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Sample records for soria moria vent

  1. Mineralogy and Geochemistry from Trollveggen Vent Field Chimneys and Metalliferous Sediments (Mohns Ridge, West Jan Mayen Fracture Zone at 71°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, S.; Cruz, I.; Fonseca, R.; Barriga, F. J.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Jan Mayen vent fields were discovered in the Mohns Ridge during an expedition with the Norwegian research vessel "G.O. Sars" in July 2005. They comprise two main active areas: (1) Soria Moria and (2) Gallionella Garden & Trollveggen. The Trollveggen vent field is located at depths of 700-750 m. Venting takes place mainly through white smoker chimneys with fluid temperatures reaching up to 260-270°C. Here we present mineralogical and geochemical data from vent chimneys and metalliferous sediments collected at the Trollveggen vent field with an ROV. Cross-sections of chimneys present evident mineralogical zonation, showing acicular barite crystals in the outer parts and sulfide enrichments in the interior (Sph + Cpy +/- Py - Po). Sediments are mainly formed by vent fragments but also by minerals precipitated by diffuse fluid circulation, showing a mineral assemblage similar to that of chimneys. Microprobe analyses were obtained both in sulfates and sulphides revealing a particular sphalerite composition, characterized by low Fe (< 2%) and high total trace metal contents (up to 4%, including Cu, Ag and Au). Geochemical profiles of gravity cores collected in the area surrounding Jan Mayen were also performed in order to investigate the presence of additional hydrothermal activity in the area. Total geochemical analyses showed a slight enrichment in trace metals, such as Cu, Zn and Fe, with exception of one core that reached 85 ppm for Cu, 150 ppm for Zn and 20% for Fe. The metal enrichment in this core suggests hydrothermal activity in the neighboring area.

  2. A new astrophysical solution to the Too Big To Fail problem. Insights from the moria simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, R.; Papastergis, E.; Ponomareva, A. A.; Rathi, S.; De Rijcke, S.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We test whether or not realistic analysis techniques of advanced hydrodynamical simulations can alleviate the Too Big To Fail problem (TBTF) for late-type galaxies. TBTF states that isolated dwarf galaxy kinematics imply that dwarfs live in halos with lower mass than is expected in a Λ cold dark matter universe. Furthermore, we want to identify the physical mechanisms that are responsible for this observed tension between theory and observations. Methods: We use the moria suite of dwarf galaxy simulations to investigate whether observational effects are involved in TBTF for late-type field dwarf galaxies. To this end, we create synthetic radio data cubes of the simulated moria galaxies and analyse their H I kinematics as if they were real, observed galaxies. Results: We find that for low-mass galaxies, the circular velocity profile inferred from spatially resolved H I kinematics often underestimates the true circular velocity profile, as derived directly from the enclosed mass. Fitting the H I kinematics of moria dwarfs with a theoretical halo profile results in a systematic underestimate of the mass of their host halos. We attribute this effect to the fact that the interstellar medium of a low-mass late-type dwarf is continuously stirred by supernova explosions into a vertically puffed-up, turbulent state to the extent that the rotation velocity of the gas is simply no longer a good tracer of the underlying gravitational force field. If this holds true for real dwarf galaxies as well, it implies that they inhabit more massive dark matter halos than would be inferred from their kinematics, solving TBTF for late-type field dwarf galaxies.

  3. LASIK flap characteristics using the Moria M2 microkeratome with the 90-microm single use head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanides, Ioannis M; Tsiklis, Nikolaos S; Astyrakakis, Nikolaos I; Pallikaris, Ioannis G; Jankov, Mirko R

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and consistency of corneal flap thickness, horizontal diameter, and hinge size with the Moria M2 90-microm single use head. Fifty-two myopic patients (104 eyes), mean age 32.6 years, underwent bilateral LASIK with a superior hinged flap using the Moria M2 microkeratome (90-microm single use head). Prospective evaluation included flap thickness (subtraction method), diameter, hinge size, interface particles, intraoperative complications, and visual recovery. The mean preoperative spherical equivalent refraction was -5.72 +/- 2.59 diopters (D) (range: -2.88 to -10.75 D) and -5.84 +/- 2.73 D (range: -3.13 to -9.38 D) for right and left eyes, respectively. The mean preoperative central corneal thickness was 548 +/- 24 microm and 547 +/- 25 microm for right and left eyes, respectively. The mean preoperative steepest K was 44.12 +/- 1.28 D and 44.41 +/- 1.27 D for right and left eyes, respectively. Corneal diameter (white-to-white) was 12 +/- 0.4 mm and 11.9 +/- 0.4 mm for right and left eyes, respectively. The mean postoperative flap thickness was 109 +/- 18 microm (range: 67 to 152 microm) and 103 +/- 15 microm (range: 65 to 151 microm) for right and left eyes, respectively. The mean postoperative flap diameter was 9.4 +/- 0.3 mm (expected mean according to the nomogram given by the company was 9.5 mm). The mean postoperative hinge chord was 4.4 +/- 0.4 mm (expected mean 4.2 mm). No interface particles were detected on slit-lamp examination. The Moria M2 90-microm single use head is safe with reasonable predictability for LASIK flap creation.

  4. Icnitas de dinosaurios en Valdelavilla (Soria, España

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    Sanz Pérez, E.

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the ichnological study of the surroundings of San Pedro Manrique (Soria, Spain, the new site at Valdelavilla, located in unit IV-b of the Huérteles Formation, has yielded dinosaur and pterosaur tracks. The main feature of this site is that it contains a great variety of dinosaur tracks, as regards their type (theropods, omithopods, sauropods their size (from 70 cm to 6 cm, and the way these tracemakers walked (digitigrade, plantigrade. Like many other place at Oncala Group, theropod tracks are abundant, and at a lesser degree, sauropod tracks are also present There is no conclusive evidence of omithopods tracks.Dentro del estudio icnológico que se realiza en los alrededores de San Pedro Manrique (Soria, España el nuevo yacimiento de Valdelavilla, enclavado en la unidad IV-b de la Aloformación Huérteles, ha proporcionado, hasta el momento, huellas de dinosaurios y de pterosaurios. La principal característica del mismo estriba en contener una gran variedad de icnitas de dinosaurios, tanto por su tipo (terópodos, omitópodos, saurópodos, como por su tamaño (desde 70 cm hasta 8 cm y forma de caminar (digitígrados, plantígrados. Como en muchos otros lugares del Grupo Oncala, abundan las huellas de terópodos y en menor proporción las de saurópodos, no presentándose claramente las de omitópodos.

  5. Cardiovascular health education intervention in the Prison of Soria

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    M.M. Martínez-Delgado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To promote awareness of healthy lifestyles, to help decrease the risk factors that cause cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, through Health Education (HE. Material and Methods: Between November and December 2014 in the prison of Soria, HE intervention in cardiovascular diseases was performed. Participation was offered to 160 inmates at the Prison. The intervention consisted of individual interviews with anthropometric assessment and review of medical records and three group sessions with theoretical and practical content of these diseases, as well as dietary recommendations, Mediterranean diet and exercise. Knowledge gained from surveys conducted for that purpose was evaluated. Results: A total of 33 (21% of 160. Average age 38.2 (35.2 to 41.3. Prevalence: Normal weight (BMI 18 to 24.9 18 (54.5%, overweight BMI (25.0 to 29.9 11 (33.3%, obesity (IBMI from 30 4 (12. 1%. Cardiovascular risk (CVR as ICC (waist hip ratio 10 (30% high risk, REGICOR 4 (12.1% moderate risk. Relative risk of comorbidity in 2 (6.0% had a slightly increased risk, 4 (12.1% had increased risk. Conclusions: HE interventions are necessary and effective in modifying lifestyles. The calculation of CVT should serve to implement preventive measures to reduce the factors of cardiovascular risk.

  6. Vented Capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Michael Allen; Hosking, Terry Alan

    2006-04-11

    A technique of increasing the corona inception voltage (CIV), and thereby increasing the operating voltage, of film/foil capacitors is described. Intentional venting of the capacitor encapsulation improves the corona inception voltage by allowing internal voids to equilibrate with the ambient environment.

  7. Energy landscapes shape microbial communities in hydrothermal systems on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Dahle, H?kon; ?kland, Ingeborg; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Pederesen, Rolf B; Steen, Ida H

    2015-01-01

    Methods developed in geochemical modelling combined with recent advances in molecular microbial ecology provide new opportunities to explore how microbial communities are shaped by their chemical surroundings. Here, we present a framework for analyses of how chemical energy availability shape chemotrophic microbial communities in hydrothermal systems through an investigation of two geochemically different basalt-hosted hydrothermal systems on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge: the Soria Moria Vent f...

  8. Diffuse lamellar keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis with the Moria LSK-One and Carriazo-Barraquer microkeratomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammano, Pavika; Rana, Azhar N; Talamo, Jonathan H

    2003-10-01

    To assess risk factors for and incidence of diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) and to investigate whether microkeratome design is associated with the incidence of DLK. The Laser Eye Consultants of Boston, Boston and Waltham, Massachusetts, USA. In a retrospective nonrandomized comparative study, 1122 consecutive primary laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) treatments (584 patients) were analyzed to determine the incidence of DLK using 2 different microkeratome designs (Moria LSK-One [LSK] and Moria Carriazo-Barraquer [C-B]). The incidence of DLK was as determined by clinical signs. The overall incidence of DLK was 2.23%. The incidence in the LSK and C-B groups was 1.09% and 4.38%, respectively, with a statistically significant difference in incidence between the 2 groups (P<.01). Epithelial irregularities increased the risk for DLK. There was no significant statistical difference in sex, age, operating room location, type of laser, or time of day the surgery was performed between the 2 groups or between eyes that had DLK and eyes without DLK. The incidence of DLK using the C-B microkeratome fell significantly after May 2000, when new cleaning methods for this device were introduced. Different microkeratomes and how they are maintained may influence the incidence of DLK. Diffuse lamellar keratitis is more common after LASIK in a setting of epithelial irregularities, whether or not an actual epithelial defect is created.

