactivation, and SO{sub 2} retention. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. SO{sub 2} Retention by CaO-Based Sorbent Spent in CO{sub 2} Looping Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.; Loncarevic, D.

    2009-07-15

    CaO-based looping cycles are promising processes for CO{sub 2} Capture from both syngas and flue gas. The technology is based on cyclical carbonation of CaO and regeneration of CaCO{sub 3} in a dual fluidized-bed reactor to produce a pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration. Use of spent sorbent from CO{sub 2} looping cycles for SO{sub 2} capture is investigated. Three limestones were investigated: Kelly Rock (Canada), La Blanca (Spain), and Katowice (Poland, Upper Silesia). Carbonation/calcination cycles were performed in a tube furnace with both the original limestones and samples thermally pretreated for different times (i.e., sintered). The spent sorbent samples were sulfated in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The changes in the resulting sorbent pore structure were then investigated using mercury porosimetry. It has been shown that the sulfation rates of both thermally pretreated and spent sorbent samples are lower in comparison with those of the original samples. However, final conversions of both spent and pretreated sorbents after longer sulfation time were comparable or higher than those observed for the original sorbents under comparable conditions. Maximum sulfation levels strongly depend on sorbent porosity and pore surface area. The results showed that spent sorbent samples from CO{sub 2} looping cycles can be used as sorbents for SO{sub 2} retention in cases where significant porosity loss does not occur during CO{sub 2} reaction cycles. In the case of spent Kelly Rock and Katowice samples, sorbent particles are practically uniformly sulfated, achieving final conversions that are determined by the total pore volume available for the bulky CaSO{sub 4} product.

  19. A comparative study between the coal-biomass briquette and raw coal in SO{sub 2} pollution and adverse effects in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Shuqun; Zhou Yanrong; Wang Yi' nan; Wang Xun; Liu Yuanfu; Iwao Uchiyama; Wang Qiangyue; Kazuhiki Sakamoto [Chongqing University of Medical Sciences. Chongqing (China). School of Public Health

    2006-12-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the adverse health effects on rabbits exposed to SO{sub 2} emitted indoors from burning coals, and compare differences between coal-biomass briquette (BB) and raw coal (RC). Thirty-six male rabbits were divided equally into three groups at random, and then exposed to burning RC, BB, and the third without burning coal (Control) for 90 days. Data showed that the average concentration of SO{sub 2} in 24 h in RC was 13.04 mg m{sup -3}, which was 5-fold greater than BB and 31-fold higher than control (0.41 mg m{sup -3}). After 45 days, the numbers of rabbits, with increased frequency of Comet cell was highest in RC. After 90 days, the % positive Comet cell was significant at 10.36% in RC, 5.42% in BB, and 1.73% in Control. There was a nonlinear dose-effect relationship between % positive Comet cell and the concentration of SO{sub 2}. The incidence of interstitial pneumonia was 6/12 in RC and 4/12 in BB showing severe squamous metaplasia with atypical hyperplasia in bronchial epithelia in RC animals. The results of study indicate that use of BB reduced the emission of SO{sub 2}; but the smoke emitted from burning coal still produced DNA damage.

  20. Measurement of CO{sub 2}, CO, SO{sub 2}, and NO emissions from coal-based thermal power plants in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, N.; Mukheriee, I.; Santra, A.K.; Chowdhury, S.; Chakraborty, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mitra, A.P.; Sharma, C. [Jadavpur University, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Power Engineering

    2008-02-15

    Measurements of CO{sub 2} (direct GHG) and CO, SO{sub 2}, NO (indirect GHGs) were conducted on-line at some of the coal-based thermal power plants in India. The objective of the study was three-fold: to quantify the measured emissions in terms of emission coefficient per kg of coal and per kWh of electricity, to calculate the total possible emission from Indian thermal power plants, and subsequently to compare them with some previous studies. Instrument IMR 2800P Flue Gas Analyzer was used on-line to measure the emission rates Of CO{sub 2}, CO, SO{sub 2}, and NO at 11 numbers of generating units of different ratings. Certain quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) techniques were also adopted to gather the data so as to avoid any ambiguity in subsequent data interpretation. For the betterment of data interpretation, the requisite statistical parameters (standard deviation and arithmetic mean) for the measured emissions have been also calculated. The emission coefficients determined for CO{sub 2}, CO, SO{sub 2}, and NO have been compared with their corresponding values as obtained in the studies conducted by other groups. The total emissions of CO{sub 2}, CO, SO{sub 2}, and NO calculated on the basis of the emission coefficients for the year 2003-2004 have been found to be 465.667, 1.583, 4.058, and 1.129 Tg, respectively.

  1. The emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O during the combustion of coal blends in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelha, P.; Boavida, D.; Gulyurtlu, I.; Cabrita, I.

    1999-07-01

    Combustion studies of five coals of different origins around the world (Colombia, Spain, South Africa and the US), were carried out in a laboratory scale fluidized bed combustor. Five blends prepared by mixing two coals, in three varying amounts, based on their petrological characterization, were selected to study the possibility of reduction NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} emissions. Temperature, fuel ratio and N/C ratio were found to be the most important parameters affecting NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O emissions among the single coals, while fuel-S content was the major factor in SO{sub 2} emissions. The results showed that some blends had the opposite behavior concerning the release of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} in relation to parent coals, and the emissions were higher than expected. The N{sub 2}O amounts observed were however, in almost all blends tested, lower than predicted values. With some blends, the mixing levels intended to reduce SO{sub 2} were not always found to correspond to those for simultaneous decrease of NO{sub x}, raising difficulties in the optimization of both emission levels. Most of the blends studied showed some evidence of interaction between the individual constituent coals. Varying the proportion of the blend components was observed to alter the temperatures at which interactions were stronger.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and adsorptive performance of MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres for SO{sub 2} removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Ling [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li Xinyong, E-mail: xyli@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Zhao Qidong; Qu Zhenping; Yuan Deling [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu Shaomin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Hu Xijun; Chen Guohua [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-12-15

    A type of uniform Mg ferrite nanospheres with excellent SO{sub 2} adsorption capacity could be selectively synthesized via a facile solvothermal method. The size of the MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres was controlled to be 300-400 nm in diameter. The structural, textural, and surface properties of the adsorbent have been fully characterized by a variety of techniques (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, BET; X-ray diffraction analysis, XRD; scanning electron microscopy, SEM; and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, EDS). The valence states and the surface chemical compositions of MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres were further identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The behaviors of SO{sub 2} oxidative adsorption on MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres were studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Both the sulfite and sulfate species could be formed on the surface of MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm of SO{sub 2} was analyzed using a volumetric method at 298 K and 473 K. The results indicate that MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres possess a good potential as the solid-state SO{sub 2} adsorbent for applications in hot fuel gas desulfurization.

  3. Electron beam non-thermal plasma hybrid system for reduction of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions from power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaroiu, Gh [Department of Power Plants, University Polytechnic of Bucharest, 313 Splaiul Independentei Street, 060042 Bucharest (Romania); Zissulescu, E [ICPET ECO SA Bucharest, 104 Berceni Street, 041912 Bucharest (Romania); Sandu, M [Technical University of Civil Engineering of Bucharest, 124 Lacul Tei Street, 020396 Bucharest (Romania); Roscia, M [University of Bergamo, 5 Marconi Street, 24044 Dalmine, Bergamo (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    In this paper an installation containing a negative corona discharge (DC) reactor, a pulse corona discharge reactor and a combined electron beam (EB) and microwave induced plasma reactor is presented. SO{sub 2} is removed up to 42% through spontaneous reaction with ammonia without EB or microwave irradiation at the temperature below 70{sup o}C. Considering the values of the removal efficiencies of 98% for SO{sub 2} and 80% for NO{sub x} applying separate EB irradiation with a dose of 40 kGy, when the simultaneous EB and microwave irradiation is applied, the required absorbed dose is about two times smaller. The SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of simultaneous DC or positive discharge and microwave discharge is higher than separate corona discharge, pulse and microwave discharge. Also, the applied voltage level at which the removal efficiency reaches the maximum value is less than that for the separate application of corona discharge or pulse discharge. The NO{sub x} removal efficiency of DC or pulse discharge suffers little change by additional use of the microwave energy. Based on this research and the results obtained by a pilot project built in collaboration with Electrostatica Bucharest, a project for an installation involving simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal by irradiation with accelerated EBs and microwaves, has been proposed for Thermo-Power Plant CET-West-Bucharest of 550 MW. (author)

  4. Laser cooling of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Petrushkin, S V

    2009-01-01

    Laser cooling is an important emerging technology in such areas as the cooling of semiconductors. The book examines and suggests solutions for a range of problems in the development of miniature solid-state laser refrigerators, self-cooling solid-state lasers and optical echo-processors. It begins by looking at the basic theory of laser cooling before considering such topics as self-cooling of active elements of solid-state lasers, laser cooling of solid-state information media of optical echo-processors, and problems of cooling solid-state quantum processors. Laser Cooling of Solids is an important contribution to the development of compact laser-powered cryogenic refrigerators, both for the academic community and those in the microelectronics and other industries. Provides a timely review of this promising field of research and discusses the fundamentals and theory of laser cooling Particular attention is given to the physics of cooling processes and the mathematical description of these processes Reviews p...

  5. Emergency reactor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Ken.

    1993-01-01

    An emergency nuclear reactor cooling device comprises a water reservoir, emergency core cooling water pipelines having one end connected to a water feeding sparger, fire extinguishing facility pipelines, cooling water pressurizing pumps, a diesel driving machine for driving the pumps and a battery. In a water reservoir, cooling water is stored by an amount required for cooling the reactor upon emergency and for fire extinguishing, and fire extinguishing facility pipelines connecting the water reservoir and the fire extinguishing facility are in communication with the emergency core cooling water pipelines connected to the water feeding sparger by system connection pipelines. Pumps are operated by a diesel power generator to introduce cooling water from the reservoir to the emergency core cooling water pipelines. Then, even in a case where AC electric power source is entirely lost and the emergency core cooling system can not be used, the diesel driving machine is operated using an exclusive battery, thereby enabling to inject cooling water from the water reservoir to a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container by the diesel drive pump. (N.H.)

  6. Calcium oxide doped sorbents for CO{sub 2} uptake in the presence of SO{sub 2} at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H.; Smirniotis, P.G. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2009-06-15

    There is an urgent need to understand sorbent tolerance for capturing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the presence of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Sulfur oxide is emitted together with CO{sub 2} from various combustion systems and can cause severe air pollution. In this study, the behavior of different dopants on the performance of calcium oxide (CaO) sorbent for capturing CO{sub 2} in the presence of SO{sub 2} was investigated. Three main sets of experiments were carried out to study carbonation and sulfation both separately and simultaneously using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The results show that SO{sub 2} reduced the capability of the sorbents for capturing CO{sub 2} because of the competition between carbonation and sulfation reactions. Formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) and calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) took place upon carbonation and sulfation, respectively. Our TGA and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicate that the carbonation is totally reversible, while this is not the case with the sulfation. The permanent residual weight gained by the sorbents during the course of sulfation is attributed to the irreversible formation of sulfate species, which is confirmed by both the TGA and XPS results. The Ce promoted CaO sorbent exhibits the best performance for CO{sub 2} capture and is the most SO{sub 2} tolerant sorbent. On the other hand, the Mn doped dopant has the strongest affinity for SO{sub 2}.

  7. Synthesis and physico-chemical characterization of CeO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} mixed oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez E, J. M.; Silva R, R.; Garcia A, R. [Instituto Tecnologico de Ciudad Madero, Div. de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Juventino Rosas y Jesus Urueta s/n, Col. Los Mangos, 89440 Ciudad Madero, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Garcia S, L. A. [IPN, Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigaciones y de Estudios sobre Medio Ambiente y Desarrollo, 30 de Junio No. 1520, Barrio La Laguna Ticoman, 07340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Handy, B. E.; Cardenas G, G. [Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, CIEP, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Av. Dr. Manuel Nava No. 6, Zona Universitaria, 78210 SLP, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Cueto H, A. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    Environmentally friendly solid-acid catalysts CeO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} were prepared by the sol gel method varying CeO{sub 2} content (10, 20 and 30 wt %) and using sulfation in situ, maintaining the sulfate ions amount present in the materials at 20 wt %. ZrO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} were also prepared for comparison proposes using the same synthesis method. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen physisorption, potentiometric titration with n-butylamine, decomposition of 2-propanol and n-pentane isomerization. The specific surface area of ZrO{sub 2}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} was high (160 m{sup 2}/g) compared with the unmodified ZrO{sub 2} (80 m{sup 2}/g), however this area decreased with increasing the CeO{sub 2} content (37-100 m{sup 2}/g). There was no significant effect of CeO{sub 2} on the tetragonal structure of ZrO{sub 2}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. The variation of acid sites amount runs parallel to the change of specific surface area. The acid sites amount decreased with increasing cerium oxide content. The decomposition of 2-propanol results fundamentally in the formation of dehydration products such as propylene and diisopropyl ether, both involving acid sites. In addition, a good performance during the n-pentane isomerization was observed for these materials. The selectivity towards isopentane reaches 84% when the Pt/CeO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} catalyst with the highest CeO{sub 2} content was used. (Author)

  8. Spectroscopic study on the intermolecular interaction of SO{sub 2} absorption in poly-ethylene glycol+H{sub 2}O systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jinrong; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhang, Na [Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Huhhot (China)

    2014-03-15

    Poly-Ethylene Glycol (PEG) 300+H{sub 2}O solutions (PEGWs) has been used as a promising medium for the absorption of SO{sub 2}. We investigated the UV, FTIR, {sup 1}H-NMR, and fluorescence spectra in the absorption processes of SO{sub 2} in PEGWs to present an important absorption mechanism. Based on the spectral results, the possibility of intermolecular hydrogen bond formation by hydroxyl oxygen atom in the PEG molecule with hydrogen atom in H{sub 2}O and S…O interaction formation by the oxygen atoms in PEG with the sulfur atom in SO{sub 2} are discussed. This shows that the spectral changes may be due to the formation of -CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O(H)…HOH… and -CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-O(CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-)…HOH… in PEGWs and the formation of -CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH…OSO…, and intermolecular S…O interaction between PEG and SO{sub 2} as the formation of -CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O(H)…(O)S(O)… and -CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-O(CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-) …(O)S(O)…. The existence of these bonds benefits the absorption and desorption processes of SO{sub 2} in PEGWs.

  9. Polyacrylamide+Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and polyacrylamide+CaO remove coliform bacteria and nutrients from swine wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entry, J.A.; Phillips, Ian; Stratton, Helen; Sojka, R.E

    2003-03-01

    Polyacrylamide mixture may be able to reduce run-off of enteric bacteria from animal wastes. - Animal wastes are a major contributor of nutrients and enteric microorganisms to surface water and ground water. Polyacrylamide (PAM) mixtures are an effective flocculent, and we hypothesized that they would reduce transport of microorganisms in flowing water. After waste water running at 60.0 l min{sup -1} flowed over PAM+Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, or PAM+CaO in furrows, total coliform bacteria (TC) and fecal coliform bacteria (FC) were reduced by 30-50% at 1 and 50 m downstream of the treatments compared to the control. In a column study, PAM+Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, and PAM+CaO applied to sandy, sandy loam, loam, and clay soils reduced NH{sub 4}{sup +} and ortho-P concentrations in leachate compared to the source waste water and the control. PAM+Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and PAM+CaO applied to sandy, sandy loam and loam soils reduced both total and ortho-P, concentrations in leachate compared to the source wastewater and control treatment. In a field study, PAM+Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, or PAM+CaO treatments did not consistently reduce NH{sub 4}{sup +}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, ortho-P, and total P concentrations in wastewater flowing over any soil compared to inflow wastewater or the control treatment. With proper application PAM+ Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and PAM+CaO may be able to reduce the numbers of enteric bacteria in slowly flowing wastewater running off animal confinement areas, reducing the amount of pollutants entering surface water and groundwater.

  10. Radiant Floor Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries, hydronic radiant floor systems are widely used for heating all types of buildings such as residential, churches, gymnasiums, hospitals, hangars, storage buildings, industrial buildings, and smaller offices. However, few systems are used for cooling.This article describes a floor...... cooling system that includes such considerations as thermal comfort of the occupants, which design parameters will influence the cooling capacity and how the system should be controlled. Examples of applications are presented....

  11. The cooling of particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    A review is given of the various methods which can be employed for cooling particle beams. These methods include radiation damping, stimulated radiation damping, ionization cooling, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, laser cooling, and laser cooling with beam coupling. Laser Cooling has provided beams of the lowest temperatures, namely 1 mK, but only for ions and only for the longitudinal temperature. Recent theoretical work has suggested how laser cooling, with the coupling of beam motion, can be used to reduce the ion beam temperature in all three directions. The majority of this paper is devoted to describing laser cooling and laser cooling with beam coupling

  12. Turbine airfoil cooling system with cooling systems using high and low pressure cooling fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jan H.; Messmann, Stephen John; Scribner, Carmen Andrew

    2017-10-25

    A turbine airfoil cooling system including a low pressure cooling system and a high pressure cooling system for a turbine airfoil of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, the low pressure cooling system may be an ambient air cooling system, and the high pressure cooling system may be a compressor bleed air cooling system. In at least one embodiment, the compressor bleed air cooling system in communication with a high pressure subsystem that may be a snubber cooling system positioned within a snubber. A delivery system including a movable air supply tube may be used to separate the low and high pressure cooling subsystems. The delivery system may enable high pressure cooling air to be passed to the snubber cooling system separate from low pressure cooling fluid supplied by the low pressure cooling system to other portions of the turbine airfoil cooling system.

  13. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  14. Semioptimal practicable algorithmic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2011-01-01

    Algorithmic cooling (AC) of spins applies entropy manipulation algorithms in open spin systems in order to cool spins far beyond Shannon's entropy bound. Algorithmic cooling of nuclear spins was demonstrated experimentally and may contribute to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Several cooling algorithms were suggested in recent years, including practicable algorithmic cooling (PAC) and exhaustive AC. Practicable algorithms have simple implementations, yet their level of cooling is far from optimal; exhaustive algorithms, on the other hand, cool much better, and some even reach (asymptotically) an optimal level of cooling, but they are not practicable. We introduce here semioptimal practicable AC (SOPAC), wherein a few cycles (typically two to six) are performed at each recursive level. Two classes of SOPAC algorithms are proposed and analyzed. Both attain cooling levels significantly better than PAC and are much more efficient than the exhaustive algorithms. These algorithms are shown to bridge the gap between PAC and exhaustive AC. In addition, we calculated the number of spins required by SOPAC in order to purify qubits for quantum computation. As few as 12 and 7 spins are required (in an ideal scenario) to yield a mildly pure spin (60% polarized) from initial polarizations of 1% and 10%, respectively. In the latter case, about five more spins are sufficient to produce a highly pure spin (99.99% polarized), which could be relevant for fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  15. Cooling of electronic equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    Cooling of electronic equipment is studied. The design size of electronic equipment decrease causing the thermal density to increase. This affect the cooling which can cause for example failures of critical components due to overheating or thermal induced stresses. Initially a pin fin heat sink...

  16. Solar absorption cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    As the world concerns more and more on global climate changes and depleting energy resources, solar cooling technology receives increasing interests from the public as an environment-friendly and sustainable alternative. However, making a competitive solar cooling machine for the market still

  17. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakilian, M.

    1977-05-01

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  18. Coherent electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-05-04

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is still too feeble, while the efficiency of two other cooling methods, stochastic and electron, falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic of protons) or at high energies (e-cooling). In this talk a specific scheme of a unique cooling technique, Coherent Electron Cooling, will be discussed. The idea of coherent electron cooling using electron beam instabilities was suggested by Derbenev in the early 1980s, but the scheme presented in this talk, with cooling times under an hour for 7 TeV protons in the LHC, would be possible only with present-day accelerator technology. This talk will discuss the principles and the main limitations of the Coherent Electron Cooling process. The talk will describe the main system components, based on a high-gain free electron laser driven by an energy recovery linac, and will present some numerical examples for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC and for electron-hadron options for these colliders. BNL plans a demonstration of the idea in the near future.

  19. The final cool down

    CERN Multimedia

    Thursday 29th May, the cool-down of the final sector (sector 4-5) of LHC has begun, one week after the start of the cool-down of sector 1-2. It will take five weeks for the sectors to be cooled from room temperature to 5 K and a further two weeks to complete the cool down to 1.9 K and the commissioning of cryogenic instrumentation, as well as to fine tune the cryogenic plants and the cooling loops of cryostats.Nearly a year and half has passed since sector 7-8 was cooled for the first time in January 2007. For Laurent Tavian, AT/CRG Group Leader, reaching the final phase of the cool down is an important milestone, confirming the basic design of the cryogenic system and the ability to operate complete sectors. “All the sectors have to operate at the same time otherwise we cannot inject the beam into the machine. The stability and reliability of the cryogenic system and its utilities are now very important. That will be the new challenge for the coming months,” he explains. The status of the cool down of ...

  20. Reduction of SO{sub 2} Emissions in coal power plants by means of spray-drying RESOX; Reduccion de Emisiones de SO{sub 2} en Centrales Termicas de Carbon Mediante Spary Drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    In this experimental study, two important matters concerning the spray-drying technology for the desulphurisation of combustion gases, from pulverized coal boilers, have been analyzed: (1) the behaviour of the spray-dryer absorber under different operating conditions and (2) the behaviour of an electrostatic precipitator that operates downstream from a spray-dryer. The results of this project are of great interest for evaluating the application of this semi-dry desulphurisation technology in existing power plants that already have electrostatic precipitators. Additionally, the conclusions drawn are useful for establishing the optimum design and operating conditions for an integrated SD-ESP flue gas treatment facility. More than 45 experimental tests have been conducted on a 10,000 Nm``3/h spray-drying desulphurisation pilot plant. The effects of SO{sub 2} and fly ash concentration, Ca/s ratio, approach to saturation temperature, density of the slurry and unit load changes on both spray dryer behaviour and treated flue gas properties have been analyzed. In two additional specific tests, the effect of injecting calcium chloride and of preparing the slurry with seawater has also been studied. The impact of spray-dryer desulphurization on the behaviour of the electrostatic precipitators has been evaluated comparing experimental data (Efficiency, emission level, electrical consumption) for the behaviour of the electrostatic precipitator, obtained in two different experimental conditions: with and without desulphurization. Additionally, the possibility of reducing the power consumption of the precipitator by means of intermittent energization has been analyzed. (Author)

  1. Reactor core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To safely and effectively cool down the reactor core after it has been shut down but is still hot due to after-heat. Constitution: Since the coolant extraction nozzle is situated at a location higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the coolant sprayed from the nozzle, is free from sucking immediately from the extraction nozzle and is therefore used effectively to cool the reactor core. As all the portions from the top to the bottom of the reactor are cooled simultaneously, the efficiency of the reactor cooling process is increased. Since the coolant extraction nozzle can be installed at a point considerably higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the distance from the coolant surface to the point of the coolant extraction nozzle can be made large, preventing cavitation near the coolant extraction nozzle. Therefore, without increasing the capacity of the heat exchanger, the reactor can be cooled down after a shutdown safely and efficiently. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, J.

    1986-08-01

    The topics discussed are the stochastic cooling systems in use at Fermilab and some of the techniques that have been employed to meet the particular requirements of the anti-proton source. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab became of paramount importance about 5 years ago when the anti-proton source group at Fermilab abandoned the electron cooling ring in favor of a high flux anti-proton source which relied solely on stochastic cooling to achieve the phase space densities necessary for colliding proton and anti-proton beams. The Fermilab systems have constituted a substantial advance in the techniques of cooling including: large pickup arrays operating at microwave frequencies, extensive use of cryogenic techniques to reduce thermal noise, super-conducting notch filters, and the development of tools for controlling and for accurately phasing the system

  3. Cooled-Spool Piston Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed cooled-spool piston compressor driven by hydraulic power and features internal cooling of piston by flowing hydraulic fluid to limit temperature of compressed gas. Provides sufficient cooling for higher compression ratios or reactive gases. Unlike conventional piston compressors, all parts of compressed gas lie at all times within relatively short distance of cooled surface so that gas cooled more effectively.

  4. Mifepristone inhibits MPA-and FGF2-induced mammary tumor growth but not FGF2-induced mammary hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Cerliani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a crosstalk between fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 and progestins inducing experimental breast cancer growth. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of FGF2 and of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA on the mouse mammary glands and to investigate whether the antiprogestin RU486 was able to reverse the MPA- or FGF2-induced effects on both, mammary gland and tumor growth. We demonstrate that FGF2 administered locally induced an intraductal hyperplasia that was not reverted by RU486, suggesting that FGF2-induced effects are progesterone receptor (PR-independent. However, MPA-induced paraductal hyperplasia was reverted by RU486 and a partial agonistic effect was observed in RU486-treated glands. Using C4-HD tumors which only grow in the presence of MPA, we showed that FGF2 administered intratumorally was able to stimulate tumor growth as MPA. The histology of FGF2-treated tumors showed different degrees of gland differentiation. RU486 inhibited both, MPA or FGF2 induced tumor growth. However, only complete regression was observed in MPA-treated tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that stromal FGF2 activates PR inducing hormone independent tumor growth.

  5. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of PEDOT/PSS/Te composite films treated with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Haijun; Cai, Kefeng, E-mail: kfcai@tongji.edu.cn [Tongji University, Key Laboratory of Advanced Civil Engineering Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Shen, Shirley [CSIRO Manufacturing (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    Firstly, tellurium (Te) nanorods with a high Seebeck coefficient have been integrated into a conducting polymer PEDOT/PSS to form PEDOT/PSS/Te composite films. The Seebeck coefficient of the PEDOT/PSS/Te (90 wt.%) composite films is ~191 μV/K, which is about 13 times greater than that of pristine PEDOT/PSS. Then, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} treatment has been used to further tune the thermoelectric properties of the composite films by adjusting the doping level and increasing the carrier concentration. After the acid treatment, the electrical conductivity of the composite films has increased from 0.22 to 1613 S/cm due to the removal of insulating PSS and the structural rearrangement of PEDOT. An optimized power factor of 42.1 μW/mK{sup 2} has been obtained at room temperature for a PEDOT/PSS/Te (80 wt.%) sample, which is about ten times larger than that of the untreated PEDOT/PSS/Te composite film.

  6. Modeling of the fluid dynamics and SO{sub 2} absorption in a gas-liquid reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marocco, L. [Alstom Power Italy, Milan (Italy)

    2010-08-01

    This paper illustrates a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model of a counter-current Open Spray Tower desulphurisation reactor and its application in the simulation of a full-scale industrial equipment. The raw flue gas flows upward while a suspension of water and limestone is sprayed downward from different heights. Thereby sulfur dioxide is washed out of the gas. The two-phase gas-liquid flow inside the equipment has been simulated with an Euler-Lagrange approach using a commercial CFD code, while a model for the SO{sub 2} absorption has been developed and implemented in the software through dedicated modules. Physical absorption is modeled using dual-film theory and appropriate empirical and semi-empirical correlations. The aqueous phase chemistry accounts for the instantaneous equilibrium reactions of eight dissolved species into a slurry droplet. The model is used to simulate an industrial plant at different operating conditions. The numerical results are in good agreement with the measured values of pressure drop and sulphur removal efficiency.

  7. Second sector cool down

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    At the beginning of July, cool-down is starting in the second LHC sector, sector 4-5. The cool down of sector 4-5 may occasionally generate mist at Point 4, like that produced last January (photo) during the cool-down of sector 7-8.Things are getting colder in the LHC. Sector 7-8 has been kept at 1.9 K for three weeks with excellent stability (see Bulletin No. 16-17 of 16 April 2007). The electrical tests in this sector have got opt to a successful start. At the beginning of July the cryogenic teams started to cool a second sector, sector 4-5. At Point 4 in Echenevex, where one of the LHC’s cryogenic plants is located, preparations for the first phase of the cool-down are underway. During this phase, the sector will first be cooled to 80 K (-193°C), the temperature of liquid nitrogen. As for the first sector, 1200 tonnes of liquid nitrogen will be used for the cool-down. In fact, the nitrogen circulates only at the surface in the ...

  8. Dry well cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki.

    1997-01-01

    A plurality of blowing ports with introduction units are disposed to a plurality of ducts in a dry well, and a cooling unit comprising a cooler, a blower and an isolating valve is disposed outside of the dry well. Cooling air and the atmosphere in the dry well are mixed to form a cooling gas and blown into the dry well to control the temperature. Since the cooling unit is disposed outside of the dry well, the maintenance of the cooling unit can be performed even during the plant operation. In addition, since dampers opened/closed depending on the temperature of the atmosphere are disposed to the introduction units for controlling the temperature of the cooling gas, the temperature of the atmosphere in the dry well can be set to a predetermined level rapidly. Since an axial flow blower is used as the blower of the cooling unit, it can be contained in a ventilation cylinder. Then, the atmosphere in the dry well flowing in the ventilation cylinder can be prevented from leaking to the outside. (N.H.)

  9. On the mechanisms of the corrosion of weathering steel by SO{sub 2} in laboratory studies: influence of the environmental parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco, J. F., E-mail: jfmarco@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física “Rocasolano”, CSIC (Spain)

    2017-11-15

    We report here on the mechanisms underlying the corrosion of weathering steel in accelerated laboratory tests using artificially polluted SO{sub 2}-atmospheres. The role of corrosion parameters such as the SO{sub 2} concentration, the exposure time, the relative humidity and temperature of the environment are discussed in detail. Through the extensive use of Mössbauer spectroscopy in both its transmission and electron detection modes, as well as with the help of other analysis techniques, the characterization of the different corrosion products at the various stages of the corrosion process has been carried out. The results complement the data obtained in field studies and help to understand the mechanisms involved in this complex phenomenon.

  10. Cooling towers: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, M.O.

    1981-02-01

    This bibliography cites 300 selected references containing information on various aspects of large cooling tower technology, including design, construction, operation, performance, economics, and environmental effects. The towers considered include natural-draft and mechanical-draft types employing wet, dry, or combination wet-dry cooling. A few references deal with alternative cooling methods, principally ponds or spray canals. The citations were compiled for the DOE Energy Information Data Base (EDB) covering the period January to December 1980. The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators

  11. History of nuclear cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuerti, M.

    1998-01-01

    The historical development of producing extreme low temperatures by magnetic techniques is overviewed. With electron spin methods, temperatures down to 1 mK can be achieved. With nuclear spins theoretically 10 -9 K can be produced. The idea of cooling with nuclear demagnetization is not new, it is a logical extension of the concept of electron cooling. Using nuclear demagnetization experiment with 3 T water cooled solenoids 3 mK could be produced. The cold record is held by Olli Lounasmaa in Helsinki with temperatures below 10 -9 K. (R.P.)

  12. Hydrophilic and mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 3}H system for fuel cell membrane applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Lan-Young [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Chungnam National University, 220 Kung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Song-Yul [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Matsuda, Atsunori, E-mail: matsuda@ee.tut.ac.j [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Lee, Chang-Soo [Department of Chemical Engineering, Chungnam National University, 220 Kung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Pyo, E-mail: dpkim@cnu.ac.k [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Chungnam National University, 220 Kung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Analytical Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, 220 Kung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-30

    Graphical abstract: The composite films containing SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 3}H resin additives, with strong water retention capabilities, showed superior proton conductivity, even at 120 {sup o}C and 25% RH, as well as a slightly improved current density at 30% RH and 70 {sup o}C, when compared to costly Nafion film. Display Omitted Research highlights: The hydrophilic and mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 3}H resins have a potential to be used as alternative membrane source materials in PEFCs. The sulfonation for hydrophilicity is conducted via simple chelating chemistry between catecholic groups and surface Ti ions. The proton conductivity of SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 3}H composite films is superior to the commercial Nafion film. - Abstract: Hydrophilic and mesoporous sulfonated SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 3}H systems as new additives for fuel cell electrolyte membranes are directly synthesized by the binary sol-gel reaction of TEOS-TiCl{sub 4} and consecutive sulfonation with a hydrophilic generator, dihydroxy-m-benzenedisulfonic acid disodium salt. The sulfonation approach makes use of the simple chelating chemistry between the catecholic groups (dihydroxy benzene) and surface Ti ions of the inorganic ordered mesoporous SBA-15 structure. The system is successfully employed in fuel cell membrane applications with a composite Nafion membrane mixed with a mesoporous hydrophilic resin additive, and reveals an obvious enhancement of the proton conductivity at low humidity and elevated temperatures. This improvement was attributed to the excellent water retention capability of the hydrophilic mesoporous resin.

  13. Prediction of SO{sub 2} pollution incidents near a power station using partially linear models and an historical matrix of predictor-response vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prada-Sanchez, J.M.; Febrero-Bande, M.; Gonzalez-Manteiga, W. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dept. de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Costos-Yanez, T. [Universidad de Vigo, Dept. de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Orense (Spain); Bermudez-Cela, J.L.; Lucas-Dominguez, T. [Laboratorio, Central Termica de As Pontes, La Coruna (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Atmospheric SO{sub 2} concentrations at sampling stations near the fossil fuel fired power station at As Pontes (La Coruna, Spain) were predicted using a model for the corresponding time series consisting of a self-explicative term and a linear combination of exogenous variables. In a supplementary simulation study, models of this kind behaved better than the corresponding pure self-explicative or pure linear regression models. (Author)

  14. Emission of NO and SO{sub 2} in a 300 kW pilot scale O{sub 2}/RFG Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tai; Liu, Zhaohui; Huang, Xiaohong; Liu, Jingzhang; Wang, Dingbang; Zheng, Chuguang [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion

    2013-07-01

    The present work was addressed toward the NO and SO{sub 2} emission results on a 300 kW pilot scale facility, and discussed the impact of the different flue gas recycle ratios on the O{sub 2}/RFG coal combustion. In this study, a Chinese lean coal was burned with air and three kinds of O{sub 2}/RFG conditions in the pilot scale oxy-fuel coal combustion facility. The composition of the flue gas was sampled and analyzed by the FT/IR gas analyzer. The ashes were sampled in different place and analyzed to study the burnout rate and the mineral transformation. And in-furnace limestone injection under the air and oxy-fuel condition was used to study the desulfurization efficiency. The comparison was made between the air combustion and O{sub 2}/RFG combustion. It can be seen that NOx emissions decrease significantly (296 mg/MJ for air-firing, 80-145 mg/MJ for oxy-firing), compared with the air condition and three kind of oxy-fuel condition. It can be seen that the low NO{sub x} characteristic of the Oxy-fuel combustion causes lower emission of NO compared with the air combustion. For the emission of SO{sub 2}, Fuel-S to SO{sub 2} conversion rate dropped from 77% in air to 50% under O{sub 2}/RFG condition. And the desulfurization efficiencies of the air combustion and O{sub 2}/RFG combustion were 28.4 and 59.1%, respectively. The contribution of SO{sub 2} enriched in the flue gas to the desulfurization efficiency was more than the contribution of increased reactivity of the limestone. By the analyzing of the ash, it was the similar between the air combustion and O{sub 2}/RFG combustion.

  15. European intercomparison workshops on air quality monitoring. Vol. 4. Measuring NO, NO{sub 2}, O{sub 3} and SO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muecke, H.G.; Kollar, M. [Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany). WHO-Zentrum zur Ueberwachung der Luftguete und Bekaempfung der Luftverschmutzung; Kratz, M.; Medem, A.; Rudolf, W.; Stummer, V.; Sukale, G. [Umweltbundesamt, Langen (Germany). UBA Pilotstation

    2000-07-01

    This report presents the results of two European Intercomparison Workshops on Air Quality Monitoring (NO, NO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and SO{sub 2}). The Workshops were a contribution to continuing quality assurance and quality control activities on air quality monitoring for Member States of the WHO European Region. Fourteen institutes mainly from Central and Eastern Europe used the opportunity to compare their measurement methods (15 manual methods and 24 monitors) and standards. (orig.)

