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Sample records for sorption guest desorption

  1. Lead sorption-desorption from organic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Zaragoza, Victor M; Carrillo, Rogelio; Gutierrez Castorena, Carmen M

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption are mechanisms involved in the reduction of metal mobility and bioavailability in organic materials. Metal release from substrates is controlled by desorption. The capacity of coffee husk and pulp residues, vermicompost and cow manure to adsorb Pb2+ was evaluated. The mechanisms involved in the sorption process were also studied. Organic materials retained high concentrations of lead (up to 36,000 mg L(-1)); however, the mechanisms of sorption varied according to the characteristics of each material: degree of decomposition, pH, cation exchange capacity and percentage of organic matter. Vermicompost and manure removed 98% of the Pb from solution. Lead precipitated in manure and vermicompost, forming lead oxide (PbO) and lead ferrite (PbFe4O7). Adsorption isotherms did not fit to the typical Freundlich and Langmuir equations. Not only specific and non-specific adsorption was observed, but also precipitation and coprecipitation. Lead desorption from vermicompost and cow manure was less than 2%. For remediation of Pb-polluted sites, the application of vermicompost and manure is recommended in places with alkaline soils because Pb precipitation can be induced, whereas coffee pulp residue is recommended for acidic soils where Pb is adsorbed.

  2. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  3. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    OpenAIRE

    Petter, Fabiano André; Ferreira, Tamara Santos; Sinhorin, Adilson Paulo; Lima, Larissa Borges de; Morais, Leidimar Alves de; Pacheco, Leandro Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula) and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1). In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorption and desorption of diu...

  4. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano André Petter

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1. In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron, total organic carbon, fulvic acid, humic acid and humin, pH and partition coefficient to organic carbon were evaluated. The Freundlich isotherm was adjusted appropriately to describe diuron sorption kinetics in all the studied treatments. The application of biochar provided increment in the sorption (Kf and reduction in the desorption of diuron in 64 and 44%, respectively. This effect is attributed to the biochar contribution to the total organic carbon and C-humin and of these to diuron through hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The positive correlation between the partition coefficient to organic carbon and Kf confirms the importance of soil organic compartment in the sorption of diuron. There was no competition of NPK fertilizer for the same sorption site of diuron. The increase and reduction in sorption and desorption, respectively, show that the application of biochar is an important alternative for the remediation of soil leaching of diuron, especially in sandy soils.

  5. Sorption-desorption behavior of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olshansky, Yaniv; Polubesova, Tamara; Vetter, Walter; Chefetz, Benny

    2011-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that are commonly found in commercial and household products. These compounds are considered persistent organic pollutants. In this study, we used 4,4'-dibromodiphenyl ether (BDE-15) as a model compound to elucidate the sorption and desorption behavior of PBDEs in soils. The organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficient (K OC ) of BDE-15 was more than three times higher for humin than for bulk soils. However, pronounced desorption hysteresis was obtained mainly for bulk soils. For humin, increasing concentration of sorbed BDE-15 resulted in decreased desorption. Our data illustrate that BDE-15 and probably other PBDEs exhibit high sorption affinity to soils. Moreover, sorption is irreversible and thus PBDEs can potentially accumulate in the topsoil layer. We also suggest that although humin is probably a major sorbent for PBDEs in soils, other humic materials are also responsible for their sequestration. - Highlights: → BDE-15 exhibited pronounced desorption hysteresis. → BDE-15 sowed higher sorption affinity to humin as compared to the bulk soils. → Sequestration of PBDEs depends on soil organic matter constitutes other than humin. - Pronounced desorption hysteresis was observed for BDE-15 in natural soils.

  6. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam degradates in several agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Gonçalves Alonso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Processes regulating pesticide fate in the environment are influenced by the physicochemical properties of pesticides and soils. Sorption and desorption are important processes as they regulate the movement of pesticides in soil. Although sorption-desorption is widely studied for herbicides, studies involving their metabolites in soil are scarce. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam metabolites (indaziflam-triazinediamine (FDAT, indaziflam-triazine-indanone (ITI and indaziflam-carboxilic acid (ICA were investigated in six Brazilian (BRA soils and three United States (USA soils with different physicochemical properties. The Freundlich equation described sorption of the metabolites for all soils (R2 > 0.98; 1/n ~ 1. Sorption order (Kf was ITI > ICA > FDAT. Mean values of Kf,oc were 453, 289, and 81 (BRA and 444, 48, and 48 (USA for metabolites ITI, ICA, and FDAT respectively. Desorption was hysteretic for all metabolites in all soils. These results suggest that these metabolites fall in the classification range of mobile to moderately mobile in soils.

  7. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    OpenAIRE

    Petter,Fabiano André; Ferreira,Tamara Santos; Sinhorin,Adilson Paulo; Lima,Larissa Borges de; Morais,Leidimar Alves de; Pacheco,Leandro Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula) and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1). In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorpti...

  8. Sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water by smectite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihao; Ding, Yunjie; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui

    2010-11-01

    Carbamazepine is a prescription anticonvulsant and mood stabilizing pharmaceutical administered to humans. Carbamazepine is persistent in the environment and frequently detected in water systems. In this study, sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water was measured for smectite clays with the surface negative charges compensated with K+, Ca2+, NH4+, tetramethylammonium (TMA), trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) cations. The magnitude of sorption followed the order: TMPA-smectite≥HDTMA-smectite>NH4-smectite>K-smectite>Ca-smectite⩾TMA-smectite. The greatest sorption of carbamazepine by TMPA-smectite is attributed to the interaction of conjugate aromatic moiety in carbamazepine with the phenyl ring in TMPA through π-π interaction. Partitioning process is the primary mechanism for carbamazepine uptake by HDTMA-smectite. For NH4-smectite the urea moiety in carbamazepine interacts with exchanged cation NH4+ by H-bonding hence demonstrating relatively higher adsorption. Sorption by K-, Ca- and TMA-smectites from water occurs on aluminosilicate mineral surfaces. These results implicate that carbamazepine sorption by soils occurs primarily in soil organic matter, and soil mineral fractions play a secondary role. Desorption of carbamazepine from the sorbents manifested an apparent hysteresis. Increasing irreversibility of desorption vs. sorption was observed for K-, Ca-, TMA-, TMPA- and HDTMA-clays as aqueous carbamazepine concentrations increased. Desorption hysteresis of carbamazepine from K-, Ca-, NH4-smectites was greater than that from TMPA- and HDTMA-clays, suggesting that the sequestrated carbamazepine molecules in smectite interlayers are more resistant to desorption compared to those sorbed by organic phases in smectite clays. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of boric acid sorption and desorption processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czosnowska, B.; Laren, E.

    1978-01-01

    The results are given of the experimental determination of the effect on the boric acid flow and sorption and desorption efficiency of the flow rate of boric acid at different concentrations through an ion exchange column 10.2 cm 2 in cross section. The strongly alkaline VOFATIT RO ion exchanger was used. (B.S.)

  10. Sorption-desorption dynamics of radiocaesium in organic matter soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcke, E.; Cremers, A.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic study has been carried out on the radiocaesium sorption properties of 25 soils (forest, peat) covering organic matter (OM) contents in the range of 10-97%. Predictions are made for radiocaesium partitioning between micaceous Frayed Edge Sites (FES) and regular exchange sites (RES) on the basis of specific radiocaesium interception potentials of the soil and overall exchange capacity. It is shown that for soils with a very high OM content (>80%), significant fractions are present in a readily reversible form in the OM phase. In soils of low-medium OM content (<40%), only a very minor fraction is present in the OM exchange complex. Experimental findings, based on a desorption screening with a variety of desorption agents are in agreement with these predictions. On the basis of a study of sorption kinetics, some additional tools are available for identifying problem soils. In cases of very high OM content, radiocaesium adsorption is completed within hours demonstrating the involvement of the OM sites. In soils for which interception occurs in the FES, sorption continues to proceed for periods of 2-3 weeks. In conclusion, some examples are presented on radiocaesium desorption using ion exchangers as radiocaesium sinks in promoting desorption. For a peaty soil, near quantitative desorption is accomplished. For forest soils with OM contents in a range of 10-40%, fixation levels of 30-50% are demonstrated

  11. Study of the radium sorption/desorption on goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassot, S.; Stammose, D.; Mallet, C.; Lefebvre, C.; Ferreux, J.-M.

    2000-01-01

    The oxi-hydroxides, present at trace level in uranium mill tailings, are responsible of about 70% of the 226 radium sorption, half being fixed on crystallized forms. This radionuclide (half time=1622y), present at high level (50 to 100kBq.kg -1 ), can be released in groundwater, involving a possible contamination of the food chain (actual concentration limit=0.37Bq.1 -1 ). So, it is very important to point out the mechanisms of the radium sorption/desorption on crystallized oxi-hydroxides as a function of chemical conditions of the system. The radium sorption on synthetic goethite α-FeOOH has been studied as a function of contact time, initial radium activity, pH, sodium and calcium concentrations. The results show that, after one hour of contact time (necessary to reach equilibrium), the radium sorption increases widely in a pH range 6-7. The increase of Na + concentration is without influence on the radium sorption, indicating the low interactions between sodium and surface sites. At the opposite, the presence of calcium in solution decreases widely the radium sorption, that indicates a competition between calcium and radium for the same kind of sorption sites of the oxi-hydroxide surface. The percentage of radium desorbed increases widely with time, from 1 to 120h and becomes constant at a time higher than 120h. This long equilibrium time for desorption in comparison with sorption one can be explain by a local evolution of the sorption sites of the solid, which become less accessible for the solution in contact. (author)

  12. Sorption and desorption of insecticides in Brazilian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchini, L.C.; Lord, K.A.; Ruegg, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The sorption from aqueous solution of ten Brazilian soil types of four organochlorine, two organophosphorus and one carbamate insecticide was determined in the laboratory using gas chromatographic and radiometric techniques. Measurements showed that soils richest in organic matter, sorbed all substances except aldrin more strongly than the other soils. DDT was the most and aldrin the least sorbed organochlorine pesticide, being dieldrin sorbed two to four times more strongly than aldrin. Sorption of lindane varied in different soils. The organophosphate insecticides malathion and parathion were strongly sorbed in the soils richest in organic matter and weakly sorbed in the poorest soils heing moderately sorbed by the other soils. Sorption of carbaryl by all soils is small. Lindane was desorbed from the soil richest in organic matter and the extent of desorption was dependent on the sorption time. (Author) [pt

  13. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prata Fábio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with KH2PO4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha-1 of P2O5, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L-1, with a 14C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL-1. Four steps of the desorption procedure with CaCl2 0.01 mol L-1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L-1. Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm-3. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%, and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content.

  14. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prata, Fabio; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges; Lavorenti, Arquimedes

    2003-01-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh 2 PO 4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha -1 of P 2 O 5 , which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L -1 ), with a 14 C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL -1 . Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl 2 0.01 mol L -1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L -1 ). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm -3 . Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  15. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Fabio [BIOAGRI Labs., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Div. de Quimica. Lab. de Radioquimica; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Ciencias Exatas; Lavorenti, Arquimedes [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Secao de Toxicologia

    2003-03-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha{sup -1} of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L{sup -1}), with a {sup 14}C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL{sup -1}. Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl{sub 2} 0.01 mol L{sup -1} and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L{sup -1}). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm{sup -3}. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  16. Sorption-desorption of radiocesium interception potential in tropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roque, Mario L.; Boaretto, Rodrigo M.; Boaretto, Antonio E.; Smolders, Erik E.T.

    2000-01-01

    A study of sorption of radiocaesium in soils of tropical climate (Brazil) was carried. The values of definitive fixation of the radiocaesium were determined by analytic methodology of sorption-desorption and the availability to plants were calculated by the determination of radiocesium interception potential (RIP). The values of sorption varied from 1,2 to 74,8% and the fixation varied from 3,2% to 32,2%. The results shown that the radiocaesium did remain adsorbed mainly to the frayed edge site. The low values of interception potential and definitive fixation demonstrated high capacity of the tropical soils in disposal the radionuclide for the solution and, consequently, to plants. (author)

  17. Sorption-desorption of samarium in Febex bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Guinart, O.; Rigol, A.; Vidal, M.; Fernandez-Poyatos, P.; Alba, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The chemical and physical nature of the clay is a key issue in the design of engineered barriers. The FEBEX bentonite is one of the clays candidates to be used in engineered barriers in deep geology repositories (DGR). Here, its performance was tested with respect to the sorption-desorption of samarium, which is a lanthanide that, besides being considered as a natural analogue of actinides, may also be present in high level radioactive waste in the form of the radioactive isotope 151 Sm. FEBEX bentonite was used in this study. This is a di-octahedral smectite, with isomorphic substitutions in tetrahedral and octahedral sheets. Its theoretical cation exchange capacity value is 1500 meq kg -1 . Sorption isotherms were obtained for Sm in the range of initial concentrations of 0.01 and 9 meq l -1 . Tests were carried out in deionized water and in a medium simulating the composition of interstitial water. Sorption tests were performed equilibrating 30 ml of the Sm solution with 0.2 g of clay. After a contact time of 24 hours, supernatants were decanted off after centrifugation. The quantification of the concentration of Sm in the initial and final solutions allowed us to quantify the Sm equilibrium concentration (C eq ), the fraction sorbed in the FEBEX bentonite (C sorb ) and to derive the sorption K d data. Desorption tests were applied to determine the desorption K d and the percentage of Sm reversibly sorbed. Desorption tests were performed with the bentonite residue from the sorption step, under the same experimental conditions, but without Sm. Powder X-ray diffractograms were obtained from 3 to 70 deg. 2θ with a step of 0.05 deg. and a counting time of 3 s. The crystalline phases were identified using the computer program X'Pert HighScore. The morphology of the samples was analyzed by SEM at 20 kV. An EDX system was fitted to the SEM equipment to perform chemical analyses of the samples using a Si/Li detector

  18. Sorption/desorption reversibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui

    2008-07-01

    Understanding sorption/desorption is an important prerequisite for the prediction of fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. During the last two decades, numerous studies have reported hysteresis phenomenon for the interaction of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with natural organic matter (NOM). It manifests as nonsingular sorption/desorption isotherms or different rates for sorption and desorption, where during desorption a higher affinity of a compound on a given sorbent and a longer time scale for release than for sorption is observed. Other studies showed that some of the reported sorption/desorption hysteresis phenomena are due to experimental artifacts, mainly resulting from non-attainment of sorption equilibrium before desorption experiments, which result in 'pseudo-hysteresis'. Except for the hypothesis of sorbent reconfiguration, clear experimental evidence for the physical or chemical mechanisms proposed to lead to hysteresis is still lacking. In this study, sorption/desorption equilibrium and kinetics of phenanthrene sorption/desorption from two soils and three carbonaceous samples were investigated using both batch and column techniques. The main objective of this work was to monitor hysteresis phenomenon by carefully recovering the solute mass in the system and to compare sorption/desorption equilibria and kinetics thermodynamically. Nonsingular isotherms and higher desorption enthalpies as well as increased activation energies with proceeding desorption are expected if significant hysteresis exists. Sorption-desorption cycles were carried out to compare equilibrium isotherms and associated sorption/desorption enthalpies (AeH, isosteric heats). Instead of the traditional decant-and-refill batch method, the experiments were conducted using a newly designed batch protocol, which enables the determination of sorption/desorption isotherms at different temperatures using a closed batch system. This method additionally allows

  19. Sorption/desorption reversibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui

    2008-07-01

    Understanding sorption/desorption is an important prerequisite for the prediction of fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. During the last two decades, numerous studies have reported hysteresis phenomenon for the interaction of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with natural organic matter (NOM). It manifests as nonsingular sorption/desorption isotherms or different rates for sorption and desorption, where during desorption a higher affinity of a compound on a given sorbent and a longer time scale for release than for sorption is observed. Other studies showed that some of the reported sorption/desorption hysteresis phenomena are due to experimental artifacts, mainly resulting from non-attainment of sorption equilibrium before desorption experiments, which result in 'pseudo-hysteresis'. Except for the hypothesis of sorbent reconfiguration, clear experimental evidence for the physical or chemical mechanisms proposed to lead to hysteresis is still lacking. In this study, sorption/desorption equilibrium and kinetics of phenanthrene sorption/desorption from two soils and three carbonaceous samples were investigated using both batch and column techniques. The main objective of this work was to monitor hysteresis phenomenon by carefully recovering the solute mass in the system and to compare sorption/desorption equilibria and kinetics thermodynamically. Nonsingular isotherms and higher desorption enthalpies as well as increased activation energies with proceeding desorption are expected if significant hysteresis exists. Sorption-desorption cycles were carried out to compare equilibrium isotherms and associated sorption/desorption enthalpies (AeH, isosteric heats). Instead of the traditional decant-and-refill batch method, the experiments were conducted using a newly designed batch protocol, which enables the determination of sorption/desorption isotherms at different temperatures using a closed batch system. This method additionally allows the

  20. Sorption of nitrate onto amine-crosslinked wheat straw: characteristics, column sorption and desorption properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xu; Gao, Bao-Yu; Zhong, Qian-Qian; Yue, Qin-Yan; Li, Qian

    2011-02-15

    The nitrate removal process was evaluated using a fixed-bed column packed with amine-crosslinked wheat straw (AC-WS). Column sorption and desorption characteristics of nitrate were studied extensively. Solid-state (13)C NMR and zeta potential analysis validated the existence of crosslinked amine groups in AC-WS. Raman shift of the nitrate peaks suggested the electrostatic attraction between the adsorbed ions and positively charged amine sites. The column sorption capacity (q(ed)) of the AC-WS for nitrate was 87.27 mg g(-1) in comparison with the raw WS of 0.57 mg g(-1). Nitrate sorption in column was affected by bed height, influent nitrate concentration, flow rate and pH, and of all these, influent pH demonstrated an essential effect on the performance of the column. In addition, desorption and dynamic elution tests were repeated for several cycles, with high desorption rate and slight losses in its initial column sorption capacity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cs-137 sorption and desorption in relation to properties of 17 soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerpen, W.

    1988-01-01

    For Cs-137 sorption and desorption studies material of Ap and Ah horizons from 17 soils with wide varying soil properties was selected. The soils were: Podsol, Luvisol, Chernozem, Cambisol, Phaeozem, Arenosol, Gleysol and other soils. The Cs-137 sorption and desorption experiments were carried out in aqueous solution (20 g of soil) under standardized conditions for two reasons: (1) to determine the amounts of Cs-137 sorption, desorption and remains as a function of different soils and (2) to evaluate the soil parameters which govern the sorption, desorption processes. Concerning the second point the sorption values, the amount of 137 Cs desorbed within four desorption cycles and the 137 Cs remains after four desorption cycles were correlated with pH, grain size, sorption capacity (CEC), and other soil properties. It will be shown that generally Cs-137 sorption, desorption and remains depend primarily on the pH of the soil. The middle sand proved to be an indicator for the strenght of sorption, and desorption processes. Sorption and desorption studies lead to the same results as found in biotest experiments

  2. Sorption-desorption of antimony species onto calcined hydrotalcite: Surface structure and control of competitive anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Leonel Vinicius; Quirino, Juliana Nunes; Abrão, Taufik; Parreira, Paulo Sérgio; Urbano, Alexandre; Santos, Maria Josefa

    2018-02-15

    Calcined hydrotalcite can be applied to remove anionic contaminants from aqueous systems such as antimony species due to its great anion exchange capacity and high surface area. Hence, this study evaluated antimonite and antimonate sorption-desorption processes onto calcined hydrotalcite in the presence of nitrate, sulfate and phosphate. Sorption and desorption experiments of antimonite and antimonate were carried out in batch equilibrium and the post-sorption solids were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). Sorption data were better fitted by dual-mode Langmuir-Freundlich model (R 2 >0.99) and desorption data by Langmuir model. High maximum sorption capacities were found for the calcined hydrotalcite, ranging from 617 to 790meqkg -1 . The competing anions strongly affected the antimony sorption. EDXRF analysis and mathematical modelling showed that sulfate and phosphate presented higher effect on antimonite and antimonate sorption, respectively. High values for sorption efficiency (SE=99%) and sorption capacity were attributed to the sorbent small particles and the large surface area. Positive hysteresis indexes and low mobilization factors (MF>3%) suggest very low desorption capacity to antimony species from LDH. These calcined hydrotalcite characteristics are desirable for sorption of antimony species from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Oxygen Sorption and Desorption Properties of Selected Lanthanum Manganites and Lanthanum Ferrite Manganites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Skou, Eivind M.; Jacobsen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Temperature‐programmed desorption (TPD) with a carrier gas was used to study the oxygen sorption and desorption properties of oxidation catalysts and solid‐oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode materials (La0.85Sr0.15)0.95MnO3+δ (LSM) and La0.60Sr0.40Fe0.80Mn0.20O3‐δ (LSFM). The powders were characterized...... by X‐ray diffractometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and BET surface adsorption. Sorbed oxygen could be distinguished from oxygen originating from stoichiometry changes. The results indicated that there is one main site for oxygen sorption/desorption. The amount of sorbed oxygen was monitored over...... time at different temperatures. Furthermore, through data analysis it was shown that the desorption peak associated with oxygen sorption is described well by second‐order desorption kinetics. This indicates that oxygen molecules dissociate upon adsorption and that the rate‐determining step...

  4. Pesticide sorption and desorption from soils having different land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Madrigal Monárrez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out within the framework of a multidisciplinary project for evaluating buffer zones for combating pesticide contamination of surface water. Such areas are effective in removing pesticides transported by run-off; however, little information is available about the fate of the pesticides so intercepted. Two herbicides having contrasting properties (isoproturon, moderately hydrophobic (log Kow = 2.5, diflufenican, strongly hydrophobic (log K ow = 4.9 and isopropylaniline (an isoproturon metabolite were used for characterising sorption and desorption from soil having three different land uses: grass buffer strip, woodland and cultivated plot. The experiments were carried out in controlled laboratory conditions using isoproturon labelled with 14C in the benzene ring. The results demonstrated that diflufenican and isopropilaniline retention was more significant than isoproturon in three soils. The three molecules’ Kd values revealed that isoproturon and diflufenicanil retention was more important in woodland soil where carbon content was more significant (ZB 0-2: Kd IPU = 15.1 Ls kg-1; Kd DFF = 169.2 Ls kg-1. Isopropilanilina Kd was higher in grass buffer strip soil (BE 0-2: Kd IPA = 53.1 L kg-1. These differences were related to different organic matter content and nature according to the type of land use.

  5. Description of the phosphorus sorption and desorption processes in lowland peaty clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoumans, O.F.

    2013-01-01

    To determine phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land to surface water, information is needed about the behavior of P in soils. In this study, the sorption and desorption characteristics of lowland peaty clay soils are described based on experimental laboratory studies. The maximum P sorption

  6. Sorption and desorption of glyphosate in Mollisols and Ultisols soils of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Ortiz, Ana Maria; Okada, Elena; Bedmar, Francisco; Costa, José Luis

    2017-10-01

    In Argentina, glyphosate use has increased exponentially in recent years as a result of the widespread adoption of no-till management combined with genetically modified glyphosate-resistant crops. This massive use of glyphosate has created concern about its potential environmental impact. Sorption-desorption of glyphosate was studied in 3 Argentinean soils with contrasting characteristics. Glyphosate sorption isotherms were modeled using the Freundlich equation to estimate the sorption coefficient (K f ). Glyphosate sorption was high, and the K f varied from 115.6 to 1612 mg 1-1/n L 1/n /kg. Cerro Azul soil had the highest glyphosate sorption capacity as a result of a combination of factors such as higher clay content, cation exchange capacity, total iron, and aluminum oxides, and lower available phosphorus and pH. Desorption isotherms were also modeled using the Freundlich equation. In general, desorption was very low (glyphosate strongly sorbs to the soils and that it is almost an irreversible process. Anguil soil had a significantly higher desorption coefficient (K fd ) than the other soils, associated with its lower clay content and higher pH and phosphorus. Glyphosate high sorption and low desorption to the studied soils may prevent groundwater contamination. However, it may also affect its bioavailability, increasing its persistence and favoring its accumulation in the environment. The results of the present study contribute to the knowledge and characterization of glyphosate retention in different soils. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2587-2592. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  7. Sorption and desorption of tritiated water vapor on piping materials of nuclear fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Satoru; Ohmori, Rumi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Sorption and desorption of D{sub 2}O on Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiO, SS316 powders were studied at ambient temperature. When D{sub 2}O were contacted with samples after drying at 303K, broad peak was observed at 2100-2700cm{sup -1} on Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO. Sorption and desorption rate depended on wave numbers. Isotope exchange rate with H{sub 2}O vapor was faster than dry desorption rate. By heating pretreatment, sorption amount and desorption rate for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO decreased. For SS316, broad peak was observed only after heating pretreatment at 673K. (author)

  8. Sorption and desorption kinetics of diuron, fluometuron, prometryn and pyrithiobac sodium in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, S; Kennedy, I R

    1999-11-01

    The sorption and desorption characteristics of four herbicides (diuron, fluometuron, prometryn and pyrithiobac-sodium) in three different cotton growing soils of Australia was investigated. Kinetics and equilibrium sorption and desorption isotherms were determined using the batch equilibrium technique. Sorption was rapid (> 80% in 2 h) and sorption equilibrium was achieved within a short period of time (ca 4 h) for all herbicides. Sorption isotherms of the four herbicides were described by Freundlich equation with an r2 value > 0.98. The herbicide sorption as measured by the distribution coefficient (Kd) values ranged from 3.24 to 5.71 L/kg for diuron, 0.44 to 1.13 L/kg for fluometuron, 1.78 to 6.04 L/kg for prometryn and 0.22 to 0.59 L/kg for pyrithiobac-sodium. Sorption of herbicides was higher in the Moree soil than in Narrabri and Wee Waa soils. When the Kd values were normalised to organic carbon content of the soils (Koc), it suggested that the affinity of the herbicides to the organic carbon increased in the order: pyrithiobac-sodium diuron. The desorption isotherms were also adequately described by the Freundlich equation. For desorption, all herbicides exhibited hysteresis and the hysteresis was stronger for highly sorbed herbicides (diuron and prometryn) than the weakly sorbed herbicides (fluometuron and pyrithiobac-sodium). Hysteresis was also quantified as the percentage of sorbed herbicides which is not released during the desorption step (omega = [nad/nde - 1] x 100). Soil type and initial concentration had significant effect on omega. The effect of sorption and desorption properties of these four herbicides on the off-site transport to contaminate surface and groundwater are also discussed in this paper.

  9. Application of simplified desorption method to sorption study. (2) Sorption of neptunium (V) on montmorillonite-based mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate the sorption behaviors of radionuclides in multi-mineral systems and the mutual effects of minerals on the sorption, this paper carried out the sorption and desorption experiments of neptunium(V) on montmorillonite-based two-mineral mixtures. The Np sorbed on montmorillonite at pH from 4 to 8 was desorbed with 1M KCl solutions, indicating that the sorption was cation exchange. The Np sorbed on apatite and calcite was nondesorbable with 1M KCl solutions, which is in harmony with the knowledge that Np forms strong complexes with the phosphate groups of apatite and the carbonate groups of calcite. This study utilized these clear distinguishes of the desorption behaviors for examining the two-mineral systems. In montmorillonite-apatite mixtures, the sorption on the montmorillonite was decreased and Np was accumulated on the apatite. In montmorillonite-calcite mixtures, the sorption on the montmorillonite was decreased due to the interference by the calcium and carbonate ions dissolved from calcite while no accumulation of Np to calcite was observed. (author)

  10. Comparative sorption and desorption behaviors of PFHxS and PFOS on sequentially extracted humic substances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lixia Zhao; Yifeng Zhang; Shuhong Fang; Lingyan Zhu; Zhengtao Liu

    2014-01-01

    The sorption and desorption behaviors of two perfluoroalkane sulfonates (PFSAs),including perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on two humic acids (HAs) and humin (HM),which were extracted from a peat soil,were investigated.The sorption kinetics and isotherms showed that the sorption of PFOS on the humic substances (HSs) was much higher than PFHxS.For the same PFSA compound,the sorption on HSs followed the order of HM > HA2 > HA1.These suggest that hydrophobic interaction plays a key role in the sorption of PFSAs on HSs.The sorption capacities of PFSAs on HSs were significantly related to their aliphaticity,but negatively correlated to aromatic carbons,indicating the importance of aliphatic groups in the sorption of PFSAs.Compared to PFOS,PFHxS displayed distinct desorption hysteresis,probably due to irreversible pore deformation after sorption of PFHxS.The sorption of the two PFSAs on HSs decreased with an increase in pH in the solution.This is ascribed to the electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding at lower pH.Hydrophobic interaction might also be stronger at lower pH due to the aggregation of HSs.

  11. Sorptiondesorption of imidacloprid insecticide on Indian soils of five different locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Singh Chauhan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sorption-desorption processes govern the movement of all chemicals including pesticides in soils. The present investigation was undertaken to study the sorption-desorption of imidacloprid, using a batch method, on soils of five different location of India. Sorption data were fitted to Freundlich isotherm. The log K value was the highest for loam type soil (1.830 and the lowest for clay type soil (1.661. The value of 1/n was the maximum for silt loam soil (0.909 but minimum for loam soil (0.723. Simple correlation analysis indicated that among soil properties only electrical conductivity showed a higher but marginally non-significant negative correlation with log K (r = -0.826 indicating that higher concentration of solutes solutes are conducive to low sorption capacity of soil. The desorption data conformed to two surfaces Freundlich desorption isotherm. The values of 1/n1' corresponding to easily desorbed fraction of imidacloprid showed significant negative correlation with soil pH (r = -0.886, significant at p ≤0.05 but significant positive correlation with clay content (r = 0.980, significant at p ≤0.01. The desorption index for easily desorbed fraction of imidacloprid (n1’/n also had significant negative correlation with soil pH (r = 0.953, significant at p ≤0.05. From cumulative desorption data, it appeared that bioavailability of imidacloprid would be lower in neutral soil than acidic or alkaline soils.

  12. Sorption, desorption and extraction of uranium from some sands under dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palagyi, S.; Laciok, A.

    2006-01-01

    Sorption, desorption and extraction behavior of uranium in various fluvial sands of domestic origin were investigated in continuous dynamic column experiments. For the sorption of U(VI) an aqueous 10 -4 M UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 solution was used at a flow rate of about 0.3 cm 3 /min. Desorption was carried out with demineralized water, and the extraction with 10 -2 M Na 2 CO 3 solution following desorption. The retardation coefficients (R) and hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients (D d ), were determined using an ADE equation. From the experimentally determined values of R, bulk density and porosity, the distribution coefficients (K d ) of the UO 2 2+ species have been calculated for the respective processes. The extent of U sorption in sands, as well as the proportion of desorbed and extracted U from these sands, was also calculated. (author)

  13. Sorption/desorption of Cs on clay and soil fractions from various regions of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erten, H.N.

    1988-01-01

    The sorption/desorption behaviour of Cs ion in the concentration region of 10 -8 to 10 -4 meqml -1 have been studied using clay and soil fractions from various regions of Turkey. The sorption curves for all the material studied show similar behaviour indicating at least two different sorption processes. One with high and the other with low distribution coefficients. The results of desorption studies indicate that Cs cation is to a large extent attached to the solid material in a reversible manner. The adsorption isotherms were found to be nonlinear in all cases. The increase of R D values with decreasing particle size in most cases, suggests that sorption and/or exchange is primarily a surface phenomenon in the clay and soil fractions studied. 14 figs.; 4 tabs

  14. Dynamic Moisture Sorption and Desorption in Fumed Silica-filled Silicone Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautschold, Olivia Carol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-02

    Characterizing dynamic moisture sorption and desorption in fumed silica-filled silicone foam is necessary for determining material compatibilities and life predictions, particularly in sealed environments that may be exposed to a range of environmental conditions. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) were performed on S5470 fumed silica-filled silicone foam to determine the weight percent of moisture at saturation. Additionally, TGA was used to determine the time, temperature, and relative humidity levels required for sorption and desorption of physisorbed moisture in S5470.

  15. Effect of Pinus radiata derived biochars on soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Honghua; Lin Kunde; Wang Hailong; Gan, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Biochars are anthropogenic carbonaceous sorbent and their influences on the sorption of environmental contaminants need to be characterized. Here we evaluated the effect of Pinus radiata derived biochars on soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene. Two biochars separately produced at 350 o C and 700 o C and three soils were tested. Biochar amendment generally enhanced the soil sorption of phenanthrene. The biochar produced at 700 o C generally showed a greater ability at enhancing a soil's sorption ability than that prepared at 350 o C. The single-step desorption measurement showed an apparent hysteresis in biochar-amended soils. After 28 d equilibration, the sorptive capacity of biochar-amended soil (with an organic carbon content of 0.16%) significantly decreased. This study clearly suggested that biochar application enhanced soil sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds, but the magnitude of enhancement depended on the preparation of biochars, the indigenous soil organic carbon levels, and the contact time between soil and biochar. - Pinus radiata derived biochars influence soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene.

  16. Glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochars – Interactions of physical and chemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Biochar, a carbon-rich product of biomass pyrolysis, could limit glyphosate transport in soil and remediate contaminated water. The present study investigates the sorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on biochars prepared from different hardwoods at temperatures ranging from 350°C t...

  17. Competitive sorption and desorption of heavy metals by individual soil components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covelo, E.F.; Vega, F.A.; Andrade, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of sorption and desorption of heavy metals by individual soil components should be useful for modelling the behaviour of soils of arbitrary composition when contaminated by heavy metals, and for designing amendments increasing the fixation of heavy metals by soils polluted by these species. In this study the competitive sorption and desorption of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn by humified organic matter, Fe and Mn oxides, kaolinite, vermiculite and mica were investigated. Due to the homogeneity of the sorbents, between-metal competition for binding sites led to their preferences for one or another metal being much more manifest than in the case of whole soils. On the basis of k d100 values (distribution coefficients calculated in sorption-desorption experiments in which the initial sorption solution contained 100 mg L -1 of each metal), kaolinite and mica preferentially sorbed and retained chromium; vermiculite, copper and zinc; HOM, Fe oxide and Mn oxide, lead (HOM and Mn oxide also sorbed and retained considerable amounts of copper). Mica only retained sorbed chromium, Fe oxide sorbed cadmium and lead, and kaolinite did not retain sorbed copper. The sorbents retaining the greatest proportions of sorbed metals were vermiculite and Mn oxide, but the ratios of k d100 values for retention and sorption suggest that cations were least reversibly bound by Mn oxide, and most reversibly by vermiculite

  18. Glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochars - interactions of physical and chemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen E; Spokas, Kurt A; Gamiz, Beatriz; Cox, Lucia; Papiernik, Sharon K; Koskinen, William C

    2018-05-01

    Biochar, a carbon-rich product of biomass pyrolysis, could limit glyphosate transport in soil and remediate contaminated water. The present study investigates the sorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on biochars prepared from different hardwoods at temperatures ranging from 350 to 900 °C to elucidate fundamental mechanisms. Glyphosate (1 mg L -1 ) sorption on biochars increased with pyrolysis temperature and was highest on 900 °C biochars; however, total sorption was low on a mass basis (glyphosate in soils, did not alter biochar sorption capacities. Glyphosate did not desorb from biochar with CaCl 2 solution; however, up to 86% of the bound glyphosate was released with a K 2 HPO 4 solution. Results from this study suggest a combined impact of surface chemistry and physical constraints on glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochar. Based on the observed phosphate-induced desorption of glyphosate, the addition of P-fertilizer to biochar-amended soils can remobilize the herbicide and damage non-target plants; therefore, improved understanding of this risk is necessary. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Effects of chemical oxidation on sorption and desorption of PAHs in typical Chinese soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Hou Lei; Luo Xiaoli; Zhu Lingyan

    2009-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation is a commonly applied soil and groundwater remediation technology, but can have significant effects on soil properties, which in turn might affect fate and transport of organic contaminants. In this study, it was found that oxidation treatment resulted mainly in breakdown of soil organic matter (SOM) components. Sorption of naphthalene and phenanthrene to the original soils and the KMnO 4 -treated soils was linear, indicating that hydrophobic partitioning to SOM was the predominant mechanism for sorption. Desorption from the original and treated soils was highly resistant, and was well modeled with a biphasic desorption model. Desorption of residual naphthalene after treating naphthalene-contaminated soils with different doses of KMnO 4 also followed the biphasic desorption model very well. It appears that neither changes of soil properties caused by chemical oxidation nor direct chemical oxidation of contaminated soils had a noticeable effect on the nature of PAH-SOM interactions. - Chemical oxidation of soils had little effect on the mechanisms controlling sorption and desorption of PAHs.

  20. Sorption and desorption of arsenate and arsenite on calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Diederik Jan; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(111)) oil calcite was investigated in a series of batch experiments in calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions covered a broad range of pH, alkalinity, calcium concentration and ionic strength. The initial arsenic...

  1. Sorption and desorption behaviors of diuron in soils amended with charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang-Yang; Ying, Guang-Guo; Kookana, Rai S

    2006-11-01

    Charcoal derived from the partial combustion of vegetation is ubiquitous in soils and sediments and can potentially sequester organic contaminants. To examine the role of charcoal in the sorption and desorption behaviors of diuron pesticide in soil, synthetic charcoals were produced through carbonization of red gum (Eucalyptus spp.) wood chips at 450 and 850 degrees C (referred to as charcoals BC450 and BC850, respectively, in this paper). Pore size distribution analyses revealed that BC850 contained mainly micropores (pores approximately 0.49 nm mean width), whereas BC450 was essentially not a microporous material. Short-term equilibration (diuron in a soil amended with various amounts of charcoals of both types. The sorption coefficients, isotherm nonlinearity, and apparent sorption-desorption hysteresis markedly increased with increasing content of charcoal in the soil, more prominently in the case of BC850, presumably due to the presence of micropores and its relatively higher specific surface area. The degree of apparent sorption-desorption hystersis (hysteresis index) showed a good correlation with the micropore volume of the charcoal-amended soils. This study indicates that the presence of small amounts of charcoal produced at high temperatures (e.g., interior of wood logs during a fire) in soil can have a marked effect on the release behavior of organic compounds. Mechanisms of this apparent hysteretic behavior need to be further investigated.

  2. Sorption and desorption of 17α-ethinylestradiol onto sediments affected by rhamnolipidic biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-Ping; Hu, Yong-You; Lin, Hui; Ou, Xue-Lian

    2018-02-15

    Many studies have addressed the desorption and mobilization performances of sorbed contaminants affected by different rhamnolipidic biosurfactants. Study results have been mixed and complicated. Rhamnolipids are always microbial produced with variable homologues. In this study, two representative rhamnolipidic fractions (i.e., RL-F1 and RL-F2, which are mono- and di-rhamnolipids, respectively) were investigated and compared to determine their influence on 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) distribution within sediment-water sorption and desorption systems. In general, the coexistence of RL-F1 and EE2 enhanced EE2 sorption in a wider monorhamnolipidic dosage range when freshly treated sorbate was used. The sorbed EE2 concentration decreased as the RL-F1 dosage increased in the aged sorbate desorption systems. However, RL-F2 facilitated EE2 mobilization in both sorption and desorption processes. Experimental data were estimated using a conceptual model that considered the sorbed rhamnolipids and aqueous micelles for organic partitioning. The model results indicated that the rhamnolipid type is an important factor influencing organic distribution, in addition to sorbate aging process and sediment characteristics. The use of a rhamnolipidic mixture containing both mono- and di-rhamnosyl components may not achieve the desired effect when the biosurfactant-enhanced mobilization or immobilization approach is selected. These results are significant for selecting and applying rhamnolipids to remediate contaminants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Sorption and desorption reactions of radionuclides with a crushed basalt-bentonite packing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.; Lane, D.L.; Allen, C.C.; Jones, T.E.

    1985-04-01

    Current design of waste packages for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in underground basalt formations includes a layer of packing material that surrounds the waste container. One of the functions of this material is to limit the release of radionuclides from a breached container into groundwater by providing a low hydraulic conductivity zone and by sorbing dissolved radionuclides. The objective of this study was to assess the radionuclide sorption capability of a proposed packing material composed of 25% sodium bentonite and 75% crushed basalt (by weight). Sorption and desorption reactions of several important waste radioelements (neptunium, uranium, plutonium, technetium, selenium, and radium) were investigated in the absence of air at 90 0 C. Uranium and neptunium were sorbed by slow reactions that follow first-order kinetics. The reaction rates are probably controlled by reduction of weakly sorbed uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) by ferrous iron in the crushed basalt component. Technetium(VII) was not reduced or sorbed under these conditions. Freundlich sorption and desorption isotherms for a given radionuclide were non-singular and show a strong tendency for sorption hysteresis. Applying the isotherm data to a one-dimensional transport model indicated that hysteretic sorption on the packing material provides an important safety factor in controlling releases of some radionuclides

  4. Phosphorus sorption-desorption and effects of temperature, pH and salinity on phosphorus sorption in marsh soils from coastal wetlands with different flooding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Ye, Xiaofei; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Guangliang; Zhao, Qingqing; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2017-12-01

    Wetland soils act as a sink or source of phosphorus (P) to the overlaying water due to phosphorus sorption-desorption processes. Litter information is available on sorption and desorption behaviors of phosphorus in coastal wetlands with different flooding conditions. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate phosphorus sorption-desorption processes, fractions of adsorbed phosphorus, and the effects of salinity, pH and temperature on phosphorus sorption on soils in tidal-flooding wetlands (TW), freshwater-flooding wetlands (FW) and seasonal-flooding wetlands (SW) in the Yellow River Delta. Our results showed that the freshly adsorbed phosphorus dominantly exists in Occluded-P and Fe/AlP and their percentages increased with increasing phosphorus adsorbed. Phosphorus sorption isotherms could be better described by the modified Langmuir model than by the modified Freundlich model. A binomial equation could be properly used to describe the effects of salinity, pH, and temperature on phosphorus sorption. Phosphorus sorption generally increased with increasing salinity, pH, and temperature at lower ranges, while decreased in excess of some threshold values. The maximum phosphorus sorption capacity (Q max ) was larger for FW soils (256 mg/kg) compared with TW (218 mg/kg) and SW soils (235 mg/kg) (p < 0.05). The percentage of phosphorus desorption (P des ) in the FW soils (7.5-63.5%) was much lower than those in TW (27.7-124.9%) and SW soils (19.2-108.5%). The initial soil organic matter, pH and the exchangeable Al, Fe and Cd contents were important factors influencing P sorption and desorption. The findings of this study indicate that freshwater restoration can contribute to controlling the eutrophication status of water bodies through increasing P sorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sorption/Desorption Interactions of Plutonium with Montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, J.; Zavarin, M.; Zhao, P.; Kersting, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    Plutonium (Pu) release to the environment through nuclear weapon development and the nuclear fuel cycle is an unfortunate legacy of the nuclear age. In part due to public health concerns over the risk of Pu contamination of drinking water, predicting the behavior of Pu in both surface and sub-surface water is a topic of continued interest. Typically it was assumed that Pu mobility in groundwater would be severely restricted, as laboratory adsorption studies commonly show that naturally occurring minerals can effectively remove plutonium from solution. However, evidence for the transport of Pu over significant distances at field sites highlights a relative lack of understanding of the fundamental processes controlling plutonium behavior in natural systems. At several field locations, enhanced mobility is due to Pu association with colloidal particles that serve to increase the transport of sorbed contaminants (Kersting et al., 1999; Santschi et al., 2002, Novikov et al., 2006). The ability for mineral colloids to transport Pu is in part controlled by its oxidation state and the rate of plutonium adsorption to, and desorption from, the mineral surface. Previously we have investigated the adsorption affinity of Pu for montmorillonite colloids, finding affinities to be similar over a wide range of Pu concentrations. In the present study we examine the stability of adsorbed Pu on the mineral surface. Pu(IV) at an initial concentration of 10-10 M was pre-equilibrated with montmorillonite in a background electrolyte at pH values of 4, 6 and 8. Following equilibration, aliquots of the suspensions were placed in a flow cell and Pu-free background electrolyte at the relevant pH was passed through the system. Flow rates were varied in order to investigate the kinetics of desorption and hence gain a mechanistic understanding of the desorption process. The flow cell experiments demonstrate that desorption of Pu from the montmorillonite surface cannot be modeled as a simple

  6. Approach for predicting P sorption/desorption behaviour of potentially eroded topsoil in watercourses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovec, Jakub; Jan, Jiří

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 624, May (2018), s. 1316-1324 ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04021342; GA MZe QI102A265; GA MŠk(CZ) EF16_013/0001782 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : erosion * Mehlich 3 * sorption/desorption Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality OBOR OECD: Water resources Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016

  7. Behavior of sorption and thermal desorption of fission products from loaded metal oxide exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerck, J.

    1986-08-01

    A new sublimation method for the concentration and purification of 99 Mo, produced by the fission of 235 U with thermal neutrons, has been developed to replace the present final decontamination steps in the various well established 99 Mo separation processes. A distinct simplification and shortening of the actual procedure is obtained by combining the chromatographic sorption on the SnO 2 -exchanger with the direct thermal desorption of the Mo product from the oxide. (orig./PW) [de

  8. Sorption and desorption of the industrial chemical MCHM into polymer pipes, liners and activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Ahart, Megan Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Polyethylene pipes and epoxy or polyurethane linings are increasingly used in drinking water infrastructure. As a recent introduction to the water industry, there are still many unknowns about how polymers will behave in the distribution system specifically relating to sorption and desorption of chemical contaminants. This study is in response to a spill of 4-methylcyclohexane methanol (MCHM) that occurred in January 2014 contaminating the drinking water of nine counties in West Virginia. Thi...

  9. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of ''local equilibrium'' assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of

  10. Competitive metal sorption and desorption onto Kappaphycus alvarezii, seaweed waste biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K O; Ramli, Nazaruddin; Said, Mamot; Ahmad, Musa [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, selangor (Malaysia); Yasir, Suhaimi Mohd [School of Sciences and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS), Sabah (Malaysia); Arbakariya Ariff, E-mail: naza@ukm.my [Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular science, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-07-15

    Competitive metal sorption and desorption onto Kappaphycus alvarezii waste biomass were investigated. Metal sorption capacities were 0.82 mg Cr (III)/ g, 0.73 mg Ni (II)/ g, 0.67 mg Cd (II)/ g, 0.65 mg Cu( II)/ g and 0.64 mg Zn (II)/ g in multi metal system. Whereas, desorption efficiencies were 66.08 %, 71.50 % and 80.44 % using 0.1 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.1 M HCl and 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, respectively. The metal sorption sequence were Cr(III) > Ni(II) > Cd(II) > Cu(II) > Zn(II), while metal desorption sequence were Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Cu(II) > Ni(II) > Cr(III). Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique was used to characterize the seaweed waste biomass. FTIR analysis shown that carbonyl (-C-O) and nitrile (-C{identical_to}N) groups interact with the metal ions. The experiments result revealed that Kappaphycus alvarezii waste biomass represent an attractive candidate to remove multi metal ions. (author)

  11. Competitive metal sorption and desorption onto Kappaphycus alvarezii, seaweed waste biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.O.; Nazaruddin Ramli; Mamot Said; Musa Ahmad; Suhaimi Mohd Yasir; Arbakariya Ariff

    2011-01-01

    Competitive metal sorption and desorption onto Kappaphycus alvarezii waste biomass were investigated. Metal sorption capacities were 0.82 mg Cr (III)/ g, 0.73 mg Ni (II)/ g, 0.67 mg Cd (II)/ g, 0.65 mg Cu( II)/ g and 0.64 mg Zn (II)/ g in multi metal system. Whereas, desorption efficiencies were 66.08 %, 71.50 % and 80.44 % using 0.1 M HNO 3 , 0.1 M HCl and 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 , respectively. The metal sorption sequence were Cr(III) > Ni(II) > Cd(II) > Cu(II) > Zn(II), while metal desorption sequence were Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Cu(II) > Ni(II) > Cr(III). Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique was used to characterize the seaweed waste biomass. FTIR analysis shown that carbonyl (-C-O) and nitrile (-C≡N) groups interact with the metal ions. The experiments result revealed that Kappaphycus alvarezii waste biomass represent an attractive candidate to remove multi metal ions. (author)

  12. Adsorption-desorption isotherms and heat of sorption of prickly pear fruit (Opuntia ficus indica)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahsasni, S.; Kouhila, M.; Mahrouz, M.

    2004-01-01

    The equilibrium moisture contents were determined for prickly pear fruit using the gravimetric static method at t=30, 40 and 50 deg. C over a range of relative humidities from 0.05 to 0.9. The sorption curves of prickly pear fruit decreased with increase in temperature at constant relative humidity. The hysteresis effect was observed. The GAB, modified Halsey, modified Chung-Pfost, modified Oswin and modified Henderson models were tested to fit the experimental data. The GAB model was found to be the most suitable for describing the sorption curves. The monolayer moisture content values for the sorption at different temperatures are calculated using a modified BET equation. The isosteric heats of desorption and adsorption of water were determined from the equilibrium data at different temperatures

  13. Adsorption-desorption isotherms and heat of sorption of prickly pear fruit (Opuntia ficus indica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahsasni, S.; Kouhila, M. E-mail: kouhila@hotmail.com; Mahrouz, M

    2004-01-01

    The equilibrium moisture contents were determined for prickly pear fruit using the gravimetric static method at t=30, 40 and 50 deg. C over a range of relative humidities from 0.05 to 0.9. The sorption curves of prickly pear fruit decreased with increase in temperature at constant relative humidity. The hysteresis effect was observed. The GAB, modified Halsey, modified Chung-Pfost, modified Oswin and modified Henderson models were tested to fit the experimental data. The GAB model was found to be the most suitable for describing the sorption curves. The monolayer moisture content values for the sorption at different temperatures are calculated using a modified BET equation. The isosteric heats of desorption and adsorption of water were determined from the equilibrium data at different temperatures.

  14. Sorption and desorption studies of chromium(VI) from nonviable cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, V.K.; Rastogi, A.

    2008-01-01

    This communication presents results pertaining to the sorptive and desorptive studies carried out on chromium(VI) removal onto nonviable freshwater cyanobacterium (Nostoc muscorum) biomass. Influence of varying the conditions for removal of chromium(VI), such as the pH of aqueous solution, the dosage of biosorbent, the contact time with the biosorbent, the temperature for the removal of chromium, the effect of light metal ions and the adsorption-desorption studies were investigated. Sorption interaction of chromium on to cyanobacterial species obeyed both the first and the second-order rate equation and the experimental data showed good fit with both the Langmuir and freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity was 22.92 mg/g at 25 o C and pH 3.0. The adsorption process was endothermic and the values of thermodynamic parameters of the process were calculated. Various properties of the cyanobacterium, as adsorbent, explored in the characterization part were chemical composition of the adsorbent, surface area calculation by BET method and surface functionality by FTIR. Sorption-desorption of chromium into inorganic solutions and distilled water were observed and this indicated the biosorbent could be regenerated using 0.1 M HNO 3 and EDTA with upto 80% recovery. The biosorbents were reused in five biosorption-desorption cycles without a significant loss in biosorption capacity. Thus, this study demonstrated that the cyanobacterial biomass N. muscorum could be used as an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of chromium(VI) bearing wastewater

  15. Effect of exchangeable cation concentration on sorption and desorption of dissolved organic carbon in saline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Raj; Rengasamy, Pichu; Marschner, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Sorption is a very important factor in stabilization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soils and thus C sequestration. Saline soils have significant potential for C sequestration but little is known about the effect of type and concentration of cations on sorption and release of DOC in salt-affected soils. To close this knowledge gap, three batch sorption and desorption experiments were conducted using soils treated with solutions either low or high in salinity. In Experiment 1, salinity was developed with either NaCl or CaCl2 to obtain an electrical conductivity (EC) in a 1:5 soil: water extract (EC1:5) of 2 and 4 dS m(-1). In Experiments 2 and 3, NaCl and CaCl2 were added in various proportions (between 25 and 100%) to obtain an EC1:5 of 0.5 and 4 dS m(-1), respectively. At EC1:5 of 4 dS m(-1), the sorption of DOC (derived from wheat straw) was high even at a low proportion of added Ca(2+) and did not change with proportion of Ca added, but at EC1:5 of 0.5 dS m(-1) increasing proportion of Ca(2+) added increased DOC sorption. This can be explained by the differences in exchangeable Ca(2+) at the two salinity levels. At EC1:5 of 4 dS m(-1), the exchangeable Ca(2+) concentration did not increase beyond a proportion of 25% Ca(2+), whereas it increased with increasing Ca(2+) proportion in the treatments at EC1:5 of 0.5 dS m(-1). The DOC sorption was lowest with a proportion of 100% as Na(+). When Ca(2+) was added, DOC sorption was highest, but least was desorbed (with deionised water), thus sorption and desorption of added DOC were inversely related. The results of this study suggest that DOC sorption in salt-affected soils is mainly controlled by the levels of exchangeable Ca(2+) irrespective of the Ca(2+) concentration in the soil solution which has implications on carbon stabilization in salt-affected soils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sorption and desorption of glyphosate, MCPA and tetracycline and their mixtures in soil as influenced by phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munira, Sirajum; Farenhorst, Annemieke

    2017-12-02

    Phosphate fertilizers and herbicides such as glyphosate and MCPA are commonly applied to agricultural land, and antibiotics such as tetracycline have been detected in soils following the application of livestock manures and biosolids to agricultural land. Utilizing a range of batch equilibrium experiments, this research examined the competitive sorption interactions of these chemicals in soil. Soil samples (0-15 cm) collected from long-term experimental plots contained Olsen P concentrations in the typical (13 to 20 mg kg -1 ) and elevated (81 to 99 mg kg -1 ) range of build-up phosphate in agricultural soils. The elevated Olsen P concentrations in field soils significantly reduced glyphosate sorption up to 50%, but had no significant impact on MCPA and tetracycline sorption. Fresh phosphate additions in the laboratory, introduced to soil prior to, or at the same time with the other chemical applications, had a greater impact on reducing glyphosate sorption (up to 45%) than on reducing tetracycline (up to 13%) and MCPA (up to 8%) sorption. The impact of fresh phosphate additions on the desorption of these three chemicals was also statistically significant, but numerically very small namely glyphosate and tetracycline and 3% for MCPA. The presence of MCPA significantly reduced sorption and increased desorption of glyphosate, but only when MCPA was present at concentrations much greater than environmentally relevant and there was no phosphate added to the MCPA solution. Tetracycline addition had no significant effect on glyphosate sorption and desorption in soil. For the four chemicals studied, we conclude that when mixtures of phosphate, herbicides and antibiotics are present in soil, the greatest influence of their competitive interactions is phosphate decreasing glyphosate sorption and the presence of phosphate in solution lessens the potential impact of MCPA on glyphosate sorption. The presence of chemical mixtures in soil solution has an overall greater impact

  17. Fate and transport with material response characterization of green sorption media for copper removal via desorption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple adsorption and desorption cycles are required to achieve the reliable operation of copper removal and recovery. A green sorption media mixture composed of recycled tire chunk, expanded clay aggregate, and coconut coir was evaluated in this study for its desorptive characteristics as a companion study of the corresponding adsorption process in an earlier publication. We conducted a screening of potential desorbing agents, batch desorption equilibrium and kinetic studies, and batch tests through 3 adsorption/desorption cycles. The desorbing agent screening revealed that hydrochloric acid has good potential for copper desorption. Equilibrium data fit the Freundlich isotherm, whereas kinetic data had high correlation with the Lagergren pseudo second-order model and revealed a rapid desorption reaction. Batch equilibrium data over 3 adsorption/desorption cycles showed that the coconut coir and media mixture were the most resilient, demonstrating they could be used through 3 or more adsorption/desorption cycles. FE-SEM imaging, XRD, and EDS analyses supported the batch adsorption and desorption results showing significant surface sorption of CuO species in the media mixture and coconut coir, followed by partial desorption using 0.1 M HCl as a desorbing agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Particle-size dependent sorption and desorption of pesticides within a water-soil-nonionic surfactant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Keller, Arturo A

    2008-05-01

    Although nonionic surfactants have been considered in surfactant-aided soil washing systems, there is little information on the particle-size dependence of these processes, and this may have significant implications for the design of these systems. In this study, Triton-100 (TX) was selected to study its effect on the sorption and desorption of two pesticides (Atrazine and Diuron) from different primary soil size fractions (clay, silt, and sand fractions) under equilibrium sorption and sequential desorption. Soil properties, TX sorption, and pesticide sorption and desorption all exhibited significant particle-size dependence. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the bulk soils and the soil fractions determined TX sorption capacity, which in turn determined the desorption efficiency. Desorption of pesticide out of the clay raction is the limiting factor in a surfactant-aided washing system. The solubilization efficiency of the individual surfactant micelles decreased as the amount of surfactant added to the systems increased. Thus, instead of attempting to wash the bulk soil, a better strategy might be to either (1) use only the amount of surfactant that is sufficient to clean the coarse fraction, then separate the fine fraction, and dispose or treat it separately, or (2) to separate the coarse fractions mechanically and then treatthe coarse and fine fractions separately. These results may be applicable to many other hydrophobic organic compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) strongly sorbed onto soils and sediments.

  19. Sorption, desorption and leaching potential of sulfonylurea herbicides in Argentinean soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcarate, Mariela P; Montoya, Jorgelina C; Koskinen, William C

    2015-01-01

    The sulfonylurea (SUs) herbicides are used to control broadleaf weeds and some grasses in a variety of crops. They have become popular because of their low application rates, low mammalian toxicity and an outstanding herbicidal activity. Sorption is a major process influencing the fate of pesticides in soil. The objective of this study was to characterize sorption-desorption of four sulfonylurea herbicides: metsulfuron-methyl (methyl 2-[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)carbamoylsulfamoyl)]benzoate), sulfometuron-methyl (methyl 2-[(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)carbamoylsulfamoyl]benzoate), rimsulfuron (1-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yl)-3-(3-ethylsulfonyl-2-pyridylsulfonyl)urea) and nicosulfuron (2-[(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yl)carbamoylsulfamoyl]-N,N-dimethylnicotinamide) from different soil horizons of different landscape positions. Sorption was studied in the laboratory by batch equilibration method. Sorption coefficients (K(d-SE)) showed that rimsulfuron (K(d-SE) = 1.18 to 2.08 L kg(-1)) and nicosulfuron (K(d-SE) = 0.02 to 0.47 L kg(-1)) were more highly sorbed than metsulfuron-methyl (K(d-SE) = 0.00 to 0.05 L kg(-1)) and sulfometuron-methyl (K(d-SE) = 0.00 to 0.05 L kg(-1)). Sorption coefficients (K(d-SE)) were correlated with pH and organic carbon content. All four herbicides exhibited desorption hysteresis where the desorption coefficients (K(d-D)) > K(d-SE). To estimate the leaching potential, K(oc) and ground-water ubiquity score (GUS) were used to calculate the half-life (t1/2) required to be classified as "leacher" or "nonleacher". According to the results, rimsulfuron and nicosulfuron herbicides would be classified as leachers, but factors such as landscape position, soil depth and the rate of decomposition in surface and subsurface soils could change the classification. In contrast, these factors do not affect classification of sulfometuron-methyl and metsulfuron-methyl; they would rank as leachers.

  20. Sorption and desorption studies of chromium(VI) from nonviable cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)], E-mail: vinodfcy@iitr.ernet.in; Rastogi, A. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2008-06-15

    This communication presents results pertaining to the sorptive and desorptive studies carried out on chromium(VI) removal onto nonviable freshwater cyanobacterium (Nostoc muscorum) biomass. Influence of varying the conditions for removal of chromium(VI), such as the pH of aqueous solution, the dosage of biosorbent, the contact time with the biosorbent, the temperature for the removal of chromium, the effect of light metal ions and the adsorption-desorption studies were investigated. Sorption interaction of chromium on to cyanobacterial species obeyed both the first and the second-order rate equation and the experimental data showed good fit with both the Langmuir and freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity was 22.92 mg/g at 25 {sup o}C and pH 3.0. The adsorption process was endothermic and the values of thermodynamic parameters of the process were calculated. Various properties of the cyanobacterium, as adsorbent, explored in the characterization part were chemical composition of the adsorbent, surface area calculation by BET method and surface functionality by FTIR. Sorption-desorption of chromium into inorganic solutions and distilled water were observed and this indicated the biosorbent could be regenerated using 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} and EDTA with upto 80% recovery. The biosorbents were reused in five biosorption-desorption cycles without a significant loss in biosorption capacity. Thus, this study demonstrated that the cyanobacterial biomass N. muscorum could be used as an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of chromium(VI) bearing wastewater.

  1. Clinoptilolite and palygorskite as sorbents of neutral emerging organic contaminants in treated wastewater: Sorption-desorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, María; Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes; Meffe, Raffaella; Lillo, Javier; de Bustamante, Irene

    2017-05-01

    Water reuse for aquifer recharge could be an important route for the introduction of emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) into the environment. The installation of a Horizontal Permeable Reactive Barrier (H-PRB) could constitute a tertiary treatment process to remove EOCs from treated domestic wastewater prior to recharge activities. The sorption-desorption behaviour of six neutral EOCs present in treated domestic wastewater (acetaminophen, caffeine, carbamazepine, cotinine, 4-acetamidoantipyrine (4-AAA) and 4-formylaminoantipyrine (4-FAA)) has been evaluated. Clinoptilolite and palygorskite have been studied as sorbents to be installed in the H-PRB. Batch tests were carried out using an EOC initial concentration ranging from 5 to 100 μg L -1 . Apart from acetaminophen and caffeine, both materials showed a limited sorption capacity of neutral EOCs (K d  = 0.63-5.42 L kg -1 ). In general, the experimental results show that EOCs exhibit a higher sorption affinity for clinoptilolite than for palygorskite. With the exception of carbamazepine, the sorption of the compounds occurs mainly by interactions with mineral surfaces as indicated by the comparison of the partition coefficients into organic matter and into mineral surfaces. According to the molecular geometry of the compounds and the sorption sequences observed, it appears that the dimensions of the organic molecules play a key role in the sorption process. All the studied EOCs exhibit irreversible sorption and sorption-desorption hysteresis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 4-MCHM sorption to and desorption from granular activated carbon and raw coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeter, T Scott; Sarver, Emily A; McNair, Harold M; Rezaee, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    4-Methylcyclohexanemethanol (4-MCHM) is a saturated higher alicyclic primary alcohol that is used in the froth flotation process for cleaning coal. In early 2014, a large spill of crude chemical (containing primarily 4-MCHM) to the Elk River near Charleston, WV contaminated the local water supply. Carbon filters at the affected water treatment facility quickly became saturated, and the contaminated water was distributed to nearby homes and businesses. Sorption of 4-MCHM to granular activated carbon (GAC) was studied in the laboratory using head space (HS) analysis via gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Sorption to raw coal was also investigated, since this material may be of interest as a sorbent in the case of an on-site spill. As expected, sorption to both materials increased with decreased particle size and with increased exposure time; although exposure time proved to be much more important in the case of GAC than for coal. Under similar conditions, GAC sorbed more 4-MCHM than raw coal (e.g., 84.9 vs. 63.1 mg/g, respectively, for 20 × 30 mesh particles exposed to 860 mg/L 4-MCHM solution for 24 h). Desorption from both materials was additionally evaluated. Interestingly, desorption of 4-MCHM on a mass per mass basis was also higher for GAC than for raw coal. Overall, results indicated that GAC readily sorbs 4-MCHM but can also readily release a portion of the chemical, whereas coal sorbs somewhat less 4-MCHM but holds it tightly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of oil dispersant on solubilization, sorption and desorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment–seawater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xiao; Gong, Yanyan; O’Reilly, S.E.; Zhao, Dongye

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Oil dispersant enhances solubilization of PAHs more effectively than surfactants. • Dispersant and dispersed oil enhance sediment sorption of PAHs and induce hysteresis. • Partitioning to sediment-sorbed dispersant is the mechanism for enhanced PAH uptake. • Dual-mode models well simulate dispersant-facilitated sorption of PAHs on sediment. • Deepwater conditions reduce solubilization of PAHs and lessen dispersant effects. - Abstract: This work investigated effects of a prototype oil dispersant on solubilization, sorption and desorption of three model PAHs in sediment–seawater systems. Increasing dispersant dosage linearly enhanced solubility for all PAHs. Conversely, the dispersant enhanced the sediment uptake of the PAHs, and induced significant desorption hysteresis. Such contrasting effects (adsolubilization vs. solubilization) of dispersant were found dependent of the dispersant concentration and PAH hydrophobicity. The dual-mode models adequately simulated the sorption kinetics and isotherms, and quantified dispersant-enhanced PAH uptake. Sorption of naphthalene and 1-methylnaphthalene by sediment positively correlated with uptake of the dispersant, while sorption of pyrene dropped sharply when the dispersant exceeded its critical micelle concentration (CMC). The deepwater conditions diminished the dispersant effects on solubilization, but enhanced uptake of the PAHs, albeit sorption of the dispersant was lowered. The information may aid in understanding roles of dispersants on distribution, fate and transport of petroleum PAHs in marine systems

  4. Sorption-desorption of imidacloprid onto a lacustrine Egyptian soil and its clay and humic acid fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Mahrous M; El-Aswad, Ahmed F; Koskinen, William C

    2015-01-01

    Sorption-desorption of the insecticide imidacloprid 1-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)-methyl]-N-nitro-2-imidazolidinimine onto a lacustrine sandy clay loam Egyptian soil and its clay and humic acid (HA) fractions was investigated in 24-h batch equilibrium experiments. Imidacloprid (IMDA) sorption-desorption isotherms onto the three sorbents were found to belong to a non-linear L-type and were best described by the Freundlich model. The value of the IMDA adsorption distribution coefficient, Kd(ads), varied according to its initial concentration and was ranged 40-84 for HA, 14-58 for clay and 1.85-4.15 for bulk soil. Freundlich sorption coefficient, Kf(ads), values were 63.0, 39.7 and 4.0 for HA, clay and bulk soil, respectively. The normalized soil Koc value for imidacloprid sorption was ∼800 indicating its slight mobility in soils. Nonlinear sorption isotherms were indicated by 1/n(ads) values imidacloprid sorption process with all tested sorbents. Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values indicated a spontaneous and physicosorption process for IMDA and a more favorable sorption to HA than clay and soil. In conclusion, although the humic acid fraction showed the highest capacity and affinity for imidacloprid sorption, the clay fraction contributed to approximately 95% of soil-sorbed insecticide. Clay and humic acid fractions were found to be the major two factors controlling IMDA sorption in soils. The slight mobility of IMDA in soils and the hysteresis phenomenon associated with the irreversibility of its sorption onto, mainly, clay and organic matter of soils make its leachability unlikely to occur.