  9. Reproducibility of flap thickness with IntraLase FS and Moria LSK-1 and M2 microkeratomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Jonathan H; Meltzer, Jeremy; Gardner, John

    2006-06-01

    To compare flap thickness reproducibility of the femtosecond laser and two mechanical microkeratomes. Flap thickness for all eyes was measured as the difference between the preoperative (day of surgery) full corneal thickness and post-flap creation central stromal bed thickness using ultrasonic pachymetry. Flap thickness values produced by three different microkeratome systems were compared for accuracy and reproducibility. For 99 flaps created using the IntraLase FS laser with an intended thickness of 110 microm, the mean achieved thickness was 119 +/- 12 microm (range: 82 to 149 microm). In 100 eyes treated with the Moria LSK-1 microkeratome with an intended flap thickness of 160 microm, the mean achieved thickness was 130 +/- 19 microm (range: 71 to 186 microm). In 135 eyes treated with the Moria M2 microkeratome with an intended flap thickness of 130 microm, mean thickness was 142 +/- 24 microm (range: 84 to 203 microm). The standard deviation and range of corneal flap thickness created with the IntraLase FS laser was significantly smaller than either mechanical microkeratome (P < .0001). When compared to two commonly used mechanical microkeratomes, mean achieved flap thickness was more reproducible with the IntraLase FS laser, reducing the comparative risk of overly thick flaps.

  10. A likely late-Roman painted pottery workshop in Tarancuena (Soria | Un probable taller local de cerámica pintada tardorromana en Tarancueña (Soria

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    Juan Manuel Abascal Palazón

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of painted pottery in the Roman site of Tarancueña (Soria stand out because of its thematic and chronological homogeneity, and the meeting in only one site of the types which appear in the peripheric counties. The analysis of the material, combined with the information from the excavations, allows us to suggest the existence of a county factory which produced this type of pottery in the second half of the IVth Century A. D. and the first years of the Vth Century A. D. | Los hallazgos de cerámica pintada del yacimiento romano de Tarancueña (Soria, destacan por su homogeneidad temática y cronológica, así como por reunir en un solo enclave los tipos que aparecen en las regiones periféricas. El análisis del material, combinado con la información de las excavaciones, permite sugerir la existencia de un taller comarcal que produjo este tipo de piezas en la segunda mitad del siglo IV y los primeros años del siglo V. d. C.

  11. Patrocinio deportivo y comunicación de marketing: el caso Soria natural - Club deportivo Numancia

    OpenAIRE

    Nájera Tejedor, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    En este trabajo se analiza el patrocinio como herramienta de marketing de las empresas y, más concretamente, el patrocinio deportivo en el mundo del fútbol. Además de los datos aportados en relación a los grandes patrocinios, se estudia el caso de una empresa mediana como Soria Natural y su relación de patrocinio con el Club Deportivo Numancia, militante de la Segunda División Española. A lo largo del trabajo se hace un análisis del estado del patrocinio en el mundo del fútbol y c...

  12. La ciudad de Soria como centro manufacturero durante el período bajomedieval

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    Máximo Diago Hernando

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El autor analiza las principales actividades manufactureras que alcanzaron cierto desarrollo en la ciudad castellana de Soria entre los siglos XIII y XVI. Demuestra que la actividad de fabricación de telas de lino apareció más tempranamente que la de fabricación de paños de lana, aunque ésta con posterioridad alcanzó mucha más importancia. También informa sobre algunas otras actividades manufactureras como el trabajo del cuero, la fabricación de zapatos, y la carpintería. Y concluye dando cuenta de las vías de participación de los artesanos en la vida política local.The author analyses the main manufacturing activities that attained a certain degree of development in the Castilian town of Soria between the thirteenth and the sixteenth centuries. He proves that the manufacture of linen cloths appeared earlier than the manufacture of woolen cloths, although this one attained a higher importance afterwards. He also informs about other manufacturing activities, like leather tanning, shoemaking and carpentry. He concludes paying attention to the participation of the artisans in the local political activity.

  13. Reorganização de saberes tradicionais em Los sorias, de Alberto Laiseca

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    Graciela Ravetti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Neste estudo, propõe-se uma consideração sobre a reformulação de saberes tradicionais em termos não metafísicos na obra do escritor argentino Alberto Laiseca, Los sorias (1998, construída a partir da convergência dos temas das religiões, da magia e da astrologia, lado a lado com outros saberes em face de (deshierarquização. Palavras chave: Literatura hispano-americana; literatura argenti­na; romance contemporâneo; ficção científica. Abstract: In this study, we propose a consideration on the reformulation of traditional knowledge in no metaphysical terms in the work of Argentine writer Alberto Laiseca, Los sorias (1998, constructed from the convergence of the themes of religion, magic and astrology alongside with other knowledge in the face of de-hierarchization. Keywords: Argentine literature; contemporary romance, science fiction, Spanish American literature.

  14. 24 CFR 3280.611 - Vents and venting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Materials—(1) Pipe. Vent piping shall be standard weight steel, wrought iron, brass, copper tube DWV, listed...) Size of vent piping—(1) Main vent. The drain piping for each toilet shall be vented by a 11/2 inch... venting cross section of a 11/2 inch diameter vent, connected to the toilet drain by one of the following...

  15. Visumax femtolasik versus Moria M2 microkeratome in mild to moderate myopia: efficacy, safety, predictability, aberrometric changes and flap thickness predictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torky, Magda A; Al Zafiri, Yousif A; Khattab, Abeer M; Farag, Rania K; Awad, Eman A

    2017-07-17

    This is an interventional prospective clinical study which was conducted to evaluate the efficacy, safety, predictability, ocular aberrations, and flap thickness predictability of Visumax femtosecond laser (FSL) compared to Moria M2 microkeratome (MK) in mild to moderate myopia. This study included 60 eyes who were divided into two groups. Thirty eyes in group (I) in which the flap was created with Visumax FSL, while in group II (30 eyes) the Moria M2 MK was used. Keratometric, refractive, and aberrometric measurements were compared preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. The intraoperative subtraction pachymetry (the SP 100 Handy pachymeter (Tomey, Nagoya, Japan) was used for preoperative pachymetry and flap thickness measurement. No significant difference was found between the two groups in regards to postoperative manifest sphere, spherical equivalent, astigmatism, safety indices nor ocular aberrations. Twenty six eyes (86.6%) in group I and 23 eyes in group II (76.6%) were within ±0.5D of the intended correction and 23 eyes (76.6%) in group I and 15 eyes in group II (50%) were within ±0.25D of the intended correction. In group I, the mean postoperative actual flap thickness was 100.12 ± 16.1 μm (81 to 122 μm), while in group II, it was 104.6 ± 20.1 μm (62 to 155 μm). The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001). Both Visumax and Moria M2 MK are safe and effective in treating myopia with no statistically significant difference in induction of ocular aberrations but with potential advantage for Visumax regarding predictability. More accurate flap thickness is achieved with Visumax femtolasik. This study was retrospectively registered on 19/6/2017. Trial registration number NCT03193411 , clinicalTrials.gov .

  16. Biaxial vent extruder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idemoto, A.; Maki, Y.; Oda, N.

    1981-01-01

    A biaxial vent extruder is described for processing of slurry-like waste fluids or radioactive waste fluids which have a hopper cylinger, a solidifying substance port and a solidified substance port. A plurality of vent cylinders each having a vent port are provided with a plunger type scraper. An extruding cylinder having a single opening for a main screw is connected to the assembled vent cylinders. The main screw extends to the upstream end of the extruding cylinder and a sub-screw extends to the extruding cylinder. The screws each having a full flight engaging the other and a set of rings are mounted on the screws near the respective vent port inlets. The screws are rotated in different directions and inwardly with respect to the vent ports. Rotors may be mounted on the screws to break down solid particles

  17. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1997-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  18. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1998-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  19. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils. Volume XII.- Castilla-Leon (c): Burgos, Soria and Segovia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, C; Millan, R.; Schmid, T.; Lago, C.; Roquero, C; Magister, M.

    1999-01-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the provinces of Burgos, Soria and Segovia of the Comunidad Autonoma de Castilla-Leon. (Author) 36 refs

  20. Consumo de tabaco en adolescentes de nuevo ingreso en el Campus Duques de Soria de la Universidad de Valladolid

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Aznar, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: Actualmente el consumo de tabaco entre los más jóvenes sigue siendo uno de los factores de mayor riesgo para la salud. Para poder intervenir desde la prevención de la salud, se considera la necesidad de profundizar en los factores predictores del consumo de tabaco en los jóvenes. Objetivo: Objetivo general: Conocer la prevalencia de consumo de tabaco en los estudiantes adolescentes de nuevo ingreso en la Universidad de Valladolid, campus de Soria. Materia...

  1. Moldes de arcilla para fundir metales procedentes del Castro Hallstáttico de El Royo (Soria

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    Jorge Juan EIROA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Durante los trabajos de la segunda campaña de excavaciones arqueológicas en el castro de la Virgen del Castillo de El Royo (Soria, que se desarrollaron durante el verano de 1979, apareció un lote de moldes de arcilla para fundir metales que, por su indudable interés para documentar aún más el desarrollo de la metalurgia en la Meseta, ofrecemos hoy, independientemente de la memoria oficial que sobre el yacimiento y su excavación preparamos.

  2. Vision in hydrothermal vent shrimp.

    OpenAIRE

    Chamberlain, S C

    2000-01-01

    Bresiliid shrimp from hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge have non-imaging eyes adapted for photodetection in light environments of very low intensity. Comparison of retinal structures between both vent shrimp and surface-dwelling shrimp with imaging eyes, and between juvenile and adult vent shrimp, suggests that vent shrimp have evolved from ancestors that lived in a light environment with bright cyclic lighting. Whether the vent shrimp live in swarms and have large dorsal eyes or l...