  16. Preparation of {sup 35}SO{sub 4}H{sub 2} and of some other {sup 35}S labeled mineral compounds; Preparation de {sup 35}SO{sub 4}H{sub 2} et de quelques autres composes mineraux simples marques a {sup 35}S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Gueronniere, E; Henry, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Methods of preparation, from pile irradiated KCI, of the following labeled molecules are described: - carrier free H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} - SCd (100 m curies/milli mole) - solution of SNa{sub 2} (100 m curies/milli mole) - solution of SK{sub 2} (100 m curies/milli mole) - S metalloid (100 m curies/milli mole) - SO{sub 3}Na{sub 2} (90 m curies/milli mole) - S{sub 2}C{sub 3}Na{sub 2} (50 m curies/mammalia). (author) [French] On decrit les methodes de preparation, a partir de KCl irradie dans les piles, des molecules suivantes marquees au {sup 35}S: - SO{sub 4}H{sub 2} (sans entraineur) - SCd (100 mcuries/millimole) - solution de SNa{sub 2} (100 mcuries/millimole) - solution de SK{sub 2} (100 mcuries/millimole) - S metalloide (100 mcuries/millimole) - Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3} (90 mcuries/millimole) - Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}C{sub 3} (50 mcuries/milIimole). (auteur)

  17. The Effect of Temperature, pH and SO/sub 2/ on Ethanol Concentration and Sugar Consumption Rate (SCR) in Apple Wine Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoglu, M. D.; Ertunc, S.; Akay, B.; Vural, N.; Hapoglu, H.; Demirci, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of operating parameters on ethanol concentration (ethanol) in apple wine production process. Examined parameters were temperature (T), pH and sulphur dioxide concentration (SO/sub 2/). Experiments were planned and executed according to a full two-level factorial experimental design method. The studied levels were 18 degree C and 25 degree C for temperature, 3 and 4 for pH and 50 and 150 ppm for SO/sub 2/. Ethanol concentration of apple wine for each set of experiments was determined by GC/MS. Experimental data were analyzed by using both graphical and quantitative Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) Techniques. The main effect of each factor on sugar consumption rate (SCR) was also examined. The results show that the effect of examined operating parameters on ethanol was negative. High temperature level caused faster fermentation rate than the one caused by low temperature. Low level of pH and high level of SO/sub 2/ inhibited the activities of both harmful microorganisms and wine yeast. (author)

  18. Microbial analysis of meatballs cooled with vacuum and conventional cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Hande Mutlu; Ozturk, Harun Kemal; Koçar, Gunnur

    2017-08-01

    Vacuum cooling is a rapid evaporative cooling technique and can be used for pre-cooling of leafy vegetables, mushroom, bakery, fishery, sauces, cooked food, meat and particulate foods. The aim of this study was to apply the vacuum cooling and the conventional cooling techniques for the cooling of the meatball and to show the vacuum pressure effect on the cooling time, the temperature decrease and microbial growth rate. The results of the vacuum cooling and the conventional cooling (cooling in the refrigerator) were compared with each other for different temperatures. The study shows that the conventional cooling was much slower than the vacuum cooling. Moreover, the microbial growth rate of the vacuum cooling was extremely low compared with the conventional cooling. Thus, the lowest microbial growth occurred at 0.7 kPa and the highest microbial growth was observed at 1.5 kPa for the vacuum cooling. The mass loss ratio for the conventional cooling and vacuum cooling was about 5 and 9% respectively.

  19. Gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Masayuki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable direct cooling of reactor cores thereby improving the cooling efficiency upon accidents. Constitution: A plurality sets of heat exchange pipe groups are disposed around the reactor core, which are connected by way of communication pipes with a feedwater recycling device comprising gas/liquid separation device, recycling pump, feedwater pump and emergency water tank. Upon occurrence of loss of primary coolants accidents, the heat exchange pipe groups directly absorb the heat from the reactor core through radiation and convection. Although the water in the heat exchange pipe groups are boiled to evaporate if the forcive circulation is interrupted by the loss of electric power source, water in the emergency tank is supplied due to the head to the heat exchange pipe groups to continue the cooling. Furthermore, since the heat exchange pipe groups surround the entire circumference of the reactor core, cooling is carried out uniformly without resulting deformation or stresses due to the thermal imbalance. (Sekiya, K.)

  20. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  1. Cooling of wood briquettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Miroljub M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the experimental research of surface temperature of wood briquettes during cooling phase along the cooling line. The cooling phase is an important part of the briquette production technology. It should be performed with care, otherwise the quality of briquettes could deteriorate and possible changes of combustion characteristics of briquettes could happen. The briquette surface temperature was measured with an IR camera and a surface temperature probe at 42 sections. It was found that the temperature of briquette surface dropped from 68 to 34°C after 7 minutes spent at the cooling line. The temperature at the center of briquette, during the 6 hour storage, decreased to 38°C.

  2. Stacking with stochastic cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspers, Fritz E-mail: Fritz.Caspers@cern.ch; Moehl, Dieter

    2004-10-11

    Accumulation of large stacks of antiprotons or ions with the aid of stochastic cooling is more delicate than cooling a constant intensity beam. Basically the difficulty stems from the fact that the optimized gain and the cooling rate are inversely proportional to the number of particles 'seen' by the cooling system. Therefore, to maintain fast stacking, the newly injected batch has to be strongly 'protected' from the Schottky noise of the stack. Vice versa the stack has to be efficiently 'shielded' against the high gain cooling system for the injected beam. In the antiproton accumulators with stacking ratios up to 10{sup 5} the problem is solved by radial separation of the injection and the stack orbits in a region of large dispersion. An array of several tapered cooling systems with a matched gain profile provides a continuous particle flux towards the high-density stack core. Shielding of the different systems from each other is obtained both through the spatial separation and via the revolution frequencies (filters). In the 'old AA', where the antiproton collection and stacking was done in one single ring, the injected beam was further shielded during cooling by means of a movable shutter. The complexity of these systems is very high. For more modest stacking ratios, one might use azimuthal rather than radial separation of stack and injected beam. Schematically half of the circumference would be used to accept and cool new beam and the remainder to house the stack. Fast gating is then required between the high gain cooling of the injected beam and the low gain stack cooling. RF-gymnastics are used to merge the pre-cooled batch with the stack, to re-create free space for the next injection, and to capture the new batch. This scheme is less demanding for the storage ring lattice, but at the expense of some reduction in stacking rate. The talk reviews the 'radial' separation schemes and also gives some

  3. Responses of pink salmon to CO2-induced aquatic acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Michelle; Hamilton, Trevor J.; Eom, Junho; Lyall, Emily M.; Gallup, Joshua; Jiang, Amy; Lee, Jason; Close, David A.; Yun, Sang-Seon; Brauner, Colin J.

    2015-10-01

    Ocean acidification negatively affects many marine species and is predicted to cause widespread changes to marine ecosystems. Similarly, freshwater ecosystems may potentially be affected by climate-change-related acidification; however, this has received far less attention. Freshwater fish represent 40% of all fishes, and salmon, which rear and spawn in freshwater, are of immense ecosystem, economical and cultural importance. In this study, we investigate the impacts of CO2-induced acidification during the development of pink salmon, in freshwater and following early seawater entry. At this critical and sensitive life stage, we show dose-dependent reductions in growth, yolk-to-tissue conversion and maximal O2 uptake capacity; as well as significant alterations in olfactory responses, anti-predator behaviour and anxiety under projected future increases in CO2 levels. These data indicate that future populations of pink salmon may be at risk without mitigation and highlight the need for further studies on the impact of CO2-induced acidification on freshwater systems.

  4. Laser cooling of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  5. Cooling with Superfluid Helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, P; Tavian, L [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    The technical properties of helium II (‘superfluid’ helium) are presented in view of its applications to the cooling of superconducting devices, particularly in particle accelerators. Cooling schemes are discussed in terms of heat transfer performance and limitations. Large-capacity refrigeration techniques below 2 K are reviewed, with regard to thermodynamic cycles as well as process machinery. Examples drawn from existing or planned projects illustrate the presentation. Keywords: superfluid helium, cryogenics.

  6. Reducing air pollution from electricity-generating large combustion plants in the European Union. An assessment of potential emission reductions of NO{sub X}, SO{sub 2} and dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodewijks, P.; Pieper, H.; Van Wortswinkel, L. [ETC partner Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO) (Belgium); Boyce, B.; Adams, M.; Goossens, E. [EEA, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-06-15

    An assessment of potential emission reductions of NO{sub X}, SO{sub 2} and dust - This report presents an assessment of the hypothetical emission reduction potential of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and dust from more than 1 500 of Europe's large combustion plants that operated in 2009. Emissions of these air pollutants could be significantly lower if all plants were to meet the emission limit values as set out in European Union legislation. (Author)

  7. Protective performances of two anti-graffiti treatments towards sulfite and sulfate formation in SO{sub 2} polluted model environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona-Quiroga, Paula Maria, E-mail: paulacq@ietcc.csic.es [Eduardo Torroja Institute for Construction Science, Serrano Galvache 4 St, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Panas, Itai; Svensson, Jan-Erik; Johansson, Lars-Gunnar [Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Goethenburg (Sweden); Blanco-Varela, Maria Teresa; Martinez-Ramirez, Sagrario [Eduardo Torroja Institute for Construction Science, Serrano Galvache 4 St, 28033 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Specific strategies for protection are being developed to counter both the staining and corrosive effects of polluted air in cities, as well as to allow for efficient removal of unwanted graffiti paintings. These protection strategies employ molecules with tailored functionalities, e.g. being hydrophobic, while maintaining porosity for molecular water vapour permeation. The present study employs SO{sub 2} and water to probe the behaviors of two anti-graffiti treatments, a water-base fluoroalkylsiloxane ('Protectosil Antigraffiti' marketed by Degussa) and an organically modified silicate (Ormosil) synthesized from a polymer chain (polydimethyl siloxane, PDMS) and two network forming alkoxides (Zr propoxide and methyl triethoxy silane, MTES) dissolved in n-propanol, on five building materials, comprising limestone, aged lime mortar, hydrated cement mortar, granite, and brick material. The materials were exposed to a synthetic atmosphere for 20 h in a climate chamber, 0.78 {+-} 0.03 ppm of SO{sub 2} and 95% RH. Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared (DR-FTIR) spectra were registered before and after exposure in the climate chamber in the cases of both treated and untreated samples. DR-FTIR, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses, suggest the anti-graffiti Ormosil to suppress formation of calcium sulfite hemihydrate (the primary initial product of the reaction of calcium compounds with SO{sub 2} and water) on carbonate materials (limestone and lime mortar). In case of the granite, brick and cement mortar, Ormosil has a negligible influence on the SO{sub 2} capture. While no sulfite formation was detected by DR-FTIR, gypsum is inferred to form due to metal oxides and minority compounds catalysed oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. In case of brick, this understanding finds support from SEM images as well as EDX. A priori presence of gypsum in hydrated cement mortars prevents positive identification by SEM

  8. Effects of O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} on the Capture Capacity of a Primary-Amine Based Polymeric CO{sub 2} Sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallenbeck, Alexander P; Kitchin, John R

    2013-08-01

    Post combustion CO{sub 2} capture is most commonly carried out using an amine solution that results in a high parasitic energy cost in the stripper unit due to the need to heat the water which comprises a majority of the amine solution. It is also well known that amine solvents suffer from stability issues due to amine leaching and poisoning by flue gas impurities. Solid sorbents provide an alternative to solvent systems that would potentially reduce the energy penalty of carbon capture. However, the cost of using a particular sorbent is greatly affected by the usable lifetime of the sorbent. This work investigated the stability of a primary amine-functionalized ion exchange resin in the presence of O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}, both of which are constituents of flue gas that have been shown to cause degradation of various amines in solvent processes. The CO{sub 2} capture capacity was measured over multiple capture cycles under continuous exposure to two simulated flue gas streams, one containing 12 vol% CO{sub 2}, 4% O{sub 2}, 84% N{sub 2}, and the other containing 12.5 vol% CO{sub 2}, 4% O{sub 2}, 431 ppm SO{sub 2}, balance N{sub 2} using a custom-built packed bed reactor. The resin maintained its CO{sub 2} capture capacity of 1.31 mol/kg over 17 capture cycles in the presence of O{sub 2} without SO{sub 2}. However, the CO{sub 2} capture capacity of the resin decreased rapidly under exposure to SO{sub 2} by an amount of 1.3 mol/kg over 9 capture cycles. Elemental analysis revealed the resin adsorbed 1.0 mol/kg of SO{sub 2}. Thermal regeneration was determined to not be possible. The poisoned resin was, however, partially regenerated with exposure to 1.5M NaOH for 3 days resulting in a 43% removal of sulfur, determined through elemental analysis, and a 35% recovery of CO{sub 2} capture capacity. Evidence was also found for amine loss upon prolonged (7 days) continuous exposure to high temperatures (120 C) in air. It is concluded that desulfurization of the flue gas

  9. Comparing Social Stories™ to Cool versus Not Cool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Mitchell, Erin; Townley-Cochran, Donna; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Leaf, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In this study we compared the cool versus not cool procedure to Social Stories™ for teaching various social behaviors to one individual diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The researchers randomly assigned three social skills to the cool versus not cool procedure and three social skills to the Social Stories™ procedure. Naturalistic probes…

  10. Thermal Annealing of Paramagnetic Defects Induced by Gamma Irradiation in (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and (ND{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} Single Crystals: Experimental Verification of the Theory of Fletcher and Brown; Recuit Thermique des Defauts Paramagnetiques Induits par Irradiation Gamma dans des Monocristaux de (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} et (ND{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}: Verification Experimentale de la Theorie de Fletcher et Brown; 0422 0415 0420 041c 0414 ; Regeneracion Termica de los Defectos Paramagneticos Inducidos por Irradiacion Gamma en Monocristales de (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} y (ND{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}: Verificacion Experimental de la Teoria de Fletcher y Brown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calusaru, A.; Barbur, I.; Ursu, I. [Institut de Physique Atomique, Bucarest (Romania); Universite ' Babes' , Cluj (Romania)

    1965-04-15

    In irradiated (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} And (ND{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} crystals two paramagnetic species were identified by means of the electron spin resonance method. The g constant of the first radical is 2.014 and of the second 2.020 for the normal hydrogen compound; for the deuterated compound they are 1.996 and 2.0032 respectively. Study of the annealing of the first radical in the 60 Degree-Sign -170 Degree-Sign C range showed that in this case the kinetics display a single plateau corresponding to a total recombination of the radicals. For each isotherm it was possible to obtain the appropriate equation using the errors function derived by Fletcher and Brown and taking as a model the recombination of initially correlated (and subsequently liberated) pairs by a random-walk process. Agreement between this function and experimental results was obtained after correcting the function by a factor {alpha}. The composite annealing curve is in good agreement with the corrected errors function. Using the phenomenological method of Fletcher and Brown for calculating the activation energy we obtained a value of 1.594 eV, corresponding to the first radical in (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}. On the basis of the variation of the diffusion coefficient with temperature we obtained a value of 1.592 eV for the same activation energy. With the Vand- Primack method we obtained 1.45 eV, which is lower than the two preceding values. We concluded that the recombination of correlated pairs by a random-walk process can be used as a model in the form given by the theory if the interaction between the species formed and the lattice is fairly weak; in this way the pairs which are initially correlated can be liberated. (author) [French] Dans les cristaux irradies de (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} et (ND{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, on a identifie deux especes paramagnetiques en utilisant la methode de resonance du spin electronique. La constante g du premier radical est 2,014, et celle du

  11. Oxidation of SO{sub 2} and formation of water droplets under irradiation of 20 MeV protons in N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/SO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Shigeo [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Nakai, Yoichi, E-mail: nakaiy@riken.jp [Radioactive Isotope Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Funada, Shuhei; Tanikawa, Hideomi; Harayama, Isao [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Kobara, Hitomi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Sasa, Kimikazu [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke [National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hvelplund, Preben [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2015-12-15

    We have performed an experiment on charged droplet formation in a humidified N{sub 2} gas with trace SO{sub 2} concentration and induced by 20 MeV proton irradiation. It is thought that SO{sub 2} reacts with the chemical species, such as OH radicals, generated through the reactions triggered by N{sub 2}{sup +} production. Both droplet number and droplet size increased with SO{sub 2} consumption for the proton irradiation. The total charged droplet numbers entering the differential mobility analyzer per unit time were proportional to the 0.68 power of the SO{sub 2} consumption. These two findings suggest that coagulation among the small droplets contributes to the formation of the droplets. The charged droplet volume detected per unit time is proportional to the SO{sub 2} consumption, which indicates that a constant amount of sulfur atoms is contained in a unit volume of droplet, regardless of different droplet-size distributions depending on the SO{sub 2} consumption.

  12. Porous sulfated metal oxide SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as an anode material for Li-ion batteries with enhanced electrochemical performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhen; Lv, Qianqian; Huang, Xiaoxiong; Tan, Yueyue; Tang, Bohejin, E-mail: tangbohejin@sues.edu.cn [Shanghai University of Engineering Science, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2017-01-15

    Sulfated metal oxide SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was prepared by a novel facile sol–gel method combined with a subsequent heating treatment process. The as-synthesized products were analyzed by XRD, FTIR, and FE-SEM. Compared with the unsulfated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the agglomeration of particles has been alleviated after the incorporation of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}. Interestingly, the primary particle size of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (about 5 nm) is similar to its normal counterparts even after the calcination treatment. More importantly, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits a porous architecture, which is an intriguing feature for electrode materials. When used as anode materials in Li-ion batteries, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} delivered a higher reversible discharge capacity (992 mAh g{sup −1}), with smaller charge transfer resistance, excellent rate performance, and better cycling stability than normal Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We believed that the presence of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and porous architecture should be responsible for the enhanced electrochemical performance, which could provide more continuous and accessible conductive paths for Li{sup +} and electrons.

  13. Characterization of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} modified chitosan membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osifo, Peter O.; Masala, Aluwani [Department of Chemical Engineering, Vaal University of Technology, Andries Potgieter Bolevald, P/Bag X021, Vanderbijlpark 1900, Gauteng (South Africa)

    2010-08-01

    Chitosan (Chs) flakes were prepared from chitin materials that were extracted from the exoskeleton of Cape rock lobsters in South Africa. The Chs flakes were prepared into membranes and the Chs membranes were modified by cross-linking with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The cross-linked Chs membranes were characterized for the application in direct methanol fuel cells. The Chs membrane characteristics such as water uptake, thermal stability, proton resistance and methanol permeability were compared to that of high performance conventional Nafion 117 membranes. Under the temperature range studied 20-60 C, the membrane water uptake for Chs was found to be higher than that of Nafion. Thermal analysis revealed that Chs membranes could withstand temperature as high as 230 C whereas Nafion 117 membranes were stable to 320 C under nitrogen. Nafion 117 membranes were found to exhibit high proton resistance of 284 s cm{sup -1} than Chs membranes of 204 s cm{sup -1}. The proton fluxes across the membranes were 2.73 mol cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for Chs- and 1.12 mol cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} Nafion membranes. Methanol (MeOH) permeability through Chs membrane was less, 1.4 x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} for Chs membranes and 3.9 x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} for Nafion 117 membranes at 20 C. Chs and Nafion membranes were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MAE) and their performances measure in a free-breathing commercial single cell DMFC. The Nafion membranes showed a better performance as the power density determined for Nafion membranes of 0.0075 W cm{sup -2} was 2.7 times higher than in the case of Chs MEA. (author)

  14. Functional MRI of CO2 induced increase in cerebral perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1994-01-01

    The sensitivity of MR gradient echo imaging towards CO2 induced changes in cerebral blood flow was investigated in 10 normal subjects. The subjects were inhaling 5% and 7% CO2 and the experiments were carried out at 1.5 T (n = 6) and 2.0 T (n = 5), allowing a comparison of field strengths....... Additional experiments were carried out using a higher spatial resolution. The largest signal increases were noted in areas corresponding to larger vessels, but significant changes were also conspicuous in deeper cortical and central grey matter. The changes appeared linearly related to the arterial CO2...... tension, within the range of PaCO2 studied. In white matter, the changes were not statistically significant....

  15. Laser cooling of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A qualitative description of laser cooling of neutral atoms is given. Two of the most important mechanisms utilized in laser cooling, the so-called Doppler Cooling and Sisyphus Cooling, are reviewed. The minimum temperature reached by the atoms is derived using simple arguments. (Author) 7 refs

  16. Technology of power plant cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maulbetsch, J.S.; Zeren, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: the thermodynamics of power generation and the need for cooling water; the technical, economic, and legislative constraints within which the cooling problem must be solved; alternate cooling methods currently available or under development; the water treatment requirements of cooling systems; and some alternatives for modifying the physical impact on aquatic systems

  17. Meltdown reactor core cooling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The meltdown reactor core cooling facility comprises a meltdown reactor core cooling tank, a cooling water storage tank situates at a position higher than the meltdown reactor core cooling tank, an upper pipeline connecting the upper portions of the both of the tanks and a lower pipeline connecting the lower portions of them. Upon occurrence of reactor core meltdown, a high temperature meltdown reactor core is dropped on the cooling tank to partially melt the tank and form a hole, from which cooling water is flown out. Since the water source of the cooling water is the cooling water storage tank, a great amount of cooling water is further dropped and supplied and the reactor core is submerged and cooled by natural convection for a long period of time. Further, when the lump of the meltdown reactor core is small and the perforated hole of the meltdown reactor cooling tank is small, cooling water is boiled by the high temperature lump intruding into the meltdown reactor core cooling tank and blown out from the upper pipeline to the cooling water storage tank to supply cooling water from the lower pipeline to the meltdown reactor core cooling tank. Since it is constituted only with simple static facilities, the facility can be simplified to attain improvement of reliability. (N.H.)

  18. Tricyclic sesquiterpene copaene prevents H2O2-induced neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Turkez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Copaene (COP, a tricyclic sesquiterpene, is present in several essential oils of medicinal and aromatic plants and has antioxidant and anticarcinogenic features. But, very little information is known about the effects of COP on oxidative stress induced neurotoxicity. Method: We used hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 exposure for 6 h to model oxidative stress. Therefore, this experimental design allowed us to explore the neuroprotective potential of COP in H2O2-induced toxicity in rat cerebral cortex cell cultures for the first time. For this purpose, methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release assays were carried out to evaluate cytotoxicity. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC and total oxidative stress (TOS parameters were used to evaluate oxidative changes. In addition to determining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG levels, the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE or comet assay was also performed for measuring the resistance of neuronal DNA to H2O2-induced challenge. Result: The results of this study showed that survival and TAC levels of the cells decreased, while TOS, 8-OH-dG levels and the mean values of the total scores of cells showing DNA damage increased in the H2O2 alone treated cultures. But pre-treatment of COP suppressed the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress which were increased by H2O2. Conclusion: It is proposed that COP as a natural product with an antioxidant capacity in mitigating oxidative injuries in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 21-28

  19. Limitations to CO2-induced growth enhancement in pot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughay, K D M; Berntson, G M; Bazzaz, F A

    1993-07-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that small pots may reduce or eliminate plant responses to enriched CO 2 atmospheres due to root restriction. While smaller pot volumes provide less physical space available for root growth, they also provide less nutrients. Reduced nutrient availability alone may reduce growth enhancement under elevated CO 2 . To investigate the relative importance of limited physical rooting space separate from and in conjunction with soil nutrients, we grew plants at ambient and double-ambient CO 2 levels in growth containers of varied volume, shape, nutrient concentration, and total nutrient content. Two species (Abutilon theophrasti, a C 3 dicot with a deep tap root andSetaria faberii, a C 4 monocot with a shallow diffuse root system) were selected for their contrasting physiology and root architecture. Shoot demography was determined weekly and biomass was determined after eight and ten weeks of growth. Increasing total nutrients, either by increasing nutrient concentration or by increasing pot size, increased plant growth. Further, increasing pot size while maintaining equal total nutrients per pot resulted in increased total biomass for both species. CO 2 -induced growth and reproductive yield enhancements were greatest in pots with high nutrient concentrations, regardless of total nutrient content or pot size, and were also mediated by the shape of the pot. CO 2 -induced growth and reproductive yield enhancements were unaffected by pot size (growth) or were greater in small pots (reproductive yield), regardless of total nutrient content, contrary to predictions based on earlier studies. These results suggest that several aspects of growth conditions within pots may influence the CO 2 responses of plants; pot size, pot shape, the concentration and total amount of nutrient additions to pots may lead to over-or underestimates of the CO 2 responses of real-world plants.

  20. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannotti, Maurizio [Physical Sciences, Barry University, 11300 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami Shores, FL 33161 (United States); Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, E-50009, Zaragoza, España (Spain); Ringwald, Andreas, E-mail: mgiannotti@barry.edu, E-mail: igor.irastorza@cern.ch, E-mail: jredondo@unizar.es, E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de [Theory group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  1. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  2. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Trauger, D.B.

    1976-01-01

    Experience to date with operation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors has been quite favorable. Despite problems in completion of construction and startup, three high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) units have operated well. The Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) in the United Kingdom has had an excellent operating history, and initial operation of commercial AGRs shows them to be satisfactory. The latter reactors provide direct experience in scale-up from the Windscale experiment to fullscale commercial units. The Colorado Fort St. Vrain 330-MWe prototype helium-cooled HTGR is now in the approach-to-power phase while the 300-MWe Pebble Bed THTR prototype in the Federal Republic of Germany is scheduled for completion of construction by late 1978. THTR will be the first nuclear power plant which uses a dry cooling tower. Fuel reprocessing and refabrication have been developed in the laboratory and are now entering a pilot-plant scale development. Several commercial HTGR power station orders were placed in the U.S. prior to 1975 with similar plans for stations in the FRG. However, the combined effects of inflation, reduced electric power demand, regulatory uncertainties, and pricing problems led to cancellation of the 12 reactors which were in various stages of planning, design, and licensing

  3. Gas cooled leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shutt, R.P.; Rehak, M.L.; Hornik, K.E.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to cover as completely as possible and in sufficient detail the topics relevant to lead design. The first part identifies the problems associated with lead design, states the mathematical formulation, and shows the results of numerical and analytical solutions. The second part presents the results of a parametric study whose object is to determine the best choice for cooling method, material, and geometry. These findings axe applied in a third part to the design of high-current leads whose end temperatures are determined from the surrounding equipment. It is found that cooling method or improved heat transfer are not critical once good heat exchange is established. The range 5 5 but extends over a large of values. Mass flow needed to prevent thermal runaway varies linearly with current above a given threshold. Below that value, the mass flow is constant with current. Transient analysis shows no evidence of hysteresis. If cooling is interrupted, the mass flow needed to restore the lead to its initially cooled state grows exponentially with the time that the lead was left without cooling

  4. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji; Oikawa, Hirohide.

    1990-01-01

    The device according to this invention can ensure cooling water required for emerency core cooling upon emergence such as abnormally, for example, loss of coolant accident, without using dynamic equipments such as a centrifugal pump or large-scaled tank. The device comprises a pressure accumulation tank containing a high pressure nitrogen gas and cooling water inside, a condensate storage tank, a pressure suppression pool and a jet stream pump. In this device there are disposed a pipeline for guiding cooling water in the pressure accumulation tank as a jetting water to a jetting stream pump, a pipeline for guiding cooling water stored in the condensate storage tank and the pressure suppression pool as pumped water to the jetting pump and, further, a pipeline for guiding the discharged water from the jet stream pump which is a mixed stream of pumped water and jetting water into the reactor pressure vessel. In this constitution, a sufficient amount of water ranging from relatively high pressure to low pressure can be supplied into the reactor pressure vessel, without increasing the size of the pressure accumulation tank. (I.S.)

  5. Emergency reactor cooling circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Hidefumi; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki.

    1994-01-01

    Cooling water in a gravitationally dropping water reservoir is injected into a reactor pressure vessel passing through a pipeline upon occurrence of emergency. The pipeline is inclined downwardly having one end thereof being in communication with the pressure vessel. During normal operation, the cooling water in the upper portion of the inclined pipeline is heated by convection heat transfer from the communication portion with the pressure vessel. On the other hand, cooling water present at a position lower than the communication portion forms cooling water lumps. Accordingly, temperature stratification layers are formed in the inclined pipeline. Therefore, temperature rise of water in a vertical pipeline connected to the inclined pipeline is small. With such a constitution, the amount of heat lost from the pressure vessel by way of the water injection pipeline is reduced. Further, there is no worry that cooling water to be injected upon occurrence of emergency is boiled under reduced pressure in the injection pipeline to delay the depressurization of the pressure vessel. (I.N.)

  6. Core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeppner, G.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor cooling system transports the heat liberated in the reactor core to the component - heat exchanger, steam generator or turbine - where the energy is removed. This basic task can be performed with a variety of coolants circulating in appropriately designed cooling systems. The choice of any one system is governed by principles of economics and natural policies, the design is determined by the laws of nuclear physics, thermal-hydraulics and by the requirement of reliability and public safety. PWR- and BWR- reactors today generate the bulk of nuclear energy. Their primary cooling systems are discussed under the following aspects: 1. General design, nuclear physics constraints, energy transfer, hydraulics, thermodynamics. 2. Design and performance under conditions of steady state and mild transients; control systems. 3. Design and performance under conditions of severe transients and loss of coolant accidents; safety systems. (orig./RW)

  7. Reactor cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Etsuji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate cleaning steps in the pipelines upon reactor shut-down by connecting a filtrating and desalting device to the cooling system to thereby always clean up the water in the pipelines. Constitution: A filtrating and desalting device is connected to the pipelines in the cooling system by way of drain valves and a check valve. Desalted water is taken out from the exit of the filtrating and desalting device and injected to one end of the cooling system pipelines by way of the drain valve and the check valve and then returned by way of another drain valve to the desalting device. Water in the pipelines is thus always desalted and the cleaning step in the pipelines is no more required in the shut-down. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEN-ZVI, I.; AHRENS, L.; BRENNAN, M.; HARRISON, M.; KEWISCH, J.; MACKAY, W.; PEGGS, S.; ROSER, T.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; YAKIMENKO, V.

    2001-01-01

    We introduce plans for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This project has a number of new features as electron coolers go: It will cool 100 GeV/nucleon ions with 50 MeV electrons; it will be the first attempt to cool a collider at storage-energy; and it will be the first cooler to use a bunched beam and a linear accelerator as the electron source. The linac will be superconducting with energy recovery. The electron source will be based on a photocathode gun. The project is carried out by the Collider-Accelerator Department at BNL in collaboration with the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics

  9. Muon ionization cooling experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    A neutrino factory based on a muon storage ring is the ultimate tool for studies of neutrino oscillations, including possibly leptonic CP violation. It is also the first step towards muon colliders. The performance of this new and promising line of accelerators relies heavily on the concept of ionisation cooling of minimum ionising muons, for which much R&D is required. The concept of a muon ionisation cooling experiment has been extensively studied and first steps are now being taken towards its realisation by a joint international team of accelerator and particle physicists. The aim of the workshop is to to explore at least two versions of an experiment based on existing cooling channel designs. If such an experiment is feasible, one shall then select, on the basis of effectiveness, simplicity, availability of components and overall cost, a design for the proposed experiment, and assemble the elements necessary to the presentation of a proposal. Please see workshop website.

  10. Emergency core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzaki, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Akihiro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve core cooling effect by making the operation region for a plurality of water injection pumps more broader. Constitution: An emergency reactor core cooling device actuated upon failure of recycling pipe ways is adapted to be fed with cooling water through a thermal sleeve by way of a plurality of water injection pump from pool water in a condensate storage tank and a pressure suppression chamber as water feed source. Exhaust pipes and suction pipes of each of the pumps are connected by way of switching valves and the valves are switched so that the pumps are set to a series operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is high and the pumps are set to a parallel operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is low. (Furukawa, Y.)

  11. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Don E [ORNL; Ezell, Matthew A [ORNL; Becklehimer, Jeff [Cray, Inc.; Donovan, Matthew J [ORNL; Layton, Christopher C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  12. Cooling nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to water or water/steam cooled reactors of the fuel cluster type. In such reactors it is usual to mount the clusters in parallel spaced relationship so that coolant can pass freely between them, the coolant being passed axially from one end of the cluster in an upward direction through the cluster and being effective for cooling under normal circumstances. It has been suggested, however, that in addition to the main coolant flow an auxiliary coolant flow be provided so as to pass laterally into the cluster or be sprayed over the top of the cluster. This auxiliary supply may be continuously in use, or may be held in reserve for use in emergencies. Arrangements for providing this auxiliary cooling are described in detail. (U.K.)

  13. Stochastic cooling for beginners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehl, D.

    1984-01-01

    These two lectures have been prepared to give a simple introduction to the principles. In Part I we try to explain stochastic cooling using the time-domain picture which starts from the pulse response of the system. In Part II the discussion is repeated, looking more closely at the frequency-domain response. An attempt is made to familiarize the beginners with some of the elementary cooling equations, from the 'single particle case' up to equations which describe the evolution of the particle distribution. (orig.)

  14. Sodium cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokkyo, N; Inoue, K; Maeda, H

    1968-11-21

    In a sodium cooled fast neutron reactor, an ultrasonic generator is installed at a fuel assembly hold-down mechanism positioned above a blanket or fission gas reservoir located above the core. During operation of the reactor an ultrsonic wave of frequency 10/sup 3/ - 10/sup 4/ Hz is constantly transmitted to the core to resonantly inject the primary bubble with ultrasonic energy to thereby facilitate its growth. Hence, small bubbles grow gradually to prevent the sudden boiling of sodium if an accident occurs in the cooling system during operation of the reactor.

  15. Cooling pond fog studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, B.B.

    1978-01-01

    The Fog Excess Water Index (FEWI) method of fog prediction has been verified by the use of data obtained at the Dresden cooling pond during 1976 and 1977 and by a reanalysis of observations made in conjunction with a study of cooling pond simulators during 1974. For applications in which the method is applied to measurements or estimates of bulk water temperature, a critical value of about 0.7 mb appears to be most appropriate. The present analyses confirm the earlier finding that wind speed plays little part in determining the susceptibility for fog generation

  16. Scrubbing water treatment for simultaneous SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ removal from gases, with an integrated stage for reducing Fe-III to Fe-II in the washing liquid circuit by lowering the pH and circulation of SO/sub 2/. Waschwasseraufbereitung fuer die simultane SO/sub 2/- und NO/sub x/-Gasreinigung mit integrierter Stufe zur Reduktion von Eisen-III zu Eisen-II im Waschfluessigkeitskreislauf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-01-08

    In the patent application P 3519681.5 a method for washing water treatment and recovery of valuable material in the simultaneous removal of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ from flue gas is described. In this method sulphuric acid and air are supplied in the oxidation chamber so that after filtration marketable gypsum is produced as a final product. Surprisingly, it was found out that with a sufficiently high reduction of the pH value to the strongly basic range by addition of sulphuric acid in the range of pH less than 3, iron-III is reduced to iron-II.

  17. Chemical-physical studies on SO{sub 2} deposition on rock samples and other absorber surfaces; Chemisch-physikalische Untersuchungen zur Deposition von Schwefeldioxid auf Gesteinsproben und anderen Absorberoberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, U.

    2000-07-01

    Stone and other surfaces are still corroded by dry-deposited sulphur dioxide, although the present concentration is in the lower ppbv range. In this work experiments were conducted to separate and assign the different resistances during the deposition process at concentrations of SO{sub 2} found in the environment today. To compare surfaces with different reactivities, the varying uptake and the resulting SO{sub 2} concentration over the surface has to be concerned. Therefore a test chamber has been developed that allows the SO{sub 2} concentration to keep constant independent of the SO{sub 2} uptake. Different stones and passive samplers were investigated in this chamber, scanning a wide range of humidity and concentration that has not been studied before. The passive sampler was also studied in a closed wind tunnel with a sulphur dioxide containing atmosphere. It has been found that the deposition velocity is increasing with decreasing SO{sub 2} concentration for all stone types. (orig.) [German] Alle technischen Oberflaechen unterliegen Alterungsprozessen. Atmosphaerische Schadgase wie Schwefeldioxid tragen zur Korrosion dieser Oberflaechen in erheblichem Umfang bei. Auch wenn insbesondere die Konzentration an SO{sub 2} in der Aussenluft in den letzten Jahren in den unteren ppbV-Bereich gesunken ist, so ist der Anteil und die Potenz dieses Gases am Zerfallsprozess von Natursteinen aufgrund seiner guten Wasserloeslichkeit und der Saeurestaerke noch immer sehr hoch. Dennoch finden sich in der Literatur kaum zuverlaessige Daten ueber die Schwefeldioxid-Aufnahme verschiedener Natursteinvarietaeten. Insbesondere mangelt es an systematischen Untersuchungen der verschiedenen, den SO{sub 2}-Depositionsprozess bestimmenden Faktoren. Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, einen wesentlichen Beitrag zur Schliessung dieser Luecken zu leisten. Dazu wurde ein Messsystem zur Untersuchung verschiedenartiger Gesteinsproben im Labor konzipiert und in Betrieb genommen. (orig.)