  5. Sorption and desorption studies of some radionuclides by soil samples. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Naggar, H A; Ezz El-Din, M R; Abd El-Gawad, A S [Hot Laborities Center, National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation control, Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The different factors influencing the sorption/desorption of {sup 137} Cs, {sup 60} Co, {sup 241} Am and {sup (152+154)}Eu by soil samples of Inshas area were investigated. Mineralogical analysis of the soil samples were carried out. The amount sorbed per gram soil (X/m) increased as the carrier concentration [C] increased from (10{sup -9} to 10{sup -}1 mol) following a freundlich type isotherm. The distribution coefficient [K d] of the radionuclides was found to be affected by pH. The presence of K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+} as competing ions decreases the sorption capacity of the radioisotopes studied. The presence of complexing agents has a significant effect on the mobility of these radioisotopes. On the basis of the results obtained an attempt is being carried out to calculate different transport rates of the relevant isotopes in the investigated media. The mathematical model for the dispersion of the radioisotopes investigated in the groundwater environment was also elucidated. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. CHARACTERIZING SOIL/WATER SORPTION AND DESORPTION BEHAVIOR OF BTEX AND PAHS USING SELECTIVE SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION (SFE); TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steve Hawthorne

    1998-01-01

    The first goal of the proposed study was to generate initial data to determine the ability of selective SFE behavior to mimic the soil/water sorption and desorption behavior of BTEX (benzene, toluene, and xylenes) and PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons).Samples generated by Professor Bill Rixey's column sorption studies (aged for 2 weeks to 8 months) and desorption studies (six weeks desorption of the aged soil columns with pure water) were extracted using sequentially-stronger SFE conditions to selectively remove different fractions of each BTEX and PAH component which range from loosely to tightly bound in the soil matrices. The selective SFE results parallel the sorption/desorption leaching behavior and mechanisms determined by Professor Rixey's investigations (under separate funding) using water desorption of soil columns previously aged with BTEX and PAHs. These results justify more intensive investigations of the use of selective SFE to mimic soil/water sorption and desorption of organic pollutants related to fossil fuels which will be performed under separate funding. The second goal of the study was to determine if selective SFE extraction behavior parallels the remediation behavior displayed by PAHs currently undergoing in-situ bioremediation at a manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. Based on soil analyses of several individual PAHs (as well as total PAHs) before remediation began, and after 147 days of remediation, selective SFE successfully mimicked remediation behavior. These results strongly support the use of selective SFE to predict remediation behavior of soils contaminated with PAHs, and are expected to provide a powerful and rapid analytical tool which will be useful for determining the remediation endpoints which are necessary for environmental protection. Based on the initial success found in the present study, additional investigations into the use of SFE for predicting and monitoring the remediation behavior of PAH-contaminated soils will be

  7. Status of radionuclide sorption-desorption studies performed by the WRIT program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Relyea, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    This paper focuses on interactions between dissolved radionuclides in groundwater and rocks and sediments away from the nearfield repository. Two approaches were used to study the primary mechanism, adsorption-desorption. Empirical studies rely on distribution coefficient measurements, and mechanism studies strive to identify, differentiate, and quantify the processes that control nuclide retardation. The status of sorption mechanism studies is discussed, with emphasis on delineating the usefulness of ideal ion-exchange, site-binding electrical double-layer, and redox-controlled sorption constructs. Since studies to date show greater potential for site-binding electrical double-layer models, future efforts will concentrate on this construct. Laboratory studies are discussed which corroborate the importance of redox reactions in causing nuclide retardation for multivalent elements, such as Tc, Np, Pu, and U. Results suggest that both solution-mediated reduction, such as the Fe(II)-Fe(III) couple, and solid-solution heterogeneous reduction reactions, such as reduction of solution Pu(VI) at the mineral surface by structural Fe(II), occur. Coupled microscopy, microprobe, and autoradiography studies have determined actual sorption sites for radionuclides on polymineralic rocks. The studies show that it is possible for minor phases to completely dominate the mass of radionuclides adsorbed. The most active minerals are typically alternation products (clays and zeolites). Several exercises are discussed which rank radionuclides according to their potential dose hazards. In each of the analyses discussed, the top four radionuclides are I, Tc, Np, and Ra. Other elements that rank high in potential hazards are Pu, U, Am, Th, Pb, Sn, Pd, and Se

  8. Effect of humic acid & bacterial exudates on sorption-desorption interactions of 90Sr with brucite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Hollie; Abrahamsen-Mills, Liam; Bryan, Nick; Foster, Lynn; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Kellet, Simon; Heath, Sarah

    2018-05-18

    One of the nuclear fuel storage ponds at Sellafield (United Kingdom) is open to the air, and has contained a significant inventory of corroded magnox fuel and sludge for several decades. As a result, some fission products have also been released into solution. 90Sr is known to constitute a small mass of the radionuclides present in the pond, but due to its solubility and activity, it is at risk of challenging effluent discharge limits. The sludge is predominantly composed of brucite (Mg(OH)2), and organic molecules are known to be present in the pond liquor with occasional algal blooms restricting visibility. Understanding the chemical interactions of these components is important to inform ongoing sludge retrievals and effluent management. Additionally, interactions of radionuclides with organics at high pH will be an important consideration for the evolution of cementitious backfilled disposal sites in the UK. Batch sorption-desorption experiments were performed with brucite, 90Sr and natural organic matter (NOM) (humic acid (HA) and Pseudanabaena catenata cyanobacterial growth supernatant) in both binary and ternary systems at high pH. Ionic strength, pH and order of addition of components were varied. 90Sr was shown not to interact strongly with the bulk brucite surface in binary systems under pH conditions relevant to the pond. HA in both binary and ternary systems demonstrated a strong affinity for the brucite surface. Ternary systems containing HA demonstrated enhanced sorption of 90Sr at pH 11.5 and vice versa, likely via formation of strontium-humate complexes regardless of the order of addition of components. The distribution coefficients show HA sorption to be reversible at all pH values studied, and it appeared to control 90Sr behaviour at pH 11.5. Ternary systems containing cyanobacterial supernatant demonstrated a difference in 90Sr behaviour when the culture had been subjected to irradiation in the first stages of its growth.

  9. Effect of the cationic composition of sorption solution on the quantification of sorption-desorption parameters of heavy metals in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastre, J.; Rauret, G.; Vidal, M.

    2006-01-01

    We obtained the sorption isotherms of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in clay, clay saline and organic soils. The distribution coefficients (K d ) were determined in 0.02 eq l -1 CaCl 2 and in a solution that simulated the soil solution cationic composition. The K d values greatly varied with the composition of the sorption solution and the initial metal concentration. The sorption experiments were complemented with the quantification of the extractable metal, to estimate the reversibility of metal sorption. The extraction yields depended on the metal-soil combination, and the initial metal concentration, showing no correlation with previous K d values. The effect of the solution composition in mobility predictions was estimated through a Retention Factor, defined as the ratio of the K d versus the extraction yield. Results showed that risk was over- or underestimated using the CaCl 2 medium in soils with a markedly different soil solution composition. - Sorption solution composition modifies metal sorption-desorption pattern in soils

  10. Continuous cadmium removal from aqueous solutions by seaweed in a packed-bed column under consecutive sorption-desorption cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, Seyed Ali; Jamali, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Packed-bed column process efficiency for cadmium adsorption from aqueous solution was investigated under different bed heights (2.6 to 7.5 cm) and feed flow rates (15 to 30 ml min -1 ). The column was filled with brown seaweed, Sargassum angustifolium. Three simplified models, including Bed Depth Service Time, Thomas, and Yoon- Nelson were employed for describing the experimental breakthrough curves as well as achieving design parameters. Bed lifetime was also evaluated in several consecutive sorption-desorption cycles. Cadmium concentration of 0.005mg l−1, as a standard limit for potable water, was considered as the breakthrough concentration. The maximum column performance was achieved 81% at 7.5 cm bed length and flow rate of 15 ml min -1 . Indeed, increasing the bed height increased the sorption performance and service time, while increasing the feed flow rate had a negative effect. Maximum sorption capacity value remained almost constant by the bed height changes; however, increase in the feed flow rate slightly decreased it. The modeling results revealed that the Yoon-Nelson model was more accurate than Thomas for describing the experimental breakthrough data, especially at low flow rates. Column service time predictions were surprisingly achieved using the Bed Depth Service Time model even at extrapolations. 20% reduction in column adsorption efficiency was observed at the end of four consecutive sorption-desorption cycles; however, desorption efficiencies were achieved more than 99% in each cycle.

  11. Continuous cadmium removal from aqueous solutions by seaweed in a packed-bed column under consecutive sorption-desorption cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, Seyed Ali; Jamali, Abbas [Persian Gulf Research Institute, Persian Gulf University, 75169, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Packed-bed column process efficiency for cadmium adsorption from aqueous solution was investigated under different bed heights (2.6 to 7.5 cm) and feed flow rates (15 to 30 ml min{sup -1}). The column was filled with brown seaweed, Sargassum angustifolium. Three simplified models, including Bed Depth Service Time, Thomas, and Yoon- Nelson were employed for describing the experimental breakthrough curves as well as achieving design parameters. Bed lifetime was also evaluated in several consecutive sorption-desorption cycles. Cadmium concentration of 0.005mg l−1, as a standard limit for potable water, was considered as the breakthrough concentration. The maximum column performance was achieved 81% at 7.5 cm bed length and flow rate of 15 ml min{sup -1}. Indeed, increasing the bed height increased the sorption performance and service time, while increasing the feed flow rate had a negative effect. Maximum sorption capacity value remained almost constant by the bed height changes; however, increase in the feed flow rate slightly decreased it. The modeling results revealed that the Yoon-Nelson model was more accurate than Thomas for describing the experimental breakthrough data, especially at low flow rates. Column service time predictions were surprisingly achieved using the Bed Depth Service Time model even at extrapolations. 20% reduction in column adsorption efficiency was observed at the end of four consecutive sorption-desorption cycles; however, desorption efficiencies were achieved more than 99% in each cycle.

  12. 3D characterization of coal strains induced by compression, carbon dioxide sorption, and desorption at in-situ stress conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pone, J. Denis N.; Halleck, Phillip M.; Mathews, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide in unmineable coal seams is an option to combat climate change and an opportunity to enhance coalbed methane production. Prediction of sequestration potential in coal requires characterization of porosity, permeability, sorption capacity and the magnitude of swelling due to carbon dioxide uptake or shrinkage due to methane and water loss. Unfortunately, the majority of data characterizing coal-gas systems have been obtained from powdered, unconfined coal samples. Little is known about confined coal behavior during carbon dioxide uptake and methane desorption. The present work focuses on the characterization of lithotype specific deformation, and strain behavior during CO 2 uptake at simulated in-situ stress conditions. It includes the evaluation of three-dimensional strain induced by the confining stress, the sorption, and the desorption of carbon dioxide. X-ray computed tomography allowed three-dimensional characterization of the bituminous coal deformation samples under hydrostatic stress. The application of 6.9 MPa of confining stress contributes an average of - 0.34% volumetric strain. Normal strains due to confining stress were - 0.08%, - 0.15% and - 0.11% along the x, y and z axes respectively. Gas injection pressure was 3.1 MPa and the excess sorption was 0.85 mmol/g. Confined coal exposed to CO 2 for 26 days displays an average volumetric expansion of 0.4%. Normal strains due to CO 2 sorption were 0.11%, 0.22% and 0.11% along x, y and z axes. Drainage of the CO 2 induced an average of - 0.33% volumetric shrinkage. Normal strains due to CO 2 desorption were - 0.23%, - 0.08% and - 0.02% along x, y and z axes. Alternating positive and negative strain values observed along the sample length during compression, sorption and desorption respectively emphasized that both localized compression/compaction and expansion of coal will occur during CO 2 sequestration. (author)

  13. Sorption and desorption of arsenic to ferrihydrite in a sand filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Soren; Larsen, Flemming; Koch, Christian Bender; Arvin, Erik

    2005-10-15

    Elevated arsenic concentrations in drinking water occur in many places around the world. Arsenic is deleterious to humans, and consequently, As water treatment techniques are sought. To optimize arsenic removal, sorption and desorption processes were studied at a drinking water treatment plant with aeration and sand filtration of ferrous iron rich groundwater at Elmevej Water Works, Fensmark, Denmark. Filter sand and pore water were sampled along depth profiles in the filters. The sand was coated with a 100-300 microm thick layer of porous Si-Ca-As-contaning iron oxide (As/Fe = 0.17) with locally some manganese oxide. The iron oxide was identified as a Si-stabilized abiotically formed two-line ferrihydrite with a magnetic hyperfine field of 45.8 T at 5 K. The raw water has an As concentration of 25 microg/L, predominantly as As(II). As the water passes through the filters, As(III) is oxidized to As(V) and the total concentrations drop asymptotically to a approximately 15 microg/L equilibrium concentration. Mn is released to the pore water, indicating the existence of reactive manganese oxides within the oxide coating, which probably play a role for the rapid As(III) oxidation. The As removal in the sand filters appears controlled by sorption equilibrium onto the ferrihydrite. By addition of ferrous chloride (3.65 mg of Fe(II)/L) to the water stream between two serially connected filters, a 3 microg/L As concentration is created in the water that infiltrates into the second sand filter. However, as water flow is reestablished through the second filter, As desorbs from the ferrihydrite and increases until the 15 microg/L equilibrium concentration. Sequential chemical extractions and geometrical estimates of the fraction of surface-associated As suggest that up to 40% of the total As can be remobilized in response to changes in the water chemistry in the sand filter.

  14. Ellipsometry-based combination of isothermal sorption-desorption measurement and temperature programmed desorption technique: A probe for interaction of thin polymer films with solvent vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Mikhail Yu.; Nealey, Paul F.

    2018-05-01

    An environmental chamber equipped with an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer, programmatic vapor pressure control, and variable temperature substrate holder has been designed for studying polymer coating behavior during an exposure to a solvent vapor and also for probing the residual solvent in the film afterwards. Both sorption-desorption cycle at a constant temperature and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of the residual solvent manifest themselves as a change of the film thickness. Monitoring of ellipsometric angles of the coating allows us to determine the thickness as a function of the vapor pressure or sample temperature. The solvent vapor pressure is precisely regulated by a computer-controlled pneumatics. TPD spectra are recorded during heating of the film in an oil-free vacuum. The vapor pressure control system is described in detail. The system has been tested on 6-170 nm thick polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate), and poly(2-vinyl pyridine) films deposited on silicon substrates. Liquid toluene, water, ethanol, isopropanol, cyclohexane, 1,2-dichloroethane, and chlorobenzene were used to create a vapor atmosphere. Typical sorption-desorption and TPD curves are shown. The instrument achieves sub-monolayer sensitivity for adsorption studies on flat surfaces. Polymer-solvent vapor systems with strong interaction demonstrate characteristic absorption-desorption hysteresis spanning from vacuum to the glass transition pressure. Features on the TPD curves can be classified as either glass transition related film contraction or low temperature broad contraction peak. Typical absorption-desorption and TPD dependencies recorded for the 6 nm thick polystyrene film demonstrate the possibility to apply the presented technique for probing size effects in extremely thin coatings.

  15. Humidity scanning quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring setup for determination of sorption-desorption isotherms and rheological changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Björklund, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastianbjorklund@gmail.com; Kocherbitov, Vitaly [Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö (Sweden); Biofilms—Research Center for Biointerfaces, Malmö University, Malmö (Sweden)

    2015-05-15

    A new method to determine water sorption-desorption isotherms with high resolution in the complete range of water activities (relative humidities) is presented. The method is based on quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The QCM-D is equipped with a humidity module in which the sample film is kept in air with controlled humidity. The experimental setup allows for continuous scanning of the relative humidity from either dry to humid conditions or vice versa. The amount of water sorbed or desorbed from the sample is determined from the resonance frequencies of the coated quartz sensor, via analysis of the overtone dependence. In addition, the method allows for characterization of hydration induced changes of the rheological properties from the dissipation data, which is closely connected to the viscoelasticity of the film. The accuracy of the humidity scanning setup is confirmed in control experiments. Sorption-desorption isotherms of pig gastric mucin and lysozyme, obtained by the new method, show good agreement with previous results. Finally, we show that the deposition technique used to coat the quartz sensor influences the QCM-D data and how this issue can be used to obtain further information on the effect of hydration. In particular, we demonstrate that spin-coating represents an attractive alternative to obtain sorption-desorption isotherms, while drop-coating provides additional information on changes of the rheological properties during hydration.

  16. Sorption/ desorption studies of some radionuclides between disposal soil fractions and ground water. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Reefy, S.A.; Ali, A.

    1996-01-01

    The radioactive waste management program in egypt includes shallow land disposal area for waste package disposal. The proposed site is located to the east of the Hot laboratory centre at Inchas. Assessment of the efficiency of the different sediments and rocks found in this area as a barrier against release of radioactive nuclide to the environment is of major importance. This study is related to evaluate the migration of Cs, Co, and Am within the environment of this site. In this concern, seven soil fractions were taken from a digging well from the proposed disposal site at different depths down to the basalt sheets. A column was constructed containing the soil fractions representing the stratigraphic successions taken from the site. The radionuclides; Cs-137, Co-60, and Am-241 were in this investigation representatives for mono, di- and tri-valent elements and also represented the radionuclides which are mostly associated with radioactive wastes. The sorption/ desorption studies of these radionuclides with the different soil fractions and ground water from the proposed disposal site were carried out. The results obtained were used to predict the migration pathways of these radionuclides within the disposal environment. 2 figs., 1 tab

  17. Sorption/ desorption studies of some radionuclides between disposal soil fractions and ground water. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Reefy, S A; Ali, A [Hot Lab. Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The radioactive waste management program in egypt includes shallow land disposal area for waste package disposal. The proposed site is located to the east of the Hot laboratory centre at Inchas. Assessment of the efficiency of the different sediments and rocks found in this area as a barrier against release of radioactive nuclide to the environment is of major importance. This study is related to evaluate the migration of Cs, Co, and Am within the environment of this site. In this concern, seven soil fractions were taken from a digging well from the proposed disposal site at different depths down to the basalt sheets. A column was constructed containing the soil fractions representing the stratigraphic successions taken from the site. The radionuclides; Cs-137, Co-60, and Am-241 were in this investigation representatives for mono, di- and tri-valent elements and also represented the radionuclides which are mostly associated with radioactive wastes. The sorption/ desorption studies of these radionuclides with the different soil fractions and ground water from the proposed disposal site were carried out. The results obtained were used to predict the migration pathways of these radionuclides within the disposal environment. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  19. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-01-01

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  20. Annealing effect reversal by water sorption-desorption and heating above the glass transition temperature-comparison of properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, A; Jean, Y C; Suryanarayanan, R

    2013-08-05

    Our objective is to compare the physical properties of materials obtained from two different methods of annealing reversal, that is, water sorption-desorption (WSD) and heating above glass transition temperature (HAT). Trehalose was annealed by storing at 100 °C for 120 h. The annealing effect was reversed either by WSD or HAT, and the resulting materials were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), water sorption studies, and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). While the products obtained by the two methods of annealing reversal appeared to be identical by conventional characterization methods, they exhibited pronounced differences in their water sorption behavior. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), by measuring the fractional free volume changes in the processed samples, provided a mechanistic explanation for the differences in the observed behavior.

  1. Effect of salinity and sediment characteristics on the sorption and desorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate at sediment-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Chun; Jia Chengxia; Pan Gang

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of solution salinity, pH and the sediment characteristics on the sorption and desorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). The results showed that the sorption of PFOS onto sediment increased by a factor of 3 as the CaCl 2 concentration increased from 0.005 to 0.5 mol L -1 at pH 7.0, and nearly 6 at pH 8.0. Desorption hysteresis occurred over all salinity. The thermodynamic index of irreversibility (TII) values increased with increasing concentration of CaCl 2 . Maximum irreversibility was found in the sorption systems with CaCl 2 in the concentration of 0.5 mol L -1 . The results suggested that PFOS can be largely removed from the water with increasing salinity, and get trapped onto sediments irreversibly. These phenomena could be explained by salting-out effect and Ca-bridging effect. Studies also suggested that the content of total organic carbon is the dominant psychochemical properties of sediment controlling the sorption of PFOS. - Salinity is an important environmental parameter affecting the transport and fate of PFOS in aquatic environment.

  2. Effect of salinity and sediment characteristics on the sorption and desorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate at sediment-water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You Chun; Jia Chengxia [State Key Lab of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Pan Gang, E-mail: gpan@rcees.ac.c [State Key Lab of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2010-05-15

    This study investigated the influence of solution salinity, pH and the sediment characteristics on the sorption and desorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). The results showed that the sorption of PFOS onto sediment increased by a factor of 3 as the CaCl{sub 2} concentration increased from 0.005 to 0.5 mol L{sup -1} at pH 7.0, and nearly 6 at pH 8.0. Desorption hysteresis occurred over all salinity. The thermodynamic index of irreversibility (TII) values increased with increasing concentration of CaCl{sub 2}. Maximum irreversibility was found in the sorption systems with CaCl{sub 2} in the concentration of 0.5 mol L{sup -1}. The results suggested that PFOS can be largely removed from the water with increasing salinity, and get trapped onto sediments irreversibly. These phenomena could be explained by salting-out effect and Ca-bridging effect. Studies also suggested that the content of total organic carbon is the dominant psychochemical properties of sediment controlling the sorption of PFOS. - Salinity is an important environmental parameter affecting the transport and fate of PFOS in aquatic environment.

  3. SALTSTONE AND RADIONUCLIDE INTERACTIONS: RADIONUCLIDE SORPTION AND DESORPTION, AND SALTSTONE REDUCTION CAPACITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D; Kimberly Roberts, K; Steven Serkiz, S; Matthew Siegfried, M

    2008-10-30

    The overall objective of this study was to measure a number of key input parameters quantifying geochemical processes in the subsurface environment of the Savannah River Site's (SRS's) Saltstone Facility. For the first time, sorption (K{sub d}) values of numerous radionuclides were measured with Saltstone and Vault 2 concrete. Particular attention was directed at understanding how Tc adsorbs and desorbs from these cementitious materials with the intent to demonstrate that desorption occurs at a much slower rate than adsorption, thus permitting the use of kinetic terms instead of (or along with) the steady state K{sub d} term. Another very important parameter measured was the reduction capacity of these materials. This parameter is used to estimate the duration that the Saltstone facility remains in a reduced chemical state, a condition that maintains several otherwise mobile radionuclides in an immobile form. Key findings of this study follow. K{sub d} values for Am, Cd, Ce, Co, Cs, Hg, I, Np, Pa, Pu, Se, Sn, Tc, U, and Y for Saltstone and Vault 2 concrete were measured under oxidized and reduced conditions. Precipitation of several of the higher valence state radionuclides was observed. There was little evidence that the Vault 2 and Saltstone K{sub d} values differed from previous SRS K{sub d} values measured with reducing grout (Kaplan and Coates 2007). These values also supported a previous finding that K{sub d} values of slag-containing cementitious materials, tend to be greater for cations and about the same for anions, than regular cementitious materials without slag. Based on these new findings, it was suggested that all previous reducing concrete K{sub d} values be used in future PAs, except Np(V) and Pu(IV) K{sub d} values, which should be increased, and I values, which should be slightly decreased in all three stages of concrete aging. The reduction capacity of Saltstone, consisting of 23 wt-% blast furnace slag, was 821.8 microequivalents per

  4. SALTSTONE AND RADIONUCLIDE INTERACTIONS: RADIONUCLIDE SORPTION AND DESORPTION, AND SALTSTONE REDUCTION CAPACITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D; Roberts, Kimberly; Serkiz, Steven; Siegfried, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to measure a number of key input parameters quantifying geochemical processes in the subsurface environment of the Savannah River Site's (SRS's) Saltstone Facility. For the first time, sorption (K d ) values of numerous radionuclides were measured with Saltstone and Vault 2 concrete. Particular attention was directed at understanding how Tc adsorbs and desorbs from these cementitious materials with the intent to demonstrate that desorption occurs at a much slower rate than adsorption, thus permitting the use of kinetic terms instead of (or along with) the steady state K d term. Another very important parameter measured was the reduction capacity of these materials. This parameter is used to estimate the duration that the Saltstone facility remains in a reduced chemical state, a condition that maintains several otherwise mobile radionuclides in an immobile form. Key findings of this study follow. K d values for Am, Cd, Ce, Co, Cs, Hg, I, Np, Pa, Pu, Se, Sn, Tc, U, and Y for Saltstone and Vault 2 concrete were measured under oxidized and reduced conditions. Precipitation of several of the higher valence state radionuclides was observed. There was little evidence that the Vault 2 and Saltstone K d values differed from previous SRS K d values measured with reducing grout (Kaplan and Coates 2007). These values also supported a previous finding that K d values of slag-containing cementitious materials, tend to be greater for cations and about the same for anions, than regular cementitious materials without slag. Based on these new findings, it was suggested that all previous reducing concrete K d values be used in future PAs, except Np(V) and Pu(IV) K d values, which should be increased, and I values, which should be slightly decreased in all three stages of concrete aging. The reduction capacity of Saltstone, consisting of 23 wt-% blast furnace slag, was 821.8 microequivalents per gram ((micro)eq/g). This value was approximately

  5. 3D characterization of coal strains induced by compression, carbon dioxide sorption, and desorption at in-situ stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pone, J. Denis N.; Halleck, Phillip M.; Mathews, Jonathan P. [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering and The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide in unmineable coal seams is an option to combat climate change and an opportunity to enhance coalbed methane production. Prediction of sequestration potential in coal requires characterization of porosity, permeability, sorption capacity and the magnitude of swelling due to carbon dioxide uptake or shrinkage due to methane and water loss. Unfortunately, the majority of data characterizing coal-gas systems have been obtained from powdered, unconfined coal samples. Little is known about confined coal behavior during carbon dioxide uptake and methane desorption. The present work focuses on the characterization of lithotype specific deformation, and strain behavior during CO{sub 2} uptake at simulated in-situ stress conditions. It includes the evaluation of three-dimensional strain induced by the confining stress, the sorption, and the desorption of carbon dioxide. X-ray computed tomography allowed three-dimensional characterization of the bituminous coal deformation samples under hydrostatic stress. The application of 6.9 MPa of confining stress contributes an average of - 0.34% volumetric strain. Normal strains due to confining stress were - 0.08%, - 0.15% and - 0.11% along the x, y and z axes respectively. Gas injection pressure was 3.1 MPa and the excess sorption was 0.85 mmol/g. Confined coal exposed to CO{sub 2} for 26 days displays an average volumetric expansion of 0.4%. Normal strains due to CO{sub 2} sorption were 0.11%, 0.22% and 0.11% along x, y and z axes. Drainage of the CO{sub 2} induced an average of - 0.33% volumetric shrinkage. Normal strains due to CO{sub 2} desorption were - 0.23%, - 0.08% and - 0.02% along x, y and z axes. Alternating positive and negative strain values observed along the sample length during compression, sorption and desorption respectively emphasized that both localized compression/compaction and expansion of coal will occur during CO{sub 2} sequestration. (author)

  6. Sorption, desorption and mineralisation of the herbicides glyphosate and MCPA in samples from two Danish soil and subsurface profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, Sebastian R.; Schultz, Anne; Jacobsen, Ole S.; Aamand, Jens

    2006-01-01

    The vertical distribution of the sorption, desorption and mineralisation of glyphosate and MCPA was examined in samples from two contrasting soil and subsurface profiles, obtained from a sandy agricultural site and a non-agricultural clay rich site. The highest mineralisation of [ 14 C-methylen]glyphosate, with 9.3-14.7% degraded to 14 CO 2 within 3 months was found in the deepest sample from the clay site. In the deeper parts of the sandy profile high sorption and low desorption of glyphosate coincided with no or minor mineralisation indicating a limited glyphosate bioavailability. MCPA was readily mineralised except in the deepest samples from both sites. The highest MCPA mineralisation was detected just below the surface layers with 72% or 44% degraded to 14 CO 2 at the sandy or the clay sites, respectively. MCPA sorped to a minor extent in all samples and no indications of sorption-controlled mineralisation was revealed. None of the herbicides were mineralised under anoxic conditions. - Natural attenuation potential of the herbicides glyphosate and MCPA was assessed in soil and subsurface profiles

  7. Sorption, desorption and mineralisation of the herbicides glyphosate and MCPA in samples from two Danish soil and subsurface profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, Sebastian R. [Department of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark)]. E-mail: srs@geus.dk; Schultz, Anne [Department of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Jacobsen, Ole S. [Department of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Aamand, Jens [Department of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark)

    2006-05-15

    The vertical distribution of the sorption, desorption and mineralisation of glyphosate and MCPA was examined in samples from two contrasting soil and subsurface profiles, obtained from a sandy agricultural site and a non-agricultural clay rich site. The highest mineralisation of [{sup 14}C-methylen]glyphosate, with 9.3-14.7% degraded to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} within 3 months was found in the deepest sample from the clay site. In the deeper parts of the sandy profile high sorption and low desorption of glyphosate coincided with no or minor mineralisation indicating a limited glyphosate bioavailability. MCPA was readily mineralised except in the deepest samples from both sites. The highest MCPA mineralisation was detected just below the surface layers with 72% or 44% degraded to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} at the sandy or the clay sites, respectively. MCPA sorped to a minor extent in all samples and no indications of sorption-controlled mineralisation was revealed. None of the herbicides were mineralised under anoxic conditions. - Natural attenuation potential of the herbicides glyphosate and MCPA was assessed in soil and subsurface profiles.

  8. Influence of mineral characteristics on the retention of low molecular weight organic compounds: a batch sorption-desorption and ATR-FTIR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeasmin, Sabina; Singh, Balwant; Kookana, Rai S; Farrell, Mark; Sparks, Donald L; Johnston, Cliff T

    2014-10-15

    Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorption-desorption behaviour of (14)C-labelled carboxylic acids (citric and oxalic) and amino acids (glutamic, alanine, phenylalanine and lysine) on pure minerals (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, ferrihydrite and goethite). The sorption experiments were complemented by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to gain possible mechanistic insight into the organic acids-mineral interactions. In terms of charge, the organic solutes ranged from strongly negative (i.e., citric) to positively charged solutes (i.e., lysine); similarly the mineral phases also ranged from positively to negatively charged surfaces. In general, sorption of anionic carboxylic and glutamic acids was higher compared to the other compounds (except lysine). Cationic lysine showed a stronger affinity to permanently charged phyllosilicates than Fe oxides. The sorption of alanine and phenylalanine was consistently low for all minerals, with relatively higher sorption and lower desorption of phenylalanine than alanine. Overall, the role of carboxylic functional groups for the sorption and retention of these carboxylic and amino acids on Fe oxides (and kaolinite) and of amino group on 2:1 phyllosilicates was noticeable. Mineral properties (surface chemistry, specific surface area), chemistry of the organic compounds (pKa value, functional groups) and the equilibrium pH of the system together controlled the differences in sorption-desorption patterns. The results of this study aid to understand the effects of mineralogical and chemical factors that affect naturally occurring low molecular weight organic compounds sorption under field conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Combined effects of DOM extracted from site soil/compost and biosurfactant on the sorption and desorption of PAHs in a soil-water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Hui, E-mail: yuhui200@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); Huang Guohe, E-mail: gordon.huang@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); An Chunjiang, E-mail: an209@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); Wei Jia, E-mail: jia.wei@iseis.org [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} The combined DOM and biosurfactant significantly enhanced desorption of PAHs. {yields} Compost DOM exhibited higher desorption enhancement capacity than the soil DOM. {yields} Competition among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant for sorption site determined desorption of PAHs from soil. {yields} Formation of DOM-biosurfactant complex enhance desorption extent of PAHs. - Abstract: The combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant on the sorption/desorption behavior of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil water systems were systematically investigated. Two origins of DOMs (extracted from soil and extracted from food waste compost) and an anionic biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) were introduced. The presence of DOM in the aqueous phase could decrease the sorption of PAHs, thus influence their mobility. Desorption enhancement for both PHE and PYR in the system with compost DOM was greater than that in the soil DOM system. This is due to the differences in specific molecular structures and functional groups of two DOMs. With the co-existence of biosurfactant and DOM, partitioning is the predominant process and the desorption extent was much higher than the system with DOM or biosurfactant individually. For PHE, the desorption enhancement of combined DOM and biosurfactant was larger than the sum of DOM or biosurfactant; however desorption enhancement for PYR in the combined system was less than the additive enhancement in two individual system under low PAH concentration. This could be explained as the competition sorption among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant. The results of this study will help to clarify the transport of petroleum pollutants in the remediation of HOCs-contaminated soils.

  10. Combined effects of DOM extracted from site soil/compost and biosurfactant on the sorption and desorption of PAHs in a soil-water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hui; Huang Guohe; An Chunjiang; Wei Jia

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The combined DOM and biosurfactant significantly enhanced desorption of PAHs. → Compost DOM exhibited higher desorption enhancement capacity than the soil DOM. → Competition among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant for sorption site determined desorption of PAHs from soil. → Formation of DOM-biosurfactant complex enhance desorption extent of PAHs. - Abstract: The combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant on the sorption/desorption behavior of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil water systems were systematically investigated. Two origins of DOMs (extracted from soil and extracted from food waste compost) and an anionic biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) were introduced. The presence of DOM in the aqueous phase could decrease the sorption of PAHs, thus influence their mobility. Desorption enhancement for both PHE and PYR in the system with compost DOM was greater than that in the soil DOM system. This is due to the differences in specific molecular structures and functional groups of two DOMs. With the co-existence of biosurfactant and DOM, partitioning is the predominant process and the desorption extent was much higher than the system with DOM or biosurfactant individually. For PHE, the desorption enhancement of combined DOM and biosurfactant was larger than the sum of DOM or biosurfactant; however desorption enhancement for PYR in the combined system was less than the additive enhancement in two individual system under low PAH concentration. This could be explained as the competition sorption among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant. The results of this study will help to clarify the transport of petroleum pollutants in the remediation of HOCs-contaminated soils.

  11. Sorption-desorption characteristics of benzimidazole based fungicide 2-(4-fluorophenyl)-1h-benzimidazole on physicochemical properties of selected pakistani soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    A batch equilibrium method has been utilized to investigate the sorption-desorption behavior of a versatile cost-effective fungicide2-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-benzimidazole) FBNZ on four Pakistani soils geographically distant, from hilly to desert areas. FBNZ is a newly synthesized fungicide prepared in the laboratory and is cost effective than the commercially available fungicides. The adsorption and desorption data were fitted to the Freundlich equation, with values of na = 1, which points to a C-type isotherm. Sorption increases with soil organic carbon content, with greater degree of adsorption for hilly soil and least adsorption on sandy soil of Multan, Punjab. Desorption studies reveal that the adsorbed fungicide are firmly retained by soil particles and present a certain degree of irreversibility. The results indicate that the soil organic matters followed by clay content are the most important soil properties governing the fungicide sorption capacity. (author)

  12. Sorption/Desorption Behavior and Mechanism of NH4(+) by Biochar as a Nitrogen Fertilizer Sustained-Release Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yanxue; Qi, Hejinyan; Liu, Yujia; He, Xiaowei

    2016-06-22

    Biochar, the pyrolysis product of biomass material with limited oxygen, has the potential to increase crop production and sustained-release fertilizer, but the understanding of the reason for improving soil fertility is insufficient, especially the behavior and mechanism of ammonium sulfate. In this study, the sorption/desorption effect of NH4(+) by biochar deriving from common agricultural wastes under different preparation temperatures from 200 to 500 °C was studied and its mechanism was discussed. The results showed that biochar displayed excellent retention ability in holding NH4(+) above 90% after 21 days under 200 °C preparation temperature, and it can be deduced that the oxygen functional groups, such as carboxyl and keto group, played the primary role in adsorbing NH4(+) due to hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction. The sorption/desorption effect and mechanism were studied for providing an optional way to dispose of agricultural residues into biochar as a nitrogen fertilizer sustained-release material under suitable preparation temperature.

  13. Sorption and desorption of remazol yellow by a Fe-zeolitic tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solache R, M. J.; Villalva C, R.; Diaz N, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of remazol yellow from aqueous solution was evaluated using a Fe-zeolitic tuff. The adsorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Sorption kinetic and isotherms were determined and the adsorption behavior was analyzed. Kinetic pseudo-second order and Langmuir-Freundlich models were successfully applied to the experimental results, indicating chemisorption on a heterogeneous material. The regeneration of the material was best accomplished by using a H 2 O 2 solution. The sorption capacity of the Fe-zeolitic tuff increased when the saturated samples were treated with a H 2O2 or FeCl 3 solution. (Author)

  14. Batch experiments for assessing the sorption/desorption characteristics of 152Eu in systems of loose sediments and water containing humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.

    2001-01-01

    The 152 Eu distribution coefficients of the sorption and desorption of non-binding loose sediments of different grain sizes are investigated using a groundwater of tertiary lignite from Northern Germany which contains high concentrations of humic acids. The batch experiments were carried out with a ratio of 2.5cm 3 /g of solution volume to sediment mass, without mixing [de

  15. Influence of temperature on pentavalent Np Sorption and desorption onto Goethite, Montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vial, M.A.; Sherman, C; Czerwinski, K.R.; Reed, D.

    2002-01-01

    Yucca Mountain Site has been selected by the United States Department of Energy as the repository for disposing the US HLW. The performance allocation analysis on a multi-barrier system for high-level radioactive waste disposal has pointed 237 Np as the dominant hazard at the inlet of the biosphere [1J. 2JNp is present in high-level radioactive wastes (HLW), although in smaller amounts in comparison to other radionuclides. Because of its long half-life of 2.14 million years and its mobile nature under aerobic conditions due to the high chemical stability of its pentavalent state, it is considered a possible long-term pollutant of the ecosystem. Understanding Np behavior is required in order to quantitatively describe its transport in surface groundwater systems. In the repository, many components are known to play an important role in Np and other actinides speciation through adsorption-, complexation-, dissolution-, precipitation- and, colloids or pseudocolloids generation reactions [1]. Inorganic Ligands (C0 3 - , OH - ), present in nearly all natural water at various degree, and organic ligands (humic acid) can react with Np and consequently affect its leachability through the formation of numerous compounds. The solubility limits of radionuclides may act as an initial barrier to radionuclide migration from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain for some radionuclides. However, once radionuclides have dissolved in water infiltrating the site, sorption of these radionuclides onto the surrounding mineral phases becomes a potentially important second barrier. The study of retardation of Np and other key actinides is of major importance in assessing the performance of the potential repository. Among the soil of interest montmorillonite and iron-based materials have generated lots of researches. Nagasaki et al. [2] recent researches on sorption equilibrium and kinetics of NpO 2 + on dispersed particles of Na-montmorillonite and Na-illite (batch experiments at p

  16. An investigation of the sorption/desorption of organics from natural waters by solid adsorbents and anion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larin, B.M.; Sedlov, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    The results of laboratory and operational tests at thermal and nuclear power stations on anion exchangers and solid adsorbents of makeup water treatment plants with regard to the sorption/desorption of organic substances in natural water and condensate are presented. The resins Amberlite trademark IRA-67, IRA-900, IRA-958Cl, Purolite registered 2 A-500P, Dowex TM3 Marathon, and others were tested. Retention of up to 60-80% of the ''organic'' material on the anion exchangers and organic absorbers installed at different places in the technological scheme of the water processing unit was attained. The possibility of a partial ''poisoning'' of the resins and the degradation of the working characteristics over the first year of operation are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Study of sorption and desorption characteristics of natural and chemically modified ionexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foeldesova, M.; Dillinger, P.; Lukac, P.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper was give information for scientific community about not-traditionally, simply, high precise and effective radio-indicator method and possibilities its use for determination of sorption characteristics of naturals and chemically adjusted ionexes. These materials are suitable as barrier materials for water, soil and air cleaning

  18. Investigation of biotransformation, sorption, and desorption of multiple chemical contaminants in pilot-scale drinking water biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Katherine E; Lew, Julia; Dickenson, Eric R V; Wert, Eric C

    2018-06-01

    The evolving demands of drinking water treatment necessitate processes capable of removing a diverse suite of contaminants. Biofiltration can employ biotransformation and sorption to remove various classes of chemicals from water. Here, pilot-scale virgin anthracite-sand and previously used biological activated carbon (BAC)-sand dual media filters were operated for ∼250 days to assess removals of 0.4 mg/L ammonia as nitrogen, 50-140 μg/L manganese, and ∼100 ng/L each of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) spiked into pre-ozonated Colorado River water. Anthracite achieved complete nitrification within 200 days and started removing ibuprofen at 85 days. Limited manganese (10%) removal occurred. In contrast, BAC completely nitrified ammonia within 113 days, removed all manganese at 43 days, and exhibited steady state removal of most TOrCs by 140 days. However, during the first 140 days, removal of caffeine, DEET, gemfibrozil, naproxen, and trimethoprim decreased, suggesting a shift from sorption to biotransformation. Acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole were removed at consistent levels, with complete removal of acetaminophen achieved throughout the study; ibuprofen removal increased with time. When subjected to elevated (1 μg/L) concentrations of TOrCs, BAC removed larger masses of chemicals; with a subsequent decrease and ultimate cease in the TOrCs spike, caffeine, DEET, gemfibrozil, and trimethoprim notably desorbed. By the end of operation, anthracite and BAC exhibited equivalent quantities of biomass measured as adenosine triphosphate, but BAC harbored greater microbial diversity (examined with 16S rRNA sequencing). Improved insight was gained regarding concurrent biotransformation, sorption, and desorption of multiple organic and inorganic contaminants in pilot-scale drinking water biofilters. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Sorption and desorption of remazol yellow by a Fe-zeolitic tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solache R, M. J. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Villalva C, R.; Diaz N, M. C., E-mail: marcos.solache@inin.gob.m [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Division de Estudios del Posgrado, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The adsorption of remazol yellow from aqueous solution was evaluated using a Fe-zeolitic tuff. The adsorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Sorption kinetic and isotherms were determined and the adsorption behavior was analyzed. Kinetic pseudo-second order and Langmuir-Freundlich models were successfully applied to the experimental results, indicating chemisorption on a heterogeneous material. The regeneration of the material was best accomplished by using a H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution. The sorption capacity of the Fe-zeolitic tuff increased when the saturated samples were treated with a H{sub 2O2} or FeCl{sub 3} solution. (Author)

  20. Effects of human management on black carbon sorption/desorption during a water transfer project: Recognizing impacts and identifying mitigation possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rong; Zhang, Jinliang; Wang, Peichao; Hu, Ronggui; Song, Yantun; Wu, Yupeng; Qiu, Guohong

    2018-05-15

    Water resources management is an important public concern. In this study, we examined the extent of sorption/desorption of trace pollutants to soil black carbon (BC) in the water level fluctuation zone (WLFZ) of the middle route of the South to North Water Transfer Project in China. In addition, we investigated the main management measures affecting these processes during the project. The results showed that the pseudo second-order model adequately describes the sorption/desorption of phenanthrene on the soil BC in the WLFZ. Water level fluctuation may indirectly influenced BC sorption/desorption by altering water chemistry. Water level residence time had negative effects on BC sorption in short-term experiments (days to months), but the impact gradually diminished with increased residence time. The results suggested that long-term field monitoring of water chemistry is urgent. During the initial period of water transfer, delaying the water supplies as drinking water source or directly irrigating crops could mitigate the adverse impacts. Future research should focus on the water-soluble products of BC degradation. The findings of this study should be useful in improving sustainable management of water resources for water transfer projects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sorption and desorption of cesium and strontium on TA-2 and TA-41 soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, K. Stephen; Li, Benjamin W.; Longmire, P.A.; Fowler, M.M.

    1996-04-01

    Current environmental monitoring has detected radioactive contaminants in alluvial groundwater, soils, and sediments in the TA-2 and TA-41 areas along the north central edge of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Because of this contamination, this study was initiated. The objective of this study is to quantify the sorptivity of cesium and strontium onto TA-2 and TA-41 site specific soil samples under a controlled environment in the laboratory. The purposes of this work are to determine cesium and strontium sorption coefficient for these sit specific soils and to evaluate the potential transport of cesium and strontium. Based on this information, a risk assessment and remediation strategy can be developed

  2. Sorption and desorption of Sr-90 and Cs-137 by sediments of the Sozh-river valley and border water collections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoshko, M.P.

    2001-01-01

    From the last literature analysis it follows, that to studying of sorption and desorption soil, some rocks and minerals properties concerning radioisotopes the steadfast attention of researchers is paid nowadays. The materials of heavy particles sorption kinetics, the action of adsorption molecules and ions from solutions on leaching products are examined. Sr-90, Cs-137, Pu-239,240 diffusion is estimated. It is found out, that sorbed and desorbed amount of radioisotopes is proportionally to their concentration in soil, and sorption (S) and distributions (Cd) factors do not depend on soil contamination density, and are determined by its physical and chemical properties, parity of firm and liquid phases. It is judged, that increase of soil absorbing properties by the increase of sorbent entering are unpromising, as sorption soil capacity is filled by Cs-137 only in thousand shares of per cent from the sorbent amount, which can be absorbed by soil. With the reference to the conditions of Belarus, experiments and natural supervision on Sr-90 and Cs-137 sorption by Fe, Mn, Si, Al, Ti hydroxides were executed. At experimental researches of electrolyte influence on radioisotope sorption by peat soils Cd amount lines were established. Sediments under certain conditions, due to desorption, become a source of the secondary contamination of natural waters up to ecologically dangerous concentration. Radioisotopes desorption ambiguity is connected to many parallel proceeding processes: exchange sorption on organic and mineral components, co-sedimentation with one-and-a-half Fe, Al and Mn hydroxides and also depends on solutions structure, cationic exchange rocks and soil capacities, concentration of competing ions. At low radioisotopes contents desorption is insignificant, at high - their extraction does not depend on reagent concentration. We carried out the experiment on studying Cs-137 and Sr-90 sorption-desorption from sediments Sozh-river valley and border water

  3. Behaviour of selenate in soils: experimental approach and modeling of hysteresis of sorption/desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loffredo, N.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of future storage of nuclear material in deep geological layers, the transfer of selenium-79 from groundwater to biosphere through irrigation is one of the scenarios considered by the ANDRA (National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management). So, the soil would act as an interface between the geosphere and biosphere. Actually the model adopted to evaluate the element mobility in soil is based on a simple representation of its distribution between the quantity adsorbed on the soil and the amount remaining in the solution (KD model). Such distribution is considered as instantaneous, reversible and linear with the concentration of contamination. This model has some inadequacies with respect to selenium because this latter can be present in different redox states that control its mobility and whose transformation kinetics among states are poorly known (Se(-II), Se(0), Se(IV) and Se(VI)). In order to improve predictions on the mobility of selenium in soil, selenate (Se(VI)) - which is the most mobile form - has been used to study its interactions with respect to two different soils (soil B and soil R). A kinetic model, alternative to the K d model, has been developed to describe the evolution of stocks of Se(VI) in solution. This model considers that a fraction of selenium is associated with soil in a reversibly way (potentially mobile) and a portion of it is stabilized in soil (pseudo-irreversibly fixed). This model integrates on one hand, in the soil, kinetics of biotic and abiotic stabilization and on the other hand, in solution, a reduction kinetic. With the goal of acquiring the parameters of the models, various experiments using dialysis bags have been effectuated, both in batch and with open-flow reactors. The parameter acquisition has allowed kinetic and K d models to be compared in different realistic scenarios of contamination (chronic or sequential) of a surface soil with 79 Se(VI). In addition, the sorption mechanisms of Se(VI) have been

  4. Sorption and desorption of lead (II) from wastewater by green algae Cladophora fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liping; Su, Yingying; Su, Hua; Wang, Xinting; Zhu, Xiaobin

    2007-05-08

    Biosorption is an effective method to remove heavy metals from wastewater. In this work, adsorption features of Cladophora fascicularis were investigated as a function of time, initial pH, initial Pb(II) concentrations, temperature and co-existing ions. Kinetics and equilibria were obtained from batch experiments. The biosorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second order model. Adsorption equilibria were well described by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity was 198.5 mg/g at 298K and pH 5.0. The adsorption processes were endothermic and the biosorption heat was 29.6 kJ/mol. Desorption experiments indicated that 0.01 mol/L Na(2)EDTA was an efficient desorbent for the recovery of Pb(II) from biomass. IR spectrum analysis suggested amido or hydroxy, CO and C-O could combine intensively with Pb(II).

  5. Sorption-Desorption Behavior of Newly synthesized N-(1H-Benzimidazole -2 ylmethyl) Acetamide (ABNZ) on Selected Soils and its Antifungal activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, K. S.; Rashid, N.

    2015-01-01

    A batch equilibrium method has been utilized to investigate the adsorption-desorption behavior of a versatile commercially available fungicide N-(1H-benzimidazole-2ylmethyl) acetamide (ABNZ) on four Pakistani soils geographically distant, from hilly to desert areas. Both qualitative and quantitative analysis has been done for sorption-desorption behavior of ABNZ. These analyses are done in the different concentration of fungicide (0-0.25, 0.25-0.5, 0.5-0.75). Based on statistical analysis ABNZ execute the Freundlich adsorption isotherm in all four tested soils having values of slope n<1 resembling the L-type curve. The distribution co-efficient K/sub d(ads)/ ranges from (2.66 to 12.42 ml/meu g/sup -1/) indicating low adsorption of ABNZ overall. Sorption increases with soil organic carbon content, exhibited greater degree of adsorption for hilly soil and least adsorption on sandy soil of Multan, Punjab. Desorption studies reveal that the adsorbed fungicide is firmly retained by soil particles and present a certain degree of irreversibility. The results indicate that the soil organic matters followed by clay content are the most important soil properties governing the fungicide sorption capacity. Compound N-(1H- benzimidazole -2-ylmethyl) acetamide (ABNZ) showed maximum antifungal activity compared to rest of the tested compound. This anti-fungal activity is substantial in comparison to other pesticides. It causes 40% inhibition of Microsporum canis and Fusarium solani. (author)

  6. A fully coupled diffusion-reaction scheme for moisture sorption-desorption in an anhydride-cured epoxy resin

    KAUST Repository

    El Yagoubi, Jalal; Lubineau, Gilles; Roger, Frederic; Verdu, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Thermoset materials frequently display non-classical moisture sorption behaviors. In this paper, we investigated this issue from an experimental point of view as well as in terms of modeling the water transport. We used the gravimetric technique to monitor water uptake by epoxy samples, with several thicknesses exposed to different levels of humidity during absorption and desorption tests. Our results revealed that the polymer displays a two-stage behavior with a residual amount of water that is desorbed progressively. We proposed a phenomenological reaction-diffusion scheme to describe this behavior. The model describes water transport as a competition between diffusion and the reaction, during which the local diffusivity and solubility depend on the local advancement of the reaction. We then implemented our model using COMSOL Multiphysics and identified it using a MATLAB-COMSOL optimization tool and the experimental data. We discussed the relation between the hydrophilicity of the product of the reaction and the diffusion behavior. We examined the reaction-induced modification of the water concentration field. It is worth noting that part of the phenomenology can be explained by the presence of hydrolyzable groups. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A fully coupled diffusion-reaction scheme for moisture sorption-desorption in an anhydride-cured epoxy resin

    KAUST Repository

    El Yagoubi, Jalal

    2012-11-01

    Thermoset materials frequently display non-classical moisture sorption behaviors. In this paper, we investigated this issue from an experimental point of view as well as in terms of modeling the water transport. We used the gravimetric technique to monitor water uptake by epoxy samples, with several thicknesses exposed to different levels of humidity during absorption and desorption tests. Our results revealed that the polymer displays a two-stage behavior with a residual amount of water that is desorbed progressively. We proposed a phenomenological reaction-diffusion scheme to describe this behavior. The model describes water transport as a competition between diffusion and the reaction, during which the local diffusivity and solubility depend on the local advancement of the reaction. We then implemented our model using COMSOL Multiphysics and identified it using a MATLAB-COMSOL optimization tool and the experimental data. We discussed the relation between the hydrophilicity of the product of the reaction and the diffusion behavior. We examined the reaction-induced modification of the water concentration field. It is worth noting that part of the phenomenology can be explained by the presence of hydrolyzable groups. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reversible Second Order Kinetics of Sorption-Desorption of Cr(VI Ion on Activated Carbon from Palm Empty Fruit Bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iip Izul Falah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon (AC from palm empty fruit bunches has been prepared, and this material was then used to adsorb Cr(VI from a solution. Characterization of the AC was conducted by detection of its functional groups, determination of total volatile compounds (VC content and its iodine number. Study on sorption-desorption kinetics was conducted by comparing results of evaluations of several models with proposed reversible second order model using the data produced in this work. Results of the works showed that the AC had similar characters compared with the AC produced by previous researchers. Application of the kinetics models on sorption Cr(VI onto the AC showed that nearly all of the models gave a good linearity. However, only the proposed model had a good relation with Langmuir isotherm, with respectively sorption (ks and desorption (kd constants were 5.75 x 10-4 L.mg‑1.min-1 and 2.20 x 10-3 min-1; maximum sorption capacity, qm = 20.00 mg.g-1; and equilibrium constant, K from kinetics experiment (0.261 L.mg-1 was comparable with the result from the isotherm experiment (0.269 L.mg-1. Hence, using this model, kinetics and Langmuir parameters can probably be determined from a single kinetics data experiment.

  9. Batch desorption studies and multiple sorption-regeneration cycles in a fixed-bed column for Cd(II) elimination by protonated Sargassum muticum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodeiro, P.; Herrero, R.; Sastre de Vicente, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    The protonated alga Sargassum muticum was employed in batch desorption studies to find the most appropriate eluting agent for Cd(II)-laden biomass regeneration. Eleven types of eluting solutions at different concentrations were tested, finding elution efficiencies higher than 90% for most of the desorbents studied. Total organic carbon and biomass weight loss measurements were made. The reusability of the protonated alga was also studied using a fixed-bed column. Eleven consecutive sorption-regeneration cycles at a flow rate of 10 mL min -1 were carried out for the removal of 50 mg L -1 Cd(II) solution. A 0.1 M HNO 3 solution was employed as desorbing agent. The column was operated during 605 h for sorption and 66 h for desorption, equivalent to a continuous use during 28 days, with no apparent loss of sorption performance. In these cycles, no diminution of the breakthrough time was found; although, a relative loss of sorption capacity, regarding the found in the first cycle, was observed. The slope of the breakthrough curves experiments a gradual increase reaching its maximum value for the last cycle tested (40% greater than for the first one). The maximum Cd(II) concentration elution peak was achieved in 5 min or less, and the metal effluent concentration was always lower than 0.9 mg L -1 after 1 h of elution. The maximum concentration factor was determined to be between 55 and 109

  10. Investigations for the influence of geochemical parameters on the sorption and desorption of lanthanides and uranium onto opalinus clay as potential host rock for a repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeser, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The development of a disposal in deep geological formations for radioactive waste is a very important task for the future. The safety assessment for more than a hundred thousand years needs a full understanding of all processes of interaction between the radioactive waste and the surrounded formations. This work contributes to this understanding. The interaction between lanthanides (homologues of the actinides americium, curium and berkelium) / uranium and the host rock opalinus clay under influence of organic substances (NOM) have been analyzed and discussed. The complex system was split into 3 binary basic systems with the following interactions - Interactions between lanthanides / uranium and NOM - Interactions between lanthanides / uranium and the opalinus clay - Interactions between NOM and opalinus clay All binary systems can be influenced by geological parameters like pH, ion strength and competing cations. The sorption / desorption of the lanthanides onto the opalinus clay is analyzed via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For the investigation of the complexation behavior of metals with NOM we used capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Under these conditions the chosen model organic humic acid affected the sorption of the lanthanides onto opalinus clay favorably. The smaller organic compounds, which dominate in the composition of the clay organics, remobilized the metals after sorption onto clay and the sorption can be inhibited by NOM. Due to the reduced metal sorption onto Opalinus clay by NOM, a migration through the clay may be possible.

  11. Mucilage from seeds of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) used as soil conditioner; effects on the sorption-desorption of four herbicides in three different soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marsico, A; Scrano, L; Amato, M; Gàmiz, B; Real, M; Cox, L

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect of the mucilage extracted from Chia seeds (Salvia hispanica L.) as soil amendment on soil physical properties and on the sorption-desorption behaviour of four herbicides (MCPA, Diuron, Clomazone and Terbuthylazine) used in cereal crops. Three soils of different texture (sandy-loam, loam and clay-loam) were selected, and mercury intrusion porosimetry and surface area analysis were used to examine changes in the microstructural characteristics caused by the reactions that occur between the mucilage and soil particles. Laboratory studies were conducted to characterise the selected herbicides with regard their sorption on tested soils added or not with the mucilage. Mucilage amendment resulted in a reduction in soil porosity, basically due to a reduction in larger pores (radius>10μm) and an important increase in finer pores (radius<10μm) and in partcles' surface. A higher herbicide sorption in the amended soils was ascertained when compared to unamended soils. The sorption percentage of herbicides in soils treated with mucilage increased in the order; sandy-loamDesorption of the herbicides was highly inhibited in the soils treated with mucilage; only Terbuthylazine showed a slight desorption in the case of loam and clay loam-soils. This study leads to the conclusion that mucilage from Chia seeds used as soil conditioner can reduce the mobility of herbicides tested in agricultural soils with different physico-chemical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sorption and desorption of 125I-, 137Cs+, 85Sr2+ and 152,154Eu3+ on disturbed soils under dynamic flow and static batch conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palagyi, S.; Vodickova, H.

    2009-01-01

    Sorption of radionuclides on homogenized soils (under 2.5 mm grain size) from synthetic groundwater of 8 x 10 -3 M ionic strength and pH 8.5 has been studied under dynamic (flow) and static (batch) conditions. The corresponding water-soluble compounds, as carriers in the 10 -6 mol/dm 3 concentration, ere added into the SGW prior to the experiments. Soil samples were taken rom several locations around the environment of the High Level Waste Storage facility at Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc in 5-100 cm depth. The dynamic experiments were carried out in columns made of PP+PE injection syringes of 7.8 cm length and 2.1 cm in diameter. A multi-head peristaltic pump was used or pumping the water upward through the columns at a seepage velocity of bout 0.06 cm/min in average. The radioactive nuclides were added into the water stream individually in a form of a short pulse in 0.1 cm 3 of demineralized water. Dynamic desorption experiments were performed with the same experimental arrangement using a mixture of 10 -2 N H 2 SO 4 and 10 -2 N NO 3 in a volume ratio of 2 : 1. Retardation, distribution and hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients during transport of radionuclides were determined by he evaluation of the integral form of a simple advection-dispersion equation, used for fitting experimental data and modeling the theoretical sorption breakthrough and desorption displacement curves. The static experiments were realized in 100 cm 3 plastic bottles stirring 5 g of soil samples with SGW occasionally in a soil to SGW ratio of 1 : 10 (m/V). Kinetic parameters including equilibrium sorption activity, activity transfer rate constants and sorption half-times were also determined. The results of dynamic experiments were compared with static sorption experiments. (author)

  13. Effect of pH, ionic strength and fulvic acid on the sorption and desorption of cobalt to bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Sh.M.; Ren, A.P.; Chen, Ch.L.; Chen, Y.X.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    Humic substances and bentonite have attracted great interest in radioactive waste management. Here the sorption of cobalt on bentonite in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA) under ambient conditions was studied. The effects of pH, ionic strength, FA and solution concentrations on cobalt sorption to bentonite were also investigated using batch techniques. The results indicate that the sorption of cobalt is strongly dependent on pH and is independent of ionic strength under our experimental conditions. Surface complexation is considered the main mechanism of cobalt sorption to bentonite. In the presence of FA, little effect of FA on cobalt sorption was found at pH 8. The addition sequences of FA/Co 2+ to the bentonite suspension on the sorption of cobalt to FA-coated bentonite were also studied. The results indicated that the sorption is not influenced by the addition sequences. Some possible mechanisms are discussed

  14. Raw or incubated olive-mill wastes and its biotransformed products as agricultural soil amendments-effect on sorption-desorption of triazine herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Moreno, Laura; Almendros, Gonzalo; Peña, Aránzazu

    2007-02-07

    Raw olive-mill waste and soil amendments obtained from their traditional composting or vermicomposting were added, at rates equivalent to 200 Mg ha-1, to a calcareous silty clay loam soil in a laboratory test, in order to improve its fertility and physicochemical characteristics. In particular, the effects on the sorption-desorption processes of four triazine herbicides have been examined. We found that comparatively hydrophobic herbicides terbuthylazine and prometryn increased their retention on amended soil whereas the more polar herbicides simazine and cyanazine were less affected. Soil application of olive cake, without transformation, resulted in the highest herbicide retention. Its relatively high content in aliphatic fractions and lipids could explain the increased herbicide retention through hydrophobic bonding and herbicide diffusion favored by poorly condensed macromolecular structures. On the other hand, the condensed aromatic structure of the compost and vermicompost from olive cake could hinder diffusion processes, resulting in lower herbicide sorption. In fact, the progressive humification in soil of olive-mill solid waste led to a decrease of sorption capacity, which suggested important changes in organic matter quality and interactions during the mineralization process. When soil amended with vermicompost was incubated for different periods of time, the enhanced herbicide sorption capacity persisted for 2 months. Pesticide desorption was reduced by the addition of fresh amendments but was enhanced during the transformation process of amendments in soil. Our results indicate the potential of soil amendments based on olive-mill wastes in the controlled, selective release of triazine herbicides, which varies depending on the maturity achieved by their biological transformation.