  3. Coil spring venting arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed

  4. Measure Guideline: Passive Vents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, David [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Neri, Robin [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This document addresses the use of passive vents as a source of outdoor air in multifamily buildings. The challenges associated with implementing passive vents and the factors affecting performance are outlined. A comprehensive design methodology and quantified performance metrics are provided. Two hypothetical design examples are provided to illustrate the process. This document is intended to be useful to designers, decision-makers, and contractors implementing passive ventilation strategies. It is also intended to be a resource for those responsible for setting high-performance building program requirements, especially pertaining to ventilation and outdoor air. To ensure good indoor air quality, a dedicated source of outdoor air is an integral part of high-performance buildings. Presently, there is a lack of guidance pertaining to the design and installation of passive vents, resulting in poor system performance. This report details the criteria necessary for designing, constructing, and testing passive vent systems to enable them to provide consistent and reliable levels of ventilation air from outdoors.

  5. Los Sorias y la escritura como guerra: temporalidad y mundos posibles en la poética de Alberto Laiseca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Agustín Conde De Boeck

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo analizaremos los modos a través de los cuales la representación de la guerra atraviesa los diferentes niveles textuales de Los sorias, la novela central deAlberto Laiseca y una de las más relevantes de la literatura argentina contemporánea. Haciéndose eco de la fuerte pregnancia cultural de lo bélico en la literatura argentina, veremos cómo gran parte del efecto de canonización de la obra de Laiseca se sustenta en el modo en que estructura los “mundos posibles” de su poética a través de la guerra ya no sólo como tema, sino como principio escriturario y como estrategia para establecer una particular distribución de la temporalidad narrativa.

  6. La evolución demográfica de la ciudad de Soria entre 1700 y 1814

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Sanz Yagüe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo analiza el movimiento de la población de la ciudad de Soria entre 1700 y 1814. Para ello se hace un seguimiento, bajo una perspectiva comparada, tanto de los censos y vecindarios, como de las principales variables demográficas extraídas de los libros parroquiales (natalidad, nupcialidad y mortalidad adulta. El estudio de la mortalidad parvular ha sido descartado por el momento, dada la importancia del subregistro a lo largo de todo el periodo. Los resultados sitúan a este núcleo urbano entre aquellos que experimentaron una trayectoria más dramática, con una larga etapa recesiva entre 1724 y 1770 y una recuperación tardía en las tres últimas décadas del Setecientos. Una tendencia propiciada, en cualquier caso, por el protagonismo de la mortalidad de crisis hasta 1750 y una segunda mitad de siglo especialmente benévola.This paper analyzes the demographic development of Soria, in the North of Castile, for the period 1700 to 1814. Still untouched, both census and parish registers have been employed to carry out this objective and to examine short-run fluctuations of vital events from a comparative point of view. Nevertheless, the mortality of the people under 8 years of age has been discarded for the moment due to the under-reporting of infant deaths in the church books and therefore the bad quality of the data. The results are clearly worse than Castilian average. The number of baptisms decreases sharply for the large period 1724-1770 but the trend turns upwards in the last three decades of the Eighteenth Century. Mortality crisis remains significant until 1750 and plays a prominent role in the course of population. Amazingly, there is not any crisis between 1751 and 1803.

  7. Vented nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, M.; Hirose, Y.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a vented nuclear fuel element having a plenum for accumulation of fission product gases and plug means for delaying the release of the fission product gases from the plenum, the plug means comprising a first porous body wettable with a liquid metal and a second porous body non-wettable with the liquid metal, the first porous body being impregnated with the liquid metal and in contact with the liquid metal

  8. Tornado protection by venting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavanagh, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the ability to protect a modern nuclear power plant from the effects of a tornado by the use of a system of venting in all safety-related structures outside of the containment. The paper demonstrates this by presenting a method of analysis and of equipment selection that fully complies with the intent and the letter of applicable federal regulatory guides. A report of an actual tornado in the City of Kalamazoo, Michigan, suggests that the concept of sealing a plant during a tornado may not always be applicable

  9. 14 CFR 25.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.975 Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Fuel tank vents. Each fuel tank must be vented from the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents...

  10. 14 CFR 29.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.975 Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Fuel tank vents. Each fuel tank must be vented from the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents...

  11. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils. Volume XII.- Castilla-Leon (c): Burgos, Soria and Segovia; Base de Datos de Propiedades Edafologicas de los Suelos Espanoles. Volumen XII.- Castilla-Leon (c): Burgos, Soria y Segovia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, C.; Millan, R.; Schmid, T.; Lago, C. [CIEMAT. Madrid (Spain); Roquero, C.; Magister, M. [UPM. Madrid (Spain)

    1999-09-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the provinces of Burgos, Soria and Segovia of the Comunidad Autonoma de Castilla-Leon. (Author)

  12. Arquitectura románica en la provincia de Soria, 1856-2014. Marco historiográfico y metodológico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Arribas, Josemi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The historiography of Romanesque in the province of Soria has three different stages. The former one begins with Eduardo Saavedra’s researches (1856 and it extends until 1934, when Gaya Nuño defends his PhD Thesis (La arquitectura románica en la provincia de Soria, which will not be published until 1946. The Spanish Civil War and the post-war period mark the beginning of the second stage, which is merely transitional, lacking any important contribution. The last stage begins with the publication of the three volumes of the Enciclopedia del Románico en Castilla y León (2002. These works have largely improved the knowledge of Romanesque architectural heritage, enhanced besides by the task undertaken by the technical office of the Cultural Project Soria Románica (2007- 2012, responsible for studying and restoring more than thirty Romanesque buildings in the Southern part of province. It is within this working frame that the building recording of the churches here presented must be understood. This historiographical assessment about provincial Romanesque does not include those buildings sited in the capital city, the Cathedral of El Burgo de Osma, the Monastery of Santa Maria de Huerta and the hermitage of San Baudelio (Casillas de Berlanga.La historiografía del Románico en la provincia de Soria tiene tres etapas diferenciadas. Una inicial, que parte de los estudios de Eduardo Saavedra (1856 y se extiende hasta 1934, fecha de la lectura de la tesis doctoral de Gaya Nuño (La arquitectura románica en la provincia de Soria, cuya publicación, no obstante, se demora hasta 1946. La Guerra Civil y posguerra marcan el comienzo de la segunda etapa, transicional y sin grandes aportaciones. La última etapa se inaugura con la publicación de los tres volúmenes sorianos de la Enciclopedia del Románico en Castilla y León (2002. Esta obra ha multiplicado el conocimiento del patrimonio edilicio románico, acrecentado, después, por la labor de la

  13. Vente d'artisanat

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Associaiton

    2014-01-01

      Éducation et Libération Vente d’artisanat du Tiers Monde Mardi 22 et mercredi 23 avril 2014 CERN, Bâtiment principal Togo, École Arc en ciel, construction des salles de classe. Appel pour le financement de ce chantier afin de libérer l’école de la charge des loyers payés pendant des années. Après nos réalisations en Amérique latine et au Bénin, nous mobilisons nos efforts pour l’école Arc en ciel de Kpémé, au Togo, sur les bords de l’Océan, à mi-chemin entre Lomé et la frontière entre le Bénin et le Togo. Il s’agit d’une école primaire privée, laïque qui a très bonne réputation en termes de résultats, notamment pour les écoliers en fin de scolar...

  14. 14 CFR 23.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.975 Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Each fuel tank must be vented... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents...

  15. Análisis de las Denominaciones de Origen y Marcas de Garantía de la provincia de Soria

    OpenAIRE

    García Manrique, Paula

    2017-01-01

    los objetivos que propusimos a la hora de comenzar esta investigación fueron los siguientes: - Analizar las figuras de marca de garantía y denominación de origen y definir su papel garante de calidad y origen de los productos. - Conocer en profundidad el proceso de obtención de una figura de calidad diferenciada (denominación de origen y marca de garantía) - Saber las razones y motivos por las que las figuras de calidad diferenciada de la provincia de Soria han llegado a adquirir tal...

  16. El roble (Quercus robur L. y otras plantas boreales en el macizo del Moncayo (Soria-Zaragoza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez García, D.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We report chorological and ecological information of 74 boreal plant species found in the Moncayo massif (Soria-Zaragoza provinces, Spain. These plants have been grouped in five general habitats. Most of these plants are extremely rare and reliclic species, someone with a southeastern distribution limit in the Sistema Ibérico mountain range. Moreover, a new hybrid, Narcissus x rafaelii Patino & Uribe-Echebarría ((N. assoanus Léon-Dufour x N. eugeniae Fdez.-Casas, is described.

    Se aportan citas de 74 plantas vasculares con distribución boreal, presentes en el macizo del Moncayo (provincias de Soria y Zaragoza. España. Se trata de especies raras que forman poblaciones relictas y muy reducidas; algunas de estas plantas parecen alcanzar en el Moncayo su límite suroriental de distribución en el Sistema Ibérico. Además, se describe como nueva especie híbrida Narcissus xrafaelii Patino & Uribe-Echebarría (N. assoanus Léon-Dufour x N. eugeniae Fdez.-Casas.

  17. Venting of gas deflagrations through relief pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrara, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    Vent devices for gas and dust explosions are often ducted to safety locations by means of relief pipes for the discharge of hot combustion products or blast waves (NFPA 68, 2002). The presence of the duct is likely to increase the severity of the explosion with respect to simply vented vessels posing a problem for the proper design of this venting configuration. The phenomenology of the vented explosion is complicated as the interaction of combustion in the duct with primary combustion in...