  18. Elementary stochastic cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Dugan, G

    1983-12-01

    Major headings in this review include: proton sources; antiproton production; antiproton sources and Liouville, the role of the Debuncher; transverse stochastic cooling, time domain; the accumulator; frequency domain; pickups and kickers; Fokker-Planck equation; calculation of constants in the Fokker-Planck equation; and beam feedback. (GHT)

  19. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    2001-01-01

    The Accelerator Collider Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is operating the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which includes the dual-ring, 3.834 km circumference superconducting collider and the venerable AGS as the last part of the RHIC injection chain. CAD is planning on a luminosity upgrade of the machine under the designation RHIC II. One important component of the RHIC II upgrade is electron cooling of RHIC gold ion beams. For this purpose, BNL and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk entered into a collaboration aimed initially at the development of the electron cooling conceptual design, resolution of technical issues, and finally extend the collaboration towards the construction and commissioning of the cooler. Many of the results presented in this paper are derived from the Electron Cooling for RHIC Design Report [1], produced by the, BINP team within the framework of this collaboration. BNL is also collaborating with Fermi National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the University of Indiana on various aspects of electron cooling

  20. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2001-05-13

    The Accelerator Collider Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is operating the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which includes the dual-ring, 3.834 km circumference superconducting collider and the venerable AGS as the last part of the RHIC injection chain. CAD is planning on a luminosity upgrade of the machine under the designation RHIC II. One important component of the RHIC II upgrade is electron cooling of RHIC gold ion beams. For this purpose, BNL and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk entered into a collaboration aimed initially at the development of the electron cooling conceptual design, resolution of technical issues, and finally extend the collaboration towards the construction and commissioning of the cooler. Many of the results presented in this paper are derived from the Electron Cooling for RHIC Design Report [1], produced by the, BINP team within the framework of this collaboration. BNL is also collaborating with Fermi National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the University of Indiana on various aspects of electron cooling.

  1. Cooling tower and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.; Ederhof, A.; Gosdowski, J.; Harms, A.; Ide, G.; Klotz, B.; Kowalczyk, R.; Necker, P.; Tesche, W.

    The influence of a cooling tower on the environment, or rather the influence of the environment on the cooling tower stands presently -along with the cooling water supply - in the middle of much discussion. The literature on these questions can hardly be overlooked by the experts concerned, especially not by the power station designers and operators. The document 'Cooling Tower and Environment' is intented to give a general idea of the important publications in this field, and to inform of the present state of technology. In this, the explanations on every section make it easier to get to know the specific subject area. In addition to older standard literature, this publication contains the best-known literature of recent years up to spring 1975, including some articles written in English. Further English literature has been collected by the ZAED (KFK) and is available at the VGB-Geschaefsstelle. Furthermore, The Bundesumweltamt compiles the literature on the subject of 'Environmental protection'. On top of that, further documentation centres are listed at the end of this text. (orig.) [de

  2. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  3. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, D. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States); German, A. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  4. Passive cooling containment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J.J.; Iotti, R.C.; Wright, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    Pressure and temperature transients of nuclear reactor containment following postulated loss of coolant accident with a coincident station blackout due to total loss of all alternating current power are studied analytically and experimentally for the full scale NPR (New Production Reactor). All the reactor and containment cooling under this condition would rely on the passive cooling system which removes reactor decay heat and provides emergency core and containment cooling. Containment passive cooling for this study takes place in the annulus between containment steel shell and concrete shield building by natural convection air flow and thermal radiation. Various heat transfer coefficients inside annular air space were investigated by running the modified CONTEMPT code CONTEMPT-NPR. In order to verify proper heat transfer coefficient, temperature, heat flux, and velocity profiles were measured inside annular air space of the test facility which is a 24 foot (7.3m) high, steam heated inner cylinder of three foot (.91m) diameter and five and half foot (1.7m) diameter outer cylinder. Comparison of CONTEMPT-NPR and WGOTHIC was done for reduced scale NPR

  5. High energy beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.; Herr, H.; Linnecar, T.; Millich, A.; Milss, F.; Rubbia, C.; Taylor, C.S.; Meer, S. van der; Zotter, B.

    1980-01-01

    The group concerned itself with the analysis of cooling systems whose purpose is to maintain the quality of the high energy beams in the SPS in spite of gas scattering, RF noise, magnet ripple and beam-beam interactions. Three types of systems were discussed. The status of these activities is discussed below. (orig.)

  6. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masaki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To actuate an automatic pressure down system (ADS) and a low pressure emergency core cooling system (ECCS) upon water level reduction of a nuclear reactor other than loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Constitution: ADS in a BWR type reactor is disposed for reducing the pressure in a reactor container thereby enabling coolant injection from a low pressure ECCS upon LOCA. That is, ADS has been actuated by AND signal for a reactor water level low signal and a dry well pressure high signal. In the present invention, ADS can be actuated further also by AND signal of the reactor water level low signal, the high pressure ECCS and not-operation signal of reactor isolation cooling system. In such an emergency core cooling system thus constituted, ADS operates in the same manner as usual upon LOCA and, further, ADS is operated also upon loss of feedwater accident in the reactor pressure vessel in the case where there is a necessity for actuating the low pressure ECCS, although other high pressure ECCS and reactor isolation cooling system are not operated. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the reliability upon reactor core accident and mitigate the operator burden. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors, a cooling water spray portion of emergency core cooling pipelines incorporated into pipelines on high temperature side is protruded to the inside of an upper plenum. Upon rupture of primary pipelines, pressure in a pressure vessel is abruptly reduced to generate a great amount of steams in the reactor core, which are discharged at a high flow rate into the primary pipelines on high temperature side. However, since the inside of the upper plenum has a larger area and the steam flow is slow, as compared with that of the pipelines on the high temperature side, ECCS water can surely be supplied into the reactor core to promote the re-flooding of the reactor core and effectively cool the reactor. Since the nuclear reactor can effectively be cooled to enable the promotion of pressure reduction and effective supply of coolants during the period of pressure reduction upon LOCA, the capacity of the pressure accumulation vessel can be decreased. Further, the re-flooding time for the reactor is shortened to provide an effect contributing to the improvement of the safety and the reduction of the cost. (N.H.)

  8. Mechanism study on the influence of in situ SO{sub x} removal on N{sub 2}O emission in CFB boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Lingnan, E-mail: wulingnan@126.com [School of Energy, Power and Mechanical Engineering, North China Electric Power University, 102206 Beijing (China); National Engineering Laboratory for Biomass Power Generation Equipment, North China Electric Power University, 102206 Beijing (China); Qin, Wu, E-mail: qinwugx@126.com [National Engineering Laboratory for Biomass Power Generation Equipment, North China Electric Power University, 102206 Beijing (China); Hu, Xiaoying, E-mail: huxy@ncepu.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Biomass Power Generation Equipment, North China Electric Power University, 102206 Beijing (China); Dong, Changqing, E-mail: cqdong1@163.com [National Engineering Laboratory for Biomass Power Generation Equipment, North China Electric Power University, 102206 Beijing (China); Yang, Yongping, E-mail: yypncepu@163.com [School of Energy, Power and Mechanical Engineering, North China Electric Power University, 102206 Beijing (China)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • The presence of SO{sub 2} would hinder N{sub 2}O decomposition on CaO (1 0 0) surface. • N{sub 2}O decomposition pathway on deSO{sub x} intermediate was proposed. • Temperature dependence of the reaction pathway was considered. • Surface recovery process was the rate-determining step for N{sub 2}O catalytic decomposition. - Abstract: The influence of in situ deSO{sub x} process on N{sub 2}O emission in CFB boiler was studied using density functional theory calculations. The competitive adsorption of SO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O on pure CaO (1 0 0) surface was first studied and the reaction priority was determined. Results showed that SO{sub 2} was more likely to adsorb on CaO (1 0 0) surface O anion site, which hindered the catalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O on CaO (1 0 0) surface and sulfurized the CaO (1 0 0) surface under reducing atmosphere. Then a partially sulfurized CaO (1 0 0) surface was established to study the catalytic activity of deSO{sub x} reaction intermediate on N{sub 2}O decomposition. The O atom transfer process and the surface recovery process were two key steps for N{sub 2}O decomposition and the rate-determining step was the latter one. The sulfurization of the surface could deactivate its catalytic activity on N{sub 2}O decomposition compared with pure CaO (1 0 0) surface but it was still better than that of pure CaS (1 0 0) surface. The free Gibbs energy was calculated to incorporate the temperature dependence of respective reactions. When temperature was higher than 373 K, the surface recovery was more likely to proceed via the LH route.

  9. Treatment for GaSb surfaces using a sulphur blended (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S/(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murape, D.M., E-mail: Davison.Murape@nmmu.ac.za [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth, 6031 (South Africa); Eassa, N.; Neethling, J.H. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth, 6031 (South Africa); Betz, R. [Department of Chemistry, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth, 6031 (South Africa); Coetsee, E.; Swart, H.C. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, PO Box 339, Bloemfontein, 9300 (South Africa); Botha, J.R.; Venter, A. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth, 6031 (South Africa)

    2012-07-01

    A sulphur based chemical, [(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S/(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}] to which S has been added, not previously reported for the treatment of (1 0 0) n-GaSb surfaces, is introduced and benchmarked against the commonly used passivants Na{sub 2}S{center_dot}9H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S. The surfaces of the treated material were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It has been found that the native oxides present on the GaSb surface are more effectively removed when treated with ([(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S/(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}] + S) than with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S or Na{sub 2}S{center_dot}9H{sub 2}O, as evidenced by the ratio of the O{sub 506eV} to Sb{sub 457eV} AES peaks. XPS results reveal that Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 5} 'replaces' Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, suggesting that sulphur atoms substitute oxygen atoms in Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}O{sub 5} to form Sb-S. It seems sulphurization only partially removes Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Treatment with ([(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S/(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}] + S) also results in a noteworthy improvement in the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of Au/n-GaSb Schottky contacts compared to those fabricated on as-received material.

  10. Acidic gases (CO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}) capture and dissociation on metal decorated phosphorene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Anlong, E-mail: alkuang@swu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Kuang, Minquan; Yuan, Hongkuan; Wang, Guangzhao; Chen, Hong [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yang, Xiaolan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • The light metal decorated phosphorene sheets are very effective for capture of CO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} because of large adsorption energies. • The adsorption energy is obviously dependent on the amount of electrons transferred between acidic gases and metal decorated phosphorene. • Pt-decorated phosphorene can effectively catalyze the dissociation of acidic gas. - Abstract: Density functional theory is employed to investigate the adsorption and dissociation of several acidic gases (CO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}) on metal (Li, Al, Ni and Pt) decorated phosphorene. The results show that light metal (Li, Al) decorated phosphorene exhibits a strong adsorption of acidic gases, i.e., the adsorption energy of CO{sub 2} on Li decorated phosphorene is 0.376 eV which is the largest in all adsorption of CO{sub 2} on metal decorated phosphorene and Al decorated phosphorene is most effective for capture of NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} due to large adsorption energies of 3.951 and 3.608 eV, respectively. Moreover, Li and Al light metals have stronger economic effectiveness and more friendly environment compared with the transition metals, the strong adsorption ability of acidic gases and low price suggest that Li, Al decorated phosphorene may be useful and promising for collection and filtration of exhaust gases. The reaction energy barriers of acidic gases dissociated process on Pt decorated phosphorene are relatively low and the reaction processes are significantly exothermic, indicating that the dissociation process is favorable.

  11. Investigation of Focusing Effect according to the Cooling Condition and Height of the Metallic layer in a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Je-Young; Chung, Bum-Jin [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The Fukushima nuclear power plant accident has led to renewed research interests in severe accidents of nuclear power plants. In-Vessel Retention (IVR) of core melt is one of key severe accident management strategies adopted in nuclear power plant design. The metallic layer is heated from below by the radioactive decay heat generated at the oxide pool, and is cooled from above and side walls. During the IVR process, reactor vessel may be cooled externally (ERVC) and the heat fluxes to the side wall increase with larger temperature difference than above. This {sup F}ocusing effect{sup i}s varied by cooling condition of upper boundary and height of the metallic layer. A sulfuric acid–copper sulfate (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} - CuSO{sub 4}) electroplating system was adopted as the mass transfer system. Numerical analysis using the commercial CFD program FLUENT 6.3 were carried out with the same material properties and cooling conditions to examine the variation of the cell. The experimental and numerical studies were performed to investigate the focusing effect according to cooling condition of upper boundary and the height in metallic layer. The height of the side wall was varied for three different cooling conditions: top only, side only, and both top and side. Mass transfer experiments, based on the analogy concept, were carried out in order to achieve high Rayleigh number. The experimental results agreed well with the Rayleigh-Benard convection correlations of Dropkin and Somerscales and Globe and Dropkin. The heat transfer on side wall cooling condition without top cooling is highest and was enhanced by decreasing the aspect ratio. The numerical results agreed well with the experimental results. Each cell pattern (cell size, cell direction, central location of cell) differed in the cooling condition. Therefore, it is difficult to predict the internal flow due to complexity of cell formation behavior.

  12. Cooling Tower Losses in Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Barhm Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Cooling towers are a very important part of many chemical plants. The primary task of a cooling tower is to reject heat into the atmosphere. They represent a relatively inexpensive and dependable means of removing low-grade heat from cooling water. The make-up water source is used to replenish water lost to evaporation. Hot water from heat exchangers is sent to the cooling tower. The water exits the cooling tower and is sent back to the exchangers or to other units for further cooling.

  13. Cooling concepts for HTS components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binneberg, A.; Buschmann, H.; Neubert, J.

    1993-01-01

    HTS components require that low-cost, reliable cooling systems be used. There are no general solutions to such systems. Any cooling concept has to be tailored to the specific requirements of a system. The following has to he taken into consideration when designing cooling concepts: - cooling temperature - constancy and controllability of the cooling temperature - cooling load and refrigerating capacity - continuous or discontinuous mode - degree of automation - full serviceability or availability before evacuation -malfunctions caused by microphonic, thermal or electromagnetic effects -stationary or mobile application - investment and operating costs (orig.)

  14. Cooling out of the blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, W.

    2006-01-01

    This article takes a look at solar cooling and air-conditioning, the use of which is becoming more and more popular. The article discusses how further research and development is necessary. The main challenge for professional experts is the optimal adaptation of building, building technology and solar-driven cooling systems to meet these new requirements. Various solar cooling technologies are looked at, including the use of surplus heat for the generation of cold for cooling systems. Small-scale solar cooling systems now being tested in trials are described. Various developments in Europe are discussed, as are the future chances for solar cooling in the market

  15. Magnetocaloric Effect and Thermoelectric Cooling - A Synergistic Cooling Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-16

    Thermoelectric Cooling - A Synergistic Cooling Technology Sb. GRANT NUMBER N00173-14-1-G016 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 82-2020-17 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...Magnetocaloric Effect and Thermoelectric Cooling - A Synergistic Cooling Technology NRL Grant N00173-14-l-G016 CODE 8200: Spacecraft Engineering Department...82-11-0 1: Space and Space Systems Technology General Engineering & Research, L.L.C. Technical & Administrative point of contact: Dr. Robin

  16. Magnetic entropy and cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Britt Rosendahl; Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden

    2010-01-01

    Some manifestations of magnetism are well-known and utilized on an everyday basis, e.g. using a refrigerator magnet for hanging that important note on the refrigerator door. Others are, so far, more exotic, such as cooling by making use of the magnetocaloric eect. This eect can cause a change...... in the temperature of a magnetic material when a magnetic eld is applied or removed. For many years, experimentalists have made use of dilute paramagnetic materials to achieve milliKelvin temperatures by use of the magnetocaloric eect. Also, research is done on materials, which might be used for hydrogen, helium...... or nitrogen liquefaction or for room-temperature cooling. The magnetocaloric eect can further be used to determine phase transition boundaries, if a change in the magnetic state occurs at the boundary.In this talk, I will introduce the magnetocaloric eect (MCE) and the two equations, which characterize...

  17. Self pumping magnetic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, V; Wang, Z; Ray, A; Ramanujan, R V; Sridhar, I

    2017-01-01

    Efficient thermal management and heat recovery devices are of high technological significance for innovative energy conservation solutions. We describe a study of a self-pumping magnetic cooling device, which does not require external energy input, employing Mn–Zn ferrite nanoparticles suspended in water. The device performance depends strongly on magnetic field strength, nanoparticle content in the fluid and heat load temperature. Cooling (Δ T ) by ∼20 °C and ∼28 °C was achieved by the application of 0.3 T magnetic field when the initial temperature of the heat load was 64 °C and 87 °C, respectively. These experiments results were in good agreement with simulations performed with COMSOL Multiphysics. Our system is a self-regulating device; as the heat load increases, the magnetization of the ferrofluid decreases; leading to an increase in the fluid velocity and consequently, faster heat transfer from the heat source to the heat sink. (letter)

  18. Laser cooling at resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudkin, Yaakov; Khaykovich, Lev

    2018-05-01

    We show experimentally that three-dimensional laser cooling of lithium atoms on the D2 line is possible when the laser light is tuned exactly to resonance with the dominant atomic transition. Qualitatively, it can be understood by applying simple Doppler cooling arguments to the specific hyperfine structure of the excited state of lithium atoms, which is both dense and inverted. However, to build a quantitative theory, we must resolve to a full model which takes into account both the entire atomic structure of all 24 Zeeman sublevels and the laser light polarization. Moreover, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, we show that coherent processes play an important role in showing consistency between the theory and the experimental results.

  19. ITER cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natalizio, A.; Hollies, R.E.; Sochaski, R.O.; Stubley, P.H.

    1992-06-01

    The ITER reference system uses low-temperature water for heat removal and high-temperature helium for bake-out. As these systems share common equipment, bake-out cannot be performed until the cooling system is drained and dried, and the reactor cannot be started until the helium has been purged from the cooling system. This study examines the feasibility of using a single high-temperature fluid to perform both heat removal and bake-out. The high temperature required for bake-out would also be in the range for power production. The study examines cost, operational benefits, and impact on reactor safety of two options: a high-pressure water system, and a low-pressure organic system. It was concluded that the cost savings and operational benefits are significant; there are no significant adverse safety impacts from operating either the water system or the organic system; and the capital costs of both systems are comparable

  20. Cooling your home naturally

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This fact sheet describes some alternatives to air conditioning which are common sense suggestions and low-cost retrofit options to cool a house. It first describes how to reflect heat away from roofs, walls, and windows. Blocking heat by using insulation or shading are described. The publication then discusses removing built-up heat, reducing heat-generating sources, and saving energy by selecting energy efficient retrofit appliances. A resource list is provided for further information.

  1. Cooling and dehumidifying coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    The operating features of cooling and dehumidifying coils and their constructional details are discussed. The heat transfer relations as applicable to the boiling refrigerant and a single phase fluid are presented. Methods of accounting for the effect of moisture condensation on the air side heat transfer coefficient and the fin effectiveness are explained. The logic flow necessary to analyze direct expansion coils and chilled water coils is discussed

  2. Solar heating and cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffie, J A

    1976-01-01

    Solar energy is discussed as an energy resource that can be converted into useful energy forms to meet a variety of energy needs. The review briefly explains the nature of this energy resource, the kinds of applications that can be made useful, and the status of several systems to which it has been applied. More specifically, information on solar collectors, solar water heating, solar heating of buildings, solar cooling plus other applications, are included.

  3. Cooling device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji.

    1996-01-01

    Upon assembling a static container cooling system to an emergency reactor core cooling system using dynamic pumps in a power plant, the present invention provides a cooling device of lowered center of gravity and having a good cooling effect by lowering the position of a cooling water pool of the static container cooling system. Namely, the emergency reactor core cooling system injects water to the inside of a pressure vessel using emergency cooling water stored in a suppression pool as at least one water source upon loss of reactor coolant accident. In addition, a cooling water pool incorporating a heat exchanger is disposed at the circumference of the suppression pool at the outside of the container. A dry well and the heat exchanger are connected by way of steam supply pipes, and the heat exchanger is connected with the suppression pool by way of a gas exhaustion pipe and a condensate returning pipeline. With such a constitution, the position of the heat exchanger is made higher than an ordinary water level of the suppression pool. As a result, the emergency cooling water of the suppression pool water is injected to the pressure vessel by the operation of the reactor cooling pumps upon loss of coolant accident to cool the reactor core. (I.S.)

  4. Conduction cooling: multicrate fastbus hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowiecki, D.; Sims, W.; Larsen, R.

    1980-11-01

    Described is a new and novel approach for cooling nuclear instrumentation modules via heat conduction. The simplicity of liquid cooled crates and ease of thermal management with conduction cooled modules are described. While this system was developed primarily for the higher power levels expected with Fastbus electronics, it has many general applications

  5. Fabrication of SO/sub 2/preparation system and calibration of PINSTECH sulfur standard for /sup 34/S/sup 32/S mass spectrometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjad, M.I.; Latif, Z.; Ali, M.; Qureshi, R.M.; Tasneem, M.A.; Khan, I.H.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, I.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the fabrication and standardization of operation procedures of a SO/sub 2/ preparation system used for the extraction of sulfur dioxide gas from sulfur minerals (aqueous sulfate, elemental sulfur, and sulfides) for sulfur isotope ratio measurements on a gas source mass spectrometer for hydrological, geological and environmental applications. SO/sub 2/ preparation procedure as described by Fumitaka Yanagisawa and Hitoshi Sakai (1983) is adopted with some modifications. A chemically pure BaSO/sub 4/ powder is chosen as PINSTECH Sulfur Standard PSS-I for routine laboratory /sup 34/S analysis. PSS-1 is calibrated against the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard Cannon Diablo Troilite (CDT) using the NBS-127 sulfur standard Sigma /sup 34/S values of PSS-1 as analyzed at PINSTECH and Institute fur Hydorlogie, Munich are found to be 14.58 +-0.07 % CDT (n=6) and 14.59+-0.15% CDT (n=2) respectively. NBS-127 is BaSO/sub 4/ powder from the National Bureau of Standards, USA and has been calibrated against CDT. Interlaboratory comparison of various standards is also documented. Using this system, the reproducibility of sulfur isotope ratio measurements is better than +-0.2 % (n=10). (author)

  6. Investigation on dielectric relaxation of PMMA-grafted natural rubber incorporated with LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, K.S.; Teo, L.P.; Sim, L.N.; Majid, S.R. [Centre for Ionics University of Malaya, Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Arof, A.K., E-mail: akarof@um.edu.my [Centre for Ionics University of Malaya, Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-07-01

    Natural rubber (NR) grafted with 30 wt% poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and designated as MG30 has been added with varying amounts of LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows the samples to be amorphous. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy indicates complexation between the cation of the salt and the oxygen atom of the C=O and -COO- groups of MG30. From electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), MG30 with 30 wt% LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} salt exhibits the highest ambient conductivity of 1.69 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} S cm{sup -1} and lowest activation energy of 0.24 eV. The dielectric behavior has been analyzed using dielectric permittivity ({epsilon} Prime), dissipation factor (tan {delta}) and dielectric modulus (M{sup Low-Asterisk }) of the samples. The dielectric constant of pure MG30 has been estimated to be {approx}1.86.

  7. A new perspective about recovering SO{sub 2} offgas in coal power plants: Energy saving. Part I. Regenerable wet methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomas-Alonso, F. [University of Murcia, Murcia (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2005-08-01

    The removal of SO{sub 2} from coal gas combustion in power plants has become a compulsory process with stricter emission limits in order to preserve the environment and the human health (EC 96/62 Directive, 2000). This article is the first of a series of three devoted to the analyses of the current methods for SO{sub 2} removal. These methods are traditionally classified as wet and dry methods. The comparative testing of them is done from the point of view of the energy demand associated with the sorbent regeneration system used for hot coal gas desulfurisation. Although it is clear that this energy related comparison could not be applied to the wet methods, they have been included in the study because of their broad industrial implementation. A total of five processes were analyzed. One of the most promising is the well-established Wellman-Lord process, although the Linde-Solinox process also has good advantages, such as no environmental impact, reduced costs and higher simplicity.

  8. Adsorption of H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} on an activated carbon cloth modified by ammonia treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudou, J.P.; Chehimi, M.; Broniek, E.; Siemieniewska, T.; Bimer, J. [University of Paris, Paris (France)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate how ammonia treatment of the surface can influence the activity of a viscose-based activated carbon cloth (ACC) for the oxidative retention of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} in humid air at 25{sup o}C. Surface basic nitrogen groups were introduced either by treatment with ammonia/air at 300{sup o}C or with ammonia/steam at 800{sup o}C. The pore structure of the samples so prepared was examined by adsorption measurements. Changes in the surface chemistry were assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The change of ACC activity could not be merely attributed to surface nitrogen groups but to other changes in the support. Ammonia/steam treatment improved ACC performance the most, not only by introducing nitrogen surface groups, but also by extending the microporosity and by modifying the distribution of surface oxygen groups. Successive adsorption-regeneration cycles showed important differences between oxidative retention of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} and the subsequent catalyst/support regeneration process.

  9. MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as a gas sensor towards SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathore, Deepshikha, E-mail: deep.nano@gmail.com; Mitra, Supratim [Department of Natural Sciences, NIIT University, Neemrana, Rajasthan 301705 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The chemical co-precipitation method was used to synthesize MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. Single cubic phase formation of nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction technique. The average particle size of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was found to be 10.7 nm using Scherrer formula. The ultrafine powder of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was pressed to design pellet of 10 mm diameter and 1mm thickness. Copper electrodes have been deposited on the surface of pellet using silver paste in the form of capacitor. Fabricated gas sensing device of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was tested towards SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} gases. Cole-Cole plot of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was investigated with the help of electrochemical workstation. The performance of the sensors including sensitivity, response and recovery time was also determined. It was observed that the MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are more sensible for NO{sub 2} gas as compared to SO{sub 2} gas.

  10. Interaction of low-expansion NZP ceramics with Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 1000{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.Y.; Cooley, K.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Joslin, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The interaction between several low-expansion NZP materials and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 1000{degrees}C in pure O{sub 2} was studied. Ba{sub 1.25}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 5.5}Si{sub 0.5}O{sub 24} experienced extensive cracking and delamination upon reaction with Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. On the other hand, Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} remained intact in terms of visual appearance, and had no significant weight loss or gain. However, the ion exchange between Na{sup +} ions and Ca{sup +2} ions was observed to be sufficiently rapid to allow the penetration of the Na{sup +} ions into the test specimens in 100h. The segregation of Ca to the specimen surface was observed due to the ion exchange. Ca{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} was also tested, but its stability could not properly be assessed because the as-received specimens contained a significant amount of MgZr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} as an impurity phase.

  11. First Simultaneous Visualization of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} Plume Dispersions using Imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hanlim; Hong, Hyunkee; Han, Kyungsoo [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Youngmin [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soonchul [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (Imaging-DOAS) has been utilized in recent years to provide slant column density (SCD) distributions of several trace gas species in the plume. The present study introduces a new method using Imaging-DOAS data to determine two-dimensional plume structure from the plume emissions of power plant in conditions of negligible aerosol effects on radiative transfer within the plume. We demonstrates for the first time that two-dimensional distributions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) in power plant emissions can be determined simultaneously in terms of SCD distribution. The SO{sub 2} SCD values generally decreased with increasing distance from the stack and with distance from the center of the plume. Meanwhile, high NO{sub 2} SCD was observed at locations several hundred meters away from the first stack due to the ratio change of NO to NO{sub 2} in NOx concentration, attributed to the NO oxidation by O{sub 3}. The results of this study show the capability of the Imaging-DOAS technique as a tool to estimate plume dimensions in power plant emissions.

  12. Electrodeposition of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} layer from solution of Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} with addition ethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlan, Dahyunir, E-mail: dahyunir@yahoo.com; Asrar, Allan [Department of Physics, Andalas University, Limau Manih Padang 25163, West Sumatera (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    The electrodeposition of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} layer from the solution Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} with the addition of ethylene glycol on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) substrate has been performed. The electrodeposition was carried out using a voltage of 5 volts for 120 seconds, with and without the addition of 2% wt ethylene glycol. Significant effects of temperature on the resulting the samples is observed when they are heated at 400 °C. Structural characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that all samples produce a layer of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with particle size less than 50 nanometers. The addition of ethylene glycol and the heating of the sample causes a shrinkage in particle size. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization shows that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} layer resulting from the process of electrodeposition of Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} without ethylene glycol, independent of whether the sample is heated or not, is uneven and buildup. Layer produced by the addition of ethylene glycol without heating produces spherical particles. On contrary, when the layer is heated the spherical particles transform to irregularly-shaped particles with smaller size.

  13. Fabrication of SO/sub 2/preparation system and calibration of PINSTECH sulfur standard for /sup 34/S/sup 32/S mass spectrometric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajjad, M I; Latif, Z; Ali, M; Qureshi, R M; Tasneem, M A; Khan, I H; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, I

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the fabrication and standardization of operation procedures of a SO/sub 2/ preparation system used for the extraction of sulfur dioxide gas from sulfur minerals (aqueous sulfate, elemental sulfur, and sulfides) for sulfur isotope ratio measurements on a gas source mass spectrometer for hydrological, geological and environmental applications. SO/sub 2/ preparation procedure as described by Fumitaka Yanagisawa and Hitoshi Sakai (1983) is adopted with some modifications. A chemically pure BaSO/sub 4/ powder is chosen as PINSTECH Sulfur Standard PSS-I for routine laboratory /sup 34/S analysis. PSS-1 is calibrated against the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard Cannon Diablo Troilite (CDT) using the NBS-127 sulfur standard Sigma /sup 34/S values of PSS-1 as analyzed at PINSTECH and Institute fur Hydorlogie, Munich are found to be 14.58 +-0.07 % CDT (n=6) and 14.59+-0.15% CDT (n=2) respectively. NBS-127 is BaSO/sub 4/ powder from the National Bureau of Standards, USA and has been calibrated against CDT. Interlaboratory comparison of various standards is also documented. Using this system, the reproducibility of sulfur isotope ratio measurements is better than +-0.2 % (n=10). (author).

  14. A 50-year record of NOx and SO{sub 2} sources in precipitation in the Northern Rocky Mountains, USA - article no. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naftz, D.L.; Schuster, P.F.; Johnson, C.A. [US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2011-03-07

    Ice-core samples from Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG), Wyoming, were used as proxy records for the chemical composition of atmospheric deposition. Results of analysis of the ice-core samples for stable isotopes of nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and sulfur ({delta}{sup 34}S, SO{sub 4}{sup 2}), as well as NO{sub 3}{sup -} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2} deposition rates from the late-1940s through the early-1990s, were used to enhance and extend existing National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) data in western Wyoming. The most enriched {delta}{sup 34}S value in the UFG ice-core samples coincided with snow deposited during the 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens, Washington. The remaining {delta}{sup 34}S values were similar to the isotopic composition of coal from southern Wyoming. The {delta}{sup 15}N values in ice-core samples representing a similar period of snow deposition were negative, ranging from -5.9 to -3.2 parts per thousand and all fall within the {delta}{sup 15}N values expected from vehicle emissions. Ice-core nitrate and sulfate deposition data reflect the sharply increasing U.S. emissions data from 1950 to the mid-1970s.

  15. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Barton, Donald; Beavis, Dana; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bluem, Hans; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruhwiler, David L; Burger, Al; Burov, Alexey; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Cole, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Delayen, Jean R; Derbenev, Yaroslav S; Eidelman, Yury I; Favale, Anthony; Fedotov, Alexei V; Fischer, Wolfram; Funk, L W; Gassner, David M; Hahn, Harald; Harrison, Michael; Hershcovitch, Ady; Holmes, Douglas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Johnson, Peter; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; Kneisel, Peter; Koop, Ivan; Lambiase, Robert; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Mahler, George; Malitsky, Nikolay; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Merminga, Lia; Meshkov, Igor; Mirabella, Kerry; Montag, Christoph; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Nehring, Thomas; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Parkhomchuk, Vasily; Parzen, George; Pate, David; Phillips, Larry; Preble, Joseph P; Rank, Jim; Rao, Triveni; Rathke, John; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Scaduto, Joseph; Schultheiss, Tom; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Shatunov, Yuri; Sidorin, Anatoly O; Skrinsky, Aleksander Nikolayevich; Smirnov, Alexander V; Smith, Kevin T; Todd, Alan M M; Trbojevic, Dejan; Troubnikov, Grigory; Wang, Gang; Wei, Jie; Williams, Neville; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zaltsman, Alex; Zhao, Yongxiang; ain, Animesh K

    2005-01-01

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.ags...

  16. Lamination cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippel, Wally E.; Kobayashi, Daryl M.

    2005-10-11

    An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a lamination cooling system including a stack of laminations, each defining a plurality of apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define a plurality of cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack, and gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed to prevent a liquid cooling fluid in the passageways from escaping between the laminations. The gaps are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. The apertures of each lamination can be coincident with the same-sized apertures of adjacent laminations to form straight passageways, or they can vary in size, shape and/or position to form non-axial passageways, angled passageways, bidirectional passageways, and manifold sections of passageways that connect a plurality of different passageway sections. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

  17. ITER cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kveton, O.K.

    1990-11-01

    The present specification of the ITER cooling system does not permit its operation with water above 150 C. However, the first wall needs to be heated to higher temperatures during conditioning at 250 C and bake-out at 350 C. In order to use the cooling water for these operations the cooling system would have to operate during conditioning at 37 Bar and during bake-out at 164 Bar. This is undesirable from the safety analysis point of view, and alternative heating methods are to be found. This review suggests that superheated steam or gas heating can be used for both baking and conditioning. The blanket design must consider the use of dual heat transfer media, allowing for change from one to another in both directions. Transfer from water to gas or steam is the most intricate and risky part of the entire heating process. Superheated steam conditioning appears unfavorable. The use of inert gas is recommended, although alternative heating fluids such as organic coolant should be investigated

  18. Reactor container cooling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1995-11-10

    The device of the present invention efficiently lowers pressure and temperature in a reactor container upon occurrence of a severe accident in a BWR-type reactor and can cool the inside of the container for a long period of time. That is, (1) pipelines on the side of an exhaustion tower of a filter portion in a filter bent device of the reactor container are in communication with pipelines on the side of a steam inlet of a static container cooling device by way of horizontal pipelines, (2) a back flow check valve is disposed to horizontal pipelines, (3) a steam discharge valve for a pressure vessel is disposed closer to the reactor container than the joint portion between the pipelines on the side of the steam inlet and the horizontal pipelines. Upon occurrence of a severe accident, when the pressure vessel should be ruptured and steams containing aerosol in the reactor core should be filled in the reactor container, the inlet valve of the static container cooling device is closed. Steams are flown into the filter bent device of the reactor container, where the aerosols can be removed. (I.S.).

  19. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Nobuaki.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor comprises a static emergency reactor core cooling system having an automatic depressurization system and a gravitationally dropping type water injection system and a container cooling system by an isolation condenser. A depressurization pipeline of the automatic depressurization system connected to a reactor pressure vessel branches in the midway. The branched depressurizing pipelines are extended into an upper dry well and a lower dry well, in which depressurization valves are disposed at the top end portions of the pipelines respectively. If loss-of-coolant accidents should occur, the depressurization valve of the automatic depressurization system is actuated by lowering of water level in the pressure vessel. This causes nitrogen gases in the upper and the lower dry wells to transfer together with discharged steams effectively to a suppression pool passing through a bent tube. Accordingly, the gravitationally dropping type water injection system can be actuated faster. Further, subsequent cooling for the reactor vessel can be ensured sufficiently by the isolation condenser. (I.N.)