  15. Comparative study on sorption/desorption of radioeuropium on alumina, bentonite and red earth: effects of pH, ionic strength, fulvic acid, and iron oxides in red earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Wenming; Wang Xiangke; Bian Xiaoyan; Wang Aixia; Du Jingzhou; Tao, Z.Y.

    2001-01-01

    The sorption and desorption of Eu(III) as a representative of trivalent lanthanides and actinides on bentonite, alumina, red earth and red earth treated to remove free iron oxides were comparatively investigated by using batch technique and radiotracer 152+154 Eu. The effects of pH, ionic strength, fulvic acid, iron oxides in red earth and the sorption mechanism were also discussed. As compared to alumina and red earth, Eu(III) presents a considerable distribution coefficient (K d ) onto bentonite. It was found that the pH and the presence of clay minerals are the main factors dominating the sorption/desorption characteristic of Eu 3+ in the soil, and that a sorption-desorption hysteresis on bentonite and red earth actually occurs. Furthermore, the main sorption mechanism of lanthanides onto bentonite, alumina and red earth is the formation of bridged hydroxo complexes with the surface, and there are negative effects of fulvic acid and free iron oxides in red earth on the sorption of Eu(III). The results of this paper indicate that the additivity rule on the sorption characteristic of a soil from the individual component's characteristics is not general

  16. Retention of Nickel in Soils: Sorption-Desorption and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption and desorption of heavy metals in soils are primary factors that influence their bioavailability and mobility in the soil profile. To examine the characteristics of nickel (Ni) adsorption-desorption in soils, kinetic batch experiments were carried out followed by Ni re...

  17. Sorção e dessorção do ametryn em Latossolos brasileiros Sorption and desorption of ametryn in Brazilian Latosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.O.C. Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O conhecimento dos processos de retenção de herbicidas em solo é fundamental para se prever o potencial de lixiviação e degradação e a eficiência no controle das plantas daninhas. Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar os processos de sorção e dessorção do ametryn em quatro solos brasileiros: Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo (LVA, Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo húmico (LVAh, Latossolo Vermelho (LV e Latossolo Amarelo (LA, com diferentes valores de pH. Para isso, utilizou-se o método Batch Equilibrium em condições controladas de laboratório e análise por cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência, com detector UV-Vis a 245 nm. Considerando os valores da constante de Freundlich modificada (K'f, verificou-se, entre os solos estudados, a ordem crescente de sorção do ametryn: LV pH 6,06 Knowledge of herbicide retention processes in soil is fundamental to predict leaching potential, degradation, and weed control efficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the processes of sorption and desorption of ametryn in four Brazilian soils: Red-Yellow Latosol (LVA, Red-Yellow humic Latosol (LVAh, Red Latosol (LV, and Yellow Latosol (LA, with different pH values. Thus, the method "Batch Equilibrium" was applied under controlled laboratory conditions, and analysis by high performance liquid chromatography using UV-Vis detector at 245 nm. Considering the values of the modified Freundlich constant (K'f, the following increasing sorption order of ametryn was verified: LV pH 6.06 <5.00 LV pH <6.30 LA pH <6.11 pH LVA sorption and desorption, and that soils with higher organic matter content showed the highest rates of sorption, besides smaller percentages of desorption, indicating the occurrence of hysteresis.

  18. Sorption-desorption studies on tuff III. A continuation of studies with samples from Jackass Flats and Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfsberg, K.; Aguilar, R.D.; Bayhurst, B.P.

    1981-05-01

    This report is the third in a series of reports describing studies of sorption and migration of radionuclides in tuff. The investigations were extended to lithologies of tuff not previously studied. Continuing experiments with uranium, plutonium, and americium are described. The dependence of sorption on the concentration of the sorbing element and on the solution-to-solid ratio was investigated for a number of nuclides and two lithologies. A circulating system was designed for measuring sorption ratios. Values obtained from this system, batch measurements, and column elutions are compared. Progress on measuring and controlling Eh is described

  19. A Study of Moisture Sorption and Dielectric Processes of Starch and Sodium Starch Glycolate : Theme: Formulation and Manufacturing of Solid Dosage Forms Guest Editors: Tony Zhou and Tonglei Li.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiew, Tze Ning; Huang, Rongying; Popov, Ivan; Feldman, Yuri; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2017-12-01

    This study explored the potential of combining the use of moisture sorption isotherms and dielectric relaxation profiles of starch and sodium starch glycolate (SSG) to probe the location of moisture in dried and hydrated samples. Starch and SSG samples, dried and hydrated, were prepared. For hydrated samples, their moisture contents were determined. The samples were probed by dielectric spectroscopy using a frequency band of 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz to investigate their moisture-related relaxation profiles. The moisture sorption and desorption isotherms of starch and SSG were generated using a vapor sorption analyzer, and modeled using the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer equation. A clear high frequency relaxation process was detected in both dried and hydrated starches, while for dried starch, an additional slower low frequency process was also detected. The high frequency relaxation processes in hydrated and dried starches were assigned to the coupled starch-hydrated water relaxation. The low frequency relaxation in dried starch was attributed to the local chain motions of the starch backbone. No relaxation process associated with water was detected in both hydrated and dried SSG within the frequency and temperature range used in this study. The moisture sorption isotherms of SSG suggest the presence of high energy free water, which could have masked the relaxation process of the bound water during dielectric measurements. The combined study of moisture sorption isotherms and dielectric spectroscopy was shown to be beneficial and complementary in probing the effects of moisture on the relaxation processes of starch and SSG.

  20. Effect of grain size on the sorption and desorption of SeO42- and SeO32- in columns of crushed granite and fracture infill from granitic water under dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videnska, K.; Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague; Palagyi, S.; Czech Technical University, Prague; Stamberg, K.; Vodickova, H.; Havlova, V.

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of 2 x 10 -5 mol/dm 3 Na 2 SeO 4 and Na 2 SeO 3 dissolved in synthetic granitic water (SGW) were investigated in columns of crushed granite and fracture infill (clay minerals) of various grain sizes. Desorption was studied using pure SGW. The goal of study was the quantification of the effect of grain size on the retardation and distribution coefficients of SeO 4 2- and SeO 3 2- , as well as on the other transport parameters (Peclet number and hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient). A model based on the erfc-function, assuming a non-linear reversible equilibrium sorption/desorption isotherm, was used for evaluation of sorption/desorption and transport parameters. The determination of selenium was performed using an ICP-MS technique. The experimental breakthrough curves were fitted using non-linear regression procedure, in the course of which the parameters mentioned were sought. Summing up, no sorption was recorded in the case of SeO 4 2- under these conditions. The values of retardation coefficients were practically one for all studied grain sizes. On the other hand, significant sorption was found for SeO 3 2- : depending on the grain size, the retardation coefficients varied between 1.6-8.7 in pure granite and 1.8-37.2 in infill materials. These values correspond to distribution coefficients of 0.2-2.5 and 0.2-12.7 cm 3 /g, respectively. The both parameters have similar values in a case of desorption which reflects the reversible character of sorption process. It was found that retardation and distribution coefficients and sorption capacity for SeO 3 2- also increase with decreasing grain size. (author)

  1. Sorption-desorption processes of radioisotopes with solid materials from liquid releases and atmosphere deposits. The distribution coefficient (Ksub(d)), its uses, limitations, and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, Arsene

    1979-03-01

    The various sorption-desorption processes of radionuclides with environmental materials are presented. The parameters governing the distribution coefficient are reviewed in the light of various examples. The factors affecting equilibria between the different phases are: reaction time, concentration of the solid phase, water quality, salinity, competition between ions, concentration of radioisotopes or stable isotopes, pH of the mobile phase, particle diameter, chemical form of the radioisotopes, nature of the solid phase, temperature. The effects of the biological parameters on the distribution coefficient are discussed. Biological processes affect the main chemical transformations: mineralization, insolubilization, oxidation-reduction, complexation, ... The importance of these processes is demonstrated by a number of examples in various media. Finally, the practical use of Ksub(d) in the assessment of the environmental impact of radioactive releases is developed, with special emphasis on the limits of its use in siting studies and its essential interest in specifying pathways and capacity of a river system [fr

  2. Determination of persistent organic pollutants in solid environmental samples using accelerated solvent extraction and supercritical fluid extraction. Exhaustive extraction and sorption/desorption studies of PCBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerklund, E.

    1998-10-01

    to verify that the developed SFE methods are exhaustive. It is quite clear though that there is no reason to continue using for example Soxhlet extraction, which should be replaced in routine laboratories. The possibility of utilizing SFE as a selective tool in sorption/desorption studies of POPs in natural sediments was also addressed. This second objective was proven successful and sediments could be characterized in terms of resistance towards desorption of bound analytes under supercritical conditions. These data could be correlated to desorption processes occurring under natural conditions. Additionally it could be verified that sorption of POPs from water to sediment is a very slow process requiring months or even years. This supports recent research results, demonstrating that distribution coefficients many times are underestimated since the system has not reached equilibrium 205 refs, 10 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Waste/Rock Interactions Technology Program: the status of radionuclide sorption-desorption studies performed by the WRIT program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Relyea, J.F.

    1982-04-01

    The most credible means for radionuclides disposed as solid wastes in deep-geologic repositories to reach the biosphere is through dissolution of the solid waste and subsequent radionuclide transport by circulating ground water. Thus safety assessment activities must consider the physicochemical interactions between radionculides present in ground water with package components, rocks and sediments since these processes can significantly delay or constrain the mass transport of radionuclides in comparison to ground-water movement. This paper focuses on interactions between dissolved radiouclides in ground water and rocks and sediments away from the near-field repository. The primary mechanism discussed is adsorption-desorption, which has been studied using two approaches. Empirical studies of adsorption-desorption rely on distribution coefficient measurements while mechanism studies strive to identify, differentiate and quantify the processes that control nuclide retardation

  4. Corrigendum to “Sorption/desorption of non-hydrophobic and ionisable pharmaceutical and personal care products from reclaimed water onto/from a natural sediment” Sci Total Environ 472 (2014) 273–281

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes, E-mail: virtudes.martinez@imdea.org [IMDEA Agua, Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies in Water, Parque Científico Tecnológico de la Universidad de Alcalá, 28805 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Meffe, Raffaella; Herrera, Sonia [IMDEA Agua, Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies in Water, Parque Científico Tecnológico de la Universidad de Alcalá, 28805 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Arranz, Elena [University of Alcalá, Geography and Geology Department, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Bustamante, Irene de [IMDEA Agua, Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies in Water, Parque Científico Tecnológico de la Universidad de Alcalá, 28805 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); University of Alcalá, Geography and Geology Department, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the sorption of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) (acetaminophen, atenolol, carbamazepine, caffeine, naproxen and sulphamethoxazole) onto the natural organic matter (NOM) and the inorganic surfaces of a natural sandy loam sediment was quantified separately. The quantification was based on the PPCP charge, their degree of ionisation, their octanol-water partitioning coefficient (K{sub OW}) and the sediment organic carbon fraction (ƒ{sub OC}). PPCP desorption from the sediment was examined under conditions of infiltrating water containing a high concentration of inorganic ions (mimicking infiltrating reclaimed water), and a low concentration (and smaller diversity) of inorganic ions (mimicking rainwater infiltration). Batch tests were performed using a sediment/water ratio of 1:4 and a PPCP initial concentration ranging from 1 to 100 μg L{sup −1}. The results showed the type and degree of PPCP ionisation to strongly influence the sorption of these compounds onto the sediment. The sorption of cationic species onto the sediment was higher than that of anionic species and mostly reversible; the sorption of neutral species was negligible with the exception of caffeine. The anionic species sorbed less onto the sediment, but also desorbed less easily. Most of the compounds showed a sorption that was highly influenced by interaction with mineral surfaces. The presence of inorganic ions had no impact on the desorption of the PPCPs from the sediment. According to the calculated percentages of removal, the mobility followed the order: carbamazepine > acetaminophen > naproxen > atenolol > sulphamethoxazole > caffeine.

  5. Corrigendum to “Sorption/desorption of non-hydrophobic and ionisable pharmaceutical and personal care products from reclaimed water onto/from a natural sediment” Sci Total Environ 472 (2014) 273–281

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes; Meffe, Raffaella; Herrera, Sonia; Arranz, Elena; Bustamante, Irene de

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the sorption of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) (acetaminophen, atenolol, carbamazepine, caffeine, naproxen and sulphamethoxazole) onto the natural organic matter (NOM) and the inorganic surfaces of a natural sandy loam sediment was quantified separately. The quantification was based on the PPCP charge, their degree of ionisation, their octanol-water partitioning coefficient (K OW ) and the sediment organic carbon fraction (ƒ OC ). PPCP desorption from the sediment was examined under conditions of infiltrating water containing a high concentration of inorganic ions (mimicking infiltrating reclaimed water), and a low concentration (and smaller diversity) of inorganic ions (mimicking rainwater infiltration). Batch tests were performed using a sediment/water ratio of 1:4 and a PPCP initial concentration ranging from 1 to 100 μg L −1 . The results showed the type and degree of PPCP ionisation to strongly influence the sorption of these compounds onto the sediment. The sorption of cationic species onto the sediment was higher than that of anionic species and mostly reversible; the sorption of neutral species was negligible with the exception of caffeine. The anionic species sorbed less onto the sediment, but also desorbed less easily. Most of the compounds showed a sorption that was highly influenced by interaction with mineral surfaces. The presence of inorganic ions had no impact on the desorption of the PPCPs from the sediment. According to the calculated percentages of removal, the mobility followed the order: carbamazepine > acetaminophen > naproxen > atenolol > sulphamethoxazole > caffeine

  6. Characterization of 200-UP-1 Aquifer Sediments and Results of Sorption-Desorption Tests Using Spiked Uncontaminated Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Brown, Christopher F.; Legore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2005-11-16

    Core characterization showed only 4 out of 13 core liner samples were intact samples and that the others were slough material. The intact samples showed typical Ringold Unit E characteristics such as being dominated by gravel and sand. Moderately reducing conditions are inferred in some core from borehole C4299. This reducing condition was caused by the hard tool process used to drill the wells. One core showed significant presence of ferric iron oxide/clay coatings on the gravels. There were no highly contaminated sediments found in the cores from the three new boreholes in UP-1 operable unit, especially for uranium. The presence of slough and ''flour'' caused by hard tooling is a serious challenge to obtaining field relevant sediments for use in geochemical experiments to determine the adsorption-desorption tendencies of redox sensitive elements such as uranium. The adsorption of COCs on intact Ringold Formation sediments and Fe/clay coatings showed that most of the anionic contaminants [Tc(VII), Se(VI), U(VI), Cr(VI), and I(-I)] did not adsorbed very well compared to cationic [Np(V), Sr(II), and Cs(I)] radionuclides. The high hydrous iron oxide content in Fe/clay coatings caused the highest Kd values for U and Np, suggesting these hydrous oxides are the key solid adsorbent in the sediments. Enhanced adsorption behavior for Tc, and Cr and perhaps Se on the sediments was considered an ?artifact? result caused by the induced reducing conditions from the hard tool drilling. Additional U(VI) adsorption Kd studies were performed on Ringold Formation sediments to develop more robust Kd data base for U. The <2 mm size separates of three UP-1 sediments showed a linear U(VI) adsorption isotherm up 1 ppm of total U(VI) concentration in solution. The additional U(VI) Kds obtained from varying carbonate concentration indicated that U(VI) adsorption was strongly influenced by the concentration of carbonate in solution. U(VI) adsorption decreased with

  7. Guest Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Tianlong Gu; Shenghui Liu

    2011-01-01

    This special issue comprises of 14 selected papers from the International Workshop on Computer Science for Environmental Engineering and EcoInformatics (CSEEE 2011). The conferences received 860 paper submissions from 15 countries and regions, of which 450 were selected for presentation after a rigorous review process. From these 450 research papers, through two rounds of reviewing, the guest editors selected 14 as the best papers on the Networking Technologies and Information track of the Co...

  8. Guest editor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-07-15

    Full text: Guest Editor for this special issue of the CERN Courier on the applications of accelerators was Dewi M. Lewis of Amersham International pic, UK. Dr. Lewis was educated at the Physics Department, University of Wales, Swansea, and learnt his accelerator physics as Engineer-in- Charge at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings before joining industry in 1979 at the beginning of the boom for commercial cyclotrons. Having managed the installation of Amersham's second and third isotope production cyclotrons in the UK, his industrial experience encompassed isotope manufacturing and business management in radiopharmaceuticals and organization of joint ventures. Following closure of several research reactors in 1990, his responsibilities extended to reactor isotope production as well as technology transfer with international laboratories. He was responsible for creation of the first Russian 'weapons to ploughshares' joint venture with the Radioisotope Association, Mayak and the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry. Dr. Lewis currently chairs the European Radiopharmaceutical Industry's committee on future reactor isotopes and is currently involved in the technical development for accelerator technology. Amersham International is one of the world's leading isotope companies, engaged in development, manufacturing, international sales and distribution of radioisotope products in markets for healthcare, research compounds and industrial products. Formerly part of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Agency, Amersham was one of the first companies to be privatized in 1982.

  9. Guest editor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Guest Editor for this special issue of the CERN Courier on the applications of accelerators was Dewi M. Lewis of Amersham International pic, UK. Dr. Lewis was educated at the Physics Department, University of Wales, Swansea, and learnt his accelerator physics as Engineer-in- Charge at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings before joining industry in 1979 at the beginning of the boom for commercial cyclotrons. Having managed the installation of Amersham's second and third isotope production cyclotrons in the UK, his industrial experience encompassed isotope manufacturing and business management in radiopharmaceuticals and organization of joint ventures. Following closure of several research reactors in 1990, his responsibilities extended to reactor isotope production as well as technology transfer with international laboratories. He was responsible for creation of the first Russian 'weapons to ploughshares' joint venture with the Radioisotope Association, Mayak and the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry. Dr. Lewis currently chairs the European Radiopharmaceutical Industry's committee on future reactor isotopes and is currently involved in the technical development for accelerator technology. Amersham International is one of the world's leading isotope companies, engaged in development, manufacturing, international sales and distribution of radioisotope products in markets for healthcare, research compounds and industrial products. Formerly part of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Agency, Amersham was one of the first companies to be privatized in 1982

  10. Development of a sensitive determination method for benzotriazole UV stabilizers in enviromental water samples with stir bar sorption extraction and liquid desorption prior to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesdeoca-Esponda, Sarah; del Toro-Moreno, Adrián; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2013-07-01

    Benzotriazole UV stabilizers are emerging compounds used in personal care products and can enter surface water after passing through wastewater treatment plants without being removed. Because these analytes are strongly hydrophobic, there is an environmental risk of accumulation in solid matrices and magnification through the trophic chain. In this work, a method based on stir bar sorption extraction with liquid desorption is presented for the extraction of benzotriazole UV stabilizers from water samples. Stir bar sorptive extraction was combined with ultra-high performance LC with MS/MS detection. All important factors affecting the stir bar sorptive extraction procedure are discussed, and the optimized method was applied to seawater and wastewater samples from Gran Canaria Island, providing good selectivity and sensitivity with LODs and limits of quantification in the range of 18.4-55.1 and 61.5-184 ng/L, respectively. Recoveries between 68.4-92.2% were achieved for the more polar compounds, whereas the recoveries were lower for the two less polar compounds, most likely due to their strong absorption into the polydimethylsiloxane stir bar phase that does not allows the complete desorption. The repeatability studies gave RSDs of between 6.45 and 12.6% for all compounds in the real samples. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Influence of the soil/solution ratio, interaction time, and extractant on the evaluation of iron chelate sorption/desorption by soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Apaolaza, Lourdes; Lucena, Juan J

    2011-03-23

    Synthetic Fe chelates are the most efficient agricultural practice to control Fe deficiency in crops, EDTA/Fe3+ and o,o-EDDHA/Fe3+ being the most commonly used. Their efficacy as Fe sources and carriers in soils can be severely limited by their retention on it. The aim of this work is to evaluate the possible bias introduced in the studies of the iron chelate retention by soils. For that purpose, results obtained for EDTA and EDDHA iron chelates from two batch studies with different soil/solution ratios were compared with data obtained for a leaching column experiment. Moreover, different extractants were tested to study the o,o-EDDHA/Fe3+ and o,p-EDDHA/Fe3+ desorption from a calcareous soil, and also the effect of the interaction time in their retention process has been evaluated. In summary, the mobility through a calcareous soil of the studied iron chelates differs greatly depending on the type of iron chelate and also on the procedure used to evaluate the retention and the soil/solution ratio used. In general, the leaching column method is preferred because the achieved conclusions are more representative of the natural conditions, but batch methods are very useful as a preliminary experiment, especially one with a high soil/solution ratio. The iron chelate desorption could be quantified by using a sequential extraction with water, sodium sulfate, and DTPA as extractants. Under the experimental conditions used in this study, o,o-EDDHA/Fe3+ retention increased with interaction time.

  12. Batch sorption-desorption of As(III) from waste water by magnetic palm kernel shell activated carbon using optimized Box-Behnken design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyika, Chinedum; Asri, Nur Asilayana Mohd; Majid, Zaiton Abdul; Jaafar, Jafariah; Yahya, Adibah

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we converted activated carbon (AC) into magnetic activated carbon (MAC), which was established to have removed arsenic (III) from wastewater. Arsenic (III) is a toxic heavy metal which is readily soluble in water and can be detrimental to human health. The MAC was prepared by incorporating Fe3O4 into the AC by using Fe3O4 extracted from a ferrous sulfate solution, designated: magnetic palm kernel shell from iron suspension (MPKSF). Batch experiments were conducted using two methods: (1) one-factor-at-a-time and (2) Box-Behnken statistical analysis. Results showed that the optimum conditions resulted in 95% of As(III) removal in the wastewater sample. The adsorption data were best fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption of As(III) onto the MPKSF was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry analysis which detected the presence of As(III) of 0.52% on the surface of the MPKSF. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of the MPKSF-As presented a peak at 573 cm-1, which was assigned to M-O (metal-oxygen) bending, indicating the coordination of As(III) with oxygen through the formation of inner-sphere complexation, thereby indicating a covalent bonding between the MPKSF functional groups and As(III). The findings suggested that the MPKSF exhibited a strong capacity to efficiently remove As(III) from wastewater, while the desorption studies showed that the As(III) was rigidly bound to the MPKSF thereby eliminating the possibility of secondary pollution.

  13. SORPTION OF Au(III BY Saccharomyces cerevisiae BIOMASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaria Amaria

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Au(III sorption by S. cerevisiae biomass extracted from beer waste industry was investigated. Experimentally, the sorption was conducted in batch method. This research involved five steps: 1 identification the functional groups present in the S. cerevisiae biomass by infrared spectroscopic technique, 2 determination of optimum pH, 3 determination of the sorption capacity and energy, 4 determination of the sorption type by conducting desorption of sorbed Au(III using specific eluents having different desorption capacity such as H2O (van der Waals, KNO3 (ion exchange, HNO3 (hydrogen bond, and tiourea (coordination bond, 5 determination of effective eluents in Au(III desorption by partial desorption of sorbed Au(III using thiourea, NaCN and KI. The remaining Au(III concentrations in filtrate were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The results showed that: 1 Functional groups of S. cerevisiae biomass that involved in the sorption processes were hydroxyl (-OH, carboxylate (-COO- and amine (-NH2, 2 maximum sorption was occurred at pH 4, equal to 98.19% of total sorption, 3 The sorption capacity of biomass was 133.33 mg/g (6.7682E-04 mol/g and was involved sorption energy 23.03 kJ mol-1, 4 Sorption type was dominated by coordination bond, 5 NaCN was effective eluent to strip Au(III close to 100%.   Keywords: sorption, desorption, S. cerevisiae biomass, Au(III

  14. Reversible Guest Exchange Mechanisms in Supramolecular Host-GuestAssemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2006-09-01

    Synthetic chemists have provided a wide array of supramolecular assemblies able to encapsulate guest molecules. The scope of this tutorial review focuses on supramolecular host molecules capable of reversibly encapsulating polyatomic guests. Much work has been done to determine the mechanism of guest encapsulation and guest release. This review covers common methods of monitoring and characterizing guest exchange such as NMR, UV-VIS, mass spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and calorimetry and also presents representative examples of guest exchange mechanisms. The guest exchange mechanisms of hemicarcerands, cucurbiturils, hydrogen-bonded assemblies, and metal-ligand assemblies are discussed. Special attention is given to systems which exhibit constrictive binding, a motif common in supramolecular guest exchange systems.

  15. Sorption behavior of cesium onto bentonite colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Kazuki; Masuda, Tsuguya; Tomura, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    It is considered that bentonite colloid might be generated from bentonite which will be used as buffer material in geological disposal system, and can facilitate the migration of radionuclides by means of sorption. In order to examine this characteristic, sorption and desorption experiments of Cs onto bentonite colloid were carried out to obtain its distribution coefficient (Kd) and information on the reversibility of its sorption. In addition, particle size distribution and shape of colloid were investigated and their effect on the sorption behavior was discussed. Kds for Cs were around 20 m 3 /kg for sorption and 30 m 3 /kg for desorption, in which sorbed Cs was desorbed by 8.4x10 -4 mol/l of NaCl solution. These values did not show any dependencies on Cs concentration and duration of sorption and desorption. The first 20% of sorbed Cs was desorbed reversibly at least. Most of colloidal particles were larger than 200 nm and TEM micrographs showed they had only several sheets of the clay crystal. Obtained Kds for colloidal bentonite were larger than those for powdered bentonite. This can be caused by difference of competing ions in the solution, characteristics of contained smectite, or sorption site density. (author)

  16. Temperature-regulated guest admission and release in microporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang (Kevin); Shang, Jin; Gu, Qinfen; Awati, Rohan V.; Jensen, Nathan; Grant, Andrew; Zhang, Xueying; Sholl, David S.; Liu, Jefferson Z.; Webley, Paul A.; May, Eric F.

    2017-06-01

    While it has long been known that some highly adsorbing microporous materials suddenly become inaccessible to guest molecules below certain temperatures, previous attempts to explain this phenomenon have failed. Here we show that this anomalous sorption behaviour is a temperature-regulated guest admission process, where the pore-keeping group's thermal fluctuations are influenced by interactions with guest molecules. A physical model is presented to explain the atomic-level chemistry and structure of these thermally regulated micropores, which is crucial to systematic engineering of new functional materials such as tunable molecular sieves, gated membranes and controlled-release nanocontainers. The model was validated experimentally with H2, N2, Ar and CH4 on three classes of microporous materials: trapdoor zeolites, supramolecular host calixarenes and metal-organic frameworks. We demonstrate how temperature can be exploited to achieve appreciable hydrogen and methane storage in such materials without sustained pressure. These findings also open new avenues for gas sensing and isotope separation.

  17. Study of sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Dong; Fan Xianhua; Su Xiguang; Zeng Jishu

    2001-01-01

    The sorption behaviors of technetium on pyrrhotine are studied with batch experiment and dilute sulfuric acid is used to dissolve the technetium adsorbed on pyrrhotine. Sorption and desorption experiment are performed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions (inert gas box). The results show that a significant sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine is found under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the sorption on the mineral is supposed to be due to the reduction of TcO 4 - to insoluble TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. Desorption process of the sorbed technetium into dilute sulfuric acid is found to be different under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. On addition of H 2 O 2 to the leach solution a sudden increase of the technetium concentration is observed

  18. Kinetics of strontium sorption in calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacic, S.; Komarov, V.F.; Vukovic, Z.

    1989-01-01

    Kinetics of strontium sorption by highly dispersed solids: tricalcium phosphate (Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , TCP) and hydroxyapatite (Ca 5 (PO 4 ) 3 )H, HAP) were investigated. Analysis of sorption data was made taking into consideration composition and morphology of ultra micro particles. Conclusion is that the isomorphous strontium impurity is structurally sensitive element for calcium phosphate. It was determined that the beginning of strontium desorption corresponds to the beginning of transformation of the TCP - HAP (author)

  19. Sorption and migration of neptunium in porous sedimentary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tadao; Mukai, Masayuki; Nakayama, Shinichi

    2005-01-01

    Column migration experiments of neptunium were conducted for porous sedimentary materials: coastal sand, tuffaceous sand, ando soil, reddish soil, yellowish soil and loess, and migration behavior, sorption mechanisms and chemical formation of Np were investigated. The migration behavior of Np in each material was much different each other, due to chemical formation in solution and/or sorption mechanism of Np. Mathematical models of different concepts were applied to the experimental results to interpret the sorption mechanism and the migration behavior. It can be concluded that both of instantaneous equilibrium sorption and sorption-desorption kinetics have to be considered to model the Np migration in sedimentary materials. (author)

  20. Sorption behaviour of herbicides in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchini, L.C.; Wiendl, F.M.; Ruegg, E.F.; Instituto Biologico, Sao Paulo

    1988-01-01

    Environmental contamination by herbicides is related with the sorption phenomenon of these compounds in the soils. The behaviour of paraquat, 2,4-D and diuron was studied in soils with different physico-chemical properties, through the Freundlich adsorption and desorption isotherms, using 14 C-radiolabeled herbicides. Results of the range of the adsorption-desorption of each herbicide was related mainly with the chemical characteristics of these compounds. (author) [pt

  1. Sorção e dessorção do imazaquin em solos com diferentes características granulométricas, químicas e mineralógicas Imazaquin sorption and desorption in soils with different mineralogical, physical and chemical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Rolland Monticelli Barizon

    2005-10-01

    cinética indica que mecanismos de difusão podem estar envolvidos neste processo.The aim of this study was to evaluate the sorption and desorption of imazaquin in soils with different granulometric, chemical and mineralogical characteristics. Isotherms and kinetics studies were carried out to quantify the hysteresis between sorption and desorption processes. The soils were classified as Rhodic Hapludox (LVdf, Typic Hapludox (LVA and Typic Quartzipsamment (RQ. The soils were air-dried and passed through a 2 mm mesh sieve, and the chemical, physical and mineralogical properties characterized. The radiolabeled molecule (14C was imazaquin, an herbicide of the imidazolinone group. Radioactivity was quantified by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The trials were carried out under controlled temperature conditions (25 ± 2 °C. Five imazaquin concentrations were used (0.67; 1.34; 2.68; 5.36; and 10.72 µmol L-1 for the sorption isotherms. The experimental data were fitted to the Freundlich equation so that sorption parameters were obtained. Subsequently, four extractions were performed with a 0.005 mol L-1CaCl2 solution in order to determine desorption parameters in a similar way for sorption. For sorption kinetics, the sorbed imazaquin amount (2.99 µmol L-1 was determined after different time intervals (0; 0.5; 1; 3; 6; 12; 24, and 48 h after imazaquin application, and the results adjusted to the Elovich equation. Imazaquin generally presented low sorption to the three soils, with higher sorption coefficients in the soils with higher clay and organic carbon content. The desorption coefficients were higher than those of sorption, evidencing the occurrence of hysteresis. Sorption kinetics showed that imazaquin is sorbed in two phases - a rapid one that presented the largest sorbed fraction, and another slower one. The application of Fick´s Law to the kinetic data showed that diffusion mechanisms might be involved in this process.

  2. Kinetics and reversibility of micropollutant sorption in sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maialen; Carrère, Hélène; Patau, Mathieu; Patureau, Dominique

    2011-10-01

    The fate of micropollutants throughout wastewater treatment systems is highly dependent on their sorption interactions with sludge matter. In this study, both the sorption and desorption kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in activated sludge were shown to be very rapid in comparison to biodegradation kinetics. It was concluded that PAH transfer does not limit their biodegradation and that their fate is governed by the sorption/desorption equilibrium state. The effect of contact time between sludge and PAHs was also investigated. It was shown that aging did not influence the sorption/desorption equilibrium although PAH losses during aging suggest that sequestration phenomena had occurred. This implies that for PAH sorption assessment within treatment processes there is no need to include a contact time dimension. As a consequence, thanks to an innovative approach taking into account sorption equilibria and sequestration, this work has demonstrated that studies in the literature which, in main, deal with micropollutant sorption in sewage sludge with only a short contact time can be extrapolated to real systems in which sorption, desorption and aging occur.

  3. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other...... intermittently. For one of the materials, aerated concrete, the sorption curves are determined at three different temperatures....

  4. Sorption mechanisms and sorption models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoroff, M.; Lefevre, G.; Duc, M.; Neskovic, C.; Milonjic, S.

    2004-01-01

    Sorption at the solid-liquid interfaces play a major role in many phenomena and technologies: chemical separations, catalysis, biological processes, transport of toxic and radioactive species in surface and underground waters. The long term safety of radioactive waste repositories is based on artificial and natural barriers, intended to sorb radionuclides after the moment when the storage matrixes and containers will be corroded. Predictions on the efficiency of sorption for more than 10 6 years have to be done in order to demonstrate the safety of such depositories, what is a goal never encountered in the history of sciences and technology. For all these purposes, and, especially for the long term prediction, acquiring of sorption data constitutes only a first step of studies. Modeling based on a very good knowledge of sorption mechanisms is needed. In this review, we shall examine the main approaches and models used to quantify sorption processes, including results taken from the literature and from our own studies. We shall compare sorption models and examine their adequacy with sorption mechanisms. The cited references are only a few examples of the numerous articles published in that field. (orig.)

  5. Sorption equilibria of ethanol on cork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequin, Sonia; Chassagne, David; Karbowiak, Thomas; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2013-06-05

    We report here for the first time a thermodynamic study of gaseous ethanol sorption on raw cork powder and plate. Our study aims at a better understanding of the reactivity of this material when used as a stopper under enological conditions, thus in close contact with a hydroethanolic solution, wine. Sorption−desorption isotherms were accurately measured by thermogravimetry at 298 K in a large range of relative pressures. Sorption enthalpies were determined by calorimetry as a function of loading. Sorption−desorption isotherms exhibit a hysteresis loop probably due to the swelling of the material and the absorption of ethanol. Surprisingly, the sorption enthalpy of ethanol becomes lower than the liquefaction enthalpy as the filling increases. This result could be attributed to the swelling of the material, which would generate endothermic effects. Sorption of SO₂ on cork containing ethanol was also studied. When the ethanol content in cork is 2 wt %, the amount of SO₂ sorbed is divided by 2. Thus, ethanol does not enhance the sorption rate for SO₂ but, on the contrary, decreases the SO₂ sorption activity onto cork, probably because of competitive sorption mechanisms.

  6. An outstanding guest

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The person celebrating CERN's 25th anniversary whose photograph we published last week was not just any guest. Readers have pointed out that it was Wim Klein, whose remarkable abilities are part of CERN's history. Well known as one of the best "human calculators", Wim was recruited by CERN in 1957 to verify computer programs, which at the time were still stumbling. Moreover, he regularly beat their speed in calculating and gave breath-taking demonstrations. During one such demonstration in September 1973, he calculated the 19th root of a 133-digit number in less than 2 minutes !

  7. Modeling and Prediction of Soil Water Vapor Sorption Isotherms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Soil water vapor sorption isotherms describe the relationship between water activity (aw) and moisture content along adsorption and desorption paths. The isotherms are important for modeling numerous soil processes and are also used to estimate several soil (specific surface area, clay content.......93) for a wide range of soils; and (ii) develop and test regression models for estimating the isotherms from clay content. Preliminary results show reasonable fits of the majority of the investigated empirical and theoretical models to the measured data although some models were not capable to fit both sorption...... directions accurately. Evaluation of the developed prediction equations showed good estimation of the sorption/desorption isotherms for tested soils....

  8. Sorption characteristics of radioactive cesium and strontium on smectite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kozai, Naofumi

    1994-01-01

    Sorption of 137 Cs and 85 Sr on smectite has been studied by combining sorption and desorption experiments. In the desorption experiments, the 137 Cs and 85 Sr were desorbed from the smectite by 0.1 N different desorption reagents solution of Li + , Na + , K + , Rb + , Cs + , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and Ba 2+ . The effects of Cs and Sr concentrations on sorption were examined by desorption experiments using 1 N KCl as a desorption reagent over a Cs and Sr concentrations range from 10 -8 to 1 N (saturated). All of Sr sorbed was desorbed with a 1 N KCl solution over Sr concentrations range of 10 -8 and 1 M. Approximately 50% of the 137 Cs sorbed at a concentration of 10 -8 M was desorbed with a 1 N KCl solution, and the fraction desorbed increased with increasing a Cs concentration. These results show that all Sr was reversibly sorbed on smectite, and a fraction of Cs was irreversibly sorbed on smectite. Thus, smectite has reversible sorption sites for Sr and both reversible and irreversible sorption sites for Cs. The fractions of Sr desorbed were related to the products of an ionic radius and charge of a desorption reagent, and those of Cs were related to the hydration energy. These results suggest that sorbed Sr and Cs reversibly on smectite form hydrated and dehydrated ions, respectively. (orig.)

  9. Sorption of radioactive technetium on pyrrhotine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, D.; Fan, X.H.; Su, X.G.; Zeng, J.S.; Dong, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The sorption behavior of technetium on pyrrhotine was studied with batch experiments and diluted sulfuric acid (less than 2.88 mol/l) was used to dissolve the technetium adsorbed on pyrrhotine. A significant sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine was observed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the sorption on the mineral was supposed to be due to the reduction of TcO 4 - to insoluble TcO 2 x nH 2 O. Sorbed technetium on the mineral could be desorbed by diluted sulfuric acid. The maximum desorption ratio under aerobic conditions was much higher than that of under anaerobic conditions, meanwhile, the desorption rates under anaerobic conditions were higher than that of under aerobic conditions in the initial stage of the experiments. (author)

  10. Astrobee Guest Science Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jose; Smith, Marion F; Wheeler, Dawn; Fluckiger, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The Astrobee Research Facility will maintain three identical free-flying Astrobee robots on the ISS. After the Astrobees are launched and commissioned in 2018, they will replace the SPHERES robots that have been operating on the ISS since 2006 (Fig. 2). Over the years, the SPHERES have been among the most-used payloads on the ISS, supporting dozens of experiments from a variety of guest scientists. In the next section, we'll talk about past SPHERES experiments as possible inspiration for your future research on Astrobee. Compared to SPHERES, the Astrobee robots will offer many new capabilities and will require less astronaut time to support, so we hope the new facility will be able to fly experiments much more often.

  11. Experimental study of strontium sorption on fissure filling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksen, T E; Cui, Daqing [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-01

    We have carried out a comparative study of sorption and desorption of strontium in groundwater on separated magnetic and size fractions of fissure filling material taken from natural fissures in granitic rock. Complete reversibility of the sorption process was demonstrated by identical Freundlich isotherms, isotopic exchangeability and pH dependence of the distribution coefficients Rd. The sorption was found to be strongly pH dependent in the range 3-11. The pH effect can be accommodated in the sorption model by considering the surface areas and surface charges of the minerals in the fissure filling material. 20 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs.

  12. Experimental study of strontium sorption on fissure filling material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.; Cui, Daqing

    1994-12-01

    We have carried out a comparative study of sorption and desorption of strontium in groundwater on separated magnetic and size fractions of fissure filling material taken from natural fissures in granitic rock. Complete reversibility of the sorption process was demonstrated by identical Freundlich isotherms, isotopic exchangeability and pH dependence of the distribution coefficients Rd. The sorption was found to be strongly pH dependent in the range 3-11. The pH effect can be accommodated in the sorption model by considering the surface areas and surface charges of the minerals in the fissure filling material. 20 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Sorption of microamount of colloidal silver iodide on hydrated iron(III) oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepak, F.; Nova, J.

    1975-01-01

    Sorption of a microamount of colloidal silver iodide labelled with 131 I on hydrated iron/III/ oxide suspension was studied. The sorption dependence upon pH, sorbent amount, and inert electrolyte concentration has revealed that sorption of silver iodide reaches no more than 63%. The sorption lasted one hour during which the maximum value was reached. Desorption time was one hour, as well. Except for measuring the sorption dependence on pH, the sorption pH was 7.0, temperature 24+-2 0 C. (F.G.)

  14. Prediction of metal sorption in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westrich, Henry R.; Anderson, Harold L. Jr.; Arthur, Sara E.; Brady, Patrick V.; Cygan, Randall T.; Liang, Jianjie; Zhang, Pengchu; Yee, N.

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide transport in soils and groundwaters is routinely calculated in performance assessment (PA) codes using simplified conceptual models for radionuclide sorption, such as the K D approach for linear and reversible sorption. Model inaccuracies are typically addressed by adding layers of conservativeness (e.g., very low K D 's), and often result in failed transport predictions or substantial increases in site cleanup costs. Realistic assessments of radionuclide transport over a wide range of environmental conditions can proceed only from accurate, mechanistic models of the sorption process. They have focused on the sorption mechanisms and partition coefficients for Cs + , Sr 2+ and Ba 2+ (analogue for Ra 2+ ) onto iron oxides and clay minerals using an integrated approach that includes computer simulations, sorption/desorption measurements, and synchrotron analyses of metal sorbed substrates under geochemically realistic conditions. Sorption of Ba 2+ and Sr 2+ onto smectite is strong, pH-independent, and fully reversible, suggesting that cation exchange at the interlayer basal sites controls the sorption process. Sr 2+ sorbs weakly onto geothite and quartz, and is pH-dependent. Sr 2+ sorption onto a mixture of smectite and goethite, however, is pH- and concentration dependent. The adsorption capacity of montmorillonite is higher than that of goethite, which may be attributed to the high specific surface area and reaction site density of clays. The presence of goethite also appears to control the extent of metal desorption. In-situ, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic measurements for montmorillonite and goethite show that the first shell of adsorbed Ba 2+ is coordinated by 6 oxygens. The second adsorption shell, however, varies with the mineral surface coverage of adsorbed Ba 2+ and the mineral substrate. This suggests that Ba 2+ adsorption on mineral surfaces involves more than one mechanism and that the stability of sorbed

  15. Thermic and thermodynamic properties of desorption process of essential oil of Hyssopus seravshanicus from bentonite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukaniev, M.A.; Badalov, A.B.; Sharopov, F.S.

    2004-01-01

    It shown, that desorption process of essential oil of Hyssopus seravshanicus from bentonite clays include by four parts (lines) and the nature between essential oil of Hyssopus seravshanicus from bentonite clays is physical and chemical sorption

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Moisture Sorption Isotherms and Determination of Isosteric Heats of Sorption of Ziziphus Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel Saad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desorption and adsorption equilibrium moisture isotherms of Ziziphus spina-christi leaves were determined using the gravimetric-static method at 30, 40, and 50°C for water activity (aw ranging from 0.057 to 0.898. At a given aw, the results show that the moisture content decreases with increasing temperature. A hysteresis effect was observed. The experimental data of sorption were fitted by eight models (GAB, BET, Henderson-Thompson, modified-Chung Pfost, Halsey, Oswin, Peleg, and Adam and Shove. After evaluating the models according to several criteria, the Peleg and Oswin models were found to be the most suitable for describing the sorption curves. The net isosteric heats of desorption and adsorption of Ziziphus spina-christi leaves were calculated by applying the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the sorption isotherms and an expression for predicting these thermodynamic properties was given.

  17. Sorption of streptococcus faecium to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oerstavik, D.

    1977-01-01

    A method has been developed by which to study the sorption of Streptococcus faecium to soda-lime cover glasses. Conditions were chosen to minimize the influence on sorption of bacterial polymer production, passive sorption being studied rather than attachment mediated by metabolic activities. Sorption of S. faecium increased with increasing temperature (to 50degC), time, and cell concentration, but equilibrium apparently was not reached even after incubation for 8 hours or at a cell concentration of 3 x 10 10 per ml. Sorption increased with solute molarity up to 0.1 M concentration of NaCl and KCl, indicating an effect of the electrical double layers on the apposition of cells to the glass surface. Desorption of bacteria could be obtained after multiple washings of the glasses in buffer or by the action of Tween 80, but not if sorbed bacteria were left in distilled water, various salt solutions, urea, or in suspensions of unlabelled bacteria. It was concluded that sorption occurred as a result of chemical interactions between the glass and the cell surface. Tween 80 at a concentration of 1 per cent inhibited sorption to 26 per cent of buffer controls, 2 M urea was less effective, and 1 M NaCl was without effect. It is suggested that hydrophobic interactions may be of importance in the binding of S. faecium to glass. (author)

  18. Tritium sorption on protective coatings for concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.; Senohrabek, J.A.; Allsop, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    Because of the high sorption level of tritium on unprotected concrete, a program to examine the effectiveness of various concrete coatings and sealants in reducing tritium sorption was undertaken, and various exposure conditions were examined. Coatings of epoxy, polyurethane, bituminous sealant, bituminous sealant covered with polyvinylidene chloride wrap, alkyd paint, and sodium silicate were investigated with tritium (HTO) vapor concentration, humidity and contact time being varied. An exposure to HT was also carried out, and the effect of humidity on the tritium desorption rate was investigated. The relative effectiveness of the coatings was in the order of bituminous sealant + wrap > bituminous sealant > solvent-based epoxy > 100%-solids epoxy > alkyd paint > sodium silicate. The commercially available coatings for concrete resulted in tritium sorption being reduced to less than 7% of unprotected concrete. This was improved to ∼0.1% with the use of the Saran wrap (polyvinylidene chloride). The amount of tritium sorbed was proportional to tritium concentration. The total tritium sorbed decreased with an increase in humidity. A saturation effect was observed with increasing exposure time for both the coated and unprotected samples. Under the test conditions, complete saturation was not achieved within the maximum 8-hour contact time, except for the solvent-based epoxy. The desorption rate increased with a higher-humidity air purge stream. HT desorbed more rapidly than HTO, but the amount sorbed was smaller. The experimental program showed that HTO sorption by concrete can be significantly reduced with the proper choice of coating. However, tritium sorption on concrete and proposed coatings will continue to be a concern until the effects of the various conditions that affect the adsorption and desorption of tritium are firmly established for both chronic and acute tritium release conditions. Material sorption characteristics must also be considered in

  19. Radionuclide sorption kinetics and column sorption studies with Columbia River basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.

    1983-09-01

    The kinetics of radionuclide sorption and desorption reactions in basalt-groundwater systems were evaluated at 60 degrees C using a batch equilibration method. It was found that many sorption reactions on surfaces of fresh (unaltered) basalt from the Umtanum and Cohassett flows are slow. Some reactions require more than 50 days to reach a steady state. Sorption of neptunium and uranium in oxidizing (air saturated) groundwater appears to be controlled by slow reduction of these elements by the basalt surfaces. The resulting lower oxidation states are more strongly sorbed. Technetium and selenium, which are anionic under oxidizing conditions, are not measurably sorbed on fresh basalt surfaces, but are slightly sorbed on the altered surfaces of flow top basalt. Under reducing conditions, where the groundwater contains dilute hydrazine, sorption is faster for neptunium, uranium, technetium, selenium, and lead. Plutonium sorption rates were not affected by the groundwater Eh. It was shown that radium was precipitated rather than sorbed under the conditions of these experiments. Umtanum flow top material sorbed radionuclides much faster than fresh basalt surfaces due to its greater surface area and cation exchange capacity. Desorption rates for plutonium, uranium, neptunium, technetium, and selenium were generally much less than sorption rates (especially for reducing conditions). These radionuclides are irreversibly sorbed on the basalts. 25 refs., 20 figs., 19 tabs

  20. Sorption behavior of neptunium on bentonite -- Effect of calcium ion on the sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Muraoka, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    The sorption behavior of neptunium on bentonite was studied with batch type sorption and desorption experiments over a pH range of 2 to 8. A series of parallel studies using Na-smectite, Ca-smectite and admixtures of Na-smectite and calcite quantified the capacity of Ca 2+ (which occurs in bentonite as an exchangeable cation of smectite and as a component of calcite) to inhibit the sorption of neptunium. The distribution coefficient (K d ) of neptunium for bentonite was constant from pH 2 to 7, while for pure Na-smectite K d increased below pH 5 due to specific sorption of neptunium on Na-smectite. Specific sorption was defined as occurring when neptunium could be desorbed by a strong acid (1 M HCl) but was stable in the presence of 1 M KCl. It was found that the quantity of neptunium sorbed on Na-smectite was inversely proportional to the concentration of Ca 2+ in solution, an effect most pronounced at pH 2+ limits the specific sorption capacity of Na-smectite for neptunium. Similarly, in the mixture of Na-smectite and calcite, sufficient Ca 2+ was solubilized to depress neptunium sorption. This investigation demonstrates that Ca 2+ contained in bentonite as exchangeable cation and released from calcite reduces the specific sorption of neptunium

  1. Sorption of americium and neptunium by deep-sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgo, J.J.W.; Rees, L.V.C.; Cronan, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    The sorption and desorption of americium and neptunium by a wide range of deep-sea sediments from natural sea water at 4 0 C has been studied using a carefully controlled batch technique. All the sediments studied should form an excellent barrier to the migration of americium since distribution coefficients were uniformly greater than 10 5 and the sorption-desorption reaction may not be reversible. The sorption of neptunium was reversible and, except for one red clay, the distribution coefficients were greater than 10 3 for all the sediments investigated. Nevertheless the migration of neptunium should also be effectively retarded by most deep-sea sediments even under relatively oxidizing conditions. The neptunium in solution remained in the V oxidation state throughout the experiments. Under the experimental conditions used colloidal americium was trapped by the sediment and solubility did not seem to be the controlling factor in the desorption of americium. (Auth.)

  2. Guest loyalty in hospitality industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagić Snježana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of competition in the hospitality sector has created the need to retain guests and prevent them from switching company due to better offer or saturation. Loyal customers are a valuable asset for catering companies, not only because of the awareness of the effects of customer loyalty. They tend to spread word-of-mouth advertising, more tolerant to price changes, as well as they casually create a linkage to their friends, relatives, colleagues, and other probable consumers and thus enable businesses to uphold a guest's base. By recognizing loyalty guests' importance, the global hospitality industry created monetary and non-monetary rewards for loyal visitors, delayed gratification (points collection and immediate rewards, as well as numerous other reward systems that try to keep them. To win customer loyalty, together with all benefits arising from it, caterers need to become familiar with factors, which determine guests' loyalty. The paper will show the results of research regarding the impact of the service quality and guests' satisfaction to their loyalty. Many authors have confirmed that employees' satisfaction affected customers' satisfaction, so this paper will give an answer does it influence on customers' loyalty as well.

  3. Sorption heat engines: simple inanimate negative entropy generators

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Anthonie W. J.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    The name 'sorption heat engines' is proposed for simple negative entropy generators that are driven by thermal cycling and work on alternating adsorption and desorption. These generators are in general not explicitly recognized as heat engines. Their mechanism is applicable to the fields of engineering, physics, chemistry, geology, and biology, in particular the origin of life. Four kinds of sorption heat engines are distinguished depending on the occurrence of changes in the adsorbent or ads...

  4. Remoção de níquel(II de soluções aquosas pela biomassa Sargassum filipendula em múltiplos ciclos de sorção-dessorção = Removal of nickel (II from aqueous solutions by Sargassum filipendula biomass in multiple cycles of sorption-desorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Aparecida Seolatto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudado o desempenho da alga marinha Sargassum filipendula na remoção de níquel de uma solução de concentração de 50 mg L-1 em pH 3,5, em colunas de leito fixo que operam em ciclos de adsorção/dessorção. Foram testados dois sistemas de eluição; oprimeiro operou com a passagem direta e o segundo com a recirculação do eluente. Em seguida, foram realizados dez ciclos consecutivos de sorção-dessorção em duas colunas de leito fixo, uma regenerada com o eluente H2SO4 (0,1 M e outra com MgSO4/H2SO4 (pH 3, em sistema de recirculação do eluente. As etapas de sorção e dessorção foram realizadas em 30 e 2h, respectivamente, representando 20 dias de uso contínuo da biomassa. Foi observada alta quantidade recuperada de níquel nas etapas de eluição (aproximadamente 95%. Ao finaldo décimo ciclo, verificou-se que a alga Sargassum filipendula continuava apresentando valores elevados da capacidade de remoção de níquel da solução, mostrando-se como alternativa eficiente de tratamento de águas residuárias contendo metais. A regeneração dabiomassa apresentou baixo custo, além de ter facilitado o processo de tratamento que dispensou trocas sucessivas da biomassa.The behavior of seaweed Sargassum filipendula during a removal of nickel from a 50 mg L-1 aqueous solution at pH 3.5 in fixed-bed columns operating in adsorption/desorption cycles was studied. Twoelution systems were tested: the first one operating with the direct passage of eluant, and the second one with the solution recycle. Then, ten consecutive sorption-desorption cycles were investigated in two packed-bed columns; the first column was regenerated with H2SO4 (0.1 M, and the second one with MgSO4/H2SO4 (3.5% in pH 3 in an eluant recycle system. The sorption and desorption stages were carried out for about 30 and 2h, respectively, representing 20 days of continuous use of the biomass. A high quantity of recovered nickelwas observed in the elution stages

  5. Transport and sorption of volatile organic compounds and water vapor in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tsair-Fuh [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    To gain insight on the controlling mechanisms for VOC transport in porous media, the relations among sorbent properties, sorption equilibrium and intraparticle diffusion processes were studied at the level of individual sorbent particles and laboratory columns for soil and activated carbon systems. Transport and sorption of VOCs and water vapor were first elucidated within individual dry soil mineral grains. Soil properties, sorption capacity, and sorption rates were measured for 3 test soils; results suggest that the soil grains are porous, while the sorption isotherms are nonlinear and adsorption-desorption rates are slow and asymmetric. An intragranular pore diffusion model coupled with the nonlinear Freundlich isotherm was developed to describe the sorption kinetic curves. Transport of benzene and water vapor within peat was studied; partitioning and sorption kinetics were determined with an electrobalance. A dual diffusion model was developed. Transport of benzene in dry and moist soil columns was studied, followed by gaseous transport and sorption in activated carbon. The pore diffusion model provides good fits to sorption kinetics for VOCs to soil and VOC to granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers. Results of this research indicate that: Intraparticle diffusion along with a nonlinea sorption isotherm are responsible for the slow, asymmetric sorption-desorption. Diffusion models are able to describe results for soil and activated carbon systems; when combined with mass transfer equations, they predict column breakthrough curves for several systems. Although the conditions are simplified, the mechanisms should provide insight on complex systems involving transport and sorption of vapors in porous media.

  6. Frof Guest Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. W. LEE

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available GUEST EDITORIALThis special issue of TOJDE is centred around the theme of ‘Web 2.0 and Social Software in Distance Education’. The Web 2.0 (O’Reilly, 2005 movement, epitomised by such nascent technologies as blogs, wikis, RSS, podcasting, as well as tag-based folksonomies, social networking, collaborative editing and peer-to-peer (P2P media sharing applications, is purported to be redefining the way we conceive and make use of the Internet, and is enjoying considerable attention and popularity in both mainstream society and education. A major aim of this issue is to encourage ongoing discussion on the question of whether, and if so, in what ways, the advent and continued growth of Web 2.0 and social software has specific implications for the field of online and web-based distance education. The special issue opens with an article by P. Clint Rogers, Stephen W. Liddle, Peter Chan, Aaron Doxey and Brady Isom (all from the USA argue that the emergence of Web 2.0 technologies, and the possibilities and the realities they represent, are fuelling profound changes to theoretical views of learning and teaching. According to the authors, in contrast to earlier e-learning efforts that simply replicated traditional models of learning and teaching in online environments, ‘E-Learning 2.0’ offers opportunities to move away from the highly centralised industrial model of learning of the past era, towards achieving individual empowerment within a global learning community. They also argue that as the personal, social and flexible technologies of Web 2.0 proliferate, the importance of re-usability and interoperability will also increase; correspondingly there is also a need for standardisation efforts to support the attainment of these goals. The second article, focuses on the use of specific Web 2.0 technologies written by Abdullah Kuzu (Anadolu University, Turkey looks at pre-service teachers’ perceptions of the use of blogs for instruction and

  7. Sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on particulate organic matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xueyan; Luo Lei; Ma Yibing; Zhang Shuzhen

    2010-01-01

    Particulate organic matter (POM) is a key organic matter fraction which can influence soil fertility. Its interactions with hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOCs) have not been characterized and the mechanisms of retention of HOCs by POM remain unclear. In the present study, sorption behaviors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene (NAP), phenanthrene (PHE), and pyrene (PYR) by POMs separated from different soils were examined and the POMs were characterized by elemental analysis, solid state 13 C NMR, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results indicated that POMs were mainly composed of aliphatic components with high polarity. The different original POMs showed similar chemical composition and configuration. Sorption behaviors of PAHs indicated that there was no significant difference in sorption capacity among the POMs. Sorption of NAP and PHE by POMs displayed a nonlinear isotherm, while sorption of PYR yielded a linear isotherm. No significant hysteresis and ionic strength effect were observed for PAH desorption from the POMs.

  8. Sorption behaviour of cobalt-60 on Suez Canal bottom sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Gawad, S.A.; El-Shinawy, R.M.K.; Abdel Malik, W.E.Y.

    1981-01-01

    Mineralogical, elemental analysis and sorption behaviour of the Suez Canal bottom sediments in the Port Said area were investigated. It was found that the bottom sediment consist mainly of quartz, feldspars and traces of calcite mineral. The cation-exchange capacity was found to increase as the particle size of the sediment decreased. Sorption of 60 Co by the bottom sediment increased with contact time up to 6 h. Variation of the solution pH from 4 to 9 showed limited increase in the sorption of 60 Co. As carrier concentrations increase from 10 -7 N to 10 -3 N, sorption of Co was found to increase linearly following Freundlich isotherm. The presence of Mg 2+ and Fe 3+ in solution depressed the sorption of 60 Co by the sediments. The desorption of 60 Co from bottom sediment with distilled and Suez Canal water was found to increase with contact time. (author)

  9. Reversibility of sorption of plutonium-239 onto hematite and goethite colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, N.; Cotter, C.R.; Kitten, H.D.; Bentley, J.; Triay, I.R.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory batch sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate: (1) sorption of plutonium-239 ( 239 Pu) on different iron oxide colloids (hematite and geothite), (2) sorption kinetics of colloidal Pu(IV) and soluble Pu(V) onto these two colloids, and (3) desorption of colloidal Pu(IV) and soluble Pu(V) from 239 Pu-loaded colloids as a function of time. Natural groundwater and carbonate-rich synthetic groundwater were used in this study. To examine the possible influence of bicarbonate on 239 Pu sorption, an additional set of experiments was conducted in sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) solutions under carbon dioxide free environments. Our results show that colloidal Pu(IV) as well as soluble Pu(V) was rapidly adsorbed by hematite and goethite colloids in both natural and synthetic groundwater. The amount of 239 Pu adsorbed by both iron oxide colloids in synthetic groundwater was higher than in natural groundwater. The presence of carbonate did not influence the sorption of 239 Pu. While sorption of soluble Pu(V) is a slow process, sorption of colloidal Pu(IV) occurs rapidly. Desorption of Pu from iron oxide colloids is much slower than the sorption processes. Our findings suggest that different sorption and desorption behaviors of 239 Pu by iron oxide colloids in groundwater may facilitate the transport of 239 Pu along potential flowpaths from the areas contaminated by radionuclide and release to the accessible environment. (orig.)

  10. Sorption of organophosphate and triazine agrochemicals on biochars and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochars are known to strongly sorb polar and nonpolar organic compounds, and biochar soil amendment can have counteracting impacts on the efficacy of, and runoff contamination by agrochemicals. This study investigated the sorption-desorption isotherms and kinetics of triazine (deisopropylatrazine)...

  11. Foreign Guests in Ancient Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zora Žbontar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Xenía was a special relationship between a foreign guest and his host in Ancient Greece. The ritual of hosting a foreigner included an exchange of objects, feasting, and the establishment of friendship between people from different social backgrounds. This relationship implied trust, loyalty, friendship, and mutual aid between the people involved. Goods and services were also exchanged without any form of payment. There were no formal laws governing xenía – it was based entirely on a moral appeal. Mutual appreciation between the host and the guest was established during the ritual, but the host did retain a certain level of superiority over the guest. Xenía was one of the most important institutions in Ancient Greece. It had a lot of features and obligations similar to kinship and marriage. In literary sources the word xénos varies in meaning from “enemy stranger”, “friendly stranger”, “foreigner”, “guest”, “host” to “ritual friend”, and it is often hard to tell which usage is appropriate in a given passage. The paper describes the emphasis on hospitality towards foreigners. It presents an example of a depiction indicating xenía is presented, as well as several objects which were traded during the ritual. The paper also addresses the importance of hospitality in Greek drama in general, especially with examples of violations of the hospitality code.

  12. Study of thermodynamic water properties and moisture sorption hysteresis of mango skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio José Ferreira de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium moisture content for adsorption and desorption isotherms of mango skin was determined using the static gravimetric method at temperatures of 20, 26, 33, 38 and 44 oC in the 0.056 to 0.873 water activity range. Both sorption curves show a decrease in equilibrium moisture content as the temperature increasing. The hysteresis effect was observed at constant water activity. The Guggenheim, Anderson, and de Boer (GAB model presented the best fitting accuracy among a group of models and was used to determine the thermodynamic properties of water sorption. Integral enthalpy and integral entropy areas showed inverted values for the adsorption and desorption isotherms over the wide range of water activity studied. These values confirm, in energetic terms, the difference between adsorption and desorption isotherms observed in the hysteresis phenomenon. Finally, the Gibbs free energy revealed that the sorption process was spontaneous for both sorption isotherms.

  13. Effects of sorption behaviour on contaminant migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnyk, T.W.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of sorption behaviour on contaminant migration in groundwater systems are varied. Retardation of migration and dispersive effects can vary widely and contaminant concentration profiles can take a number of different shapes. This report examines the nature of some of these effects, especially those due to sorption behaviours that are dependent on the concentration of the contaminant in the groundwater. The effects are calculated using, in most cases, analytical solutions to the chemical equations imbedded in a simple reaction-cell or box-model transport algorithm. The hydrogeological parameters are held constant, and radioactive decay and hydrodynamic dispersion are excluded. A general discussion of the role of sorption equations in transport modelling is followed by presentation of migration results for a number of models of sorption behaviour varying from linear isotherms, Langmuir, Freundlich and ion-exchange isotherms, to precipitation reactions and multiple-site sorption reactions. The results are compared and general conclusions are drawn about the various migration behaviours calculated. The conclusions are that equilibrium sorption of trace contaminants can be modelled with linear isotherms (constant distribution coefficients or constant retardation factors) but the evaluation and extrapolation of the distribution coefficient are not easy. Nonlinear isotherms lead to unsymmetrical migration fronts. A comparison of Freundlich and linear isotherms is made. Sorption/desorption kinetic factors can be significant on the time scale of laboratory experiments and can cause large dispersive effects. Slow but important reactions can be missed altogether. Precipitation or mineralization behaviour cannot be modelled with constant distribution coefficients. Also, mineralization reactions can be kinetically slow even on the geological time scale. 89 refs

  14. Sorption of tritium and tritiated water on construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, R.S.; Miller, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    Sorption and desorption of tritium (HT) and tritiated water (HTO) on materials to be used in the construction of fusion facilities were studied. In ∼ 24-hour exposures in argon or room air, metal samples sorbed 8-200 μCi/m 2 of tritium from atmospheres of 5-9 Ci/m 3 HT, and non-metallic samples sorbed 60-800 μCi/m 2 from atmospheres of 14 Ci/m 3 HT. Sorption of HTO varied much more widely than HT sorption for different samples, ranging from 4 μCi/m 2 for glass to 1,300,000 μCi/m 2 for concrete samples, in 24-hour exposures to 1 Ci/m 3 HTO in room air. Time dependence of desorption in dry air showed a rapid initial process and a slower secondary process. (Author) (10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.)