  18. Emergency venting of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkamp, H.

    1995-01-01

    With the numerical codes developed for safety analysis the venting of steam vessel can be simulated. ATHLET especially is able to predict the void fraction depending on the vessel height. Although these codes contain a one-dimensional model they allow the description of complex geometries due to the detailed nodalization of the considered apparatus. In chemical reactors, however, the venting process is not only influenced by the flashing behaviour but additionally by the running chemical reaction in the vessel. Therefore the codes used for modelling have to consider the kinetics of the chemical reaction. Further multi-component systems and dissolving processes have to be regarded. In order to preduct the fluid- and thermodynamic process it could be helpful to use 3-dimensional codes in combination with the one-dimensional codes as used in nuclear industry to get a more detailed describtion of the running processes. (orig./HP)

  19. Explosive Volcanic Eruptions from Linear Vents on Earth, Venus and Mars: Comparisons with Circular Vent Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Wimert, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    Conditions required to support buoyant convective plumes are investigated for explosive volcanic eruptions from circular and linear vents on Earth, Venus, and Mars. Vent geometry (linear versus circular) plays a significant role in the ability of an explosive eruption to sustain a buoyant plume. On Earth, linear and circular vent eruptions are both capable of driving buoyant plumes to equivalent maximum rise heights, however, linear vent plumes are more sensitive to vent size. For analogous mass eruption rates, linear vent plumes surpass circular vent plumes in entrainment efficiency approximately when L(sub o) > 3r(sub o) owing to the larger entrainment area relative to the control volume. Relative to circular vents, linear vents on Venus favor column collapse and the formation of pyroclastic flows because the range of conditions required to establish and sustain buoyancy is narrow. When buoyancy can be sustained, however, maximum plume heights exceed those from circular vents. For current atmospheric conditions on Mars, linear vent eruptions are capable of injecting volcanic material slightly higher than analogous circular vent eruptions. However, both geometries are more likely to produce pyroclastic fountains, as opposed to convective plumes, owing to the low density atmosphere. Due to the atmospheric density profile and water content on Earth, explosive eruptions enjoy favorable conditions for producing sustained buoyant columns, while pyroclastic flows would be relatively more prevalent on Venus and Mars. These results have implications for the injection and dispersal of particulates into the planetary atmosphere and the ability to interpret the geologic record of planetary volcanism.

  20. Review of containment vent filter technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The technology applied for the design and construction of containment vent filters is compiled and reviewed. The national positions leading to the selection of venting or method of filtration are extracted from position papers. Several areas of further information needs are identified

  1. Nuevos y enigmáticos grabados rupestres en el sector oriental de la meseta castellano-leonesa (San Esteban de Gormaz, Soria, España

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Gómez-Barrera

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Con la publicación de los Grabados rupestres postpaleolíticos del Alto Duero (IVluseo Numantino, Soria, 1992 dábamos por concluido uno de los capítulos más importante del estudio del arte rupestre del extremo oriental de la meseta castellano-leonesa. El trabajo —Tesis Doctoral de uno de nosotros dirigida por el Prof. Dr. D. E. Ripoll— recogía más de 2.769 figuras grabadas en 73 abrigos rocosos y, a juicio del recensionista de International Newsletter on Rock Art (\\hlORA núm. 5, 1993, p. 31, venía a constituir un trabajo de base para el conocimiento de este tipo de manifestaciones en la Península Ibérica. La investigación, sin embargo, no se estancó y la casualidad ha querido que, pasado un tiempo, fuéramos advertidos de la existencia, en San Esteban de Gormaz (Soria, de una cueva que disponía en sus paredes y techumbre de un amplio, y enigmático, conjunto de grabados rupestres. ¿Enigmáticos? Sí. La cueva «Las Salinas» —como fue bautizada por los niños que la descubrieron— presenta un corpus grabado próximo, por su técnica, estilo y temática, al mundo «esquemático» peninsular si bien la existencia entre sus motivos de, al menos, dos proboscidios provoca en nosotros la duda no sólo ya sobre su adscripción estilístico-cultural sino, y sobre todo, sobre su autenticidad. Precisamente estas dudas son las que —además del consejo de nuestro maestro el Prof. E. Ripoll— motivan las páginas que siguen, en espera de que la experiencia de otros colegas nos pueda dar alguna luz que las disipe o matice.

  2. Filtered containment venting in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindau, L.; Ellisson, K.

    1989-01-01

    After the TMI accident, Swedish authorities decided that all Swedish nuclear power plants should be upgraded with respect to mitigation of the consequences of severe accidents. One contribution to meet these ends is filtered containment venting, i.e. means to relieve containment overpressure and to clean the relief gas from radioactive components. The first system in operation was built at the Barsebaeck site (2 BWR's) where a gravel bed filter was installed. For the remaining Swedish units (7 BWR's and 3 PWR's) a passive, self-controlling wet scrubber system, FILTRA-MVSS, is now under installation. The principle of the FILTRA-MVSS is a self-controlling, self-pumping venturi collector submerged in a pool, and it is used to filter out emissions of solid and gaseous radioactive components

  3. Multilayer Insulation Ascent Venting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramel, R. W.; Sutherlin, S. G.; Johnson, W. L.

    2017-01-01

    The thermal and venting transient experienced by tank-applied multilayer insulation (MLI) in the Earth-to-orbit environment is very dynamic and not well characterized. This new predictive code is a first principles-based engineering model which tracks the time history of the mass and temperature (internal energy) of the gas in each MLI layer. A continuum-based model is used for early portions of the trajectory while a kinetic theory-based model is used for the later portions of the trajectory, and the models are blended based on a reference mean free path. This new capability should improve understanding of the Earth-to-orbit transient and enable better insulation system designs for in-space cryogenic propellant systems.

  4. Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campana, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180 0 rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements

  5. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venting, ventilation and combustion... Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required by... appliance listing and the appliance manufacturer's instructions. (b) Venting and combustion air systems...

  6. Safe venting of ''red oil'' runaway reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paddleford, D.F.; Fauske, H.K.

    1994-01-01

    Calorimetry testing of Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) saturated with strong nitric acid was performed to determine the relationship between vent size and pressure buildup in the event of a runaway reaction. These experiments show that runaway can occur in an open system, but that even when runaway is induced in the TBP/HN0 3 system, dangerous pressure buildup will be prevented with practical vent size

  7. Hidrogeoquímica de los manantiales sulfhídricos y ferruginosos de las facies Purbeck-Weald del noroeste de la Cordillera Iberica (provincia de Soria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz Pérez, E.

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to study the chemical composition of the sulfide-bearingand iron-rich springs in Soria. These springs are mainly located on sedimentary rocks of the Purbeck-Weald facies and most precisely in the Oncala group materials. Sulfide-bearing spring water belongs to calcium sulfate facies. It pH is basic or neutral. This kind of springs is mainly in the eastern area of Oncala group. Sulfate reduction with presence of organic matter seems to be the most common ORIGIN of the H2S. lronrich springs are more often located in the westside of Oncala group. Water of these springs has calcium bicarbonate character, very low salinity and acid pH. These differences on major ion chemical composition likely show the influence of the lithologic and mineralogic changes in the Oncala group. It presents low soluble terrigenous sediments in the western area whereas eastward there is a facies lateral change with the appearance of carbonates and sulfates. On the other hand, none of the iron-rich springs contains H2S and coversely Fe is never detected in the sulfide-bearing springs, although sometimes they appear together. This fact is in accordance with the plot of the two water types have in the pH/Eh diagrams.El objetivo de este trabajo consiste en el estudio de la composición química de las aguas de los manantiales sulfhídricos y ferruginosos existentes en la provincia de Soria. Este tipo de surgencias se encuentran principalmente en los materiales de las facies Purbeck-Weald, y más concretamente en los afloramientos del grupo Oncala. Los manantiales sulfhídricos son de facies sulfatada cá1cica, pH neutro o básico, y se concentran en el sector oriental del grupo Oncala; en la mayoría de los casos, el origen del H2S parece deberse a procesos de reducción de sulfatos en presencia de materia orgánica. Los manantiales ferruginosos tienden a ser más frecuentes en el sector oeste del grupo Oncala, donde presentan un car

  8. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  9. PRIMERA SISTEMATIZACIÓN DE LAS CARACTERÍSTICAS ESTILÍSTICAS DE LA ALFARERÍA FINA DEL SITIO SORIA 2 (VALLE DE YOCAVIL, NOROESTE ARGENTINO / First systematization of stylistic characters of fine pottery from Soria 2 site (Yocavil, Northwestern Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Clara Spano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una primera sistematización de las características de la alfarería temprana del sitio Soria 2 (valle de Yocavil, Noroeste Argentino, centrando el análisis en ejemplares pertenecientes al denominado conjunto fino. Se apunta a la caracterización de una muestra del abundante material cerámico hallado en un contexto primario, para el cual se cuenta con un fechado de inicios de la Era Cristiana. El material es clasificado recurriendo a la categoría estilo, entendiendo a la misma como la integración de aspectos morfológicos, tecnológicos y decorativos, que convergen en los “modos de hacer” vigentes durante la ocupación del sitio. Se detallan las variables analíticas puestas en juego: forma, técnica de manufactura, pasta, cocción, tratamiento de la superficie y decoración. La conjunción de dichas variables es la base para proponer modalidades estilísticas. Adicionalmente, se refiere brevemente a las prácticas en las cuales las vasijas estuvieron involucradas, tomando en cuenta los contextos de hallazgo (doméstico y funerario. El análisis sugiere que algunos ejemplares de la muestra estudiada exhiben afinidades con espacios circundantes.   Palabras clave: alfarería; modalidades estilísticas; contexto primario; Formativo; valle de Yocavil.   Abstract In this paper we present a first systematization of the features of early pottery found at the site Soria 2 (Yocavil Valley, Northwestern Argentina, focusing the analysis on the specimens belonging to the so-called fine pottery group. We aim at the characterization of a sample of the abundant ceramic material found in primary context for which there is a radiocarbon date from the beginning of the Christian era. The material is classified using the style category, considered here as the integration of morphological, technological and decorative aspects, which converge in the current “ways of doing” at those times of the site occupation. The analytical variables used

  10. Characterizing the Morphology, Distribution, and Formation Geometry of Mercury's Pyroclastic Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwiak, L. M.; Head, J. W.; Wilson, L.

    2018-05-01

    We present a final catalog of pyroclastic vents on Mercury, identifying 104 candidate pyroclastic vents. We then assess the vent distribution, morphologic variation, and probable formation geometries.