  20. Proceedings: Cooling tower and advanced cooling systems conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference was held August 30 through September 1, 1994, in St. Petersburg, Florida. The conference was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and hosted by Florida Power Corporation to bring together utility representatives, manufacturers, researchers, and consultants. Nineteen technical papers were presented in four sessions. These sessions were devoted to the following topics: cooling tower upgrades and retrofits, cooling tower performance, cooling tower fouling, and dry and hybrid systems. On the final day, panel discussions addressed current issues in cooling tower operation and maintenance as well as research and technology needs for power plant cooling. More than 100 people attended the conference. This report contains the technical papers presented at the conference. Of the 19 papers, five concern cooling tower upgrades and retrofits, five to cooling tower performance, four discuss cooling tower fouling, and five describe dry and hybrid cooling systems. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  1. Optimization of lime addition in a dry air pollution control device; Optimerad rening av HCl och SO{sub 2} med minskade kalktillsatser vid torr roeasrening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikstroem-Blomqvist, Evalena; Samuelsson, Jessica; Ohlsson, Anna

    2006-12-15

    The focus of this project is to optimize the absorption of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulphuric acid (SO{sub 2}) in a dry air pollution control device system connected to a waste combustor. A significant amount of absorbent are generally added into the processes to achieve an efficient cleaning of the flue gas. Reduced absorbent consumption has double benefits on the operative expenses due to decreased purchase and landfilling costs. The objective was to study the affect of flue gas temperature and moisture, (relative humidity, RH), on the efficiency of HCl and SO{sub 2} absorption on hydrated lime. Additionally, the efficiency of a pre-treated hydrated lime with larger specific surface and pore volume was investigated. The measuring campaign was conducted on the 20 MW fluidized bed waste incinerator own by Boraas Energi och Miljoe AB in Sweden. Results from 26 experimental days with normal hydrated lime showed a positive correlation between the efficiency of the lime and RH in the flue gas. Four levels of RH between 3.28% to 4.84% were tested. The levels were adjusted by lowering the flue gas temperature and/or by adding water to the waste fuel. The smallest effect where achieved by solely adding water to the waste fuel. RH increased solely to 3.62% and the amount of lime consumption was reduced with only 5% compare to normal condition. By lowering the flue gas temperature 10 deg C to 143 deg C, RH increased to 4.06% and the amount of lime added was reduced with 13%. The largest impact was found when both the flue gas temperature and the moisture content were changed. At those process conditions RH reach 4.84 % and the usage of lime were reduced with 26%. Additional 12 experimental days were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of a pretreated hydrated lime with larger specific surface and pore volume. The results showed that the surface enlarged absorbent was almost twice as effective as the normal hydrated lime. Moreover, the results indicated an equal

  2. Cooling lubricants; Kuehlschmierstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, W. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Breuer, D. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Blome, H. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Deininger, C. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Hahn, J.U. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Kleine, H. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Nies, E. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Pflaumbaum, W. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Stockmann, R. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Willert, G. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Sonnenschein, G. [Maschinenbau- und Metall-Berufsgenossenschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    As a rule, the base substances used are certain liquid hydrocarbons from mineral oils as well as from native and synthetic oils. Through the addition of further substances the cooling lubricant takes on the particular qualities required for the use in question. Employees working with cooling lubricants are exposed to various hazards. The assessment of the concentrations at the work station is carried out on the basis of existing technical rules for contact with hazardous substances. However, the application/implementation of compulsory investigation and supervision in accordance with these rules is made difficult by the fact that cooling lubricants are, as a rule, made up of complicated compound mixtures. In addition to protecting employees from exposure to mists and vapours from the cooling lubricants, protection for the skin is also of particular importance. Cooling lubricants should not, if at all possible, be brought into contact with the skin. Cleansing the skin and skin care is just as important as changing working clothes regularly, and hygiene and cleanliness at the workplace. Unavoidable emissions are to be immediately collected at the point where they arise or are released and safely disposed of. This means taking into account all sources of emissions. The programme presented in this report therefore gives a very detailed account of the individual protective measures and provides recommendations for the design of technical protection facilities. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Als Basisstoffe dienen in der Regel bestimmte fluessige Kohlenwasserstoffverbindungen aus Mineraloelen sowie aus nativen oder synthetischen Oelen. Durch die Zugabe von weiteren Stoffen erlangt der Kuehlschmierstoff seine fuer den jeweiligen Anwendungsabfall geforderten Eigenschaften. Beschaeftigte, die mit Kuehlschmierstoffen umgehen, sind unterschiedliche Gefahren ausgesetzt. Die Beurteilung der Kuehlschmierstoffkonzentrationen in der Luft am Arbeitsplatz erfolgt auf der Grundlage bestehender

  3. Osmotic and activity coefficients of {l_brace}y Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + (1 - y) ZnSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) at T = 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjanovic, V. [High Technical School, Trg Svetog Save 34, 31 000 Uzice (Serbia and Montenegro); Ninkovic, R. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Miladinovic, J. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)]. E-mail: duma@elab.tmf.bg.ac.yu; Todorovic, M. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Pavicevic, V. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-02-01

    The osmotic coefficients of the mixed electrolyte solution {l_brace}y Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + (1 - y) ZnSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) have been measured by the isopiestic method, at T = 298.5 K. The experimental results were treated by Scatchard's, Pitzer-Kim's and Clegg-Pitzer-Brimblecombe's methods for mixed-electrolyte solutions. By these methods, the activity coefficients for Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and ZnSO{sub 4} were calculated and compared. The Scatchard interaction parameters are used for calculation of the excess Gibbs free energy as a function of ionic strength and ionic-strength fraction of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Also, the Zdanovskii's rule of linearity is tested.

  4. Cooling of molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.; Krohn, S.; Kreckel, H.; Lammich, L.; Lange, M.; Strasser, D.; Grieser, M.; Schwalm, D.; Zajfman, D.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of the use of stored ion beams and phase space cooling (electron cooling) is given for the field of molecular physics. Emphasis is given to interactions between molecular ions and electrons studied in the electron cooler: dissociative recombination and, for internally excited molecular ions, electron-induced ro-vibrational cooling. Diagnostic methods for the transverse ion beam properties and for the internal excitation of the molecular ions are discussed, and results for phase space cooling and internal (vibrational) cooling are presented for hydrogen molecular ions

  5. Improve crossflow cooling tower operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports how various crossflow cooling tower elements can be upgraded. A typical retrofit example is presented. In the past decade, cooling tower technology has progressed. If a cooling tower is over ten years old, chances are the heat transfer media and mechanical equipment were designed over 30 to 40 years ago. When a chemical plant expansion is projected or a facility desires to upgrade its equipment for greater output and energy efficiency, the cooling tower is usually neglected until someone discovers that the limiting factor of production is the quality of cold water returning from the cooling tower

  6. In vitro and in vivo studies of the carcinogenic, toxic and genotoxic activities of the air pollutants SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/, separately and in combination with carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and N-nitrosamines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeller, W J; Klein, R G; Pool, B L; Schmezer, P; Horsch, F; Filby, W G; Fund, N; Gross, S; Hanisch, B; Kilz, E; Seidel, A [comps.

    1988-04-01

    In the course of our studies directed at elucidating biological effects of the air pollutants SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ it was found, that the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is inhibited by SO/sub 2/. This effect was observed in vitro and in vivo and is based on a sulfite- and not on a sulfate-mediated action. NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/ reduce DNA single strand breaks induced by B(a)P in fetal hamster lung cells in vitro and SO/sub 2/ reduces DNA single strand breaks induced by AMMN in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. The postulated mechanisms of action are discussed. Sulfite itself induces DNA-amplification in SV40 transformed CO60 cells; but an increase in the amplification rate induced by B(a)P or 7,12-DMBA was not observed. The in vitro genotoxicity (DNA single strand breaks) of 3 nitrosamines (AMMN, NDMA, NMBzA) is reduced in rat hepatocytes from donor animals pretreated with 50 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 2 weeks. Inhalation of NO/sub x/ by rats reduced the activities of AHH, NDMA-D and GST in hepatocytes and of GST in lung cells. Following SO/sub 2/ inhalation NDMA-D activity in the liver is increased and GST activity in the lung is decreased. In a current in vivo long-term inhalation study of NDMA+-SO/sub 2/ or NO/sub x/ first tumors of the nasal cavity are already observed after a total dose of 2 mg NDMA/animal.

  7. Evaluation of SO{sub 2} oxidation and fly ash filtration by an activated carbon fluidized-bed reactor: The effects of acid modification, copper addition and operating condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jui-Yeh Rau; Hui-Hsin Tseng; Bo-Chin Chiang; Ming-Yen Wey; Min-Der Lin [National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (Taiwan). Department of Environmental Engineering

    2010-03-15

    It is expected that the simultaneous removal of acid gases and particles from flue gas, using a single process and at the same temperature, will become an economical, and thus, desirable option. Accordingly, this study investigates the potential for the utilization of a fluidized-bed adsorbent/catalyst reactor for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and fly ash from simulated flue gas. The operating conditions for the evaluation include: (1) different pre-treatments of the adsorbent/catalyst, (2) the operating parameters of adsorption/filtration and (3) the effects of simultaneous adsorption/filtration through the fluidized-bed reactor. Based on the experimental data gathered, the Broensted acid sites were formed on the surface of activated carbon (AC) support materials after modification with nitric or sulfuric acid and it acted as anchor. This characteristic accounts for the promotion of the effects of dispersion and adsorption of the adsorbent/catalyst. Moreover, the addition of copper facilitated the oxygen transfer of SO{sub 2} to the carbon matrix. The concentration of SO{sub 2} removed by the fluidized-bed adsorbent/catalyst reactor decreased from 17.9 to 14.2 mg SO{sub 2}/g of adsorbent after exposure to a high concentration of fly ash. Therefore, an acid-pre-treatment of the adsorbent/catalyst is required to hasten the removal of SO{sub 2} in the simulated flue gas. Our result shows that the acidic groups may facilitate the adsorbent/catalyst removal of SO{sub 2} when there exist high concentrations of fly ash in the flue gas. 50 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Cooling device in thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Tsutomu.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent loss of cooling effect over the entire torus structure directly after accidental toubles in a cooling device of a thermonuclear device. Constitution: Coolant recycling means of a cooling device comprises two systems, which are alternately connected with in-flow pipeways and exit pipeways of adjacent modules. The modules are cooled by way of the in-flow pipeways and the exist pipeways connected to the respective modules by means of the coolant recycling means corresponding to the respective modules. So long as one of the coolant recycling means is kept operative, since every one other modules of the torus structure is still kept cooled, the heat generated from the module put therebetween, for which the coolant recycling is interrupted, is removed by means of heat conduction or radiation from the module for which the cooling is kept continued. No back-up emergency cooling system is required and it can provide high economic reliability. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Cooling water systems design using process integration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cooling water systems are generally designed with a set of heat exchangers arranged in parallel. This arrangement results in higher cooling water flowrate and low cooling water return temperature thus reducing cooling tower efficiency. Previous...

  10. Studies on SO/sub 2/, NO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/: effect on ciliary activity in rabbit trachea of single in vitro exposure and resorption in rabbit nasal cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalhamm, T; Sjoeholm, J

    1963-01-01

    Absorption in nasal cavity was tested by drawing gas through tracheal cannula at 1 liter/min for 45 min (...simple and is not intended to give accurate quantitative results.). Both SO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/ were strongly absorbed, even at high concentrations, whereas NO/sub 2/ was not. Required concentration to arrest ciliary activity after 5 min was 500 to 1000 mg/liter for NH/sub 3/, 150 to 200 for NO/sub 2/, and 20 to 30 for SO/sub 2/. Some evidence of dose-time-effect for this action was observed.

  11. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  12. Illumination and radiative cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Shanhui; Raman, Aaswath Pattabhi; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden

    2018-03-20

    Aspects of the present disclosure are directed to providing and/or controlling electromagnetic radiation. As may be implemented in accordance with one or more embodiments, an apparatus includes a first structure that contains an object, and a second structure that is transparent at solar wavelengths and emissive in the atmospheric electromagnetic radiation transparency window. The second structure operates with the first structure to pass light into the first structure for illuminating the object, and to radiatively cool the object while preserving the object's color.

  13. Rotary engine cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Charles (Inventor); Gigon, Richard M. (Inventor); Blum, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rotary engine has a substantially trochoidal-shaped housing cavity in which a rotor planetates. A cooling system for the engine directs coolant along a single series path consisting of series connected groups of passages. Coolant enters near the intake port, passes downwardly and axially through the cooler regions of the engine, then passes upwardly and axially through the hotter regions. By first flowing through the coolest regions, coolant pressure is reduced, thus reducing the saturation temperature of the coolant and thereby enhancing the nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanism which predominates in the high heat flux region of the engine during high power level operation.

  14. Gas cooled HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.

    1985-01-01

    In the He-cooled, graphite-moderated HTR with spherical fuel elements, the steam generator is fixed outside the pressure vessel. The heat exchangers are above the reactor level. The hot gases stream from the reactor bottom over the heat exchanger, through an annular space around the heat exchanger and through feed lines in the side reflector of the reactor back to its top part. This way, in case of shutdown there is a supplementary natural draught that helps the inner natural circulation (chimney draught effect). (orig./PW)

  15. Onderzoeksrapportage duurzaam koelen : EOS Renewable Cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeze, J.; Sluis, van der S.; Wissink, E.

    2010-01-01

    For reducing energy use for cooling, alternative methods (that do not rely on electricity) are needed. Renewable cooling is based on naturally available resources such as evaporative cooling, free cooling, phase change materials, ground subcooling, solar cooling, wind cooling, night radiation &

  16. Cooling power technology at a turning point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hese, L.H.

    1978-01-01

    From freshwater cooling and efflux condenser cooling to wet recirculation cooling, hybrid and dry cooling towers, cooling tower technology has seen a development characterized by higher cooling tower costs and reduced power plant efficiency. Therefore, all research work done at the moment concentrates on making up for the economic losses connected with improved environmental protection. (orig.) [de

  17. Study of TL and optically stimulated luminescence of K{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Cu nanophosphor for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandlik, Nandkumar [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Department of Physics, Ferguson College, Pune 411004 (India); Sahare, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Kulkarni, M.S. [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Bhatt, B.C. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India)

    2014-02-15

    Nanocrytstalline K{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Cu phosphor was synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method and annealed at different temperatures (400–900 °C) for 2 h. The XRD spectrum shows the cubic structure with crystallite size ∼20 nm. The same was also confirmed from the TEM image which shows the formation of nanorods having diameter ∼20 nm and length of ∼200 nm. They are found to be quite uniform in shapes and sizes. These samples were irradiated with gamma radiation for the doses varying from 0.01 Gy to 10 kGy and their thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics and continuous wave optically stimulated luminescence (CW-OSL) have been studied. The sample annealed at 700 °C was found to be most sensitive than others. The glow curves of the nanophosphor show a major peak at around 175 °C and other two peaks of low intensity at around 85 °C and 305 °C. The traps responsible for the three thermoluminescence peaks in K{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Cu are also found to be sensitive to the OSL. The qualitative correlation between TL peaks and CW-OSL response is established. The TL response of the sample annealed at 700 °C for 2 h and irradiated with different gamma doses shows a linear behavior from 0.01 up to 300 Gy and become sublinear in the range of 300 Gy–1 kGy before it saturates with further increase in the dose, while, the OSL response of the same sample shows linearity up to 1 kGy. Simple glow curve structure, easy method of synthesis, and linear dose response make the nanocrystalline phosphor a good candidate for radiation dosimetry, especially for the estimation of high doses of gamma rays where the microcrystalline phosphors generally saturate. -- Highlights: • Nanocrytstalline K{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Cu phosphor was synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method. • Thermoluminescence (TL) and continuous wave optically stimulated luminescence (CW-OSL) characteristics have been studied. • The TL glow

  18. THE EFFECT OF BROADBAND SOFT X-RAYS IN SO{sub 2}-CONTAINING ICES: IMPLICATIONS ON THE PHOTOCHEMISTRY OF ICES TOWARD YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilling, S.; Bergantini, A., E-mail: sergiopilling@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (UNIVAP), Laboratório de Astroquímica e Astrobiologia (LASA), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the effects produced mainly by broadband soft X-rays up to 2 keV (plus fast (∼keV) photoelectrons and low-energy (∼eV) induced secondary electrons) in the ice mixtures containing H{sub 2}O:CO{sub 2}:NH{sub 3}:SO{sub 2} (10:1:1:1) at two different temperatures (50 and 90 K). The experiments are an attempt to simulate the photochemical processes induced by energetic photons in SO{sub 2}-containing ices present in cold environments in the ices surrounding young stellar objects (YSO) and in molecular clouds in the vicinity of star-forming regions, which are largely illuminated by soft X-rays. The measurements were performed using a high-vacuum portable chamber from the Laboratório de Astroquímica e Astrobiologia (LASA/UNIVAP) coupled to the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. In situ analyses were performed by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Sample processing revealed the formation of several organic molecules, including nitriles, acids, and other compounds such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, SO{sub 3}, CO, and OCN{sup −}. The dissociation cross section of parental species was on the order of (2–7) × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2}. The ice temperature does not seem to affect the stability of SO{sub 2} in the presence of X-rays. Formation cross sections of new species  produced were also determined. Molecular half-lives at ices toward YSOs due to the presence of incoming soft X-rays were estimated. The low values obtained employing two different models of the radiation field of YSOs (TW Hydra and typical T-Tauri star) reinforce that soft X-rays are indeed a very efficient source of molecular dissociation in such environments.

  19. Antarctica: Cooling or Warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunde, Armin; Ludescher, Josef; Franzke, Christian

    2013-04-01

    We consider the 14 longest instrumental monthly mean temperature records from the Antarctica and analyse their correlation properties by wavelet and detrended fluctuation analysis. We show that the stations in the western and the eastern part of the Antarctica show significant long-term memory governed by Hurst exponents close to 0.8 and 0.65, respectively. In contrast, the temperature records at the inner part of the continent (South Pole and Vostok), resemble white noise. We use linear regression to estimate the respective temperature differences in the records per decade (i) for the annual data, (ii) for the summer and (iii) for the winter season. Using a recent approach by Lennartz and Bunde [1] we estimate the respective probabilities that these temperature differences can be exceeded naturally without inferring an external (anthropogenic) trend. We find that the warming in the western part of the continent and the cooling at the South Pole is due to a gradually changes in the cold extremes. For the winter months, both cooling and warming are well outside the 95 percent confidence interval, pointing to an anthropogenic origin. In the eastern Antarctica, the temperature increases and decreases are modest and well within the 95 percent confidence interval. [1] S. Lennartz and A. Bunde, Phys. Rev. E 84, 021129 (2011)

  20. Cooled spool piston compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hydraulically powered gas compressor receives low pressure gas and outputs a high pressure gas. The housing of the compressor defines a cylinder with a center chamber having a cross-sectional area less than the cross-sectional area of a left end chamber and a right end chamber, and a spool-type piston assembly is movable within the cylinder and includes a left end closure, a right end closure, and a center body that are in sealing engagement with the respective cylinder walls as the piston reciprocates. First and second annual compression chambers are provided between the piston enclosures and center housing portion of the compressor, thereby minimizing the spacing between the core gas and a cooled surface of the compressor. Restricted flow passageways are provided in the piston closure members and a path is provided in the central body of the piston assembly, such that hydraulic fluid flows through the piston assembly to cool the piston assembly during its operation. The compressor of the present invention may be easily adapted for a particular application, and is capable of generating high gas pressures while maintaining both the compressed gas and the compressor components within acceptable temperature limits.

  1. Modelization of cooling system components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copete, Monica; Ortega, Silvia; Vaquero, Jose Carlos; Cervantes, Eva [Westinghouse Electric (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    In the site evaluation study for licensing a new nuclear power facility, the criteria involved could be grouped in health and safety, environment, socio-economics, engineering and cost-related. These encompass different aspects such as geology, seismology, cooling system requirements, weather conditions, flooding, population, and so on. The selection of the cooling system is function of different parameters as the gross electrical output, energy consumption, available area for cooling system components, environmental conditions, water consumption, and others. Moreover, in recent years, extreme environmental conditions have been experienced and stringent water availability limits have affected water use permits. Therefore, modifications or alternatives of current cooling system designs and operation are required as well as analyses of the different possibilities of cooling systems to optimize energy production taking into account water consumption among other important variables. There are two basic cooling system configurations: - Once-through or Open-cycle; - Recirculating or Closed-cycle. In a once-through cooling system (or open-cycle), water from an external water sources passes through the steam cycle condenser and is then returned to the source at a higher temperature with some level of contaminants. To minimize the thermal impact to the water source, a cooling tower may be added in a once-through system to allow air cooling of the water (with associated losses on site due to evaporation) prior to returning the water to its source. This system has a high thermal efficiency, and its operating and capital costs are very low. So, from an economical point of view, the open-cycle is preferred to closed-cycle system, especially if there are no water limitations or environmental restrictions. In a recirculating system (or closed-cycle), cooling water exits the condenser, goes through a fixed heat sink, and is then returned to the condenser. This configuration

  2. Review of cavity optomechanical cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong-Chun; Hu Yu-Wen; Xiao Yun-Feng; Wong Chee Wei

    2013-01-01

    Quantum manipulation of macroscopic mechanical systems is of great interest in both fundamental physics and applications ranging from high-precision metrology to quantum information processing. For these purposes, a crucial step is to cool the mechanical system to its quantum ground state. In this review, we focus on the cavity optomechanical cooling, which exploits the cavity enhanced interaction between optical field and mechanical motion to reduce the thermal noise. Recent remarkable theoretical and experimental efforts in this field have taken a major step forward in preparing the motional quantum ground state of mesoscopic mechanical systems. This review first describes the quantum theory of cavity optomechanical cooling, including quantum noise approach and covariance approach; then, the up-to-date experimental progresses are introduced. Finally, new cooling approaches are discussed along the directions of cooling in the strong coupling regime and cooling beyond the resolved sideband limit. (topical review - quantum information)

  3. Electronic cooling using thermoelectric devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebarjadi, M., E-mail: m.zebarjadi@rutgers.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Institute of Advanced Materials, Devices, and Nanotechnology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Thermoelectric coolers or Peltier coolers are used to pump heat in the opposite direction of the natural heat flux. These coolers have also been proposed for electronic cooling, wherein the aim is to pump heat in the natural heat flux direction and from hot spots to the colder ambient temperature. In this manuscript, we show that for such applications, one needs to use thermoelectric materials with large thermal conductivity and large power factor, instead of the traditionally used high ZT thermoelectric materials. We further show that with the known thermoelectric materials, the active cooling cannot compete with passive cooling, and one needs to explore a new set of materials to provide a cooling solution better than a regular copper heat sink. We propose a set of materials and directions for exploring possible materials candidates suitable for electronic cooling. Finally, to achieve maximum cooling, we propose to use thermoelectric elements as fins attached to copper blocks.

  4. Measurements for the determination of acid dew point and SO[sub 3] concentration in the flue gas of utility boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derichs, W.; Menden, W.; Ebel, P.K. (RWE Energie AG, Bergheim (Germany))

    1991-10-01

    Until now, the well-known measuring systems for determining acid dewpoint have been applied primarily to flue gases from oil-fired combustion. Using an acid dewpoint measuring system which has now been available on the market for some time, it is possible to measure the acid dewpoint reliably and continuously in flue gas from coal-fired combustion, with low SO[sub 3] concentrations. This measuring system has also been used for flue gas from which the dust and sulphur have been removed as well as for untreated flue gas of conventional combustion systems with gas, oil, hard coal and brown coal firing and also in fluidized bed combustion systems. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Projection of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X}, NMVOC, NH{sub 3} and particle emissions - 2005 to 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boll Illerup, J; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Winther, M; Hjorth Mikkelsen, M; Nielsen, Malene; Fauser, P; Gyldenkaerne, S

    2008-05-15

    This report contains a description of models and background data for projection of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X}, NH{sub 3}, NMVOC, TSP, PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} for Denmark. The emissions are projected to 2030 using basic scenarios together with the expected results of a few individual policy measures. Official Danish forecasts of activity rates are used in the models for those sectors for which the forecasts are available, i.e. the latest official forecast from the Danish Energy Authority. The emission factors refer to international guidelines and some are country-specific and refer to Danish legislation, Danish research reports or calculations based on emission data from a considerable number of plants. The projection models are based on the same structure and method as the Danish emission inventories in order to ensure consistency. (au)

  6. On the studies of thermodynamics properties of fast neutron irradiated (Li{sub x}K{sub 1-x}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khatib, A.M.; Kassem, M.E.; Gomaa, N.G.; Mahmoud, S.A. [Alexandria Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The effect of fast neutron irradiation on the thermodynamic properties of (Li{sub x}K{sub 1-x}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, (x = 0.1, 0.2,......0.5) has been studied. The measurements were carried out in the vicinity of phase transition. The study reveals that as the lithium content decreases the first high temperature phase T{sub c} 705K disappears, while the second one is shifted to lower temperature. It is observed also that the specific heat, C{sub p}, decreases sharply with neutron integrated fluence {phi} and increases once more. Both entropy and enthalpy changes increase with the increase of neutron integrated fluence. (Author).

  7. Cassava starch graft copolymers an eco-friendly corrosion inhibitor for steel in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xianghong; Deng, Shuduan [Southwest Forestry University, Kunming (China)

    2015-11-15

    Cassava starch graft copolymer (CSGC) was prepared by grafting acryl amide (AA) onto cassava starch (CS). The inhibition effect of CSGC on the corrosion of cold rolled steel (CRS) in 1.0M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution was first studied by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) methods. The results show that CSGC is a good inhibitor, and inhibition efficiency of CSGC is higher than that of CS or AA. The adsorption of CSGC on steel surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. CSGC is a mixed-type inhibitor at 20 .deg. C, while mainly a cathodic inhibitor at 50 .deg. C.

  8. COOLING STAGES OF CRYOGENIC SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Троценко, А. В.

    2011-01-01

    The formalized definition for cooling stage of low temperature system is done. Based on existing information about the known cryogenic unit cycles the possible types of cooling stages are single out. From analyses of these stages their classification by various characteristics is suggested. The results of thermodynamic optimization of final throttle stage of cooling, which are used as working fluids helium, hydrogen and nitrogen, are shown.

  9. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, R.J. E-mail: pasquin@fnal.gov

    2004-10-11

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented.

  10. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2004-10-01

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented.

  11. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented

  12. Isolation and application of SO{sub X} and NO{sub X} resistant microalgae in biofixation of CO{sub 2} from thermoelectricity plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radmann, Elisangela Martha; Vieira Camerini, Felipe; Duarte Santos, Thaisa [Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Food Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG), P.O. Box 474, Rio Grande-RS 96201-900 (Brazil); Vieira Costa, Jorge Alberto, E-mail: dqmjorge@furg.br [Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Food Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG), P.O. Box 474, Rio Grande-RS 96201-900 (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Microalgae can help reduce global warming. {yields} Synechococcus nidulans and Chlorella vulgaris were isolated in a thermoelectric plant. {yields} Microalgae were compared with Spirulina and Scenedesmus obliquus for CO{sub 2} fixation. {yields} Microalgae were exposed to CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and NO, simulating a gas from coal combustion. {yields} C. vulgaris and Spirulina sp. showed 13.43% of maximum daily fixation. - Abstract: Microalgae have been studied for their potential use in foodstuffs, agriculture, in the treatment of wastewater and, in particular, in the reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide, the main cause of global warming. Thermoelectricity plants account for 22% of CO{sub 2} emitted into the atmosphere and native microalgae may be more tolerant to the gases emitted from burning fossil fuels. In the study presented here, microalgae were isolated from ponds next to a Thermoelectricity Plant, located in southern Brazil, and identified as Synechococcus nidulans and Chlorella vulgaris. The isolated microalgae were grown and compared with two different strains of microalgae, Spirulina sp. and Scenedesmus obliquus, for CO{sub 2} biofixation. The microalgae were exposed to 12% CO{sub 2}, 60 ppm of SO{sub 2} and 100 ppm of NO, simulating a gas from coal combustion. The C. vulgaris had similar behavior to Spirulina sp., with 13.43% of maximum daily fixation. The microalgae with the greater fixing capacity were C. vulgaris and Spirulina sp. and these can be grown in electric power plants for CO{sub 2} biofixation of the coal combustion gas, which would help reduce global warming.

  13. The pentasulfates A{sub 2}[S{sub 5}O{sub 16}] (A = Li, Na, Cs, Ag). Rare species by reactions in SO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Lisa Verena; Struckmann, Mona; Becker, Anna; Wickleder, Mathias S. [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Justus Liebig University of Giessen (Germany)

    2017-02-03

    The reaction of various sulfate salts A{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (A = Li, Na, Ag, Cs) with neat SO{sub 3} led to the respective pentasulfates A{sub 2}[S{sub 5}O{sub 16}] {Li_2[S_5O_1_6]: monoclinic, C2/c, Z = 4, a = 1850.71(7) pm, b = 665.45(2) pm, c = 992.80(4) pm, β = 106.764(2) , V = 1170.72(7) x 10"6 pm"3; Na_2[S_5O_1_6]: orthorhombic, Pbcn, Z = 4, a = 880.17(3) pm, b = 1039.88(4) pm, c = 1348.58(5) pm, V = 1234.32(8) x 10"6 pm"3; Ag_2[S_5O_1_6]: orthorhombic, Pbcn, Z = 4, a = 884.34(4) pm, b = 1043.19(5) pm, c = 1381.83(7) pm, V = 1274.8(1) x 10"6 pm"3; Cs_2[S_5O_1_6]: monoclinic, P2_1, Z = 4, a = 892.96(3) pm, b = 859.72(3) pm, c = 978.30(4) pm, β = 101.443(2) , V = 736.11(5) x 10"6 pm"3}. All four compounds are colorless and extremely moisture-sensitive substances. They all contain the pentasulfate anion [S{sub 5}O{sub 16}]{sup 2-} that has, until now, only been reported once. This comparative study of polysulfate salts with the same polysulfate anion, but varying countercations, is a crucial step in comprehending this very basic and, nevertheless, poorly investigated class of materials. Raman spectroscopy and powder diffraction complete the structural investigations. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Preparation of lithium indium oxide via a rheological phase route and its electrochemical characteristics in LiOH and Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guo-Qing [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science of Yangtze Normal University, 408100 Chongqing (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Zhang, Sheng-Tao [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Wu, Xing-Fa [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science of Yangtze Normal University, 408100 Chongqing (China)

    2010-01-15

    Submicrometer-sized lithium indium oxide (LiInO{sub 2}) powder via a rheological phase method using trilithium citrate tetra hydrate (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}Li{sub 3}O{sub 7} . 4H{sub 2}O) and indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has been prepared in this work for the first time. The optimal pyrolyzing temperature range to prepare crystalline LiInO{sub 2} is between 650 and 900 C, which was confirmed by thermal gravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analysis of the precursor and X-ray diffraction analysis. The pure phase LiInO{sub 2} sample obtained has a uniform particle morphology and submicrosize, which was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical studies show that a new pair of cathodic and anodic peaks at 0.23 and 0.38 V (vs. saturated calomel electrode) was obviously observed from the cyclic voltammetry curve of LiInO{sub 2} in 1 M LiOH solution, indicating a battery characteristic of the material in this electrolyte. While in 1 M Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution, the sample presents a supercapacitive characteristic within the same potential range. The reasons for different electrochemical behaviors in these two electrolytes can be attributed to the fact that the reaction of lithium ion insertion/extraction into/out of a LiInO{sub 2} electrode takes place in the bulk material in LiOH electrolyte solution, whereas it takes place on the electrode/electrolyte interface for Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte case. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Adsorption behavior of Co anchored on graphene sheets toward NO, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, CO and HCN molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yanan, E-mail: yntang2010@hotmail.com [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Zhengzhou Normal University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450044 (China); Quantum Materials Research Center, Zhengzhou Normal University, Henan 450044 (China); Chen, Weiguang; Li, Chenggang; Pan, Lijun [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Zhengzhou Normal University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450044 (China); Quantum Materials Research Center, Zhengzhou Normal University, Henan 450044 (China); Dai, Xianqi, E-mail: xqdai@henannu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Zhengzhou Normal University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450044 (China); Quantum Materials Research Center, Zhengzhou Normal University, Henan 450044 (China); Ma, Dongwei [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455000 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In contrast to the pristine graphene, a vacancy defect in graphene strongly stabilizes the Co atom. • The positively charged of Co atom on graphene can regulate the stability of gas molecules. • Different gas molecules can modulate the electronic structure of Co–graphene systems. • The adsorbed NO on Co–graphene can effectively regulate the magnetic properties of systems. - Abstract: Based on the first-principles of density-functional theory (DFT), the effects of gas adsorption on the change in geometric stability, electronic structure and magnetic properties of graphene with anchored Co (Co–graphene) systems were investigated. A single Co adatom interacts much weaker with pristine graphene (Co/pri–graphene) than with the graphene containing a single vacancy (Co/SV–graphene). The Co dopant provides more electrons to the dangling bonds of carbon atom at defective site and exhibits more positive charges, which makes Co/SV–graphene less prone to be adsorbed by gas molecules in comparison to Co/pri–graphene. It is found that the electronic structure and magnetic properties of Co–graphene systems can be modulated by adsorbing gas molecules. Except the NH{sub 3} molecule, the adsorbed NO, SO{sub 2}, CO or HCN as electron acceptors on the Co/pri–graphene can exhibit semiconducting properties. Among the gas molecules, the strong adsorption of NO molecule can effectively regulate the magnetic properties of Co–graphene systems. Moreover, the stable configuration of Co/SV–graphene is more likely to be the gas sensor for detecting NO and SO{sub 2}. The results validate that the reactivity of atomic-scale catalyst is supported on graphene sheets, which is expected to be potentially efficient in the gas sensors and electronic device.

  16. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  17. Theory of tapered laser cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Hiromi; Wei, J.

    1998-01-01

    A theory of tapered laser cooling for fast circulating ion beams in a storage ring is constructed. The authors describe the fundamentals of this new cooling scheme, emphasizing that it might be the most promising way to beam crystallization. The cooling rates are analytically evaluated to study the ideal operating condition. They discuss the physical implication of the tapering factor of cooling laser, and show how to determine its optimum value. Molecular dynamics method is employed to demonstrate the validity of the present theory

  18. Technology of simultaneous eliminations of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases by use of electron beam; Technologia jednoczesnej eliminacji SO{sub 2} i NO{sub x} z gazow odlotowych przy uzyciu wiazki elektronow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Iller, E.; Zimek, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Romanowski, M.; Koperski, K. [Biuro Studiow i Projektow `Proatom`, Warsaw (Poland); Jackowski, Z. [Towarzystwo Handlowe `Elektrim`, Warsaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The positive results of combustion gases purification have been achieved in many laboratory scale and pilot plant installations utilized radiation technology. That gives the best arguments for design the full scale process. The Polish authorities decided to localize such installation in Pomorzany Power Plant (near Szczecin - Nord West Port of Poland) 270000 Nm{sup 3}/h are being planned to process in it. The 90% of SO{sub 2} and 70% of NO{sub x} contents will be removed. The technical and economical aspects of the project have been presented in the paper. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling water intake collector for a nuclear reactor. It includes multiple sub-collectors extending out in a generally parallel manner to each other, each one having a first end and a second one separated along their length, and multiple water outlets for connecting each one to a corresponding pressure tube of the reactor. A first end tube and a second one connect the sub-collector tubes together to their first and second ends respectively. It also includes multiple collector tubes extending transversely by crossing over the sub-collector tubes and separated from each other in the direction of these tubes. Each collector tubes has a water intake for connecting to a water pump and multiple connecting tubes separated over its length and connecting each one to the corresponding sub-collector [fr

  20. Emergency core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubokoya, Takashi; Okataku, Yasukuni.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the fuel soundness upon loss of primary coolant accidents in a pressure tube type nuclear reactor by injecting cooling heavy water at an early stage, to suppress the temperature of fuel cans at a lower level. Constitution: When a thermometer detects the temperature rise and a pressure gauge detects that the pressure for the primary coolants is reduced slightly from that in the normal operation upon loss of coolant accidents in the vicinity of the primary coolant circuit, heavy water is caused to flow in the heavy water feed pipeway by a controller. This enables to inject the heavy water into the reactor core in a short time upon loss of the primary coolant accidents to suppress the temperature rise in the fuel can thereby maintain the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Cooling of rectangular bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frainer, V.J.