  15. A Numerical Approach for Non-Linear Moisture Flow in Porous Materials with Account to Sorption Hysteresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn; Nyman, U.

    2010-01-01

    . History-dependent sorption behaviour is introduced by considering scanning curves between the bounding desorption and absorption curves. The method, therefore, makes it possible to calculate equilibrium water contents for arbitrary relative humidity variations at every material point considered...

  16. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products

  17. Quantifying the effect of sorption and bioavailability of hydrophobic organic contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Bouwer, E.; Cunningham, A.

    1994-01-01

    In-situ bioremediation has been applied successfully at a few sites. Several restrictions presently exist which could greatly limit the effectiveness of this promising technology. Hydrophobic organic contaminants tend to sorb onto soil. However, microorganisms are most effective in utilizing substrates from the aqueous phase. Sorption tends to separate the direct contact between microorganisms and contaminants necessary for biodegradation to occur. A series of experiments, which represented scenarios with fast sorption/desorption, slow sorption/desorption, mass transfer across boundary layer and mass transfer within attached microorganisms (biofilm), was conducted to demonstrate the concentration effect and the mass transfer effect. A method has been developed to quantify bioavailability of organic contaminants in aquatic environments. Bioavailability Factor (B f ), a dimensionless parameter derived from mathematical models and verified by experimental results, has been formulated to describe the impact of equilibrium sorption, nonequilibrium sorption, and mass transfer processes on the rate and extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons

  18. Moisture sorption–desorption characteristics and the corresponding thermodynamic properties of carvedilol phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikiran Allada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Carvedilol phosphate (CDP is a nonselective beta-blocker used for the treatment of heart failures and hypertension. In this work, moisture sorption–desorption characteristics and thermodynamic properties of CDP have been investigated. Materials and Methods: The isotherms were determined using dynamic vapor sorption analyzer at different humidity conditions (0%–90% relative humidity and three pharmaceutically relevant temperatures (20°C, 30°C, and 40°C. The experimental sorption data determined were fitted to various models, namely, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller; Guggenheim-Anderson-De Boer (GAB; Peleg; and modified GAB. Isosteric heats of sorption were evaluated through the direct use of sorption isotherms by means of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Statistical Analysis Used: The sorption model parameters were determined from the experimental sorption data using nonlinear regression analysis, and mean relative percentage deviation (P, correlation (Correl, root mean square error, and model efficiency were considered as the criteria to select the best fit model. Results: The sorption–desorption isotherms have sigmoidal shape – confirming to Type II isotherms. Based on the statistical data analysis, modified GAB model was found to be more adequate to explain sorption characteristics of CDP. It is noted that the rate of adsorption and desorption is specific to the temperature at which it was being studied. It is observed that isosteric heat of sorption decreased with increasing equilibrium moisture content. Conclusions: The calculation of the thermodynamic properties was further used to draw an understanding of the properties of water and energy requirements associated with the sorption behavior. The sorption–desorption data and the set of equations are useful in the simulation of processing, handling, and storage of CDP and further behavior during manufacture and storage of CDP formulations.

  19. Effects of mineralogy on sorption of strontium and cesium onto Calico Hills Tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Case, F.I.; O'Kelley, G.D.; Land, J.F.

    1990-04-01

    The sorption properties of tuff formations at the proposed site for the high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been extensively studied. Sorption and desorption measurements were made of strontium and cesium onto clinoptilolite and Calico Hills Tuff. The object was to see whether there was a correlation between sorption of strontium and cesium onto Calico Hills Tuff and the sorption of strontium and cesium onto clinoptilolite based on the content of clinoptilolite in the Calico Hills Tuff. 13 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  20. 2.6. Sorption of serum albumin by ethynyl-piperidol hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalikov, D.Kh.

    2012-01-01

    The sorption of serum albumin by ethynyl-piperidol hydrogels was studied in this article. Albumins adsorption on the surface of solids was considered. The capacity of cross-linked ethynyl piperidol polymers to the serum albumin was considered as well. The kinetic curves of sorption of human serum albumin by triple copolymer of isopropenyl trimethyl ethynyl piperidol were constructed. Sorption activity of ethynyl-piperidol polymers depending on ph of solution of human serum albumin were defined. Influence of solution ionic strength on sorption of human serum albumin was defined as well. The desorption of human serum albumin from the complexes with hydrogels was examined.

  1. Effects of sorption hysteresis on radionuclide releases from waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.; Reed, D.T.

    1985-01-01

    A one-dimensional, numerical transport model was used to calculate radionuclide releases from waste packages emplaced in a nuclear waste repository in basalt. The model incorporates both sorption and desorption isotherm parameters measured previously for sorption of key radionuclides on the packing material component of the waste package. Sorption hysteresis as described by these isotherms lowered releases of some radionuclides by as much as two orders of magnitude. Radionuclides that have low molar inventories (relative to uranium), high solubility, and strongly sorbed, are most affected by sorption hysteresis. In these cases, almost the entire radionuclide inventory is sorbed on the packing material. The model can be used to help optimize the thickness of the packing material layer by comparing release rate versus packing material thickness curves with Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) release limits

  2. Capturing the guest experience in hotels phase one : theoretical background and development of the guest experience scan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marle, van R.S.F. (Rienk); Pijls, R. (Ruth); Schreiber, G.H. (Gerrit)

    2011-01-01

    The goal for the coming years is to get insight in the guest experience in hotels. What is guest experience? How to measure guest experience? What is the relation between guest experience and guest loyalty? And finally, what tangible elements in the physical environment of hotels and the contact

  3. Recent progress in sorption mechanisms and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoroff, M.; Lefevre, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Sorption-desorption phenomena play an important role in the migration of radioactive species in surface and underground waters. In order to predict the transport of these species, we need a good knowledge of sorption processes and data, together with reliable models able to be included in transport calculation. Traditional approaches based on experimentally determined distribution coefficients (Kd) and sorption isotherms have a limited predictive capability, since they are very sensitive to the numerous parameters characterizing the solution and the solid. Models based on thermodynamic equilibria were developed to account for the influence these parameters: the ion exchange model and the surface complexation models (2-pK mono-site, 1-pK multi-site, with several different electrostatic models: CCM, DLM, BSM, TLM,...). Although these models are very useful, studies performed in recent years showed that they have important theoretical and experimental limitations, which result in the fact that we must be very careful when we use them for extrapolating sorption data to long term and to large natural systems. Among all problems which can be found are: the possibility to fit a set of experimental data with different models, sometimes bad adequacy with the real sorption processes, some theoretical limitations such as a rigorous definition of reference and standard states in surface equilibria, slow kinetics which prevent from equilibrium achievement, irreversibility, solubility and evolution of solid phases... Through the increase of the number of sensitive spectroscopic methods, we are now able to know more about sorption processes at the atomic scale. Models such as the 1-pK CD-MUSIC model can account for the influence of orientation of the faces of the solid. More and more examples of the influence of this orientation on the sorption properties are known. Calculations performed by 'ab initio' modeling is also useful to predict the

  4. Quantitative analysis of the guest-concentration dependence of the mobility in a disordered fluorene-arylamine host-guest system in the guest-to-guest regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H. T.; Hof, A.J.; Lu, M.; Blom, P. W. M.; de Vries, R. J.; Coehoorn, R.

    2011-01-01

    The charge transport in a polyspirobifluorene derivative with copolymerized N,N,N',N'-tetraaryldiamino biphenyl (TAD) hole transport units is investigated as a function of the TAD content. For TAD concentrations larger than 5%, guest-to-guest transport is observed. It is demonstrated that in this

  5. Quantitative analysis of the guest-concentration dependence of the mobility in a disordered fluorene-arylamine host-guest system in the guest-to-guest regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H.T.; Hof, A.J.; Lu, M.; Blom, P.W.M.; Vries, R.J. de; Coehoorn, R.

    2011-01-01

    The charge transport in a polyspirobifluorene derivative with copolymerized N,N,N',N'-tetraaryldiamino biphenyl (TAD) hole transport units is investigated as a function of the TAD content. For TAD concentrations larger than 5, guest-to-guest transport is observed. It is demonstrated that in this

  6. THE SORPTION OF OFLOXACIN BY HYDRATED ALUMINA AND SILICON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Chebotarev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of ofloxacin (OFL – the antibiotic from class of fluoroquinolones has been studied on alumina (γ-Al2O3 different acid-base modifications – acidic Al2O3(acidic, neutral Al2O3 (Neutral and the basic Al2O3 (core and amorphous silica – silica gel (SG L 5/40 and aerosil A-300. Determination of ofloxacin in solutions has been carried out by spectrophotometry on spectrophotometer SF-46 at λ = 291 nm and acidity 7. To clarify the nature of the sorption surfaces of OFL hydrated on aluminum and silicon oxides were studied according to the degree of extraction (S% from pH, contact time of the phases (min. sample from the sorbent mass (g; sorption isotherms were built and antibiotic desorption was studied. The OFL significant recovery (~ 60% is observed at the pH range of 4 ÷ 8, and reaches its maximum (80-85% at pH 7. The maximum degree of extraction of the antibiotic on aerosil A-300 and L 5/40 silica realized at pH 6 and it was ~ 80%. Comparative analysis of the forms constructed isotherms (L – type indicates a significant affinity investigated hydrated oxides to sorbate. The value of the static exchange capacity and concentration ratios can proof that. Differences in the quantitative characteristics of sorption of aluminum and silicon oxides are associated with nature and the acid-base properties of adsorption sites. In the study of the OFL concentrates desorption in static mode dilute NaOH and HNO3 solutions it was found that growth desorption degree occured with increasing concentration. Desorption was 2-3 times better in the case of aluminum oxide than silicon oxide when there were the same concentrations of acid and alkali. This is another confirmation of the participation in various sorption interactions forces of physical and chemical nature.

  7. Thermodynamics of imidacloprid sorption in Croatian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milin, Čedomila; Broznic, Dalibor

    2015-04-01

    Neonicotinoids are increasingly replacing the organophosphate and methylcarbamate acetylcholinesterase inhibitors which are losing their effectiveness because of selection for resistant pest populations. Imidacloprid is the most important neonicotinoid with low soil persistence, high insecticidal potency and relatively low mammalian toxicity. In Croatia, imidacloprid is most commonly used in olive growing areas, including Istria and Kvarner islands, as an effective means of olive fruit fly infestation control. Sorption-desorption behavior of imidacloprid in six soils collected from five coastal regions in Croatia at 20, 30 and 40°C was investigated using batch equilibrium technique. Isothermal data were applied to Freundlich, Langmuir and Temkin equation, and the thermodynamic parameters ΔH°, ΔG°, ΔS° were calculated. The sorption isotherm curves were of non-linear and may be classified as L-type suggesting a relatively high sorption capacity for imidacloprid. Our results showed that the KFsor values decreased for all the tested soils as the temperature increases, indicating that the temperature strongly influence the sorption. Values of ΔG° were negative (-4.65 to -2.00 kJ/mol) indicating that at all experimental temperatures the interactions of imidacloprid with soils were spontaneous process. The negative and small ΔH° values (-19.79 to -8.89 kJ/mol) were in the range of weak forces, such as H-bonds, consistent with interactions and par¬titioning of the imidacloprid molecules into soil organic matter. The ΔS° values followed the range of -57.12 to -14.51 J/molK, suggesting that imidacloprid molecules lose entropy during transition from the solution phase to soil surface. It was found that imidacloprid desorption from soil was concentration and temperature dependent, i.e. at lower imidacloprid concentrations and temperature, lower desorption percentage occurred. Desorption studies revealed that hysteretic behavior under different temperature

  8. Sorption of strontium by magnetically modified yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yantao; Ji Yanqin; Tian Qing; Shao Xianzhang; Shi Jianhe; Ivo Safarik; Zhang Shengdong; Li Jinying

    2008-01-01

    Magnetically modified fodder's yeast (Kluyveromyces fragilis) cells using water based magnetic fluid, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). The sorption-desorption properties of Sr 2+ by these yeast cells from nitrate salt of Sr 2+ were studied. The results demonstrated that the Sr 2+ sorption volume by these cells enhanced with increasing pH and reached a plateau between pH 4.0 and 7.0. A minor effect by temperature was observed. The sorption volumes are 19.5 mg/g and 53.5 mg/g from 10 ppm and 40 ppm Sr 2+ solution respectively within 20 min. The sorption of Sr 2+ in these cells can be desorbed under 0.1 mol/L HNO 3 solution. The maximum Sr 2+ sorption volume is 96.7 mg/g at 20℃. The sorption characteristic fits Langmuir model well with 140.8 mg/g calculated maximum sorption volume by these yeast cells. (authors)

  9. Sorption media for stormwater treatment - A laboratory evaluation of five low-cost media for their ability to remove metals and phosphorus from artificial stormwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Tove; Nielsen, Asbjørn H.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2012-01-01

    states. The sorbents were tested towards phosphorus, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc at concentration and conditions relevant for typical stormwater. The materials were tested for sorption capacity and kinetics. Desorption was tested under neutral and alkaline conditions...

  10. Sorption of benzothiazoles onto sandy aquifer material under equilibrium and nonequlibrium conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kragulj Marijana M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the sorption behaviour of 1,3-benzothiazole (BT and 2-(methylthiobenzothiazole (MTBT was investigated on Danube geosorbent under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. All sorption isotherms fitted well with the Freundlich model (R2=0.932-0.993. The results showed that organic matter of the Danube geosorbent has a higher sorption affinity for the more hydrophobic MTBT compared to BT. However, sorption-desorption experiments showed that MTBT was more easily desorbed than BT molecules, which indicates the importance of absorption relative to adsorption in the overall sorption mechanism of MTBT. In general, molecules of BT and MTBT were more easily desorbed in the lower concentration range, which resulted in an increase in the hysteresis indices with increasing concentrations. Column experiments revealed that retention of the investigated compounds on the aquifer material followed the compound’s hydrophobicity. BT showed a lower retention, in accordance with its lower sorption affinity obtained in the static experiments, while MTBT showed a greater sorption affinity, and thus had a longer retention time on the column. Thus during transport BT represent greater risk for groundwaters than MTBT. These results have increased our understanding of benzothiazoles sorption and desorption process which represent one of the most important factors which influence the behaviour of organic compounds in the environment.

  11. Sorption behaviour of perfluoroalkyl substances in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinovic, Jelena; Lacorte, Silvia; Vidal, Miquel; Rigol, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The sorption behaviour of three perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS), was studied in six soils with contrasting characteristics, especially in the organic carbon content. Sorption isotherms were obtained by equilibrating the soil samples with 0.01 mol L(-1) CaCl2 solutions spiked with increasing concentrations of the target PFAS. The sorption reversibility of PFASs was also tested for some of the samples. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify the target PFASs in the solutions. Both the Freundlich and linear models were appropriate to describe the sorption behaviour of PFASs in soils, and enabled us to derive solid-liquid distribution coefficients (Kd) for each compound in each soil. Kd values increased from 19 to 295 mL g(-1) for PFOS, from 2.2 to 38 mL g(-1) for PFOA and from 0.4 to 6.8 mL g(-1) for PFBS, and were positively correlated with the organic carbon content of the soil. KOC values obtained from the correlations were 710, 96 and 17 mL g(-1) for PFOS, PFOA and PFBS, respectively. Whereas Kd values decreased in the sequence PFOS>PFOA>PFBS, desorption yields were lower than 13% for PFOS, from 24 to 58% for PFOA, and from 32 to 60% for PFBS. This shows that the physicochemical characteristics of PFASs, basically their hydrophobicity, controlled their sorption behaviour in soils, with PFOS being the most irreversibly sorbed PFAS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sorption by cation exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.

    1994-04-01

    A procedure for introducing exchange into geochemical/surface complexation codes is described. Beginning with selectivity coefficients, K c , defined in terms of equivalent fractional ion occupancies, a general expression for the molar based exchange code input parameters, K ex , is derived. In natural systems the uptake of nuclides onto complex sorbents often occurs by more than one mechanism. The incorporation of cation exchange and surface complexation into a geochemical code therefore enables sorption by both mechanisms to be calculated simultaneously. The code and model concepts are tested against sets of experimental data from widely different sorption studies. A proposal is made to set up a data base of selectivity coefficients. Such a data base would form part of a more general one consisting of sorption mechanism specific parameters to be used in conjunction with geochemical/sorption codes to model and predict sorption. (author) 6 figs., 6 tabs., 26 refs

  13. Metal Sorption to Dolomite Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.; Kelly, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Potential human intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) might release actinides into the Culebra Dolomite where sorption reactions will affect of radiotoxicity from the repository. Using a limited residence time reactor the authors have measured Ca, Mg, Nd adsorption/exchange as a function of ionic strength, P CO2 , and pH at 25 C. By the same approach, but using as input radioactive tracers, adsorption/exchange of Am, Pu, U, and Np on dolomite were measured as a function of ionic strength, P CO2 , and pH at 25 C. Metal adsorption is typically favored at high pH. Calcium and Mg adsorb in near-stoichiometric proportions except at high pH. Adsorption of Ca and Mg is diminished at high ionic strengths (e.g., 0.5M NaCl) pointing to association of Na + with the dolomite surface, and the possibility that Ca and Mg sorb as hydrated, outer-sphere complexes. Sulfate amplifies sorption of Ca and Mg, and possibly Nd as well. Exchange of Nd for surface Ca is favored at high pH, and when Ca levels are low. Exchange for Ca appears to control attachment of actinides to dolomite as well, and high levels of Ca 2+ in solution will decrease Kds. At the same time, to the extent that high P CO2 increase Ca 2+ levels, JK d s will decrease with CO 2 levels as well, but only if sorbing actinide-carbonate complexes are not observed to form (Am-carbonate complexes appear to sorb; Pu-complexes might sorb as well; U-carbonate complexation leads to desorption). This indirect CO 2 effect is observed primarily at, and above, neutral pH. High NaCl levels do not appear to affect to actinide K d s

  14. Data for the sorption of actinides on candidate materials for use in repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.D.; Pryke, D.C.; Rees, J.H.

    1988-02-01

    The sorptive behaviour of the actinides uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium has been investigated under air-saturated conditions on a number of candidate near-field materials by batch sorption experiments. Distribution ratios were measured with respect to initial actinide concentration, the solid:liquid ratio and contact time. Desorption experiments were carried out to help elucidate the mechanism of sorption. The fit of the data to the Freundlich isotherm was assessed. This work contains the data obtained in the investigation. (author)

  15. Have the Guests Perceived Superior Value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levyda Levyda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to describe guests’ perceived value by using a multidimensional approach. From previous research, guests’ perceived value consisted of some functional value, emotional value, and social value. Based on guest experience, and functional value consisted of physical evidence, guest room, food and beverage, hotel staff, and price. This research was conducted in four-star hotels in Jakarta. The respondents were the guests who had stayed in four-star hotels. The number of the respondent was 405. The data were obtained by using self-administered questionnaires. This research shows that guests have not perceived superior value. Some of the values and the necessary efforts need to be improved.

  16. New Horizons Pluto Flyby Guest Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.; Turney, D.; Fisher, S.; Carr, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    On July 14, 2015, after 9.5 years of cruise, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the Pluto system to gather first images humankind had ever seen on Pluto and its five moons. While much has been discovered about the Pluto system since New Horizons launch in 2006, the system has never been imaged at high resolution and anticipation of the "First Light" of the Pluto system had been anticipated by planetary enthusiasts for decades. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), which built and operates New Horizons, was the focal point for gathering three distinct groups: science and engineering team members; media and public affairs representatives; and invited public, including VIP's. Guest operations activities were focused on providing information primarily to the invited public and VIP's. High level objectives for the Guest Operations team was set to entertain and inform the general public, offer media reaction shots, and to deconflict activities for the guests from media activities wherever possible. Over 2000 people arrived at APL in the days surrounding closest approach for guest, science or media operations tracks. Reaction and coverage of the Guest Operations events was universally positive and global in impact: iconic pictures of the auditorium waving flags during the moment of closest approach were published in media outlets on every continent. Media relations activities ensured coverage in all key media publications targeted for release, such as the New York Times, Science, Le Monde, and Nature. Social and traditional media coverage of the events spanned the globe. Guest operations activities are designed to ensure that a guest has a memorable experience and leaves with a lifelong memory of the mission and their partnership in the activity. Results, lessons learned, and other data from the New Horizons guest operations activity will be presented and analyzed.

  17. Extrapolation studies on desorption of thorium and uranium at different solution compositions on contaminated soil sediments (Malaysia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Hakimi Sakuma

    2000-01-01

    By means of batch desorption experiments, the thorium and uranium desorption properties of contaminated soil sediments are investigated as a function of the effect of cations present in the groundwater. A phenomenological correlation between the desorption coefficient and the concentration of Ca and Mg in the water is determined. Kd Thorium -0.15849 ± 0.03237 log (Ca + Mg) + 5.06715 ± 0.09106; Kd Uranium = -0.11984 ± 0.03237 log (Ca + Mg) + 2.99909 ± 0.09105. By these models the sorption/desorption behaviour of soils can be predicted phenomenologically as function of the groundwater composition. (author)

  18. Sorption of a nonionic surfactant Tween 80 by minerals and soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Soyoung, E-mail: soyoung@pusan.ac.kr; Jeong, Hoon Young, E-mail: hjeong@pusan.ac.kr

    2015-03-02

    Highlights: • Tween 80 sorption varies significantly among soil minerals. • Sorption mechanisms and atomic compositions explain to mineral-specific sorption. • Clay minerals and SOM in soils are the key contributors to Tween 80 sorption. • Hysteresis suggests the potential difficulty in removing residual surfactants. - Abstract: Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate Tween 80 sorption by oxides, aluminosilicates, and soils. For oxides, the sorption by silica and alumina follow linear isotherms, and that by hematite follows a Langmuir isotherm. Considering isotherm type and surface coverage, Tween 80 may partition into the silica/alumina–water interface, whereas it may bind to hematite surface sites. Among aluminosilicates, montmorillonite shows the greatest sorption due to the absorption of Tween 80 into interlayers. For other aluminosilicates, it sorbs to surfaces, with the sorption increasing as plagioclase < vermiculite < kaolinite. This results from the relative reactivity among surface sites: ≡NaOH, ≡CaOH << ≡SiOH < ≡AlOH. Experiments using dry- and wet-sieved soils reveal that fine-grained clay minerals, difficult to separate by dry-sieving, contribute significantly to Tween 80 sorption. The greater sorption by untreated soils than H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated soils indicates that soil organic matter is a vital sorbent. The sorption hysteresis, contributed to by clay minerals and soil organic matter, is characterized by the greater sorption during the desorption than the sorption stages. This suggests the potential difficulty in removing surfactants from soils. Also, sorption of surfactants can adversely affect surfactant-enhanced remediation by decreasing the aquifer permeability and the availability of surfactants for micellar solubilization.

  19. Reconciling the discrepancies between crystallographic porosity and guest access as exemplified by Zn-HKUST-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldblyum, Jeremy I; Liu, Ming; Gidley, David W; Matzger, Adam J

    2011-11-16

    There are several compounds for which there exists a disconnect between porosity as predicted by crystallography and porosity measured by gas sorption analysis. In this paper, the Zn-based analogue of Cu(3)(btc)(2) (HKUST-1), Zn(3)(btc)(2) (Zn-HKUST-1; btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate) is investigated. Conventional analysis of Zn-HKUST-1 by powder X-ray diffraction and gas sorption indicates retention of crystalline structure but negligible nitrogen uptake at 77 K. By using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, a densified surface layer preventing the entry of even small molecular species into the crystal framework is revealed. The material is shown to have inherent surface instability after solvent removal, rendering it impermeable to molecular guests irrespective of handling and processing methods. This previously unobserved surface instability may provide insight into the failure of other microporous coordination polymers to exhibit significant porosity despite crystal structures indicative of regular, interconnected, microporous networks.

  20. Sorption data bases and mechanistic sorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    In common with many other countries with a nuclear programme, the Swiss concept for the disposal of radioactive waste is focused on deep burial in specially constructed repositories in geologically stable host rocks. Under such conditions, the most likely means whereby radionuclides might return to the biosphere involves their transport in slowly moving groundwater. The sorption of radionuclides by solid phases in the engineered barriers within the repository, and in the surrounding geological media, limits their release and retards their movement. Performance assessment studies for disposal concepts are carried out by Nagra, the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, in which various release scenarios are examined, and 'doses to man' calculated. The uptake of radionuclides by immobile phases is one of the pillars upon which the safety case rests. Hence, sorption databases are very important data sets for performance assessments. The methodology lying behind the construction of sorption databases, and some aspects of the supporting experimental work, are briefly described in this report. Flexible, long-term, focused research programmes are required to properly understand the radionuclide/rock/groundwater system, and this is an essential pre-requisite for producing robust state-of-the-art sorption databases. (author)

  1. Sorption data bases and mechanistic sorption studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.H

    2000-07-01

    In common with many other countries with a nuclear programme, the Swiss concept for the disposal of radioactive waste is focused on deep burial in specially constructed repositories in geologically stable host rocks. Under such conditions, the most likely means whereby radionuclides might return to the biosphere involves their transport in slowly moving groundwater. The sorption of radionuclides by solid phases in the engineered barriers within the repository, and in the surrounding geological media, limits their release and retards their movement. Performance assessment studies for disposal concepts are carried out by Nagra, the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, in which various release scenarios are examined, and 'doses to man' calculated. The uptake of radionuclides by immobile phases is one of the pillars upon which the safety case rests. Hence, sorption databases are very important data sets for performance assessments. The methodology lying behind the construction of sorption databases, and some aspects of the supporting experimental work, are briefly described in this report. Flexible, long-term, focused research programmes are required to properly understand the radionuclide/rock/groundwater system, and this is an essential pre-requisite for producing robust state-of-the-art sorption databases. (author)

  2. Moisture sorption isotherms and thermodynamic properties of bovine leather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhfakh, Rihab; Mihoubi, Daoued; Kechaou, Nabil

    2018-04-01

    This study was aimed at the determination of bovine leather moisture sorption characteristics using a static gravimetric method at 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C. The curves exhibit type II behaviour according to the BET classification. The sorption isotherms fitting by seven equations shows that GAB model is able to reproduce the equilibrium moisture content evolution with water activity for moisture range varying from 0.02 to 0.83 kg/kg d.b (0.9898 thermodynamic properties such as isosteric heat of sorption, sorption entropy, spreading pressure, net integral enthalpy and entropy. Net isosteric heat of sorption and differential entropy were evaluated through direct use of moisture isotherms by applying the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and used to investigate the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory. Both sorption enthalpy and entropy for desorption increase to a maximum with increasing moisture content, and then decrease sharply with rising moisture content. Adsorption enthalpy decreases with increasing moisture content. Whereas, adsorption entropy increases smoothly with increasing moisture content to a maximum of 6.29 J/K.mol. Spreading pressure increases with rising water activity. The net integral enthalpy seemed to decrease and then increase to become asymptotic. The net integral entropy decreased with moisture content increase.

  3. Experimental determination of sorption in fractured flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mitchell D.; Bennett, Philip C.; Sharp, John M.; Choi, Wan-Joo

    2002-09-01

    Fracture "skins" are alteration zones on fracture surfaces created by a variety of biological, chemical, and physical processes. Skins increase surface area, where sorption occurs, compared to the unaltered rock matrix. This study examines the sorption of organic solutes on altered fracture surfaces in an experimental fracture-flow apparatus. Fracture skins containing abundant metal oxides, clays, and organic material from the Breathitt Formation (Kentucky, USA) were collected in a manner such that skin surface integrity was maintained. The samples were reassembled in the lab in a flow-through apparatus that simulated ˜2.7 m of a linear fracture "conduit." A dual-tracer injection scheme was utilized with the sorbing or reactive tracer compared to a non-reactive tracer (chloride) injected simultaneously. Sorption was assessed from the ratio of the first temporal moments of the breakthrough curves and from the loss of reactive tracer mass and evaluated as a function of flow velocity and solute type. The breakthrough curves suggest dual-flow regimes in the fracture with both sorbing and non-sorbing flow fields. Significant sorption occurs for the reactive components, and sorption increased with decreasing flow rate and decreasing compound solubility. Based on moment analysis, however, there was little retardation of the center of solute mass. These data suggest that non-equilibrium sorption processes dominate and that slow desorption and boundary layer diffusion cause extensive tailing in the breakthrough curves.

  4. Desorption behaviors of BDE-28 and BDE-47 from natural soils with different organic carbon contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenxin; Cheng Fangfang; Li Weibo; Xing Baoshan; Tao Shu

    2012-01-01

    Desorption kinetic and isothermal characteristics of BDE-28 and BDE-47 were investigated using natural soils with different organic carbon fractions. The results indicated that a two-compartment first-order model with dominant contribution of slow desorption could adequately describe the released kinetics of studied PBDEs. Desorption isotherms of different samples could be fitted well by linear distribution model or nonlinear Freundlich model. Moreover, most desorption procedures roughly exhibited hysteresis with respect to preceding sorption ones. At the statistically significant level of 0.05 or 0.1, total organic carbon content (f OC ) exhibited significant correlations with the fitted parameters by the isothermal models. The correlations of f OC and SOM fractions (e.g., fulvic acid and humin) with the single point desorption coefficients at lower aqueous concentrations of studied PBDEs were significant; while at higher aqueous concentrations, the relationships were less significant or insignificant. Our findings may facilitate a comprehensive understanding on behaviors of PBDEs in soil systems. - Highlights: ► A two-compartment first-order kinetic model for the PBDEs studied was established. ► Isotherm was fitted well by a linear distribution or a nonlinear Freundlich model. ► Desorption commonly exhibited somewhat hysteresis relative to sorption. ► Soil organic carbon fractions showed close correlations with the model parameters. - Two-compartment first-order model, and linear distribution model or nonlinear Freundlich model could well elucidate desorption kinetics and isotherms of PBDEs in natural soils, respectively.

  5. Sorption of 241Am onto montmorillonite, illite and hematite colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.; Ulrich, H.J.; Silby, H.

    1994-01-01

    Actinide sorption on colloids may be described as a competition between the formation of complexes in solution and the build up of surface complexes. The role of particle and of carbonate concentrations on the sorption/desorption of 241 Am on montmorillonite, illite and hematite colloids is investigated. Since the partition coefficient (K p ) values are virtually independent of the colloid concentrations, within the range 1 to 300 ppm, no significant aggregation takes place in the sorption/desorption experiment. At pH 8, a slight decrease of K p is observed if the concentration of total carbonate exceeds 10 -2 M. The formation of the carbonato- (and hydroxo-carbonato-) complexes in the solution competes with the formation of surface complexes on the colloids. A relationship between the sorption coefficient and the complexation of 241 Am in the solution has been found. This leads to the conclusion that, besides free americium cation, the hydroxo-, and carbonato- as well as the mixed hydroxo-carbonato-complexes are sorbed. Only when the tricarbonatocomplex [Am(CO 3 ) 3 ] 3- prevails (total carbonate concentration > 10 -2 M), a significant decrease of the distribution coefficient is observed. At pH 10 this decrease disappears because under these conditions the strong hydroxo-complexes dominate. A pragmatic and relatively simple application of surface complexation model describes the observed features. (orig.)

  6. Periodic Sorption of Tungstate Ions on Anionite AV-17-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’yachenko Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple sorption of sodium tungstate resulting from the autoclave-soda digestion of a tungsten-bearing concentrate was studied using anion-exchange resin AV-17-8. The choice of ion exchange resin was carried out under static conditions using highly basic anionites. The sorption and desorption plots for tungstate and carbonate ions were demonstrated under dynamic conditions. The total dynamic capacity of the resin was estimated for each species of the ions in three sorption cycles. The applicability of the AV-17-8 resin as a sorbent in the autoclave-soda process flowsheet was determined.

  7. A comparative study of phosphate sorption in lowland soils under oxic and anoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Lisa; Pedersen, Thomas Vils; Jensen, Henning S.

    2010-01-01

    of 36 to 93% of the dithionite-extractable FeIII (FeBD). Langmuir fitted Pi sorption isotherms showed a Pi release of up to 1.1 mmol kg-1 in six soils when Pi concentrations in the matrix (Psol) were lower than 10 µM. Phosphate desorption was attributed to dissolution of amorphous iron oxides......, and higher pH under anoxic conditions. The point of zero net sorption (EPC0) increased 2- to 10-fold on reduction. Five soils showed higher Pi sorption capacities in the anoxic than in the oxic state at higher Psol concentrations. Solubility calculations indicated that precipitation of vivianite or similar...

  8. Radionuclides sorption in clay soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siraky, G.; Lewis, C.; Hamlat, S.; Nollmann, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of clay soils is examined through a parametric study of the distribution coefficient (Kd) for the radionuclides of interest, Cs and Sr. This work is a preliminary stage of the migration studies of these nuclides in a porous medium (ground of Ezeiza, Argentina) and the evaluation of radiologic impact of the removal of low and intermediate activity wastes in shallow trenches. The determination of Kd is performed by a static technique or batch. The phases are separated by centrifugation at 20000 g during 1 hour. The activity of supernatant solution of Cs-137 and Sr-85 is measured in a detecting system of I Na(Tl) well-type. Two types of parameters were changed: a) those related to the determination method: phase separation (centrifugation vs. centrifugation plus filtration); equilibrium period, ratio solid/liquid; b) those related to the geochemical system: pH of contact solution, carrier concentration, competitive ions, ionic strength, desorption. It was observed that the modification of parameters in the Kd-measurement does not change the order of magnitude of results. (Author)

  9. Sorption properties of wool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radetić Maja M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Strict ecological legislation, especially in highly developed countries, imposed requirements for the purification of industrial effluents and the need for efficient oil clean up after sea and inland water spills. Although numerous processes have been developed, the application of sorbents is still one of the most efficient methods to remove heavy metal ions, dyes and crude oil from water. Recently, special attention was paid to sorbents based on natural fibres. A review of studies concerning the sorption properties of wool is presented in this paper. The presence of various functional groups on the wool fibre surface contributes to the efficient sorption of heavy metal ions and dyes. A hydrophobic, scaly surface and fibre crimp strongly influence the high sorption capacity of wool for oil. Wool has great sorption potential even as a recycled material. Accordingly, it can be used as a viable substitute to commercially available synthetic sorbents that show poor biodegradab ility.

  10. Sorption of thiabendazole in sub-tropical Brazilian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Neto, Odilon França; Arenas, Alejandro Yopasa; Fostier, Anne Hélène

    2017-07-01

    Thiabendazole (TBZ) is an ionizable anthelmintic agent that belongs to the class of benzimidazoles. It is widely used in veterinary medicine and as a fungicide in agriculture. Sorption and desorption are important processes influencing transport, transformation, and bioavailability of xenobiotic compounds in soils; data related to sorption capacity are therefore needed for environmental risk assessments. The aim of this work was to assess the sorption potential of TBZ in four Brazilians soils (sandy, sandy-clay, and clay soils), using batch equilibrium experiments at three pH ranges (2.3-3.0, 3.8-4.2, and 5.5-5.7). The Freundlich sorption coefficient (K F ) ranged from 9.0 to 58 μg 1-1/n  (mL) 1/n  g -1 , with higher values generally observed at the lower pH ranges (2.3-3.0 and 3.8-4.2) and for clay soils. The highest organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (K OC ) obtained at pH 3.8-5.7 (around the natural pH range of 4.1-5.0) for both clay soils and sandy-clay soil were 3255 and 2015 mL g -1 , respectively. The highest correlations K F vs SOM (r = 0.70) and K F vs clay content (r = 0.91) were observed at pH 3.8-4.2. Our results suggest that TBZ sorption/desorption is strongly pH dependent and that its mobility could be higher in the studied soils than previously reported in soils from temperate regions.

  11. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwarno Suwarno

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is reactive toward hydrogen forming metal hydride which has a potential application in      energy storage and conversion. Titanium hydride has been widely studied for hydrogen storage, thermal storage, and battery electrodes applications. A special interest is using titanium for hydrogen production in a hydrogen sorption-enhanced steam reforming of natural gas. In the present work, non-isothermal dehydrogenation kinetics of titanium hydride and kinetics of hydrogenation in gaseous flow at isothermal conditions were investigated. The hydrogen desorption was studied using temperature desorption spectroscopy (TDS while the hydrogen absorption and desorption in gaseous flow were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The present work showed that the path of dehydrogenation of the TiH2 is d®b®a hydride phase with possible overlapping steps occurred. The fast hydrogen desorption rate observed at the TDS main peak temperature were correlated with the fast transformation of the d-TiH1.41 to b-TiH0.59. In the gaseous flow, hydrogen absorption and desorption were related to the transformation of b-TiH0.59 Û d-TiH1.41 with 2 wt.% hydrogen reversible content. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 21st November 2016; Revised: 20th March 2017; Accepted: 9th April 2017; Available online: 27th October 2017; Published regularly: December 2017 How to Cite: Suwarno, S., Yartys, V.A. (2017. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (3: 312-317  (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.810.312-317

  12. Evaluation of theoretical and empirical water vapor sorption isotherm models for soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2016-01-01

    sorption isotherms of building materials, food, and other industrial products, knowledge about the 24 applicability of these functions for soils is noticeably lacking. We present validation of nine models for characterizing adsorption/desorption isotherms for a water activity range from 0.03 to 0...

  13. Sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds to plastics in marine environments: Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endo, S.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastics have shown to contain various environmental chemicals. For evaluating the potential of plastics to influence regional and global dynamics of these chemicals and to serve as a vector to marine biota, understanding of sorption and desorption of chemicals by plastics is important. In

  14. Determination of storage conditions for new biscuits using their sorption isotherms

    OpenAIRE

    G. Diukareva; A. Pak; A. Gasanova

    2015-01-01

    Introduction For the formation of biscuits quality natural carrier of iodine and sweetener from stevia leaves were used. Desorption of moisture is the dominant process, which will determine the guaranteed shelf life of biscuits. The conditions for the developed biscuits storage was determined by investigating of sorption isotherms and kinetics of reaching the equilibrium moisture content. Materials and Methods. The objects of stud...

  15. Phosphorus fractions and phosphorus sorption characteristics of freshwater sediments and their relationship to sediment composition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovec, Jakub; Hejzlar, Josef

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 151, č. 4 (2001), s. 687-703 ISSN 0003-9136 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/99/0028; GA ČR GA206/00/0063 Keywords : nutrients in aquatic systems * sorption/desorption of phosphorus Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 1.186, year: 2001

  16. Metal sorption on kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westrich, H.R.; Brady, P.V.; Cygan, R.T.; Nagy, K.L.; Anderson, H.L.

    1997-01-01

    A key issue in performance assessment of low-level radioactive waste sites is predicting the transport and retardation of radionuclides through local soils under a variety of hydrologic and geochemical conditions. Improved transport codes should include a mechanistic model of radionuclide retardation. The authors have been investigating metal sorption (Cs + , Sr 2+ , and Ba 2+ ) on a simple clay mineral (kaolinite) to better understand the geochemical interactions of common soil minerals with contaminated groundwaters. These studies include detailed characterizations of kaolinite surfaces, experimental adsorption measurements, surface complexation modeling, and theoretical simulations of cation sorption. The aluminol edge (010) site has been identified as the most likely site for metal sorption on kaolinite in natural solutions. Relative metal binding strengths decrease from Ba 2+ to Sr 2+ to Cs + , with some portion sorbed on both kaolinite edges and basal surfaces. Some Cs + also appears to be irreversibly sorbed on both sites. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that Cs + is sorbed at aluminol (010) edge sites as an inner-sphere complex and weakly sorbed as an outer-sphere complex on (001) basal surfaces. These results provide the basis to understand and predict metal sorption onto kaolinite, and a framework to characterize sorption processes on more complex clay minerals

  17. Examination of competitive lanthanide sorption onto smectites and its significance in the management of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galunin, Evgeny [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Alba, Maria D. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas - Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Santos, Maria J. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR 86051-990 (Brazil); Abrao, Taufik [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas - Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Vidal, Miquel, E-mail: miquel.vidal@ub.edu [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-02-28

    The competitive effect of La and Lu (analogues of radionuclides appearing in radioactive waste) in the sorption in four smectites was examined. Sorption and desorption distribution coefficients (K{sub d}; K{sub d,des}), and desorption rates (R{sub des}) were determined from batch tests in two media: deionized water and, to consider the influence of cement leachates, 0.02 mol L{sup -1} Ca. The competitive effect was lower when high-affinity sites were available, as in the water medium at the lowest range of initial lanthanide concentration, with high K{sub d} for La and for Lu (5-63 x 10{sup 4} L kg{sup -1}). Lower K{sub d} was measured at higher initial concentrations and in the Ca medium, where Lu showed a stronger competitive effect. This was confirmed by fitting the sorption data to a two-solute Langmuir isotherm. The desorption data indicated that sorption was virtually irreversible for the scenarios with high sorption, with an excellent correlation between K{sub d} and K{sub d,des} (R{sup 2} around 0.9 for the two lanthanides). Assuming that radioactive waste is a mixture of radionuclides, and that Ca ions will be provided by the cement leachates, this would reduce the retention capacity of clay engineered barriers.

  18. Guest Editorial: Functional neurosurgery | Enslin | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 106, No 8 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Functional neurosurgery. JMN Enslin. Abstract. No Abstract.

  19. Performance of LiCl Impregnated Mesoporous Material Coating over Corrugated Heat Exchangers in a Solid Sorption Chiller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Liu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The composite material made by impregnating 40 wt. % lithium chloride (LiCl into the mesopores of a kind of natural porous rock (Wakkanai Siliceous Shale: WSS micropowders (short for “WSS + 40 wt. % LiCl” had been developed previously, and can be regenerated below 100 °C with a cooling coefficient of performance (COP of approximately 0.3 when adopted as a sorbent in a sorption cooler. In this study, experiments have been carried out on an intermittent solid sorption chiller with the WSS + 40 wt. % LiCl coating over two aluminum corrugated heat exchangers. Based on the experimental condition (regeneration temperature of 80 °C, condensation temperature of 30 °C in the desorption process; sorption temperature of 30 °C and evaporation temperature of 12 °C in the sorption process, the water sorption amount changes from 20 wt. % to 70 wt. % in one sorption cooling cycle. Moreover, a specific cooling power (SCP of 86 W/kg, a volumetric specific cooling power (VSCP of 42 W/dm3, and a specific sorption power of 170 W/kg can be achieved with a total sorption and desorption time of 20 min. The obtained cooling COP is approximately 0.16.

  20. Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Brett C.; Revzan, Kenneth L.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-11-30

    We present experimental data and semi-empirical models describing the sorption of organic gases in a simulated indoor residential environment. Two replicate experiments were conducted with 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a 50-m{sup 3} room finished with painted wallboard, carpet and cushion, draperies and furnishings. The VOCs span a wide volatility range and include ten Hazardous Air Pollutants. VOCs were introduced to the static chamber as a pulse and their gas-phase concentrations were measured during a net adsorption period and a subsequent net desorption period. Three sorption models were fit to the measured concentrations for each compound to determine the simplest formulation needed to adequately describe the observed behavior. Sorption parameter values were determined by fitting the models to adsorption period data then checked by comparing measured and predicted behavior during desorption. The adequacy of each model was evaluated using a goodness of fit parameter calculated for each period. Results indicate that sorption usually does not greatly affect indoor concentrations of methyl-tert-butyl ether, 2-butanone, isoprene and benzene. In contrast, sorption appears to be a relevant indoor process for many of the VOCs studied, including C{sub 8}-C{sub 10} aromatic hydrocarbons (HC), terpenes, and pyridine. These compounds sorbed at rates close to typical residential air change rates and exhibited substantial sorptive partitioning at equilibrium. Polycyclic aromatic HCs, aromatic alcohols, ethenylpyridine and nicotine initially adsorbed to surfaces at rates of 1.5 to >6 h{sup -1} and partitioned 95 to >99% in the sorbed phase at equilibrium.

  1. Guest driven structural transformation studies of a luminescent metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    at room temperature often render MOFs which gener- ally encapsulate low boiling solvents as free guests in the pores. These MOFs generally exhibit flexible char- acter because they often lose those trapped guests upon air drying of the MOFs crystals and undergo struc- tural variations, often termed as guest induced ...

  2. Impact of activated carbon, biochar and compost on the desorption and mineralization of phenanthrene in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E.C.; Rein, Arno; Winding, Anne; Wollensen de Jonge, Lis; Trapp, Stefan; Karlson, Ulrich G.

    2013-01-01

    Sorption of PAHs to carbonaceous soil amendments reduces their dissolved concentrations, limiting toxicity but also potentially biodegradation. Therefore, the maximum abiotic desorption of freshly sorbed phenanthrene (≤5 mg kg −1 ) was measured in three soils amended with activated carbon (AC), biochar or compost. Total amounts of phenanthrene desorbed were similar between the different soils, but the amendment type had a large influence. Complete desorption was observed in the unamended and compost amended soils, but this reduced for biochar (41% desorbed) and AC (8% desorbed). Cumulative amounts mineralized were 28% for the unamended control, 19% for compost, 13% for biochar and 4% for AC. Therefore, the effects of the amendments in soil in reducing desorption were also reflected in the extents of mineralization. Modeling was used to analyze key processes, indicating that for the AC and charcoal treatments bacterial activity did not limit mineralization, but rather desorption into the dissolved phase. -- Highlights: •Phenanthrene desorption and mineralization compared in soils with activated carbon, charcoal or compost. •Only activated charcoal and biochar hindered both desorption and mineralization. •A linear relationship was found between the extents desorbed and mineralized. •Modelling indicated that bacterial activity was not limiting but that desorption was. -- Extraction into an exhaustive silicone sink measures the maximum phenanthrene desorption from soils with amendments, and this is reflected in the extent of mineralization

  3. Sorption of phenanthrene and benzene on differently structural kerogen: Important role of micropore-filling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yulong; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Ran, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Shale was thermally treated to obtain a series of kerogen with varied maturation. Their chemical, structural and porous properties were related to the sorption and/or desorption behaviors of phenanthrene and benzene. As the treatment temperature increases, aliphatic and carbonyl carbon of the kerogen samples decrease, while their aromaticity and maturation increase. Meanwhile, the isothermal nonlinearity of phenanthrene and benzene increases whereas the sorption capacity and micropore adsorption volumes (V o,d ) initially increase and then decrease. The V o,d of benzene is significantly correlated with, but higher than that of phenanthrene, suggesting similar micropore filling mechanism and molecular sieve effect. The benzene desorption exhibits hysteresis, which is related to the pore deformation of the kerogen and the entrapment of solute in the kerogen matrix. The V o,d of phenanthrene and benzene on the kerogen samples accounts for 23–46% and 36–65% of the maximum sorption volumes, respectively, displaying the importance of the micropore filling. -- Highlights: • The microporosity estimated by benzene vapor differs greatly from that by N 2 . • The micropore volume changes with kerogen maturation. • The phenanthrene or benzene sorption is related to the microporosity of kerogen. • Higher adsorption volume for benzene than for phenanthrene suggests molecular sieve effect. • The pore-filling plays an important role in the sorption of phenanthrene and benzene. -- The sorption behaviors of benzene and phenanthrene are related to the microporosity of the differently matured kerogen, indicating the importance of pore-filling

  4. Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, M.; Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The key consequences of SERP are: (i) reformation reaction is carried out at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than that in a conventional SMR reactor (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (ii) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 98+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (iii) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The first phase of the program has focused on the development of a sorbent for CO{sub 2} which has (a) reversible CO{sub 2} capacity >0.3 mmol/g at low partial pressures of CO{sub 2} (0.1 - 1.0 atm) in the presence of excess steam (pH{sub 2}O/pCO{sub 2}>20) at 400-500{degrees}C and (b) fast sorption-desorption kinetics for CO{sub 2}, at 400-500{degrees}C. Several families of supported sorbents have been identified that meet the target CO{sub 2} capacity. A few of these sorbents have been tested under repeated sorption/desorption cycles and extended exposure to high pressure steam at 400-500{degrees}C. One sorbent has been scaled up to larger quantities (2-3 kg) and tested in the laboratory process equipment for sorption and desorption kinetics of CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2}, sorption and desorption kinetics are desirably fast. This was a critical path item for the first phase of the program and now has been successfully demonstrated. A reactor has been designed that will allow nearly isothermal operation for SERP-SMR. This reactor was integrated into an overall process flow diagram for the SERP-SMR process.

  5. The effect of carbonate on neptunium sorption by hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.C.; Holt, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Hydroxyapatite, Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 , is a common mineral, the main inorganic compound in bone and exhibits strong sorptive properties for many radionuclides. It has been widely studied and proposed as a backfill material for nuclear waste repositories. Neptunium is one the radionuclides sorbed by hydroxyapatite. Neptunium is of particular importance to nuclear waste repository performance because of its relatively high aqueous solubility, high mobility in the environment and long half-life. In this work, we report on the effects of carbonate on sorption of neptunium by hydroxyapatite. Batch sorption and desorption studies for neptunium were performed as a function of carbonate concentration in water using a synthetic hydroxyapatite. The results indicate even low concentrations of carbonate significantly reduce neptunium sorption and enhance desorption. The data were fit to several simple isotherm equations with the Langmuir equation giving the best results. The results of the work are discussed with respect to nuclear waste repository performance. (authors)

  6. Tritium sorption by cement and subsequent release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, F.; Yamawaki, M.

    1995-01-01

    In a fusion reactor or tritium-handling facilities, contamination of concrete by tritium and subsequent release from it to the reator or experimental room is a matter of problem for safe control of tritium and management of operational environment. In order to evaluate this tritium behavior, interaction of tritiated water with concrete or cement should be clarified. In the present study, HTO sorption and subsequent release from cement were experimentally studied.(1)Sorption experiments were conducted using columns packed with cement particles of different sizes. From the analysis of the breakthrough curve, tritium diffusivity in macropores and microparticles were evaluated.(2)From the short-term tritium release experiments, effective desorption rate constants were evaluated and the effects of temperature and moisture were studied.(3)In the long-term tritium release experiments to 6000h, the tritium release mechanism was found to be composed of three kinds of water: initially from capillary water, and in the second stage from gel water and from the water in the cement crystal.(4)Tritium release behavior by heat treatment to 800 C was studied. A high temperature above 600 C was required for the tritium trapped in the crystal water to be released. (orig.)

  7. Sorption isotherms: A review on physical bases, modeling and measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limousin, G. [Atomic Energy Commission, Tracers Technology Laboratory, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France) and Laboratoire d' etude des Transferts en Hydrologie et Environnement (CNRS-INPG-IRD-UJF), BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France)]. E-mail: guillaumelimousin@yahoo.fr; Gaudet, J.-P. [Laboratoire d' etude des Transferts en Hydrologie et Environnement (CNRS-INPG-IRD-UJF), BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France); Charlet, L. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Techtonophysique - CNRS-IRD-LCPC-UJF-Universite de Savoie, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France); Szenknect, S. [Atomic Energy Commission, Tracers Technology Laboratory, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Barthes, V. [Atomic Energy Commission, Tracers Technology Laboratory, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Krimissa, M. [Electricite de France, Division Recherche et Developpement, Laboratoire National d' Hydraulique et d' Environnement - P78, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France)

    2007-02-15

    The retention (or release) of a liquid compound on a solid controls the mobility of many substances in the environment and has been quantified in terms of the 'sorption isotherm'. This paper does not review the different sorption mechanisms. It presents the physical bases underlying the definition of a sorption isotherm, different empirical or mechanistic models, and details several experimental methods to acquire a sorption isotherm. For appropriate measurements and interpretations of isotherm data, this review emphasizes 4 main points: (i) the adsorption (or desorption) isotherm does not provide automatically any information about the reactions involved in the sorption phenomenon. So, mechanistic interpretations must be carefully verified. (ii) Among studies, the range of reaction times is extremely wide and this can lead to misinterpretations regarding the irreversibility of the reaction: a pseudo-hysteresis of the release compared with the retention is often observed. The comparison between the mean characteristic time of the reaction and the mean residence time of the mobile phase in the natural system allows knowing if the studied retention/release phenomenon should be considered as an instantaneous reversible, almost irreversible phenomenon, or if reaction kinetics must be taken into account. (iii) When the concentration of the retained substance is low enough, the composition of the bulk solution remains constant and a single-species isotherm is often sufficient, although it remains strongly dependent on the background medium. At higher concentrations, sorption may be driven by the competition between several species that affect the composition of the bulk solution. (iv) The measurement method has a great influence. Particularly, the background ionic medium, the solid/solution ratio and the use of flow-through or closed reactor are of major importance. The chosen method should balance easy-to-use features and representativity of the studied

  8. Improved hydrogen sorption kinetics in wet ball milled Mg hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Li

    2011-05-04

    H{sub 2} with Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} is much larger than the standard wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} with Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and the corresponding sorption behavior is also much improved. Furthermore, a simple model is built up in which the key parameter is main specific surface area and it follows the experimental desorption results quite well. (orig.)

  9. Technetium Sorption Media Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.B.; Kelly, S.E.; Robbins, R.A.; Adams, R.D.; Thorson, M.A.; Haass, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents information and references to aid in the selection of 99Tc sorption media for feasibility studies regarding the removal of 99Tc from Hanford's low activity waste. The report contains literature search material for sorption media (including ion exchange media) for the most tested media to date, including SuperLig 639, Reillex HPQ, TAM (Kruion), Purolite A520E and A530E, and Dowex 1X8. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities in a safe, environmentally compliant, cost-effective and energy-effective manner.

  10. TECHNETIUM SORPTION MEDIA REVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN JB; KELLY SE; ROBBINS RA; ADAMS RD; THORSON MA; HAASS CC

    2011-08-25

    This report presents information and references to aid in the selection of 99Tc sorption media for feasibility studies regarding the removal of 99Tc from Hanford's low activity waste. The report contains literature search material for sorption media (including ion exchange media) for the most tested media to date, including SuperLig 639, Reillex HPQ, TAM (Kruion), Purolite A520E and A530E, and Dowex 1X8. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities in a safe, environmentally compliant, cost-effective and energy-effective manner.

  11. Sorption and Migration Mechanisms of 237 Np through Sandy Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantaraprachoom, Nanthavan; Tanaka, Tadao

    2003-06-01

    In order to evaluate migration behavior of radioactive nuclides in the disposal of low-level radioactive waste into a shallow land burial, the sorption characteristic and migration behavior of 237 Np through sandy soil was studied. Two experimental methods were performed by using batch and column systems. The distribution coefficients (K d ) obtained from the adsorption and desorption process are rather small about 16 and 21 cm 3 /g respectively. Size distribution of 237 Np species in the influent solution was measured by ultra-filtration technique. Migration mechanism of 237 Np was studied by column experiments. The experimental condition was the influence of volume of eluting solution; 100, 300, 500, 1000 and 2000 ml respectively. The result from five column experiments confirm that the sorption characteristics of 237 Np are mainly controlled by a reversible ion-exchange reaction and the migration of 237 Np in the sandy soil can be estimated by using the K d concept

  12. Gas sorption properties of microporous metal organic frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, JeongYong; Li Jing; Jagiello, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    A low-temperature gas sorption study has been carried out on four three-dimensional microporous metal organic framework (MMOF) structures and two two-dimensional layered structures. The pore characteristics are analyzed based on the argon adsorption-desorption isotherms at 87 K. The results from hydrogen sorption experiments conducted at 77 and 87 K show that all MMOFs have a relatively high hydrogen uptake, with adsorbed hydrogen densities falling in the range of liquid hydrogen. Isosteric heats of hydrogen adsorption data calculated based on the Clausius-Clapeyron equation are consistent with these observations, indicating strong sorbent-sorbate interactions. - Graphical abstract: Hydrogen adsorption isotherms measured at 77 and 87 K

  13. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI)) desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments

  14. Switchable host-guest systems on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-Wei; Sun, Yu-Long; Song, Nan

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: For device miniaturization, nanotechnology follows either the "top-down" approach scaling down existing larger-scale devices or the "bottom-up' approach assembling the smallest possible building blocks to functional nanoscale entities. For synthetic nanodevices, self-assembly on surfaces is a superb method to achieve useful functions and enable their interactions with the surrounding world. Consequently, adaptability and responsiveness to external stimuli are other prerequisites for their successful operation. Mechanically interlocked molecules such as rotaxanes and catenanes, and their precursors, that is, molecular switches and supramolecular switches including pseudorotaxanes, are molecular machines or prototypes of machines capable of mechanical motion induced by chemical signals, biological inputs, light or redox processes as the external stimuli. Switching of these functional host-guest systems on surfaces becomes a fundamental requirement for artificial molecular machines to work, mimicking the molecular machines in nature, such as proteins and their assemblies operating at dynamic interfaces such as the surfaces of cell membranes. Current research endeavors in material science and technology are focused on developing either a new class of materials or materials with novel/multiple functionalities by shifting host-guest chemistry from solution phase to surfaces. In this Account, we present our most recent attempts of building monolayers of rotaxanes/pseudorotaxanes on surfaces, providing stimuli-induced macroscopic effects and further understanding on the switchable host-guest systems at interfaces. Biocompatible versions of molecular machines based on synthetic macrocycles, such as cucurbiturils, pillararenes, calixarenes, and cyclodextrins, have been employed to form self-assembled monolayers of gates on the surfaces of mesoporous silica nanoparticles to regulate the controlled release of cargo/drug molecules under a range of external stimuli

  15. Impact of long-term wastewater irrigation on sorption and transport of atrazine in Mexican agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K; Duwig, C; Prado, B; Siebe, C; Hidalgo, C; Etchevers, J

    2012-01-01

    In the Mezquital Valley, Mexico, crops have been irrigated with untreated municipal wastewater for more than a century. Atrazine has been applied to maize and alfalfa grown in the area for weed control for 15 years. Our objectives were to analyse (i) how wastewater irrigation affects the filtering of atrazine, and (ii) if the length of irrigation has a significant impact. We compared atrazine sorption to Phaeozems that have been irrigated with raw wastewater for 35 (P35) and 85 (P85) years with sorption to a non-irrigated (P0) Phaeozem soil under rainfed agriculture. The use of bromide as an inert water tracer in column experiments and the subsequent analysis of the tracers' breakthrough curves allowed the calibration of the hydrodynamic parameters of a two-site non equilibrium convection-dispersion model. The quality of the irrigation water significantly altered the soils' hydrodynamic properties (hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and the size of pores that are hydraulically active). The impacts on soil chemical properties (total organic carbon content and pH) were not significant, while the sodium adsorption ratio was significantly increased. Sorption and desorption isotherms, determined in batch and column experiments, showed enhanced atrazine sorption and reduced and slower desorption in wastewater-irrigated soils. These effects increased with the length of irrigation. The intensified sorption-desorption hysteresis in wastewater-irrigated soils indicated that the soil organic matter developed in these soils had fewer high-energy, easily accessible sorption sites available, leading to lower and slower atrazine desorption rates. This study leads to the conclusion that wastewater irrigation decreases atrazine mobility in the Mezquital valley Phaeozems by decreasing the hydraulic conductivity and increasing the soil's sorption capacity.

  16. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Uranium sorption. Final Report - Volume 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, T.D.; Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.; Sekine, K.

    1992-01-01

    In this volume, the results of studies of uranium sorption (adsorption and desorption) to both single, well-defined mineral phases, and to selected natural (Koongarra) substrates are reported. The single phases included the amorphous iron oxide ferrihydrite, crystalline silica and two naturally occurring kaolinites, KGa-1 and Nichika. The surface properties of these materials were rigorously defined, and adsorption studies were conducted over a range of solution pH, ionic strength, carbonate content, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations, and in the presence of uranium complexants and (potentially) competing adsorbates (such as phosphate and fluoride). The results of these studies were modelled using the 'surface complexation' approach, with a diffuse layer description of the electrical double layer. The impacts of mineral phase transformations (specifically the aging of amorphous ferrihydrite to more crystalline forms) on the uptake and desorption of uranium are also reported. The amount of data obtained in this study, with a number of experimental parameters being varied over a wide range, has enabled more confidence to be placed in the modelling results. The derived model for ferrihydrite adequately accounts for the effect on U sorption of a number of parameters, most notably pH, pCO 2 and total U present. Few (if any) of the models previously proposed are adequate in this respect. While the modelling of the data for the natural substrates is not as advanced, the U sorption data on the natural substrates show similar features to the U sorption on the model substrates. This suggests that the insights obtained in the modelling of the data for ferrihydrite will be valuable in deriving a model for the more complex natural substrates

  17. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Uranium sorption. Final Report - Volume 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waite, T D; Payne, T E [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Davis, J A [United States Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sekine, K [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    In this volume, the results of studies of uranium sorption (adsorption and desorption) to both single, well-defined mineral phases, and to selected natural (Koongarra) substrates are reported. The single phases included the amorphous iron oxide ferrihydrite, crystalline silica and two naturally occurring kaolinites, KGa-1 and Nichika. The surface properties of these materials were rigorously defined, and adsorption studies were conducted over a range of solution pH, ionic strength, carbonate content, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations, and in the presence of uranium complexants and (potentially) competing adsorbates (such as phosphate and fluoride). The results of these studies were modelled using the `surface complexation` approach, with a diffuse layer description of the electrical double layer. The impacts of mineral phase transformations (specifically the aging of amorphous ferrihydrite to more crystalline forms) on the uptake and desorption of uranium are also reported. The amount of data obtained in this study, with a number of experimental parameters being varied over a wide range, has enabled more confidence to be placed in the modelling results. The derived model for ferrihydrite adequately accounts for the effect on U sorption of a number of parameters, most notably pH, pCO{sub 2} and total U present. Few (if any) of the models previously proposed are adequate in this respect. While the modelling of the data for the natural substrates is not as advanced, the U sorption data on the natural substrates show similar features to the U sorption on the model substrates. This suggests that the insights obtained in the modelling of the data for ferrihydrite will be valuable in deriving a model for the more complex natural substrates 87 refs., 27 tabs., 56 figs.

  18. Sorption of actinides onto nanodiamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchatskaya, Yulia; Romanchuk, Anna; Yakovlev, Ruslan; Kulakova, Inna [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Shiryaev, Andrei [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry; Kalmykov, Stepan [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry

    2015-06-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (ND) present a significant part of nanocarbons group, which could be produced on commercial scale by detonation of explosives in a closed chamber. Their unique properties of high surface area, low weight and radiation resistance make ND a prospective candidate for applications in sorption processes in radiochemistry. To study the influence of surface chemistry on sorption properties, apristine sample of ND was treated with acids and hydrogen. The surface chemistry of the samples was characterised by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Boehm titration. The sorption properties of ND were tested fordifferent radionuclides. The sorption capacity of ND was shown to be higher than those of commonly used radionuclide sorbents like activated carbon and compariable to other members of nanocarbon group like graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes. The sorption properties were shown to be influenced by the presence of oxygen-containing groups on the surface of ND. This represents an opportunity to increase the sorption capacity of ND.

  19. Sorption of actinides onto nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchatskaya, Yulia; Romanchuk, Anna; Yakovlev, Ruslan; Kulakova, Inna; Shiryaev, Andrei; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow; Kalmykov, Stepan; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow

    2015-01-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (ND) present a significant part of nanocarbons group, which could be produced on commercial scale by detonation of explosives in a closed chamber. Their unique properties of high surface area, low weight and radiation resistance make ND a prospective candidate for applications in sorption processes in radiochemistry. To study the influence of surface chemistry on sorption properties, apristine sample of ND was treated with acids and hydrogen. The surface chemistry of the samples was characterised by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Boehm titration. The sorption properties of ND were tested fordifferent radionuclides. The sorption capacity of ND was shown to be higher than those of commonly used radionuclide sorbents like activated carbon and compariable to other members of nanocarbon group like graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes. The sorption properties were shown to be influenced by the presence of oxygen-containing groups on the surface of ND. This represents an opportunity to increase the sorption capacity of ND.