  11. Airborne lidar detection of an underwater thermal vent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddewig, Michael R.; Churnside, James H.; Shaw, Joseph A.

    2017-07-01

    We report the lidar detection of an underwater feature that appears to be a thermal vent in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, USA, with the Montana State University Fish Lidar. The location of the detected vent was 30 m from the closest vent identified in a United States Geological Survey of Yellowstone Lake in 2008. A second possible vent is also presented, and the appearance of both vents in the lidar data is compared to descriptions of underwater thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake from the geological literature.

  12. On Small Disturbance Ascent Vent Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    As a spacecraft undergoes ascent in a launch vehicle, its ambient pressure environment transitions from one atmosphere to high vacuum in a matter of a few minutes. Venting of internal cavities is necessary to prevent the buildup of pressure differentials across cavity walls. These pressure differentials are often restricted to low levels to prevent violation of container integrity. Such vents usually consist of fixed orifices, ducts, or combinations of both. Duct conductance behavior is fundamentally different from that for orifices in pressure driven flows governing the launch vehicle ascent depressurization environment. Duct conductance is governed by the average pressure across its length, while orifice conductance is dictated by a pressure ratio. Hence, one cannot define a valid equivalent orifice for a given duct across a range of pressure levels. This presentation discusses development of expressions for these two types of vent elements in the limit of small pressure differentials, explores conditions for their validity, and compares their features regarding ascent depressurization performance.

  13. Modelling of particles collection by vented limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsitrone, E.; Pegourie, B.; Granata, G.

    1995-01-01

    This document deals with the use of vented limiters for the collection of neutral particles in Tore Supra. The model developed for experiments is presented together with its experimental validation. Some possible improvements to the present limiter are also proposed. (TEC). 5 refs., 3 figs

  14. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-01

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  15. Kolanut (Cola Nitida Vent Schott of Endlicher)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kolanut (Cola Nitida Vent Schott of Endlicher). S.O. Agbeniyi, Otuonye, H.A. andAR. Adedeji Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria. Abstract. The mycoflora associated with processing stages of kolanut post-harvest were evaluated at the Cocoa. Research Institute of Nigeria, Ibadan Nigeria. Several samples of healthy and ...

  16. Summary of measurements with MicroVent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreau, Jerome Le; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    This summary presents the main results when MicroVent is used in the cooling case, without heat recovery. Experiments have thus been performed with relatively low inlet air temperature (below 15°C). Different solutions have been compared to decrease the risk of draught in the occupied zone: ‐ usi...

  17. 33 CFR 159.61 - Vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vents. 159.61 Section 159.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE... to minimize clogging by either the contents of the tank or climatic conditions such as snow or ice. ...

  18. 33 CFR 183.520 - Fuel tank vent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.520 Fuel tank vent systems. (a) Each fuel tank must have a vent system that prevents pressure in the tank from exceeding 80... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank vent systems. 183.520...

  19. 46 CFR 182.450 - Vent pipes for fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vent pipes for fuel tanks. 182.450 Section 182.450... TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.450 Vent pipes for fuel tanks. (a) Each unpressurized fuel tank must be fitted with a vent pipe connected to the highest point of the tank...

  20. 14 CFR 27.975 - Fuel tank vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents. 27.975 Section 27.975... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.975 Fuel tank vents. (a) Each fuel tank... system must be designed to minimize spillage of fuel through the vents to an ignition source in the event...

  1. 46 CFR 119.450 - Vent pipes for fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vent pipes for fuel tanks. 119.450 Section 119.450... Specific Machinery Requirements § 119.450 Vent pipes for fuel tanks. (a) Each unpressurized fuel tank must... area of the vent pipe for diesel fuel tanks must be as follows: (1) Not less than the cross sectional...

  2. 46 CFR 56.50-85 - Tank-vent piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of the tanks to vent pipes. (2) Tanks having a comparatively small surface, such as fuel oil settling... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank-vent piping. 56.50-85 Section 56.50-85 Shipping... APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-85 Tank-vent piping. (a) This section...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1408 - Aggregate batch vent stream provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Aggregate batch vent stream provisions... § 63.1408 Aggregate batch vent stream provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of aggregate batch vent streams at a new or existing affected source shall comply with either paragraph (a)(1...

  4. Filtered atmospheric venting of LWR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, L.; Ahlstroem, P.E.; Bachofner, E.; Graeslund, C.; Johansson, K.; Nilsson, L.; Persson, Aa.; Eriksson, B.

    1981-03-01

    The FILTRA project is a cooperative Swedish programme which started in February 1980. It is aimed at investigating the possibility of reducing the risk for a large release of radioactivity, assuming a severe reactor accident. The project has been focused on filtered venting of the reactor containment. The first stage of the project has dealt with two types of severe accident sequences, namely core meltdown as a result of the complete loss of water supplies to the reactor pressure vessel and insufficient cooling of the reactor containment. Some important conclusion are the following. The applicability of computer models used to describe various phenomena in the accident sequence must be scrutinized. The details of the design of the containment are important and must be taken into consideration in a more accurate manner than in previous analyses. A pressure relief area of less than 1 m 2 appears to be adequate. The following principles should guide the technical design of filtered venting systems, namely reduction of the risk for the release of those radioactive substances which could cause long term land contamination, provision for a passive function of the vent filter system during the first 24 hours and achievement of filtering capabilities which make leakages in severe accidents comparable to the leakages of radioactive substances in less severe accidents, which do not necessarily actuate the pressure relief system. Nothing indicates that a system for filtered venting of a BWR containment would have a significant negative effect on the safety within the framework of the design basis. Efforts should be directed towards designing a filtered venting system for a BWR such as Barsebaeck. (authors)

  5. Provisions for containment venting in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    In this short paper an overlook is given of the systems developed in Germany for filtered containment venting and their implementation in nuclear power plants. More information on the development can be found in the Proceedings of the DOE/NRC Aircleaning Conferences. In Germany, 28.8 % of the electric energy is produced by 19 nuclear power reactors. No new power reactor is expected to be built at least within the next ten years, but France and Germany cooperate in the development of a future European Power Reactor (ERP). This reactor type will be fitted with a core catcher and passive cooling in order to avoid serious consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident so that provisions for containment venting are not required. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  6. Provisions for containment venting in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, J.G.

    1997-08-01

    In this short paper an overlook is given of the systems developed in Germany for filtered containment venting and their implementation in nuclear power plants. More information on the development can be found in the Proceedings of the DOE/NRC Aircleaning Conferences. In Germany, 28.8 % of the electric energy is produced by 19 nuclear power reactors. No new power reactor is expected to be built at least within the next ten years, but France and Germany cooperate in the development of a future European Power Reactor (ERP). This reactor type will be fitted with a core catcher and passive cooling in order to avoid serious consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident so that provisions for containment venting are not required. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Simulación de la recarga artificial de un acuífero en su manantial. Aplicación al manantial de Vozmediano (Soria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz, E.

    1997-04-01

    í entendido, la estructura de la solución puede ser percibida como una extensión, con varias celdas, de una sencilla aproximación del modelo unicelular. El propósito de la aproximación del modelo es el estudio de la gestión para un año medio del manantial de Vozmediano (Soria, ayudándose de la inercia del acuífero.

  8. Visualization of the air flow behind the automotive benchmark vent

    OpenAIRE

    Pech, Ondřej; Jedelský, Jan; Caletka, Petr; Jícha, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Passenger comfort in cars depends on appropriate function of the cabin HVAC system. A great attention is therefore paid to the effective function of automotive vents and proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. The article deals with the visualization of air flow from the automotive benchmark vent. The visualization was made for two different shapes of the inlet channel connected to the benchmark vent. The smoke visualization with the laser knife was used. The influence of ...

  9. Light at deep sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dover, Cindy Lee; Cann, J. R.; Cavanaugh, Colleen; Chamberlain, Steven; Delaney, John R.; Janecky, David; Imhoff, Johannes; Tyson, J. Anthony

    We usually think of the bottom of the sea as a dark environment, lit only by flashes of bioluminescent light. Discovery of light associated with geothermal processes at deep sea hydrothermal vents forces us to qualify our textbook descriptions of the seafloor as a uniformly dark environment. While a very dim glow emitted from high temperature (350°) vents (black smokers) at mid-oceanic ridge spreading centers has been documented [Van Dover et al, 1988], the source of this light and its role, if any, in the evolution and adaptation of photobiochemical processes have yet to be determined. Preliminary studies indicate that thermal radiation alone may account for the “glow” ]Smith and Delaney, 1989] and that a novel photoreceptor in shrimp-colonizing black smoker chimneys may detect this “glow” [Van Dover et al., 1989; Pelli and Chamberlain, 1989]. A more controversial question, posed by C. L. Van Dover, J. R. Cann, and J. R. Delaney at the 1993 LITE Workshop at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, is whether there may be sufficient light of appropriate wavelengths to support geothermally driven photosynthesis by microorganisms.

  10. Venting processes: Effects on the vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattwig, M.

    1980-01-01

    In the case of venting as a protective measure against explosions a dangerous pressure wave and a large flame must be expected in the neighbourhood of the vent. Moreover the recoil force which is exerted on the protected vessel can be the cause for the destruction of the plant. Therefore experiments have been made on the dependence of the pressure wave and the recoil force from well-known or easily determinable parameters. The results of the investigations allow the estimation of the maximum overpressure which must be expected at a given point outside the vessel, if the reduced explosion pressure which will be reached in the interior of the vessel is known. Beyond that it could be shown that the maximum recoil force is nearly always considerably smaller than the value given by theory. Only very rarely the theoretical value is reached. Therefore it is totally sufficient for practical purposes when the maximum recoil to be expected is calculated from the theoretical equation. (orig.) [de

  11. MAVEN Contamination Venting and Outgassing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Elaine M.; Hughes, David W.; Secunda, Mark S.; Chen, Philip T.; Morrissey, James R.; Riegle, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) is the first mission to focus its study on the Mars upper atmosphere. MAVEN will study the evolution of the Mars atmosphere and climate, by examining the conduit through which the atmosphere has to pass as it is lost to the upper atmosphere. An analysis was performed for the MAVEN mission to address two distinct concerns. The first goal of the analysis was to perform an outgassing study to determine where species outgassed from spacecraft materials would redistribute to and how much of the released material might accumulate on sensitive surfaces. The second portion of the analysis serves to predict what effect, if any, Mars atmospheric gases trapped within the spacecraft could have on instrument measurements when re-released through vents. The re-release of atmospheric gases is of interest to this mission because vented gases from a higher pressure spacecraft interior could bias instrument measurements of the Mars atmosphere depending on the flow rates and directions.