    1979-01-01

    A solution of the time-transient Heat Transfer Differential Equation in rectangular coordinates is presented, leading to a model which describes the temperature drop with time in rectangular bars. It is similar to an other model for cilindrical bars which has been previously developed in the Laboratory of Mechanical Metallurgy of UFRGS. Following these models, a generalization has been made, which permits cooling time evaluation for all profiles. These results are compared with experimental laboratory data in the 1200 to 800 0 C range. Some other existing models were also studied which have the purpose of studing the same phenomenon. Their mathematical forms and their evaluated values are analyzed and compared with experimental ones. (Author) [pt

  2. ATLAS' major cooling project

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, a considerable effort has been put into commissioning the various units of ATLAS' complex cryogenic system. This is in preparation for the imminent cooling of some of the largest components of the detector in their final underground configuration. The liquid helium and nitrogen ATLAS refrigerators in USA 15. Cryogenics plays a vital role in operating massive detectors such as ATLAS. In many ways the liquefied argon, nitrogen and helium are the life-blood of the detector. ATLAS could not function without cryogens that will be constantly pumped via proximity systems to the superconducting magnets and subdetectors. In recent weeks compressors at the surface and underground refrigerators, dewars, pumps, linkages and all manner of other components related to the cryogenic system have been tested and commissioned. Fifty metres underground The helium and nitrogen refrigerators, installed inside the service cavern, are an important part of the ATLAS cryogenic system. Two independent helium refrigerators ...

  3. Ash partitioning during the oxy-fuel combustion of lignite and its dependence on the recirculation of flue gas impurities (H{sub 2}O, HCl and SO{sub 2})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facun Jiao; Juan Chen; Lian Zhang; Yajuan Wei; Yoshihiko Ninomiya; Sankar Bhattacharya; Hong Yao [Monash University, Clayton, Vic. (Australia). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2011-06-15

    Oxy-fuel combustion of a brown coal (i.e. lignite) has been carried out at 1000{sup o}C to experimentally examine the vaporisation of organically bound metals and the agglomeration of ash particles as a function of the concentration of gaseous impurities including H{sub 2}O, HCl and SO{sub 2} in about 27% O{sub 2} balanced with CO{sub 2}. The properties of bulk ash and individual metals were investigated intensively. Particularly, attention was paid to Na which is notorious for fouling and to organically bound Al which has been less studied. The results indicate that, the organically bound metals, although possessing a very low content in the raw coal, are vital for the agglomeration of ash particles, which are also highly sensitive to the loading of gas impurities in flue gas. HCl recirculation is the most crucial factor promoting the vaporisation of metals via chlorination. Apart from alkali metals, the organically bound Al and Ti were also vaporised noticeably. Recirculation of SO{sub 2} promoted the sulfation of Na to condense into liquid droplet which increased fine ash yield. Co-existence of bulk HCl and SO{sub 2} played a synergetic role in the sulfation of Na via an initial chlorination of the char-bound Na. In contrast, co-existence of steam with HCl and SO{sub 2} favored the formation of Na alumino-silicates, which are favorable for ash agglomeration. 34 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. A wet effluent denuder/mist-chamber coupled to ion chromatography for the continuous measurement of atmospheric HONO, HNO{sub 3}, NO{sub 3}{sup -} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellweger, C.; Baltensperger, U. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Hofer, P. [EMPA, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    A denuder/mist chamber system has been developed for the continuous automated measurement of low level concentrations of HONO, HNO{sub 3} as well as of NO{sub 3}{sup -} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. (author) 2 figs., 1 ref.

  5. Fluence of dielectric constant (D), (H/sup +/) and (SO/sub 4/sup -2/) on the rate of redox reaction between tris (2,2-bipyridine) iron (II) and ceric sulphate in aqueous sulphuric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, R.; Naqvi, I.I.; Farrukh, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Kinetic of the redox reaction between tris (2,2-bipyridine)iron(II) cation and ceric sulphate has been studied in aqueous sulphuric acid medium. Different methods were employed for the determination of order of reaction. The order of reaction is found to be first with respect to reductant however retarding effect of increasing initial concentration of oxidant is found. Influence of (H/sup +/), (SO/sub 4/sup 2-) and dielectric constant (D) on the rate of redox reaction has also been studied. Increase in (H/sup +/) and dielectric constant of the medium retard the rate while enhancement of the (SO/sub 4/sup 2-/) accelerates the rate first and then the reaction goes towards retardation. Effects of (H/sup +/) and (SO/sub 4/sup 2-/) were studied by using acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer for the first one and varying ionic concentrations of the salt sodium sulphate for the latter one, whereas dielectric constant was varied by using 0%, 10% and 20% ethanol-water mixtures. Results of effects of each one of the factors i.e., H/sup +/, SO/sub 4/sup 2-/ and dielectric constant (D) have been compared and on the basis of these factors, (Ce(SO/sub 4/ )/sub 3/)/sup 2-/ is suggested to be the active species of cerium(IV). However a rate law consistent with the observed kinetic data has also been derived supporting the proposed mechanism. (author)

  6. The oxidation of ReCl{sub 5} with oleum: synthesis and crystal structure of Re{sub 2}O{sub 4}Cl{sub 4}(SO{sub 4})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betke, Ulf; Wickleder, Mathias S. [Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Institute of Pure and Applied Chemistry (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    The reaction of ReCl{sub 5} and fuming sulfuric acid (25 % SO{sub 3}) in a sealed glass tube at 200 C led to red, needle shaped single crystals of Re{sub 2}O{sub 4}Cl{sub 4}(SO{sub 4}) (monoclinic, C2/c, a = 1501.8(2) pm, b = 1545.9(2) pm, c = 945.18(8) pm, β = 98.761(9) , Z = 8). In the crystal structure the [ReO{sub 2}] moieties are linked by [SO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} tetrahedra to chains along the [101] direction. Each sulfate ion connects four rhenium atoms, additional two chloride ions complete the octahedral coordination sphere of each rhenium atom according to {sup 1}{sub ∞}[ReO{sub 2/1}Cl{sub 2/1}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2/4}]. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Core catcher cooling for a gas-cooled fast breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Schretzmann, K.

    1976-01-01

    Water, molten salts, and liquid metals are under discussion as coolants for the core catcher of a gas-cooled fast breeder. The authors state that there is still no technically mature method of cooling a core melt. However, the investigations carried out so far suggest that there is a solution to this problem. (RW/AK) [de

  8. Film cooling for a closed loop cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2003-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. At least one film cooling hole is defined through a wall of at least one of the cavities for flow communication between an interior of the cavity and an exterior of the vane. The film cooling hole(s) are defined adjacent a potential low LCF life region, so that cooling medium that bleeds out through the film cooling hole(s) reduces a thermal gradient in a vicinity thereof, thereby the increase the LCF life of that region.

  9. Comparison of field data with a thermodynamic model for the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ - HNO/sub 3/ - NH/sub 3/ system at high humidities and in fogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, D.J.; Munger, J.W.; Waldman, J.M.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    1986-04-01

    A systematic characterization of the atmospheric H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ - NH/sub 2/ system was conducted in the fogwater, the aerosol, and the gas phase at a network of sites in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Spatial patterns of concentrations were established that reflect the distribution of SO/sub 2/, NO/sub X/, and NH/sub 3/ emissions within the valley. The concept of atmospheric alkalinity was introduced to interpret these concentrations in terms of the buffering capacity of the atmosphere with respect to inputs of strong acids. Regions of predominantly acidic and alkaline fogwater were identified. Fogwater was found to be alkaline in most of the valley, but small changes in emission budgets could lead to widespread acid fog. An extended stagnation episode was studied in detail: progressive accumulation of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ - HNO/sub 3/ - NH/sub 3/ species was documented over the course of the episode, and interpreted in terms of production and removal mechanisms. Secondary production of strong acids H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and HNO/sub 3/ under stagnant conditions resulted in a complete titration of available alkalinity at sites furthest from NH/sub 3/ sources. A steady SO/sub 2/ conversion rate of 0.4 - 1.1% h/sup -1/ was estimated in the stagnant mixed layer of haze aerosol under overcast conditions, and was attributed to non-photochemical heterogeneous processes. Removal of SO/sub 2/ was enhanced in fog as compared to non-foggy conditions. Conversion of NO/sub X/ to HNO/sub 3/ slowed down during the stagnation episode because of reduced photochemical activity: fog did not appear to enhance conversion of NO/sub X/. Decreases in total HNO/sub 3/ concentrations were observed upon acidification of the atmosphere, and were attributed to displacement of NO/sub 3-/ by H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in the aerosol followed by rapid deposition of HNO/sub 3/(g). The occurrence of fog was associated with general decreases of aerosol concentrations due to enhanced removal by deposition.

  10. Cooling Tower Overhaul of Secondary Cooling System in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Chul; Lee, Young Sub; Jung, Hoan Sung; Lim, In Chul [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    HANARO, an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor of 30 MWth power in Korea, has been operating normally since its initial criticality in February, 1995. For the last about ten years, A cooling tower of a secondary cooling system has been operated normally in HANARO. Last year, the cooling tower has been overhauled for preservative maintenance including fills, eliminators, wood support, water distribution system, motors, driving shafts, gear reducers, basements, blades and etc. This paper describes the results of the overhaul. As results, it is confirmed that the cooling tower maintains a good operability through a filed test. And a cooling capability will be tested when a wet bulb temperature is maintained about 28 .deg. C in summer and the reactor is operated with the full power.

  11. Onderzoeksrapportage duurzaam koelen : EOS Renewable Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Broeze, J.; Sluis, van der, S.; Wissink, E.

    2010-01-01

    For reducing energy use for cooling, alternative methods (that do not rely on electricity) are needed. Renewable cooling is based on naturally available resources such as evaporative cooling, free cooling, phase change materials, ground subcooling, solar cooling, wind cooling, night radiation & storage. The project was aimed to create innovative combinations of these renewable cooling technologies and sophisticated control systems, to design renewable climate systems for various applicati...

  12. High efficient removal of molybdenum from water by Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}: Effects of pH and affecting factors in the presence of co-existing background constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiang; Ma, Jun, E-mail: majunhit@126.com; Lu, Xixin; Huangfu, Xiaoliu; Zou, Jing

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Proposed high efficient Mo (VI) removal with Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} coagulation-filtration. • Studied different effects of Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and FeCl{sub 3} due to different anionic portions. • Reported the adverse effect of calcium on the removal of Mo (VI). • Proposed factors affecting Mo (VI) removal: intercepted Fe and adsorption affinity. - Abstract: Comparatively investigated the different effects of Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} coagulation-filtration and FeCl{sub 3} coagulation-filtration on the removal of Mo (VI). And the influence of calcium, sulfate, silicate, phosphate and humic acid (HA) were also studied. The following conclusions can be obtained: (1) compared with the case of FeCl{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} showed a higher Mo (VI) removal efficiency at pH 4.00–5.00, but an equal removal efficiency at pH 6.00–9.00. (2) The optimum Mo (VI) removal by Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} was achieved at pH 5.00–6.00; (3) The presence of calcium can reduce the removal of Mo (VI) over the entire pH range in the present study; (4) The effect of co-existing background anions (including HA) was dominated by three factors: Firstly the influence of co-existing background anions on the content of Fe intercepted from water (intercepted Fe). Secondly the competition of co-existing anions with Mo (VI) for adsorption sites. Thirdly the influence of co-existing background anions on the Zeta potential of the iron flocs.

  13. Esterification of industrial-grade palm fatty acid distillate over modified ZrO{sub 2} (with WO{sub 3}-, SO{sub 4} -and TiO{sub 2}-): Effects of co-solvent adding and water removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mongkolbovornkij, P.; Laosiripojana, N. [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi (Thailand); Champreda, V. [National Center for Genetic Enginnering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), Pathumthani (Thailand); Sutthisripok, W. [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla (Thailand)

    2010-11-15

    The esterification of palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD), a by-product from palm oil industry, in the presence of three modified zirconia-based catalysts i.e. SO{sub 4}-ZrO{sub 2}, WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} (with several sulfur- and tungsten-loading contents, Ti/Zr molar ratios, and calcination temperatures) was studied. It was found that, among all synthesized catalysts, the reaction in the presence of SO{sub 4}-ZrO{sub 2} and WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} (with 1.8%SO{sub 4} calcined at 500 C and/or 20%WO{sub 3} calcined at 800 C) enhances relatively high fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield (84.9-93.7%), which was proven to relate with the high acid site density and specific surface area as well as the formation of tetragonal phase over these catalysts. The greater benefit of WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} over SO{sub 4}-ZrO{sub 2} was its high stability after several reaction cycles, whereas significant deactivation was detected over SO{sub 4}-ZrO{sub 2} due to the leaching of sulfur from catalyst. For further improvement, the addition of toluene as co-solvent was found to increase the FAME yield along with reduce the requirement of methanol to PFAD molar ratio (while maintains the FAME yield above 90%). Furthermore, it was observed that the presence of water in the feed considerably lower the FAME yield due to the catalyst surface interfering by water and the further hydrolysis of FAME back to fatty acids. We proposed here that the negative effect can be considerably minimized by adding molecular sieve to remove water from the feed and/or during the reaction. (author)

  14. Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by- product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, June 11, 1992--September 11, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sublette, K.L.

    1992-12-31

    Based on the work described simultaneous SO{sub 2}/No{sub x} removal from flue gas based on direct contact of the gas with SRB and T. denitrificans co-cultures or cultures-in-series has been eliminated as a viable process concept at this time. The technical reasons are as follows: (1) NO inhibition of SO{sub 2} reduction by D. desulfuricans - Although the NO concentrations used in the experiments described above are somewhat higher than that found in a typical flue gas, it is quite possible that at lower NO concentrations (or partial pressures) the inhibiting effects will simply take longer to become apparent. (2) Nitrate suppression of NO removal - As noted previously, the cultivation of T. denitrificans in a microbial flue gas treatment system (either one or two stages) would require sulfide-limiting conditions. Therefore, the electron acceptor must be in excess, requiring nitrate in the T. denitrificans process culture. As shown in experiments described above, nitrate significantly suppresses the removal of NO from a feed gas making simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal impractical by microbial means. (3) O{sub 2} inhibition of SO{sub 2} and NO reduction - It has been demonstrated that D. desulfuricans working cultures are tolerant of up to 1.7% O{sub 2} in the feed gas. However, further increases in the O{sub 2} partial pressure in the feed gas resulted in O{sub 2} inhibition of SO{sub 2} reduction. These inhibiting levels of O{sub 2} are comparable to those concentrations found in flue gases (3). Therefore, in any process in which raw flue gas contacts a D. desulfuricans culture marginal stability at best can be expected.

  15. Microbial reduction of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] as a means of by- product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sublette, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    Based on the work described simultaneous SO[sub 2]/No[sub x] removal from flue gas based on direct contact of the gas with SRB and T. denitrificans co-cultures or cultures-in-series has been eliminated as a viable process concept at this time. The technical reasons are as follows: (1) NO inhibition of SO[sub 2] reduction by D. desulfuricans - Although the NO concentrations used in the experiments described above are somewhat higher than that found in a typical flue gas, it is quite possible that at lower NO concentrations (or partial pressures) the inhibiting effects will simply take longer to become apparent. (2) Nitrate suppression of NO removal - As noted previously, the cultivation of T. denitrificans in a microbial flue gas treatment system (either one or two stages) would require sulfide-limiting conditions. Therefore, the electron acceptor must be in excess, requiring nitrate in the T. denitrificans process culture. As shown in experiments described above, nitrate significantly suppresses the removal of NO from a feed gas making simultaneous SO[sub 2]/NO[sub x] removal impractical by microbial means. (3) O[sub 2] inhibition of SO[sub 2] and NO reduction - It has been demonstrated that D. desulfuricans working cultures are tolerant of up to 1.7% O[sub 2] in the feed gas. However, further increases in the O[sub 2] partial pressure in the feed gas resulted in O[sub 2] inhibition of SO[sub 2] reduction. These inhibiting levels of O[sub 2] are comparable to those concentrations found in flue gases (3). Therefore, in any process in which raw flue gas contacts a D. desulfuricans culture marginal stability at best can be expected.

  16. Newton's Law of Cooling Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The cooling of objects is often described by a law, attributed to Newton, which states that the temperature difference of a cooling body with respect to the surroundings decreases exponentially with time. Such behaviour has been observed for many laboratory experiments, which led to a wide acceptance of this approach. However, the heat transfer…

  17. Be Cool, Man! / Jevgeni Levik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Levik, Jevgeni

    2005-01-01

    Järg 1995. aasta kriminaalkomöödiale "Tooge jupats" ("Get Shorty") : mängufilm "Be Cool, Chili Palmer on tagasi!" ("Be Cool") : režissöör F. Gary Gray, peaosades J. Travolta ja U. Thurman : USA 2005. Lisatud J. Travolta ja U. Thurmani lühiintervjuud

  18. Core cooling system for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Ryoichi; Amada, Tatsuo.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of residual heat dissipation from the reactor core in case of emergency by providing a secondary cooling system flow channel, through which fluid having been subjected to heat exchange with the fluid flowing in a primary cooling system flow channel flows, with a core residual heat removal system in parallel with a main cooling system provided with a steam generator. Constitution: Heat generated in the core during normal reactor operation is transferred from a primary cooling system flow channel to a secondary cooling system flow channel through a main heat exchanger and then transferred through a steam generator to a water-steam system flow channel. In the event if removal of heat from the core by the main cooling system becomes impossible due to such cause as breakage of the duct line of the primary cooling system flow channel or a trouble in a primary cooling system pump, a flow control valve is opened, and steam generator inlet and outlet valves are closed, thus increasing the flow rate in the core residual heat removal system. Thereafter, a blower is started to cause dissipation of the core residual heat from the flow channel of a system for heat dissipation to atmosphere. (Seki, T.)

  19. Theory of semiconductor laser cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, Greg

    Recently laser cooling of semiconductors has received renewed attention, with the hope that a semiconductor cooler might be able to achieve cryogenic temperatures. In order to study semiconductor laser cooling at cryogenic temperatures, it is crucial that the theory include both the effects of excitons and the electron-hole plasma. In this dissertation, I present a theoretical analysis of laser cooling of bulk GaAs based on a microscopic many-particle theory of absorption and luminescence of a partially ionized electron-hole plasma. This theory has been analyzed from a temperature 10K to 500K. It is shown that at high temperatures (above 300K), cooling can be modeled using older models with a few parameter changes. Below 200K, band filling effects dominate over Auger recombination. Below 30K excitonic effects are essential for laser cooling. In all cases, excitonic effects make cooling easier then predicted by a free carrier model. The initial cooling model is based on the assumption of a homogeneous undoped semiconductor. This model has been systematically modified to include effects that are present in real laser cooling experiments. The following modifications have been performed. (1) Propagation and polariton effects have been included. (2) The effect of p-doping has been included. (n-doping can be modeled in a similar fashion.) (3) In experiments, a passivation layer is required to minimize non-radiative recombination. The passivation results in a npn heterostructure. The effect of the npn heterostructure on cooling has been analyzed. (4) The effect of a Gaussian pump beam was analyzed and (5) Some of the parameters in the cooling model have a large uncertainty. The effect of modifying these parameters has been analyzed. Most of the extensions to the original theory have only had a modest effect on the overall results. However we find that the current passivation technique may not be sufficient to allow cooling. The passivation technique currently used appears

  20. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  1. Cooling off with physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Chris [Unilever R and D (United Kingdom)

    2003-08-01

    You might think of ice cream as a delicious treat to be enjoyed on a sunny summer's day. However, to the ice-cream scientists who recently gathered in Thessaloniki in Greece for the 2nd International Ice Cream Symposium, it is a complex composite material. Ice cream consists of three dispersed phases: ice crystals, which have a mean size of 50 microns, air bubbles with a diameter of about 70 microns, and fat droplets with a size of 1 micron. These phases are held together by what is called the matrix - not a sci-fi film, but a viscous solution of sugars, milk proteins and polysaccharides. The microstructure, and hence the texture that you experience when you eat ice cream, is created in a freezing process that has remained fundamentally unchanged since the first ice-cream maker was patented in the 1840s. The ingredients - water, milk protein, fat, sugar, emulsifiers, stabilizers, flavours and a lot of air - are mixed together before being pasteurized and homogenized. They are then pumped into a cylinder that is cooled from the outside with a refrigerant. As the mixture touches the cylinder wall it freezes and forms ice crystals, which are quickly scraped off by a rotating blade. The blade is attached to a beater that disperses the ice crystals into the mixture. At the same time, air is injected and broken down into small bubbles by the shear that the beater generates. As the mixture passes along the cylinder, the number of ice crystals increases and its temperature drops. As a result, the viscosity of the mixture increases, so that more energy input is needed to rotate the beater. This energy is dissipated as heat, and when the ice cream reaches about -6 deg. C the energy input through the beater equals the energy removed as heat by the refrigerant. The process therefore becomes self-limiting and it is not possible to cool the ice cream any further. However, at -6 deg. C the microstructure is unstable. The ice cream therefore has to be removed from the freezer

  2. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  3. 46 CFR 153.432 - Cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooling systems. 153.432 Section 153.432 Shipping COAST... Control Systems § 153.432 Cooling systems. (a) Each cargo cooling system must have an equivalent standby... cooling system. (b) Each tankship that has a cargo tank with a required cooling system must have a manual...

  4. Huge opportunity for solar cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In Europe more than 400 solar cooling systems have been installed. By contrast, only a small number of solar cooling installations exist in Australia - primarily adsorption and absorption systems for commercial and hospitals - although these systems are growing. As with other renewable energy technologies, cost is a challenge. However solar cooling is currently competitive with other technologies, with some suggesting that system costs have been decreasing by about 20% per annum in recent times. Australia is also leading efforts in the development of residential solar desiccant technology, currently commercialising Australian-developed technology. Commercial and industrial enterprises are increasingly aware of the impact of demand charges, the potential to install technology as a hedge against future energy price rises and opportunities associated with increased on-site generation and reduced reliance on the grid, often necessitating on-site demand reduction and management. They are also driven by environmental and corporate social responsibility objectives as well as the opportunity for energy independence and uninterruptible operation. Interestingly, many of these interests are mirrdred at residential level, inspiring CSIRO's commercialisation of a domestic scale solar air conditioner with Australian manufacturer Brevis Climate Systems. Australia and other countries are increasingly aware of solar cooling as technology which can reduce or replace grid-powered cooling, particularly in applications where large building thermal energy requirements exist. In these applications, heating, cooling and hot water are generated and used in large amounts and the relative amounts of each can be varied dynamically, depending on building requirements. Recent demonstrations of solar cooling technology in Australia include Hunter TAFE's Solar Desiccant Cooling System - which provides heating, cooling and hot water to commercial training kitchens and classrooms - GPT

  5. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Akira; Kobayashi, Masahide.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable a stable operation of an emergency core cooling system by preventing the system from the automatic stopping at an abnormally high level of the reactor water during its operation. Constitution: A pump flow rate signal and a reactor water level signal are used and, when the reactor water level is increased to a predetermined level, the pump flow rate is controlled by the reactor water level signal instead of the flow rate signal. Specifically, when the reactor water level is gradually increased by the water injection from the pump and exceeds a setting signal for the water level, the water level deviation signal acts as a demand signal for the decrease in the flow rate of the pump and the output signal from the water level controller is also decreased depending on the control constant. At a certain point, the output signal from the water level controller becomes smaller than the output signal from the flow rate controller. Thus, the output signal from the water level controller is outputted as the output signal for the lower level preference device. In this way, the reactor water level and the pump flow rate can be controlled within a range not exceeding the predetermined pump flow rate. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. Cooling water injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inai, Nobuhiko.

    1989-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, ECCS system is constituted as a so-called stand-by system which is not used during usual operation and there is a significant discontinuity in relation with the usual system. It is extremely important that ECCS operates upon occurrence of accidents just as specified. In view of the above in the present invention, the stand-by system is disposed along the same line with the usual system. That is, a driving water supply pump for supplying driving water to a jet pump is driven by a driving mechanism. The driving mechanism drives continuously the driving water supply pump in a case if an expected accident such as loss of the function of the water supply pump, as well as during normal operation. That is, all of the water supply pump, jet pump, driving water supply pump and driving mechanism therefor are caused to operate also during normal operation. The operation of them are not initiated upon accident. Thus, the cooling water injection system can perform at high reliability to remarkably improve the plant safety. (K.M.)

  7. Magnet cooling economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmer, J.F.; Liggett, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    The recommendation to use superfluid helium II in superconducting magnet design has become more prevalent in recent years. Advanced fusion reactor studies such as the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study recently completed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLML) have based superconducting magnet design on the use of He II because of reduced magnet volume, improved stability characteristics, or increased superconductor critical current at fields above 9 Tesla. This paper reports the results of a study to determine the capital costs ($/watt) and the operating costs (watts/watt) of refrigeration systems in the 1.8K to 300K temperature range. The cost data is applied to a 1.8K magnet that is subject to neutronic heating wherein the magnet case is insulated from the winding so that the case can be cooled at a higher temperature (less costly) than the winding. The life cycle cost (capital plus operating) is reported as a function of coil temperature and insulation thickness. In some cases there is an optimum, least-cost thickness. In addition, the basic data can be used to evaluate the impact of neutron shielding effectiveness trades on the combined shield, magnet, cryorefrigerator, and operating life cycle cost

  8. Stochastic cooling in muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10 30 cm -2 s -1 as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to ∼10 3 for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW

  9. Hybrid cooling tower Neckarwestheim 2 cooling function, emission, plume dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeuning, G.; Ernst, G.; Maeule, R.; Necker, P.

    1990-01-01

    The fan-assisted hybrid cooling tower of the 1300 MW power plant Gemeinschafts-Kernkraftwerk Neckarwestheim 2 was designed and constructed based on results from theoretical and experimental studies and experiences from a smaller prototype. The wet part acts in counterflow. The dry part is arranged above the wet part. Each part contains 44 fans. Special attention was payed to the ducts which mix the dry into the wet plume. The cooling function and state, mass flow and contents of the emission were measured. The dispersion of the plume in the atmosphere was observed. The central results are presented in this paper. The cooling function corresponds to the predictions. The content of drifted cooling water in the plume is extremely low. The high velocity of the plume in the exit causes an undisturbed flow into the atmosphere. The hybrid operation reduces visible plumes strongly, especially in warmer and drier ambient air

  10. Emergency cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.K.; Burylo, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    The site of the gas-cooled reactor with direct-circuit gas turbine is preferably the sea coast. An emergency cooling system with safety valve and emergency feed-water addition is designed which affects at least a part of the reactor core coolant after leaving the core. The emergency cooling system includes a water emergency cooling circuit with heat exchanger for the core coolant. The safety valve releases water or steam from the emergency coolant circuit when a certain temperature is exceeded; this is, however, replaced by the emergency feed-water. If the gas turbine exhibits a high and low pressure turbine stage, which are flowed through by coolant one behind another, a part of the coolant can be removed in front of each part turbine by two valves and be added to the haet exchanger. (RW/LH) [de

  11. The Cool 100 book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselip, J.; Pointing, D.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of The Cool 100 book is to document 100 inspiring, educational and practical examples of sustainable and accessible energy supply solutions created by, or suitable for, isolated communities in the cooler regions of the world. The book features the following projects, explored in detail: 1. Promoting Unst Renewable Energy (PURE) project, a pioneering project that demonstrates how wind power and hydrogen technologies can be combined to meet the energy needs of a remote industrial estate on the island of Unst in the British Isles. 2. The EDISON project, or Electric vehicles in a Distributed and Integrated market using Sustainable energy and Open Networks that explored increased renewable energy use and electric vehicle operation in Denmark, with a case study on the island of Bornholm. 3. The Sarfannguit Wireless Electricity Reading project, which has significantly improved utility metering and enabled improved energy management, reduced electricity demand, and the introduction of renewable energy technologies in the isolated villages of Greenland. 4. The Renewable Energy Croft and Hydrogen facility, which uses innovative technologies to support a gardening facility in the Outer Hebrides (Scotland), and is also a working laboratory for students of the local university to develop a hydrogen energy economy. 5. The Samsoe Renewable Energy Island in Denmark, an iconic example of how an island community can consume only green electricity by using a range of innovative technologies and behavioural changes to reduce demand and to harness green energy resources. 6. The Hydrogen Office Project which demonstrates how a commercial office in the coastal town of Methil in Scotland can be supported by a novel renewable, hydrogen and fuel cell energy system, and how the local community is engaged with the project. 7. The Northern Sustainable House in Nunavut, Canada, which explores the process and results of a project to design and implement housing for local families that

  12. CO$_2$ cooling experience (LHCb)

    CERN Document Server

    Van Lysebetten, Ann; Verlaat, Bart

    2007-01-01

    The thermal control system of the LHCb VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a two-phase C0$_2$ cooling system based on the 2-Phase Accumulator Controlled Loop (2PACL) method. Liquid carbon dioxide is mechanically pumped in a closed loop, chilled by a water-cooled freon chiller and evaporated in the VELO detector. The main goal of the system is the permanent cooling of the VELO silicon sensors and of the heat producing front-end electronics inside a vacuum environment. This paper describes the design and the performance of the system. First results obtained during commissioning are also presented.

  13. Cooling towers principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, G B; Osborn, Peter D

    1990-01-01

    Cooling Towers: Principles and Practice, Third Edition, aims to provide the reader with a better understanding of the theory and practice, so that installations are correctly designed and operated. As with all branches of engineering, new technology calls for a level of technical knowledge which becomes progressively higher; this new edition seeks to ensure that the principles and practice of cooling towers are set against a background of up-to-date technology. The book is organized into three sections. Section A on cooling tower practice covers topics such as the design and operation of c

  14. Passive low energy cooling of buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Givoni, Baruch

    1994-01-01

    A practical sourcebook for building designers, providing comprehensive discussion of the impact of basic architectural choices on cooling efficiency, including the layout and orientation of the structure, window size and shading, exterior color, and even the use of plantings around the site. All major varieties of passive cooling systems are presented, with extensive analysis of performance in different types of buildings and in different climates: ventilation; radiant cooling; evaporative cooling; soil cooling; and cooling of outdoor spaces.

  15. Electrocatalytic activity of a mononuclear yttrium(III)–methyl orange complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles for adsorption/desorption of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafaie, Fahimeh [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadadzadeh, Hassan, E-mail: hadad@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behnamfar, Mohammad Taghi [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rudbari, Hadi Amiri [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan, 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    A new mononuclear yttrium(III) complex, [Y(MO){sub 3}(DMF){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (where MO{sup –} is methyl orange anion (4-[(4-dimethylamino)phenyldiazenyl]benzenesulfonate)), was synthesized in an aqueous solution. The complex was characterized by elemental analysis, UV/Vis, FT-IR, and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The yttrium oxysulfate nanoparticles (Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) were then prepared by calcination of [Y(MO){sub 3}(DMF){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The hydrogen adsorption/desorption (H{sub ads}/H{sub des}) behavior of the Y(III) complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles was studied at a carbon paste electrode (CPE) in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The recorded voltammograms exhibited a pair of peaks corresponding to the adsorption/desorption of hydrogen for the Y(III) complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles. The results show a reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption reaction for both compounds. The voltammograms of the nanoparticles indicate an excellent cycling stability for the adsorption/desorption of hydrogen. In addition, the linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) technique was used to investigate the electrocatalytic activity of both compounds for the hydrogen adsorption reaction. The linear voltammograms of both compounds demonstrate the excellent electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen adsorption reaction. - Highlights: • Preparation of a new Y(III) complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles. • Investigation of the H{sub ads}/H{sub des} reaction for both compounds by voltammetry. • Observation of two peaks corresponding to the H{sub ads}/H{sub des} in both compounds. • An excellent cycling stability for the nanoparticles in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}.

  16. Energy Savers: Cool Summer Tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.

    2001-01-01

    A tri-fold brochure addressing energy-saving tips for homeowners ranging from low- or no-cost suggestions to higher cost suggestions for longer-term savings. Cooling, windows, weatherizing, and landscaping are addressed

  17. Extended analysis of cooling curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djurdjevic, M.B.; Kierkus, W.T.; Liliac, R.E.; Sokolowski, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal Analysis (TA) is the measurement of changes in a physical property of a material that is heated through a phase transformation temperature range. The temperature changes in the material are recorded as a function of the heating or cooling time in such a manner that allows for the detection of phase transformations. In order to increase accuracy, characteristic points on the cooling curve have been identified using the first derivative curve plotted versus time. In this paper, an alternative approach to the analysis of the cooling curve has been proposed. The first derivative curve has been plotted versus temperature and all characteristic points have been identified with the same accuracy achieved using the traditional method. The new cooling curve analysis also enables the Dendrite Coherency Point (DCP) to be detected using only one thermocouple. (author)

  18. Geothermal heat can cool, too

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellstein, J.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at how geothermal energy can not only be used to supply heating energy, but also be used to provide cooling too. The article reports on a conference on heating and cooling with geothermal energy that was held in Duebendorf, Switzerland, in March 2008. The influence of climate change on needs for heating and cooling and the need for additional knowledge and data on deeper rock layers is noted. The seasonal use of geothermal systems to provide heating in winter and cooling in summer is discussed. The planning of geothermal probe fields and their simulation is addressed. As an example, the geothermal installations under the recently renewed and extended 'Dolder Grand' luxury hotel in Zurich are quoted. The new SIA 384/6 norm on geothermal probes issued by the Swiss Association of Architects SIA is briefly reviewed.

  19. Cooling methods for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspersic, B.; Fabjan, L.; Petelin, S.

    1977-01-01

    There are some results of measurements carried out on the wet cooling tower 275 MWe at TE Sostanj and on the experimental cooling tower at Jozef Stefan Institute, as well. They are including: the measurements of the output air conditions, the measurements of the cross current of water film and vapour-air flowing through two plates, and the distribution of velocity in boundary layer measured by anemometer

  20. Induced draught circular cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanquet, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Induced draught atmospheric cooling towers are described, to wit those in which the circulation is by power fans. This technique with fans grouped together in the centre enables a single tower to be used and provides an excellent integration of the steam wreath into the atmosphere. This type of cooling tower has been chosen for fitting out two 900 MW units of the Chinon power station in France [fr

  1. DETERMINATION OF RADIATOR COOLING SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Yakubovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a methodology for calculation of a radiator cooling surface with due account of heat transfer non-uniformity on depth of its core. Calculation of radiator cooling surfaces of «Belarus-1221» and «Belarus-3022» tractors has been carried out in the paper. The paper also advances standard size series of radiators for powerful «Belarus» tractor type.

  2. Cryogenic cooling system for HTS cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeru [Taiyo Nippon Sanso, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Recently, Research and development activity of HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power application is very progressive worldwide. Especially, HTS cable system and HTSFCL (HTS Fault current limiter) system are proceeding to practical stages. In such system and equipment, cryogenic cooling system, which makes HTS equipment cooled lower than critical temperature, is one of crucial components. In this article, cryogenic cooling system for HTS application, mainly cable, is reviewed. Cryogenic cooling system can be categorized into conduction cooling system and immersion cooling system. In practical HTS power application area, immersion cooling system with sub-cooled liquid nitrogen is preferred. The immersion cooling system is besides grouped into open cycle system and closed cycle system. Turbo-Brayton refrigerator is a key component for closed cycle system. Those two cooling systems are focused in this article. And, each design and component of the cooling system is explained.

  3. Investigation into complexing in Re/sup 7/-H/sub 3/O/sup +/-SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-H/sub 2/O system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinyakova, G S [AN Latvijskoj SSR, Riga. Inst. Neorganicheskoj Khimii

    1979-10-01

    Using the methods of spectrophotometry and conductometry it is shown, that in the ReO/sub 4//sup -/-H/sub 3/O/sup +/-SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-H/sub 2/O system interaction between rhenium (7) and sulfuric acid takes place in a wide concentration range. In low-acid solutions at pH 2.0-0.9 rhenium(7) complex with proton is formed at the ratio of 1:1 with lgK/sub 1/=3.30+-0.02. In 1-10 mol. sulfuric acid observed is consecutive complexing at the rhenium(7) - sulfuric acid ratio in the complex of 1:1 and 1:2 respectively with lgK/sub 2/=0.93+-0.13 and lgK/sub 3/=0.34+-0.03. At the background of concentrated perchloric acid rhenium (7) and sodium sulfate form two complex compounds at rhenium (7) - sodium sulfate ratio of 1:1 and 1:2 with lgK/sub 1/=1.86+-0.02 and lgK/sub 2/=2.35+-0.03.