  20. New approach in modeling Cr(VI) sorption onto biomass from metal binary mixtures solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Anhui Normal University, South Jiuhua Road, 189, 241002 Wuhu (China); Chemical Engineering Department, Escola Politècnica Superior, Universitat de Girona, Ma Aurèlia Capmany, 61, 17071 Girona (Spain); Fiol, Núria [Chemical Engineering Department, Escola Politècnica Superior, Universitat de Girona, Ma Aurèlia Capmany, 61, 17071 Girona (Spain); Villaescusa, Isabel, E-mail: Isabel.Villaescusa@udg.edu [Chemical Engineering Department, Escola Politècnica Superior, Universitat de Girona, Ma Aurèlia Capmany, 61, 17071 Girona (Spain); Poch, Jordi [Applied Mathematics Department, Escola Politècnica Superior, Universitat de Girona, Ma Aurèlia Capmany, 61, 17071 Girona (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    In the last decades Cr(VI) sorption equilibrium and kinetic studies have been carried out using several types of biomasses. However there are few researchers that consider all the simultaneous processes that take place during Cr(VI) sorption (i.e., sorption/reduction of Cr(VI) and simultaneous formation and binding of reduced Cr(III)) when formulating a model that describes the overall sorption process. On the other hand Cr(VI) scarcely exists alone in wastewaters, it is usually found in mixtures with divalent metals. Therefore, the simultaneous removal of Cr(VI) and divalent metals in binary mixtures and the interactive mechanism governing Cr(VI) elimination have gained more and more attention. In the present work, kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto exhausted coffee from Cr(VI)–Cu(II) binary mixtures has been studied in a stirred batch reactor. A model including Cr(VI) sorption and reduction, Cr(III) sorption and the effect of the presence of Cu(II) in these processes has been developed and validated. This study constitutes an important advance in modeling Cr(VI) sorption kinetics especially when chromium sorption is in part based on the sorbent capacity of reducing hexavalent chromium and a metal cation is present in the binary mixture. - Highlights: • A kinetic model including Cr(VI) reduction, Cr(VI) and Cr(III) sorption/desorption • Synergistic effect of Cu(II) on Cr(VI) elimination included in the model • Model validation by checking it against independent sets of data.

  1. Binary Component Sorption of Cadmium, and Copper Ions onto Yangtze River Sediments with Different Particle Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Fan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sorption is a crucial process that influences immobilization and migration of heavy metals in an aqueous environment. Sediments represent one of the ultimate sinks for heavy metals discharged into water body. Moreover, the particle size of sediments plays an extremely important role in the immobilization of heavy metals. In this study, the sorption and desorption of cadmium (Cd and copper (Cu onto sediments with different particle sizes were investigated to predict the rate and capacity of sorption, to understand their environmental behaviors in an aqueous environment. Batch sorption and kinetic experiments were conducted to obtain the retained amount and rate of Cd and Cu in a binary system. Experimental data were simulated using sorption models to ascertain the sorption capacity and the kinetic rate. Results of European Communities Bureau of Reference (BCR sequential extraction showed the highest concentration of Cd (0.344 mg kg−1, and its distribution varied with sediment particle size and site. Furthermore, most of Cu (approximately 57% to 84% existed as a residual fraction. The sorption of Cu onto six sediments followed a pseudo-first order reaction, whereas that of Cd followed a pseudo-second order reaction. Additionally, the competitive Langmuir model fitted the batch sorption experimental data extremely well. The highest sorption capacities of Cd and Cu reach 0.641 mmol kg−1 and 62.3 mmol kg−1, respectively, on the smallest submerged sediment particles. The amounts of Cu and Cd desorbed (mmol kg−1 increased linearly with the initial concentration increasing. Thus, sediment texture is an important factor that influences the sorption of heavy metal onto sediments.

  2. New approach in modeling Cr(VI) sorption onto biomass from metal binary mixtures solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chang; Fiol, Núria; Villaescusa, Isabel; Poch, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades Cr(VI) sorption equilibrium and kinetic studies have been carried out using several types of biomasses. However there are few researchers that consider all the simultaneous processes that take place during Cr(VI) sorption (i.e., sorption/reduction of Cr(VI) and simultaneous formation and binding of reduced Cr(III)) when formulating a model that describes the overall sorption process. On the other hand Cr(VI) scarcely exists alone in wastewaters, it is usually found in mixtures with divalent metals. Therefore, the simultaneous removal of Cr(VI) and divalent metals in binary mixtures and the interactive mechanism governing Cr(VI) elimination have gained more and more attention. In the present work, kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto exhausted coffee from Cr(VI)–Cu(II) binary mixtures has been studied in a stirred batch reactor. A model including Cr(VI) sorption and reduction, Cr(III) sorption and the effect of the presence of Cu(II) in these processes has been developed and validated. This study constitutes an important advance in modeling Cr(VI) sorption kinetics especially when chromium sorption is in part based on the sorbent capacity of reducing hexavalent chromium and a metal cation is present in the binary mixture. - Highlights: • A kinetic model including Cr(VI) reduction, Cr(VI) and Cr(III) sorption/desorption • Synergistic effect of Cu(II) on Cr(VI) elimination included in the model • Model validation by checking it against independent sets of data

  3. Kinetics and equilibrium modeling of uranium(VI) sorption by bituminous shale from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortaboy, Sinem; Atun, Gülten

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Oil shales are sedimentary rocks containing a polymeric matter in a mineral matrix. • Sorption potential of bituminous shale (BS) for uranium recovery was investigated. • U(VI) sorption increased with decreasing pH and increasing temperature. • Kinetic data were analyzed based on single and two resistance diffusion models. • The results fit well to the McKay equation assuming film and intraparticle diffusion. - Abstract: Sorption of U(VI) onto a bituminous shale (BS) from a nuclear power plant project site in Black Sea region was investigated for potential risk assessment when it releases into the environment with contaminated ground and surface water. The sorption characteristics of the BS for U(VI) recovery were evaluated as a function of contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial concentration, pH and temperature. Kinetic results fit better with pseudo-second-order model rather than pseudo-first-order. The possibility of diffusion process was analyzed based on Weber–Morris intra-particle diffusion model. The McKay equation assuming film- and intraparticle diffusion better predicted the data than the Vermeulen approximation presuming surface diffusion. Equilibrium sorption data were modeled according to the Langmuir, Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) and Freundlich isotherm equations. Sorption capacity increased from 0.10 to 0.15 mmol g −1 in 298–318 K temperature range. FT-IR analysis and pH dependent sorption studies conducted in hydroxide and carbonate media revealed that U(VI) species were sorbed in uranyl and its hydroxo forms on the BS. Desorption studies showed that U(VI) leaching with Black Sea water was negligible from the loaded BS. The activation parameters (E a , ΔH ∗ and ΔG ∗ ) estimated from diffusion coefficients indicated the presence of an energy barrier in the sorption system. However, thermodynamic functions derived from sorption equilibrium constants showed that overall sorption process was spontaneous in nature

  4. Enrofloxacin sorption on smectite clays: effects of pH, cations, and humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Hu, Shan; Jing, Chuanyong

    2012-04-15

    Enrofloxacin (ENR) occurs widely in natural waters because of its extensive use as a veterinary chemotherapeutic agent. To improve our understanding of the interaction of this emerging contaminant with soils and sediments, sorption of ENR on homoionic smectites and kaolinite was studied as a function of pH, ionic strength, exchangeable cations, and humic acid concentration. Batch experiments and in situ ATR-FTIR analysis suggested multiple sorption mechanisms. Cation exchange was a major contributor to the sorption of cationic ENR species on smectite. The decreased ENR sorption with increasing ionic strength indicated the formation of outer-sphere complexes. Exchangeable cations significantly influenced the sorption capacity, and the observed order was Csdesorption FTIR spectra indicated that OH of the carboxyl group was involved in the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes. The XRD analysis confirmed that interlayer intercalation is an important contributor to ENR sorption, while humic acid had a negligible contribution to the interlayer intercalation. The results of this study provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of ENR sorption on clay minerals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel magnetic nanoparticles coated by benzene- and β-cyclodextrin-bearing dextran, and the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Eunae; Tahir, Muhammad Nazir; Min Choi, Jae

    2015-01-01

    We present the synthesis of novel magnetic nanoparticles functionalized by benzene- and β-cyclodextrin-derivatized dextran. The grafting strategy was based on the [alkynyl-iron] cluster in the modified dextrans, which were prepared by click reaction from alkyne-modified dextran and benzyl azide......, the potential for removing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as phenanthrene and pyrene by sorption onto the nanomaterials was assessed. In the sorption, pi-stacking interactions of the benzene-derivatized dextran and host–guest chemistry of the β-cyclodextrin-derivatized dextran were considered...

  6. Effect of drying on the desorption of diuron and terbuthylazine from natural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartz, Bernd; Louchart, Xavier

    2007-03-01

    This work was initiated to study the effects of climate induced soil water status variations which can reach extreme values under natural conditions on the sorption process of hydrophobic organic compounds. Based on the classical slurry batch methodology an approach is developed that allows the fast and careful complete drying of soil suspensions (microwave technique). Classical adsorption experiments were followed by three desorption steps with and without drying cycles. Drying and re-wetting enhanced the sorption-desorption hysteresis and Freundlich adsorption coefficients increased from 5.9 to 16 and 5.2 to 21 over three drying cycles for diuron and terbuthylazine respectively. Assuming the validity of a dual stage adsorption process, model evaluation suggests that drying is as a shrinking-like process leading to conformational changes of the dominant sorbent (soil organic matter) which restrict the intra-micro-particle diffusion. Rewetting only leads to a partial recovery of the diffusional pore space.

  7. Investigation of uranium sorption from carbonate solutions by different ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekrasova, N.A.; Kudryavtseva, S.P.; Milyutin, V.V.; Chuveleva, Eh.A.; Firsova, L.A.; Gelis, V.M.

    2008-01-01

    One studied the uranium sorption from the reference carbonate solutions based on the ion-exchange resins varying in the rank. The PFA-300, the A-560, the AB-17x8 highly basic anionites and the ampholytes (S-930, S-922, S-957, ANKB-35) were shown to manifest the best sorption characteristics as to U. One determined the dependences of the static exchange capacity of the PFA-300, the A-560 and the S-922 resins as to the uranium on the carbonate solution pH, as well as the absorbed uranium desorption conditions [ru

  8. Sorptive and desorptive fractionation of dissolved organic matter by mineral soil matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Adi; Chefetz, Benny

    2012-01-01

    Interactions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with soil minerals, such as metal oxides and clays, involve various sorption mechanisms and may lead to sorptive fractionation of certain organic moieties. While sorption of DOM to soil minerals typically involves a degree of irreversibility, it is unclear which structural components of DOM correspond to the irreversibly bound fraction and which factors may be considered determinants. To assist in elucidating that, the current study aimed at investigating fractionation of DOM during sorption and desorption processes in soil. Batch DOM sorption and desorption experiments were conducted with organic matter poor, alkaline soils. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-Vis spectroscopy were used to analyze bulk DOM, sorbed DOM, and desorbed DOM fractions. Sorptive fractionation resulted mainly from the preferential uptake of aromatic, carboxylic, and phenolic moieties of DOM. Soil metal-oxide content positively affected DOM sorption and binding of some specific carboxylate and phenolate functional groups. Desorptive fractionation of DOM was expressed by the irreversible-binding nature of some carboxylic moieties, whereas other bound carboxylic moieties were readily desorbed. Inner-sphere, as opposed to outer-sphere, ligand-exchange complexation mechanisms may be responsible for these irreversible, as opposed to reversible, interactions, respectively. The interaction of aliphatic DOM constituents with soil, presumably through weak van der Waals forces, was minor and increased with increasing proportion of clay minerals in the soil. Revealing the nature of DOM-fractionation processes is of great importance to understanding carbon stabilization mechanisms in soils, as well as the overall fate of contaminants that might be associated with DOM. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  9. Be My Guest: A Survey of Mass Communication Students' Perception of Guest Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Patrick F.; Craig, Clay

    2017-01-01

    The use of guest speakers as a pedagogical technique across disciplines at the college level is hardly novel. However, empirical assessment of journalism and mass communication students' perceptions of this practice has not previously been conducted. To fill this gap, this article presents results from an online survey specifically administered to…

  10. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Powell, Brian A.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time which has implications for near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption-desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  11. Experimental studies of Cs, Sr, Ni, and Eu sorption on Na-illite and the modelling of Cs sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, C.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.

    1999-08-01

    A natural illite (illite du Puy) was purified and converted to the homo-ionic Na-form. The conditioned Na-illite was characterised in terms of its mineralogy, chemical inventory and physico-chemical properties. The structural formula was determined from energy dispersive spectroscopic analyses (SEM/TEM-EDS) and bulk chemistry measurements. A cation exchange capacity of 127 meq kg -1 was determined by the 22 Na isotope dilution method at neutral pH. The Na-CEC was also measured as a function of pH. The stability of Na-illite as a function of pH in the range between 3 and 6 was investigated. At low pH values partial dissolution of the illite occurs releasing the structural elements Al, Si, Mg, and K into solution. The presence of Ca and Sr in solution was interpreted as being due to desorption from cation exchange sites. All of these elements are also present at neutral pH but at considerably lower levels. Such effects cannot be avoided and must be considered in the interpretation of the sorption measurements. The main focus of the experimental work presented here is on the sorption behaviour of Cs, Sr, Ni and Eu on conditioned Na-illite as a function of NaClO 4 background electrolyte concentration (0.1 and 0.01 M), nuclide concentration and pH in the range between 3 and 11. Sorption edge data (R d versus pH) and sorption isotherms (quantity of nuclide sorbed versus equilibrium nuclide concentration) are presented for these four elements. Prior to beginning these experiments, sorption kinetics were measured. The broad based pool of sorption measurements generated from this work will provide the source data sets for subsequent modelling. So far only the Cs sorption measurements have been modelled. A two site cation exchange model was developed to describe the sorption of Cs over the whole range of experimental conditions. The two site types were termed 'frayed edge sites' (FES, high affinity/low capacity) and 'type II sites' (low affinity/high capacity). Selectivity

  12. A kinetic approach to model sorption dynamics of radionuclides in soils: from desire to operational application?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Garin, A.; Garcia-Sanchez, L.; Coppin, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (France); Krimissa, M. [Electricite de France (France)

    2014-07-01

    The understanding of radionuclides (RN) behaviour and subsequent fluxes in the soil/solution/plant system is still a challenging question for realistic short, medium or long term risk assessments. Several years of researches have been devoted to improve the modeling of radionuclides migration in soils and their transfer to other compartments of the biosphere (eg. plants), as well as to constitute databases of model parameters (eg. distribution coefficient (K{sub d})). These works contributed to define, and then to extend, the domain of applicability of radioecological models, but they also helped to identify gaps and ways to improve them. However, these improvements have not been fully taken into account. Within this framework, the evolution of RN chemical speciation in time (often described as aging) was specifically addressed, as it control RN retention properties and bioavailability. Regarding soluble and RN solid speciation in soils, such processes generally lead to a shift from low to high K{sub d} values. Common explanations consist in the transfer of sorbed RN to non-(or less) exchangeable solid species, or in the lixiviation of the most available radionuclide fraction, both decreasing the reversibly sorbed RN fraction. Kinetics studies have examined such changes in K{sub d} value with time and various models have been proposed to fit the different evolutions. Among them, an empirical three-box model is often used to describe the kinetics of RN sorption when RN mostly occurs in the soil solution as a free ion (eg. Cs and Sr). This model assumes that the radionuclide may be sorbed either as a labile fraction, defining an exchangeable K{sub d}-like liquid/solid distribution, or sorbed as a less or non-exchangeable fraction. The last is estimated through its corresponding sorption and desorption rate constants, which describes a pseudo-first order reaction. Modeling of sorption dynamic is a way to link K{sub d} values derived from field-contaminated soils to

  13. Plutonium sorption to nanocast mesoporous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Wang, Deborah; Jones, Stephen; Olive, Daniel; Nitsche, Heino [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.; Tueysuez, Harun [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    Nanocast ordered mesoporous carbons are attractive as sorbents because of their extremely high surface areas and large pore volumes. This paper compares Pu uptake, added as Pu(VI), to both untreated and chemically oxidized CMK-(carbon molecular sieves from KAIST) type mesoporous carbon with that to a commercial amorphous activated carbon. The CMK was synthesized via nanocasting by using cubic ordered mesoporous silica KIT-6 as a hard template, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and nitrogen adsorption. A portion of the CMK was oxidized by treatment with nitric acid, and will be called OX CMK. The three carbon powders have similar particle morphology, and high BET surface areas. The activated carbon is disordered, while the CMK materials show large domains of ordered cubic mesostructure. The CMK material seems to have more oxygen-containing functional groups than the activated carbon, and the oxidation of the CMK increased the density of these groups, especially - COOH, thus lowering the point of zero charge (PZC) of the material. Batch studies of all 3 materials with plutonium solutions, in a 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} matrix were performed to investigate pH dependence, sorption kinetics, Pu uptake capacities, competition with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in solution, and Pu desorption. Both CMK materials demonstrated high Pu sorption from solutions of pH 3 or greater, and the oxidized CMK also showed high sorption from pH 2 solutions. The activated carbon bound less Pu, and at a much slower rate than CMK. All other batch experiments were carried out in pH 4 solutions. The Pu uptake from low-concentration solutions was faster for the oxidized CMK than for untreated CMK, but in more concentrated samples (∝ 250 μM Pu), the Pu uptake kinetics and apparent capacity were the same for oxidized and untreated CMK. The 23-h Pu uptake capacity of the CMK

  14. Kinetics of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline adsorption and desorption on two acid soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to quantify retention/release of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline on two soils, paying attention to sorption kinetics and to implications of the adsorption/desorption processes on transfer of these pollutants to the various environmental compartments...... tetracycline > oxytetracycline > chlortetracycline in soil 1, with similar values for the three antibiotics and the sequence tetracycline > chlortetracycline > oxytetracycline in soil 2. The desorption sequences were oxytetracycline > tetracycline > chlortetracycline in soil 1 and oxytetracycline...... > chlortetracycline > tetracycline in soil 2. In conclusion, the SFC technique has yielded new kinetic data regarding tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline adsorption/desorption on soils, indicating that it can be used to shed further light on the retention and transport processes affecting antibiotics...

  15. Guest Speakers in School-Based Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Madsen, Nikki; Eisenberg, Marla E.

    2014-01-01

    This study, using data from a statewide survey (n = 332), examined teachers' practices regarding the inclusion of guest speakers to cover sexuality content. More than half of teachers (58%) included guest speakers. In multivariate analyses, teachers who taught high school, had professional preparation in health education, or who received…

  16. The benefit of guest loyalty programmes | La Rose | Research in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the literature review of this research, the following aspects are discussed: a loyalty programme and its use; the sort of loyalty programmes; the effects of a loyalty programme; and the wishes and needs of a leisure guest. Surveys were divided among 46 leisure guests of Apollo Hotels and Resorts in order to collect data on ...

  17. Evaluation of Lagergren Kinetics Equation by Using Novel Kinetics Expression of Sorption of Zn2+ onto Horse Dung Humic Acid (HD-HA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Rusdiarso

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Extraction and purification of humic acid from dry horse dung powder (HD-HA was performed successfully and the purified HD-HA was then applied as sorbent to adsorb Zn2+. Extraction and purification were performed based on procedure of Stevenson (1994 under atmospheric air. Parameters investigated in this work consist of effect of medium sorption acidity, sorption rate (ka and desorption rate constant (kd, Langmuir (monolayer and Freundlich (multilayer sorption capacities, and energy (E of sorption. The ka and kd were determined according to the kinetic model of second order sorption reaching equilibrium, monolayer sorption capacity (b and energy (E were determined according to Langmuir isotherm model, and multilayer sorption capacity (B was determined based on Freundlich isotherm model. Sorption of Zn2+ on purified HD-HA was maximum at pH 5.0. The novel kinetic expression resulted from proposed kinetic model has been shown to be more applicable than the commonly known Lagergren equation obtained from the pseudo-first order sorption model. The application of the equation revealed that the intercept of Lagergren equation, ln qe was more complex function of initial concentration of Zn2+ (a, Langmuir sorption capacity (b, and sorbed Zn2+ at equilibrium (xe.

  18. Combined analysis of 1,3-benzodioxoles by crystalline sponge X-ray crystallography and laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yukako; Ohara, Kazuaki; Taki, Rika; Saeki, Tomomi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro

    2018-03-12

    The crystalline sponge (CS) method, which employs single-crystal X-ray diffraction to determine the structure of an analyte present as a liquid or an oil and having a low melting point, was used in combination with laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). 1,3-Benzodioxole derivatives were encapsulated in CS and their structures were determined by combining X-ray crystallography and MS. After the X-ray analysis, the CS was subjected to imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) with an LDI spiral-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The ion detection area matched the microscopic image of the encapsulated CS. In addition, the accumulated 1D mass spectra showed that fragmentation of the guest molecule (hereafter, guest) can be easily visualized without any interference from the fragment ions of CS except for two strong ion peaks derived from the tridentate ligand TPT (2,4,6-tris(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine) of the CS and its fragment. X-ray analysis clearly showed the presence of the guest as well as the π-π, CH-halogen, and CH-O interactions between the guest and the CS framework. However, some guests remained randomly diffused in the nanopores of CS. In addition, the detection limit was less than sub-pmol order based on the weight and density of CS determined by X-ray analysis. Spectroscopic data, such as UV-vis and NMR, also supported the encapsulation of the guest through the interaction between the guest and CS components. The results denote that the CS-LDI-MS method, which combines CS, X-ray analysis and LDI-MS, is effective for structure determination.

  19. Effect of biosurfactant[0] on the sorption of phenanthrene onto original and H2O2-treated soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Xiaohong; ZHAN Xinhua; ZHOU Lixiang

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of biosurfactant on sorption of phenanthrene (PHE) onto the original or H2O2-treated black loamy soil (typic isohumisols) and red sandy soil (typic ferralisols). The sorption isotherms were performed with the original and "soft" carbon-removed soils in the presence and absence of biosurfactant (200 mg/L). The sorption and degradation of biosurfactant were investigated. The result showed that organic matter played an important role in PHE sorption onto the black loamy and red sandy soils, and the PHE sorption isotherms on the "soft" carbon-removed soils exhibited more nonlinearity than those on the original soils. The values of partition coefficient (Kd) on the original black loamy soil with or without 200 mg/L biosurfactant were 181.6 and 494.5 mL/g, respectively. Correspondingly, in the red sandy soil, Kd was 246.4 and 212.8 mL/g in the presence or absence of biosurfactant, respectively. The changes of Kd suggested that biosurfactant inhibited PHE sorption onto the black loamy soil, but facilitated PHE sorption onto the red sandy soil. The nonlinearity of PHE sorption isotherm was decreased in the presence of biosurfactant. Site specific sorption might occur during PHE sorption onto both the original and the "soft" carbon-removed soils in the presence of biosurfactant. It was noted that biosurfactant could also be sorbed onto soils. The maximal sorption capacity of the red sandy soil for biosurfactant was (76.9 ± 0.007) μg/g, which was 1.31 times that of black loamy soil. Biosurfactant was degraded quickly in the two selected soils, and 92% of biosurfactant were mineralized throughout the incubation experiment for 7 d. It implied that biosurfactant should be added frequently when the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils was conducted through PAH desorption approach facilitated by biosurfactant.

  20. Science in the schoolhouse: an uninvited guest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Timothy J; Tankersley, Melody

    2004-01-01

    Science and scientific thinking have not made a substantial impact on educational practice. In this discussion, we examine the relationship between science and education and delineate four reasons for characterizing science as an uninvited guest in schools: (a) Science is not highly regarded in society; (b) good science and bad science are often mistaken for one another; (c) the amount of current data is overwhelming; and (d) science is not easy for those who practice it (researchers), those who translate it (teacher educators), or those who consume it (teachers). We suggest several strategies to improve this relationship, including promoting standards of educational practice, emphasizing the role of teacher educators as translators of the research base into classroom practice, and linking student outcomes with the use of effective instructional practices.

  1. Ultrafast Carbon Dioxide Sorption Kinetics Using Lithium Silicate Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambo, Apolo; He, Juan; Nguyen, Tu Quang; Atla, Veerendra; Druffel, Thad; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2017-06-14

    In this paper, the Li 4 SiO 4 nanowires (NWs) were shown to be promising for CO 2 capture with ultrafast kinetics. Specifically, the nanowire powders exhibited an uptake of 0.35 g g -1 of CO 2 at an ultrafast adsorption rate of 0.22 g g -1 min -1 at 650-700 °C. Lithium silicate (Li 4 SiO 4 ) nanowires and nanopowders were synthesized using a "solvo-plasma" technique involving plasma oxidation of silicon precursors mixed with lithium hydroxide. The kinetic parameter values (k) extracted from sorption kinetics obtained using NW powders are 1 order of magnitude higher than those previously reported for the Li 4 SiO 4 -CO 2 reaction system. The time scales for CO 2 sorption using nanowires are approximately 3 min and two orders magnitude faster compared to those obtained using lithium silicate powders with spherical morphologies and aggregates. Furthermore, Li 4 SiO 4 nanowire powders showed reversibility through sorption-desorption cycles indicating their suitability for CO 2 capture applications. All of the morphologies of Li 4 SiO 4 powders exhibited a double exponential behavior in the adsorption kinetics indicating two distinct time constants for kinetic and the mass transfer limited regimes.

  2. Hollow fiber adsorbents for CO2 capture: Kinetic sorption performance

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.

    2011-07-01

    We describe a CO 2 capture platform based on hollow polymeric fibers with sorbent particles embedded in the porous fiber wall for post-combustion CO 2 capture. These fibers are intended for use in a rapid temperature swing adsorption (RTSA) process. The RTSA system utilizes the hollow fiber morphology by flowing cooling water on the bore-side of the fibers during sorption to prevent temperature rise associated with the sorption enthalpy. Steam or hot water is flowed through the bores during desorption to desorb CO 2 rapidly. To minimize material transfer between the bore and the fiber wall, a dense Neoprene ® lumen layer is cast on the bore-side of the fiber wall. In this paper, the key sorption step and associated kinetic resistances for the uncooled fibers are examined and evaluated for this portion of the RTSA process. Chopped fibers in a packed bed, as well as fibers assembled into a parallel flow module, have been tested in a simulated flue gas stream. Kinetic limitations in the hollow fiber modules are largely overcome by increasing the superficial gas velocity and the fiber packing in the module-indicating that film diffusion is the controlling mass transfer limitation in the fiber system. The un-cooled fiber modules lose apparent capacity as superficial velocities are increased, likely indicating non-isothermal operation, whereas the actively-cooled fibers in the packed bed maintain apparent capacity at all flowrates studied. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Evaluation of theoretical and empirical water vapor sorption isotherm models for soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per; de Jonge, Lis W.

    2016-01-01

    The mathematical characterization of water vapor sorption isotherms of soils is crucial for modeling processes such as volatilization of pesticides and diffusive and convective water vapor transport. Although numerous physically based and empirical models were previously proposed to describe sorption isotherms of building materials, food, and other industrial products, knowledge about the applicability of these functions for soils is noticeably lacking. We present an evaluation of nine models for characterizing adsorption/desorption isotherms for a water activity range from 0.03 to 0.93 based on measured data of 207 soils with widely varying textures, organic carbon contents, and clay mineralogy. In addition, the potential applicability of the models for prediction of sorption isotherms from known clay content was investigated. While in general, all investigated models described measured adsorption and desorption isotherms reasonably well, distinct differences were observed between physical and empirical models and due to the different degrees of freedom of the model equations. There were also considerable differences in model performance for adsorption and desorption data. While regression analysis relating model parameters and clay content and subsequent model application for prediction of measured isotherms showed promise for the majority of investigated soils, for soils with distinct kaolinitic and smectitic clay mineralogy predicted isotherms did not closely match the measurements.

  4. Sorption Behavior of Strontium-85 Onto Colloids of Silica and Smectite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, N.; Triay, I.R.; Mason, C.F.V.; Longmire, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Strontium-90 is one of the sizable radioactive contaminants found in DP Canyon at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Radioactive surveys found the 90 Sr is present in surface and groundwater in DP Canyon and Los Alamos Canyon. Colloids may influence the transport of this radionuclide in surface water and groundwater environments in both canyons. In this study, we investigated the sorption/desorption behavior of Sr on colloids of smectite and silica. Laboratory batch sorption experiments were conducted using 85 Sr as a surrogate to 90 Sr. Groundwater, collected from DP Canyon and from Well J-13 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and deionized water were used in this study. Our results show that 92% to 100% of 85 Sr was rapidly adsorbed onto smectite colloids in all three waters. The concentrations of Ca 2+ significantly influence the adsorption of 85 Sr onto silica colloids. Desorption of 85 Sr from smectite colloids is much slower than the sorption process. Desorption of 85 Sr from silica colloids was rapid in DP groundwater and slow using J-13 groundwater and deionized water

  5. Enhanced desorption of cesium from collapsed interlayer regions in vermiculite by hydrothermal treatment with divalent cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Xiangbiao, E-mail: yin.x.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Wang, Xinpeng [College of Resources and Metallurgy, Guangxi University, 100 Daxue East Road, Nanning 530004 (China); Wu, Hao; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Takeshita, Kenji [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Desorption of Cs{sup +} fixed in collapsed interlayer region of vermiculite was studied. • Monovalent cations readily induced interlayer collapse inhibiting Cs{sup +} desorption. • Larger hydrous ionic radii of divalent cations greatly prevented Cs{sup +} desorption. • Effect of divalent cation on Cs{sup +} desorption changes depending on thermal treatment. • ∼100% removal of saturated Cs{sup +} was achieved by hydrothermal treatment at 250 °C. - Abstract: Adsorption of cesium (Cs) on phyllosilicates has been intensively investigated because natural soils have strong ability of immobilizing Cs within clay minerals resulting in difficulty of decontamination. The objectives of present study are to clarify how Cs fixation on vermiculite is influenced by structure change caused by Cs sorption at different loading levels and how Cs desorption is affected by various replacing cations induced at different treating temperature. As a result, more than 80% of Cs was readily desorbed from vermiculite with loading amount of 2% saturated Cs (5.49 × 10{sup −3} mmol g{sup −1}) after four cycles of treatment of 0.01 M Mg{sup 2+}/Ca{sup 2+} at room temperature, but less than 20% of Cs was desorbed from saturated vermiculite. These distinct desorption patterns were attributed to inhibition of Cs desorption by interlayer collapse of vermiculite, especially at high Cs loadings. In contrast, elevated temperature significantly facilitated divalent cations to efficiently desorb Cs from collapsed regions. After five cycles of treatment at 250 °C with 0.01 M Mg{sup 2+}, ∼100% removal of saturated Cs was achieved. X-ray diffraction analysis results suggested that Cs desorption was completed through enhanced diffusion of Mg{sup 2+} cations into collapsed interlayer space under hydrothermal condition resulting in subsequent interlayer decollapse and readily release of Cs{sup +}.

  6. Absorption/desorption in sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naimpally, A.

    1987-01-01

    This survey paper shall seek to present the present state of knowledge concerning absorption and desorption in spray chambers. The first part of the paper presents the theories and formulas for the atomization and break-up of sprays in nozzles. Formulas for the average (sauter-mean) diameters are then presented. For the case of absorption processes, the formulas for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients is in drops. The total; mass transfer is the total of the transfer in individual drops. For the case of desorption of sparingly soluble gases from liquids in a spray chamber, the mass transfer occurs in the spray just at the point of break-up of the jet. Formulas for the desorption of gases are presented

  7. Sorption Isotherm of Southern Yellow Pine—High Density Polyethylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feihong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and relative humidity (RH are two major external factors, which affect equilibrium moisture content (EMC of wood-plastic composites (WPCs. In this study, the effect of different durability treatments on sorption and desorption isotherms of southern yellow pine (SYP-high density polyethylene (HDPE composites was investigated. All samples were equilibriumed at 20 °C and various RHs including 16%, 33%, 45%, 66%, 75%, 85%, 93%, and100%. EMCs obtained from desorption and absorption for different WPC samples were compared with Nelson’s sorption isotherm model predictions using the same temperature and humidity conditions. The results indicated that the amount of moisture absorbed increased with the increases in RH at 20 °C. All samples showed sorption hysteresis at a fixed RH. Small difference between EMC data of WPC samples containing different amount of ultraviolet (UV stabilizers were observed. Similar results were observed among the samples containing different amount of zinc borate (ZB. The experimental data of EMCs at various RHs fit to the Nelson’s sorption isotherm model well. The Nelson’s model can be used to predicate EMCs of WPCs under different RH environmental conditions.

  8. Data compilation for particle impact desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiyama, Takashi; Nagai, Siro; Ozawa, Kunio; Takeuchi, Fujio.

    1984-05-01

    The desorption of gases from solid surfaces by incident electrons, ions and photons is one of the important processes of hydrogen recycling in the controlled thermonuclear reactors. We have surveyed the literature concerning the particle impact desorption published through 1983 and compiled the data on the desorption cross sections and desorption yields with the aid of a computer. This report presents the results obtained for electron stimulated desorption, the desorption cross sections and yields being given in graphs and tables as functions of incident electron energy, surface temperature and gas exposure. (author)

  9. Sorption properties of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eletskii, Aleksandr V

    2004-01-01

    The current status of research in sorption properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reviewed. The structural peculiarities of CNTs, determining their sorption characteristics, are considered. The mechanisms of sorption of gaseous and condensed substances by such structures are analyzed. Special attention is paid to the problem of using CNTs for storing hydrogen and other gaseous substances. Methods for filling CNTs with liquid materials, based on capillary phenomena and wetting the graphite surface of the CNT with liquids of various nature, are considered. Properties of 'peapods' formed as a result of filling single-walled CNTs with fullerene molecules are reviewed. Also considered are perspectives on the applied usage of the sorption properties of CNTs in electrochemical and fuel cells, and material storage devices, as well as for producing superminiature metallic conductors. (reviews of topical problems)

  10. Retention model for sorptive extraction-thermal desorption of aqueous samples : application to the automated analysis of pesticides and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in water samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, H.A.; David, F.; Sandra, P.J.F.; Janssen, J.G.M.; Cramers, C.A.M.G.

    1998-01-01

    In this report, an automated method for sorptive enrichment of aqueous samples is presented. It is based on sorption of the analytes of interest into a packed bed containing 100% polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) particles followed by thermal desorption for complete transfer of the enriched solutes onto

  11. The guest-worker in Western Europe--an obituary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, S

    1986-01-01

    The significance of guest workers is examined for six Western European countries. It is found that "the dynamics of the migratory process led to family reunification and settlement, against the original intentions of the workers, employers and states concerned. The recruitment of guest-workers stopped after 1974, but many migrants stayed on, becoming permanent ethnic minorities, in a situation of economic and social crisis. It is argued that guest-worker systems inevitably lead to permanent migration in the long run, and that it is better to plan for orderly settlement through appropriate policies." excerpt

  12. SPS Ion Induced Desorption Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will give a study about the induced desorption from heavy ion (Indium ion run from week 45 in SPS T4-H8 area) impacting LHC type graphite collimator. 4 different samples are located in the 4 chambers 90° one to each other: pure graphite, graphite with copper coating, graphite with NEG coating, 316LN stainless steal (reference).

  13. Adsorption-desorption and leaching of pyraclostrobin in Indian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Navakishore; Gupta, Suman; Gajbhiye, Vijay T

    2013-01-01

    Pyraclostrobin is a new broad-spectrum foliar applied and seed protectant fungicide of the strobilurin group. In this paper, adsorption-desorption of pyraclostrobin has been investigated in three different soils viz. Inceptisol (sandy loam, Delhi), Vertisol (sandy clay, Hyderabad) and Ultisol (sandy clay loam, Thrissur). Effect of organic matter and clay content on sorption was also studied in Inceptisol of Delhi. Leaching potential of pyraclostrobin as influenced by rainfall was studied in intact soil columns to confirm the results of adsorption-desorption studies. The adsorption studies were carried out at initial concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 μg mL(-1). The distribution coefficient (Kd) values in three test soils ranged from 4.91 to 18.26 indicating moderate to high adsorption. Among the three test soils, adsorption was the highest in Ultisol (Kd 18.26), followed by Vertisol (Kd 9.87) and Inceptisol (Kd 4.91). KF value was also highest for Ultisol soil (66.21), followed by Vertisol (40.88) and Inceptisol (8.59). S-type adsorption isotherms were observed in all the three test soils. Kd values in organic carbon-removed soil and clay-removed soil were 3.57 and 2.83 respectively, indicating lower adsorption than normal Inceptisol. Desorption studies were carried out at initial concentrations of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 μg mL(-1). Desorption was the greatest in Inceptisol, followed by Vertisol and Ultisol. Amounts of pyraclostrobin desorbed in three desorption cycles for different concentrations were 23.1-25.3%, 9.4-20.7% and 8.1-13.6% in Inceptisol, Vertisol and Ultisol respectively. Desorption was higher in clay fraction-removed and organic carbonremoved soils than normal Inceptisol. Desorption was slower than adsorption in all the test soils, indicating hysteresis effect (with hysteresis coefficient values varying from 0.05 to 0.20). Low values of hysteresis coefficient suggest high hysteresis effect indicating easy and strong adsorption, and slow

  14. Carbon tetrachloride desorption from activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, L.A.; Sansone, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride was desorbed from a granular activated carbon subsequent to its adsorption under various vapor exposure periods. The varied conditions of exposure resulted in a range of partially saturated carbon beds which, when followed by a constant flow rate for desorption, generated different forms of the desorbing concentration versus time curve. A method of analyzing the desorption curves is presented which permits extraction of the various desorbing rates from the different desorption and to relate this to the time required for such regeneration. The Wheeler desorption kinetic equation was used to calculate the pseudo first order desorption rate constant for the carbon. The desorption rate constant was found to increase monotonically with increasing saturation of the bed, permitting the calculation of the maximum desorption rate constant for the carbon at 100% saturation. The Retentivity Index of the carbon, defined as the dimensionless ratio of the adsorption to the desorption rate constant, was found to be 681

  15. Fluoride ions sorption of the water using natural and modified hematite with aluminium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teutli S, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    sorbent, increased when using from 0.02 to 0.14 g of hematite. The results showed that the Elovich model described the process of sorption kinetics, and Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich models the sorption isotherm. These results indicated that the mechanism of sorption was the chemisorption. Also, desorption studies were carried out, and it was observed that the fluoride ions can be removed from the modified hematite using NaCl or NaOH solutions, desorption was more efficient using NaOH solution. (Author)

  16. Potential phosphorus eutrophication mitigation strategy: Biochar carbon composition, thermal stability and pH influence phosphorus sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngatia, L W; Hsieh, Y P; Nemours, D; Fu, R; Taylor, R W

    2017-08-01

    Phosphorus (P) eutrophication is a major pollution problem globally, with unprecedented amount of P emanating from agricultural sources. But little is known about the optimization of soil-biochar P sorption capacity. The study objective was to determine how biochar feedstocks and pyrolysis conditions influences carbon (C) thermal stability, C composition and pH and in turn influence the phosphorus sorption optimization. Biochar was produced from switchgrass, kudzu and Chinese tallow at 200, 300, 400, 500, 550, 650,750 °C. Carbon thermal stability was determined by multi-element scanning thermal analysis (MESTA), C composition was determined using solid state 13 C NMR. Phosphorus sorption was determined using a mixture of 10% biochar and 90% sandy soil after incubation. Results indicate increased P sorption (P biochar pyrolysis temperature. However, optimum P sorption was feedstock specific with switchgrass indicating P desorption between 200 and 550 °C. Phosphorus sorption was in the order of kudzu > switchgrass > Chinese tallow. Total C, C thermal stability, aromatic C and alkalinity increased with elevated pyrolysis temperature. Biochar alkalinity favored P sorption. There was a positive relationship between high thermal stable C and P sorption for Kudzu (r = 0.62; P = 0.0346) and Chinese tallow (r = 0.73; P = 0.0138). In conclusion, biochar has potential for P eutrophication mitigation, however, optimum biochar pyrolysis temperature for P sorption is feedstock specific and in some cases might be out of 300-500 °C temperature range commonly used for agronomic application. High thermal stable C dominated by aromatic C and alkaline pH seem to favor P sorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Transport and Sorption Behavior in Confined Coal Cores for Enhanced Coalbed Methane and CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jikich, S.A.; McLendon, T.R.; Seshadri, K.S.; Irdi, G.A.; Smith, D.H.

    2007-11-01

    Measurements of sorption isotherms and transport properties of CO2 in coal cores are important for designing enhanced coalbed methane/CO2 sequestration field projects. Sorption isotherms measured in the lab can provide the upper limit on the amount of CO2 that might be sorbed in these projects. Because sequestration sites will most likely be in unmineable coals, many of the coals will be deep and under considerable lithostatic and hydrostatic pressures. These lithostatic pressures may significantly reduce the sorption capacities and/or transport rates. Consequently, we have studied apparent sorption and diffusion in a coal core under confining pressure. A core from the important bituminous coal Pittsburgh #8 was kept under a constant, three-dimensional external stress; the sample was scanned by X-ray computer tomography (CT) before, then while it sorbed, CO2. Increases in sample density due to sorption were calculated from the CT images. Moreover, density distributions for small volume elements inside the core were calculated and analyzed. Qualitatively, the computerized tomography showed that gas sorption advanced at different rates in different regions of the core, and that diffusion and sorption progressed slowly. The amounts of CO2 sorbed were plotted vs. position (at fixed times) and vs. time (for various locations in the sample). The resulting sorption isotherms were compared to isotherms obtained from powdered coal from the same Pittsburgh #8 extended sample. The results showed that for this single coal at specified times, the apparent sorption isotherms were dependent on position of the volume element in the core and the distance from the CO2 source. Also, the calculated isotherms showed that less CO2 was sorbed than by a powdered (and unconfined) sample of the coal. Changes in density distributions during the experiment were also observed. After desorption, the density distribution of calculated volume elements differed from the initial distribution

  18. A study of specific sorption of neptunium(V) on smectite in low pH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka; Ito, Yoshimoto

    1996-01-01

    The 'specific sorption' of neptunium(V) on smectite, in other words, a strong sorption undesorbable by 1 M KCl, is studied with a combination of batch type sorption and desorption experiments over a pH range of 2 to 5. Six types of homoionic smectite (Li-, Na-, K-, Cs-, Mg-, and Ca-smectite) are used in this study. Distribution coefficients (K d ) of neptunium for smectite vary over a wide pH range; the maximum K d value of ∝300 cm 3 x g -1 at around pH 2 for Li- and Na-smectite and the minimum value of ∝2 cm 3 x g -1 for Cs-smectite. The specific sorption of neptunium depends on pH and on the affinity of the exchangeable cation for smectite; the lower the pH of solution or the affinity, the larger the specific sorption. The neptunium-smectite association varies with the elapse of contact time. Within the first day of the neptunium-smectite contact the neptunium sorbed on na-smectite at low pH is desorbable by 1 M KCl solution, and on the passage of time most of the neuptunium sorbed becomes undesorbable by KCl (the specific sorption). Hydronium ion in solution is sorbed on smectite at low pH and dissociates the exchangeable cation from smectite into solution, and the specific sorption of neuptunium increases with increasing the exchangeable cation that is dissociated from smectite. (orig.)

  19. Guest Editorial: Health financing lessons from Thailand for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest Editorial: Health financing lessons from Thailand for South Africa on the path towards universal health coverage. Mark Blecher, Anban Pillay, Walaiporn Patcharanarumol, Warisa Panichkriangkrai, Viroj Tangcharoensathien, Yot Teerawattananon, Supasit Pannarunothai, Jonatan Davén ...

  20. A Different Guest Worker Story: Roma Guest Workers – a Transnational Minority in Transmigration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Banić-Grubišić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available he paper considers the ambiguity of the term ‘guest worker’, based on the example of economic migrants who belong to the Roma population. Over the last fifty years, members of the Roma minority have migrated to Western European countries for different reasons (economic, political and social reasons, and there is no official data on the precise number of Roma who have migrated abroad, whether permanently or temporarily. It is possible to establish a number of categories of Roma immigrants who reside permanently or temporarily in Western European countries. These are: the so-called “classic guest workers” who, through legal or illegal means went to work abroad in the 60’s and 70’s, and mostly settled permanently in the host countries; Roma refugees from Kosovo and/or asylum seekers who left the country during the wars in the 90’s, and who were returned to Serbia after the signing of the Readmission treaty; and those Roma who represent occasional economic migrants: people who, after Serbia was put on the white Schengen list (the liberalization of the visa policy for citizens of Serbia, spend three months at a time working abroad. Even though these three categories of Roma workers have different reasons for migrating from and returning to Serbia, the majority of the population perceives them as a unified, distinct whole – as guest workers. The paper is the result of fieldwork conducted in South-Eastern Serbia, in the village of Minicevo.

  1. Interaction enthalpies of solid human serum albumin with water-dioxane mixtures: comparison with water and organic solvent vapor sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A.; Faizullin, Djihanguir A.

    2004-01-01

    Enthalpy changes (ΔH tot ) on the immersion of dehydrated human serum albumin (HSA) into water-dioxane mixtures have been measured using a Setaram BT-2.15 calorimeter at 298 K. Thermodynamic activity of water was varied from 0 to 1. Calorimetric results are discussed together with the FTIR-spectroscopic data on water and organic solvent vapor adsorption/desorption isotherms on solid HSA. Dioxane sorption exhibits a pronounced hysteresis. Calorimetric and dioxane desorption dependencies consist of two parts. No dioxane sorption was observed in low water activity region (a w tot values are close to zero. At water activity about 0.5 the sharp exothermic drop of the interaction enthalpy values was observed. This exothermic drop is accompanied by the sharp increase in the amount of sorbed dioxane and additional water sorption (compared with that for pure water). Dioxane adsorption branch resembles a smooth curve. In this case, solid HSA binds more than 300 mol dioxane/mol HSA at low water activities. By using a water activity-based comparison we distinguished between dioxane-assisted and dioxane-competitive effect on water sorption. The obtained results demonstrate that the hydration 'history' of solid protein is an important factor that controls as the state of protein macromolecule as well as the sorption of low-molecular organic molecules

  2. Desorption kinetics of ciprofloxacin in municipal biosolids determined by diffusion gradient in thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, E; Starnes, D

    2016-12-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a commonly-prescribed antibiotic that is largely excreted by the body, and is often found at elevated concentrations in treated sewage sludge (biosolids) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. When biosolids are applied to soils, they could release CIP to surface runoff, which could adversely affect growth of aquatic organisms that inhabit receiving water bodies. The hazard risk largely depends on the amount of antibiotic in the solid phase that can be released to solution (labile CIP), its diffusion coefficient, and sorption/desorption exchange rates in biosolids particles. In this study, these processes were evaluated in a Class A Exceptional Quality Biosolids using a diffusion gradient in thin films (DGT) sampler that continuously removed CIP from solution, which induced desorption and diffusion in biosolids. Mass accumulation of antibiotic in the sampler over time was fit by a diffusion transport and exchange model available in the software tool 2D-DIFS to derive the distribution coefficient of labile CIP (K dl ) and sorption/desorption rate constants in the biosolids. The K dl was 13 mL g -1 , which equated to 16% of total CIP in the labile pool. Although the proportion of labile CIP was considerable, release rates to solution were constrained by slow desorption kinetics (desorption rate constant = 4 × 10 -6 s -1 ) and diffusion rate (effective diffusion coefficient = 6 × 10 -9  cm 2  s -1 . Studies are needed to investigate how changes in temperature, water content, pH and other physical and chemical characteristics can influence antibiotic release kinetics and availability and mobility in biosolid-amended soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanoparticle guests in lyotropic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölle, Sarah; Park, Ji Hyun; Schymura, Stefan; Jo, Hyeran; Scalia, Giusy; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    In this chapter we discuss the benefits, peculiarities and main challenges related to nanoparticle templating in lyotropic liquid crystals. We first give a brief bird's-eye view of the field, discussing different nanoparticles as well as different lyotropic hosts that have been explored, but then quickly focus on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in surfactant-based lyotropic nematic phases. We discuss in some detail how the transfer of orientational order from liquid crystal host to nanoparticle guest can be verified and which degree of ordering can be expected, as well as the importance of choosing the right surfactant and its concentration for the stability of the nanoparticle suspension. We introduce a method for dispersing nanoparticles with an absolute minimum of stabilizing surfactant, based on dispersion below the Krafft temperature, and we discuss the peculiar phenomenon of filament formation in lyotropic nematic phases with a sufficient concentration of well-dispersed carbon nanotubes. Finally, we describe how the total surfactant concentration in micellar nematics can be greatly reduced by combining cat- and anionic surfactants, and we discuss how nanotubes can help in inducing the liquid crystal phase close to the isotropic-nematic boundary.

  4. Mechanism of host-guest complexation by cucurbituril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, César; Hudgins, Robert R; Nau, Werner M

    2004-05-12

    The factors affecting host-guest complexation between the molecular container compound cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) and various guests in aqueous solution are studied, and a detailed complexation mechanism in the presence of cations is derived. The formation of the supramolecular complex is studied in detail for cyclohexylmethylammonium ion as guest. The kinetics and thermodynamics of complexation is monitored by NMR as a function of temperature, salt concentration, and cation size. The binding constants and the ingression rate constants decrease with increasing salt concentration and cation-binding constant, in agreement with a competitive binding of the ammonium site of the guest and the metal cation with the ureido carbonyl portals of CB6. Studies as a function of guest size indicate that the effective container volume of the CB6 cavity is approximately 105 A(3). It is suggested that larger guests are excluded for two reasons: a high activation barrier for ingression imposed by the tight CB6 portals and a destabilization of the complex due to steric repulsion inside. For example, in the case of the nearly spherical azoalkane homologues 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene (DBH, volume ca. 96 A(3)) and 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (DBO, volume ca. 110 A(3)), the former forms the CB6 complex promptly with a sizable binding constant (1300 M(-1)), while the latter does not form a complex even after several months at optimized complexation conditions. Molecular mechanics calculations are performed for several CB6/guest complexes. A qualitative agreement is found between experimental and calculated activation energies for ingression as a function of both guest size and state of protonation. The potential role of constrictive binding by CB6 is discussed.

  5. The distribution dynamics and desorption behaviour of mobile pharmaceuticals and caffeine to combined sewer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajj-Mohamad, M; Darwano, H; Duy, S Vo; Sauvé, S; Prévost, M; Arp, H P H; Dorner, S

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are discharged to the environment from wastewater resource recovery facilities, sewer overflows, and illicit sewer connections. To understand the fate of pharmaceuticals, there is a need to better understand their sorption dynamics to suspended sediments (SS) and settled sediments (StS) in sewer systems. In this study, such sorption dynamics to both SS and StS were assessed using a batch equilibrium method under both static and dynamic conditions. Experiments were performed with natively occurring and artificially modified concentrations of sewer pharmaceuticals (acetaminophen, theophylline, carbamazepine, and a metabolite of carbamazepine) and caffeine. Differences in apparent distribution coefficients, K d,app , between SS and StS were related to differences in their organic carbon (OC) content, and the practice of artificially modifying the concentration. K d,app values of modified contaminant concentrations and high OC sediments were substantially higher. Pseudo-second order desorption rates for these mobile compounds were also quantified. Successive flushing events to simulate the addition of stormwater to sewer networks revealed that aqueous concentrations would not necessarily decrease, because the added water will rapidly return to equilibrium concentrations with the sediments. Sorption and desorption kinetics must be considered in addition to dilution, to avoid underestimating the influence of dilution on concentrations of pharmaceuticals discharged to the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Penerapan Aplikasi Web Di Hotel Arinda Guest House Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ade Mubarok

    2017-09-01

    Abstract Hotel was a thriving industry very fast with the advent of the information technology. One factor that can provide comfort is the existence of the information rapid to a reservation hotel. Several problems that ordinarily encountered hotel management and customers as it tough for rapid information, do check in and the payment of requiring guests come to the hotel, include families in village records the guest log and make a report manually.In writing thesis this, writer build a application of hotel by adopting information technology. The model used to the development of software is the method waterfall, which begins with analysis needs adapted to systems are go at the hotel arinda guest house, design system and software, coding, testing, and implementation.So that this research produce information system a reservation hotel web-based. Of interface ease of use user and showing functionality that can be used to at the check in , the hotel , faster information and save time prospective guest on do reservations , efficient in recording the guest log and reports.   Keywords: Website, Aplication, Hotel Arinda Guest House, checked in, Waterfall.

  7. Phosphorus sorption capacity of biochars varies with biochar type and salinity level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdug, Abdelhafid Ahmed; Chang, Scott X; Ok, Yong Sik; Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Anyia, Anthony

    2018-02-10

    Biochar is recognized as an effective material for recovering excess nutrients, including phosphorus (P), from aqueous solutions. Practically, that benefits the environment through reducing P losses from biochar-amended soils; however, how salinity influences P sorption by biochar is poorly understood and there has been no direct comparison on P sorption capacity between biochars derived from different feedstock types under non-saline and saline conditions. In this study, biochars derived from wheat straw, hardwood, and willow wood were used to compare P sorption at three levels of electrical conductivity (EC) (0, 4, and 8 dS m -1 ) to represent a wide range of salinity conditions. Phosphorus sorption by wheat straw and hardwood biochars increased as aqueous solution P concentration increased, with willow wood biochar exhibiting an opposite trend for P sorption. However, the pattern for P sorption became the same as the other biochars after the willow wood biochar was de-ashed with 1 M HCl and 0.05 M HF. Willow wood biochar had the highest P sorption (1.93 mg g -1 ) followed by hardwood (1.20 mg g -1 ) and wheat straw biochars (1.06 mg g -1 ) in a 25 mg L -1 P solution. Although the pH in the equilibrium solution was higher with willow wood biochar (~ 9.5) than with the other two biochars (~ 6.5), solution pH had no or minor effects on P sorption by willow wood biochar. The high sorption rate of P by willow wood biochar could be attributed to the higher concentrations of salt and other elements (i.e., Ca and Mg) in the biochar in comparison to that in wheat straw and hardwood biochars; the EC values were 2.27, 0.53, and 0.27 dS m -1 for willow wood, wheat straw, and hardwood biochars, respectively. A portion of P desorbed from the willow wood biochar; and that desorption increased with the decreasing P concentration in the aqueous solution. Salinity in the aqueous solution influenced P sorption by hardwood and willow wood but not by wheat straw

  8. Residual Sorption and leaching of the herbicide diuron following de-oiled two-phase olive mill waste addition to soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Pineiro, A.; Albarran, A.; Cabrera, D.; Rato, J. M.; Munoz, A.; Flores, S.

    2009-07-01

    The residual sorption, desorption, degradation, and leaching of the herbicide diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) a herbicide widely used in olive groves, was studied following the addition to soils of de oiled two-phase olive mill waste (DTPOMW). Field experiments were conducted on an olive grove soil amended over seven years with DTPOMW. (Author)

  9. A study of the water vapor sorption isotherms of hardened cement pastes: Possible pore structure changes at low relative humidity and the impact of temperature on isotherms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    cement paste samples and a model material MCM-41. The pronounced impact of temperature on desorption isotherms of cement based materials as reported in literature was not found in this investigation. The results suggest that the differences between the sorption isotherms measured at different...

  10. Residual Sorption and leaching of the herbicide diuron following de-oiled two-phase olive mill waste addition to soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Pineiro, A.; Albarran, A.; Cabrera, D.; Rato, J. M.; Munoz, A.; Flores, S.

    2009-01-01

    The residual sorption, desorption, degradation, and leaching of the herbicide diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) a herbicide widely used in olive groves, was studied following the addition to soils of de oiled two-phase olive mill waste (DTPOMW). Field experiments were conducted on an olive grove soil amended over seven years with DTPOMW. (Author)

  11. Sorption Hysteresis of Light Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide in Shale and Kerogen

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Huangjing

    2017-11-20

    We present adsorption and desorption isotherms of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane and iso-butane as well as carbon dioxide for two shales and isolated kerogens determined by a gravimetric method. The sorption measurements of two shales were performed at three different temperatures, 308.15, 323.15, and 338.15 K. For the isolated kerogens, the measurements were conducted at 338.15 K. Methane and ethane sorption isotherms were measured to 35 bar. Carbon dioxide sorption isotherms were studied to 30 bar. Due to the low vapor pressure at room temperature, the sorption isotherms of propane, n-butane and iso-butane were measured to 8, 2, and 2 bar, respectively. The adsorptions of propane, n-butane, and iso-butane were much higher than methane at the highest pressures where the measurements were conducted. The adsorption of n-butane was 10 times higher than methane by mole at 2 bar, followed by iso-butane and propane. Our data show significant adsorption hysteresis in ethane, propane, n-butane and iso-butane. The most pronounced hysteresis was found in n-butane and iso-butane. Significant hysteresis is attributed to the reversible structural changes of kerogens. Dissolution of adsorbates into organic matter may also affect the hysteresis. This is the first report of propane and butane sorption isotherms in shales.

  12. Sorption Hysteresis of Light Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide in Shale and Kerogen

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Huangjing; Lai, Zhiping; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    We present adsorption and desorption isotherms of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane and iso-butane as well as carbon dioxide for two shales and isolated kerogens determined by a gravimetric method. The sorption measurements of two shales were performed at three different temperatures, 308.15, 323.15, and 338.15 K. For the isolated kerogens, the measurements were conducted at 338.15 K. Methane and ethane sorption isotherms were measured to 35 bar. Carbon dioxide sorption isotherms were studied to 30 bar. Due to the low vapor pressure at room temperature, the sorption isotherms of propane, n-butane and iso-butane were measured to 8, 2, and 2 bar, respectively. The adsorptions of propane, n-butane, and iso-butane were much higher than methane at the highest pressures where the measurements were conducted. The adsorption of n-butane was 10 times higher than methane by mole at 2 bar, followed by iso-butane and propane. Our data show significant adsorption hysteresis in ethane, propane, n-butane and iso-butane. The most pronounced hysteresis was found in n-butane and iso-butane. Significant hysteresis is attributed to the reversible structural changes of kerogens. Dissolution of adsorbates into organic matter may also affect the hysteresis. This is the first report of propane and butane sorption isotherms in shales.

  13. Equilibrium and kinetic studies for the sorption of 3-methoxybenzaldehyde on activated kaolinites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyuncu, Huelya [Forensic Medicine Foundation, Nasuhpasa Bath Street, No. 12, 16010 Heykel, Bursa (Turkey)]. E-mail: hkoyuncu@yyu.edu.tr; Kul, Ali Riza [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Art and Science, Department of Chemistry, 65080 Van (Turkey)]. E-mail: alirizakul@yyu.edu.tr; Yildiz, Nuray [Ankara University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: nyildiz@eng.ankara.edu.tr; Calimli, Ayla [Ankara University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: calimli@eng.ankara.edu.tr; Ceylan, Hasan [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Art and Science, Department of Chemistry, 65080 Van (Turkey)]. E-mail: hceylan@yyu.edu.tr

    2007-03-06

    The sorption of 3-methoxybenzaldehyde on activated kaolinites has been investigated at different temperatures. Two types of activation tests were performed. The sorption equilibrium was studied by sorption isotherms in the temperature range 303-333 K for natural (untreated), thermally and acid activated kaolinites. It was shown that the isotherm shapes were not affected by temperature and activation types of kaolinite. The absorbance data at 312 nm were fitted reasonably well with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and the model parameters were determined for different temperatures. Thermodynamic quantities such as Gibbs free energy ({delta}G), the enthalpy ({delta}H) and the entropy change of sorption ({delta}S) were determined for natural, thermally and acid activated kaolinites. It was shown that the sorption processes were an endothermic reactions, controlled by physical mechanisms and spontaneously. Adsorption capacity of acid activated kaolinite for 3-methoxybenzaldehyde was higher compared to that of natural and thermally activated kaolinites at various temperatures. The adsorption and desorption rate constants (k {sub a} and k {sub d}) were obtained separately by applying a geometric approach to the first order Langmuir model. This method provided good conformity between the K from Langmuir parameters and K {sub geo} (k {sub a}/k {sub d}) from geometric approach.

  14. Equilibrium and kinetic studies for the sorption of 3-methoxybenzaldehyde on activated kaolinites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyuncu, Huelya; Kul, Ali Riza; Yildiz, Nuray; Calimli, Ayla; Ceylan, Hasan

    2007-01-01

    The sorption of 3-methoxybenzaldehyde on activated kaolinites has been investigated at different temperatures. Two types of activation tests were performed. The sorption equilibrium was studied by sorption isotherms in the temperature range 303-333 K for natural (untreated), thermally and acid activated kaolinites. It was shown that the isotherm shapes were not affected by temperature and activation types of kaolinite. The absorbance data at 312 nm were fitted reasonably well with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and the model parameters were determined for different temperatures. Thermodynamic quantities such as Gibbs free energy (ΔG), the enthalpy (ΔH) and the entropy change of sorption (ΔS) were determined for natural, thermally and acid activated kaolinites. It was shown that the sorption processes were an endothermic reactions, controlled by physical mechanisms and spontaneously. Adsorption capacity of acid activated kaolinite for 3-methoxybenzaldehyde was higher compared to that of natural and thermally activated kaolinites at various temperatures. The adsorption and desorption rate constants (k a and k d ) were obtained separately by applying a geometric approach to the first order Langmuir model. This method provided good conformity between the K from Langmuir parameters and K geo (k a /k d ) from geometric approach

  15. A Room with a Viewpoint Revisited: Descriptive Norms and Hotel Guests' Towel Reuse Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Bohner, Gerd; Schlüter, Lena E.

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204), descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room") and temporal prox...

  16. Evaluation of sorption distribution coefficient of Cs onto granite using sorption data collected in sorption database and sorption model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, S.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the sorption distribution coefficients (K d ) of Cs onto granite collected from the JAERI Sorption Database (SDB), the parameters for a two-site model without the triple-layer structure were optimized. Comparing the experimentally measured K d values of Cs onto Mizunami granite carried out by JAEA with the K d values predicted by the model, the effect of the ionic strength on the K d values of Cs onto granite was evaluated. It was found that K d values could be determined using the content of biotite in granite at a sodium concentration ([Na]) of 1 x 10 -2 to 5 x 10 -1 mol/dm 3 . It was suggested that in high ionic strength solutions, the sorption of Cs onto other minerals such as microcline should also be taken into account. (author)

  17. Evaluation of sorption distribution coefficient of Cs onto granite using sorption data collected in sorption database and sorption model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaki, S., E-mail: nagasas@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Based on the sorption distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) of Cs onto granite collected from the JAERI Sorption Database (SDB), the parameters for a two-site model without the triple-layer structure were optimized. Comparing the experimentally measured K{sub d} values of Cs onto Mizunami granite carried out by JAEA with the K{sub d} values predicted by the model, the effect of the ionic strength on the K{sub d} values of Cs onto granite was evaluated. It was found that K{sub d} values could be determined using the content of biotite in granite at a sodium concentration ([Na]) of 1 x 10{sup -2} to 5 x 10{sup -1} mol/dm{sup 3} . It was suggested that in high ionic strength solutions, the sorption of Cs onto other minerals such as microcline should also be taken into account. (author)

  18. Effects of aged sorption on pesticide leaching to groundwater simulated with PEARL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesten, Jos J T I

    2017-01-15

    Leaching to groundwater is an important element of the regulatory risk assessment of pesticides in western countries. Including aged sorption in this assessment is relevant because there is ample evidence of this process and because it leads to a decrease in simulated leaching. This work assesses the likely magnitude of this decrease for four groundwater scenarios used for regulatory purpose in the EU (from the UK, Portugal, Austria and Greece) and for ranges of aged-sorption parameters and substance properties using the PEARL model. Three aged-sorption parameters sets were derived from literature, representing approximately 5th, 50th and 95th percentile cases for the magnitude of the effect of aged sorption on leaching concentrations (called S, M and L, respectively). The selection of these percentile cases was based only on the f NE parameter (i.e. the ratio of the aged sorption and the equilibrium sorption coefficients) because leaching was much more affected by the uncertainty in this parameter than by the uncertainty in the desorption rate coefficient of these sites (k d ). For the UK scenario, the annual flux concentration of pesticide leaching at 1m depth decreased by typically a factor of 5, 30 and >1000 for the S, M and L parameter sets, respectively. This decrease by a factor of 30 for the M parameter set appeared to be approximately valid also for the other three scenarios. Decreasing the Freundlich exponent N from 0.9 into 0.7 for the M parameter set, increased this factor of 30 into a factor of typically 1000, considering all four scenarios. The aged-sorption sites were close to their equilibrium conditions during the leaching simulations for two of the four scenarios (for all substances considered and the M parameter set), but this was not the case for the other two scenarios. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sorption behavior of nonylphenol (NP) on sewage-irrigated soil: Kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Caixiang; Yao, Linlin; Li, Jiale; Liu, Min; Xu, Liang; Evalde, Mulindankaka

    2014-01-01

    The reuse of wastewater for irrigation of agricultural land is a well established resources management practice but has the disadvantage of inputting various forms of contaminants into the terrestrial environment including nonylphenol (NP), a well known endocrine disrupting substance. To elucidate the environmental fate and transport of NP, the sorption behavior on sewage-irrigated soil was studied by batch experiment. It was found that sorption processes of NP on different sorbents (soil, humic acid (HA) and silica) could be expressed well using two compartment pseudo first-order model, where both surface and intra-particle diffusion were probable rate-controlling processes. Linear model could better express the sorption of NP on soil, black carbon (BC) and mineral (e.g., SiO 2 ) except HA than Freundlich model. The large value of distribution coefficients of normalized organic carbon (K oc ) on soils indicated that NP was limited to migrate to deep soil. The higher desorption partition coefficient of NP on soil showed enhanced hysteresis. According to the experimental data, the calculated thermodynamic parameters implied that the sorption reaction on sewage-irrigation was spontaneous, exothermic and entropy decreasing process. The amount of soil organic matter (SOM) dominated the sorption capacity, whereas the sorption behavior of NP on soil showed no significant correlation with ionic strength. - Highlights: • Both surface and intra-particle diffusion were rate-controlling processes. • Soil composition influences the partition activity of NP. • Soil organic matter has dominated the sorption capacity of NP on soil. • NP molecule was limited to migrate to deep soil in sewage-irrigated area

  20. Sorption behaviour of radiocaesium in soils from various regions of Libya and Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenber, Mohamed Ahmed.