  12. Venting device for nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Masahiro; Ogata, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    An airtight vessel of a venting device of a nuclear reactor container is connected with a reactor container by way of a communication pipeline. A feed water tank is disposed at a position higher than the liquid surface of scrubbing water in the airtight vessel for supplying scrubbing water to the airtight vessel. In addition, a scrubbing water storage tank is disposed at a position hither than the feed water tank for supplying scrubbing water to the feed water tank. Storage water in the feed water tank is introduced into the airtight vessel by the predetermined opening operation of a valve by the pressure exerted on the liquid surface and the own weight of the storage water. Further, the storage water in the scrubbing water storage tank is led into the feed water tank by the water head pressure. The scrubbing water for keeping the performance of the venting device of the reactor container can be supplied by a highly reliable method without using AC power source or the like as a driving source. (I.N.)

  13. 14 CFR 34.11 - Standard for fuel venting emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Emissions (New and In-Use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.11 Standard for fuel venting emissions. (a) No fuel venting emissions shall be discharged into the atmosphere from any new or in-use aircraft gas... include one of the following: (1) Incorporation of an FAA-approved system that recirculates the fuel back...

  14. Thermal hydraulic analysis of BWR containment venting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baburajan, P.K.; Sharma, Prashant; Paul, U.K.; Gaikwad, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Installation of additional containment filtered venting system (CFVS) is necessary to depressurize the containment to maintain its mechanical integrity due to over pressurization during severe accident condition. A typical venting system for BWR is modelled using RELAP5 and analysed to investigate the effect of various thermal hydraulic parameters on the operational parameters of the venting system. The venting system consists of piping from the containment to the scrubber tank and exit line from the scrubber tank. The scrubber tank is partially filled with water to enable the scrubbing action to remove the particulate radionuclides from the incoming containment air. The pipe line from the containment is connected to the venturi inlet and the throat of the venturi is open to the scrubber tank water inventory at designed submergence level. The exit of the venturi is open to scrubber tank water. Filters are used in the upper air space of the scrubber tank as mist separator before venting out the air into the atmosphere through the exit vent line. The effect of thermal hydraulic parameters such as inlet fluid temperature, inlet steam content and venturi submergence in the scrubber tank on the venting flow rate, exit steam content, scrubber tank inventory, overflow line and siphon breaker flow rate is analysed. Results show that inlet steam content and the venturi nozzle submergence influence the venting system parameters. (author)

  15. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, V. H.; Less, B. D.; Singer, B. C.; Stratton, J. C.; Wray, C. P.

    2015-02-01

    In many residential building retrofit programs, air tightening to increase energy efficiency is often constrained by safety concerns with naturally vented combustion appliances. Tighter residential buildings more readily depressurize when exhaust equipment is operated, making combustion appliances more prone to backdraft or spill combustion exhaust into the living space. Several measures, such as installation guidelines, vent sizing codes, and combustion safety diagnostics, are in place with the intent to prevent backdrafting and combustion spillage, but the diagnostics conflict and the risk mitigation objective is inconsistent. This literature review summarizes the metrics and diagnostics used to assess combustion safety, documents their technical basis, and investigates their risk mitigations. It compiles information from the following: codes for combustion appliance venting and installation; standards and guidelines for combustion safety diagnostics; research evaluating combustion safety diagnostics; research investigating wind effects on building depressurization and venting; and software for simulating vent system performance.

  16. A New Approach to Uncertainty Reduction in Launch Vehicle Compartment Venting

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Launch vehicle compartments are vented to the external environment during ascent to minimize undesirable structural loading. Prediction of venting performance is an...

  17. Design experiments for a vented containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesboel, R.

    1985-01-01

    A filtered containment venting system, operable late in 1985, is currently under installation at the Barsebaeck twin nuclear power station in Sweden. The filter unit, which communicates with the containments of both reactor units, but is separated from them by rupture discs, consists of a concrete bed, 40 m high and 20 m in diameter, filled with gravel of grain size 25-35 mm. The performance of the gravel bed under such accident conditions which might lead to an activation of this safeguard system has been the subject for investigation within the FILTRA project. These investigations have shown that the gravel bed acts as: an expansion volume for decreasing gas pressure and increasing gas residence time, a heat sink for condensing steam, an excellent filter medium for removing aerosols and elemental iodine, and a sump volume for collecting radioactive condensate. The results from iodine retention studies in gravel beds are mainly considered

  18. A thermoelectric cap for seafloor hydrothermal vents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Yu; Wu, Shi-jun; Yang, Can-jun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a thermoelectric cap (TC) to harvest hydrothermal energy. • The TC was deployed at a hydrothermal vent site near Kueishantao islet, Taiwan. • The TC monitored the temperature of the hydrothermal fluids during the field test. • The TC could make the thermal energy of hydrothermal fluids a viable power source. - Abstract: Long-term in situ monitoring is crucial to seafloor scientific investigations. One of the challenges of operating sensors in seabed is the lifespan of the sensors. Such sensors are commonly powered by batteries when other alternatives, such as tidal or solar energy, are unavailable. However, the batteries have a limited lifespan and must be recharged or replaced periodically, which is costly and impractical. A thermoelectric cap, which harvests the thermal energy of hydrothermal fluids through a conduction pipe and converts the heat to electrical energy by using thermoelectric generators, was developed to avoid these inconveniences. The thermoelectric cap was combined with a power and temperature measurement system that enables the thermoelectric cap to power a light-emitting diode lamp, an electronic load (60 Ω), and 16 thermocouples continuously. The thermoelectric cap was field tested at a shallow hydrothermal vent site near Kueishantao islet, which is located offshore of northeastern Taiwan. By using the thermal gradient between hydrothermal fluids and seawater, the thermoelectric cap obtained a sustained power of 0.2–0.5 W during the field test. The thermoelectric cap successfully powered the 16 thermocouples and recorded the temperature of the hydrothermal fluids during the entire field test. Our results show that the thermal energy of hydrothermal fluids can be an alternative renewable power source for oceanographic research.

  19. Containment venting sliding pressure venting process for PWR and BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckardt, B.

    1991-01-01

    In order to reduce the residual risk associated with hypothetical severe nuclear accidents, nuclear power plants in Germany as well as in certain other European countries have been or will be backfitted with a system for filtered containment venting. During venting system process design, particular importance is attached to the requirements regarding, for example, high aerosol loading capability, provision for decay heat removal from the scrubber unit, the aerosol spectrum to be retained and entirely passive functioning of the scrubber unit. The aerosol spectrum relevant for process design and testing varies depending on aerosol concentrations, the time at which venting is commenced and whether there is an upstream wetwell, etc. Because of this the Reactor Safety Commission in Germany has specified that SnO 2 with a mass mean diameter of approximately 0.5 μm should be used as an enveloping test aerosol. To meet the above-mentioned requirements, a combined venturi scrubber system was developed which comprises a venturi section and a filter demister section and is operated in the sliding pressure mode. This scrubber system was tested using a full-scale model and has now been installed in 14 PWR and BWR plants in Germany and Finland

  20. Energy landscapes shape microbial communities in hydrothermal systems on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, Håkon; Økland, Ingeborg; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Pederesen, Rolf B; Steen, Ida H

    2015-07-01

    Methods developed in geochemical modelling combined with recent advances in molecular microbial ecology provide new opportunities to explore how microbial communities are shaped by their chemical surroundings. Here, we present a framework for analyses of how chemical energy availability shape chemotrophic microbial communities in hydrothermal systems through an investigation of two geochemically different basalt-hosted hydrothermal systems on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge: the Soria Moria Vent field (SMVF) and the Loki's Castle Vent Field (LCVF). Chemical energy landscapes were evaluated through modelling of the Gibbs energy from selected redox reactions under different mixing ratios between seawater and hydrothermal fluids. Our models indicate that the sediment-influenced LCVF has a much higher potential for both anaerobic and aerobic methane oxidation, as well as aerobic ammonium and hydrogen oxidation, than the SMVF. The modelled energy landscapes were used to develop microbial community composition models, which were compared with community compositions in environmental samples inside or on the exterior of hydrothermal chimneys, as assessed by pyrosequencing of partial 16S rRNA genes. We show that modelled microbial communities based solely on thermodynamic considerations can have a high predictive power and provide a framework for analyses of the link between energy availability and microbial community composition.