  4. Modeling the effects of changes in new source review on national SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions from electricity-generating units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Evans; Benjamin F. Hobbs; Craig Oren; Karen L. Palmer [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2008-01-15

    The Clean Air Act establishes New Source Review (NSR) programs that apply to construction or modification of major stationary sources. In 2002 and 2003, EPA revised its rules to narrow NSR's coverage of renovations. Congress mandated a National Research Council study of the revisions' impacts. In that study, we used an electricity-sector model to explore possible effects of the equipment replacement provision (ERP), the principal NSR change directed at power plants. We find that, assuming implementation of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR), tight enforcement of the prerevision NSR rules would likely lead to no or limited decreases in national emissions compared to policies such as ERP. However, emissions might shift forward in time because the previous NSR rules would depress allowance prices, discouraging banking and encouraging allowance use. Only under the most aggressive prerevision NSR enforcement scenario, in which essentially all coal capacity is compelled to retrofit controls by 2020, do NOx emissions fall below ERP levels. Even then, total 2007-2020 SO{sub 2} emissions are unaffected. Further decreases in national emissions could be accomplished more cheaply by tighter emissions caps than through NSR because caps provide incentives for efficient operating strategies, such as fuel switching, as well as retrofits. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Swift heavy ion irradiated SnO{sub 2} thin film sensor for efficient detection of SO{sub 2} gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Punit; Sharma, Savita [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Tomar, Monika [Department of Physics, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Singh, Fouran [Inter University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drguptavinay@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Response of Ni{sup 7+} ion irradiated (100 MeV) SnO{sub 2} film have been performed. • Effect of irradiation on the structural and optical properties of SnO{sub 2} film is studied. • A decrease in operating temperature and increased response is seen after irradiation. - Abstract: Gas sensing response studies of the Ni{sup 7+} ion irradiated (100 MeV) and non-irradiated SnO{sub 2} thin film sensor prepared under same conditions have been performed towards SO{sub 2} gas (500 ppm). The effect of irradiation on the structural, surface morphological, optical and gas sensing properties of SnO{sub 2} thin film based sensor have been studied. A significant decrease in operating temperature (from 220 °C to 60 °C) and increased sensing response (from 1.3 to 5.0) is observed for the sample after irradiation. The enhanced sensing response obtained for the irradiated SnO{sub 2} thin film based sensor is attributed to the desired modification in the surface morphology and material properties of SnO{sub 2} thin film by Ni{sup 7+} ions.

  6. Synergistic effect of halide ions on the corrosion inhibition of aluminium in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} using 2-acetylphenothiazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebenso, E.E

    2003-03-05

    The corrosion inhibition of aluminium in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the presence of 2-acetylphenothiazine (2APTZ) at temperature range of 30-60 deg. C was studied using the weight loss and thermometric techniques. The effect of addition of halides (KCl, KBr, KI) is also reported. The inhibition efficiency (I, %) increased with increase in concentration of 2APTZ. The addition of the halides increased the inhibition efficiency to a considerable extent. The temperature increased the corrosion rate and inhibition efficiency in the range 30-60 deg. C in the absence and presence of the inhibitor and halides. Phenomenon of chemical adsorption is proposed. Flory-Huggins adsorption isotherm equation was obeyed at all the concentrations studied. The decrease in inhibition efficiency (and surface coverage values) was found to be in the order I{sup -}>Br{sup -}>Cl{sup -} which clearly indicates that the radii and the electronegativity of halides play a significant role in the adsorption process. All the data acquired reveal that 2APTZ acts as an inhibitor in the acid environment from the two techniques used. The synergistic effect of 2APTZ and halide ions is discussed.

  7. Growth response in radish to sequential and simultaneous exposures of NO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/. [Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Belle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogsett, W.E.; Holman, S.R.; Gumpertz, M.L.; Tingey, D.T.

    1984-01-01

    Sequential and simultaneous exposures of radish Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Belle to 0.8 ..mu..l liter/sup -1/ nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and 0.8 ..mu..l liter/sup -1/ sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) were conducted under both day- and night-time conditions to examine the effects on growth and development. Plants were exposed for 2 h per week over the four-week growing period. Frequent harvests at regular intervals were utilized for determination of the growth analysis functions. Sequential exposure to the two pollutants had no effect on growth compared with the charcoal-filtered air controls. Simultaneous exposure to the gases significantly reduced plant growth. The relative growth rate was reduced throughout the growing period apparently influenced by a reduced net assimilation rate. The partitioning of the available assimilate was altered to favor leaf growth at the expense of hypocotyl development. Night-time simultaneous exposures also altered growth progress but to a lesser degree than exposures during the day.

  8. Effect of exposure to O/sub 3/, SO/sub 2/, and NO/sub 2/ upon the lung histamine content of guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, T

    1969-01-01

    Male guinea pigs were exposed to 1 or 4 to 8 ppM O/sub 3/, 10 or 50 ppM SO/sub 2/, or 10 or 80 ppM NO/sub 2/ for 3 hr. Histamine and water content of lungs were measured. Animals exposed to higher concentrations of O/sub 3/ or NO/sub 2/ had edematous lungs. Lungs of those exposed to lower concentrations of O/sub 3/ or NO/sub 2/ also had slightly higher water contents. Lung histamine content and concentration decreased by O/sub 3/ exposure but not by any other treatment. In vitro exposure of lung to O/sub 3/ showed released histamine occurring in the perfusion outflow. Endogenous, cellular, inert histamine evidently was released by O/sub 3/ stimulant. However, the mechanism for NO/sub 2/-caused edema was not revealed, but could be direct action on lung vessels rather than through histamine mediation.

  9. Removal of As(V) and simultaneous production of copper powder from a Cu(II)-As(V)-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte by using reactive electrodialysis; Eliminacion de As (V) y produccion simultanea de polvo de cobre de un electrolito de Cu(II) - As(V) - H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} mediante electrodialisis reactiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez, J. P.

    2012-11-01

    The removal of As(V) and the simultaneous generation of powder of copper from an electrolyte made of As(V) - Cu(II) - H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was studied by using electro dialysis at several current densities, temperatures and aeration of the electrolyte. The removal of arsenic was proportional to the current density, temperature and aeration used. The removal of arsenic reached a value of 0.14 mmol/h at 500 A/m2, 25 degree centigrade and without aeration, this value increased to 0.31 mmol/h by increasing the aeration to 6.6 l/h. The Cu(II) was recovered in a 98 % as a fine arsenic free powder of metallic copper with oxides of copper. The arsenic was removed from the electrolyte by adsorption onto the anodic slimes generated from the lead anode oxidation. (Author) 24 refs.

  10. Electrocatalysts of platinum, cobalt and nickel prepared by mechanical alloying for the oxygen reduction reaction in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 0.5M; Electrocatalizadores de Platino, Cobalto y Niquel preparados por Aleado Mecanico para la reaccion de reduccion de oxigeno en H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 0.5M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia C, M.A.; Fernandez V, S.M.; Vargas G, J.R. [lNIN, Depto. de Quimica, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Metallic powders of Pt, Co and Nickel were processed by mechanical alloyed and electrocatalysts were synthesized for the oxygen reduction reaction, applicable in fuel cells. The structural and morphological characterization was carried out using X-ray Diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the alloyed powders formed agglomerates that consist of crystalline particles of nano metric size. Its were obtained polarization curves by the Electrode of Rotational Disk technique in a solution of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 0.5 M, used as electrolyte, to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity of mechanically alloyed powders. Tafel graphics were built to determine the kinetic parameters of each electro catalyst. The PtCoNi alloy exhibited the biggest electrocatalytic activity, with the smallest over potential for the oxygen reduction reaction. (Author)

  11. Emergency cooling system for a liquid metal cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Ryoichi; Fujiwara, Toshikatsu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To suitably cool liquid metal as coolant in emergency in a liquid metal cooled reactor by providing a detector for the pressure loss of the liquid metal passing through a cooling device in a loop in which the liquid metal is flowed and communicating the detector with a coolant flow regulator. Constitution: A nuclear reactor is stopped in nuclear reaction by control element or the like in emergency. If decay heat is continuously generated for a while and secondary coolant is insufficiently cooled with water or steam flowed through a steam and water loop, a cooler is started. That is, low temperature air is supplied by a blower through an inlet damper to the cooler to cool the secondary coolant flowed into the cooler through a bypass pipe so as to finally safely stop an entire plant. Since the liquid metal is altered in its physical properties by the temperature at this time, it is detected to regulate the opening of the valve of the damper according to the detected value. (Sekiya, K.)

  12. Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by-product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, September 11, 1992--December 11, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sublette, K.L.

    1992-12-31

    With the continual increase in the utilization of high sulfur and high nitrogen containing fossil fuels, the release of airborne pollutants into the environment has become a critical problem. The fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 2} during combustion. Fuel nitrogen and a fraction of the nitrogen from the combustion air are converted to nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide, NO{sub x}. For the past five years Combustion Engineering (now Asea Brown Boveri or ABB) and, since 1986, the University of Tulsa (TU) have been investigating the oxidation of H{sub 2}S by the facultatively anaerobic and autotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans and have developed a process, concept for the microbial removal of H{sub 2}S from a gas stream the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO by D. desulfuricans and T. denitrificans co-cultures and cultures-in-series was demonstrated. These systems could not be sustained due to NO inhibition of D. desulfuricans. However, a preliminary economic analysis has shown that microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}S with subsequent conversion to elemental sulfur by the Claus process is both technically and economically feasible if a less expensive carbon and/or energy source can be found. It has also been demonstrated that T. denitrificans can be grown anaerobically on NO(g) as a terminal electron acceptor with reduction to elemental nitrogen. Microbial reduction of NO{sub x} is a viable process concept for the disposal of concentrated streams of NO{sub x} as may be produced by certain regenerable processes for the removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gas.

  13. (Solid + liquid) isothermal evaporation phase equilibria in the aqueous ternary system (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + MgSO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O) at T = 308.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Shiqiang [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Deng Tianlong [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); College of Materials, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China)], E-mail: dtl@cdut.edu.cn

    2008-06-15

    The solubility and the density in the aqueous ternary system (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + MgSO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O) at T = 308.15 K were determined by the isothermal evaporation. Our experimental results permitted the construction of the phase diagram and the plot of density against composition. It was found that there is one eutectic point for (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} . H{sub 2}O + MgSO{sub 4} . 7H{sub 2}O), two univariant curves, and two crystallization regions corresponding to lithium sulphate monohydrate (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} . H{sub 2}O) and epsomite (MgSO{sub 4} . 7H{sub 2}O). The system belongs to a simple co-saturated type, and neither double salts nor solid solution was found. Based on the Pitzer ion-interaction model and its extended HW models of aqueous electrolyte solution, the solubility of the ternary system at T = 308.15 K has been calculated. The predicted solubility agrees well with the experimental values.

  14. Characterisation of Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag cement-like composites for the immobilisation of sulfate bearing nuclear wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobasher, Neda; Bernal, Susan A.; Hussain, Oday H. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Apperley, David C. [Solid-State NMR Group, Department of Chemistry, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Kinoshita, Hajime [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Soluble sulfate ions in nuclear waste can have detrimental effects on cementitious wasteforms and disposal facilities based on Portland cement. As an alternative, Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag composites are studied for immobilisation of sulfate-bearing nuclear wastes. Calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C–A–S–H) with some barium substitution is the main binder phase, with barium also present in the low solubility salts BaSO{sub 4} and BaCO{sub 3}, along with Ba-substituted calcium sulfoaluminate hydrates, and a hydrotalcite-type layered double hydroxide. This reaction product assemblage indicates that Ba(OH){sub 2} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} act as alkaline activators and control the reaction of the slag in addition to forming insoluble BaSO{sub 4}, and this restricts sulfate availability for further reaction as long as sufficient Ba(OH){sub 2} is added. An increased content of Ba(OH){sub 2} promotes a higher degree of reaction, and the formation of a highly cross-linked C–A–S–H gel. These Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag composite binders could be effective in the immobilisation of sulfate-bearing nuclear wastes.

  15. Likelihood estimations of vegetative alteration near known or proposed sources of air pollution. 1st annual progress report. [Computer simulation of effects on plants of SO/sub 2/ from fossil-fuel power plants sited in rural areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, D.D.; Pennypacker, S.P.

    1978-08-01

    There is an increasing trend to locate fossil-fuel electric generating stations in rural areas. These stations emit large quantities of air pollutants capable of causing serious alterations to the surrounding environment. The major phytotoxic air pollutant emitted is sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). The best way to predict the potential impact of new or expanded sources in rural areas would be to develop a computer model to simulate and predict SO/sub 2/ injury to vegetation. The proposed simulator would provide valuable input information for tasks such as site selection and compilation of environmental impact statements. Such a model would also provide data to management operators for the regulation of emissions. The model would also aid in our basic understanding of the complex interactions which influence plant susceptibility to air pollution. Input to the model would consist of biological and physical data and the output would include the probability of SO/sub 2/ injuring vegetation near existing or proposed sites. The model would be validated using a field situation. This report presents the results obtained during the first year of the project (August 1, 1977 to July 31, 1978).

  16. Transformation from Ag@Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} to Ag@Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 4} hybrid at room temperature: preparation and its visible light photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Ting; Gao, Shanmin, E-mail: gaosm@ustc.edu; Wang, Qingyao; Xu, Hui [Ludong University, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Wang, Zeyan; Huang, Baibiao, E-mail: bbhuang@sdu.edu.cn; Dai, Ying [Shandong University, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials (China)

    2017-02-15

    In the present study, Ag/Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 4} hybrid photocatalysts were obtained via a facile redox–precipitation reaction approach by using Ag@Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} nanocomposite as the precursor and KMnO{sub 4} as the oxidant. Multiple techniques, such as X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), photocurrent and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), were applied to investigate the structures, morphologies, optical, and electronic properties of as-prepared samples. The photocatalytic activities were evaluated by photodegradation of organic rhodamine B (RhB) and methyl orange (MO) under visible light irradiation. It was found that pure Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 4} can partially transform into metallic Ag during the photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants, but the Ag/Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 4} hybrids can maintain its structure stability and show enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity because of the surface plasma resonance effect of the metallic Ag.

  17. Atmospheric emissions from power plant cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheletti, W.

    2006-01-01

    Power plant recirculated cooling systems (cooling towers) are not typically thought of as potential sources of air pollution. However, atmospheric emissions can be important considerations that may influence cooling tower design and operation. This paper discusses relevant U.S. environmental regulations for potential atmospheric pollutants from power plant cooling towers, and various methods for estimating and controlling these emissions. (orig.)

  18. Power semiconductor device adaptive cooling assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    The invention relates to a power semiconductor device (100) cooling assembly for cooling a power semiconductor device (100), wherein the assembly comprises an actively cooled heat sink (102) and a controller (208; 300), wherein the controller (208; 300) is adapted for adjusting the cooling

  19. Impingement jet cooling in gas turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, R S

    2014-01-01

    Due to the requirement for enhanced cooling technologies on modern gas turbine engines, advanced research and development has had to take place in field of thermal engineering. Impingement jet cooling is one of the most effective in terms of cooling, manufacturability and cost. This is the first to book to focus on impingement cooling alone.

  20. Specific cooling capacity of liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Adcock, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    The assumed cooling process and the method used to calculate the specific cooling capacity of liquid nitrogen are described, and the simple equation fitted to the calculated specific cooling capacity data, together with the graphical form calculated values of the specific cooling capacity of nitrogen for stagnation temperatures from saturation to 350 K and stagnation pressures from 1 to 10 atmospheres, are given.

  1. 14 CFR 29.908 - Cooling fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooling fans. 29.908 Section 29.908... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.908 Cooling fans. For cooling fans that are a part of a powerplant installation the following apply: (a) Category A. For cooling fans installed...

  2. Cool colored coating and phase change materials as complementary cooling strategies for building cooling load reduction in tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Jiawei; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan; Zingre, Kishor T.; Yang, Jinglei; Wan, Man Pun; Yang, En-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Cool colored coating and PCM are two complementary passive cooling strategies. • A PCM cool colored coating system is developed. • The coating reduces cooling energy by 8.5% and is effective yearly in tropical Singapore. - Abstract: Cool colored coating and phase change materials (PCM) are two passive cooling strategies often used separately in many studies and applications. This paper investigated the integration of cool colored coating and PCM for building cooling through experimental and numerical studies. Results showed that cool colored coating and PCM are two complementary passive cooling strategies that could be used concurrently in tropical climate where cool colored coating in the form of paint serves as the “first protection” to reflect solar radiation and a thin layer of PCM forms the “second protection” to absorb the conductive heat that cannot be handled by cool paint. Unlike other climate zones where PCM is only seasonally effective and cool paint is only beneficial during summer, the application of the proposed PCM cool colored coating in building envelope could be effective throughout the entire year with a monthly cooling energy saving ranging from 5 to 12% due to the uniform climatic condition all year round in tropical Singapore.

  3. Fossil fuel and biomass burning effect on climate - Heating or cooling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Fraser, Robert S.; Mahoney, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The basic theory of the effect of pollution on cloud microphysics and its global implications is applied to compare the relative effect of a small increase in the consumption rate of oil, coal, or biomass burning on cooling and heating of the atmosphere. The characteristics of and evidence for the SO2 induced cooling effect are reviewed. This perturbation analysis approach permits linearization, therefore simplifying the analysis and reducing the number of uncertain parameters. For biomass burning the analysis is restricted to burning associated with deforestation. Predictions of the effect of an increase in oil or coal burning show that within the present conditions the cooling effect from oil and coal burning may range from 0.4 to 8 times the heating effect.

  4. New cooling regulation technology of secondary cooling station in DCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuan; Yan, Jun-wei; Zhu, Dong-sheng; Liu, Fei-long; Lei, Jun-xi [The Key Lab of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Liang, Lie-quan [The Key Lab of E-Commerce Market Application Technology of Guangdong Province, Guangdong University of Business Studies, Guangzhou 510320 (China)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, a kind of new control technology of secondary cooling station (constant flow rate/variable temperature difference) in district cooling system (DCS) is proposed in view of serial consequences including low efficiency and high operating cost caused by low temperature of supply water in DCS. This technology has been applied in DCS of Guangzhou University City. The result has already indicated that such technology can increase the supply and return temperatures of buildings, return water temperature of primary side in the plate heat exchanger unit, moreover, the efficiency of both the chiller and the whole system are improved significantly. (author)

  5. Beam Cooling with ionisation losses

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, Carlo; Kadi, Y; Vlachoudis, V

    2006-01-01

    A novel type of particle "cooling", called Ionization Cooling, is applicable to slow (v of the order of 0.1c) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin foil enhance the nuclear reaction probability, in a steady configuration in which ionisation losses are recovered at each turn by a RF-cavity. For a uniform target "foil" the longitudinal momentum spread diverges exponentially since faster (slower) particles ionise less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge shaped "foil". Multiple scattering and straggling are then "cooled" in all three dimensions, with a method similar to the one of synchrotron cooling, but valid for low energy ions. Particles then stably circulate in the beam indefinitely, until they undergo for instance nuclear processes in the thin target foil. This new method is under consideration for the nuclear production of a few MeV/A ion beams. Simple reactions, for instance Li 7 + D Li 8 + p, are more ...

  6. Newton's law of cooling revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, M

    2009-01-01

    The cooling of objects is often described by a law, attributed to Newton, which states that the temperature difference of a cooling body with respect to the surroundings decreases exponentially with time. Such behaviour has been observed for many laboratory experiments, which led to a wide acceptance of this approach. However, the heat transfer from any object to its surrounding is not only due to conduction and convection but also due to radiation. The latter does not vary linearly with temperature difference, which leads to deviations from Newton's law. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the cooling of objects with a small Biot number. It is shown that Newton's law of cooling, i.e. simple exponential behaviour, is mostly valid if temperature differences are below a certain threshold which depends on the experimental conditions. For any larger temperature differences appreciable deviations occur which need the complete nonlinear treatment. This is demonstrated by results of some laboratory experiments which use IR imaging to measure surface temperatures of solid cooling objects with temperature differences of up to 300 K.

  7. TPX heating and cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kungl, D.J.; Knutson, D.S.; Costello, J.; Stoenescu, S.; Yemin, L.

    1995-01-01

    TPX, while having primarily super-conducting coils that do not require water cooling, still has very significant water cooling requirements for the plasma heating systems, vacuum vessel, plasma facing components, diagnostics, and ancillary equipment. This is accentuated by the 1000-second pulse requirement. Two major design changes, which have significantly affected the TPX Heating and Cooling System, have been made since the conceptual design review in March of 1993. This paper will discuss these changes and review the current status of the conceptual design. The first change involves replacing the vacuum vessel neutron shielding configuration of lead/glass composite tile by a much simpler and more reliable borated water shield. The second change reduces the operating temperature of the vacuum vessel from 150 C to ≥50 C. With this temperature reduction, all in-vessel components and the vessel will be supplied by coolant at a common ≥50 C inlet temperature. In all, six different heating and cooling supply requirements (temperature, pressure, water quality) for the various TPX components must be met. This paper will detail these requirements and provide an overview of the Heating and Cooling System design while focusing on the ramifications of the TPX changes described above

  8. Helium-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longton, P.B.; Cowen, H.C.

    1975-01-01

    In helium cooled HTR's there is a by-pass circuit for cleaning purposes in addition to the main cooling circuit. This is to remove such impurities as hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide and water from the coolant. In this system, part of the coolant successively flows first through an oxidation bed of copper oxide and an absorption bed of silica gel, then through activated charcoal or a molecular sieve. The hydrogen and carbon monoxide impurities are absorbed and the dry gas is returned to the main cooling circuit. To lower the hydrogen/water ratio without increasing the hydrogen fraction in the main cooling circuit, some of the hydrogen fraction converted into water is added to the cooling circuit. This is done, inter alia, by bypassing the water produced in the oxidation bed before it enters the absorption bed. The rest of the by-pass circuit, however, also includes an absorption bed with a molecular sieve. This absorbs the oxidized carbon monoxide fraction. In this way, such side effects as the formation of additional methane, carburization of the materials of the by-pass circuit or loss of graphite are avoided. (DG/RF) [de

  9. Cooling clothing utilizing water evaporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakoi, Tomonori; Tominaga, Naoto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2014-01-01

    . To prevent wet discomfort, the T-shirt was made of a polyester material having a water-repellent silicon coating on the inner surface. The chest, front upper arms, and nape of the neck were adopted as the cooling areas of the human body. We conducted human subject experiments in an office with air......We developed cooling clothing that utilizes water evaporation to cool the human body and has a mechanism to control the cooling intensity. Clean water was supplied to the outer surface of the T-shirt of the cooling clothing, and a small fan was used to enhance evaporation on this outer surface...... temperature ranging from 27.4 to 30.7 °C to establish a suitable water supply control method. A water supply control method that prevents water accumulation in the T-shirt and water dribbling was validated; this method is established based on the concept of the water evaporation capacity under the applied...

  10. TGF-β2 inhibits AKT activation and FGF-2-induced corneal endothelial cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jiawei; Lu Zhenyu; Reinach, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The corneal endothelial cells form a boundary layer between anterior chamber and cornea. This single cell layer is important to maintain cornea transparency by eliciting net fluid transport into the anterior chamber. Injuries of the corneal endothelial layer in humans lead to corneal swelling and translucence. This hindrance is thought to be due to limited proliferative capacity of the endothelial layer. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) and transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF-β2) are both found in aqueous humor, and these two cytokines promote and inhibit cell growth, respectively. The intracellular signaling mechanisms by which TGF-β2 suppresses the mitogenic response to FGF-2, however, remain unclear. We have addressed this question by investigating potential crosstalk between FGF-2-induced and TGF-β2-regulated intracellular signaling events in cultured bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) cells. We found that TGF-β2 and FGF-2 oppositely affect BCE cell proliferation and TGF-β2 can override the stimulating effects of FGF-2 by increasing COX-2 expression in these cells. Consistent with these findings, overexpression of COX-2 significantly reduced FGF-2-induced cell proliferation whereas a COX-2 specific inhibitor NS398 reversed the effect of TGF-β2 on FGF-2-induced cell proliferation. The COX-2 product prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) blocks FGF-2-induced cell proliferation. Whereas FGF-2 stimulates cell proliferation by activating the AKT pathway, TGF-β2 and PGE-2 both inhibit this pathway. In accordance with the effect of PGE-2, cAMP also inhibits FGF-2-induced AKT activation. These findings suggest that the mitogenic response to FGF-2 in vivo in the corneal endothelial layer may be inhibited by TGF-β2-induced suppression of the PI3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway

  11. To cool, but not too cool: that is the question--immersion cooling for hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nigel A S; Caldwell, Joanne N; Van den Heuvel, Anne M J; Patterson, Mark J

    2008-11-01

    Patient cooling time can impact upon the prognosis of heat illness. Although ice-cold-water immersion will rapidly extract heat, access to ice or cold water may be limited in hot climates. Indeed, some have concerns regarding the sudden cold-water immersion of hyperthermic individuals, whereas others believe that cutaneous vasoconstriction may reduce convective heat transfer from the core. It was hypothesized that warmer immersion temperatures, which induce less powerful vasoconstriction, may still facilitate rapid cooling in hyperthermic individuals. Eight males participated in three trials and were heated to an esophageal temperature of 39.5 degrees C by exercising in the heat (36 degrees C, 50% relative humidity) while wearing a water-perfusion garment (40 degrees C). Subjects were cooled using each of the following methods: air (20-22 degrees C), cold-water immersion (14 degrees C), and temperate-water immersion (26 degrees C). The time to reach an esophageal temperature of 37.5 degrees C averaged 22.81 min (air), 2.16 min (cold), and 2.91 min (temperate). Whereas each of the between-trial comparisons was statistically significant (P < 0.05), cooling in temperate water took only marginally longer than that in cold water, and one cannot imagine that the 45-s cooling time difference would have any meaningful physiological or clinical implications. It is assumed that this rapid heat loss was due to a less powerful peripheral vasoconstrictor response, with central heat being more rapidly transported to the skin surface for dissipation. Although the core-to-water thermal gradient was much smaller with temperate-water cooling, greater skin and deeper tissue blood flows would support a superior convective heat delivery. Thus, a sustained physiological mechanism (blood flow) appears to have countered a less powerful thermal gradient, resulting in clinically insignificant differences in heat extraction between the cold and temperate cooling trials.

  12. Wireless sensor network adaptive cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T. [SynapSense Corp., Folsom, CA (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Options for reducing data centre cooling energy requirements and their cost savings were discussed with particular reference to a wireless control solution developed by SynapSense Corporation. The wireless sensor network reduces cooling energy use at data centres by providing improved air flow management through the installation of cold aisle containment. The use of this low cost, non-invasive wireless sensor network has reduced the cooling energy use in a data center at BC Hydro by 30 per cent. The system also reduced the server and storage fan energy by 3 per cent by maintaining inlet air temperature below ASHRAE recommended operating range. The distribution of low power, low cost wireless sensors has enabled visualization tools that are changing the way that data centres are managed. The annual savings have been estimated at 4,560,000 kWh and the annual carbon dioxide abatement is approximately 1,400 metric tons. tabs., figs.

  13. Cooled Beam Diagnostics on LEIR

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquille, G; Carli, C; Chanel, M; Prieto, V; Sautier, R; Tan, J

    2008-01-01

    Electron cooling is central in the preparation of dense bunches of lead beams for the LHC. Ion beam pulses from the LINAC3 are transformed into short highbrightness bunches using multi-turn injection, cooling and accumulation in the Low Energy Ion Ring, LEIR [1]. The cooling process must therefore be continuously monitored in order to guarantee that the lead ions have the required characteristics in terms of beam size and momentum spread. In LEIR a number of systems have been developed to perform these measurements. These include Schottky diagnostics, ionisation profile monitors and scrapers. Along with their associated acquisition and analysis software packages these instruments have proved to be invaluable for the optimisation of the electron cooler.

  14. Assessment of cooling tower impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This guideline describes the state of the art of the meteorological impact of wet cooling towers that are about 80 m to 170 m high, and have a waste heat power in the range of 1000 MW and 2500 MW. The physical processes occurring in the lowest layer of the atmosphere and their impact in the dispersion of cooling tower emissions are represented. On the basis of these facts, the impact on weather or climate in the vicinity of a high wet cooling tower is estimated. Thereby the results of the latest investigations (observations, measurements, and modeling) on the different locations of plants as well as their different power and construction types are taken into consideration. (orig.) [de

  15. Forced draft wet cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, A.; Caudron, L.; Viollet, P.L.

    1975-01-01

    The disposal of the heat released from a 1000MW power plant needs a natural draft tower of about 130m of diameter at the base, and 170m height, or a cooling system with a draft forced by about forty vans, a hundred meters in diameter, and thirty meters height. The plumes from atmospheric cooling systems form, in terms of fluid mechanics, hot jets in a cross current. They consist in complex flows that must be finely investigated with experimental and computer means. The study, currently being performed at the National Hydraulics Laboratory, shows that as far as the length and height of visible plumes are concerned, the comparison is favorable to some types of forced draft cooling system, for low and medium velocities, (below 5 or 6m/s at 10m height. Beyond these velocities, the forced draft sends the plume up to smaller heights, but the plume is generally more dilute [fr

  16. Emergency cooling device for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hisamichi; Naito, Masanori; Sato, Chikara; Chino, Koichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To pour high pressure cooling water into a core, when coolant is lost in a boiling water reactor, thereby restraining the rise of fuel cladding. Structure: A control rod guiding pipe, which is moved up and down by a control rod, is mounted on the bottom of a pressure vessel, the control rod guiding pipe being communicated with a high pressure cooling water tank positioned externally of the pressure vessel, and a differential in pressure between the pressure vessel and the aforesaid tank is detected when trouble of coolant loss occurs, and the high pressure cooling water within the tank is poured into the core through the control rod guiding pipe to restrain the rise of fuel cladding. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Emergency cooling apparatus for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, S.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described which has the core surrounded by coolant and an inert cover gas all sealed within a container, an emergency cooling apparatus employing a detector that will detect cover gas or coolant, particularly liquid sodium, leaking from the container of the reactor, to release a heat exchange material that is inert to the coolant, which heat exchange material is cooled during operation of the reactor. The heat exchange material may be liquid niitrogen or a combination of spheres and liquid nitrogen, for example, and is introduced so as to contact the coolant that has leaked from the container quickly so as to rapidly cool the coolant to prevent or extinguish combustion. (Official Gazette)

  18. Cooling many particles at once

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitiello, G.; Knight, P.; Beige, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We propose a mechanism for the collective cooling of a large number N of trapped particles to very low temperatures by applying red-detuned laser fields and coupling them to the quantized field inside an optical resonator. The dynamics is described by what appear to be rate equations but where some of the major quantities are coherences and not populations. It is shown that the cooperative behaviour of the system provides cooling rates of the same order of magnitude as the cavity decay rate. This constitutes a significant speed-up compared to other cooling mechanisms since this rate can, in principle, be as large as the square root of N times the single-particle cavity or laser coupling constants. (author)

  19. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  20. Simulated Measurements of Cooling in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohayai, Tanaz [IIT, Chicago; Rogers, Chris [Rutherford; Snopok, Pavel [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Cooled muon beams set the basis for the exploration of physics of flavour at a Neutrino Factory and for multi-TeV collisions at a Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) measures beam emittance before and after an ionization cooling cell and aims to demonstrate emittance reduction in muon beams. In the current MICE Step IV configuration, the MICE muon beam passes through low-Z absorber material for reducing its transverse emittance through ionization energy loss. Two scintillating fiber tracking detectors, housed in spectrometer solenoid modules upstream and downstream of the absorber are used for reconstructing position and momentum of individual muons for calculating transverse emittance reduction. However, due to existence of non-linear effects in beam optics, transverse emittance growth can be observed. Therefore, it is crucial to develop algorithms that are insensitive to this apparent emittance growth. We describe a different figure of merit for measuring muon cooling which is the direct measurement of the phase space density.

  1. Beam Dynamics With Electron Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Uesugi, T; Noda, K; Shibuya, S; Syresin, E M

    2004-01-01

    Electron cooling experiments have been carried out at HIMAC in order to develop new technologies in heavy-ion therapy and related researches. The cool-stacking method, in particular, has been studied to increase the intensity of heavy-ions. The maximum stack intensity was 2 mA, above which a fast ion losses occurred simulatneously with the vertical coherent oscillations. The instability depends on the working point, the stacked ion-density and the electron-beam density. The instability was suppressed by reducing the peak ion-density with RF-knockout heating.

  2. Magnetization effects in electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Skrinskii, A.N.

    A study is made of cooling in an electron beam which is accompanied by a strong magnetic field and a longitudinal temperature low compared to the transverse temperature. It is shown that the combination of two factors--magnetization and low longitudinal temperature of electrons--can sharply increase the cooling rate of a heavy-particle beam when the velocity spread is smaller than the transverse spread of electron velocities and reduce its temperature to the longitudinal temperature of the electrons, which is lower than that of the cathode by several orders of magnitude

  3. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The invention aims at simplying gas-cooled nuclear reactors. For the cooling gas, the reactor is provided with a main circulation system comprising one or several energy conversion main groups such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulation system comprising at least one steam-generating boiler heated by the gas after its passage through the reactor core and adapted to feed a steam turbine with motive steam. The invention can be applied to reactors the main groups of which are direct-cycle gas turbines [fr

  4. Lamination cooling system formation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippel, Wally E [Altadena, CA; Kobayashi, Daryl M [Monrovia, CA

    2009-05-12

    An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a cooling system. A stack of laminations have apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define straight or angled cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack. Gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

  5. Cooling towers in the landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boernke, F.

    1977-01-01

    The cooling tower as a large technical construction is one of the most original industrial buildings. It sticks out as an outlandish element in our building landscape, a giant which cannot be compared with the traditional forms of technical buildings. If it is constructed as a reinforced-concrete hyperboloid, its shape goes beyond all limits of building construction. Judgment of these highly individual constructions is only possible by applying a novel standard breaking completely with tradition. This new scale of height and dimension in industrial construction, and in particular the modern cooling tower, requires painstaking care and design and adaptation to the landscape around it. (orig.) [de

  6. Dynamic analysis of cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittnar, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Natural draught cooling towers are shell structures subjected to random vibrations due to wind turbulence and earthquake. The need of big power plant units has initiated the design of very large cooling towers. The random response of such structures may be analysed using a spectral approach and assuming a linear behaviour of the structure. As the modal superposition method is the most suitable procedure for this purpose it is necessary to determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes with adequate accuracy. (orig./GL)

  7. Investigations on passive containment cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knebel, J.U.; Cheng, X.; Neitzel, H.J.; Erbacher, F.J.; Hofmann, F.