    1992-01-01

    In the last years the interest of zeolite minerals has increased. Some of them have been tested as caesium binding agents in both animals and in soil-plant systems. The sorption capacity of zeolites was high, and the experimental results showed that the zeolite materials have a considerable potential as a caesium binding agent. A significant reduction reduction in the plant uptake of 134 Cs, maximally by a factor of 8, was obtained in the experiments. The sorption characteristics of 134 Cs on soils from various regions of Libya and Sweden were studied, using batch techniques. The influence of soil parameters, contact time, and various concentrations of Cs + , K + and NH 4 + in the solution on the sorption ratio (R s -value) for 134 Cs were determined by using 134 Cs as a tracer. Important parameters influencing the sorption were clay content, pH, and the concentration of cations, in particular that of K + and NH 4 + , which compete with Cs + for the sorption sites. The conditions influencing the exchangeability of 134 Cs sorbed in different soil types were studied in desorption experiments. The exchangeability of caesium was determined by extraction with 1 N Ba Cl 2 and 1 N NH 4 Cl. The results showed that divalent Ba 2+ was much less effective than the monovalent NH 4 + in exchanging 134 Cs from the sorption sites in the soils. Increasing the equilibration time and drying the soils reduced the exchangeability of 134 Cs in most of the soils, especially the fraction exchangeable with NH 4 + . Correlations were found between the radiocaesium transfer factor for plant uptake, clay content, and sorption ratio. Simple mathematical models were used to estimate the transfer factors for radiocaesium to wheat on soils of interest, for which no uptake data are available. 31 refs, 1 fig, 2 tabs

  1. Sorption isotherms, GAB parameters and isosteric heat of sorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quirijns, E.J.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Straten, van G.

    2005-01-01

    The diffusion-sorption drying model has been developed as a physics-based way to model the decreasing drying rate at low moisture contents. This new model is founded on the existence of different classes of water: free and bound water. The transition between these classes and the corresponding

  2. Ordered silica particles made by nonionic surfactant for VOCs sorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Difallah, Oumaima; Hamaizi, Hadj, E-mail: hamaizimizou@yahoo.fr [University of Oran, OranMenaouer (Algeria); Amate, Maria Dolores Urena; Socias-Viciana, Maria Del Mar [University of Almeria (Spain)

    2017-07-15

    Adsorption of light organic compounds such acetone, 1-propanol and carbon dioxide was tested by using mesoporous silica materials made from non ionic surfactant with long chain and silica sources as tetraethyl orthosilicate TEOS and modified Na-X and Li-A Zeolites. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to characterize the silica particles of a variety prepared samples. Acetone, 1-propanol and CO{sub 2} adsorption at 298K was evaluated by a volumetric method and indicate a high sorption capacity of organic compounds depending essentially on the porous texture of adsorbents. An adsorption kinetic model was proposed to describe the adsorption of VOCs over template-free mesoporous silica materials. A good agreement with experimental data was found. (author)

  3. Sorption of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) to synthetic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Erping; Haderlein, Stefan B; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2005-10-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widely used gasoline oxygenate. Contamination of MTBE and its major degradation product tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in groundwater and surface water has received great attention. However, sorption affinity and sorption mechanisms of MTBE and TBA to synthetic resins, which can be potentially used in removal of these contaminants from water, in passive sampling, or in enrichment of bacteria, have not been studied systemically. In this study, kinetic and equilibrium sorption experiments (single solute and binary mixtures) on four synthetic resins were conducted. The sorption affinity of the investigated sorbents for MTBE and TBA decreases in the order Ambersorb 563>Optipore L493>Amberlite XAD4>Amberlite XAD7, and all show higher sorption affinity for MTBE than for TBA. Binary experiments with o-xylene, a major compound of gasoline as co-contaminant, imply that all resins preferentially sorb o-xylene over MTBE or TBA, i.e., there is sorption competition. In the equilibrium aqueous concentration (Ceq) range (0.1-139.0 mg/L for MTBE, and 0.01-48.4 mg/L for TBA), experimental and modeling results as well as sorbent characteristics indicate that micropore filling and/or some other type of adsorption process (e.g., adsorption to specific sites of high sorption potential at low concentrations) rather than partitioning were the dominant sorption mechanisms. Optipore L493 has favourable sorption and desorption characteristics, and is a suitable sorbent, e.g., in bacteria enrichment or passive sampling for moderately polar compounds. However, for highly polar compounds such as TBA, Ambersorb 563 might be a better choice, especially in water treatment.

  4. Separation of radionuclides using host-guest materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, V.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the development of complex procedure with using commercially available sorbents to separate anthropogenic actinides 237 Np, 241 Am, 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu and their determination in the liquid radioactive wastes by using alpha spectrometry. Abilities of using commercially available sorbent AnaLig(R)Pu-02 gel from IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc. were tested, this product belongs to host-guest materials based on molecular recognition technology. This material is capable of selectively capturing actinides in oxidation state IV. To adjust the oxidation state of 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu was used NaNO 2 . Pu(IV) forms in the medium of nitric acid complexes, [Np(NO 3 ) 6 ] - , which are captured on the column. For the second monitored radionuclide, neptunium is typical valence V, Np(V) in the concentrated nitric acid produces strong complexes, [Np(NO 3 ) 6 ] - , which are capable of the sorption on the column of AnaLig(R)Pu-02 gel. The most common state of americium in aqueous solutions is III. Whereas in this oxidation state, americium do not form complexes in 8 mol·dm -3 nitric acid is the result of the flow-through. On the base of experimental obtained results, solution of 0.1 mol·dm -3 NH 4 I in 9 mol·dm -3 HCl was selected for elution of plutonium. Neptunium was eluted from the column using 9 mol·dm -3 of HCl with addition of 0.5 cm 3 TiCl 3 . Optimizing conditions for the separation procedure was performed by using model solution of radioactive waste which was prepared according to the chemical composition of radioactive concentrate from NPP Mochovce and NPP Bohunice. The effect of the concentration of Fe 3+ , the effect of the concentration of the HCl, the effect of the concentration of the solution of NH 4 I and the effect of the volume of this solution to the yields of 238 Pu were studied. And also was studied the effect of 9 mol·dm -3 of HCl and the effect of volume of 15 % TiCl 3 to the yields of 237 Np. Sorbent DGA(R) Resin from

  5. Influence of the evaporation rate and the evaporation mode on the hydrogen sorption kinetics of air-exposed magnesium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, A.; Knystautas, E.J.; Huot, J.; Schulz, R.

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that the hydrogen sorption properties of air-exposed magnesium films are influenced by the deposition parameters such as the evaporation rate or the evaporation mode used during their preparation. As the evaporation rate increases, the structure of the film tends to be highly oriented along the [002] direction and the kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption are faster. Moreover, the hydrogen sorption kinetics of magnesium films prepared with an electron beam source under a high vacuum are faster by almost a factor of two compared to those prepared using resistive heating under low vacuum. These two parameters reduce drastically the activation and the incubation period during hydrogen absorption and desorption, respectively

  6. Terpsichorean Architecture: Guest Editor’s Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Mitchell

    2011-09-01

    light to form and how we hear ourselves live in that form.’ This special issue, guest edited by Tony Mitchell, University of Technology Sydney, contains papers that discuss a wide range of different modes and forms of music and music writing in all fields, and in many parts of the world, from a perspective of history, performance, and architecture (including ‘natural’ architectural forms.

  7. Guest editorial - Networked collaboration, sharing and response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav Skundberg

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available  This issue of Seminar.net contains three articles that were written in connection with a Norwegian e-learning conference titled “Networked collaboration, sharing and response”. The conference was held in Mars 2008 in Trondheim, and the presentations from the conference is available (in norwegian language at http://www.nvu.no. Networked collaboration was chosen as a theme because collaboration is important to achieve learning, according to the social-constructivistic pedagogy that has a strong standing in Norway, but how should this occur on the net? Sharing of content, as in digital learning resources, is a phenomenon with increasing popularity as described in the OECD-report “Giving Knowledge for Free”. But to achieve reuse of content, not only publishing it, it is important with a networked community where the plethora of information can be sorted with relevance to specific topics. Response is about guiding, coaching and tutoring. In what ways may resources and tools be used to move in the direction of solving Bloom’s two sigma problem/challenge? The first article, by Morten Flate Paulsen, shows how cooperative learning can be implemented successfully so that students have optimal individual freedom within online learning communities. The second article, by Carl F. Dons, shows how student teachers can be prepared to deal with pupils who have a wide range of experiences of the digital world. The third and last article, by Kristin Dale, is sharing experiences with multiple choice-tests to give midterm responses to students. In addition, this issue has a commentary article by Rune Krumsvik discussing the need to develop new practices for teachers and students on the background of the digital developments. The conference and articles covers three big themes. It may be difficult to find more important issues, apart from finding money and time to support its development. Olav Skundberg, guest editorAssociate professor

  8. Sorption on inactive repository components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, M.P.; Smith, A.J.; Williams, S.J.

    1990-11-01

    The near-field of an intermediate level/low level radioactive waste repository will contain significant quantities of iron and steel, Magnox and Zircaloy. Their corrosion products may possess significant sorption capacity for radioelements. The sorption of americium and plutonium onto magnesium hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, colloidal magnetite and colloidal haematite has been studied under conditions typical of the porewater of a cementitious near-field. R D values ≥ 10 5 m g -1 were measured for both actinides on the oxides and hydroxides. These values are at least as great as those measured on crushed 3:1 Blast Furnace Slag/Ordinary Portland cement. Competitive sorption experiments have shown that sorption onto the corrosion products does not take place in preference to that on the cement or the converse. Magnetite and haematite colloids are positively charged in cement-equilibrated water whilst zirconium hydroxide is negatively charged. Crushed cement was found to be positively charged. Simple experiments show that only a small proportion of haematite colloids is potentially mobile through a column of crushed cement. (author)

  9. Sorption on inactive repository components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, M.P.; Smith, A.J.; Williams, S.J.

    1990-07-01

    The near-field of an intermediate level/low level radioactive waste repository will contain significant quantities of iron and steel, Magnox and Zircaloy. Their corrosion products may possess significant sorption capacity for radioelements. The sorption of americium and plutonium onto magnesium hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, colloidal magnetite and colloidal haematite has been studied under conditions typical of the porewater of a cementitious near-field. R D values ≥ 10 5 ml g -1 were measured for both actinides on the oxides and hydroxides. These values are at least as great at those measured on crushed 3:1 Blast Furnace Slag/Ordinary Portland Cement. Competitive sorption experiments have shown that sorption onto the corrosion products does not take place in preference to that on the cement or the converse. Magnetite and haematite colloids are positively charged in cement-equilibrated water whilst zirconium hydroxide is negatively charged. Crushed cement was found to be positively charged. Simple experiments show that only a small proportion of haematite colloids is potentially mobile through a column of crushed cement. (author)

  10. Total Quality Management Implementation and Guest Satisfaction in Hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Knežević

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Total quality management (TQM has become a modern system of constant improvement of the quality of all company activities. The purpose of this study is to measure the expectations and satisfaction of the guests concerning the attribute quality of the hotel product. Furthermore obtained results were compared in such a way as to analyse particularly the reviews of hotels which have implemented TQM and have the ISO 9001 certificates with reviews from hotels which have not implemented TQM and do not have the ISO 9001 certificates. The conducted analysis included 55 hotels in Serbia belonging to the 4- and 5-star categories, i.e. 1308 guests who have stayed in them. The results show that between the observed groups of guests there are fewer differences in expectations than in perception, and that generally speaking guests who have stayed in the hotels that have implemented TQM are more satisfied. The biggest difference concerning the guest satisfaction with the quality of service in the observed hotels is noticeable in relation to the employees and the value-for-money.

  11. Sorption of phenanthrene and benzene on differently structural kerogen: important role of micropore-filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulong; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Ran, Yong

    2014-02-01

    Shale was thermally treated to obtain a series of kerogen with varied maturation. Their chemical, structural and porous properties were related to the sorption and/or desorption behaviors of phenanthrene and benzene. As the treatment temperature increases, aliphatic and carbonyl carbon of the kerogen samples decrease, while their aromaticity and maturation increase. Meanwhile, the isothermal nonlinearity of phenanthrene and benzene increases whereas the sorption capacity and micropore adsorption volumes (Vo,d) initially increase and then decrease. The Vo,d of benzene is significantly correlated with, but higher than that of phenanthrene, suggesting similar micropore filling mechanism and molecular sieve effect. The benzene desorption exhibits hysteresis, which is related to the pore deformation of the kerogen and the entrapment of solute in the kerogen matrix. The Vo,d of phenanthrene and benzene on the kerogen samples accounts for 23-46% and 36-65% of the maximum sorption volumes, respectively, displaying the importance of the micropore filling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sorption of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by konjac glucomannan beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Konjac glucomannan beads have been investigated as metal biosorbent for Pb(II) from aqueous solu-tions. The effect of contact time, solution pH, initial metal concentration, and desorption were studied in batch experiments at 20℃±2℃. Maximum mental sorption was found to occur at initial pH 4.0―5.5. Kinetic studies revealed that the initial uptake was rapid and equilibrium was established in 3 h and that the data followed the prseudo-second order reaction. The equilibrium sorption data at initial pH 4.0 were described by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models; however, Langmuir isotherm model has been found to provide the best correlation. The highest value of Langmuir maximum uptake (qmax) was found to be 105.71 mg·g-1. Similar Freundlich empirical constant (KF) was obtained to be 1.98 for lead. Adsorption-complexation may be involved in the sorption process of lead. Desorption experi- ments showed evidence that after two contacts neither HCl nor EDTA solutions were able to desorb lead from the konjac glucomannan beads, but the desorbtion efficacy of HCl solution was higher than EDTA solution. The results obtained show that konjac glucomannan beads may be used for the treat-ment of wastewater contaminated with lead.

  13. Sorption and mobility of 14C-fenamiphos in Brazilian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Tanya; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala

    2018-02-02

    Although fenamiphos is widely used as an insecticide and nematicide in bowling greens and agriculture, information on its sorption in tropical soils is limited. In this study, mobility, sorption, and desorption dynamics of 14 C-fenamiphos in three contrasting Brazilian soils were examined both in batch and column experiments. Fenamiphos sorption coefficients (K d ) were 2.33, 3.86, and 3.9 L kg -1 for the three soils tested. The insecticide exhibited linear adsorption isotherms in all the three soils, and desorption was in a range of 30-40% during a 72-h period. With its low mobility, fenamiphos did not percolate through the soil profile even after 48 h. However, there is a risk of leaching to water bodies due to runoff because of its high solubility in water. In view of the fact that fenamiphos and its oxidation products are highly toxic to aquatic invertebrates and could affect the soil microbial activities even at low concentrations, the present information is of great importance in risk assessment of fenamiphos in the environment.

  14. Sorption of DNA by diatomite-Zn(II) embedded supermacroporous monolithic p(HEMA) cryogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozak, Kabil Özcan; Erzengin, Mahmut; Sargin, Idris; Ünlü, Nuri

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the DNA sorption performance of diatomite-Zn(II) embedded supermacroporous monolithic p(HEMA) cryogels were investigated for the purpose of designing a novel adsorbent that can be utilized for DNA purification, separation and immunoadsorption studies such as removal of anti-dsDNA antibodies from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patient plasma. Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [p(HEMA)]-based monolithic cryogel column embedded with Zn(2+)-diatomite particles was prepared by free radical cryo-copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (MBAAm). The polymerization reaction was initiated by N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) pair in an ice bath. After thawing, the monolithic composite cryogels were used for affinity sorption and then subsequent desorption of DNA molecules from aqueous solutions. Diatomite (DA) particles were characterized by XRF and BET method. The characterization of composite cryogel was done through SEM imaging. The effects of pH of the solution, initial DNA concentration, ionic strength, temperature and flow rates on adsorption were investigated to determine the optimum conditions for adsorption/desorption experiments. The particle embedding procedure was shown to yield significantly enhanced adsorption of DNA on the adsorbent. Furthermore, considering its excellent bio-compatibility, p(HEMA) cryogels are promising a candidate for further DNA sorption studies.

  15. Physicochemical characteristics and sorption capacities of heavy metal ions of activated carbons derived by activation with different alkyl phosphate triesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Hai; Yang, Shaokun; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Chenglu; Wu, Haiming

    2014-10-01

    Five alkyl phosphate triesters (APTEs), including trimethyl phosphate (TMP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), triisopropyl phosphate (TPP), tributyl phosphate (TBP) and trioctyl phosphate (TOP), were used as activating agents for preparing activated carbons (AC-APTEs) with high surface acidity and metal ion sorption capacity. N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, surface morphologies, elemental compositions, results of Boehm's titration and sorption capacities of heavy metal ions of the carbons were investigated. AC-APTEs contained much more acidic groups and exhibited much less surface area (phosphoric acid activation. For the AC-APTEs, AC-TOP had the highest surface area (488 m2/g), AC-TMP showed the highest yield (41.1%), and AC-TBP possessed the highest acidic groups (2.695 mmol/g), oxygen content (47.0%) and metal ion sorption capacities (40.1 mg/g for Ni(II) and 53.5 mg/g for Cd(II)). For the carbons, AC-APTEs showed much larger Ni(II) and Cd(II) sorption capacities than AC-PPA, except AC-TPP. The differences of the carbons in the physicochemical and sorption properties suggested surface chemistry of the carbons was the main factor influencing their sorption capacities whereas the pore structure played a secondary role.

  16. Factors affecting sorption of radiocobalt by river sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Din, M.R.E.; Ramadan, A.B.; Atta, E.R.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the principal factors affecting the interaction of radio cobalt with fresh water sediments and their importance for migration of radio cobalt in surface water streams. The uptake percent (U%) of radio cobalt by Ismailia Cannal bottom sediments (ICUBS) have been studied as a function of contact time, ph, competing ion, carrier concentration and natural ligands such as humic acid using batch technique. Mineralogical analyses of the sediment samples were carried out. The amount sorbed per gram sediment, (X/m), increased as the carrier concentration increased from 10 -8 mol. Following a Freundlich type isotherm. The uptake of radio cobalt was found to be affected by changing in the ph of the aqueous phase. Presence of Mg 24 ions as competing cation decreases the sorption of 60 Co. Presence of humic acid shows a slight effect on the sorption of 60 Co. Desorption of the investigated metal ion from the loaded sediment samples was also studied. A mathematical model for the migration of the investigated radioisotope in Ismailia canal water stream was developed to predict the concentrations of cobalt ion at different distances in X-direction

  17. Experimental study on an innovative multifunction heat pipe type heat recovery two-stage sorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.X.; Wang, R.Z.; Wang, L.W.; Lu, Z.S.

    2008-01-01

    An innovative multifunction heat pipe type sorption refrigeration system is designed, in which a two-stage sorption thermodynamic cycle based on two heat recovery processes was employed to reduce the driving heat source temperature, and the composite sorbent of CaCl 2 and activated carbon was used to improve the mass and heat transfer performances. For this test unit, the heating, cooling and heat recovery processes between two reactive beds are performed by multifunction heat pipes. The aim of this paper is to investigate the cycled characteristics of two-stage sorption refrigeration system with heat recovery processes. The two sub-cycles of a two-stage cycle have different sorption platforms though the adsorption and desorption temperatures are equivalent. The experimental results showed that the pressure evolutions of two beds are nearly equivalent during the first stage, and desorption pressure during the second stage is large higher than that in the first stage while the desorption temperatures are same during the two operation stages. In comparison with conventional two-stage cycle, the two-stage cycle with heat recovery processes can reduce the heating load for desorber and cooling load for adsorber, the coefficient of performance (COP) has been improved more than 23% when both cycles have the same regeneration temperature of 103 deg. C and the cooling water temperature of 30 deg. C. The advanced two-stage cycle provides an effective method for application of sorption refrigeration technology under the condition of low-grade temperature heat source or utilization of renewable energy

  18. Modeling of hydrogen desorption from tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guterl, J., E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Smirnov, R.D. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Krasheninnikov, S.I. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Nuclear Research National University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Uberuaga, B.; Voter, A.F.; Perez, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 8754 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen retention in metallic plasma-facing components is among key-issues for future fusion devices. For tungsten, which has been chosen as divertor material in ITER, hydrogen desorption parameters experimentally measured for fusion-related conditions show large discrepancies. In this paper, we therefore investigate hydrogen recombination and desorption on tungsten surfaces using molecular dynamics simulations and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to analyze adsorption states, diffusion, hydrogen recombination into molecules, and clustering of hydrogen on tungsten surfaces. The quality of tungsten hydrogen interatomic potential is discussed in the light of MD simulations results, showing that three body interactions in current interatomic potential do not allow to reproduce hydrogen molecular recombination and desorption. Effects of surface hydrogen clustering on hydrogen desorption are analyzed by introducing a kinetic model describing the competition between surface diffusion, clustering and recombination. Different desorption regimes are identified and reproduce some aspects of desorption regimes experimentally observed.

  19. Kinetics of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline adsorption and desorption on two acid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Fernández-Sanjurjo, Maria J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to quantify retention/release of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline on two soils, paying attention to sorption kinetics and to implications of the adsorption/desorption processes on transfer of these pollutants to the various environmental compartments. We used the stirred flow chamber (SFC) procedure to achieve this goal. All three antibiotics showed high affinity for both soils, with greater adsorption intensity for soil 1, the one with the highest organic matter and Al and Fe oxides contents. Desorption was always  oxytetracycline > chlortetracycline in soil 1, with similar values for the three antibiotics and the sequence tetracycline > chlortetracycline > oxytetracycline in soil 2. The desorption sequences were oxytetracycline > tetracycline > chlortetracycline in soil 1 and oxytetracycline > chlortetracycline > tetracycline in soil 2. In conclusion, the SFC technique has yielded new kinetic data regarding tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline adsorption/desorption on soils, indicating that it can be used to shed further light on the retention and transport processes affecting antibiotics on soils and other media, thus increasing knowledge on the behavior and evolution of these pharmaceutical residues in the environment.

  20. Importance of satisfaction and guests experience in hotel business organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Srđan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hotel companies which operate in today's competitive environment must constantly work on improving their products and services, at the request of their guests. Customer satisfaction is the key to retaining existing and attracting new guests. To achieve this goal, managers in the hotel organizations have become aware of the fact that the quality of staying in hotel represent unique experience for tourists. Lot of papers are dealing with the exploration of this topic, it only proves its importance nowadays. However, insufficient attention is paid to the simultaneous study of experience of guests and their satisfaction through the offered models (indexes that are created for this purpose. The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of these issues and identify their potential symbiosis.

  1. Water sorption kinetics of damaged beans: GAB model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M. Baptestini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to model the water sorption kinetics of damaged beans. Grains with initial moisture content of 53.85%, dry basis (d.b., were used. One portion of the grains was used to obtain desorption isotherms, while the other was subjected to drying until the moisture content of 5.26% (d.b., so that it was subjected to the adsorption. For the induction of damage, a Stein Breakage Tester was used. To obtain the equilibrium moisture content, grains were placed in a climatic chamber at 20, 30, 40 and 50 ± 1 °C combined with relative humidity of 30, 40, 50, 70 and 90 ± 3%. The GAB model fitted well to the equilibrium moisture experimental data of damaged grains and control. With increasing temperature, the monolayer moisture contents decreased in adsorption and desorption processes, ranging from 9.84 to 5.10% d.b. The lower moisture content in the monolayer in damaged grains indicates that lower moisture content is necessary to ensure their conservation.

  2. Guest Controlled Nonmonotonic Deep Cavity Cavitand Assembly State Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Du; Barnett, J Wesley; Gibb, Bruce C; Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2017-11-30

    Octa-acid (OA) and tetra-endo-methyl octa-acid (TEMOA) are water-soluble, deep-cavity cavitands with nanometer-sized nonpolar pockets that readily bind complementary guests, such as n-alkanes. Experimentally, OA exhibits a progression of 1:1 to 2:2 to 2:1 host/guest complexes (X:Y where X is the number of hosts and Y is the number of guests) with increasing alkane chain length from methane to tetradecane. Differing from OA only by the addition of four methyl groups ringing the portal of the pocket, TEMOA exhibits a nonmonotonic progression of assembly states from 1:1 to 2:2 to 1:1 to 2:1 with increasing guest length. Here we present a systematic molecular simulation study to parse the molecular and thermodynamic determinants that distinguish the succession of assembly stoichiometries observed for these similar hosts. Potentials of mean force between hosts and guests, determined via umbrella sampling, are used to characterize association free energies. These free energies are subsequently used in a reaction network model to predict the equilibrium distributions of assemblies. Our models accurately reproduce the experimentally observed trends, showing that TEMOA's endo-methyl units constrict the opening of the binding pocket, limiting the conformations available to bound guests and disrupting the balance between monomeric complexes and dimeric capsules. The success of our simulations demonstrate their utility at interpreting the impact of even simple chemical modifications on supramolecular assembly and highlight their potential to aid bottom-up design.

  3. Study on the effects of titanium oxide based nanomaterials as catalysts on the hydrogen sorption kinetics of magnesium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Anderson de Farias; Jardim, Paula Mendes; Santos, Dilson Silva dos, E-mail: anderso.n@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Conceicao, Monique Osorio Talarico da [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda (UniFOA), RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Magnesium hydride is highly attractive for hydrogen storage in solid state in reason of its high gravimetric capacity (7,6 wt% of H{sub 2}) and low density (1,7 g/cm³), making it a promissory candidate for mobile applications [1]. However, its low sorption kinetics and desorption temperature are the main obstacles for its application. In the present study the catalytic role of TiO{sub 2} based nanomaterials with different morphologies on the sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2} was evaluated. The additions consisted on titanate nanotubes (TTNT-Low), TiO{sub 2} nanorods (TTNT-550) and nanoparticles (KA-100, TTNT-ACID). Transmission and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (S/TEM) associated with X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) mapping was used to characterize the catalysts' morphology and crystalline structure and their dispersion within magnesium hydride, altogether with other characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and BET technique for structure and surface area analysis. The sorption kinetics were evaluated by means of a volumetric gas absorption/desorption (Sievert-type) apparatus. The results indicated that all additives improved the sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}, but the samples with TTNT-550 (TiO{sub 2} nanorods) and TTNT-ACID (TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles) presented the best and the second best performances, respectively, suggesting that the 1D morphology may promote a slightly superior kinetics than particulate catalysts. (author)

  4. Rotaxane and catenane host structures for sensing charged guest species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Matthew J; Beer, Paul D

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: The promise of mechanically interlocked architectures, such as rotaxanes and catenanes, as prototypical molecular switches and shuttles for nanotechnological applications, has stimulated an ever increasing interest in their synthesis and function. The elaborate host cavities of interlocked structures, however, can also offer a novel approach toward molecular recognition: this Account describes the use of rotaxane and catenane host systems for binding charged guest species, and for providing sensing capability through an integrated optical or electrochemical reporter group. Particular attention is drawn to the exploitation of the unusual dynamic properties of interlocked molecules, such as guest-induced shuttling or conformational switching, as a sophisticated means of achieving a selective and functional sensor response. We initially survey interlocked host systems capable of sensing cationic guests, before focusing on our accomplishments in synthesizing rotaxanes and catenanes designed for the more challenging task of selective anion sensing. In our group, we have developed the use of discrete anionic templation to prepare mechanically interlocked structures for anion recognition applications. Removal of the anion template reveals an interlocked host system, possessing a unique three-dimensional geometrically restrained binding cavity formed between the interlocked components, which exhibits impressive selectivity toward complementary anionic guest species. By incorporating reporter groups within such systems, we have developed both electrochemical and optical anion sensors which can achieve highly selective sensing of anionic guests. Transition metals, lanthanides, and organic fluorophores integrated within the mechanically bonded structural framework of the receptor are perturbed by the binding of the guest, with a concomitant change in the emission profile. We have also exploited the unique dynamics of interlocked hosts by demonstrating that an

  5. Characterization of aqueous interactions of copper-doped phosphate-based glasses by vapour sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähli, Christoph; Shah Mohammadi, Maziar; Waters, Kristian E; Nazhat, Showan N

    2014-07-01

    Owing to their adjustable dissolution properties, phosphate-based glasses (PGs) are promising materials for the controlled release of bioinorganics, such as copper ions. This study describes a vapour sorption method that allowed for the investigation of the kinetics and mechanisms of aqueous interactions of PGs of the formulation 50P2O5-30CaO-(20-x)Na2O-xCuO (x=0, 1, 5 and 10mol.%). Initial characterization was performed using (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Increasing CuO content resulted in chemical shifts of the predominant Q(2) NMR peak and of the (POP)as and (PO(-)) Fourier transform infrared absorptions, owing to the higher strength of the POCu bond compared to PONa. Vapour sorption and desorption were gravimetrically measured in PG powders exposed to variable relative humidity (RH). Sorption was negligible below 70% RH and increased exponentially with RH from 70 to 90%, where it exhibited a negative correlation with CuO content. Vapour sorption in 0% and 1% CuO glasses resulted in phosphate chain hydration and hydrolysis, as evidenced by protonated Q(0)(1H) and Q(1)(1H) species. Dissolution rates in deionized water showed a linear correlation (R(2)>0.99) with vapour sorption. Furthermore, cation release rates could be predicted based on dissolution rates and PG composition. The release of orthophosphate and short polyphosphate species corroborates the action of hydrolysis and was correlated with pH changes. In conclusion, the agreement between vapour sorption and routine characterization techniques in water demonstrates the potential of this method for the study of PG aqueous reactions. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sorption kinetics of Cs and Sr in sediments of a Savannah River Site reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    Laboratory measurements of the sorption and desorption of 134 Cs and 85 Sr to sediments were conducted. These sediments were sampled from the profundal zone of Par Pond at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina. The isotopes 134 Cs and 85 Sr were used to trace the sorption properties of the main contaminants found in the reservoir which are 137 Cs and 90 Sr respectively. The sorption behavior of these two elements was studied using spiked sediment/water slurries of a known mass to volume ratio. The results reveal that Sr undergoes significant reversible sorption while a fraction of Cs irreversibly sorbs to the sediment. The calculated distribution coefficient Kd at equilibrium was (3 ± 0.6) x 10 3 for 134 Cs after 60 d and (1 ± 0.2) x 10 3 for 85 Sr after 7 d at pH ∼ 6 and slurry ratio of 1:1000 g/ml. The K d for 134 Cs ranged from 2 x 10 2 to 3 x 10 4 depending on pH and conductivity. The 85 Sr reached equilibrium in a few days, while 134 Cs reached an apparent equilibrium in 1--2 months. The K d for 134 Cs was a function of the slurry ratio, pH, conductivity, and contact time. These factors were interrelated since the sediments released ions to the slurry mixture which decreased the pH and increased the conductivity. A sorption isotherm measured for 134 Cs was linear at water concentrations from 60 mBq/ml to 20 Bq/ml. A kinetic model was proposed to describe the basic sorption of 134 Cs to Par Pond sediments under homogeneous laboratory conditions

  7. Using fluorescent dyes as proxies to study herbicide removal by sorption in buffer zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollinger, Jeanne; Dagès, Cécile; Voltz, Marc

    2017-04-01

    The performance of buffer zones for removing pesticides from runoff water varies greatly according to landscape settings, hydraulic regime, and system design. Evaluating the performance of buffers for a range of pesticides and environmental conditions can be very expensive. Recent studies suggested that the fluorescent dyes uranine and sulforhodamine B could be used as cost-effective surrogates of herbicides to evaluate buffer performance. However, while transformation mechanisms in buffers have been extensively documented, sorption processes of both dyes have rarely been investigated. In this study, we measured the adsorption, desorption, and kinetic sorption coefficients of uranine and sulforhodamine B for a diverse range of buffer zone materials (soils, litters, plants) and compared the adsorption coefficients (Kd) to those of selected herbicides. We also compared the global sorption capacity of 6 ditches, characterized by varying proportions of the aforementioned materials, between both dyes and a set of four herbicides using the sorption-induced pesticide retention indicator (SPRI). We found that both the individual Kd of uranine for the diverse buffer materials and the global sorption capacity of the ditches are equivalent to those of the herbicides diuron, isoproturon, and metolachlor. The Kd of sulforhodamine B on plants and soils are equivalent to those of glyphosate, and the global sorption capacities of the ditches are equivalent for both molecules. Hence, we demonstrate for the first time that uranine can be used as a proxy of moderately hydrophobic herbicides to evaluate the performance of buffer systems, whereas sulforhodamine B can serve as a proxy for more strongly sorbing herbicides.

  8. Adsorption and desorption of contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palumbo, A.V.; Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; DeFlaun, M.; Ensley, B.

    1994-01-01

    The microbial remediation of sites Contaminated with organics is well documented, however, there are some significant problems that remain to be solved in the areas of contaminants sorbed to soils and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination. Methods of in situ bioremediation techniques employ either the stimulation of indigenous populations by nutrient addition, or the addition of prepared bacterial cultures to the subsurface environment. Problems of contaminant sorption and NAPL's are related in that both encompass reduced contaminant bioavailability. Non-aqueous phase liquids have been identified as a priority area for research in the In situ Program due to their presence at DOE sites and the lack of adequate technology to effectively treat this contamination. Bioremediation technologies developed as a result of this project are easily transferred to industry

  9. Prediction of water vapour sorption isotherms and microstructure of hardened Portland cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgh, James M. de; Foster, Stephen J.; Valipour, Hamid R.

    2016-01-01

    Water vapour sorption isotherms of cementitious materials reflect the multi-scale physical microstructure through its interaction with moisture. Our ability to understand and predict adsorption and desorption behaviour is essential in the application of modern performance-based approaches to durability analysis, along with many other areas of hygro-mechanical and hygro-chemo-mechanical behaviour. In this paper, a new physically based model for predicting water vapour sorption isotherms of arbitrary hardened Portland cement pastes is presented. Established thermodynamic principles, applied to a microstructure model that develops with hydration, provide a rational basis for predictions. Closed-form differentiable equations, along with a rational consideration of hysteresis and scanning phenomena, makes the model suitable for use in numerical moisture simulations. The microstructure model is reconciled with recently published 1 H NMR and mercury intrusion porosimetry results.

  10. Modeling volatile organic compounds sorption on dry building materials using double-exponential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Baoqing; Ge, Di; Li, Jiajia; Guo, Yuan; Kim, Chang Nyung

    2013-01-01

    A double-exponential surface sink model for VOCs sorption on building materials is presented. Here, the diffusion of VOCs in the material is neglected and the material is viewed as a surface sink. The VOCs concentration in the air adjacent to the material surface is introduced and assumed to always maintain equilibrium with the material-phase concentration. It is assumed that the sorption can be described by mass transfer between the room air and the air adjacent to the material surface. The mass transfer coefficient is evaluated from the empirical correlation, and the equilibrium constant can be obtained by linear fitting to the experimental data. The present model is validated through experiments in small and large test chambers. The predicted results accord well with the experimental data in both the adsorption stage and desorption stage. The model avoids the ambiguity of model constants found in other surface sink models and is easy to scale up

  11. Application of biomass for the sorption of radionuclides from low level Purex aqueous wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanujam, A; Gopalakrishnan, V; Dhami, P S; Kannan, R [Fuel Reprocessing Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Udupa, S R; Salvi, N A [Bio-Organic Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1997-05-01

    Microbial biomass have been found to be good biological adsorbents for radioactive nuclides such as uranium and thorium with comparatively easy desorption and recovery. Based on this, sorption studies have been carried out to assess the feasibility of using biomass Rhizopus arrhizus (RA) for the removal of radionuclides present in Purex low level waste streams. Biomass Rhizopus arrhizus (RA) appears effective for the removal of actinides and fission products from low level Purex plant waste/effluent solutions. Maximum sorption for uranium and plutonium is observed at 6-7 pH whereas for Am, Eu, Pm, Ce and Zr the sorption is maximum at pH 2 with high D values and fast kinetics in both cases. Sorption for Ru and Cs are negligible. Sorbed nuclides are recoverable by elution with 1 M HNO{sub 3}, on once through basis. The method can be used for treating the evaporator condensates from the plant and the hold-up delay tank solution. The sodium nitrate salt concentration in the aqueous solution beyond 0.14 M seriously affects the metal uptake. The results from column experiments indicate a limited loading capacity in terms of mg of Am/U/Pu etc. per gm of RA. However, as the Purex low level effluents contain only trace level activities whose absolute ionic concentrations are much lower, the capacities observed with the present form of biomass may still be satisfactory. 15 refs., 12 tabs.

  12. The effect of organics on the sorption of cobalt by glacial sand in laboratory batch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haigh, D.G.; Williams, G.M.; Hooker, P.J.; Ross, C.A.M.; Allen, M.R.; Warwick, P.

    1989-01-01

    Acetate, EDTA and organic compounds naturally present in groundwater at the Drigg in situ radionuclide migration experimental site, have been studied to assess their effect on the sorption of cobalt by glacial sand in a series of batch experiments. Removing 56% of the natural organic material from the grounwater with DEAE cellulose increased the distribution ratio (R d ) of cobalt by a factor of about two. EDTA had a dramatic effect on the sorption of Co even at low concentrations, reducing the R d by up to two orders of magnitude. At EDTA concentrations greater than 5 mg/l, there was no further reduction in sorption. EDTA was not itself sorbed, but formed a mobile complex with Co. Differences in distribution ratios were observed depending on whether the cobalt was added before or after EDTA. Within the same period of equilibrium, the R d values were higher when cobalt was allowed to equilibrate with the sand before adding EDTA. The desorption of cobalt from the mineral surface may be a rate-limiting step such that equilibrium was not achieved within the 14-day period of these experiments. Acetate had no effect on cobalt sorption in any of the experiments undertaken. This work is part of the Commission Mirage project, Phase 2, research area Geochemistry of actinides and fission products in natural aquifer systems

  13. Application of biomass for the sorption of radionuclides from low level Purex aqueous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanujam, A.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Dhami, P.S.; Kannan, R.; Udupa, S.R.; Salvi, N.A.

    1997-05-01

    Microbial biomass have been found to be good biological adsorbents for radioactive nuclides such as uranium and thorium with comparatively easy desorption and recovery. Based on this, sorption studies have been carried out to assess the feasibility of using biomass Rhizopus arrhizus (RA) for the removal of radionuclides present in Purex low level waste streams. Biomass Rhizopus arrhizus (RA) appears effective for the removal of actinides and fission products from low level Purex plant waste/effluent solutions. Maximum sorption for uranium and plutonium is observed at 6-7 pH whereas for Am, Eu, Pm, Ce and Zr the sorption is maximum at pH 2 with high D values and fast kinetics in both cases. Sorption for Ru and Cs are negligible. Sorbed nuclides are recoverable by elution with 1 M HNO 3 , on once through basis. The method can be used for treating the evaporator condensates from the plant and the hold-up delay tank solution. The sodium nitrate salt concentration in the aqueous solution beyond 0.14 M seriously affects the metal uptake. The results from column experiments indicate a limited loading capacity in terms of mg of Am/U/Pu etc. per gm of RA. However, as the Purex low level effluents contain only trace level activities whose absolute ionic concentrations are much lower, the capacities observed with the present form of biomass may still be satisfactory

  14. Thermodynamic Properties, Sorption Isotherms and Glass Transition Temperature of Cape Gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica López

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption and desorption isotherms of fresh and dried Cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L. were determined at three temperatures (20, 40 and 60 °C using a gravimetric technique. The data obtained were fitted to several models including Guggenheim-Anderson- De Boer (GAB, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, Henderson, Caurie, Smith, Oswin, Halsey and Iglesias-Chirife. A non-linear least square regression analysis was used to evaluate the models. The Iglesias-Chirife model fitted best the experimental data. Isosteric heat of sorption was also determined from the equilibrium sorption data using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and was found to decrease exponentially with increasing moisture content. The enthalpy-entropy compensation theory was applied to the sorption isotherms and indicated an enthalpy-controlled sorption process. Glass transition temperature (Tg of Cape gooseberry was also determined by differential scanning calorimetry and modelled as a function of moisture content with the Gordon-Taylor, the Roos and the Khalloufi models, which proved to be excellent tools for predicting glass transition of Cape gooseberry.

  15. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Motsoaledi | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 4 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. A Motsoaledi. Abstract. No abstract ...

  16. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Meyers | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. AM Meyers. Abstract. No abstract.

  17. The paradoxical path towards the memorable guest experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Ambrosio, Luigi; Madsen, Jan Halberg

    This paper examines the design of hospitality and tourism experiences staged for international tourists in the emerging Italian destination Campi Flegrei on the Bay of Naples. In particular, this case focuses on the paradox that Campi Flegrei (CF) hospitality providers around the Lake Avernus face...... in the conceptualisation of the guest experience in the context of a non-DMO governed destination....

  18. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  19. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Gagić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and increased retention.Service quality is fundamental component which produce higher levels of guest satisfaction, which in turn lead to higher sales revenue.The main purpose of this study was to examine the quality dimensions that affect guest satisfaction in restaurant industry. Food and beverage quality, the quality of service delivery, physical environment and price fairness are analyzed as a key components of restaurant experience. The results could be helpful tool for restaurant managers to invest their resources more efficiently, making changes to crucial quality attributes that elicit the guests’ satisfaction level. A management approach focused on guest satisfaction can improve restaurant business performance.

  20. A light controlled cavitand wall regulates guest binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Orion B; Sather, Aaron C; Rebek, Julius

    2011-01-14

    Here we report a cavitand with a photochemical switch as one of the container walls. The azo-arene switch undergoes photoisomerization when subjected to UV light producing a self-fulfilled cavitand. This process is thermally and photochemically reversible. The reported cavitand binds small molecules and these guests can be ejected from the cavitand through this photochemical process.

  1. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes 129 Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of 129 Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, 129 Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature

  2. Guest Editorial | Frade | Journal of Student Affairs in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Student Affairs in Africa. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 2 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial. Nelia Frade. Abstract. Tutoring and ...

  3. SANS contrast variation on a dendrimer host-guest complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleppinger, R.; Mortensen, K.; Meijer, E.W.

    2002-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique was used to study the configurational changes in an oligoethyleneoxy-functionalized poly(propyleneimine) dendrimer (host) when forming complexes with rose bengal (guest). Guinier fits to the scattering data recorded at max. contrast indicated a

  4. Guest-responsive structural adaptation of a rationally-designed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    adaptability of the TB core to undergo subtle structural changes in response to the guest that is included. The structural ... we report the design, synthesis and inclusion behaviour of a novel ..... Based on a rational design, we have shown from ...

  5. Forward by Guest Editors | Potgieter | African Journal on Conflict ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal on Conflict Resolution. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Forward by Guest Editors. Cheryl Potgieter, Paulus ...

  6. Guest Editorial From plants to medicine for management of sickle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest Editorial From plants to medicine for management of sickle cell disorder. Charles Wambele. Abstract. No Abstract. Discovery and Innovation Vol. 18(1) 2006: 1-4. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/dai.v18i1.15718.

  7. Sorption of Cu and Zn in low organic matter-soils as influenced by soil properties and by the degree of soil weathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, V; Golia, E E

    2015-11-01

    Copper and Zn sorption and desorption, among other factors, depend on soil pH, but in soils with different degree of weathering the role of other soil properties (e.g., oxides content and the level of their crystallinity) has not been thoroughly examined. We conducted batch sorption and desorption tests using 21 low-organic C soils that belonged to the soil orders of Entisols, newly developed soils, Inceptisols, and Alfisols, the most weathered soils. Zinc sorption was lower than that of Cu, and its desorption faster, confirming that it is a highly mobile metal. Alfisols had the weaker affinity for metals, due to the lower soil pH typical of this soil order, but also due to the low reactivity colloids they contained. Correlation analyses showed that Fe oxides in Alfisols increased metal release from soils, while they decreased metal desorption from Entisols. We conclude that in low organic matter-content soils, where the protective role of organic colloids is not to be expected, high soil pH alone is not sufficient to protect against metal contamination, but the degree of soil weathering is also important, due to the dominant role of other mineral phases (here, Fe oxides). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sorption behavior of cobalt on manganese dioxide, smectite and their mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, T.; Kozai, N.

    1995-01-01

    The sorption behavior of cobalt on manganese dioxide, the clay mineral smectite and mixtures of the two was studied by batch type sorption/desorption experiments at neutral pH. Sorption behavior was examined by sequential extraction, in which the sorbents were contacted first with a 1 M CH 3 COONH 4 solution and then with a hydroxylamine solution (NH 2 OH of 1 M with 25 weight % CH 3 COOH). More than 70% of the sorbed cobalt was desorbed from smectite with a 1 M CH 3 COONH 4 solution: about 15% of the cobalt remained on the smectite after treatment with the hydroxylamine solution. Less than 1% of the remaining cobalt was desorbed from manganese dioxide with a 1 M CH 3 COONH 4 solution; with the hydroxylamine solution, all was desorbed. In mixtures of MnO 2 and smectite that were formulated to sorb equal amounts of cobalt regardless of the MnO 2 /smectite ratio in the mixture, less than 5% of the sorbed cobalt was desorbed by treatment with 1 M CH 3 COONH 4 . The fraction of the cobalt desorbed by treatment with the hydroxylamine solution increased with increased MnO 2 in the mixtures. The fraction of the cobalt sorbed on MnO 2 in the mixture was estimated from the desorption experiments. The results showed that higher fractions were sorbed onto MnO 2 than were estimated by the weighted averages of distribution coefficients for MnO 2 and smectite. Therefore, in minerals of the mixture, manganese dioxide is a more important component than smectite for the sorption of cobalt. (orig.)

  9. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-01-01

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation

  10. Quality of customer service: perceptions from guests in all-inclusive resorts in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel L. Frater

    2007-01-01

    With data collected from guests in all-inclusive resorts in Jamaica, West Indies, the purposes of this study were to: (1) delineate unique dimensions of customer service perceptions among guests and (2) report the finding of a study that measured guests' perceptions of the quality of customer service in all-inclusive resorts. The study asked the following research...

  11. Field-induced detrapping in disordered organic semiconducting host-guest systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cottaar, J.; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    In a disordered organic semiconducting host-guest material, containing a relatively small concentration of guest molecules acting as traps, the charge transport may be viewed as resulting from carriers that are detrapped from the guest to the host. Commonly used theories include only detrapping due

  12. Pu Sorption, Desorption and Intrinsic Colloid Stability under Granitic Chemical Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Pihong [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Zurong [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-04

    This progress report (M4FT-14LL0807031) describes research conducted at LLNL as part of the Crystalline Repository effort within the UFD program. Part I describes the dissolution kinetics of intrinsic Pu colloids synthesized in an alkaline solution. Part II describes the morphology and dissolution characteristics of various forms of Pu oxides prepared over a range of solution and temperature conditions. Proposed FY15 activities are identified.

  13. Microplastics as Vectors for Environmental Contaminants : Exploring Sorption, Desorption, and Transfer to Biota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna B.; Rist, Sinja; Bodin, Julia

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence and effects of microplastics (MPs) in the aquatic environment are receiving increasing attention. In addition to their possible direct adverse effects on biota, the potential role of MPs as vectors for hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs), compared to natural pathways, is a topic...... outline research needed to fill knowledge gaps and improve model-based calculations of MP-facilitated HOC transfer in the environment. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:488–493. © 2017 SETAC...... of much debate. It is evident, however, that temporal and spatial variations of MP occurrence do (and will) occur. To further improve the estimations of the role of MPs as vectors for HOC transfer into biota under varying MP concentrations and environmental conditions, it is important to identify...

  14. Applicability of microautoradiography to sorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.L.; Wolfsberg, K.

    1979-01-01

    The technique of microautoradiography was applied to the study of the sorption of uranium and americium on five rock types which exist at the Nevada Test Site. It was found that autoradiograms could be prepared in a few days which would allow the specific minerals responsible for sorption to be identified. Furthermore, the state of aggregation of the sorbed species was clearly indicated. It was concluded that microautoradiography was a useful adjunct to currently used methods for studying sorption of certain radionuclides

  15. Effect of drying on the desorption of diuron and terbuthylazine from natural soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartz, Bernd [Institute for Land Use, Rostock University, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)]. E-mail: bernd.lennartz@uni-rostock.de; Louchart, Xavier [Laboratory on Interactions between Soils, Agrosystems and Hydrosystems (LISAH), National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), 2 place Viala, 34060 Montpellier Cedex 1 (France)

    2007-03-15

    This work was initiated to study the effects of climate induced soil water status variations which can reach extreme values under natural conditions on the sorption process of hydrophobic organic compounds. Based on the classical slurry batch methodology an approach is developed that allows the fast and careful complete drying of soil suspensions (microwave technique). Classical adsorption experiments were followed by three desorption steps with and without drying cycles. Drying and re-wetting enhanced the sorption-desorption hysteresis and Freundlich adsorption coefficients increased from 5.9 to 16 and 5.2 to 21 over three drying cycles for diuron and terbuthylazine respectively. Assuming the validity of a dual stage adsorption process, model evaluation suggests that drying is as a shrinking-like process leading to conformational changes of the dominant sorbent (soil organic matter) which restrict the intra-micro-particle diffusion. Rewetting only leads to a partial recovery of the diffusional pore space. - Drying of soil samples increased the binding of herbicidal compounds which is interpreted as a reduction of diffusional mass transfer into and out of the soil organic matter.

  16. Effect of drying on the desorption of diuron and terbuthylazine from natural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennartz, Bernd; Louchart, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    This work was initiated to study the effects of climate induced soil water status variations which can reach extreme values under natural conditions on the sorption process of hydrophobic organic compounds. Based on the classical slurry batch methodology an approach is developed that allows the fast and careful complete drying of soil suspensions (microwave technique). Classical adsorption experiments were followed by three desorption steps with and without drying cycles. Drying and re-wetting enhanced the sorption-desorption hysteresis and Freundlich adsorption coefficients increased from 5.9 to 16 and 5.2 to 21 over three drying cycles for diuron and terbuthylazine respectively. Assuming the validity of a dual stage adsorption process, model evaluation suggests that drying is as a shrinking-like process leading to conformational changes of the dominant sorbent (soil organic matter) which restrict the intra-micro-particle diffusion. Rewetting only leads to a partial recovery of the diffusional pore space. - Drying of soil samples increased the binding of herbicidal compounds which is interpreted as a reduction of diffusional mass transfer into and out of the soil organic matter

  17. Adsorption and desorption characteristic of benzimidazole based fungicide carbendazim in pakistani soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, K.S.; Rashid, N.; Tazaiyen, S.; Nazar, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    A versatile cost-effective Benzimidazole based fungicide, Carbendazim (methyl 1H-benzimidazole-2 carboxylate ) has been utilized to investigate its sorption-desorption behaviour on physicochemical properties of geographical soils, ranging from hilly to desert areas of Pakistan, via batch equilibrium method. The data obtained in all tests showed that adsorption co-efficient isotherm for Carbendazim in four tested soil were well fitted the freundlich equation. Distribution co-efficient (K d ) parameters are low (3.59 to 11.60 ml micro g/sup -1/) indicating low adsorption. It was observed that Carbendazim showed a relatively greater degree of adsorption on soil samples (Soil 4) that were collected from northern hilly areas Ayubia, Khyber Pakhton khaw (KPK) (Silt loam) i.e.11.60 ml mu g/sup -1/ and least adsorption on sandy Soil of Multan Punjab(Soil 2). While other two soils 1 were collected from Murree region, a boarder of Punjab and KPK mountain area and Soil 3 from Tarnol, Islamabad. Desorption studies reveal that the adsorbed fungicide is firmly retained by soil particles and their adsorption are almost irreversible. The results indicate that soil organic matter (SOM) and appropriate pH also play key role in sorption capacity. (author)

  18. Enhanced desorption of PCB and trace metal elements (Pb and Cu) from contaminated soils by saponin and EDDS mixed solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Menghua; Hu, Yuan; Sun, Qian; Wang, Linling; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the simultaneous desorption of trace metal elements and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) from mixed contaminated soil with a novel combination of biosurfactant saponin and biodegradable chelant S,S-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS). Results showed significant promotion and synergy on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption with the mixed solution of saponin and EDDS. The maximal desorption of Pb, Cu and PCB were achieved 99.8%, 85.7% and 45.7%, respectively, by addition of 10 mM EDDS and 3000 mg L −1 saponin. The marked interaction between EDDS and saponin contributed to the synergy performance. The sorption of EDDS and saponin on soil was inhibited by each other. EDDS could enhance the complexation of metals with the saponin micelles and the solubilization capabilities of saponin micelles for PCB. Our study suggests the combination of saponin and EDDS would be a promising alternative for remediation of co-contaminated soils caused by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) and metals. -- Highlights: ► A novel combination of biosurfactant saponin and EDDS was used to simultaneously remove mixed contaminations from soil. ► Significant synergy on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption were achieved with EDDS/saponin. ► The marked interaction between EDDS and saponin contributed to the synergy performance. -- Significant synergistic effect on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption were achieved with the mixed solution of saponin and EDDS

  19. Strontium sorption on Savannah River Plant soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, S.L.

    1984-12-01

    A laboratory study of strontium-85 sorption was conducted using Savannah River Plant soil and groundwater from the low-level waste burial ground. Systematic variation of soil and water composition indicates that strontium sorption is most strongly a function of pH. Changes in clay content and in K + , Ca 2+ , or Mg 2+ concentrations influence strontium sorption indirectly through the slight pH changes which result. The ions Na + , Cl - , and NO 3 - have no effect. Ferrous ion, added to groundwater to simulate the conditions of water at the bottom of waste trenches, did not account for low strontium sorption observed with some trench waters

  20. Sorption processes affecting arsenic solubility in oxidized surface sediments from Tulare Lake Bed, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, S.; Goldberg, S.; Herbel, M.J.; Chalmers, A.T.; Fujii, R.; Tanji, K.K.

    2006-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in shallow groundwater in Tulare Basin pose an environmental risk because of the carcinogenic properties of As and the potential for its migration to deep aquifers that could serve as a future drinking water source. Adsorption and desorption are hypothesized to be the major processes controlling As solubility in oxidized surface sediments where arsenate [As(V)] is dominant. This study examined the relationship between sorption processes and arsenic solubility in shallow sediments from the dry Tulare Lake bed by determining sorption isotherms, pH effect on solubility, and desorption-readsorption behavior (hysteresis), and by using a surface complexation model to describe sorption. The sediments showed a high capacity to adsorb As(V). Estimates of the maximum adsorption capacity were 92 mg As kg- 1 at pH 7.5 and 70 mg As kg- 1 at pH 8.5 obtained using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Soluble arsenic [> 97% As(V)] did not increase dramatically until above pH 10. In the native pH range (7.5-8.5), soluble As concentrations were close to the lowest, indicating that As was strongly retained on the sediment. A surface complexation model, the constant capacitance model, was able to provide a simultaneous fit to both adsorption isotherms (pH 7.5 and 8.5) and the adsorption envelope (pH effect on soluble As), although the data ranges are one order of magnitude different. A hysteresis phenomenon between As adsorbed on the sediment and As in solution phase was observed in the desorption-readsorption processes and differs from conventional hysteresis observed in adsorption-desorption processes. The cause is most likely due to modification of adsorbent surfaces in sediment samples upon extensive extractions (or desorption). The significance of the hysteresis phenomenon in affecting As solubility and mobility may be better understood by further microscopic studies of As interaction mechanisms with sediments subjected to extensive leaching

  1. Repeated sorption of water in SBA-15 investigated by means of in situ small-angle x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erko, M; Paris, O; Wallacher, D; Findenegg, G H

    2012-01-01

    The effect of repeated cycles of water adsorption/desorption on the structural stability of ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15 is studied by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). In situ sorption measurements are conducted using a custom-built sorption apparatus in connection with a laboratory SAXS setup. Two striking irreversible changes are observed in the sorption isotherms as derived from the integrated SAXS intensity. First, the capillary condensation pressure shifts progressively to lower relative pressure values with increasing number of sorption cycles. This effect is attributed to chemisorption of water at the silica walls, resulting in a change of the fluid-wall interaction. Second, the sorption cycles do not close completely at vanishing vapour pressure, suggesting that progressively more water remains trapped within the porous material after each cycle. This effect is interpreted to be the result of an irreversible collapse of parts of mesopores, originating from pore wall deformation due to the large Laplace pressure of water acting on the pore walls at capillary condensation and capillary evaporation. (paper)

  2. Sorption of Cu(II) Ions on Chitosan-Zeolite X Composites: Impact of Gelling and Drying Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelad, Amal; Morsli, Amine; Robitzer, Mike; Bengueddach, Abdelkader; di Renzo, Francesco; Quignard, Françoise

    2016-01-19

    Chitosan-zeolite Na-X composite beads with open porosity and different zeolite contents were prepared by an encapsulation method. Preparation conditions had to be optimised in order to stabilize the zeolite network during the polysaccharide gelling process. Composites and pure reference components were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD); scanning electron microscopy (SEM); N₂ adsorption-desorption; and thermogravimetric analysis (TG). Cu(II) sorption was investigated at pH 6. The choice of drying method used for the storage of the adsorbent severely affects the textural properties of the composite and the copper sorption effectiveness. The copper sorption capacity of chitosan hydrogel is about 190 mg·g(-1). More than 70% of this capacity is retained when the polysaccharide is stored as an aerogel after supercrititcal CO₂ drying, but nearly 90% of the capacity is lost after evaporative drying to a xerogel. Textural data and Cu(II) sorption data indicate that the properties of the zeolite-polysaccharide composites are not just the sum of the properties of the individual components. Whereas a chitosan coating impairs the accessibility of the microporosity of the zeolite; the presence of the zeolite improves the stability of the dispersion of chitosan upon supercritical drying and increases the affinity of the composites for Cu(II) cations. Chitosan-zeolite aerogels present Cu(II) sorption properties.

  3. Modeling of kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste in a stirred batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escudero, Carlos; Fiol, Nuria; Poch, Jordi; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Cr(VI) removal by grape stalks has been postulated to follow two mechanisms, adsorption and reduction to trivalent chromium. Nevertheless, the rate at which both processes take place and the possible simultaneity of both processes has not been investigated. In this work, kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste has been studied. Experiments were carried out at different temperatures but at a constant pH (3 ± 0.1) in a stirred batch reactor. Results showed that three steps take place in the process of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste: Cr(VI) sorption, Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) and the adsorption of the formed Cr(III). Taking into account the evidences above mentioned, a model has been developed to predict Cr(VI) sorption on grape stalks on the basis of (i) irreversible reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) reaction, whose reaction rate is assumed to be proportional to the Cr(VI) concentration in solution and (ii) adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI) and formed Cr(III) assuming that all the processes follow Langmuir type kinetics. The proposed model fits successfully the kinetic data obtained at different temperatures and describes the kinetics profile of total, hexavalent and trivalent chromium. The proposed model would be helpful for researchers in the field of Cr(VI) biosorption to design and predict the performance of sorption processes.

  4. Highly sensitive sorption-luminescence determination of trace europium with preconcentration on silica chemically modified with iminodiacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronina, R.D.; Zorov, N.B.

    2007-01-01

    Features of a sorption-luminescence method for the determination of trace europium were studied. The method includes the preliminary sorption of europium at pH 7.1 from solutions with silica chemically modified with iminodiacetic acid, the subsequent treatment of the sorbent with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone at pH 8.0, and the measurement of the intensity of luminescence of the surface three-component europium complex at 613 nm. The effect of moisture as the quencher of luminescence of the surface europium complex was studied, and techniques for its removal were proposed. Sorption in the static mode provides the detection limit of europium of 7 x 10 -5 g/ml. The calibration plot is linear in the range of two orders of magnitude of europium concentration in solutions. The relative standard deviation in the determination of 1.5 x 10 -2 μg/ml europium is 5%. In the dynamic mode of sorption from 1000 ml of an analyzed solution with the use of sorption-desorption, the detection limit of europium of 8 x 10 -7 μg/ml was attained [ru

  5. Sorption of prioritized elements on montmorillonite colloids and their potential to transport radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wold, Susanna

    2010-04-01

    , Pd, Se, Sn, Zr and U. K d -values for colloids and radionuclides are scarce as well as sorption kinetics. Sorption values were not found for the elements Ra, Nb and Pd, yet sorption of the analogues Sr, Pu and Ni are instead representing these elements. Since sorption and desorption kinetic studies are scarce, recommendations on the reversibility have been based on the elements sorption mechanisms and from their K d -values

  6. Sorption of prioritized elements on montmorillonite colloids and their potential to transport radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wold, Susanna (Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry)

    2010-04-15

    , Ni, Pd, Se, Sn, Zr and U. K{sub d}-values for colloids and radionuclides are scarce as well as sorption kinetics. Sorption values were not found for the elements Ra, Nb and Pd, yet sorption of the analogues Sr, Pu and Ni are instead representing these elements. Since sorption and desorption kinetic studies are scarce, recommendations on the reversibility have been based on the elements sorption mechanisms and from their K{sub d}-values

  7. PAHs soil decontamination in two steps: desorption and electrochemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, M Teresa; Gómez, Jose; Pazos, Marta; Sanromán, M Angeles

    2009-07-15

    The presence of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils poses a potential threat to human health if exposure levels are too high. Nevertheless, the removal of these contaminants presents a challenge to scientists and engineers. The high hydrophobic nature of PAHs enables their strong sorption onto soil or sediments. Thus, the use of surfactants could favour the release of sorbed hydrophobic organic compounds from contaminated soils. In this work, five surfactants, namely Brij 35, Tergitol NP10, Tween 20, Tween 80 and Tyloxapol, are evaluated on the desorption of PAHs [benzanthracene (BzA), fluoranthene (FLU), and pyrene (PYR), single and in mixture] from a model sample such as kaolin. In all cases, the best results were obtained when Tween 80 was employed. In order to obtain the global decontamination of PAHs, their electrochemical degradation is investigated. It is concluded that the order of increasing degradation for single compounds is BzA>FLU>PYR when they are subject to the same electrochemical treatment. In addition, there is a direct relationship between the ionization potential and the electrochemical degradation of PAH.