  1. Numerical Study of Severe Accidents on Containment Venting Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Na Rae; Bang, Young Suk; Park, Tong Kyu; Lee, Doo Yong [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yu Jung; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Hyeong Taek [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Under severe accident, the containment integrity can be challenged due to over-pressurization by steam and non-condensable gas generation. According to Seismic Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) result, the late containment failure by over-pressurization has been identified as the most probable containment failure mode. In addition, the analyses of Fukushima nuclear power plant accident reveal the necessity of the proper containment depressurization to prevent the large release of the radionuclide to environment. Containment venting has been considered as an effective approach to maintain the containment integrity from over-pressurization. Basic idea of containment venting is to relieve the pressure inside of the containment by establishing a flow path to the external environment. To ensure the containment integrity under over-pressure conditions, it is crucial to conduct the containment vent in a timely manner with a sufficient discharge flow rate. It is also important to optimize the vent line size to prevent additional risk of leakage and to install at the site with limited space availability. The purpose of this study is to identify the effective venting conditions for preventing the containment over-pressurization and investigate the vent flow characteristics to minimize the consequence of the containment ventilation.. In order that, thermodynamic behavior of the containment and the discharged flow depending on different vent strategies are analyzed and compared. The representative accident scenarios are identified by reviewing the Level 2 PSA result and the sensitivity analyses with varying conditions (i.e. vent line size and vent initiation pressure) are conducted. MAAP5 model for the OPR1000 Korea nuclear power plant has been used for severe accident simulations. Containment venting can be an effective strategy to prevent the significant failure of the containment due to over-pressurization. However, it should be carefully conducted because the vented

  2. Numerical Study of Severe Accidents on Containment Venting Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Na Rae; Bang, Young Suk; Park, Tong Kyu; Lee, Doo Yong; Choi, Yu Jung; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Hyeong Taek

    2014-01-01

    Under severe accident, the containment integrity can be challenged due to over-pressurization by steam and non-condensable gas generation. According to Seismic Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) result, the late containment failure by over-pressurization has been identified as the most probable containment failure mode. In addition, the analyses of Fukushima nuclear power plant accident reveal the necessity of the proper containment depressurization to prevent the large release of the radionuclide to environment. Containment venting has been considered as an effective approach to maintain the containment integrity from over-pressurization. Basic idea of containment venting is to relieve the pressure inside of the containment by establishing a flow path to the external environment. To ensure the containment integrity under over-pressure conditions, it is crucial to conduct the containment vent in a timely manner with a sufficient discharge flow rate. It is also important to optimize the vent line size to prevent additional risk of leakage and to install at the site with limited space availability. The purpose of this study is to identify the effective venting conditions for preventing the containment over-pressurization and investigate the vent flow characteristics to minimize the consequence of the containment ventilation.. In order that, thermodynamic behavior of the containment and the discharged flow depending on different vent strategies are analyzed and compared. The representative accident scenarios are identified by reviewing the Level 2 PSA result and the sensitivity analyses with varying conditions (i.e. vent line size and vent initiation pressure) are conducted. MAAP5 model for the OPR1000 Korea nuclear power plant has been used for severe accident simulations. Containment venting can be an effective strategy to prevent the significant failure of the containment due to over-pressurization. However, it should be carefully conducted because the vented

  3. Tank vent processing system having a corrosion preventive device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Shoichi; Sato, Hirofumi

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent corrosion of a tank vent processing device by injecting an oxygen gas. Constitution: Oxygen gas and phosphorous at high temperature are poured into a tank vent processing device and amorphous oxide layers optimum to the prevention of external corrosion are formed to the inner surface of the device. Since the corrosion preventive device using the oxygen gas injection can be constituted as a relatively simple device, it is more economical than constituting a relatively large tank vent processing device with corrosion resistant stainless steels. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Visualization of the air flow behind the automotive benchmark vent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Ondrej; Jedelsky, Jan; Caletka, Petr; Jicha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Passenger comfort in cars depends on appropriate function of the cabin HVAC system. A great attention is therefore paid to the effective function of automotive vents and proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. The article deals with the visualization of air flow from the automotive benchmark vent. The visualization was made for two different shapes of the inlet channel connected to the benchmark vent. The smoke visualization with the laser knife was used. The influence of the shape of the inlet channel to the airflow direction, its enlargement and position of air flow axis were investigated.

  5. Visualization of the air flow behind the automotive benchmark vent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pech Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Passenger comfort in cars depends on appropriate function of the cabin HVAC system. A great attention is therefore paid to the effective function of automotive vents and proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. The article deals with the visualization of air flow from the automotive benchmark vent. The visualization was made for two different shapes of the inlet channel connected to the benchmark vent. The smoke visualization with the laser knife was used. The influence of the shape of the inlet channel to the airflow direction, its enlargement and position of air flow axis were investigated.

  6. 40 CFR 63.1326 - Batch process vents-recordkeeping provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....1325(e) for aggregate batch vent streams; (ii) For a boiler or process heater, a description of the location at which the vent stream is introduced into the boiler or process heater; (iii) For a boiler or... process vents or halogenated aggregate batch vent streams, the percent reduction of total hydrogen halides...

  7. A bestiary of ordinary vent activities at Stromboli (and what it tells us about vent conditions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Damien; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2015-04-01

    Normal active degassing at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands, Italy) is traditionally divided in two classes. Puffing correspond to the frequent (~1 Hz) release of small gas pockets (0.5 - 1 m of diameter) at low exit velocities (5 - 15 m/s). Whereas, Strombolian explosions occur at a frequency of 1 - 10 per hour, and are characterized the ejection of bombs and/or ash at high velocities (50 - 400 m/s). In order to get a broader overview of two types of degassing, we used a thermal high speed FLIR SC655 camera to monitor the temperature anomalies generated by the expelled gas, ash, and/or bombs. The enhanced time and spatial resolutions of the camera (200 frames per second, 15 cm wide pixels) enables to use numerical algorithms to distinguish and characterize individual ejection events. In particular, for each explosion and puff, we compute the temperature, the volume, the exit point and the rise velocities of the expelled material. These values, as well as the frequency of the release events, are used to portray a total of 12 vent activities, observed during three field campaigns in 2012, 2013 and 2014. Sustained puffing was visible on 7 cases, with an intensity ranging on at least two orders of magnitude. Although the released gas volume is sometimes highly variable, on some cases, constant sized puffs allows to define a typical discharge frequency ranging between 0.4 and 1.5 Hz. Regular Strombolian explosions, with various duration, intensity and ash contents, are reported in 6 cases, 2 of them simultaneously presenting a puffing activity. In some cases, we noticed modifications of the vent activity just before the explosions. These precursors, usually lasting about 1 second but occasionally reaching 10 seconds, can be sorted into 1) increase of the puffing activity ; 2) emission of gas plumes ; 3) inflation of the visible vent surface. Finally, one vent activity was hybrid between puffing and Strombolian explosions, with frequent explosions (1 Hz) ejecting numerous

  8. Population genetic structure of Rufous-Vented Prinia (Prinia burnesii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2010-12-27

    Dec 27, 2010 ... INTRODUCTION. The Rufous-vented Prinia is an endemic species of the. Indian subcontinent that is ..... considerations in listing subspecies under the U.S. Endangered. Species Act. Cons. Biol. 6: 1584-1594. Heukeshoven J ...

  9. Turbofan Engine Core Compartment Vent Aerodynamic Configuration Development Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Leonard J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the design methodology used in the development of the aerodynamic configuration of the nacelle core compartment vent for a typical Boeing commercial airplane together with design challenges for future design efforts. Core compartment vents exhaust engine subsystem flows from the space contained between the engine case and the nacelle of an airplane propulsion system. These subsystem flows typically consist of precooler, oil cooler, turbine case cooling, compartment cooling and nacelle leakage air. The design of core compartment vents is challenging due to stringent design requirements, mass flow sensitivity of the system to small changes in vent exit pressure ratio, and the need to maximize overall exhaust system performance at cruise conditions.

  10. Explosion testing for the container venting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashdollar, K.L.; Green, G.M.; Thomas, R.A.; Demiter, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the study of the hazards of inspecting nuclear waste stored at the Hanford Site, the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Hanford Company have developed a container venting system to sample the gases that may be present in various metal drums and other containers. In support of this work, the US Bureau of Mines has studied the probability of ignition while drilling into drums and other containers that may contain flammable gas mixtures. The Westinghouse Hanford Company drilling procedure was simulated by tests conducted in the Bureau's 8-liter chamber, using the same type of pneumatic drill that will be used at the Hanford Site. There were no ignitions of near-stoichiometric hydrogen-air or methane-air mixtures during the drilling tests. The temperatures of the drill bits and lids were measured by an infrared video camera during the drilling tests. These measured temperatures are significantly lower than the ∼500 degree C autoignition temperature of uniformly heated hydrogen-air or the ∼600 degree C autoignition temperature of uniformly heated methane-air. The temperatures are substantially lower than the 750 degree C ignition temperature of hydrogen-air and 1,220 degree C temperature of methane-air when heated by a 1-m-diameter wire

  11. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF EMPIRICAL MODELS FOR VENTED LEAN HYDROGEN EXPLOSIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Anubhav Sinha; Vendra C. Madhav Rao; Jennifer X. Wen

    2017-01-01

    Explosion venting is a method commonly used to prevent or minimize damage to an enclosure caused by an accidental explosion. An estimate of the maximum overpressure generated though explosion is an important parameter in the design of the vents. Various engineering models (Bauwens et al., 2012, Molkov and Bragin, 2015) and European (EN 14994 ) and USA standards (NFPA 68) are available to predict such overpressure. In this study, their performance is evaluated using a number of published exper...

  12. The ProVent model learns to speak French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher E

    2014-10-20

    Leroy and colleagues report on the accuracy of the Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation Prognostic Model ('ProVent') in a cohort study of patients ventilated for at least 21 days in one of three hospitals in the north of France. This study is noteworthy because it is the first to describe the performance of the ProVent model both outside the US and in a community hospital-based setting.

  13. A model for vented deflagration of hydrogen in a volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulpuru, S.R.; Wilkin, G.B.

    1982-02-01

    A simple model was constructed to predict the property transients resulting from the deflagration of a combustible mixture in a sphere or cylinder with venting of the gas mixture to the environment. A computer program VENT, was written to solve the model equation. The model will be particularly useful for studying hydrogen burning effects in loss-of-coolant plus losss of emergency coolant accidents in CANDU reactors

  14. Hydrogen is an energy source for hydrothermal vent symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jillian M; Zielinski, Frank U; Pape, Thomas; Seifert, Richard; Moraru, Cristina; Amann, Rudolf; Hourdez, Stephane; Girguis, Peter R; Wankel, Scott D; Barbe, Valerie; Pelletier, Eric; Fink, Dennis; Borowski, Christian; Bach, Wolfgang; Dubilier, Nicole

    2011-08-10

    The discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents in 1977 revolutionized our understanding of the energy sources that fuel primary productivity on Earth. Hydrothermal vent ecosystems are dominated by animals that live in symbiosis with chemosynthetic bacteria. So far, only two energy sources have been shown to power chemosynthetic symbioses: reduced sulphur compounds and methane. Using metagenome sequencing, single-gene fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, shipboard incubations and in situ mass spectrometry, we show here that the symbionts of the hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge use hydrogen to power primary production. In addition, we show that the symbionts of Bathymodiolus mussels from Pacific vents have hupL, the key gene for hydrogen oxidation. Furthermore, the symbionts of other vent animals such as the tubeworm Riftia pachyptila and the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata also have hupL. We propose that the ability to use hydrogen as an energy source is widespread in hydrothermal vent symbioses, particularly at sites where hydrogen is abundant.