    1997-01-01

    The composite containment design for advanced LWRs that has been examined under the PASCO project is a promising design concept for purely passive decay heat removal after a severe accident. The passive cooling processes applied are natural convection and radiative heat transfer. Heat transfer through the latter process removes at an emission coefficient of 0.9 about 50% of the total heat removed via the steel containment, and thus is an essential factor. The heat transferring surfaces must have a high emission coefficient. The sump cooling concept examined under the SUCO project achieves a steady, natural convection-driven flow from the heat source to the heat sink. (orig./CB) [de

  8. Sequential SO{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} capture enhanced by steam reactivation of a CaO-based sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilije Manovic; Edward J. Anthony [CANMET Energy Technology Centre-Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Natural Resources Canada

    2008-07-15

    The steam hydration reactivation characteristics of three limestone samples after multiple CO{sub 2} looping cycles are presented here. The CO{sub 2} cycles were performed in a tube furnace (TF) and the resulting samples were hydrated by steam in a pressure reactor (PR). The reactivation was performed with spent samples after carbonation and calcination stages. The reactivation tests were done with a saturated steam pressure at 200{sup o}C and also at atmospheric pressure and 100 {sup o}C. The characteristics of the reactivation samples were examined using BET and BJH pore characterization (for the original and spent samples, and samples reactivated under different conditions) and also by means of a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The levels of hydration achieved by the reactivated samples were determined as well as the conversions during sulphation and multiple carbonation cycles. It was found that the presence of a CaCO{sub 3} layer strongly hinders sorbent hydration and adversely affects the properties of the reactivated sorbent with regard to its behavior in sulphation and multiple carbonation cycles. Here, hydration of calcined samples under pressure is the most effective method to produce superior sulphur sorbents. However, reactivation of calcined samples under atmospheric conditions also produces sorbents with significantly better properties in comparison to those of the original sorbents. These results show that separate CO{sub 2} capture and SO{sub 2} retention in fluidized bed systems enhanced by steam reactivation is promising even for atmospheric conditions if the material for hydration is taken from the calciner. 49 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. The influence of reactivation by hydration of spent SO{sub 2} sorbents on their impact fragmentation in fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagnaro, F.; Salatino, P.; Santoro, L.; Scala, F. [University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)

    2010-09-01

    The relationship between calcination/sulphation and attrition/fragmentation of calcium-based SO{sub 2} sorbents in fluidized bed (FB) combustors has long been recognized, but only recently did attrition by impact receive due consideration. There is limited available information in the literature on the propensity of exhausted calcium-based sorbents to undergo high-velocity impact fragmentation after they have been reactivated by steam or water hydration. The present study addresses the relationship between hydration-induced reactivation of spent Ca-based sorbents and attrition by impact loading. The sorbent used in this work (a high-calcium Italian limestone) was pre-processed (sulphation at 850{sup o}C in a lab-scale FB, water hydration for 3 h at 25{sup o}C in a thermostatic bath, steam hydration for 3 h at 250 degrees C in a tubular reactor, dehydration at 850{sup o}C in the FB) and subjected to impact tests in a purposely designed impact test rig, operated with particle impact velocities ranging from 4 to 45 m s{sup -1}. The particle size distribution of the debris was worked out to define a fragmentation index and a probability density function of the size of generated fragments. The effect of hydration/reactivation of spent sorbent on propensity to undergo impact fragmentation was assessed, and results are discussed in the light of a mechanistic framework. It was observed that the prevailing particle breakage pattern was splitting/chipping for water-reactivated samples, disintegration for steam-reactivated samples. Characterization of sorbent microstructure by porosimetry and microscopic investigation on the reactivated samples highlighted a clear relationship between the extent of fragmentation and the cumulative specific volume of mesopores.

  10. Thermoluminescence study of K{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Cu nanophosphor for gamma ray dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandlik, Nandkumar [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Department of Physics, Fergusson College, Pune 411004 (India); Sahare, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Patil, B.J. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Department of Physics, Abasaheb Garware College, Pune 411004 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2013-11-15

    Nanocrystalline K{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Cu was synthesized by chemical coprecipitation method and annealed at 700 °C. XRD of this sample shows the cubic structure and the crystallite size ∼20 nm. The same was also confirmed with TEM and shows the formation of nanorods of quite uniform in shape having diameter ∼20 nm and length in the range of 200 nm. The FTIR spectrum exhibits the bands corresponding to sulphate anions around 1015 and 600 cm{sup −1}. These samples were irradiated with gamma radiation for the dose varying from 0.1 Gy to 50 kGy and their TL characteristics have been studied. The glow curves of the pristine samples consists of two peaks one at around 139 °C while another one around 185 °C while the glow curve of samples annealed at 700 °C show a major peak at around 165 °C and other two peaks of low intensity at around 300 °C and 390 °C. The change in glow curve structures around 700 °C is due to the phase transition (from orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}to cubic P2{sub 1}3 phase). The energy levels (trapping levels) get reorganized due to phase transition after the phase transition temperature (260 °C) and remain the same at higher temperatures (700 °C). TL dose response shows a linear behavior up to 1 kGy and further saturates with increase in the dose. Simple glow curve structure, easy method of synthesis, linear dose response and low fading make the nanocrystalline phosphor a good candidate for radiation dosimetry and especially, for the estimation of high doses of gamma rays where the microcrystalline phosphors generally saturate.

  11. High temperature corrosion of thermally sprayed NiCr- and amorphous Fe-based coatings covered with a KCl-K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varis, T.; Suhonen, T.; Tuurna, S.; Ruusuvuori, K.; Holmstroem, S.; Salonen, J. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Bankiewicz, D.; Yrjas, P. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    New process conditions due to the requirement of higher efficiency together with the use of high-chlorine and alkali containing fuels such as biomass and waste fuels for heat and electricity production will challenge the resistance and life of tube materials. In conventional materials the addition of alloying elements to increase the corrosion resistance in aggressive combustion conditions increases costs relatively rapidly. Thermally sprayed coating offer promising, effective, flexible and cost efficient solutions to fulfill the material needs for the future. Some heat exchanger design alteractions before global commercialization have to be overcome, though. High temperature corrosion in combustion plants can occur by a variety of mechanisms including passive scale degradation with subsequent rapid scaling, loss of adhesion and scale detachment, attack by melted or partly melted deposits via fluxing reactions and intergranular-/interlamellar corrosion. A generally accepted model of the ''active oxidation'' attributes the responsibility for inducing corrosion to chlorine. The active oxidation mechanism plays a key role in the thermally sprayed coatings due to their unique lamellar structure. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of NiCr (HVOF and Wire Arc), amorphous Fe-based, and Fe13Cr (Wire Arc) thermally sprayed coatings, were tested in the laboratory under simplified biomass combustion conditions. The tests were carried out by using a KCl-K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} salt mixture as a synthetic biomass ash, which was placed on the materials and then heat treated for one week (168h) at two different temperatures (550{sup 0}C and 600 C) and in two different gas atmospheres (air and air+30%H{sub 2}O). After the exposures, the metallographic cross sections of the coatings were studied with SEM/EDX analyzer. The results showed that the coatings behaved relatively well at the lower test temperature while critical corrosion through the lamella boundaries

  12. Cooling system for auxiliary reactor component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihira, Tomoko.

    1991-01-01

    A cooling system for auxiliary reactor components comprises three systems, that is, two systems of reactor component cooling water systems (RCCW systems) and a high pressure component cooling water system (HPCCW system). Connecting pipelines having partition valves are intervened each in a cooling water supply pipeline to an emmergency component of each of the RCCW systems, a cooling water return pipeline from the emmergency component of each of the RCCW systems, a cooling water supply pipeline to each of the emmergency components of one of the RCCW system and the HPCCW system and a cooling water return pipeline from each of the emmergency components of one of the RCCW system and the HPCCW system. With such constitution, cooling water can be supplied also to the emmergency components in the stand-by system upon periodical inspection or ISI, thereby enabling to improve the backup performance of the emmergency cooling system. (I.N.)

  13. MicroRNA-486-5p suppresses TGF-ß2-induced proliferation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bei Liu

    2017-09-27

    486-5p) on TGF-b2-induced proliferation, invasion ... The human lens epithelial cell line was purchased from ... MiR-486-5p mimics and negative control mimics were ... specific binding was blocked using 5% non-fat milk for 1.

  14. Interleukin 17 enhances bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced ectopic bone formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, M.; Kruyt, M. C.; Groen, W. M.; Van Dorenmalen, K. M.A.; Dhert, W. J.A.; Öner, F. C.; Alblas, J.

    2018-01-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17) stimulates the osteogenic differentiation of progenitor cells in vitro through a synergy with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. This study investigates whether the diverse responses mediated by IL-17 in vivo also lead to enhanced BMP-2-induced bone formation. Since IL-17 is

  15. Synaptotagmin-7 is a principal Ca2+ sensor for Ca2+ -induced glucagon exocytosis in pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wei, Shun-Hui; Hoang, Dong Nhut

    2009-01-01

    Hormones such as glucagon are secreted by Ca(2+)-induced exocytosis of large dense-core vesicles, but the mechanisms involved have only been partially elucidated. Studies of pancreatic beta-cells secreting insulin revealed that synaptotagmin-7 alone is not sufficient to mediate Ca(2+)-dependent i...

  16. Ca2+-Induced Cold Set Gelation of Whey Protein Isolate Fibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Hendrickx, H.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we describe the rheological behaviour of Ca2+-induced cold-set gels of whey protein mixtures. Coldset gels are important applications for products with a low thermal stability. In previous work [1], we determined the state diagram for whey protein mixtures that were heated for 10 h at

  17. The study on the evaporation cooling efficiency and effectiveness of cooling tower of film type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yingjian; You Xinkui; Qiu Qi; Li Jiezhi

    2011-01-01

    Based on heat and mass transport mechanism of film type cooling, which was combined with an on-site test on counter flow film type cooling tower, a mathematical model on the evaporation and cooling efficiency and effectiveness has been developed. Under typical climatic conditions, air conditioning load and the operating condition, the mass and heat balances have been calculated for the air and the cooling water including the volume of evaporative cooling water. Changing rule has been measured and calculated between coefficient of performance (COP) and chiller load. The influences of air and cooling water parameters on the evaporative cooling efficiency were analyzed in cooling tower restrained by latent heat evaporative cooling, and detailed derivation and computation revealed that both the evaporative cooling efficiency and effectiveness of cooling tower are the same characteristics parameters of the thermal performance of a cooling tower under identical assumptions.

  18. A cool present for LEIR

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    LEIR (Low Energy Ion Ring), which will supply lead ions to the LHC experiments, has taken delivery of one of its key components, its electron cooling system. From left to right, Gérard Tranquille, Virginia Prieto and Roland Sautier, in charge of the electron cooling system for LEIR at CERN, and Christian Lacroix, in charge of installation for the LEIR machine. On 16 December, the day before CERN's annual closure, the LEIR teams received a rather impressive Christmas present. The "parcel" from Russia, measuring 7 metres in length and 4 metres in height, weighed no less than 20 tonnes! The component will, in fact, be one of the key elements of the future LEIR, namely its electron cooling system. LEIR is one of the links in the injector chain that will supply lead ions to the LHC experiments, in particular ALICE (see Bulletin No. 28/2004 of 5 July 2004), within the framework of the I-LHC Project. The electron cooling system is designed to reduce and standardise transverse ion velocity. This focuses the bea...

  19. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor is described, wherein coolant is arranged to be flowed upwardly through a fuel assembly and having one or more baffles located above the coolant exit of the fuel assembly, the baffles being arranged so as to convert the upwardly directed motion of liquid metal coolant leaving the fuel assembly into a substantially horizontal motion. (author)

  20. Cool Runnings For String 2

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    String 2 is a series of superconducting magnets that are prototypes of those which will be installed in the LHC. It was cooled down to 1.9 Kelvin on September 14th. On Thursday last week, the dipoles of String 2 were successfully taken to nominal current, 11850 A.

  1. Peltier cooling in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Longji; Miao, Ruijiao; Wang, Kun; Thompson, Dakotah; Zotti, Linda Angela; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2018-02-01

    The study of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions is of fundamental interest for the development of various technologies including cooling (refrigeration) and heat-to-electricity conversion1-4. Recent experimental progress in probing the thermopower (Seebeck effect) of molecular junctions5-9 has enabled studies of the relationship between thermoelectricity and molecular structure10,11. However, observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions—a critical step for establishing molecular-based refrigeration—have remained inaccessible. Here, we report direct experimental observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions. By integrating conducting-probe atomic force microscopy12,13 with custom-fabricated picowatt-resolution calorimetric microdevices, we created an experimental platform that enables the unified characterization of electrical, thermoelectric and energy dissipation characteristics of molecular junctions. Using this platform, we studied gold junctions with prototypical molecules (Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au, Au-terphenyl-4,4''-dithiol-Au and Au-4,4'-bipyridine-Au) and revealed the relationship between heating or cooling and charge transmission characteristics. Our experimental conclusions are supported by self-energy-corrected density functional theory calculations. We expect these advances to stimulate studies of both thermal and thermoelectric transport in molecular junctions where the possibility of extraordinarily efficient energy conversion has been theoretically predicted2-4,14.

  2. System for cooling a cabinet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a cooling system comprising an active magnetic regenerator having a cold side and a hot side, a hot side heat exchanger connected to the hot side of the magnetic regenerator, one or more cold side heat exchangers, and a cold store reservoir comprising a volume...

  3. Cooling system upon reactor isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Oda, Shingo; Miura, Satoshi

    1992-01-01

    A water level indicator for detecting the upper limit value for a range of using a suppression pool and a thermometer for detecting the temperature of water at the cooling water inlet of an auxiliary device are disposed. When a detection signal is intaken and the water level in the suppression pool reach the upper limit value for the range of use, a secondary flow rate control value is opened and a primary flow rate control valve is closed. When the temperature of the water at the cooling water inlet of the auxiliary device reaches the upper limit value, the primary and the secondary flow rate control valves are opened. During a stand-by state, the first flow rate control valve is set open and the secondary flow rate control valve is set closed respectively. After reactor isolation, if a reactor water low level signal is received, an RCIC pump is actuated and cooling water is sent automatically under pressure from a condensate storage tank to the reactor and the auxiliary device requiring coolants by way of the primary flow rate control valve. Rated flow rate is ensured in the reactor and cooling water of an appropriate temperature can be supplied to the auxiliary device. (N.H.)

  4. Passive Cooling of Body Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Ronald; Matic, Peter; Mott, David

    2013-03-01

    Warfighter performance can be adversely affected by heat load and weight of equipment. Current tactical vest designs are good insulators and lack ventilation, thus do not provide effective management of metabolic heat generated. NRL has undertaken a systematic study of tactical vest thermal management, leading to physics-based strategies that provide improved cooling without undesirable consequences such as added weight, added electrical power requirements, or compromised protection. The approach is based on evaporative cooling of sweat produced by the wearer of the vest, in an air flow provided by ambient wind or ambulatory motion of the wearer. Using an approach including thermodynamic analysis, computational fluid dynamics modeling, air flow measurements of model ventilated vest architectures, and studies of the influence of fabric aerodynamic drag characteristics, materials and geometry were identified that optimize passive cooling of tactical vests. Specific architectural features of the vest design allow for optimal ventilation patterns, and selection of fabrics for vest construction optimize evaporation rates while reducing air flow resistance. Cooling rates consistent with the theoretical and modeling predictions were verified experimentally for 3D mockups.

  5. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, P.

    1991-10-15

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

  6. Proton-antiproton colliding beam electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Skrinskij, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    A possibility of effective cooling of high-energy pp tilde beams (E=10 2 -10 3 GeV) in the colliding mode by accompanying radiationally cooled electron beam circulating in an adjacent storage ring is studied. The cooling rate restrictions by the pp tilde beam interaction effects while colliding and the beam self-heating effect due to multiple internal scattering are considered. Some techniques permitting to avoid self-heating of a cooling electron beam or suppress its harmful effect on a heavy particle beam cooling are proposed. According to the estimations the cooling time of 10 2 -10 3 s order can be attained [ru

  7. A combined capillary cooling system for cooling fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Ana Paula; Pelizza, Pablo Rodrigo; Galante, Renan Manozzo; Bazzo, Edson [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (LabCET/UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Combustao e Engenharia de Sistemas Termicos], Emails: ana@labcet.ufsc.br, pablo@labcet.ufsc.br, renan@labcet.ufsc.br, ebazzo@emc.ufsc.br

    2010-07-01

    The operation temperature control has an important influence over the PEMFC (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell) performance. A two-phase heat transfer system is proposed as an alternative for cooling and thermal control of PEMFC. The proposed system consists of a CPL (Capillary Pumped Loop) connected to a set of constant conductance heat pipes. In this work ceramic wick and stainless mesh wicks have been used as capillary structure of the CPL and heat pipes, respectively. Acetone has been used as the working fluid for CPL and deionized water for the heat pipes. Experimental results of three 1/4 inch stainless steel outlet diameter heats pipes and one CPL have been carried out and presented in this paper. Further experiments are planned coupling the proposed cooling system to a module which simulates the fuel cell. (author)

  8. Scrubbing water treatment for simultaneous SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ removal from gases, with an integrated stage for reducing Fe-III to Fe-II in the washing liquid circuit by lowering the pH and circulation of SO/sub 2/. Waschwasseraufbereitung fuer die simultane SO/sub 2/- und NO/sub x/- Gasreinigung mit integrierter Stufe zur Reduktion von Eisen-III zu Eisen-II im Waschfluessigkeitskreislauf durch Absenkung des pH-Wertes und Kreislauffuehrung von Schwefeldioxid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelter, H.; Igelbuescher, H.; Gresch, H.; Dewert, H.

    1987-01-22

    In the main application P3524046.6 it is specified that when the pH value is lowered by the addition of an acid to a value below 3, iron(III) is reduced to iron(II), which means that it is no more necessary to apply an additional reducing agent for converting iron(III) to iron(II). To optimize the entire process of reduction, it is suggested that the solid matter produced with the help of calcium hydroxide from a partial flow of the scrubbing liquid circulation be acidified in a reaction vessel with the help of sulphuric acid to a pH value of 3.5 to 4.2, and that a partial oxidation of calcium sulphite be effected by adding a gaseous oxidant (air, O/sub 2/). The further reduction of the pH value due to oxidation and/or its further reduction by a mineral acid to a value between 1.5 and 2.5 leads to a decomposition of the non-oxidized calcium sulphite with the formation of SO/sub 2/ and thus to a reduction of iron(III) to iron(II); the supply of the oxidizing agent is thereby adjusted during the reduction phase, and surplus SO/sub 2/ released is recycled to the reaction vessel.

  9. Cooling towers for thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaboseau, J.

    1987-01-01

    After a brief recall on cooling towers testing and construction, this paper presents four examples of very large French nuclear power plant cooling towers, and one of an Australian thermal power plant [fr

  10. Design: More than a cool chair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Austin, Robert; Sullivan, Erin

    2006-01-01

    Austin, R., Friis, K., Sullivan, E. 2006. Design: More than a cool chair. Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing.......Austin, R., Friis, K., Sullivan, E. 2006. Design: More than a cool chair. Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing....

  11. A review of photovoltaic cells cooling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubeer, Swar A.; Mohammed, H. A.; Ilkan, Mustafa

    2017-11-01

    This paper highlights different cooling techniques to reduce the operating temperature of the PV cells. This review paper focuses on the improvement of the performance of the small domestic use PV systems by keeping the temperature of the cells as low as possible and uniform. Different cooling techniques have been investigated experimentally and numerically the impact of the operating temperature of the cells on the electrical and thermal performance of the PV systems. The advantages and disadvantages of ribbed wall heat sink cooling, array air duct cooling installed beneath the PV panel, water spray cooling technique and back surface water cooling are examined in this paper to identify their effective impact on the PV panel performance. It was identified that the water spray cooling system has a proper impact on the PV panel performance. So the water cooling is one way to enhance the electrical efficiency of the PV panel.

  12. A review of photovoltaic cells cooling techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubeer Swar A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights different cooling techniques to reduce the operating temperature of the PV cells. This review paper focuses on the improvement of the performance of the small domestic use PV systems by keeping the temperature of the cells as low as possible and uniform. Different cooling techniques have been investigated experimentally and numerically the impact of the operating temperature of the cells on the electrical and thermal performance of the PV systems. The advantages and disadvantages of ribbed wall heat sink cooling, array air duct cooling installed beneath the PV panel, water spray cooling technique and back surface water cooling are examined in this paper to identify their effective impact on the PV panel performance. It was identified that the water spray cooling system has a proper impact on the PV panel performance. So the water cooling is one way to enhance the electrical efficiency of the PV panel.

  13. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  14. Theory, technology, and technique of stochastic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, J.

    1993-10-01

    The theory and technological implementation of stochastic cooling is described. Theoretical and technological limitations are discussed. Data from existing stochastic cooling systems are shown to illustrate some useful techniques

  15. Cooling Performance of Additively Manufactured Microchannels and Film Cooling Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Curtis K.

    Additive manufacturing (AM) enables fabrication of components that cannot be made with any other manufacturing method. Significant advances in metal-based AM systems have made this technology feasible for building production parts to be used use in commercial products. In particular, the gas turbine industry benefits from AM as a manufacturing technique especially for development of components subjected to high heat flux. It has been shown that the use of microchannels in high heat flux components can lead to more efficient cooling designs than those that presently exist. The current manufacturing methods have prevented the use of microchannels in such parts, but AM now makes them manufacturable. However, before such designs can become a reality, much research must be done to characterize impacts on flow and heat transfer of AM parts. The current study considers the effect on flow and heat transfer through turbine cooling features made with AM. Specifically, the performance of microchannels and film cooling holes made with laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) is assessed. A number of test coupons containing microchannels were built from high temperature alloy powders on a commercially available L-PBF machine. Pressure drop and heat transfer experiments characterized the flow losses and convective heat transfer of air passing through the channels at various Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers. The roughness of the channels' surfaces was characterized in terms of statistical roughness parameters; the morphology of the roughness was examined qualitatively. Magnitude and morphology of surface roughness found on AM parts is unlike any form of roughness seen in the literature. It was found that the high levels of roughness on AM surfaces result in markedly augmented pressure loss and heat transfer at all Reynolds numbers, and conventional flow and heat transfer correlations produce erroneous estimates. The physical roughness measurements made in this study were correlated to

  16. Evaporative cooling in polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimotori, S; Sonai, A [Toshiba Corp. Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-06-05

    The concept of the evaporative cooling for the internally humidified PEFC was confirmed by the experiment. The evaporative cooling rates at the anode and the cathode were mastered under the various temperatures and air utilizations. At a high temperature the proportion of the evaporative cooling rate to the heat generation rate got higher, the possibility of the evaporative cooling was demonstrated. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Engineered design of SSC cooling ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bear, J.B.

    1993-05-01

    The cooling requirements of the SSC are significant and adequate cooling water systems to meet these requirements are critical to the project's successful operation. The use of adequately designed cooling ponds will provide reliable cooling for operation while also meeting environmental goals of the project to maintain streamflow and flood peaks to preconstruction levels as well as other streamflow and water quality requirements of the Texas Water Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency

  18. Effect of trace elements (ZnSO/sub 4/, MnSO/sub 4//sub /and Al/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/) on soil Ph, Zinc and manganese concentrations in case of mature teat bushes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosheen, M.; Riaz, A.K.

    2005-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effect of trace elements on growth and yield of mature tea bushes, at National Tea Research Inst., Shinkiari, Mansehra, Pakistan, during 2003. The treatments included control (no fertilizer), recommended dose of NPK (432:111:74 kg ha/sup -1/ alone and NPK in combination with either two doses of (5.5 and 11 kg ha/sup -1/) ZnSO/sub 4/ or (2.0 and 4.0 kg ha/sup -1/)MnSO/sub 4/ or (0.225 and 0.45 kg ha/sup -1/) Al/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ to soil and one dose of each (11 kg ha/sup -1/) ZnSO/sub 4/, (4.0 kg ha/sup -1) MnSO/sub 4/ and (0.45 kg ha/sup -1/) Al/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ applied as spray solution. Treatments including soil application of NPK alone and NPK + either ZnSO/sub 4/, MnSO/sub 4/ or Al/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ significantly (P < 0.001) increased tea yield (fresh weight of three leaves + bud), shoot height and tissue Zn and Mn concentrations with significant interactions (T x t) on tissue Zn and Mn levels. As compared to control the yield increased by 7.0,30,.37,42,37 and 34% with NPK alone, NPK + 5.5, + 11.0 ZnSO/sub 4/, + 2.0, + 4.0 MnSO/sub 4/, + 0.225, + 0.45 kg ha/sup -1/ Al/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/, respectively during fist three months while the yield of six months plucking showed similar response to treatments but was significantly lower than the first three months. Soil pH, Zn and Mn concentrations were significantly affected by treatments, time of sampling, and depth of sampling. Except ZnSO/sub 4/, lower doses of MnSO/sub 4/ (2.0 kg ha-l) and Al/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ (0.225 kg ha/sup -1/), were more effective as compared to their higher doses when applied to soil, regarding tea yield and shoot height. Foliar application of 11 kg ha-l ZnSO/sub 4/ significantly increased yield as compared to its both levels when applied to soil. It is concluded that MnSO/sub 4/ and Al/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ should be applied at the rate of 2.0 and 0.225 kg ha/sup -l/. (author)

  19. Helium cooling of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Baxi, C.; Bourque, R.; Dahms, C.; Inamati, S.; Ryder, R.; Sager, G.; Schleicher, R.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of worldwide design experience and in coordination with the evolution of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the application of helium as a coolant for fusion appears to be at the verge of a transition from conceptual design to engineering development. This paper presents a review of the use of helium as the coolant for fusion reactor blanket and divertor designs. The concept of a high-pressure helium cooling radial plate design was studied for both ITER and PULSAR. These designs can resolve many engineering issues, and can help with reaching the goals of low activation and high performance designs. The combination of helium cooling, advanced low-activation materials, and gas turbine technology may permit high thermal efficiency and reduced costs, resulting in the environmental advantages and competitive economics required to make fusion a 21st century power source. ((orig.))

  20. Ionization cooling ring for muons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Palmer

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Practical ionization cooling rings could lead to lower cost or improved performance in neutrino factory or muon collider designs. The ring modeled here uses realistic three-dimensional fields. The performance of the ring compares favorably with the linear cooling channel used in the second U.S. Neutrino Factory Study. The normalized 6D emittance of an ideal ring is decreased by a factor of approximately 240, compared with a factor of only 15 for the linear channel. We also examine such real-world effects as windows on the absorbers and rf cavities and leaving empty lattice cells for injection and extraction. For realistic conditions the ring decreases the normalized 6D emittance by a factor of 49.

  1. Information technology equipment cooling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-20

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools air utilized by the rack of information technology equipment to cool the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat generated by the rack of information technology equipment.

  2. Integrated circuit cooled turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Um, Jae Y.; Holloman, Harry; Koester, Steven

    2017-08-29

    A turbine rotor blade includes at least two integrated cooling circuits that are formed within the blade that include a leading edge circuit having a first cavity and a second cavity and a trailing edge circuit that includes at least a third cavity located aft of the second cavity. The trailing edge circuit flows aft with at least two substantially 180-degree turns at the tip end and the root end of the blade providing at least a penultimate cavity and a last cavity. The last cavity is located along a trailing edge of the blade. A tip axial cooling channel connects to the first cavity of the leading edge circuit and the penultimate cavity of the trailing edge circuit. At least one crossover hole connects the penultimate cavity to the last cavity substantially near the tip end of the blade.

  3. International Ventilation Cooling Application Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzer, Peter; Psomas, Theofanis Ch.; OSullivan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The currently running International Energy Agency, Energy and Conservation in Buildings, Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling (VC) project, is coordinating research towards extended use of VC. Within this Annex 62 the joint research activity of International VC Application Database has been carried out...... and locations, using VC as a mean of indoor comfort improvement. The building-spreadsheet highlights distributions of technologies and strategies, such as the following. (Numbers in % refer to the sample of the database’s 91 buildings.) It may be concluded that Ventilative Cooling is applied in temporary......, systematically investigating the distribution of technologies and strategies within VC. The database is structured as both a ticking-list-like building-spreadsheet and a collection of building-datasheets. The content of both closely follows Annex 62 State-Of-The- Art-Report. The database has been filled, based...

  4. Renewables for Heating and Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This timely report examines the technologies, current markets and relative costs for heat and cold production using biomass, geothermal and solar-assisted systems. It evaluates a range of national case studies and relevant policies. Should the successful and more cost-effective policies be implemented by other countries, then the relatively untapped economic potential of renewable energy heating and cooling systems could be better realised, resulting in potential doubling of the present market within the next few years.

  5. Water cooling of RF structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battersby, G.; Zach, M.

    1994-06-01

    We present computer codes for heat transfer in water cooled rf cavities. RF parameters obtained by SUPERFISH or analytically are operated on by a set of codes using PLOTDATA, a command-driven program developed and distributed by TRIUMF [1]. Emphasis is on practical solutions with designer's interactive input during the computations. Results presented in summary printouts and graphs include the temperature, flow, and pressure data. (authors). 4 refs., 4 figs

  6. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  7. Liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuchkov, I.I.; Filonov, V.S.; Zaitsev, B.I.; Artemiev, L.N.; Rakhimov, V.V.

    1976-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled reactor is described comprising two rotatable plugs, one of them, having at least one hole, being arranged internally of the other, a recharging mechanism with a guide tube adapted to be moved through the hole of the first plug by means of a drive, and a device for detecting stacks with leaky fuel elements, the recharging mechanism tube serving as a sampler

  8. Dew Point Evaporative Comfort Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Multiple DASs were installed at Fort Carson, and the data from all the sensors were stored and partially processed on Campbell Scientific Data Loggers. The...evaporative cooling technologies would be expected to easily overcome utility- scale water withdrawal rates. As an example, an evaluation of an...Ambient pressure Outdoor Setra 276 1% of full scale Pyranometer Horizontal Campbell Scientific CS300 5% of daily total The OAT measurement has an

  9. Gas cooled traction drive inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides a modular circuit card configuration for distributing heat among a plurality of circuit cards. Each circuit card includes a housing adapted to dissipate heat in response to gas flow over the housing. In one aspect, a gas-cooled inverter includes a plurality of inverter circuit cards, and a plurality of circuit card housings, each of which encloses one of the plurality of inverter cards.

  10. 46 CFR 119.420 - Engine cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Engine cooling. 119.420 Section 119.420 Shipping COAST... Machinery Requirements § 119.420 Engine cooling. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all engines must be water cooled and meet the requirements of this paragraph. (1) The engine head...

  11. 46 CFR 182.420 - Engine cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Engine cooling. 182.420 Section 182.420 Shipping COAST...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.420 Engine cooling. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), and (e) of this section, all engines must be water cooled and meet...

  12. Early developments in solar cooling equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    A brief description of a development program to design, fabricate and field test a series of solar operated or driven cooling devices, undertaken by the Marshall Space Flight Center in the context of the Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Act of 1974, is presented. Attention is given to two basic design concepts: the Rankine cycle principle and the use of a dessicant for cooling.

  13. Desalting a process cooling water using nanofiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radier, R.G.J.; van Oers, C.W.; Steenbergen, A.; Wessling, Matthias

    2001-01-01

    The cooling water system of a chemical plant of Akzo Nobel is a partly open system. The site is located at the North Sea. The air in contact with the cooling water contains seawater droplets dissolving and increasing the chloride concentration. The cooling water contains chromate to protect the

  14. Interleukin-2 induces tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of stat3 in human T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Svejgaard, A; Skov, S

    1994-01-01

    that stimulation through the IL-2R induced tyrosine phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation of stat3, a newly identified member of the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family of proteins. In contrast, stat1 proteins were not tyrosine phosphorylated after IL-2 ligation, whereas...... an apparent molecular mass of 84 kDa and was not recognized by stat3 or stat1 mAb or antisera. Since IL-2 induced nuclear translocation of the 84 kDa protein and stat3 followed identical kinetics, p84 is a candidate for a new, yet undefined, member of the STAT family. Taken together, we report that IL-2...... induces tyrosine phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation of stat3 and an as yet undefined 84-kDa protein in antigen-specific human T cell lines....

  15. Thermoluminescence response of K{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} nanophosphor Co-doped with Eu and Ce for gamma ray dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, B. J. [Dept. of Physics, Abasaheb Garware College, Pune-411004 (India); Bhadane, Mahesh S.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Mandlik, N. T. [Dept. of Physics, Fergusson College, Pune-411004 (India); Kulkarni, M. S. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Bhatt, B. C. [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-06-24

    K{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} nanophosphors co-doped with Eu and Ce were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method. These samples were further annealed at 700 °C structural reformation. The structural and morphological characteristics were studied using XRD and TEM techniques. The particle size calculated from XRD spectra was around 35 nm. The as synthesized sample shows cubic structure annealed at 700 °C. The as synthesized and annealed sample of K{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}: EuCe were irradiated with Co{sup 60} gamma rays for the doses from 2Gy to 1kGy. The TL characteristic sample of co-doped were studied for the dosimetric application by gamma radiation. The TL spectrum of annealed sample has single peaked at 160 °C. The Eu doped sample has a high TL sensitivity than Ce doped sample. But after co-doping with Eu and Ce, TL intensity observed to be decreased. The decrees in TL peak intensity of the phosphor on co-doping of Eu and Ce gives an insight into the emission mechanism of the phosphor which involves energy transfer from Eu to Ce. The TL response of all the samples were found to be linear for the dose from 2 Gy to 1 KGy. Therefore, K{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}: EuCe nanophosphor can be used for the measurement of high dose of gamma radiation.

  16. Visualization of water usage and photosynthetic activity of street trees exposed to 2 ppm of SO{sub 2}-A combined evaluation by cold neutron and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, U. [Faculty of Agriculture, Iwate University (Japan)], E-mail: uzuki@iwate-u.ac.jp; Kardjilov, N.; Hilger, A.; Manke, I. [SF3, Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy (Germany); Shono, H. [Faculty of Agriculture, Iwate University (Japan); Herppich, W.B. [Department of Horticultural Engineering, Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering Potsdam-Bornim (Germany)

    2009-06-21

    Photosynthetic efficacy and auto-exhaust-fume resistance of street trees were evaluated by cold neutron radiography (CNR) with D{sub 2}O tracer and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) imaging. With these techniques, information on the responses of water usage and photosynthetic activity of plants exposed to simulate toxic auto-exhaust fumes (2 ppm SO{sub 2} in air) were obtained. Branches of hibiscus trees were detached, placed into a tub with aerated water and used for the experiments after rooting. A CF image was taken before SO{sub 2} was applied for 1 h. During the experiment, CNR and CF imaging were conduced. H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O in the plant container were exchanged every 30 min to observe water uptake. D{sub 2}O tracer clearly showed water uptake into the hibiscus stem during each treatment. When the atmosphere was changed from simulated auto-exhaust fumes to normal air again, the amount of D{sub 2}O and, hence, water uptake increased. CF imaging was well suited to evaluate the effects of SO{sub 2} as simulated toxic auto-exhaust fumes on plants. The maximum photochemical efficiency (F{sub v}/F{sub m}), a sensitive indicator of the efficacy and the integrity of plants' photosynthesis, immediately dropped by 30% after supplying the simulated auto-exhaust fumes. This indicates that toxic auto-exhaust fumes negatively affected the photosynthetic activity of hibiscus leaves. Simultaneous CNR and CF imaging successfully visualized variations of photosynthetic activity and water uptake in the sample. Thus, this combination method was effective to non-destructive analyze the physiological status of plants.

  17. Cooling device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Miyuki.

    1996-01-01

    In a cooling device for a reactor container, a low pressure vessel is connected to an incondensible gas vent tube by way of an opening/closing valve. Upon occurrence of a loss of coolant accident, among steams and incondensible gases contained in the reactor container, steams are cooled and condensed in a heat exchanger. The incondensible gases are at first discharged from the heat exchanger to a suppression pool by way of the incondensible gas vent tube, but subsequently, they are stagnated in the incondensible gas vent tube to hinder heat exchanging and steam cooling and condensing effects in the heat exchanger thereby raising temperature and pressure in the reactor. However, if the opening/closing valve is opened when the incondensible gases are stagnated in the incondensible gas vent tube, since the incondensible gases stagnated in the heat exchanger are sucked and discharged to the low pressure vessel, the performance of the heat exchanger is maintained satisfactorily thereby enabling to suppress elevation of temperature and pressure in the reactor container. (N.H.)

  18. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed

    1998-01-01

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

  19. Emergency reactor core cooling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Iwata, Yasutaka.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor core cooling device for a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, D/S pit (gas/water separator storage pool) water is used as a water source for the emergency reactor core cooling facility upon occurrence of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) by introducing the D/S pit water to the emergency reactor core cooling (ECCS) pump. As a result, the function as the ECCS facility can be eliminated from the function of the condensate storage tank which has been used as the ECCS facility. If the function is unnecessary, the level of quality control and that of earthquake resistance of the condensate storage tank can be lowered to a level of ordinary facilities to provide an effect of reducing the cost. On the other hand, since the D/S pit as the alternative water source is usually a facility at high quality control level and earthquake resistant level, there is no problem. The quality of the water in the D/S pit can be maintained constant by elevating pressure of the D/S pit water by a suppression pool cleanup (SPCU) pump to pass it through a filtration desalter thereby purifying the D/S pit water during the plant operation. (I.S.)

  20. Emergency reactor core cooling facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Iwata, Yasutaka

    1996-11-01

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor core cooling device for a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, D/S pit (gas/water separator storage pool) water is used as a water source for the emergency reactor core cooling facility upon occurrence of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) by introducing the D/S pit water to the emergency reactor core cooling (ECCS) pump. As a result, the function as the ECCS facility can be eliminated from the function of the condensate storage tank which has been used as the ECCS facility. If the function is unnecessary, the level of quality control and that of earthquake resistance of the condensate storage tank can be lowered to a level of ordinary facilities to provide an effect of reducing the cost. On the other hand, since the D/S pit as the alternative water source is usually a facility at high quality control level and earthquake resistant level, there is no problem. The quality of the water in the D/S pit can be maintained constant by elevating pressure of the D/S pit water by a suppression pool cleanup (SPCU) pump to pass it through a filtration desalter thereby purifying the D/S pit water during the plant operation. (I.S.)