  8. Thermal Desorption Analysis of Effective Specific Soil Surface Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagin, A. V.; Bashina, A. S.; Klyueva, V. V.; Kubareva, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    A new method of assessing the effective specific surface area based on the successive thermal desorption of water vapor at different temperature stages of sample drying is analyzed in comparison with the conventional static adsorption method using a representative set of soil samples of different genesis and degree of dispersion. The theory of the method uses the fundamental relationship between the thermodynamic water potential (Ψ) and the absolute temperature of drying ( T): Ψ = Q - aT, where Q is the specific heat of vaporization, and a is the physically based parameter related to the initial temperature and relative humidity of the air in the external thermodynamic reservoir (laboratory). From gravimetric data on the mass fraction of water ( W) and the Ψ value, Polyanyi potential curves ( W(Ψ)) for the studied samples are plotted. Water sorption isotherms are then calculated, from which the capacity of monolayer and the target effective specific surface area are determined using the BET theory. Comparative analysis shows that the new method well agrees with the conventional estimation of the degree of dispersion by the BET and Kutilek methods in a wide range of specific surface area values between 10 and 250 m2/g.

  9. Sorption of radionuclides on inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajec, P.; Matel, L.

    1995-01-01

    The sorption of cesium, strontium, plutonium and americium from water solution on natural zeolite, clay minerals, synthetic zeolites and ferrocyanides in silica gel matrix was studied. The same experiments but with synthetic zeolites irradiated by the dose 100 kGy proved no change in sorption properties. 1 tab., 4 refs

  10. Nitrate Sorption in an Agricultural Soil Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissem Hamdi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concentrations of in surface water and groundwater can cause ecological and public health effects and has come under increased scrutiny by both environmental scientists and regulatory agencies. For many regions though, including the Sahel of Tunisia, little is known about the sorption capacity of soils. In this project we measured sorption by a profile of an iso-humic soil from Chott Meriem, Tunisia. Soil samples were collected from four soil depths (0–25, 25–60, 60–90, and 90–120 cm on 1 June 2011, and their sorption capacity was determined using batch experiments under laboratory conditions. The effects of contact time, the initial concentration, and the soil-solution ratio on sorption were investigated. In general, the results suggested that was weakly retained by the Chott Meriem soil profile. The quantity of sorption increased with depth, contact time, initial concentration, and soil-solution ratios. To evaluate the sorption capacities of the soil samples at concentrations ranging between 25 and 150 mg L−1 experimental data were fitted to both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm sorption models. The results indicated that Freundlich model was better for describing sorption in this soil profile.

  11. GUEST SERVICES QUALITY ASSESMENT IN TOURISM, USING AN ATTRIBUTES SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPA LUMINITA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is considered that a weakness of the Romanian tourism offer is the quality of guest services. In this paper we established as an objective to examine in detail the importance given by the consumers to the components of guest service quality and their perceived performance, based on the three pillars of service quality: the material base (equipments, staff training and staff behavior. The emphasis is on the investigation regarding staff training and behaviour, taking into account the multiple attributes SERVQUAL scale. On the basis of this work lies a survey done in March-April 2010 on the population of Oradea, on a sample of 1060 people. Results confirm the importance granted to staff in ensuring quality of tourism services and their perceived relatively weak performance.

  12. Usability of Security Management:Defining the Permissions of Guests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew; Stajano, Frank

    Within the scenario of a Smart Home, we discuss the issues involved in allowing limited interaction with the environment for unidentified principals, or guests. The challenges include identifying and authenticating guests on one hand and delegating authorization to them on the other. While the technical mechanisms for doing so in generic distributed systems have been around for decades, existing solutions are in general not applicable to the smart home because they are too complex to manage. We focus on providing both security and usability; we therefore seek simple and easy to understand approaches that can be used by a normal computer-illiterate home owner, not just by a trained system administrator. This position paper describes ongoing research and does not claim to have all the answers.

  13. Supramolecular polymeric materials via cyclodextrin-guest interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Akira; Takashima, Yoshinori; Nakahata, Masaki

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Cyclodextrins (CDs) have many attractive functions, including molecular recognition, hydrolysis, catalysis, and polymerization. One of the most important uses of CDs is for the molecular recognition of hydrophobic organic guest molecules in aqueous solutions. CDs are desirable host molecules because they are environmentally benign and offer diverse functions. This Account demonstrates some of the great advances in the development of supramolecular materials through host-guest interactions within the last 10 years. In 1990, we developed topological supramolecular complexes with CDs, polyrotaxane, and CD tubes, and these preparation methods take advantage of self-organization between the CDs and the polymers. The combination of polyrotaxane with αCD forms a hydrogel through the interaction of αCDs with the OH groups on poly(ethylene glycol). We categorized these polyrotaxane chemistries within main chain type complexes. At the same time, we studied the interactions of side chain type supramolecular complexes with CDs. In these systems the guest molecules modified the polymers and selectively formed inclusion complexes with CDs. The systems that used low molecular weight compounds did not show such selectivity with CDs. The multivalency available within the complex cooperatively enhances the selective binding of CD with guest molecules via the polymer side chains, a phenomenon that is analogous to binding patterns observed in antigen-antibody complexes. To incorporate the molecular recognition properties of CDs within the polymer side chains, we first prepared stimuli-responsive sol-gel switching materials through host-guest interactions. We chose azobenzene derivatives for their response to light and ferrocene derivatives for their response to redox conditions. The supramolecular materials were both redox-responsive and self-healing, and these properties resulted from host-guest interactions. These sol-gels with built in switches gave us insight for

  14. Kinetics and reversibility of radionuclide sorption reactions with rocks. Progress report for fiscal year 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.; Brown, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    Sorption-desorption reactions of cesium, strontium, neptunium, americium, and plutonium on basalt, granite, and argillite were observed for 218 days. Equilibrium in batch experiments was not reached for most radionuclides even after this long time. Reactions of the crushed rock with ground waters (dissolution, hydrolysis, precipitation, etc.) also did not reach equilibrium after 150 days. The dissolution of basalt is accompanied by the formation of colloidal particles which contain Si, Fe, Ca, and Al. These colloids sorb Cs, Sr, Am, and Pu during equilibration. Some of the colloids pass through 0.3-μm flters, are not retained even on 0.01-μm filters and, therefore, cause calculated K/sub d/ values to be too low. Samples of crushed basalt, granite, and argillite were artificially weathered by continuous leaching with distilled water for 6 months both in air and in an oxygen-free stream of nitrogen gas. The weathered rock was then characterized for surface area, surface structure, cation exchange capacity, and composition of weathered surface on the rock. Comparisons were made of radionuclide sorption (after 14 days) on fresh rock, rock weathered in air, and rock weathered in N 2 . Sorption on rocks weathered in N 2 generally is less than on rock weathered in air. This is possibly due to the lack of an Fe(OH) 3 coating on the rock weathered in N 2 . The Fe(OH) 3 is known to scavenge cations and silica from solution. Sorption of Cs, Si, Am, and Pu is strongly affected by weathering basalt and argillite. However, the cation exchange capacity is changed very little, suggesting that ion exchange plays a minor role in sorption of these radionuclides

  15. Determination of storage conditions for new biscuits using their sorption isotherms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Diukareva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction For the formation of biscuits quality natural carrier of iodine and sweetener from stevia leaves were used. Desorption of moisture is the dominant process, which will determine the guaranteed shelf life of biscuits. The conditions for the developed biscuits storage was determined by investigating of sorption isotherms and kinetics of reaching the equilibrium moisture content. Materials and Methods. The objects of study arenewly developed biscuits: "Health" (rich in iodine and with the replacement of 50 % sugar by stevioside, "Light" (with the replacement of 75% of sugar by stevioside and enriched with wheat bran, "Fortified" (containselamine, which is a natural source of iodine. Control – the biscuit prepared according to traditional recipes. Tenzometric method was used to study the sorption equilibrium moisture content. Differential function of pore radius distribution was determined using sorption isotherms and then have been subjected to approximation. Results. New biscuits samples are in the area of polymolecular and monomolecular sorption in the range of the relative air humidity (RAH from 10 to 75 ... 80%. The control sample has less distinct plot of monomolecular sorption (10 to 20% and short- moisture range wich is corresponding with polymolecularsorption (from 20 to 65 ... 70%. There is a moisture absorbtion ofmicrocapillary and swelling of samples when RAHincreases to 75 ... 80% for all the samples. The ratio of average pore radius tothe most likely of the test samples are differentthat wasshown by the investigation of differential function of pore distribution. So this ratio for biscuit "Health" is 5.73, for biscuit "Light" − 2.98,forbiscuit "Fortified"− 4.91 and for the control − 3.88. Conclusions. There’s the sense to store developed biscuits in a cardboard packaging with polymeric covering, if RAH is not more than 75%, and vapor-proof if RAH is above that.

  16. Sorption of mercury on chemically synthesized polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remya Devi, P.S.; Verma, R.; Sudersanan, M.

    2006-01-01

    Sorption of inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ) and methyl mercury, on chemically synthesized polyaniline, in 0.1-10N HCl solutions has been studied. Hg 2+ is strongly sorbed at low acidities and the extent of sorption decreases with increase in acidity. The sorption of methyl mercury is very low in the HCl concentration range studied. Sorption of Hg 2+ on polyaniline in 0.1-10N LiCl and H 2 SO 4 solutions has also been studied. The analysis of the data indicates that the sorption of Hg 2+ depends on the degree of protonation of polyaniline and the nature of mercury(II) chloride complexes in solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis (XPS) of polyaniline sorbed with mercury show that mercury is bound as Hg 2+ . Sorbed mercury is quantitatively eluted from polyaniline with 0.5N HNO 3 . Polyaniline can be used for separation and pre-concentration of inorganic mercury from aqueous samples. (author)

  17. Phenanthrene sorption on biochar-amended soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahawaththa Gamage, Inoka Damayanthi Kumari; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    on their influences on the sorption of environmental contaminants. In a field-based study at two experimental sites in Denmark, we investigated the effect of birch wood-derived biochar (Skogans kol) on the sorption of phenanthrene in soils with different properties. The soil sorption coefficient, Kd (L kg-1......), of phenanthrene was measured on sandy loam and loamy sand soils which have received from zero up to 100 t ha-1 of biochar. Results show that birch wood biochar had a higher Kd compared to soils. Furthermore, the application of birch wood biochar enhanced the sorption of phenanthrene in agricultural soils...... carbon, while it negatively correlated with clay content. The results also revealed that biochar-mineral interactions play an important role in the sorption of phenanthrene in biochar-amended soil....

  18. Cobalt sorption onto Savannah River Plant soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, S.L.

    1985-06-01

    A laboratory study of cobalt-60 sorption was conducted using Savannah River Plant soil and groundwater from the low-level waste burial ground. Systematic variation of soil and water composition indicates that cobalt sorption is most strongly a function of pH. Over a pH range of 2 to 9, the distribution coefficient ranged from 2 to more than 10,000 mL/g. Changes in clay content and in K + , Ca 2+ , or Mg 2+ concentrations influence cobalt sorption indirectly through the slight pH changes which result. The ions Na + , Cl - , and NO 3 - have no effect on cobalt sorption. Ferrous ion, added to groundwater to simulate the condition of water at the bottom of the waste trenches, accounts for part of the decrease in cobalt sorption observed with trench waters. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Sorption study of 226Ra(II) et 238U(VI) on to peat organic matter, in mining environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordelet, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    The environmental footprint of former uranium mining sites is a major concern for society. In order to guarantee the protection of ecosystems and thus a minimal radiological impact on the biosphere, it is important to understand and to be able to model the phenomena controlling the migration of uranium and its decay products, specially radium ( 226 Ra) (AREVA's Envir-at-Mines project). In the environment, among solid phases which can retain 238 U(VI) and 226 Ra(II), peat is known to have relevant affinity for U(VI). Because peat is usually composed at 90% dry weight of organic matter, the aim of this study was to qualify and quantify peat organic matter affinity for 238 U(VI) and 226 Ra(II). Peat samples extracted from Les Sagnes (close to a former uranium mining site in Limousin area, France) was characterised and batch adsorption/desorption experiments were conducted. The results indicate that 226 Ra(II) adsorption onto that peat is higher than 97% for pH ≥ 4-6 (depending on the organic/mineral ratio in dry peat) corresponding to K d values about 4500 ± 500 mL/g and 238 U(VI) adsorption is higher than 80% at pH ≥ 3 with K d maximal values reaching 11000 mL/g around pH 4.5. Only a little desorption was measured after one month. An ion exchange modelling for radium adsorption onto one type of organic matter sorption site was enough to fit the experimental adsorption K d for the peat over the whole range of pH. However, uranium sorption on peat can be modelled on that organic sorption site only from pH 1 to 5. From pH 5 to 10, to explain the experimental uranium adsorption K d values (close to 1500 mL/g), uranium sorption onto mineral phases (such as smectite and iron oxide in this study) has to be considered. An operational data set is given for both 238 U(VI) and 226 Ra(II) sorption onto Les Sagnes peat. Unlike usual peat, peat from Les Sagnes contains more than 10% dry weight of mineral matter. That is why it is necessary to model sorption of those two

  20. Journalism Education 2016 Vol 5(2): Guest Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler-Watt, Karen

    2016-01-01

    “It’s the story that matters! Teaching journalism’s storytellers” Special Edition of Journalism Education Guest Editor: Karen Fowler-Watt, Bournemouth University, UK. Storytelling is the journalist’s craft skill. Shaped by the tenets of objectivity and accuracy, the news narrative informs the debate and brings us the human stories. If journalism is a craft, then the story is the journalist’s work of art. In a rapidly changing landscape of technological revolution, shifting business models and...

  1. Complaint Speech Act of Hotel and Restaurant Guests

    OpenAIRE

    Suryawan, I Nengah; Putra Yadnya, Ida Bagus; Puspani, Ida Ayu Made

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at analyzing how complaint speech act of hotel and restaurant guests are performed and responded based on categories of speech acts and how they are performed considering the aspects of acts: locutionary, illocutionary, and perlocutionary. The method and technique of collecting data in this study is documentation method in which the data were collected using the technique of note taking and were qualitatively analyzed. The findings show that complaint of hotel and restaura...

  2. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Snježana Gagić; Dragan Tešanović; Ana Jovičić

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and inc...

  3. Molecular mechanism of adsorption/desorption hysteresis: dynamics of shale gas in nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, FengChao; Liu, He; Wu, HengAn

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the adsorption and desorption behavior of methane has received considerable attention since it is one of the crucial aspects of the exploitation of shale gas. Unexpectedly, obvious hysteresis is observed from the ideally reversible physical sorption of methane in some experiments. However, the underlying mechanism still remains an open problem. In this study, Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to explore the molecular mechanisms of adsorption/desorption hysteresis. First, a detailed analysis about the capillary condensation of methane in micropores is presented. The influence of pore width, surface strength, and temperature on the hysteresis loop is further investigated. It is found that a disappearance of hysteresis occurs above a temperature threshold. Combined with the phase diagram of methane, we explicitly point out that capillary condensation is inapplicable for the hysteresis of shale gas under normal temperature conditions. Second, a new mechanism, variation of pore throat size, is proposed and studied. For methane to pass through the throat, a certain energy is required due to the repulsive interaction. The required energy increases with shrinkage of the throat, such that the originally adsorbed methane cannot escape through the narrowed throat. These trapped methane molecules account for the hysteresis. Furthermore, the hysteresis loop is found to increase with the increasing pressure and decreasing temperature. We suggest that the variation of pore throat size can explain the adsorption/desorption hysteresis of shale gas. Our conclusions and findings are of great significance for guiding the efficient exploitation of shale gas.

  4. Adsorption-desorption behavior of atrazine on agricultural soils in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Lin; Ge, ChengJun; Feng, Dan; Yu, Huamei; Deng, Hui; Fu, Bomin

    2017-07-01

    Adsorption and desorption are important processes that affect atrazine transport, transformation, and bioavailability in soils. In this study, the adsorption-desorption characteristics of atrazine in three soils (laterite, paddy soil and alluvial soil) were evaluated using the batch equilibrium method. The results showed that the kinetics of atrazine in soils was completed in two steps: a "fast" adsorption and a "slow" adsorption and could be well described by pseudo-second-order model. In addition, the adsorption equilibrium isotherms were nonlinear and were well fitted by Freundlich and Langmuir models. It was found that the adsorption data on laterite, and paddy soil were better fitted by the Freundlich model; as for alluvial soil, the Langmuir model described it better. The maximum atrazine sorption capacities ranked as follows: paddy soil>alluvial soil>laterite. Results of thermodynamic calculations indicated that atrazine adsorption on three tested soils was spontaneous and endothermic. The desorption data showed that negative hysteresis occurred. Furthermore, lower solution pH value was conducive to the adsorption of atrazine in soils. The atrazine adsorption in these three tested soils was controlled by physical adsorption, including partition and surface adsorption. At lower equilibrium concentration, the atrazine adsorption process in soils was dominated by surface adsorption; while with the increase of equilibrium concentration, partition was predominant. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Multifunctional guest-host particles engineered by reversal nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Uh-Myong; Kaban, Burhan; Tomita, Andreea; Krekić, Kristijan; Klintuch, Dieter; Pietschnig, Rudolf; Ehresmann, Arno; Holzinger, Dennis; Hillmer, Hartmut

    2018-03-01

    Particulate polymeric microfibers with incorporated europium(III)oxide (Eu2O3) nanoparticles were introduced as a magneto-photoluminescent multifunctional material fabricated via reversal nanoimprint lithography. To specifically address the volume properties of these guest-host particles, the guest, Eu2O3, was milled down to an average particle size of 350 nm in diameter and mixed with the host-polymer, AMONIL®, before in situ hardening in the imprint stamp. The variation of the fabrication process parameters, i.e. delay time, spin coating speed, as well as the concentration of Eu2O3 nanoparticles was proven to have a significant impact on both the structure quality and the stamp release of the microfibers with respect to the formation of a thinner residual layer. Structural characterization performed by SEM revealed optimum fabrication process parameters for a homogeneous spatial distribution of Eu2O3 nanoparticles within the microfibers while simultaneously avoiding the formation of undesired agglomerates. The magneto-photoluminescent properties of Eu2O3 nanoparticles, i.e. a red emission at 613 nm and a paramagnetic response, were found to be superimposed to the optic and the diamagnetic behaviors of AMONIL®. The results imply that guest-host interdependence of these properties can be excluded and that the suggested technique enables for specific tailoring of particulate multifunctional materials with focus on their volume properties.

  6. Influence of pyrolysis temperature and hardwood species on resulting biochar properties and their effect on azimsulfuron sorption as compared to other sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, Carmen, E-mail: carmentrigo1@gmail.com [Department of Soil, Water & Climate, University of Minnesota, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Cox, Lucia, E-mail: lcox@irnase.csic.es [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiología de Sevilla (IRNASE-CSIC), P.O. Box 1052, 41080 Seville (Spain); Spokas, Kurt, E-mail: kurt.spokas@ars.usda.gov [USDA-Agricultural Research Service, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, Rm. 439, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Azimsulfuron is an acidic herbicide with a high water solubility which makes risk of groundwater contamination a concern. Various wood based biochars produced at different pyrolysis temperatures were characterized along with their sorption capacity for the herbicide azimsulfuron. In addition, we compared sorption on biochars with sorption on mineral sorbents such as clay minerals and iron oxides. In biochar formed at high temperatures (500 °C and 700 °C), FT-IR studies confirmed the increase in aromaticity. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the biochars showed differences in the macroporous structure and lower size pores at higher temperatures. SSA (Specific Surface Area) of the biochars increased with pyrolysis temperature and, for all different biochars, this resulted in higher sorption of azimsulfuron. In the case of mineral sorbents, sorption is not related to SSA. Higher sorption is observed in a montmorillonite, of lower SSA, than in mixture of clay minerals with 30% smectite (w/w). On the contrary as with the clays, sorption on the two iron oxyhydroxides increased with SSA. Desorption studies showed hysteresis. Leaching studies showed no effect on azimsulfuron retention on soil column amended with apple wood biochar, while a reduction of azimsulfuron in leachates in soil columns amended with the modified montmorillonite and alder wood biochar (500 °C). Total retention was shown for alder wood biochar. - Highlights: • Use of biochars and mineral sorbents to mitigate azimsulfuron water contamination • Sorption relates with SSA for biochar and iron oxyhydroxide but not for clays. • Higher sorption values for biochar pyrolysis at 700 °C than mineral sorbents • Different effects on leaching for apple wood biochar, SW-Fe and alder wood biochar.

  7. Influence of pyrolysis temperature and hardwood species on resulting biochar properties and their effect on azimsulfuron sorption as compared to other sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigo, Carmen; Cox, Lucia; Spokas, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Azimsulfuron is an acidic herbicide with a high water solubility which makes risk of groundwater contamination a concern. Various wood based biochars produced at different pyrolysis temperatures were characterized along with their sorption capacity for the herbicide azimsulfuron. In addition, we compared sorption on biochars with sorption on mineral sorbents such as clay minerals and iron oxides. In biochar formed at high temperatures (500 °C and 700 °C), FT-IR studies confirmed the increase in aromaticity. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the biochars showed differences in the macroporous structure and lower size pores at higher temperatures. SSA (Specific Surface Area) of the biochars increased with pyrolysis temperature and, for all different biochars, this resulted in higher sorption of azimsulfuron. In the case of mineral sorbents, sorption is not related to SSA. Higher sorption is observed in a montmorillonite, of lower SSA, than in mixture of clay minerals with 30% smectite (w/w). On the contrary as with the clays, sorption on the two iron oxyhydroxides increased with SSA. Desorption studies showed hysteresis. Leaching studies showed no effect on azimsulfuron retention on soil column amended with apple wood biochar, while a reduction of azimsulfuron in leachates in soil columns amended with the modified montmorillonite and alder wood biochar (500 °C). Total retention was shown for alder wood biochar. - Highlights: • Use of biochars and mineral sorbents to mitigate azimsulfuron water contamination • Sorption relates with SSA for biochar and iron oxyhydroxide but not for clays. • Higher sorption values for biochar pyrolysis at 700 °C than mineral sorbents • Different effects on leaching for apple wood biochar, SW-Fe and alder wood biochar

  8. Thermodynamic properties of water sorption of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. as a function of moisture content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Prette

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Jackfruit tree is one of the most significant trees in tropical home gardens and perhaps the most widespread and useful tree in the important genus Artocarpus. The fruit is susceptible to mechanical and biological damage in the mature state, and some people find the aroma of the fruit objectionable, particularly in confined spaces. The dehydration process could be an alternative for the exploitation of this product, and the relationship between moisture content and water activity provides useful information for its processing and storage. The aim of this study was to determine the thermodynamic properties of the water sorption of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. as a function of moisture content. Desorption isotherms of the different parts of the jackfruit (pulp, peduncle, mesocarp, peel, and seed were determined at four different temperatures (313.15, 323.15, 333.15, and 343.15 K in a water activity range of 0.02-0.753 using the static gravimetric method. Theoretical and empirical models were used to model the desorption isotherms. An analytical solution of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation was proposed to calculate the isosteric heat of sorption, the differential entropy, and Gibbs' free energy using the Guggenhein-Anderson-de Boer and Oswin models considering the effect of temperature on the hygroscopic equilibrium.

  9. The effect of TTNT nanotubes on hydrogen sorption using MgH2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Coutinho Brum

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanotubes are promising materials to be used with magnesium hydride, as catalysts, in order to enhance hydrogen sorption. A study was performed on the hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of MgH2 with the addition of TTNT (TiTanate NanoTubes. The MgH2-TTNT composite was prepared by ball milling and the influence of the TTNT amount (1.0 and 5.0 wt. (% on the hydrogen capacity was evaluated. The milling of pure MgH2 was performed for 24 hours and afterwards the MgH2-TTNT composite was milled for 20 minutes. Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM were used to evaluate the nanotube synthesis and show the particle morphology of the MgH2-TTNT composite, respectively. The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC examination provided some evidence with the shifting of the peaks obtained when the amount of TTNT is increased. The hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics tests showed that the TTNT nanotubes can enhance hydrogen sorption effectively and the total hydrogen capacity obtained was 6.5 wt. (%.

  10. The effect of TTNT nanotubes on hydrogen sorption using MgH{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brum, Mariana Coutinho; Jardim, Paula Mendes; Conceicao, Monique Osorio Talarico da; Santos, Dilson Silva dos, E-mail: monique@metalmat.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEMM/COPPEP/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2013-11-01

    Nanotubes are promising materials to be used with magnesium hydride, as catalysts, in order to enhance hydrogen sorption. A study was performed on the hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of MgH{sub 2} with the addition of TTNT (TiTanate nanotubes). The MgH{sub 2} -TTNT composite was prepared by ball milling and the influence of the TTNT amount (1.0 and 5.0 wt. (%)) on the hydrogen capacity was evaluated. The milling of pure MgH{sub 2} was performed for 24 hours and afterwards the MgH{sub 2} -TTNT composite was milled for 20 minutes. Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to evaluate the nanotube synthesis and show the particle morphology of the MgH{sub 2} -TTNT composite, respectively. The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) examination provided some evidence with the shifting of the peaks obtained when the amount of TTNT is increased. The hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics tests showed that the TTNT nanotubes can enhance hydrogen sorption effectively and the total hydrogen capacity obtained was 6.5 wt. (%). (author)

  11. Annealing effect on thermodynamic and physical properties of mesoporous silicon: A simulation and nitrogen sorption study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pushpendra; Huber, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Discovery of porous silicon formation in silicon substrate in 1956 while electro-polishing crystalline Si in hydrofluoric acid (HF), has triggered large scale investigations of porous silicon formation and their changes in physical and chemical properties with thermal and chemical treatment. A nitrogen sorption study is used to investigate the effect of thermal annealing on electrochemically etched mesoporous silicon (PS). The PS was thermally annealed from 200˚C to 800˚C for 1 hr in the presence of air. It was shown that the pore diameter and porosity of PS vary with annealing temperature. The experimentally obtained adsorption / desorption isotherms show hysteresis typical for capillary condensation in porous materials. A simulation study based on Saam and Cole model was performed and compared with experimentally observed sorption isotherms to study the physics behind of hysteresis formation. We discuss the shape of the hysteresis loops in the framework of the morphology of the layers. The different behavior of adsorption and desorption of nitrogen in PS with pore diameter was discussed in terms of concave menisci formation inside the pore space, which was shown to related with the induced pressure in varying the pore diameter from 7.2 nm to 3.4 nm.

  12. The effect of TTNT nanotubes on hydrogen sorption using MgH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brum, Mariana Coutinho; Jardim, Paula Mendes; Conceicao, Monique Osorio Talarico da; Santos, Dilson Silva dos

    2013-01-01

    Nanotubes are promising materials to be used with magnesium hydride, as catalysts, in order to enhance hydrogen sorption. A study was performed on the hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of MgH 2 with the addition of TTNT (TiTanate nanotubes). The MgH 2 -TTNT composite was prepared by ball milling and the influence of the TTNT amount (1.0 and 5.0 wt. (%)) on the hydrogen capacity was evaluated. The milling of pure MgH 2 was performed for 24 hours and afterwards the MgH 2 -TTNT composite was milled for 20 minutes. Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to evaluate the nanotube synthesis and show the particle morphology of the MgH 2 -TTNT composite, respectively. The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) examination provided some evidence with the shifting of the peaks obtained when the amount of TTNT is increased. The hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics tests showed that the TTNT nanotubes can enhance hydrogen sorption effectively and the total hydrogen capacity obtained was 6.5 wt. (%). (author)

  13. Managing Guest as an Asset: a Conceptual Review in the Context of Accommodation Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Suhartanto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the concept of a customer as an asset of business in the accommodation industry. The purpose of this article is to examine the value of guests as a firm asset and to propose a model for managing guests as an asset in the context of accommodation services. A guest is considered an asset due to its role in providing revenue to the accommodation firm. Because of this role, the accommodation guest needs to be managed appropriately. This article argues that guest service evaluation (i.e. service quality, perceived value, and guest satisfaction and service loyalty are important factors in the development of guest lifetime value. The proposed model of managing guests as an asset consists of marketing instruments, service evaluation, guest loyalty, and financial outcomes provides a comprehensive guide on how accommodation firms can manage the lifetime value of their guests. Finally, as there are limited studies examining this issue, future research should test the proposed model.

  14. Dosimeter-Type NOx Sensing Properties of KMnO4 and Its Electrical Conductivity during Temperature Programmed Desorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Moos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An impedimetric NOx dosimeter based on the NOx sorption material KMnO4 is proposed. In addition to its application as a low level NOx dosimeter, KMnO4 shows potential as a precious metal free lean NOx trap material (LNT for NOx storage catalysts (NSC enabling electrical in-situ diagnostics. With this dosimeter, low levels of NO and NO2 exposure can be detected electrically as instantaneous values at 380 °C by progressive NOx accumulation in the KMnO4 based sensitive layer. The linear NOx sensing characteristics are recovered periodically by heating to 650 °C or switching to rich atmospheres. Further insight into the NOx sorption-dependent conductivity of the KMnO4-based material is obtained by the novel eTPD method that combines electrical characterization with classical temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The NOx loading amount increases proportionally to the NOx exposure time at sorption temperature. The cumulated NOx exposure, as well as the corresponding NOx loading state, can be detected linearly by electrical means in two modes: (1 time-continuously during the sorption interval including NOx concentration information from the signal derivative or (2 during the short-term thermal NOx release.

  15. Investigation of the charge boost technology for the efficiency increase of closed sorption thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohringer, C.; Engel, G.; Köll, R.; Wagner, W.; van Helden, W.

    2017-10-01

    The inclusion of solar thermal energy into energy systems requires storage possibilities to overcome the gap between supply and demand. Storage of thermal energy with closed sorption thermal energy systems has the advantage of low thermal losses and high energy density. However, the efficiency of these systems needs yet to be increased to become competitive on the market. In this paper, the so-called “charge boost technology” is developed and tested via experiments as a new concept for the efficiency increase of compact thermal energy storages. The main benefit of the charge boost technology is that it can reach a defined state of charge for sorption thermal energy storages at lower temperature levels than classic pure desorption processes. Experiments are conducted to provide a proof of principle for this concept. The results show that the charge boost technology does function as predicted and is a viable option for further improvement of sorption thermal energy storages. Subsequently, a new process application is developed by the author with strong focus on the utilization of the advantages of the charge boost technology over conventional desorption processes. After completion of the conceptual design, the theoretical calculations are validated via experiments.

  16. Sorption of uranyl ions on hydrous oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.R.; Venkataramani, B.

    1988-01-01

    Sorption of uranyl ions on hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO), magnetite (MAG), and hydrous thorium oxide (HThO) has been studied as a function of pH. Hydrous oxides have been characterized by their pH-titration curves, intrinsic dissociation constants (pK ai * ) and point of zero charge (pH pzc ). The fraction of protonated surface hydroxyl groups as well as the surface pH (pH surf ) as a function of solution pH have been computed. The distribution of various hydrolyzed species of uranyl ions with solution pH have been compared with uranyl sorption isotherm on these oxides. Sorption edge in all the cases occurs when free hydroxyl groups are available on the surface and pH surf is sufficiently high to favor the formation of dimer-like species on the surface. A new model for the sorption process, called surface hydrolysis model, which explains these and other features of uranyl sorption on hydrous oxides has been proposed. The model visualizes the sorption process as linking of uranyl ions with two adjacent free surface hydroxyl groups without deprotonation (provided the surface pH is high for the hydrolysis of uranyl ions) and formation of dimer-like structures on the surface. The new model has been successfully applied to the present and other available data on uranyl ion sorption on hydrous oxides. (author)

  17. Functionalization of Magnetic Chitosan Particles for the Sorption of U(VI, Cu(II and Zn(II—Hydrazide Derivative of Glycine-Grafted Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed F. Hamza

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new magnetic functionalized derivative of chitosan is synthesized and characterized for the sorption of metal ions (environmental applications and metal valorization. The chemical modification of the glycine derivative of chitosan consists of: activation of the magnetic support with epichlorohydrin, followed by reaction with either glycine to produce the reference material (i.e., Gly sorbent or glycine ester hydrochloride, followed by hydrazinolysis to synthesize the hydrazide functionalized sorbent (i.e., HGly sorbent. The materials are characterized by titration, elemental analysis, FTIR analysis (Fourrier-transform infrared spectrometry, TGA analysis (thermogravimetric analysis and with SEM-EDX (scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The sorption performances for U(VI, Cu(II, and Zn(II are tested in batch systems. The sorption performances are compared for Gly and HGly taking into account the effect of pH, the uptake kinetics (fitted by the pseudo-second order rate equation, and the sorption isotherms (described by the Langmuir and the Sips equations. The sorption capacities of the modified sorbent reach up to 1.14 mmol U g−1, 1.69 mmol Cu g−1, and 0.85 mmol Zn g−1. In multi-metal solutions of equimolar concentration, the chemical modification changes the preferences for given metal ions. Metal ions are desorbed using 0.2 M HCl solutions and the sorbents are re-used for five cycles of sorption/desorption without significant loss in performances.

  18. As(III) and As(V) sorption on iron-modified non-pyrolyzed and pyrolyzed biomass from Petroselinum crispum (parsley).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Cedillo, M J; Olguín, M T; Fall, C; Colin-Cruz, A

    2013-03-15

    The sorption of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions onto iron-modified Petroselinum crispum (PCFe) and iron-modified carbonaceous material from the pyrolysis of P. crispum (PCTTFe) was investigated. The modified sorbents were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. The sorbent elemental composition was determined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The principal functional groups from the sorbents were determined with FT-IR. The specific surfaces and points of zero charge (pzc) of the materials were also determined. As(III) and As(V) sorption onto the modified sorbents were performed in a batch system. After the sorption process, the As content in the liquid and solid phases was determined with atomic absorption and neutron activation analyses, respectively. After the arsenic sorption processes, the desorption of Fe from PCFe and PCTTFe was verified with atomic absorption spectrometry. The morphology of PC changed after iron modification. The specific area and pzc differed significantly between the iron-modified non-pyrolyzed and pyrolyzed P. crispum. The kinetics of the arsenite and arsenate sorption processes were described with a pseudo-second-order model. The Langmuir-Freundlich model provided the isotherms with the best fit. Less than 0.02% of the Fe was desorbed from the PCFe and PCTTFe after the As(III) and As(V) sorption processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High surface area niobium oxides as catalysts for improved hydrogen sorption properties of ball milled MgH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, V.V.; Rougier, A.; Aymard, L.; Nazri, G.A.; Tarascon, J.-M.

    2008-01-01

    We report, high surface area (up to 200 m 2 /g) nanocrystalline niobium oxide (so called p-Nb 2 O 5 ) synthesized by 'chimie douce' route and its importance in enhancing the hydrogen sorption properties of MgH 2 . p-Nb 2 O 5 induces faster kinetics than commonly used commercial Nb 2 O 5 (c-Nb 2 O 5 ) when ball milled with MgH 2 (named (MgH 2 ) catalyst ) by reducing the time of desorption from 35 min in (MgH 2 ) c-Nb 2 O 5 to 12 min in (MgH 2 ) p-Nb 2 O 5 at 300 deg. C. The BET surface area of as-prepared Nb 2 O 5 was tuned by heat treatment and its effect on sorption properties was studied. Among them, both p-Nb 2 O 5 and Nb 2 O 5 :350 (p-Nb 2 O 5 heated to 350 deg. C with a BET specific surface area of 46 m 2 /g) desorb 5 wt.% within 12 min, exhibiting the best catalytic activity. Furthermore, thanks to the addition of high surface area Nb 2 O 5 , the desorption temperature was successfully lowered down to 200 deg. C, with a significant amount of desorbed hydrogen (4.5 wt.%). In contrast, the composite (MgH 2 ) c-Nb 2 O 5 shows no desorption at this 'low' temperature

  20. Adsorption-desorption characteristics of Ni, Zn and Pb in soils of a landfill environment in Metro Manila, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castañeda, Soledad S.; Cuarto, Christina D.; David, Carlos Primo C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the sorption-desorption characteristics of Ni, Zn, and Pb on two soil types in the environment of a municipal waste disposal facility. Batch experiments were carried out in ambient temperature and in unadjusted and close to soil field pH conditions. The kinetics of of adsorption fitted a pseudo second-order model. Rate constants were calculated and an empirical model for predicting adsorption of metal ions at a given time was derived from these constants. The equilibrium sorption capacities for the heavy metals in the clay and sandy loam soils were estimated using the Linear, Freundlich, and Langmuir isotherm models. The sorption process of Ni, Pb, and Zn in both soils generally fitted well with the Freundlich isotherm model at moderate to high initial concentration range of the metals. The Langmuir isotherm was applicable to the adsorption of Ni and Zn only. The adsorption capacity of the clay soil for the metals followed the order Zn > Pb > Ni. In the sandy loam soil, the adsorption capacity for the metals under the same conditions followed the order Pb > Zn > Ni. The adsorption capacities for the metals were in order of 1mg/g in both the landfill clay soil and the Lukutan River sandy loam soil, with slightly higher values for the clay soil. Desorption was minimal, less than 1% in the clay soil and about 2% in the sandy loam soil. Sorption reversibility tests showed that the retention of the metals in both soils follows the order Ni> Pb> Zn. (author)

  1. Heavy metal sorption by microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandau, E.; Sandau, P.; Pulz, O.

    1996-01-01

    Viable microalgae are known to be able to accumulate heavy metals (bioaccumulation). Against a background of the increasing environmental risks caused by heavy metals, the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Spirulina platensis and their potential for the biological removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions were taken as an example for investigation. Small-scale cultivation tests (50 l) with Cd-resistant cells of Chlorella vulgaris have shown that approx. 40% of the added 10 mg Cd/l was removed from the solution within seven days. At this heavy metal concentration sensitive cells died. Non-viable microalgae are able to eliminate heavy metal ions in a short time by biosorption in uncomplicated systems, without any toxicity problems. Compared with original biomasses, the sorption capacity of microalgal by-products changes only insignificantly. Their low price makes them economical. (orig.)

  2. Characterization of sorption properties of selected soils from Lublin region by using water vapour adsorption method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skic, Kamil; Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-04-01

    *The studies were carried out within the framework of a research project. The project was financed from funds of National Science Center on the base of decision number DEC-2013/11/D/NZ9/02545 Among many methods proposed to study sorption properties of soils an analysis of adsorption/ desorption isotherm is probably the easiest and most convenient one. It characterizes both quantity and quality of mineral and organic components and also their physical and physicochemical properties. The main aim of this study is comparison of sorption properties of selected Polish soils by using water vapour adsorption method. Samples were taken from the depth of 0-20 cm, from the Lublin region, eastern Poland. Soils were selected on the basis of their different physicochemical properties and were classified as: Haplic Fluvisol, Haplic Chernozem, Mollic Gleysol, Rendzic Phaeozem, Stagnic Luvisol, Haplic Cambisol (WG WRB 2006). Data taken from experimental adsorption isotherms were used to determine parameters of monolayer capacity, specific surface area and the total amount of vapour adsorbed at relative pressure of 0.974. Obtained adsorption and desorption isotherms reviled that adsorbate molecules interacted with the soil particles in different extent. Similar monolayer capacity was observed for Haplic Fluvisol, Haplic Chernozem and Stagnic Luvisol, while for Mollic Gleysol was more than 4 times higher. Mollic Gleysol was also characterized by highest values of specific surface area as well as quantity of adsorbed vapour at relative pressure of 0.974. Higher sorption was caused by presence of soil colloids which contains functional groups of a polar nature (mainly hydroxyls, phenolic and carboxyls). These groups similarly to silicates, oxides, hydratable cations as well as electric charge form adsorption centres for water vapour molecules.

  3. Sorption of methylxanthines by different sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, S. G.; Andreeva, E. Yu.; Tolmacheva, V. V.; Terent'eva, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    Sorption of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine, diprophylline, and pentoxyphylline on different sorbents (supercross-linked polystyrene, surface-modified copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene Strata-X, and carbon nanomaterials Taunit and Diasorb-100-C16T) was studied in a static mode in an effort to find new sorbents suitable for sorption isolation and concentration of methylxanthines. The peculiarities of sorption of methylxanthines were explained in relation to the solution acidity, the nature of the sorbates and their concentration, the nature of the solvent, and the structural characteristics of the sorbents.

  4. Sorption isolation of strontium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, V.A.; Zheleznov, V.V.; Kaplun, E.V.; Sokol'nitskaya, T.A.; Yukhkam, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Sorption isolation of strontium from seawater is considered and prospects of use of selective adsorbents for purification of seawater or liquid radioactive wastes mixed with seawater from 90 Sr are discussed. Comparative analysis of sorptive properties of adsorbents of different nature is done. It is shown that sorption-reagent materials developed by authors can to afford effective separation of 90 Sr from seawater. Possible mechanism of strontium sorption by these adsorbents is considered. The prospect of their use for purification of liquid radioactive wastes from strontium is shown [ru

  5. Radionuclide sorption behavior in particulate matter in near coastal marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, A.M.; Ortega-Lara, V.; Leckie, J.O.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: In order to evaluate the migration behavior of radioactive cesium and strontium while transported from continental aquatic systems to marine environments, the sorption behaviors for these metals were evaluated in several different environments. Laboratory experiments using radioactive tracers, and equilibrium as well as time dependent modeling were used to evaluate and quantify the distribution of the two elements as a function of element chemistry, solid substrate characteristics and solution composition. The experimental conditions reflected salinities ranging from those found in rivers and lakes through estuaries to the ocean. Adsorption constants were obtained for strontium in natural sediments from these aquatic environments. The strontium specification was evaluated in solution as well as in the adsorbed state. Sorption of strontium occurred mainly as outer sphere complexes. Major cations, ligands (soluble and particulate), ionic strength, and pH were among parameters that affected the distribution of cesium and strontium between adsorbed and dissolved forms. Time-dependent sorption behaviors were observed under study dissolved salt and suspended sediment conditions. Desorption occurred to some degree for all sediment types. Cesium was exchanged with potassium and sodium in clay minerals and was therefore less desorbed than would be expected. The results allowed the description of migration behaviors of two important pollutants from the atomic energy industry

  6. Prediction of uranium and technetium sorption during titration of contaminated acidic groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fan, E-mail: zhangfan@itpcas.ac.cn [Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Parker, Jack C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Brooks, Scott C.; Watson, David B. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 (United States); Jardine, Philip M. [Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Gu, Baohua [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    This study investigates uranium and technetium sorption onto aluminum and iron hydroxides during titration of acidic groundwater. The contaminated groundwater exhibits oxic conditions with high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U, Tc, and various metal cations. More than 90% of U and Tc was removed from the aqueous phase as Al and Fe precipitated above pH 5.5, but was partially resolublized at higher pH values. An equilibrium hydrolysis and precipitation reaction model adequately described variations in aqueous concentrations of metal cations. An anion exchange reaction model was incorporated to simulate sulfate, U and Tc sorption onto variably charged (pH-dependent) Al and Fe hydroxides. Modeling results indicate that competitive sorption/desorption on mixed mineral phases needs to be considered to adequately predict U and Tc mobility. The model could be useful for future studies of the speciation of U, Tc and co-existing ions during pre- and post-groundwater treatment practices.

  7. Moisture Sorption Isotherms and Properties of Sorbed Water of Neem ( Azadirichta indica A. Juss) Kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngono Mbarga, M. C.; Bup Nde, D.; Mohagir, A.; Kapseu, C.; Elambo Nkeng, G.

    2017-01-01

    A neem tree growing abundantly in India as well as in some regions of Asia and Africa gives fruits whose kernels have about 40-50% oil. This oil has high therapeutic and cosmetic qualities and is recently projected to be an important raw material for the production of biodiesel. Its seed is harvested at high moisture contents, which leads tohigh post-harvest losses. In the paper, the sorption isotherms are determined by the static gravimetric method at 40, 50, and 60°C to establish a database useful in defining drying and storage conditions of neem kernels. Five different equations are validated for modeling the sorption isotherms of neem kernels. The properties of sorbed water, such as the monolayer moisture content, surface area of adsorbent, number of adsorbed monolayers, and the percent of bound water are also defined. The critical moisture content necessary for the safe storage of dried neem kernels is shown to range from 5 to 10% dry basis, which can be obtained at a relative humidity less than 65%. The isosteric heats of sorption at 5% moisture content are 7.40 and 22.5 kJ/kg for the adsorption and desorption processes, respectively. This work is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to give the important parameters necessary for drying and storage of neem kernels, a potential raw material for the production of oil to be used in pharmaceutics, cosmetics, and biodiesel manufacturing.

  8. The effect of organics on the sorption of cobalt by glacial sand in laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haigh, G.; Williams, G.M.; Hooker, P.J.; Ross, C.A.M.; Allen, M.R.

    1989-02-01

    The effect of acetate, EDTA and natural organic compounds in groundwater at Drigg test site, on the sorption of cobalt by glacial sand has been studied in a series of batch experiments. Removing 50% of the organic material from the groundwater with DEAE cellulose increased the distribution ratio (R d ) of cobalt by a factor of about two. The addition of both EDTA and acetate to the sand/water system led to the removal of Ca, Mg, Sr and Ba from solution. Both organic compounds had the effect of reducing the pH and bicarbonated concentrations. EDTA also removed iron from the solution. EDTA reduced the R d for Co by up to 2 orders of magnitude. At EDTA concentrations greater than 5mg/1, there was no further reduction in sorption. EDTA was not itself sorbed, but formed a mobile complex with Co. Within the same period of equilibrium, the R d values were lower when EDTA was allowed to equilibrate with the sand before adding cobalt. The desorption of cobalt from the minerals surface may be a rate limiting step such that equilibrium was not achieved within the 14 day period of these experiments. Acetate had no effect of cobalt sorption. (author)

  9. Desorption of cadmium from a natural Shanghai clay using citric acid industrial wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yingying; Yeung, Albert T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → CAIW is very effective in desorbing cadmium from soil particle surfaces at soil mixture pHs of lower than 5. → The cadmium desorption efficiency of CAIW also depends on the initial sorbed concentration of cadmium on soil particle surfaces. → Complexions of cadmium with citric acid and acetic acid are the dominant mechanisms for cadmium desorption in the soil mixture pH range of 4-8. → CAIW may be a promising enhancement agent for the remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils. - Abstract: The sorption/desorption characteristics of heavy metals onto/from soil particle surfaces are the primary factors controlling the success of the remediation of heavy-metal contaminated soils. These characteristics are pH-dependent, chemical-specific, and reversible; and can be modified by enhancement agents such as chelates and surfactants. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using citric acid industrial wastewater (CAIW) to desorb cadmium from a natural clay from Shanghai, China at different soil mixture pHs. It can be observed from the results that the proportion of cadmium desorbed from the soil using synthesized CAIW is generally satisfactory, i.e., >60%, when the soil mixture pH is lower than 6. However, the proportion of desorbed cadmium decreases significantly with increase in soil mixture pH. The dominant cadmium desorption mechanism using CAIW is the complexion of cadmium with citric acid and acetic acid in CAIW. It is concluded that CAIW can be a promising enhancement agent for the remediation of cadmium-contaminated natural soils when the environmental conditions are favorable. As a result, CAIW, a waste product itself, can be put into productive use in soil remediation.

  10. Desorption of cadmium from a natural Shanghai clay using citric acid industrial wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Yingying, E-mail: guyong99hg@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, China University of Petroleum (East China), 66 West Changjiang Road, Qingdao 266555 (China); Yeung, Albert T., E-mail: yeungat@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} CAIW is very effective in desorbing cadmium from soil particle surfaces at soil mixture pHs of lower than 5. {yields} The cadmium desorption efficiency of CAIW also depends on the initial sorbed concentration of cadmium on soil particle surfaces. {yields} Complexions of cadmium with citric acid and acetic acid are the dominant mechanisms for cadmium desorption in the soil mixture pH range of 4-8. {yields} CAIW may be a promising enhancement agent for the remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils. - Abstract: The sorption/desorption characteristics of heavy metals onto/from soil particle surfaces are the primary factors controlling the success of the remediation of heavy-metal contaminated soils. These characteristics are pH-dependent, chemical-specific, and reversible; and can be modified by enhancement agents such as chelates and surfactants. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using citric acid industrial wastewater (CAIW) to desorb cadmium from a natural clay from Shanghai, China at different soil mixture pHs. It can be observed from the results that the proportion of cadmium desorbed from the soil using synthesized CAIW is generally satisfactory, i.e., >60%, when the soil mixture pH is lower than 6. However, the proportion of desorbed cadmium decreases significantly with increase in soil mixture pH. The dominant cadmium desorption mechanism using CAIW is the complexion of cadmium with citric acid and acetic acid in CAIW. It is concluded that CAIW can be a promising enhancement agent for the remediation of cadmium-contaminated natural soils when the environmental conditions are favorable. As a result, CAIW, a waste product itself, can be put into productive use in soil remediation.

  11. Adsorption and desorption of carbaryl on hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide modified zeolite NaY using RGB portable photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patdhanagul, Nopbhasinthu; Chanpaka, Saiphon; Intharaksa, Orapan; Sirival, Rujikarn; Thanomsith, Kannikar; Wongkwanklom, Sarayuth

    2018-04-01

    The carbaryl adsorption-desorption isotherms of zeolite NaY and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HTAB) modified zeolite NaY were investigated. Zeolite NaY was synthesized and modified by HTAB in the concentration range 0.1 - 10.0 mM. The adsorption isotherms indicated that zeolite modified with HTAB could significantly enhance the carbaryl adsorption capacity. Zeolite NaY modified with 5.0 mM HTAB gave great carbaryl adsorption because of hydrophilic surface. The 5.0 mM HTAB could adsorb up to 145.75 ppm g-1 of carbaryl which was equivalent to a 36.7% increase. The Surface area characterization showed the remaining of pore volume and pore size diameter and external surface area whereas the BET surface area and micropore surface area of modified zeolite slightly decreased. The XRD results indicate that modification of zeolite NaY with HTAB does not change the crystallinity of the starting zeolite. The elemental analysis indicated that the Si/Al ratio of synthesized zeolite NaY was close to 2.43. Desorption of carbaryl was tested by organic solvents such as methanol, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran, hexane and Deionized water. The results demonstrated that the percentage desorption of methanol is the highest. Carbaryl was quantitatively desorbed with percentage desorption of 82-100 %. It indicated sorption mechanism of carbaryl on the modified sorbent which was principally driven by hydrophobic forces.

  12. Desorption of 137Cs from Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. using solutions of acids and their salts mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA A. ČUČULOVIĆ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The desorption of 137Cs from Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. lichen was investigated using the solutions: A H2SO4–HNO3–K2SO4, B H2SO4–HNO3–Na2SO4 and C H2SO4–HNO3– (NH42SO4–(NH4NO3 at pH 2.00, 2.58, 2.87, 3.28 and 3.75, similar to acid rain. After five consecutive desorptions using solutions A, B and C, from 44.0 % (solution B, pH 3.75 to 68.8 % (solution C, pH 3.28 of 137Cs had been desorbed from the lichen. In all cases, the most successful 137Cs desorption was the first one. In the presence of K+ (solution A the total amount of desorbed 137Cs did not depend on the pH of the solution and this was confirmed by the analogous reactions of Cs+ and K+, due to their similar ionic radii. The dependencies of the non-desorbed content of 137Cs on the number of desorptions gave curves indicating that at least two types of sorption occur. One of them can be dominant if suitable desorbants are used. The results indicate lichens as secondary sources of environment pollution with 137Cs.

  13. Moisture Sorption in Porous Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    2007-01-01

    pressure and weight data can be "translated" to pore geometry by known physical relationships. In this context, analytical descriptions are important which can relate moisture condensation in pore structures to ambient vapor pressure. Such a description, the extended BET-relation, is presented...... physical parameters, the so-called BET-parameters: The heat property factor, C, and the pore surface, SBET (derived from the so-called uni-molecular moisture content uBET). A software ‘SORP07’ has been developed to handle any calculations made in the paper. For readers who have a special interest...... in the subject considered this software is available on request to the author. Keywords: Porous materials, moisture, adsorption, desorption, BET-parameters....

  14. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Tezuka, Kyoichi; Taguchi, Tatsuhiko; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K.; Ohmura, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the ...

  15. Business Guests Satisfaction in the Hotel Industry: A Case Study of North American Hotel Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Milan Bradić; Ljiljana Kosar; Bojana Kalenjuk

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of satisfaction of business guests with hotel brands in North America. In analysis we used the guests responses (scores) given for 12 different elements of hotel product. In order to arrive at more accurate results, monitored hotel chains are grouped into price tiers. The aim of this paper is to indicate what facilities and services the North American business guests appreciate most. Industry trends and results may be beneficial to all hoteliers, especially in...

  16. Deuterium desorption from tungsten using laser heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Retention and desorption of hydrogenic species need to be accurately modeled to predict the tritium inventory of next generation fusion devices, which is needed both for tritium fuel recovery and for tritium safety concerns. In this paper, experiments on thermal desorption of deuterium from intrinsic polycrystalline tungsten defects using laser heating are compared to TMAP-7 modeling. The samples during deuterium plasma exposure were at a temperature of 373K for this benchmark study with ion fluence of 0.7–1.0 ×1024Dm−2. Following plasma exposure, a fiber laser (λ= 1100nm heated the samples to peak surface temperatures ranging from ∼500 to 1400K with pulse widths from 10ms to 1s, and 1 to 10 pulses applied to each sample. The remaining deuterium retention was measured using temperature programmed desorption (TPD. Results show that > 95% of deuterium is desorbed when the peak surface temperature reached ∼950K for > 1s. TMAP-7 is used to predict deuterium desorption from tungsten for a range of surface temperatures and heating durations, and is compared to previous work on desorption from beryllium codeposits.

  17. PCB congener sorption to carbonaceous sediment components: Macroscopic comparison and characterization of sorption kinetics and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyeok; Al-Abed, Souhail R.

    2009-01-01

    Sorption of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to sediment is a key process in determining their mobility, bioavailability, and chemical decomposition in aquatic environments. In order to examine the validity of currently used interpretation approaches for PCBs sorption, comparative results on 2-chlorobiphenyl sorption to carbonaceous components in sediments (activated carbon, carbon black, coal, soot, graphite, flyash, wood) were macroscopically correlated with the structural, morphological, crystallographic, and compositional properties of the carbonaceous components. Since the Freundlich sorption constant, K F (L kg -1 ) spanned several orders of magnitude, ranging from log K F of 6.13-5.27 for activated carbon, 5.04 for carbon black, 3.83 for coal to 3.08 for wood, organic carbon partitioning approach should be more specifically categorized, considering the various forms, nature and origins of organic carbon in sediment. Sorption rate constants and fraction parameters, which were numerically defined from empirical kinetic model with fast and slow sorption fractions, were closely related to the physicochemical properties of the carbonaceous components. Sorption interpretation approaches with a specific property and viewpoint, such as organic carbon partitioning, soot carbon distribution, or surface area correlation, did not properly explain the overall results on sorption capacity, fast and slow sorption kinetics, and partitioning coefficient. It is also important to emphasize the heterogeneous nature of sediment and the difficulties of encompassing the partitioning among its carbonaceous components.

  18. PCB congener sorption to carbonaceous sediment components: Macroscopic comparison and characterization of sorption kinetics and mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeok [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R., E-mail: al-abed.souhail@epa.gov [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Sorption of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to sediment is a key process in determining their mobility, bioavailability, and chemical decomposition in aquatic environments. In order to examine the validity of currently used interpretation approaches for PCBs sorption, comparative results on 2-chlorobiphenyl sorption to carbonaceous components in sediments (activated carbon, carbon black, coal, soot, graphite, flyash, wood) were macroscopically correlated with the structural, morphological, crystallographic, and compositional properties of the carbonaceous components. Since the Freundlich sorption constant, K{sub F} (L kg{sup -1}) spanned several orders of magnitude, ranging from log K{sub F} of 6.13-5.27 for activated carbon, 5.04 for carbon black, 3.83 for coal to 3.08 for wood, organic carbon partitioning approach should be more specifically categorized, considering the various forms, nature and origins of organic carbon in sediment. Sorption rate constants and fraction parameters, which were numerically defined from empirical kinetic model with fast and slow sorption fractions, were closely related to the physicochemical properties of the carbonaceous components. Sorption interpretation approaches with a specific property and viewpoint, such as organic carbon partitioning, soot carbon distribution, or surface area correlation, did not properly explain the overall results on sorption capacity, fast and slow sorption kinetics, and partitioning coefficient. It is also important to emphasize the heterogeneous nature of sediment and the difficulties of encompassing the partitioning among its carbonaceous components.

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a tool investigating arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) sorption by an aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Parsons, Jason G; Datta, Rupali; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-11-15

    Historic applications of arsenical pesticides to agricultural land have resulted in accumulation of residual arsenic (As) in such soils. In situ immobilization represents a cost-effective and least ecological disrupting treatment technology for soil As. Earlier work in our laboratory showed that drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs), a low-cost, waste by-product of the drinking-water treatment process exhibit a high affinity for As. Wet chemical experiments (sorption kinetics and desorption) were coupled with X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to elucidate the bonding strength and type of As(V) and As(III) sorption by an aluminum-based WTR. A fast (1h), followed by a slower sorption stage resulted in As(V) and As(III) sorption capacities of 96% and 77%, respectively. Arsenic desorption with a 5mM oxalate from the WTR was minimal, being always absorption spectroscopy data showed inner-sphere complexation between As and surface hydroxyls. Reaction time (up to 48h) had no effect on the initial As oxidation state for sorbed As(V) and As(III). A combination of inner-sphere bonding types occurred between As and Al on the WTR surface because mixed surface geometries and interatomic distances were observed.

  20. Carbon dioxide sorption on EDTA modified halloysite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waszczuk Patrycja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the sorption study of CO2 on EDTA surface modified halloysite was conducted. In the paper chemical modification of halloysite from the Dunino deposit (Poland and its influence on sorption of CO2 are presented. A halloysite samples were washed with water-EDTA 1% solution, centrifuged to separate liquid and impurities and dried. The samples were tested for the sorption capacity using a manometric method with pressure up to 3 MPa. A Langmuir adsorption model was fitted to the data. The results showed that EDTA had a limited effect on the increase of sorption potential at low pressure and the samples exhibited similar results to that ones treated solely with the water solution.

  1. Sorption of metaldehyde using granular activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salvestrini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the ability of granular activated carbon (GAC to sorb metaldehyde was evaluated. The kinetic data could be described by an intra-particle diffusion model, which indicated that the porosity of the sorbent strongly influenced the rate of sorption. The analysis of the equilibrium sorption data revealed that ionic strength and temperature did not play any significant role in the metaldehyde uptake. The sorption isotherms were successfully predicted by the Freundlich model. The GAC used in this paper exhibited a higher affinity and sorption capacity for metaldehyde with respect to other GACs studied in previous works, probably as a result of its higher specific surface area and high point of zero charge.

  2. Radionuclide sorption on granitic drill core material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.; Locklund, B.

    1987-11-01

    Distribution ratios were determined for Sr-85, Cs-134 and Eu-152 on crushed granite and fissure coating/filling material from Stripa mines. Measurements were also carried out on intact fissure surfaces. The experimental data for Sr-85, Cs-134 on crushed material can be accomodated by a sorption model based on the assumption that the crushed material consists of porous spheres with outer and inner surfaces available for sorption. In the case of Eu-152 only sorption on the outer surfaces of the crushed material was observed. The absence of sorption on inner surfaces is most probably due to high depletion of the more strongly sorbed Eu-152 in the water phase and very low diffusivity of Eu-152 in the sorbed state. (orig./HP)

  3. Tweens on the Internet - communication in virtual guest books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnBritt Enochsson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available  Today digital communication is a natural part of young people’s social life. It has increased drastically during the last few years, and there are still a lot of questions about what this means, and how this new media affects communication. This study focuses on young people of 11-13, i.e.the age between children and teenagers, also called tweens. In a large study, the overall aim is to see what communication in the Internet community LunarStorm means to them in their social life. This particular paper reports on the content of the asynchronous communication in the participants’ digital guest books, which is one of the main channels for communication between the participants. A group of 15 tweens from a small village in Sweden were studied when communicating in Sweden’s largest Internet community, LunarStorm. The research method used was what is usually described as cyber ethnography. The contributions in the participants’ digital guest books are not written by the guest book owners themselves, which means that the focus is on the collective aspects of this communication, and not from a specific children’s point of view. Qualitative analyses were made of the content of 947 contributions in the participants’ guest books in order to make a statistical analysis. Most of the participants’ communication was between friends in the same geographical neighbourhood concerning how things are going, what to do, when to meet and similar things. The contributions were divided into three categories: (1 Social chat (2 Chain letters, and (3 Messages incomprehensible to outsiders. The information-category was divided into three sub-categories depending on the emotions expressed. 44% of the total messages were considered as emotionally neutral information, 39% as kind or encouraging, and also with an aim to sort things out, and 6% of the total messages contained insults and elements of anger. Among the younger users of the Internet community

  4. Guest Room Lighting at the Hilton Columbus Downtown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-06-30

    At the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Ohio, DOE's Better Buildings Alliance conducted a demonstration of Next Generation Luminaires-winning downlights installed in all guest rooms and suites prior to the hotel's 2012 opening. After a post-occupancy assessment, the LED downlights not only provided the aesthetic appearance and dimming functionality desired, but also provided 50% energy savings relative to a comparable CFL downlight and enabled the lighting power to be more than 20% below that allowed by code. This document is a summary case study of the report.

  5. The hotel comment card: a motivator of guest satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred W. Ogle

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This   paper   explores   the   traditional   pen   and   paper   hotel   comment   card   (HCC   from   the  guests’  perspective  to  gain  an  insight  and  to  improve  its  effectiveness.  The  HCC  has  long  been   the  predominant  method  of  soliciting  guest  feedback.  Although  electronic  methods  of  collection  are  now  available  the  HCC  has  a  sense  of  familiarity,  has  general  acceptance,  and   is   widely   employed.   Initially,   a   literature   review   of   the   hotel   comment   card   is  provided.  Then,  the  study  explores  how  frequent  guests  categorize  HCC  attributes.  These  attributes  are  then  extended  to  include  evaluation  criteria  identified  in  the  literature  and  desired  by  hotel  managers.    The  extended  evaluation  criterion  is  then  used  to  explore  how  frequent  hotel  guests  believe  that  future  HCCs  may  motivate  guests  to  provide  feedback   and   assist   in   the   co-­creation   of   value.   The   overall   finding   is   that   the   HCCs   design   and  execution  can  be  improved.

  6. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of Pb(II, Cd(II and Zn(II sorption by Lagenaria vulgaris shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić-Stojanović Dragana-Linda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of lead, cadmium and zinc ions from aqueous solution by Lagenaria vulgaris shell biosorbent (LVB in batch system was investigated. The effect of relevant parameters such as contact time, biosorbent dosage and initial metal ions concentration was evaluated. The Pb(II, Cd(II and Zn(II sorption equilibrium (when 98% of initial metal ions were sorbed was attained within 15, 20 and 25 min, respectively. The pseudo first, pseudo-second order, Chrastil’s and intra-particle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetic data. The experimental data fitted the pseudo-second order kinetic model and intra-particle diffusion model. Removal efficiency of lead(II, cadmium(II and zinc(II ions rapidly increased with increasing biosorbent dose from 0.5 to 8.0 g dm-3. Optimal biosorbent dose was set to 4.0 g dm-3. An increase in the initial metal concentration increases the sorption capacity. The sorption data of investigated metal ions are fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. Langmuir model best fitted the equilibrium data (r2 > 0.99. Maximal sorption capacities of LVB for Pb(II, Cd(II and Zn(II at 25.0±0.5°C were 0.130, 0.103 and 0.098 mM g-1, respectively. The desorption experiments showed that the LVB could be reused for six cycles with a minimum loss of the initial sorption capacity.

  7. The effect of the thermal reduction temperature on the structure and sorption capacity of reduced graphene oxide materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolbin, Alexandr V., E-mail: dolbin@ilt.kharkov.ua [B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 47 Lenin Ave., Kharkov 61103 (Ukraine); Khlistyuck, Maria V.; Esel' son, Valentin B.; Gavrilko, Viktor G.; Vinnikov, Nikolay A.; Basnukaeva, Razet M. [B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 47 Lenin Ave., Kharkov 61103 (Ukraine); Maluenda, Irene; Maser, Wolfgang K.; Benito, Ana M. [Instituto de Carboquímica, ICB-CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castán, 4, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: The influence of reduction temperatures on the structure and the sorption capacity of thermally reduced graphene (TRGO) has been investigated systematically. A set of TRGO materials were prepared by thermal treatment of parent graphene oxide (GO) at five temperatures (T = 200, 300, 500, 700, and 900 °C). Investigations of these materials by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy methods have shown that both the structure and the residual oxygen functional groups on the TRGO surface can be controlled by varying the temperature of the thermal treatment. The data on the sorption and desorption of {sup 4}He, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, Ne and Kr gases in the temperature interval T = 2–290 K clearly demonstrate that the sorption capacity of TRGO is closely related to the structural changes induced by the treatment temperatures. It is important that the sorption capacities of TRGOs treated at 300 °C and at 900 °C significantly increase for all the gases used. The prominent increase in the sorption capacity at 300 °C is attributed to the structural disorder and liberation of the pores caused by the removal of intercalated water and labile oxygen functional groups (oFGs) favored at this temperature. At 900 °C the sorption capacity increases due to the generation of new defects on the TRGO surface, which provide additional access to the internal space between the folds and sheets of the TRGO structure. By tailoring the structural properties we emphasize the potential of TRGO as a highly efficient sorbent.

  8. Sorption of heteropoly acids by polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitreinko, S.G.; Goncharova, L.V.; Runov, V.K.; Zakharov, V.N.; Aslanova, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    Sorption of oxidized and reduced forms of molybdosilicic, molybdophosphoric and molybdovanadophosphoric acids by polyurethane foam based on ethers and esters is studied. On the basis of sorption dependence on solution pH, polyurethane foam type and spectral characteristics of sorbates the suggestion has been made that in the polyurethane foam phase there are two main types of sorbent-sorbate interaction: electrostatic (ion-ion) and with hydrogen bond formation: and it is impossible to determine the contribution of every interaction

  9. Sorption of organophosphate esters by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wei; Yan, Li [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Duan, Jinming [School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055 (China); Jing, Chuanyong, E-mail: cyjing@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: The interfacial interactions between the OPE molecules and CNTs. - Highlights: • Oxygen-containing groups on CNTs change the sorption property for OPEs. • Molecular configuration of OPEs has insignificant impact on their sorption. • Hydrophobic, π–π EDA and Brønsted acid–base interaction occurred between the CNTs and OPEs. - Abstract: Insights from the molecular-level mechanism of sorption of organophosphate esters (OPEs) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can further our understanding of the fate and transport of OPEs in the environment. The motivation for our study was to explore the sorption process of OPEs on multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and their oxidized counterparts (O-MWCNTs and O-SWCNTs), and its molecular mechanism over a wide concentration range. The sorption isotherm results revealed that the hydrophobicity of OPEs dominated their affinities on a given CNT and the π–π electron donor–acceptor (EDA) interaction also played an important role in the sorption of aromatic OPEs. This π–π EDA interaction, verified with Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy, could restrict the radial vibration of SWCNTs and affect the deformation vibration γ(CH) bands of OPE molecules. The OPE surface coverage on CNTs, estimated using the nonlinear Dubinin–Ashtakhov model, indicated that the oxygen-containing functional groups on CNTs could interact with water molecules by H-bonding, resulting in a decrease in effective sorption sites. In addition, FTIR analysis also confirmed the occurrence of Brønsted acid–base interactions between OPEs and surface OH groups of SWCNTs. Our results should provide mechanistic insights into the sorption mechanism of OPE contaminants on CNTs.

  10. Sorption of cesium and uranium to Feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijland, G.C.; Pennders, R.M.J.

    1990-07-01

    Within safety assessment studies, for nuclear waste disposal in deep geologic formations, calculation for the migration of radionuclides through the geosphere are often carried out with models taking sorption into account. In the past 8 years the insight grew that other physico-chemical processes, besides sorption, could affect migration behaviour. While the currently used transport models were being improved taking either linear or non-linear sorption into account, the coupling of geochemical and transport models came into scope. In spite of these developments models which are still based on the sorption theory are frequently applied in studying migration behaviour of radionuclides. This is caused by the necessity of making preliminary pronouncements, while coupled models are still in stage of development and thermodynamic data are very limited available. Therefore one has to obtain insight in the reliability of the models based on the sorption theory. within the sorption database there is a lack of knowledge about mineralogy, composition of the fluid and the experimental conditions underlying the data. Therefore the Expert Group on geochemical Modelling supported by the Finnish proposal in order to obtain insight in the possible deviation of the sorption coefficients that can be estimated from experiments performed with standard samples, fluid composition and experimental conditions. Nine laboratories from OECD membership countries took part in this intercalibration study. In the framework of the Dutch safety assessment studies the Dutch National Institute of Public health and Environmental protection (RIVM) has decided to participate in this exercise. In this report the results are presented of sorption experiments for cesium and natural Uranium to Feldspar. (H.W.). 4 refs.; 1 fig.; 7 tabs

  11. Sorption of fomesafen in Brazilian soils

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,G.R.; D'Antonino,L.; Faustino,L.A.; Silva,A.A.; Ferreira,F.A.; Texeira,C.C.

    2013-01-01

    The study of the dynamics of a herbicide in the soil focus on the interactions with environmental components to obtain agronomic efficiency, ensuring selectivity to the culture and risk reduction of environmental impact. This study evaluated the sorption process of fomesafen in the Brazilian soils Ultisol, Cambisol, and Organosol. Besides soil, washed sand was used as an inert material for determination of the sorption ratio of fomesafen in the soil. The bioassay method was applied, using Sor...

  12. Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jun Shang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment.

  13. Contribution to the study of sorption mechanisms at solid-liquid interfaces: application to the cases of apatites and oxy-hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duc, M.

    2002-11-01

    Sorption-desorption phenomena play an important role in the transport of toxic and radioactive elements in surface and underground water in contact with solid matter. Selenium, which is one of the long-lived radionuclides present in radioactive waste, is characterized by several oxidation states and by anionic species in aqueous solutions. In order to predict its transport, we need a good knowledge of its sorption processes. We have studied the sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) on two types of solids present in natural media or which have been proposed as additives to active barriers: hydroxy-apatites, fluoro-apatite and iron oxi-hydroxides (goethite and hematite). Sorption mechanisms have been studied through an approach including several different and complementary methods: titrimetry, zeta-metry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy, etc... Results showed that Se(VI) is much less sorbed than Se(VI) on both types of solids. For Se(IV) the sorption mechanisms are different for iron oxides and apatites. On oxides, sorption increases when pH decreases. It can be interpreted by a surface complexation model, essentially through an inner sphere complex (monodentate or bidentate). Modelling of Se sorption curves was performed after the determination of acido-basic properties of oxides. However, the determination of the intrinsic properties of oxides is disturbed by several parameters identified as impurities, evolution of the solid in solution, kinetic and solubility of the solid. For apatites, selenium sorption proceeds by exchange with superficial groups, with a maximum of fixation at approximately pH 8. Thanks to XPS measurements and the elaboration of a mathematical model, we could determine the depth of penetration of both selenium and cadmium on apatites. (author)

  14. Iodine sorption by microwave irradiated hydrotalcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, S.P. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, C.P. 72570, Puebla, Pue (Mexico); Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Fetter, G. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, C.P. 72570, Puebla, Pue (Mexico)]. E-mail: geolarfetter@yahoo.com.mx; Bosch, P. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, C.P. 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bulbulian, S. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-12-15

    Mg-Al hydrotalcite-like compounds (HT) were prepared by the microwave method on the one hand with ethoxide-acetylacetonate and on the other with acetylacetonate as precursors. They presented a maximum sorption capacity of 2.179 and 1.517 meq of {sup 131}I{sup -}/g of hydrotalcite respectively. When the hydrotalcites were calcined and rehydrated in a {sup 131}I{sup -} solution, iodine sorption decreased in both samples to 1.515 and 1.446, respectively. The corresponding value for nitrated hydrotalcite which was prepared by the conventional method for comparison purposes, was 0.570. The radionuclide content in hydrotalcites was determined by {gamma}-spectrometry. {sup 131}I{sup -} sorption is dependent on two main parameters: one is the type of the interlayer organic material and the second the surface area. It was found that hydrotalcites prepared with ethoxide-acetylacetonate were better sorbents for {sup 131}I{sup -} than those with acetylacetonate. Still, if the specific surface area increased, {sup 131}I{sup -}sorption increased as well; nitrated HT resulted in low specific surface area and a low sorption capacity. It is, therefore, concluded that organic residues present in the samples prepared by the microwave method favor the sorption of radioactive anions, in particular {sup 131}I{sup -} if compared with nitrated and/or carbonate interlayered hydrotalcites.

  15. Migration and sorption phenomena in packaged foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekharan, V; Floros, J D

    1997-10-01

    Rapidly developing analytical capabilities and continuously evolving stringent regulations have made food/package interactions a subject of intense research. This article focuses on: (1) the migration of package components such as oligomers and monomers, processing aids, additives, and residual reactants in to packaged foods, and (2) sorption of food components such as flavors, lipids, and moisture into packages. Principles of diffusion and thermodynamics are utilized to describe the mathematics of migration and sorption. Mathematical models are developed from first principles, and their applicability is illustrated using numerical simulations and published data. Simulations indicate that available models are system (polymer-penetrant) specific. Furthermore, some models best describe the early stages of migration/sorption, whereas others should be used for the late stages of these phenomena. Migration- and/or sorption-related problems with respect to glass, metal, paper-based and polymeric packaging materials are discussed, and their importance is illustrated using published examples. The effects of migrating and absorbed components on food safety, quality, and the environment are presented for various foods and packaging materials. The impact of currently popular packaging techniques such as microwavable, ovenable, and retortable packaging on migration and sorption are discussed with examples. Analytical techniques for investigating migration and sorption phenomena in food packaging are critically reviewed, with special emphasis on the use and characteristics of food-simulating liquids (FSLs). Finally, domestic and international regulations concerning migration in packaged foods, and their impact on food packaging is briefly presented.

  16. STM-Induced Hydrogen Desorption via a Hole Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.

    1998-01-01

    We report STM-induced desorption of H from Si(100)-H(2 X 1) at negative sample bias. The desorption rate exhibits a power-law dependence on current and a maximum desorption rate at -7 V. The desorption is explained by vibrational heating of H due to inelastic scattering of tunneling holes...... with the Si-H 5 sigma hole resonance. The dependence of desorption rate on current and bias is analyzed using a novel approach for calculating inelastic scattering, which includes the effect of the electric field between tip and sample. We show that the maximum desorption rate at -7 V is due to a maximum...

  17. Influence of sorption competition on sorption data for MX-80 bentonite used in performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.; Marques Fernandes, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In order to obtain a (quasi) mechanistic understanding of radionuclide uptake on clay minerals and argillaceous rocks, the majority of sorption experiments have been carried out on purified clay minerals such as montmorillonite and illite at trace concentrations (sorption edges), or as a function of concentration (sorption isotherms), with a single radionuclide under well-defined conditions in simple background electrolytes. As a result of such studies the 2 site proto-lysis non electrostatic surface complexation cation exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) sorption model, was developed and has been successfully applied to quantitatively describe the uptake of numerous radionuclides of differing valences as a function of pH and concentration on montmorillonite. In a deep geological repository for high level waste, stable impurities arise from many sources: they are present in the pore waters, in the tunnel back fill materials and host rock formations, they arise from the corrosion of the carbon steel canister and finally they are dissolved from the spent fuel and vitrified high level waste simultaneously with the radionuclides. These impurities, which are an integral part of a realistic repository system, can potentially compete with radionuclides for the sorption sites on the backfill materials and host rock and thus reduce their uptake on them. The influence of competitive sorption is not intrinsically included (or only partly so) in the sorption model. It is clearly an inherently important issue to quantify the influence of sorption competition on the transport of released radionuclides through the multi-barrier system in a deep repository. In this study an extreme case of a competitive sorption scenario in the near field of a HLW repository is presented. Two factors are considered: one associated with the high concentrations and the other with competitive sorption effects. The tendency in both cases is to cause a reduction in

  18. Sorption Regularities in Behaviour of Fission-Product Elements during Filtration of their Solutions through Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitsyn, V. I.; Balukova, V. D.; Gromov, V. V.; Zakharov, S. I.; Zhagin, B. P.; Spiridonov, F. M.

    1960-07-01

    Research on the sorption of radioisotopes under natural conditions employing the controlled filtration process was performed. Radioisotopes were introduced into the solution as soon as filtration had become steady and the process continued for four months. Soil samples were then taken by drilling at different depths and analysed to determine their radioisotope content. Diffusion of radioisotopes was observed at depths of up to 10 m; two distinct boundaries of soil-activity decrease were ascertained: at the surface of the site and at the depth of the solution filtration front. In addition, the radiostrontium absorption by natural sorbents, principally pure minerals widely distributed in soils and subsoils, was investigated separately. The presence of calcium ions, even in small quantities, sharply reduces the degree of radiostrontium sorption. However, other conditions being equal, strontium may be absorbed to a greater extent than calcium, according to the composition of the sorbent. The field investigations of radiostrontium sorption and migration showed that when filtering radioactive solutions two possible variants have to be taken into account. In the first case the solutions are discharged into soil unaffected by any flow of ground water. In this situation the radiostrontium is retained by the soil. In the second case, the radioisotopes proceed directly into the water-bearing horizon. The radiostrontium will then migrate with the ground water flow and through the soil and this migration will be further affected by the sorption and desorption processes occurring. The experiments performed demonstrate the ease with which long-lived radioisotopes migrate under natural conditions and call attention to the need for thorough study of ground water problems in connexion with various methods of disposing of radioactive waste into ground. (author)

  19. Experimental study of a laboratory concrete material representative of containment buildings: desorption isotherms and permeability determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semete, P.; Fevrier, B.; Delorme, J.; Sanahuja, J.; Desgree, P.; Le Pape, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The isotherm sorption curve is a first order parameter for the calculations of concrete drying and/or creep using Finite Element Analysis. An experimental campaign was undertaken by EDF MMC in order to characterize the first desorption isotherm at room temperature of a laboratory material representative of concrete containment buildings. Long term drying tests were carried out on cement paste and on three samples geometries on concrete (with radial and axial one-dimensional drying on thin disks and multi-dimensional drying on Representative Elementary Volumes). The measurements results (porosity, densities and mass loss curves) are provided and the isotherms obtained for the four different configurations are compared. Several analyses of the results are proposed including the assessment of a criterion for the determination of the moisture content final balance (estimation of the asymptotic mass loss) and the back-analysis of equivalent permeability. (authors)

  20. Desorption of hydrogen from magnesium hydride: in-situ electron diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, B.; Jones, I.P.; Walton, A.; Mann, V.; Book, D.; Harris, I.R.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a phase change has been studied where electron beam in Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) has been used to transform MgH 2 into magnesium. A combination of in-situ Electron Diffraction (ED) and an in-situ Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) study under ED mode describes the phase transformation in terms of, respectively, change in the crystal structure and Plasmon energy shift. The orientation relation [001] MgH2 //[-2110] Mg and (-110) MgH2 //(0001) Mg , obtained from the ED study, has been used to propose a model for the movements of magnesium atoms in the structural change to describe the dynamics of the process. The in-situ EELS study has been compared with the existing H-desorption model. The study aims to describe the sorption dynamics of hydrogen in MgH 2 which is a base material for a number of promising hydrogen storage systems. (author)

  1. Neptunium(V) sorption on kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amayri, S.; Jermolajev, A.; Reich, T. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    The sorption behavior of neptunium(V) onto the clay mineral kaolinite was studied in batch experiments under different experimental conditions: [Np(V)] = 7 x 10{sup -12}-8 x 10{sup -6} M, solid-to-liquid ratio 2-20 g L{sup -1}, I = 0.1 and 0.01 M NaClO{sub 4}, pH = 6-10, ambient air and Ar atmosphere. The short-lived isotope {sup 239}Np (T{sub 1/2} = 2.36 d) was used instead of {sup 237}Np (T{sub 1/2} = 2.14 x 10{sup 6} a) to study the sorption behavior of Np(V) at environmentally-relevant concentrations, i.e., 7 x 10{sup -12} M Np. In addition, {sup 239}Np(V) served as tracer to measure sorption isotherms over six orders of magnitude in Np concentration (4.8 x 10{sup -12}-1.0 x 10{sup -4} M). The results show that Np(V) sorption on kaolinite is strongly influenced by pH, CO{sub 2}, and ionic strength. The sorption of 8 x 10{sup -6} M Np(V) at pH 9.0, and ionic strength of 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} was proportional to the solid-to-liquid ratio of kaolinite in the range of 2-10 g L{sup -1}. In the absence of CO{sub 2}, the Np(V) uptake increased continuously with increasing pH value up to 97% at pH 10. Under ambient CO{sub 2}, the sorption of Np decreased above pH 8 up to zero at pH 10. An increase of Np(V) concentration from 7 x 10{sup -12} to 8 x 10{sup -6} M resulted in a shift of the sorption pH edge by up to one pH unit to higher pH values. The ionic strength influenced the Np(V) sorption onto kaolinite only in the presence of ambient CO{sub 2}. Under Ar atmosphere the sorption of Np(V) was independent from ionic strength, indicating the formation of inner-sphere complexes of Np(V) with kaolinite. Time-dependent batch experiments at pH 9.0 under ambient CO{sub 2} showed that the sorption of Np(V) on kaolinite is fast and fully reversible over six orders in Np(V) concentration. (orig.)

  2. Technetium sorption by stibnite from natural water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretroukhine, V.; Sergeant, C.; Deves, G.; Poulain, S.; Vesvres, M.H.; Thomas, B.; Simonoff, M.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption of technetium by powdered and polished mineral stibnite Sb 2 S 3 has been investigated in simulated and natural underground waters from the Meuse/Haute-Marne region (France). The sorption by powdered stibnite has been found to be complete under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions in batch experiments. The sorption rate is higher in the absence of oxygen than under aerobic condition. Increasing the temperature from 30 C to 60 C results in a rise of the sorption rate by 9.1 and 27 times under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. The observed differences in sorption kinetics in the presence and in absence of oxygen are explained by the interaction of oxygen with sulfide ion in aerobic conditions and by the reduction of technetium(VII) by iron(II) and by other impurities present in natural water and in the mineral, and by the subsequent sorption of Tc(IV) on stibnite under anaerobic conditions. The sorption on a polished mineral surface resulted in the formation of a technetium film, probably Tc 2 S 7 , with a thickness of 1-3 μg Tc/cm 2 pH 3-6 and 4-12 μg Tc/cm 2 at 9-12. The simultaneous formation of stibnite colloids with adsorbed technetium occurs at pH 9-12. The study of the technetium film on the mineral by proton induced X-ray emission analysis showed it to be at least one order of magnitude thinner on the SiO 2 impurities than on the main Sb 2 S 3 component and the iron impurities. (orig.)

  3. Computer simulation of molecular sorption in zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmiano, Mark Daniel

    2001-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis encompasses the computer simulation of molecular sorption. In Chapter 1 we outline the aims and objectives of this work. Chapter 2 follows in which an introduction to sorption in zeolites is presented, with discussion of structure and properties of the main zeolites studied. Chapter 2 concludes with a description of the principles and theories of adsorption. In Chapter 3 we describe the methodology behind the work carried out in this thesis. In Chapter 4 we present our first computational study, that of the sorption of krypton in silicalite. We describe work carried out to investigate low energy sorption sites of krypton in silicalite where we observe krypton to preferentially sorb into straight and sinusoidal channels over channel intersections. We simulate single step type I adsorption isotherms and use molecular dynamics to study the diffusion of krypton and obtain division coefficients and the activation energy. We compare our results to previous experimental and computational studies where we show our work to be in good agreement. In Chapter 5 we present a systematic study of the sorption of oxygen and nitrogen in five lithium substituted zeolites using a transferable interatomic potential that we have developed from ab initio calculations. We show increased loading of nitrogen compared to oxygen in all five zeolites studied as expected and simulate adsorption isotherms, which we compare to experimental and simulated data in the literature. In Chapter 6 we present work on the sorption of ferrocene in the zeolite NaY. We show that a simulated, low energy sorption site for ferrocene is correctly located by comparing to X-ray powder diffraction results for this same system. The thesis concludes with some overall conclusions and discussion of opportunities for future work. (author)

  4. Secondary ion shadow-cone enhanced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechen Chang (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-02-01

    The incident angle dependence of the secondary particle emission process under keV ion bombardment has been investigated. The results from the full molecular dynamics calculations indicate that the flux anisotropy of the incident beam, resulting from the non-uniform impact parameters for the surface atom of a single crystal, affects the particle desorption in a systematic fashion. The enhanced desorption at certain angles of incidence corresponds to the intensive focusing of the incident beam to the near-surface atom and the extended dissipation of momentum by large-angle scattering. This observation has let us to develop a new theoretical model in which the enhanced desorption is described by the distance of closest encounter along the trajectory of the incident particle to the surface atom. The computer time for the simulation of the incident-angle-dependent emission process is significantly reduced. The results from the calculation based on this model are in good agreement both with the results from the full dynamics calculation and with the experimental results. The new model also allows a complementary evaluation of the microscopic dynamics involved in the shadow-cone enhanced desorption. (author).

  5. Exciton-Promoted Desorption From Solid Water Surfaces A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCoustra, M.R.S.; Thrower, J.D.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Desorption from solid water surfaces resulting from interaction with electromagnetic and particle radiation is reviewed in the context of the role of nonthermal desorption in astrophysical environments. Experimental observations are interpreted in terms of mechanisms sharing a common basis...

  6. Binding of chemical warfare agent simulants as guests in a coordination cage: contributions to binding and a fluorescence-based response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Christopher G P; Piper, Jerico R; Ward, Michael D

    2016-05-07

    Cubic coordination cages act as competent hosts for several alkyl phosphonates used as chemical warfare agent simulants; a range of cage/guest structures have been determined, contributions to guest binding analysed, and a fluorescent response to guest binding demonstrated.

  7. A Student-Centered Guest Lecturing: A Constructivism Approach to Promote Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Guo, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement has become a big challenge in higher education, especially when distance learning is getting more and more popular. Guest lecturing is a popular method to bring relevance to the classroom and engage in students. Ground on the theory of constructivism, this paper introduces a student-centered guest lecturing that allows students…

  8. PPII propensity of multiple-guest amino acids in a proline-rich environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2011-07-07

    There has been considerable debate about the intrinsic PPII propensity of amino acid residues in denatured polypeptides. Experimentally, this scale is based on the behavior of guest amino acid residues placed in the middle of proline-based hosts. We have used classical molecular dynamics simulations combined with replica-exchange methods to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the conformational equilibria of proline-based host oligopeptides with multiple guest amino acids including alanine, glutamine, valine, and asparagine. The tracked structural characteristics include the secondary structural motifs based on the Ramachandran angles and the cis/trans isomerization of the prolyl bonds. In agreement with our recent study of single amino acid guests, we did not observe an intrinsic PPII propensity in any of the guest amino acids in a multiple-guest setting. Instead, the experimental results can be explained in terms of (i) the steric restrictions imposed on the C-terminal guest amino acid that is immediately followed by a proline residue and (ii) an increase in the trans content of the prolyl bonds due to the presence of guest residues. In terms of the latter, we found that the more guests added to the system, the larger the increase in the trans content of the prolyl bonds, which results in an effective increase in the PPII content of the peptide.

  9. Data compilation for particle-impact desorption, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiyama, Takashi; Nagai, Siro; Ozawa, Kunio; Takeutchi, Fujio.

    1985-07-01

    The particle impact desorption is one of the elementary processes of hydrogen recycling in controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors. We have surveyed the literature concerning the ion impact desorption and photon stimulated desorption published through the end of 1984 and compiled the data on the desorption cross sections and yields with the aid of a computer. This report presents the results of the compilation in graphs and tables as functions of incident energy, surface temperature and surface coverage. (author)

  10. Controlling the Host-Guest Interaction Mode through a Redox Stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalóki, György; Croué, Vincent; Carré, Vincent; Aubriet, Frédéric; Alévêque, Olivier; Levillain, Eric; Allain, Magali; Aragó, Juan; Ortí, Enrique; Goeb, Sébastien; Sallé, Marc

    2017-12-18

    A proof-of-concept related to the redox-control of the binding/releasing process in a host-guest system is achieved by designing a neutral and robust Pt-based redox-active metallacage involving two extended-tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF) ligands. When neutral, the cage is able to bind a planar polyaromatic guest (coronene). Remarkably, the chemical or electrochemical oxidation of the host-guest complex leads to the reversible expulsion of the guest outside the cavity, which is assigned to a drastic change of the host-guest interaction mode, illustrating the key role of counteranions along the exchange process. The reversible process is supported by various experimental data ( 1 H NMR spectroscopy, ESI-FTICR, and spectroelectrochemistry) as well as by in-depth theoretical calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hydrogen bonding assemblies in host guest complexes with 18-crown-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonari, M. S.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Kravtsov, V. Ch.; Lipkowski, J.; Ganin, E. V.; Yavolovskii, A. A.

    2003-02-01

    Recent X-ray crystal structural data for two novel 1:2 host-guest complexes of 18-crown-6 with neutral organic molecules, thiaamide hydrazide of 2-aminobenzoic acid and thiaamide hydrazide of 4-amino-1,2,5-thiadiazole-3-carbonic acid are reported. The supramolecular structures of these two and five relative complexes are discussed from the point of view of participation of donor groups in coordination with the crown ether, and donor and acceptor groups in the self-assembly of the guest molecules. Guest molecules have incorporated amine and hydrazine moieties as proton donors and carbonyl oxygen and sulfur (in thiadiazole and in thiaamine moieties) as proton acceptors. The guest-guest interactions appeared to be crucial in the final architecture.

  12. A Pyrene- and Phosphonate-Containing Fluorescent Probe as Guest Molecule in a Host Polymer Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Marchand-Brynaert

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available New host-guest materials have been prepared by incorporation of a home-made organic probe displaying a pyrene motif and a phosphonate function into a regular amphiphilic copolymer. Using powder X-Ray diffraction, photoluminescence and FT-IR spectroscopy, we have been able to study the non-covalent interactions between the host matrix and the guest molecule in the solid state. Interestingly, we have shown that the matrix directs the guest spatial localization and alters its properties. Thanks to the comparison of pyrene vs. N-pyrenylmaleimide derivatives, the influence of the chemical nature of the guest molecules on the non-covalent interactions with the host have been studied. In addition, using polyethylene glycol as a reference host, we have been able to evidence a true matrix effect within our new insertion materials. The phosphonated guest molecule appears to be a novel probe targeting the hydrophilic domain of the host copolymer.

  13. A room with a viewpoint revisited: descriptive norms and hotel guests' towel reuse behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Bohner

    Full Text Available Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204, descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room" and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous. Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones.

  14. A room with a viewpoint revisited: descriptive norms and hotel guests' towel reuse behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Gerd; Schlüter, Lena E

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204), descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room") and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous). Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones.

  15. Sorption of cesium in intact rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puukko, E.

    2014-04-01

    The mass distribution coefficient K d is used in performance assessment (PA) to describe sorption of a radionuclide on rock. The R d is determined using crushed rock which causes uncertainty in converting the R d values to K d values for intact rock. This work describes a method to determine the equilibrium of sorption on intact rock. The rock types of the planned Olkiluoto waste disposal site were T-series mica gneiss (T-MGN), T-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (T-TGG), P-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (P-TGG) and pegmatitic granite (PGR). These rocks contain different amount of biotite which is the main sorbing mineral. The sorption of cesium on intact rock slices was studied by applying an electrical field to speed up migration of cesium into the rock. Cesium is in the solution as a noncomplex cation Cs + and it is sorbed by ion exchange. The tracer used in the experiments was 134 Cs. The experimental sorption on the intact rock is compared with values calculated using the in house cation exchange sorption model (HYRL model) in PHREEQC program. The observed sorption on T-MGN and T-TGG rocks was close to the calculated values. Two PGR samples were from a depth of 70 m and three samples were from a depth of 150 m. Cesium sorbed more than predicted on the two 70 m PGR samples. The sorption of Cs on the three 150 m PGR samples was small which was consistent with the calculations. The pegmatitic granite PGR has the smallest content of biotite of the four rock types. In the case of P-TGG rock the observed values of sorption were only half of the calculated values. Two kind of slices were cut from P-TGG drill core. The slices were against and to the direction of the foliation of the biotite rims. The sorption of cesium on P-TGG rock was same in both cases. The results indicated that there was no effect of the directions of the electric field and the foliation of biotite in the P-TGG rock. (orig.)

  16. Geoelectrical Monitoring of Ammonium Sorption Processes in a Biochar Filtration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. L.; Osei, C.; Rabinovich, A.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Rouff, A.

    2017-12-01

    With the rise of modern agriculture, nutrient pollution has become an increasingly important environmental concern. A common problem is excess nitrogen which agricultural livestock farms often generate in the form of ammonium (NH4+). This highly soluble ion is easily transported through runoff and leaching, leading to water supply contamination and soil fertility decline. Biochar is the carbon-rich product of thermal decomposition of biomass in an oxygen-free environment. It is primarily used as a soil enhancer with other applications currently under research. Biochar's unique characteristics such as high surface area, high sorption capacity and long term biological and chemical stability make it a prime candidate for environmental applications such as contaminant regulation and waste effluent treatment. The spectral induced polarization (SIP) method is an established geoelectrical method that has been increasingly used in environmental investigations. SIP is unique among geophysical methods because it is sensitive not only to the bulk properties of the medium under investigation but also to the interfacial properties (e.g., mineral-fluid). The unique properties that make biochar attractive for environmental use are associated with surface properties (e.g., surface area, surface charge, presence of functional groups) that are expected to have a profound effect on SIP signals. This study presents early results on the use of the SIP method to monitor ammonium recycling of swine wastewater in a biochar filtration system. SIP measurements were taken continuously as biochar-packed columns were first injected with an ammonium wastewater solution (sorption phase) and then an ammonium-free solution (desorption phase). Geochemical monitoring showed that outflow ammonium concentration decreased during the sorption phase and increased during the desorption phase. The collected SIP data appear to be in agreement with the geochemical monitoring, providing a temporally

  17. Desorption of intrinsic cesium from smectite: inhibitive effects of clay particle organization on cesium desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Sakai, Haruka; Itono, Taeko; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji

    2014-09-16

    Fine clay particles have functioned as transport media for radiocesium in terrestrial environments after nuclear accidents. Because radiocesium is expected to be retained in clay minerals by a cation-exchange reaction, ascertaining trace cesium desorption behavior in response to changing solution conditions is crucially important. This study systematically investigated the desorption behavior of intrinsic Cs (13 nmol/g) in well-characterized Na-montmorillonite in electrolyte solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) under widely differing cation concentrations (0.2 mM to 0.2 M). Batch desorption experiments demonstrated that Cs(+) desorption was inhibited significantly in the presence of the environmental relevant concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (>0.5 mM) and high concentrations of K(+). The order of ability for Cs desorption was Na(+) = K(+) > Ca(2+) = Mg(2+) at the highest cation concentration (0.2 M), which is opposite to the theoretical prediction based on the cation-exchange selectivity. Laser diffraction grain-size analyses revealed that the inhibition of Cs(+) desorption coincided with the increase of the clay tactoid size. Results suggest that radiocesium in the dispersed fine clay particles adheres on the solid phase when the organization of swelling clay particles occurs because of changes in solution conditions caused by both natural processes and artificial treatments.

  18. The NEA sorption data base (SDB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruegger, B.; Ticknor, K.

    1992-01-01

    The current NEA Sorption Data Base is developed to replace the former International Sorption Information Retrieval System (ISIRS) initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and contains about 11,000 distribution coefficients with corresponding experimental condition parameters describing sorption of key nuclides for a large variety of solid and liquid phases. The SDB is designed to run on a micro-computer using the commercially available database software dBASE III Plus. For each recorded sorption experiment, the SDB provides a bibliographical reference, the most complete characterization of the solid and liquid phases available, a description of the experimental conditions and the distribution coefficient or retardation factor for each element studied. When available, parameters such as temperature, initial radionuclide concentration, pH, Eh, contact time, solid to solution ratio, sample origin, oxidation state and type of solution are included. The SDB provides information for a wide variety of rocks or geological materials, buffer backfill candidates, concretes/cements, elements (Am, Cs, Co, I, Np, Pu, Ra, Sr, Se, Tc, U and, to a lesser extent, Ag, Ba, C, Ce, Eu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, Pd, Pm, Ru, Sb, Sn, Y, Zn, and Zr), or radioisotopes. A compilation of sorption data like SDB provide a readily available source of data for radioactive waste repository performance assessments when site specific data are not available or essential, for example, during a site selection phase. 2 appendices

  19. Radionuclide sorption from the safety evaluation perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Research and development directed towards the assessment of the long-term performance of radioactive waste disposal systems has been recognised as a priority area with a strong need for international co-operation and co-ordination. The ultimate aims is to promote the quality and credibility of safety assessment techniques for radioactive waste disposal. Sorption in the geosphere is one of the key processes for retarding the transport of radionuclide from the underground disposal facility to the biosphere. In many cases, sorption in the near field and in the biosphere is also important. A workshop, organised to favor discussion around a small number of invited papers, was held in October 1991: - to evaluate critically the way sorption processes are incorporated in performance assessment models; - to identify open issues of high priority, and; - to propose future activities to resolve these issues. These proceedings reproduce the invited papers and the conclusions and recommendations adopted by the workshop. Eight papers are in the INIS SCOPE. The main subjects studied are: sorption database comparison, sorption database development and three case studies, experimental techniques, adsorption models

  20. Sorption of radionuclides by tertiary clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.; Czurda, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    The sorption capacity of different clay types for some metals (Co, Cs, Sr and Zn), occurring as common radionuclides in radioactive waste deposits, had been analysed by a static (batch technique) and a dynamic method (percolation tests, in which the driving force is a hydraulic gradient). Sorption capacity generally increased with an increasing pH of solution. A decrease of sorption capacity had been observed in the order Zn > Cs ≥ Co > Sr for the batch and Cs > Zn > Sr > Co for the percolation tests. Clay marls showed a distinctly higher sorption respectively retention capacity as pure clays. Sorption capacity depends on solution parameters like type and concentration of radionuclide, pH, salt concentration, etc., and on rock parameters like mineral content (e.g. swelling clay minerals and carbonates), organic material, rock pH, micro fabric, etc. A third parameter of great influence is the contact time between clay and solution. The adsorption isotherms reflect two different adsorption mechanisms: a very rapid adsorption (a few minutes) on the external surfaces of clay minerals and a slow adsorption process (weeks and longer), due to the diffusion of metal ions into the interlayer space of clay minerals. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  1. Moisture sorption of Thai red curry powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudathip Inchuen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moisture sorption study was conducted on Thai red curry powder prepared by two different drying methods, viz. microwave and hot-air drying. Moisture sorption isotherms of the red curry powder at 30 C and water activity in the range of 0.113-0.970 were determined by a static gravimetric method. The isotherms exhibited Type III behaviour. The moisture sorption data were fitted to several sorption models and a non-linear regression analysis method was used to evaluate the constants of the sorption equations. The fit was evaluated using the coefficient of determination (R2, the reduced chi-square (2 and the root mean square error (RMSE. The GAB model followed by the Lewiski-3 model gave the best fit to the experimental data. The monolayer moisture content, taken as the safe minimum moisture level in the red curry powder, was determined using the BET equation and was found to range between 0.080 - 0.085 gram water per gram dry matter.

  2. Contribution to the study of sorption mechanisms at solid-liquid interfaces: application to the cases of apatites and oxy-hydroxides; Contribution a l'etude des mecanismes de sorption aux interfaces solide-liquide: application aux cas des apatites et des oxy-hydroxydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duc, M

    2002-11-15

    Sorption-desorption phenomena play an important role in the transport of toxic and radioactive elements in surface and underground water in contact with solid matter. Selenium, which is one of the long-lived radionuclides present in radioactive waste, is characterized by several oxidation states and by anionic species in aqueous solutions. In order to predict its transport, we need a good knowledge of its sorption processes. We have studied the sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) on two types of solids present in natural media or which have been proposed as additives to active barriers: hydroxy-apatites, fluoro-apatite and iron oxi-hydroxides (goethite and hematite). Sorption mechanisms have been studied through an approach including several different and complementary methods: titrimetry, zeta-metry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy, etc... Results showed that Se(VI) is much less sorbed than Se(VI) on both types of solids. For Se(IV) the sorption mechanisms are different for iron oxides and apatites. On oxides, sorption increases when pH decreases. It can be interpreted by a surface complexation model, essentially through an inner sphere complex (monodentate or bidentate). Modelling of Se sorption curves was performed after the determination of acido-basic properties of oxides. However, the determination of the intrinsic properties of oxides is disturbed by several parameters identified as impurities, evolution of the solid in solution, kinetic and solubility of the solid. For apatites, selenium sorption proceeds by exchange with superficial groups, with a maximum of fixation at approximately pH 8. Thanks to XPS measurements and the elaboration of a mathematical model, we could determine the depth of penetration of both selenium and cadmium on apatites. (author)

  3. Mechanisms of plutonium sorption to mineral oxide surfaces: new insights with implications for colloid-enhanced migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, J.M.; Santschi, P.H.

    2010-01-01

    New equilibrium and kinetic models have been developed to describe rate-limited sorption and desorption of Pu onto and off of mineral oxide surfaces using a generic approach to estimate sorption constants that require minimal laboratory calibrations. Equilibrium, reactions describing a total of six surface species were derived from a combination of empirical relationships previously described in the literature and generated as part of this work. These sorption reactions and corresponding equilibrium constants onto goethite (and silica) are: triple bond SOH + Pu 3+ triple bond SOPu 2+ + H + , log K = -2.1(-10) (1) triple bond SOH + Pu 4+ triple bond SOPu 3+ + H + , log K = 15.3(7.2) (2) triple bond SOH + PuO 2 + triple bond SOPuO 2 + H + , log K = -8.5(-16.5) (3) triple bond SOH + PuO 2 2+ triple bond SOPuO 2 + + H + , log K = 1.2(-6.5) (4) triple bond SOH + Pu 4- + 3H 2 O triple bond SOPu(OH) 3 + 4H + , log K = 12.5(4.6) (5) triple bond SOH + Pu 4+ + 4H 2 O triple bond SOPu(OH) 4 - + 5H + , log K = 5.0(-2.3) (6) The kinetic model decouples reduced (III, IV) and oxidized (V, VI) forms of Pu via a single rate-limiting, but reversible, surface mediated reaction: triple bond SOPuO 2 + H 2 O + 1/2H 2(g) ↔ k 1 k 2 triple bond SOPu(OH) 2 log k 1 = -5.3 (7) Where the reaction rate is equal to: (d[ triple bond SOPu 2 ])/(d t ) = k 1 [Pu OX ] - k 2 [Pu red ] (8) and [Pu OX ] and [Pu red ] are the sums of the oxidized (V and VI) and reduced (III and IV) surface species, respectively. Predictions using the equilibrium and kinetic models were validated against previously published experimental results, which give credence to the validity of the proposed mechanisms controlling the sorption of Pu onto mineral oxide surfaces. Of importance, a reversible, rate-limited, reaction successfully predicted time dependent behavior associated with Pu sorption onto goethite. Previously, researchers have suggested desorption of Pu to these surfaces is extremely slow or even irreversible

  4. PENGARUH ISOTERM SORPSI AIR TERHADAP STABILITAS BERAS UBI [Effect of Moisture Sorption Isotherm to Stability of “Sweet Potato Rice”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Widowati1*

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available “Sweet Potato Rice” stability as a dry food product was determined by water activity (aw and equilibrium moisture content (Me. This relationship is known as moisture sorption isotherm. This research were aimed 1 to study moisture sorption isotherm of “Sweet Potato Rice” from sweet potato flour (Cangkuang variety and native/heat moisture treatment (HMT starch which was stored at the range of aw:0.06 - 0.96 and 28oC; 2 to determine an appropriate model for describing product moisture sorption isotherm and 3 to predict “Sweet Potato Rice” shelf of life. Experimental design used was a random complete design with two factor, namely: 1 sweet potato starch: native and HMT, and 2 packaging material: polyethylene (PE and polypropylene (PP.The result showed that the moisture sorption isotherm profiles were sigmoid. Smith equation was the best model which described moisture sorption isotherm with R2= 0,991-0,993 for adsorption and R2= 0,964-0,971 for desorption. Shelf life test showed that “Sweet Potato Rice” from Cangkuang flour and modified starch had longer shelf life (5.67 months when packed in PP bag and 2.3 months when packed in PE bag; while shelf life artificial sweet potato made from Cangkuang flour and native starch was 4.24 months when packed in PP bag and 1.72 months when packed in PE bag.

  5. Chromium(VI) sorption efficiency of acid-activated banana peel over organo-montmorillonite in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Anam; Bibi, Irshad; Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Ok, Yong Sik; Murtaza, Ghulam; Shahid, Muhammad; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Li, Dongwei; Mahmood, Tariq

    2017-07-03

    In the present study, we examined sorption of chromate (Cr(VI)) to acid-activated banana peel (AABP) and organo-montmorillonite (O-mont) as a function of pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration at a sorbent dose of 4 g L -1 and at 20 ± 1°C in aqueous solutions. In sorption edge experiments, maximum Cr(VI) removal was obtained at pH 3 after 2 hours by AABP and O-mont (88% and 69%). Sorption isotherm data showed that the sorption capacity of AABP was higher than O-mont (15.1 vs. 6.67 mg g -1 , respectively, at pH 4). Freundlich and Langmuir models provided the best fits to describe Cr(VI) sorption onto AABP (R 2 = 0.97) and O-mont (R 2 = 0.96). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy elucidated that for AABP mainly the -OH, -COOH, -NH 2 , and for O-mont intercalated amines and -OH surface functional groups were involved in Cr(VI) sorption. The scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses, although partly, indicate that the (wt. %) proportion of cations (e.g., Ca, Mg) in AABP decreased after Cr(VI) sorption. This may be due to ion exchange of chromite (Cr(III)) (produced from Cr(VI) reduction) with cationic elements in AABP. Also, Cr(VI) desorption (using phosphate solution) from AABP was lower (29%) than that from O-mont (51%) up to the third regeneration cycle. This bench scale comparative study highlights that the utilization of widely available and low-cost acid-activated biomaterials has a greater potential than organo-clays for Cr(VI) removal in aqueous media. However, future studies are warranted to precisely delineate different mechanisms of Cr(VI) sorption/reduction by acid-activated biomaterials and organo-clays.

  6. STRATEGIC MARKETING ALTERNATIVES AT AGRO-TOURISM GUEST HOUSE LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta-Andreea ANDREIANA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, tourists started to turn away from the mass tourism and consider the alternative one. Therefore, various forms of tourism were born, among which the rural tourism, to be regarded from two perspectives: it contributes to local and regional development and brings benefits to tourism by creating a new, higher quality holiday concept. This requires the participation of local authorities in the preparing of area development strategies, involving the inhabitants and local traders. By following up the dramatic condition of the Romanian tourism, the insufficient development of the rural tourism and the low involvement degree of the local authorities, we proposed an assessment and recommended strategic marketing alternatives for the improvement of the current condition of the agro tourism guest houses.

  7. Understanding hospitality house guests' needs: a brief case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mary Katherine Waibel

    2011-08-01

    A.E. Kazak's (2006) call to develop theory-driven and empirically supported programs aimed at strengthening the competencies of families affected by pediatric illness applies to both medical and nonmedical facilities and institutions that care for pediatric patients and their loved ones. M.K.W. Duncan and A. Blugis (in press, this issue) note that despite the intuitive and practical nature of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, no theory translates into an infallible understanding of any individual guest's needs or a program of universally applied best practice standards for meeting those needs. Using Maslow's theory as a framework, this brief report describes the complexity and fluidity of one mother's needs during her stay at a hospitality house following the birth of her premature twin babies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Communication of Slovenian Tourism Workers with Italian guests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Gomzi Praprotnik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For an Italian guest, getting to know Slovenia as a tourist destination is inevitably connected with getting to know the Slovenian cuisine. Italians are a nation eagerly developing the culture of food, and therefore the gastronomic offer in a certain environment and at a certain time is for them often the basis for a comprehensive perception of the said destination. A good offer, a suitable marketing and an attractive presentation of typical Slovenian dishes play an important role in getting to know natural and cultural heritage as they can widen the knowledge about people and places, eliminate prejudice and strengthen intercultural cooperation. Kind and professional staff, knowledge of the language, civilisation, cultural habits, and differences may be the factors contributing to the assertion of local products and services, and to educating the users of restaurant and tourism services.

  9. Sensitivity of Deep Soil Organic Carbon Age to Sorption, Transport and Microbial Interactions - Insights from a Calibrated Process Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, B.; Schrumpf, M.; Reichstein, M.

    2013-12-01

    Subsoil soil organic carbon (SOC) is characterized by conventional radiocarbon ages on the order of centuries to millennia. Most vertically explicit SOC turnover models represent this persistence of deep SOC by one pool that has millennial turnover times. This approach lumps different stabilizing mechanisms such as chemical recalcitrance, sorptive stabilization and energy limitation into a single rate constant. As an alternative, we present a continuous, vertically explicit SOC decomposition model that allows for stabilization via sorption and microbial interactions (COMISSION model). We compare the COMISSION model with the SOC profile of a Haplic Podzol under a Norway spruce forest. In the COMISSION model two pools receive aboveground litter input and vertically distributed root litter input. The readily leachable and soluble fraction of litter input enters a dissolved organic carbon pool (DOC), while the rest enters the residue pool which represents polymeric, non-soluble SOC. The residue pool is depolymerized with extracellular enzymes produced by a microbial pool to enter the DOC pool which represents SOC potentially available for assimilation by microbes. The adsorption/desorption of DOC from/to mineral surfaces controls the availability of carbon in the DOC pool for assimilatory uptake by microbes. The sorption of DOC is modeled with dynamic Langmuir equations. The desorbed part of the DOC pool not only constitutes the substrate for the microbial pool, but is also transported via advection. Interactions of microbes with the residue and DOC pool are modeled with Michaelis-Menten kinetics - this not only allows representing ';priming', but also the retardation of decomposition via energy limitation in the deep soil where substrate is scarce. Further, soil organic matter is recycled within the soil profile through microbial processing - dead microbes either enter the DOC or the residue pool, and thereby also contribute to longer residence times with soil depth

  10. Sorption behaviour of radioactive technetium in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Deying

    1996-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of technetium in different soils has been studied by batch experiments under aerobic conditions. The soil samples have been taken to study the characteristics and to derive the pH-Eh values. In addition, the activated carbon and reduced iron powder have been selected as additives to the JAERI sand according to the former research work, so that the technetium sorption behaviour in the artificial soils can be studied under similar conditions. The experimental results show that all these soil samples except for the gluey soil have a very small distribution coefficient for Tc, while the artificial soils have a very large distribution coefficient for Tc. Besides, for artificial soils, the distribution coefficient (R d ) values will become larger and larger when more additive is added and more contact time is allowed. The physico-chemical fixation processes and possible sorption modes have been discussed as well

  11. Sorption of Europium in zirconium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, G.

    2004-01-01

    Some minerals have the property of sipping radioactive metals in solution, that it takes advantage to manufacture contention barriers that are placed in the repositories of nuclear wastes. The more recent investigations are focused in the development of new technologies guided to the sorption of alpha emissors on minerals which avoid their dispersion in the environment. In an effort to contribute to the understanding of this type of properties, some studies of sorption of Europium III are presented like homologous of the americium, on the surface of zirconium silicate (ZrSiO 4 ). In this work the results of sorption experiences are presented as well as the interpretation of the phenomena of the formation of species in the surface of the zirconium silicate. (Author)

  12. Water sorption and transport in dry crispy bread crust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, M.B.J.; Nieuwenhuijzen, van N.H.; Tromp, R.H.; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2010-01-01

    Water sorption and dynamical properties of bread crust have been studied using gravimetric sorption experiments. Water uptake and loss were followed while relative humidity (RH) was stepwise in- or decreased (isotherm experiment) or varied between two adjusted values (oscillatory experiment).

  13. The sorption of acids in cellular side of apple pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoev, M.G.; Mukhiddinov, Z.K.

    1994-01-01

    Equilibrium swell of sample refuse after separation of water is use for study of sorption of hydrochloric acid. Quantity adsorb acids set a price to difference her concentration before and after equilibrium sorption

  14. Molecular simulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon sorption to black carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.; Govers, H.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Strong sorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants to soot or black carbon (BC) is an important environmental process limiting the bioremediation potential of contaminated soils and sediments. Reliable methods to predict BC sorption coefficients for organic contaminants are therefore required. A

  15. On the derivation of a sorption database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewart, F.T.; Haworth, A.; Wisbey, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The safety arguments in support of many radioactive waste repository concepts are heavily dependent on the existence of a sorption reaction. Such a reaction will, in the near field, reduce the magnitude of the release of a number of hazardous radionuclides so that their release to the geosphere is dispersed in time. In the geosphere, the sorption reactions provide a mechanism whereby the migration of the elements released from the repository is retarded and the radioisotopes then subsequently decay. The processes involved in sorption cannot in many cases be satisfactorily represented in thermodynamic terms such as are employed in the description of dissolution and precipitation. Experiments that investigate these reactions are not easy to perform. The sorption parameters that are obtained experimentally for the near field relate, in the UK case, to sorption on to a cementitious surface. These surfaces, since they consist substantially of calcium hydroxide or calcium silicate hydrates, control the aqueous chemistry, do not permit pH changes to be made and limit the range of concentrations of sorbate that may be used. In the far field, on the other hand, the surfaces are not in general so active with respect to the solution chemistry and data can be obtained across a wide spectrum of aqueous chemistries. These data, although they may be useful in testing and parameterizing models, may not have validity under field conditions since the minerals will, inevitably, react to the changes in water chemistry, over geological timescales. The uncertainties in the experimental data are, for many elements and solids, balanced by a reasonable agreement between workers in the values of the parameters used to describe sorption. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Effects of cell condition, pH, and temperature on lead, zinc, and copper sorption to Acidithiobacillus caldus strain BC13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aston, John E.; Apel, William A.; Lee, Brady D.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: →At. caldus sorbs lead, zinc, and copper across a range of pH and temperature. →At. caldus shows a relatively high sorption capacity for zinc and copper at low pH. → Lead, zinc, and copper sorption decreases in tertiary mixtures. → Copper appears to sorb via a different mechanism(s) than lead or zinc. - Abstract: This study describes the effects of cell condition, pH, and temperature on lead, zinc, and copper sorption to Acidithiobacillus caldus strain BC13 with a Langmuir model. Copper exhibited the highest loading capacity, 4.76 ± 0.28 mmol g -1 , to viable cells at pH 5.5. The highest k L (binding-site affinity) observed was 61.2 ± 3.0 L mmol -1 to dehydrated cells at pH 4.0. The pHs that maximized loading capacities and binding-site affinities were generally between 4.0 and 5.5, where the sum of free-proton and complexed-metal concentrations was near a minimum. Of additional importance, lead, zinc, and copper sorbed to viable cells at pH values as low as 1.5. Previous studies with other acidithiobacilli did not measure viable-cell sorption below pH 4.0. In separate experiments, desorption studies showed that far less copper was recovered from viable cells than any other metal or cell condition, suggesting that uptake may play an important role in copper sorption by At. caldus strain BC13. To reflect an applied system, the sorption of metal mixtures was also studied. In these experiments, lead, zinc, and copper sorption from a tertiary mixture were 40.2 ± 4.3%, 28.7 ± 3.8%, and 91.3 ± 3.0%, respectively, of that sorbed in single-metal systems.

  17. Sorption Properties of Some Romanian Gingerbread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulbure Anca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Water activity of gingerbread is very important for keeping the product freshness and shelf life. Water activity is influenced by composition, water content and temperature. The water content of gingerbread could vary according with storage condition. i.e. rH. 11 gingerbread samples were analysed. The water content and water activity lies between 7.0 and 12.6% and respectively 0.590 and 0.715. The sorption isotherms were determined at 30°C by gravimetric method. The moisture sorption is influenced by composition, especially sweeteners and humectants. Honey and invert sugar have the same impact on gingerbread higroscopicity.

  18. Sorption of radionuclides on hard rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Bourke, P.J.; Green, A.; Littleboy, A.K.

    1987-09-01

    Methods for measuring sorption on hard rocks, particularly of strontium, caesium, neptunium and americium on Darley Dale sandstone and Welsh slate have been investigated. The methods tried included batch tests with crushed rock and tests of simultaneous diffusion and convection with sorption on intact rock. High pressures (800m H 2 O) were used in the convective tests to pump water quickly through the rock samples and to measure high sorptivities in times shorter than those needed in the diffusive methods with intact samples. (author)

  19. A Sorption Hysteresis Model For Cellulosic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Damkilde, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The equilibrium concentration of adsorbed water in cellulosic materials is dependent on the history of the variations of vapor pressure in the ambient air, i.e. sorption hysteresis. Existing models to describe this phenomenon such as the independent domain theory have numerical drawbacks and....../or imply accounting for the entire history variations of every material point. This paper presents a sorption hysteresis model based on a state formulation and expressed in closed-form solutions, which makes it suitable for implementation into a numerical method....

  20. Sorption of natural uranium by algerian bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megouda, N.; Kadi, H.; Hamla, M.S.; Brahimi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.Batch sorption experiments have been used to assess the sorption behaviour of uranium onto natural and drilling bentonites. The operating parameters (pH, aolis-liquid ratio, particle size, time and initial uranium concentration) influenced the rate of adsorption. The distribution coefficient (Kd) range values at equilibrium time are 45.95-1079.26 ml/g and 32.81-463053 ml/g for the drilling and natural bentonites respectively. The equilibrium isotherms show that the data correlate with both Freundlich and Langmuir models

  1. The sorption of iodine by an inorganic zinc primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, G J; Bekeris, P A [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify and evaluate significant parameters in the sorption of I{sub 2}(g) onto Carbo Zinc 11 inorganic primer, a paint used in the containment structure of some CANDU reactors. Air containing known amounts of {sup 131}I{sub 2}(g) was passed through 0.64 cm diameter glass tubing coated on the inner surface with paint. The accumulation of iodine on the surface was continuously monitored using two scintillation detectors. The test parameters covered were relative humidity, flow rate, I{sub 2} concentration and paint temperature. Adsorption was rapid at 23{sup o}C and predominantly gas phase mass transfer limited: the deposition velocity of 0.7{+-}0.4 cm/s was similar to the gas phase mass transfer coefficient of 1.2 cm/s estimated for the system. The deposition velocity observed at a higher paint surface temperature was an order of magnitude smaller. A similar deposition velocity was observed at 23{sup o}C for adsorption of I{sub 2}(g) from essentially dry air suggesting that the low deposition velocity observed for high surface temperature was limited by the amount of water on the paint surface. The rate of adsorption on the paint was directly proportional to the I{sub 2}(g) concentration over the range in concentration studied. The majority of the iodine retained by the paint could not be removed by washing with methanol or chloroform, but it was removed by water indicating that it was in an ionic form. Analysis of the speciation of the iodine in the wash water indicated that only a third of it was in the form of I{sup -}; the form of the remaining iodine could not be resolved. Desorption from the paint was negligible at room temperature but was detectable at higher temperatures. These low desorption rates and the ionic nature of the surface iodine indicated that adsorption occurred predominantly through a chemisorption process. A number of possible mechanisms were proposed. (author) 5 figs., 2 tabs., 6 refs.

  2. A Tunable Cyclic Container: Guest-Induced Conformational Switching, Efficient Guest Exchange, and Selective Isolation of C70 from a Fullerene Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pritam; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2017-07-18

    An adaptable cyclic porphyrin dimer with highly flexible linkers has been used as an artificial molecular container that can efficiently encapsulate various aromatic guests (TCNQ/C 60 /C 70 ) through strong π-π interactions by adjusting its cavity size and conformation. The planar aromatic guest (TCNQ) can be easily and selectively exchanged with larger aromatic guests (C 60 /C 70 ). During the guest-exchange process, the two porphyrin rings switch their relative orientation according to the size and shape of the guests. This behavior of the cyclic container has been thoroughly investigated by using UV/Vis spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystal structure determination of the host-guest assemblies. The electrochemical and photophysical studies demonstrated the occurrence of photoinduced electron transfer from bisporphyrin to TCNQ/C 60 /C 70 in the respective host-guest assemblies. The cyclic host can form complexes with C 60 and C 70 with association constants of (2.8±0.2)×10 5 and (1.9±0.3)×10 8  m -1 , respectively; the latter value represents the highest binding affinity for C 70 reported so far for zinc(II) bisporphyrinic receptors. This high selectivity for the binding of C 70 versus C 60 allows the easy extraction and efficient isolation of C 70 from a C 60 /C 70 fullerene mixture. Experimental evidence was substantiated by DFT calculations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Host–Guest Chirality Interplay: A Mutually Induced Formation of a Chiral ZMOF and Its Double-Helix Polymer Guests

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xiaolong

    2016-01-12

    A novel homochiral zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF), [(Cu4I4) (dabco)2]·[Cu2(bbimb)]·3DMF (JLU-Liu23, dabco =1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]-octane, H2bbimb =1,3-bis(2-benzimidazol)benzene, DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), has been successfully constructed to host unprecedented DNA-like [Cu2(bbimb)]n polymers with double-helicity. The host-guest chirality interplay permitted the induced formation of an unusual gyroid MOF with homochirality and helical channels in the framework for the first time, JLU-Liu23. Importantly, the enantiomeric pairs (23P, 23M) can be promoted and isolated in the presence of appropriate chiral inducing agents, affording enantioselective separation of chiral molecules as well as small gas molecules. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  4. Mathematical model of the sorption phenomenon of methanol in activated coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes, Farid B.; Chejne, Farid; Mejia, Juan M.; Londono, Carlos A. [Grupo de Termodinamica Aplicada y Energias Alternativas - Instituto de Energia, Facultad de Minas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede Medellin (Colombia)

    2009-05-15

    A transient model of a sorption refrigerator using activated carbon/methanol pair is presented. It is a non-uniform pressure model conformed by the mass, energy and momentum balance equations in cylindrical coordinates, for the activated coal bed contained in the adsorber. The results obtained from the simulation were suitably validated by the experimental information obtained from field test data and from data reported in the literature, presenting errors below 1.6% for each cycle step. The model allows to get data of temperature, pressure, density and gas velocity profiles in radial direction, as well as the solid temperature and the quantity of adsorbed methanol in the activated carbon bed in adsorption/evaporation and desorption/condensation steps. (author)

  5. Hydrogen storage materials discovery via high throughput ball milling and gas sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Kaye, Steven S; Riley, Conor; Greenberg, Doron; Galang, Daniel; Bailey, Mark S

    2012-06-11

    The lack of a high capacity hydrogen storage material is a major barrier to the implementation of the hydrogen economy. To accelerate discovery of such materials, we have developed a high-throughput workflow for screening of hydrogen storage materials in which candidate materials are synthesized and characterized via highly parallel ball mills and volumetric gas sorption instruments, respectively. The workflow was used to identify mixed imides with significantly enhanced absorption rates relative to Li2Mg(NH)2. The most promising material, 2LiNH2:MgH2 + 5 atom % LiBH4 + 0.5 atom % La, exhibits the best balance of absorption rate, capacity, and cycle-life, absorbing >4 wt % H2 in 1 h at 120 °C after 11 absorption-desorption cycles.

  6. Mathematical model of the sorption phenomenon of methanol in activated coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes, Farid B.; Chejne, Farid; Mejia, Juan M.; Londono, Carlos A.

    2009-01-01

    A transient model of a sorption refrigerator using activated carbon/methanol pair is presented. It is a non-uniform pressure model conformed by the mass, energy and momentum balance equations in cylindrical coordinates, for the activated coal bed contained in the adsorber. The results obtained from the simulation were suitably validated by the experimental information obtained from field test data and from data reported in the literature, presenting errors below 1.6% for each cycle step. The model allows to get data of temperature, pressure, density and gas velocity profiles in radial direction, as well as the solid temperature and the quantity of adsorbed methanol in the activated carbon bed in adsorption/evaporation and desorption/condensation steps.

  7. The sorption and crystallographic characteristics of alumina activated in a reactor for pneumatic transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJILJANA ROZIC

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Active transition alumina powders were obtained by flash calcination of gibbsite in a reactor for pneumatic transport in the dilute, two-phase flow regime in the temperature interval from 883 to 943 K with a residence time between 0.4 and 0.9 s. The results of X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the activated alumina samples were either microcrystalline or amorphous. From nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms, the specific surface areas of all samples were calculated by the BETmethod. Using the sorption data, the fractal dimension of the surface of the alumina samples was calculated according to a modified FHH method. By application of fractal geometry, using the values of the fractal dimension of the surface and of the specific surface area, the effective surface areas of the active aluminas were calculated for the adsorption of molecules having a cross-section area greater than that of the nitrogen molecule.

  8. EVALUATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM EXISTING COAL FIRED PLANTS BY HYBRID SORPTION USING SOLID SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Steven; Palo, Daniel; Srinivasachar, Srivats; Laudal, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Under contract DE-FE0007603, the University of North Dakota conducted the project Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Existing Coal Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents. As an important element of this effort, an Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) Assessment was conducted by Barr Engineering Co. (Barr) in association with the University of North Dakota. The assessment addressed air and particulate emissions as well as solid and liquid waste streams. The magnitude of the emissions and waste streams was estimated for evaluation purposes. EH&S characteristics of materials used in the system are also described. This document contains data based on the mass balances from both the 40 kJ/mol CO2 and 80 kJ/mol CO2 desorption energy cases evaluated in the Final Technical and Economic Feasibility study also conducted by Barr Engineering.

  9. Thermal desorption study of physical forces at the PTFE surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface was successfully employed to study the possible role of physical forces in the enhancement of metal-PTFE adhesion by radiation. The thermal desorption spectra were analyzed without assumptions to yield the activation energy for desorption over a range of xenon coverage from less than 0.1 monolayer to more than 100 monolayers. For multilayer coverage, the desorption is zero-order with an activation energy equal to the sublimation energy of xenon. For submonolayer coverages, the order for desorption from the unirradiated PTFE surface is 0.73 and the activation energy for desorption is between 3.32 and 3.36 kcal/mol; less than the xenon sublimation energy. The effect of irradiation is to increase the activation energy for desorption to as high as 4 kcal/mol at low coverage.

  10. The sorption behaviour of 99Tc on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Deying; Zeng Jishu

    2004-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of 99 Tc on apricot-pit activated carbon with batch experiment is studied. The influence of such factors as sorbent particle size, temperature, pH value on sorption ratio, and the Freundlich sorption isotherms are reported in this paper. (author)

  11. Suitability of Moshi Pumice for Phosphorus Sorption in Constructed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of Moshi Pumice's phosphorus sorption behaviours and properties was carried out in laboratory scale where by 1-2 mm, 2-4 mm and 4-8 mm grains were tested using batch experiments. The results show that Moshi Pumice has high phosphorus sorption capacity. The sorption capacity for the Moshi Pumice was ...