  1. Air and water cooled modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, Daniel L.; Arnold, Phillip A.; Ball, Don G.; Cook, Edward G.

    1995-01-01

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air.

  2. Elastocaloric cooling materials and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    We are actively pursuing applications of thermoelastic (elastocaloric) cooling using shape memory alloys. Latent heat associated with martensitic transformation of shape memory alloys can be used to run cooling cycles with stress-inducing mechanical drives. The coefficient of performance of thermoelastic cooling materials can be as high as 11 with the directly measured DT of around 17 °C. Depending on the stress application mode, the number of cycles to fatigue can be as large as of the order of 105. Efforts to design and develop thermoelastic alloys with long fatigue life will be discussed. The current project at the University of Maryland is focused on development of building air-conditioners, and at Maryland Energy and Sensor Technologies, smaller scale commercial applications are being pursued. This work is carried out in collaboration with Jun Cui, Yiming Wu, Suxin Qian, Yunho Hwang, Jan Muehlbauer, and Reinhard Radermacher, and it is funded by the ARPA-E BEETIT program and the State of Maryland.

  3. Emergency reactor container cooling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns an emergency cooling facility for a nuclear reactor container having a pressure suppression chamber, in which water in the suppression chamber is effectively used for cooling the reactor container. That is, the lower portion of a water pool in the pressure suppression chamber and the inside of the reactor container are connected by a pipeline. The lower end of the pipeline and a pressurized incombustible gas tank disposed to the outside of the reactor container are connected by a pipeline by way of valves. Then, when the temperature of the lower end of the pressure vessel exceeds a predetermined value, the valves are opened. If the valves are opened, the incombustible gas flows into the lower end of the pipeline connecting the lower portion of the water pool in the pressure suppression chamber and the inside of the reactor container. Since the inside of the pipeline is a two phase flow comprising a mixture of a gas phase and a liquid phase, the average density is decreased. Therefore, the water level of the two phase flow is risen by the level difference between the inside and the outside of the pipeline and, finally, the two phase mixture is released into the reactor container. As a result, the reactor container can be cooled by water in the suppression chamber by a static means without requiring pumps. (I.S.)

  4. PGE2-induced colon cancer growth is mediated by mTORC1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, Marc; Faes, Seraina; Dormond-Meuwly, Anne; Demartines, Nicolas; Dormond, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PGE 2 activates mTORC1 in colon cancer cells. • Inhibition of mTORC1 blocks PGE 2 induced colon cancer cell growth. • mTORC1 is a signaling intermediary in PGE 2 induced colon cancer cell responses. - Abstract: The inflammatory prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) cytokine plays a key role in the development of colon cancer. Several studies have shown that PGE 2 directly induces the growth of colon cancer cells and furthermore promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing the production of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The signaling intermediaries implicated in these processes have however not been fully characterized. In this report, we show that the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays an important role in PGE 2 -induced colon cancer cell responses. Indeed, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE 2 increased mTORC1 activity as observed by the augmentation of S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation, a downstream effector of mTORC1. The PGE 2 EP 4 receptor was responsible for transducing the signal to mTORC1. Moreover, PGE 2 increased colon cancer cell proliferation as well as the growth of colon cancer cell colonies grown in matrigel and blocking mTORC1 by rapamycin or ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR abrogated these effects. Similarly, the inhibition of mTORC1 by downregulation of its component raptor using RNA interference blocked PGE 2 -induced LS174T cell growth. Finally, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE 2 increased VEGF production which was also prevented by mTORC1 inhibition. Taken together, these results show that mTORC1 is an important signaling intermediary in PGE 2 mediated colon cancer cell growth and VEGF production. They further support a role for mTORC1 in inflammation induced tumor growth

  5. Dexmedetomidine attenuates H2O2-induced cell death in human osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ji-Young; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Park, Bong-Soo; Yoon, Ji-Uk; Shin, Sang-Wook; Kim, Do-Wan

    2016-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species play critical roles in homeostasis and cell signaling. Dexmedetomidine, a specific agonist of the α 2 -adrenoceptor, has been commonly used for sedation, and it has been reported to have a protective effect against oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether dexmedetomidine has a protective effect against H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative stress and the mechanism of H 2 O 2 -induced cell death in normal human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) cells. Cells were divided into three groups: control group-cells were incubated in normoxia without dexmedetomidine, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) group-cells were exposed to H 2 O 2 (200 µM) for 2 h, and Dex/H 2 O 2 group-cells were pretreated with dexmedetomidine (5 µM) for 2 h then exposed to H 2 O 2 (200 µM) for 2 h. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated. Osteoblast maturation was determined by assaying bone nodular mineralization. Expression levels of bone-related proteins were determined by western blot. Cell viability was significantly decreased in the H 2 O 2 group compared with the control group, and this effect was improved by dexmedetomidine. The Hoechst 33342 and Annexin-V FITC/PI staining revealed that dexmedetomidine effectively decreased H 2 O 2 -induced hFOB cell apoptosis. Dexmedetomidine enhanced the mineralization of hFOB cells when compared to the H 2 O 2 group. In western blot analysis, bone-related protein was increased in the Dex/H 2 O 2 group. We demonstrated the potential therapeutic value of dexmedetomidine in H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative stress by inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing osteoblast activity. Additionally, the current investigation could be evidence to support the antioxidant potential of dexmedetomidine in vitro.

  6. BMP2 induces PANC-1 cell invasion by MMP-2 overexpression through ROS and ERK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Ben, Qi-Wen; Yao, Wei-Yan; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Chen, Da-Fan; He, Xiang-Yi; Li, Lei; Yuan, Yao-Zong

    2012-06-01

    The emerging roles of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in the initiation and progression of multiple cancers have drawn great attention in cancer research. We hypothesized that BMP2 promotes cancer metastasis by modulating MMP-2 secretion and activity through intracellular ROS regulation and ERK activation in human pancreatic cancer. Our data show that stimulation of PANC-1 cells with BMP2 induced MMP-2 secretion and activation, associated with decreased E-cadherin expression, resulting in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) and cell invasion. Blockade of ROS by the ROS scavenger, 2-MPG, abolished cell invasion, inhibited the EMT process and decreased MMP-2 expression, suggesting ROS accumulation caused an increase in MMP-2 expression in BMP2-stimulated PANC-1 cell invasion. Furthermore, treatment of PANC-1 cells with 2-MPG or ERK inhibitor PD98059 reduced the phosphorylation of ERK, resulting in attenuation of BMP2-induced cell invasion and MMP-2 activation. Taken together, these results suggest that BMP2 induces the cell invasion of PANC-1 cells by enhancing MMP-2 secretion and acting through ROS accumulation and ERK activation.

  7. Modeling impacts of NH{sub 3} on uptake of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by charged nucleating nanoparticles in the Earth's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadykto, A. B., E-mail: anadykto@gmail.com [Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Department of Applied Mathematics, Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, Vadkovsky per. 1, Moscow 127055 (Russian Federation); Nazarenko, K. M.; Markov, P. N. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, Vadkovsky per. 1, Moscow 127055 (Russian Federation); Yu, F. [Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2016-06-08

    The understanding of the role of ammonia, a well-known stabilizer of binary sulfuric acid-water clusters, in the gas-to-nanoparticle conversion in the Earth atmosphere is critically important for the assessment of aerosol radiative forcing associated with the climate changes. The sulfuric acid H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is present in the atmosphere in the form of the gas-phase hydrates (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, whose interaction with NH{sub 3} leads to the formation of more stable bisulfate clusters (NH{sub 3})(H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub n}. Although the impact of NH{sub 3} on the thermochemical stability of binary clusters nucleating homogeneously has been studied in some detail in the past, the effect of ammonia on other microphysical properties relevant to nucleation remains insufficiently well understood. In the present study, the effect of ammonia on the electrical dipole moment controlling the nucleation of airborne ions via the dipole-charge interaction has been investigated using the Density Functional Theory (DFT), ab initio MP2 and model chemistry G3 methods. The presence of ammonia in (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub n} is found to lead to very large enhancement in the dipole moment, which exceeds 2.0-2.5 Debyes (∼60-80%), 3.7-5.0 Debyes (∼90-180%), 1.4-4.5 Debyes (∼50-150%) and 2.1-5.5 Debyes (∼60-700%) for n = 0, n = 1, n = 2 and n = 3, respectively. The implications of this include the significantly increased uptake of the sulfuric acid, the key atmospheric nucleation precursor, by airborne ions and neutrals (due to dipole-dipole interaction), enhanced nucleation rates and the elevated production of ultrafine particles, which cause adverse health impacts.

  8. Theoretical analysis of the performance of different cooling strategies with the concept of cool exergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Shukuya, Masanori; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2016-01-01

    The whole chains of exergy flows for different cooling systems were compared. The effects of cooling demand (internal vs. external solar shading), space cooling method (floor cooling vs. air cooling with ventilation system), and the availability of a nearby natural heat sink (intake air for the v......The whole chains of exergy flows for different cooling systems were compared. The effects of cooling demand (internal vs. external solar shading), space cooling method (floor cooling vs. air cooling with ventilation system), and the availability of a nearby natural heat sink (intake air...... for the ventilation system being outdoor air vs. air from the crawl-space, and air-to-water heat pump vs. ground heat exchanger as cooling source) on system exergy performance were investigated. It is crucial to minimize the cooling demand because it is possible to use a wide range of heat sinks (ground, lake, sea......-water, etc.) and indoor terminal units, only with a minimized demand. The water-based floor cooling system performed better than the air-based cooling system; when an air-to-water heat pump was used as the cooling source, the required exergy input was 28% smaller for the floor cooling system. The auxiliary...

  9. Experimental evaluation of cooling efficiency of the high performance cooling device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2016-06-01

    This work deal with experimental evaluation of cooling efficiency of cooling device capable transfer high heat fluxes from electric elements to the surrounding. The work contain description of cooling device, working principle of cooling device, construction of cooling device. Experimental part describe the measuring method of device cooling efficiency evaluation. The work results are presented in graphic visualization of temperature dependence of the contact area surface between cooling device evaporator and electronic components on the loaded heat of electronic components in range from 250 to 740 W and temperature dependence of the loop thermosiphon condenser surface on the loaded heat of electronic components in range from 250 to 740 W.

  10. Experimental evaluation of cooling efficiency of the high performance cooling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Patrik, E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk; Malcho, Milan, E-mail: milan.malcho@fstroj.uniza.sk [University of Žilina, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Power Engineering, Univerzitna 1, 010 26 Žilina (Slovakia)

    2016-06-30

    This work deal with experimental evaluation of cooling efficiency of cooling device capable transfer high heat fluxes from electric elements to the surrounding. The work contain description of cooling device, working principle of cooling device, construction of cooling device. Experimental part describe the measuring method of device cooling efficiency evaluation. The work results are presented in graphic visualization of temperature dependence of the contact area surface between cooling device evaporator and electronic components on the loaded heat of electronic components in range from 250 to 740 W and temperature dependence of the loop thermosiphon condenser surface on the loaded heat of electronic components in range from 250 to 740 W.

  11. Atmospheric cooling tower with reduced plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, D.M.; Lagoutte, A.

    1985-01-01

    The cooling tower, usable in thermal-electric power plants, has a vertical chimney having a central water tower fed with water to be cooled, a pipe network distributing water coming from the water tower and dispersing it in flows streaming down on a packing, and a basin to receive the water cooled by contact with an air flow passing through apertures at the lower part of the chimney and flowing up through the chimney. The cooling tower has inlet air pipes for the said apertures to a zone of the chimney situated beyond the streaming zone, the said pipes being arranged such their surface is swept by water to be cooled [fr

  12. Passive containment cooling water distribution device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Fanto, Susan V.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using a series of radial guide elements and cascading weir boxes to collect and then distribute the cooling water into a series of distribution areas through a plurality of cascading weirs. The cooling water is then uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weir notches in the face plate of the weir box.

  13. Cooling Tower (Evaporative Cooling System) Measurement and Verification Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnik, Charles W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Boyd, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stoughton, Kate M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lewis, Taylor [Colorado Energy Office, Denver, CO (United States)

    2017-12-05

    This measurement and verification (M and V) protocol provides procedures for energy service companies (ESCOs) and water efficiency service companies (WESCOs) to determine water savings resulting from water conservation measures (WCMs) in energy performance contracts associated with cooling tower efficiency projects. The water savings are determined by comparing the baseline water use to the water use after the WCM has been implemented. This protocol outlines the basic structure of the M and V plan, and details the procedures to use to determine water savings.

  14. Origin and prevention of infection with Legionella pneumophila through cooling towers and evaporative cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze-Roebbecke, R.

    1994-01-01

    Evaporative cooling towers and industrial ventilator cooling towers have repeatedly been described as the origin of Legionnaires' disease. This article describes the design and function of cooling towers and evaporative cooling towers, sums up knowledge on the colonization of such systems with Legionella pneumophila, and describes conditions permitting the transmission of Legionella. Furthermore, design, maintenance, cleaning and disinfection measures are indicated which are believed to reduce the risk of infection through industrial and evaporative cooling towers. (orig.) [de

  15. Simulations of floor cooling system capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odyjas, Andrzej; Górka, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Floor cooling system capacity depends on its physical and operative parameters. Using numerical simulations, it appears that cooling capacity of the system largely depends on the type of cooling loads occurring in the room. In the case of convective cooling loads capacity of the system is small. However, when radiation flux falls directly on the floor the system significantly increases productivity. The article describes the results of numerical simulations which allow to determine system capacity in steady thermal conditions, depending on the type of physical parameters of the system and the type of cooling load occurring in the room. Moreover, the paper sets out the limits of system capacity while maintaining a minimum temperature of the floor surface equal to 20 °C. The results are helpful for designing system capacity in different type of cooling loads and show maximum system capacity in acceptable thermal comfort condition. -- Highlights: ► We have developed numerical model for simulation of floor cooling system. ► We have described floor system capacity depending on its physical parameters. ► We have described floor system capacity depending on type of cooling loads. ► The most important in the obtained cooling capacities is the type of cooling loads. ► The paper sets out the possible maximum cooling floor system capacity

  16. Auxiliary cooling device for power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanoi, Kozo.

    1996-01-01

    An auxiliary cooling sea water pipeline for pumping up cooling sea water, an auxiliary cooling sea water pipeline and a primary side of an auxiliary cooling heat exchanger are connected between a sea water taking vessel and a sea water discharge pit. An auxiliary cooling water pump is connected to an auxiliary water cooling pipeline on the second side of the auxiliary cooling heat exchanger. The auxiliary cooling water pipeline is connected with each of auxiliary equipments of a reactor system and each of auxiliary equipments of the turbine system connected to a turbine auxiliary cooling water pipeline in parallel. During ordinary operation of the reactor, heat exchange for each of the auxiliary equipments of the reactor and heat exchange for each of the equipments of the turbine system are conducted simultaneously. Since most portions of the cooling devices of each of the auxiliary equipments of the reactor system and each of the auxiliary equipments of the turbine system can be used in common, the operation efficiency of the cooling device is improved. In addition, the space for the pipelines and the cost for the equipments can be reduced. (I.N.)

  17. Workshop on beam cooling and related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosser, J.

    1994-01-01

    The sessions of the Workshop on Beam Cooling and Related Topics, held in Montreux from 4-8 October 1993, are reported in these Proceedings. This meeting brought together international experts in the field of accelerator beam cooling. Its purpose was to discuss the status of the different cooling techniques currently in use (stochastic, electron, ionization, heavy-ion, and laser) and their actual performances, technological implications, and future prospects. Certain theoretical principles (muon cooling, cyclotron maser cooling) were discussed and are reported on in these Proceedings. Also of interest in this Workshop was the possibility of beam crystallization in accelerators using ultimate cooling. In the first part of these Proceedings, overview talks on the various cooling techniques, their implications, present performance, and future prospects are presented. More detailed reports on all the topics are then given in the form of oral presentations or poster sessions. Finally, the chairmen and/or convenors then present summary talks. (orig.)

  18. Provisioning cooling elements for chillerless data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2018-02-13

    Systems and methods for cooling include one or more computing structure, an inter-structure liquid cooling system that includes valves configured to selectively provide liquid coolant to the one or more computing structures; a heat rejection system that includes one or more heat rejection units configured to cool liquid coolant; and one or more liquid-to-liquid heat exchangers that include valves configured to selectively transfer heat from liquid coolant in the inter-structure liquid cooling system to liquid coolant in the heat rejection system. Each computing structure further includes one or more liquid-cooled servers; and an intra-structure liquid cooling system that has valves configured to selectively provide liquid coolant to the one or more liquid-cooled servers.

  19. Cool Uden Røg

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Maiken Hollænder; Pedersen, Nikoline Juul; Andersen, Sif Alberte

    2016-01-01

    This project sets out to investigate the reception of a media text by a specific audience. Particularly, how a predetermined target group, children attending 7th to 9th grade in a Danish elementary school, understand the campaign “Cool Uden Røg”, launched by Kræftens Bekæmpelse. In order to do so, a group interview with said target group, four students aged 13-15, was conducted. The empirical data gathered through the interview was then analysed using Kim Schrøder’s multidimensional reception...

  20. Process for cooling waste water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohner, P

    1976-12-16

    The process for avoiding thermal pollution of waters described rests on the principle of the heat conduction tube, by which heat is conducted from the liquid space into the atmosphere at a lower temperature above it. Such a tube, here called a cooling tube, consists in its simplest form of a heat conducting corrugated tube, made, for example, of copper or a copper alloy or of precious metals, which is sealed to be airtight at both ends, and after evacuation, is partially filled with a medium of low boiling point. The longer leg of the tube, which is bent at right angles, lies close below the surface of the water to be cooled and parallel to it; the shorter leg projects vertically into the atmosphere. The liquid inside the cooling tube fills the horizontal part of the tube to about halfway. A certain part of the liquid is always evaporated in this part. The vapor rising in the vertical part of the tube condenses on the internal wall cooled by the air outside, and gives off its heat to the atmosphere. The condensed medium flows back down the vertical internal wall into the initial position in a continuous cycle. A further development contains a smooth plastic inner tube in an outer corrugated tube, which is shorter than the outer tube; it ends at a distance from the caps sealing the outer tube at both ends. In this design the angle between the vertical and horizontal leg is less than 90/sup 0/. The shorter leg projects vertically from the water surface, below which the longer leg rises slightly from the knee of tube. The quantity of the liquid is gauged as a type of siphon, so that the space between the outer and inner tube at the knee of the tube remains closed by the liquid medium. The medium evaporated from the surface in the long leg of the tube therefore flows over the inner tube, which starts above the level of the medium. Thus evaporation and condensation paths are separated.

  1. Biofouling Control in Cooling Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Reg Bott

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An important aspect of environmental engineering is the control of greenhouse gas emissions. Fossil fuel-fired power stations, for instance, represent a substantial contribution to this problem. Unless suitable steps are taken the accumulation of microbial deposits (biofouling on the cooling water side of the steam condensers can reduce their efficiency and in consequence, the overall efficiency of power production, with an attendant increase in fuel consumption and hence CO2 production. Biofouling control, therefore, is extremely important and can be exercised by chemical or physical techniques or a combination of both. The paper gives some examples of the effectiveness of different approaches to biofouling control.

  2. Information technology equipment cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  3. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-06-07

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  4. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-01-01

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  5. Theoretical insight of adsorption cooling

    KAUST Repository

    Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2011-06-03

    This letter proposes and presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the energetic performances of an adsorption cooler as a function of pore widths and volumes of solid adsorbents. The simulated results in terms of the coefficient of performance are validated with experimental data. It is found from the present analysis that the performance of an adsorption cooling device is influenced mainly by the physical characteristics of solid adsorbents, and the characteristics energy between the adsorbent-adsorbate systems. The present study confirms that there exists a special type of silicagel having optimal physical characteristics that allows us to obtain the best performance.

  6. Theoretical insight of adsorption cooling

    KAUST Repository

    Chakraborty, Anutosh; Leong, Kai Choong; Thu, Kyaw; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Ng, Kim Choon

    2011-01-01

    This letter proposes and presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the energetic performances of an adsorption cooler as a function of pore widths and volumes of solid adsorbents. The simulated results in terms of the coefficient of performance are validated with experimental data. It is found from the present analysis that the performance of an adsorption cooling device is influenced mainly by the physical characteristics of solid adsorbents, and the characteristics energy between the adsorbent-adsorbate systems. The present study confirms that there exists a special type of silicagel having optimal physical characteristics that allows us to obtain the best performance.

  7. Hot moons and cool stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heller René

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The exquisite photometric precision of the Kepler space telescope now puts the detection of extrasolar moons at the horizon. Here, we firstly review observational and analytical techniques that have recently been proposed to find exomoons. Secondly, we discuss the prospects of characterizing potentially habitable extrasolar satellites. With moons being much more numerous than planets in the solar system and with most exoplanets found in the stellar habitable zone being gas giants, habitable moons could be as abundant as habitable planets. However, satellites orbiting planets in the habitable zones of cool stars will encounter strong tidal heating and likely appear as hot moons.

  8. Assessment of spent fuel cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents the methodology, the findings, and the conclusions of a study that was done by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) on loss of spent fuel pool cooling. The study involved an examination of spent fuel pool designs, operating experience, operating practices, and procedures. AEOD's work was augmented in the area of statistics and probabilistic risk assessment by experts from the Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory. Operating experience was integrated into a probabilistic risk assessment to gain insight on the risks from spent fuel pools

  9. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, Joel; Jarriand, Paul.

    1975-01-01

    The invention concerns a fast neutron nuclear reactor cooled by a liquid metal driven through by a primary pump of the vertical drive shaft type fitted at its lower end with a blade wheel. To each pump is associated an exchanger, annular in shape, fitted with a central bore through which passes the vertical drive shaft of the pump, its wheel being mounted under the exchanger. A collector placed under the wheel comprises an open upward suction bell for the liquid metal. A hydrostatic bearing is located above the wheel to guide the drive shaft and a non detachable diffuser into which at least one delivery pipe gives, envelopes the wheel [fr

  10. Evaluation of the degree of resistance of maternal scots pine trees and their progeny to the action of SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/ and a mixture of these gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bialobok, S; Karolewski, P

    1978-01-01

    Detached shoots of trees and 10 months old seedlings from seed collected from these trees, from 17 clones of Scots pine, had been subjected to the action of sulfur dioxide, ozone and a mixture of these gases. The plants were exposed to the gases in chambers specially adapted for the purpose. The concentrations of gases used and the durations of exposition permitted a considerable differentiation of the degree of needle injury observed on individual trees. On the basis of the experiments conducted a comparison was made of the injuries to needles of mother trees and to their seedling progenies made by the various gas treatments. A significant positive correlation was observed between the injuries in mothers and in the progenies due to SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ acting alone. Comparison of the injuries observed on single needles and on needle pairs in fascicles allowed us to conclude that the latter were more sensitive to the action of SO/sub 2/ while with ozone the opposite is true. 22 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  11. Quantification of Health Effects Related to SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, O{sub 3} and Particulate Matter Exposure. Report from the Nordic Expert Meeting Oslo, 15-17 October, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clench-Aas, J.; Krzyzanowski, M. [eds.

    1996-12-31

    The Nordic Council of Ministers founded a workshop of European and Nordic experts to assess the current literature and develop dose-response functions for the criteria air quality indicators of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, O{sub 3} and particulate matter. This is the report from the workshop held in Oslo on October 15-17, 1995. Estimates of exposure-response relationships are needed to assess the health impact of environmental factors. Based on available research evidence, the relationships for the common air pollutants - particulate matter, sulphur dioxide, ozone and nitrogen dioxide - were reviewed. The Meeting concluded by quantifying exposure-response relationships for particulate matter, SO{sub 2} and ozone; the relationship for NO{sub 2} was not quantified. The Meeting also identified other exposure-response relationships considered to be substantiated, but for which the available data did not provide sufficient background to quantify the risk. The reported concentration-response associations relate to short-term changes in risk due to changes in levels of pollutants. For chronic effects of prolonged exposures the data were judged to be insufficient for quantification. 211 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Fatty acid methyl ester synthesis catalyzed by solid superacid catalyst SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/ZrO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}/La{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Sun, Li; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Hai-Peng [Energy Research Institute of Shandong Academy of Sciences, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2010-01-15

    A new type of solid superacid catalyst with the composition of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/ZrO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} loaded with lanthanum was prepared by precipitation and impregnation. The catalytic performance for the synthesis of fatty acid methyl ester from fatty acid and methanol was investigated. The influences of preparation conditions on catalyst performance were studied, the optimum results of which showed that amount of La(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} was 0.1 wt.%, the concentration of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for impregnation was 0.5 mol l{sup -1} and calcination temperature was 550 C. In addition, the effects of reaction parameters on esterification efficiency were also studied. With the catalyst amount of 5 wt.%, methanol amount of 1 ml/g fatty acid (FA) and reaction duration of 5 h at 60 C, the conversion ratio could reach above 95%. The catalyst recycled without any treatments could exhibit high activity with the conversion efficiency of above 90% after being reused five times. (author)

  13. Molecular dynamics and quantum chemical calculation studies on 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazide as corrosion inhibitor in 2.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musa, Ahmed Y., E-mail: ahmed.musa@ymail.com [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Takriff, Mohd Sobri [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} This work deals with a study of chemical additives for corrosion inhibition of mild steel in acidic conditions. {yields} The effects of the additive 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazide (DTS) on mild steel were studied by means of electrochemical techniques. {yields} Quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic model were performed to characterize the inhibition mechanism. {yields} The calculations provided information that helps in the analysis/interpretation of the experimental work. - Abstract: The inhibition of mild steel corrosion in a 2.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution by 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazide (DTS) was studied at 30 deg. C using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Quantum chemical parameters were calculated for DTS using PM3-SCF method. The molecular dynamic method was performed to simulate the adsorption of the DTS molecules on Fe surface. Results showed that DTS performed excellent as inhibitor for mild steel corrosion in a 2.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution and indicated that the inhibition efficiencies increase with the concentration of inhibitor. Theoretical results indicated that DTS could adsorb on the mild steel surface firmly through heteroatoms.

  14. Inhibition performance of a gemini surfactant and its co-adsorption effect with halides on mild steel in 0.25 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiumei [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang 110168 (China); Yang Huaiyu, E-mail: hyyang@imr.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang Fuhui [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1,4-Bis (1-chlorobenzyl-benzimidazolyl)-butane has good inhibition effect for mild steel in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compound acts as a mixed-type inhibitor and obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Halide ions can improve the inhibition property of compound via the co-adsorption effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbed halides play an important intermediate bridge role in co-adsorption process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained results can supply the bases for the future using of cationic inhibitor. - Abstract: The inhibition performance of a cationic gemini-surfactant (CBB) and its co-adsorption behavior with halides on mild steel in 0.25 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution was studied by weight loss and electrochemical techniques. Results showed that the compound could effectively inhibit the mild steel corrosion and acted as a mixed-type inhibitor by suppressing simultaneously anodic and cathodic reactions. Addition of the halides improve the inhibition efficiency of CBB and the synergistic effect increase in the order of I{sup -} > Br{sup -} > Cl{sup -}, revealing that halides radii and their electronegativity may play significant roles in co-adsorption with the cationic inhibitor.

  15. Global observation of EKC hypothesis for CO{sub 2}, SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emission: A policy understanding for climate change mitigation in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danesh Miah, Md., E-mail: dansforestry@yahoo.co [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh); Forest Policy Laboratory, Shinshu University, 8304 Minamimminowa-Mura, Kami Ina Gun, 399-4598 Nagano-ken (Japan); Farhad Hossain Masum, Md. [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh); Koike, Masao [Forest Policy Laboratory, Shinshu University, 8304 Minamimminowa-Mura, Kami Ina Gun, 399-4598 Nagano-ken (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis is critical to understanding the developmental path of a nation in relation to its environment. How the effects of economic development processes dictate environmental changes can be found through the study of EKC. To understand the EKC phenomena for climate change, this study was undertaken by reviewing the available literature. As CO{sub 2}, SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} are the significant greenhouse gases (GHG) responsible for global warming, thus leading to climate change, the study focused on those GHGs for EKC consideration. With an understanding of the different EKC trajectories, an attempt was made to determine the implications for the economic development of Bangladesh in regards to the EKC. It was shown that EKC for CO{sub 2} was following a monotonous straight line in most cases. SO{sub x} were shown to follow the full trajectory of the EKC in most situations and NO{sub x} was shown the hope only for the developed countries getting the low-income turning point. The type of economic policy that Bangladesh should follow in regards to the discussed pollutants and sources is also revealed. From these discussions, contributions to policy stimulation in Bangladesh are likely to be made.

  16. Global observation of EKC hypothesis for CO{sub 2}, SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emission. A policy understanding for climate change mitigation in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danesh Miah, Md. [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh); Forest Policy Laboratory, Shinshu University, 8304 Minamimminowa-Mura, Kami Ina Gun, 399-4598 Nagano-ken (Japan); Farhad Hossain Masum, Md. [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh); Koike, Masao [Forest Policy Laboratory, Shinshu University, 8304 Minamimminowa-Mura, Kami Ina Gun, 399-4598 Nagano-ken (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis is critical to understanding the developmental path of a nation in relation to its environment. How the effects of economic development processes dictate environmental changes can be found through the study of EKC. To understand the EKC phenomena for climate change, this study was undertaken by reviewing the available literature. As CO{sub 2}, SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} are the significant greenhouse gases (GHG) responsible for global warming, thus leading to climate change, the study focused on those GHGs for EKC consideration. With an understanding of the different EKC trajectories, an attempt was made to determine the implications for the economic development of Bangladesh in regards to the EKC. It was shown that EKC for CO{sub 2} was following a monotonous straight line in most cases. SO{sub x} were shown to follow the full trajectory of the EKC in most situations and NO{sub x} was shown the hope only for the developed countries getting the low-income turning point. The type of economic policy that Bangladesh should follow in regards to the discussed pollutants and sources is also revealed. From these discussions, contributions to policy stimulation in Bangladesh are likely to be made. (author)

  17. Innovative technologies for Faraday shield cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, J.H.; Lindemuth, J.E.; North, M.T.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Alternative advanced technologies are being evaluated for use in cooling the Faraday shields used for protection of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICR) antennae in Tokamaks. Two approaches currently under evaluation include heat pipe cooling and gas cooling. A Monel/water heat pipe cooled Faraday shield has been successfully demonstrated. Heat pipe cooling offers the advantage of reducing the amount of water discharged into the Tokamak in the event of a tube weld failure. The device was recently tested on an antenna at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The heat pipe design uses inclined water heat pipes with warm water condensers located outside of the plasma chamber. This approach can passively remove absorbed heat fluxes in excess of 200 W/cm 2 ;. Helium-cooled Faraday shields are also being evaluated. This approach offers the advantage of no liquid discharge into the Tokamak in the event of a tube failure. Innovative internal cooling structures based on porous metal cooling are being used to develop a helium-cooled Faraday shield structure. This approach can dissipate the high heat fluxes typical of Faraday shield applications while minimizing the required helium blower power. Preliminary analysis shows that nominal helium flow and pressure drop can sufficiently cool a Faraday shield in typical applications. Plans are in progress to fabricate and test prototype hardware based on this approach

  18. Sailuotong Prevents Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2-Induced Injury in EA.hy926 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Wang Seto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sailuotong (SLT is a standardised three-herb formulation consisting of Panax ginseng, Ginkgo biloba, and Crocus sativus designed for the management of vascular dementia. While the latest clinical trials have demonstrated beneficial effects of SLT in vascular dementia, the underlying cellular mechanisms have not been fully explored. The aim of this study was to assess the ability and mechanisms of SLT to act against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced oxidative damage in cultured human vascular endothelial cells (EAhy926. SLT (1–50 µg/mL significantly suppressed the H2O2-induced cell death and abolished the H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in a concentration-dependent manner. Similarly, H2O2 (0.5 mM; 24 h caused a ~2-fold increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release from the EA.hy926 cells which were significantly suppressed by SLT (1–50 µg/mL in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation of SLT (50 µg/mL increased superoxide dismutase (SOD activity and suppressed the H2O2-enhanced Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved caspase-3 expression. In conclusion, our results suggest that SLT protects EA.hy916 cells against H2O2-mediated injury via direct reduction of intracellular ROS generation and an increase in SOD activity. These protective effects are closely associated with the inhibition of the apoptotic death cascade via the suppression of caspase-3 activation and reduction of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, thereby indicating a potential mechanism of action for the clinical effects observed.

  19. Gangliosides inhibit bee venom melittin cytotoxicity but not phospholipase A2-induced degranulation in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Hirofumi; Kitani, Seiichi

    2011-01-01

    Sting accident by honeybee causes severe pain, inflammation and allergic reaction through IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. In addition to this hypersensitivity, an anaphylactoid reaction occurs by toxic effects even in a non-allergic person via cytolysis followed by similar clinical manifestations. Auto-injectable epinephrine might be effective for bee stings, but cannot inhibit mast cell lysis and degranulation by venom toxins. We used connective tissue type canine mast cell line (CM-MC) for finding an effective measure that might inhibit bee venom toxicity. We evaluated degranulation and cytotoxicity by measurement of β-hexosaminidase release and MTT assay. Melittin and crude bee venom induced the degranulation and cytotoxicity, which were strongly inhibited by mono-sialoganglioside (G M1 ), di-sialoganglioside (G D1a ) and tri-sialoganglioside (G T1b ). In contrast, honeybee venom-derived phospholipase A 2 induced the net degranulation directly without cytotoxicity, which was not inhibited by G M1 , G D1a and G T1b . For analysis of distribution of Gα q and Gα i protein by western blotting, lipid rafts were isolated by using discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifuge. Melittin disrupted the localization of Gα q and Gα i at lipid raft, but gangliosides stabilized the rafts. As a result from this cell-based study, bee venom-induced anaphylactoid reaction can be explained with melittin cytotoxicity and phospholipase A 2 -induced degranulation. Taken together, gangliosides inhibit the effect of melittin such as degranulation, cytotoxicity and lipid raft disruption but not phospholipase A 2 -induced degranulation in mast cells. Our study shows a potential of gangliosides as a therapeutic tool for anaphylactoid reaction by honeybee sting.

  20. Gangliosides inhibit bee venom melittin cytotoxicity but not phospholipase A(2)-induced degranulation in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hirofumi; Kitani, Seiichi

    2011-05-01

    Sting accident by honeybee causes severe pain, inflammation and allergic reaction through IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. In addition to this hypersensitivity, an anaphylactoid reaction occurs by toxic effects even in a non-allergic person via cytolysis followed by similar clinical manifestations. Auto-injectable epinephrine might be effective for bee stings, but cannot inhibit mast cell lysis and degranulation by venom toxins. We used connective tissue type canine mast cell line (CM-MC) for finding an effective measure that might inhibit bee venom toxicity. We evaluated degranulation and cytotoxicity by measurement of β-hexosaminidase release and MTT assay. Melittin and crude bee venom induced the degranulation and cytotoxicity, which were strongly inhibited by mono-sialoganglioside (G(M1)), di-sialoganglioside (G(D1a)) and tri-sialoganglioside (G(T1b)). In contrast, honeybee venom-derived phospholipase A(2) induced the net degranulation directly without cytotoxicity, which was not inhibited by G(M1), G(D1a) and G(T1b). For analysis of distribution of Gα(q) and Gα(i) protein by western blotting, lipid rafts were isolated by using discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifuge. Melittin disrupted the localization of Gα(q) and Gα(i) at lipid raft, but gangliosides stabilized the rafts. As a result from this cell-based study, bee venom-induced anaphylactoid reaction can be explained with melittin cytotoxicity and phospholipase A(2)-induced degranulation. Taken together, gangliosides inhibit the effect of melittin such as degranulation, cytotoxicity and lipid raft disruption but not phospholipase A(2)-induced degranulation in mast cells. Our study shows a potential of gangliosides as a therapeutic tool for anaphylactoid reaction by honeybee sting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.