  15. SBWR PCCS vent phenomena and suppression pool mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coddington, P. [Thermal-Hydraulics Lab., Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Andreani, M. [Nuclear Engineering Lab., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    The most important phenomena influencing the effectiveness of the pressure suppression capability of the water pool within the Wetwell compartment of the SBWR Containment, during the period of Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) venting, have been critically reviewed. In addition, calculations have been carried-out to determine the condensation of the vented steam and the distribution of the energy deposited in the liquid pool. It has been found that a large contribution to the vapour suppression is due to condensation inside the vent pipe. The condensation rate of the steam inside the bubbles, produced at the vent exit, during their rise to the surface, may however be rather low, because of the large size bubbles. This can lead to vapour channelling to the Wetwell gas space. The above comments are likely to be ameliorated if the vent exit is a distributed source or sparger. Due to the large water flow rates within the {open_quotes}bubbly two-phase plume{close_quotes} generated by the gas injection, the water in the pool above the vent exit is likely to be heated nearly isothermally (perfect mixing). The effect of the suppression pool walls would be to enhance the recirculation and, consequently to promote mixing. The large size of the bubbles therein and of the walls on pool mixing are the most severe difficulties in extrapolating the results from scaled experiments to prototypical conditions.

  16. La traducción a la lengua inglesa de referencias culturales españolas en la provincia de Soria: gastronomía, fiestas y tradiciones. Proyecto para la elaboración de un glosario bilingüe

    OpenAIRE

    García Tabernero, José Fernando

    2014-01-01

    La gastronomía, las manifestaciones festivas y las tradiciones son recursos turísticos fundamentales en la promoción del turismo en la provincia de Soria. Uno de los principales mercados-objetivo es el público angloparlante y, dada la importancia económica y el carácter internacional de una lengua como el inglés, nos preguntamos cómo son las traducciones existentes de las referencias culturales sobre gastronomía, fiestas y tradiciones de nuestra provincia. Grado en Turismo

  17. Bacterial Diets of Primary Consumers at Hydrothermal Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govenar, B.; Shank, T. M.

    2008-12-01

    Chemical energy produced by mixing hydrothermal fluids and seawater supports dense biological communities on mid-ocean ridges. The base of the food web at deep-sea hydrothermal vents is formed by chemolithoautotrophic bacteria that use the energy from the oxidation of reduced chemicals to fix inorganic carbon into simple sugars. With the exception of a few species that have chemolithoautotropic bacterial symbionts, most of the vent-endemic macrofauna are heterotrophs that feed on free-living bacteria, protists, and other invertebrates. The most abundant and diverse group of primary consumers in hydrothermal vent communities belong to the Gastropoda, particularly the patellomorph limpets. Gastropod densities can be as high as 2000 individuals m-2, and there can be as many as 13 species of gastropods in a single aggregation of the siboglinid tubeworm Riftia pachyptila and more than 40 species along the East Pacific Rise. Some gastropods are ubiquitous and others are found in specific microhabitats, stages of succession, or associated with different foundation species. To determine the mechanisms of species coexistence (e.g. resource partitioning or competition) among hydrothermal vent primary consumers and to track the flow of energy in hydrothermal vent communities, we employed molecular genetic techniques to identify the gut contents of four species of co-occurring hydrothermal vent gastropods, Eulepetopsis vitrea, Lepetodrilus elevatus, Lepetodrilus ovalis and Lepetodrilus pustulosus, collected from a single diffuse-flow hydrothermal vent site on the East Pacific Rise. Unique haplotypes of the 16S gene that fell among the epsilon-proteobacteria were found in the guts of every species, and two species had gut contents that were similar only to epsilon-proteobacteria. Two species had gut contents that also included haplotypes that clustered with delta-proteobacteria, and one species had gut contents that clustered with alpha- proteobacteria. Differences in the diets

  18. Are vent crab behavioral preferences adaptations for habitat choice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Tseng, Li-Chun; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2017-01-01

    Hydrothermal vent organisms are adapted to their extreme and patchily distributed habitats. They are expected to have evolved mechanisms that keep them in their specific habitation. Since little is known about the recruitment or habitat selection of HV organisms such as brachyurans, we examined the properties of several hydrothermal vent-associated cues on the behavior of the hydrothermal vent (HV) crab Xenograpsus testudinatus in the laboratory that were contrasted by the offering of non-vent cues. This crab species is endemic and dominates the vent fauna of Turtle Island off the NE coast of Taiwan. HV crabs were separately and in combination offered the following vent-specific cues: (1) sulfuric sediment, (3) air-bubbling, (4) elevated temperature, (5) dead settled zooplankton, (7) other crabs, and (8) shade. The non-vent-specific cues were: (2) quarz sediment, (6) dead fish, (8) light. These cues were provided on either side of a two-choice chamber. The movement of individual crabs was monitored: as initial and final choices, and as the proportion of time the crabs spent in each compartment (resident time). Cues were offered alone and no such cue as a control in the same set-up. Sulfuric sediments and dead fish were significantly more attractive to females, and other crabs irrespective of gender were significantly more attractive to males. When compared to expected distributions, crabs, irrespective of gender, significantly avoided light and tended to select other crabs, air-bubbling, sulfuric sediment, elevated temperature, dead fish, dead zooplankton, and quarz sediments in the order of decreasing importance. Data do not support the hypothesis that dead settled zooplankton was particularly attractive nor that the other gender was selected. A combination of several vent-associated cues (sulfuric sediment, elevated temperature, air-bubbling) facilitated the strongest attraction to the crabs as reflected by all response variables. The 'first choice' responses

  19. Analysis of Gas Vent System in Overseas LILW Disposal Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Yub; Kim, Ju Youl [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hae Ryong; Ha, Jae Chul [Korea Radioactive Waste Management Corporation, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A Low- and Intermediate-Level Radioactive Waste (LILW) disposal facility is currently under construction in Korea. It is located in the aquifer, 80{approx}130 m below the ground surface. Thus, it is expected that disposal facility will be saturated after closure and various gases will be generated from metal corrosion, microbial degradation of organic materials and radiolysis. Generated gases will move up to the upper part of the silo, and it will increase the pressure of the silo. Since the integrity of the engineered barrier could be damaged, development of effective gas vent system which can prevent the gas accumulation in the silo is essential. In order to obtain basic data needed to develop site-specific gas vent system, gas vent systems of Sweden, Finland and Switzerland, which have the disposal concept of underground facility, were analyzed

  20. Vent clearing analysis of a Mark III pressure suppression containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, R.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of the vent clearing transient in a Mark III pressure suppression containment after a hypothetical LOCA is carried out. A two-dimensional numerical model solving the transient fluid dynamic equations is used. The geometry of the pressure suppression pool is represented and the pressure and velocity fields in the pool are obtained from the moment the LOCA occurs until the first vent in the drywell wall clears. The results are compared to those obtained with the one-diemensional model used for containment design, with special interest on two-dimensional effects. Some conclusions concerning the effect of the water discharged into the suppression pool through the vents on submerged structures are obtained. Future improvements to the model are suggested. (orig.)

  1. Vents Pattern Analysis at Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancato, Alfonso; Tusa, Giuseppina; Coltelli, Mauro; Proietti, Cristina; Branca, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Mount Etna is a composite stratovolcano located along the Ionian coast of eastern Sicily. It is characterized by basaltic eruptions, both effusive and explosive, occurred during a complex eruptive history over the last 500 ka. Flank eruptions occur at an interval of decades, mostly concentrated along the NE, S and W rift zones. A vent clustering at various scales is a common feature in many volcanic settings. In order to identify the clusters within the studied area, a spatial point pattern analysis is undertaken using vent positions, both known and reconstructed. It reveals both clustering and spatial regularity in the Etna region at different distances. The visual inspection of the vent spatial distribution suggests a clustering on the rift zones of Etna volcano. To confirm this evidence, a coarse analysis is performed by the application of Ξ2- and t-test simple statistics. Then, a refined analysis is performed by using the Ripley K-function (Ripley, 1976), whose estimator K(d), knowing the area of the study region and the number of vents, allow us to calculate the distance among two different location of events. The above estimator can be easier transformed by using the Besag L-function (Besag, 1977); the peaks of positive L(d)=[K(d)/π]1/2 -d values indicate clustering while troughs of negative values stand for regularity for their corresponding distances d (L(d)=0 indicates complete spatial randomness). Spatial pattern of flank vents is investigated in order to model the spatial distribution of likely eruptive vents for the next event, basically in terms of relative probabilities. For this, a Gaussian kernel technique is used, and the L(d) function is adopted to generate an optimal smoothing bandwidth based on the clustering behaviour of the Etna volcano. A total of 154 vents (among which 36 are reconstructed), related to Etna flank activity of the last 4.0 ka, is used to model future vent opening. The investigated region covers an area of 850 km2, divided

  2. Blast venting through blanket material in the HYLIFE ICF reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.C.; Peterson, P.F.; Schrock, V.E.

    1992-01-01

    This work presents a numerical study of blast venting through various blanket configurations in the HYLIFE ICF reactor design. The study uses TSUNAMI -- a multi-dimensional, high-resolution, shock capturing code -- to predict the momentum exchange and gas dynamics for blast venting in complex geometries. In addition, the study presents conservative predictions of wall loading by gas shock and impulse delivered to the protective liquid blanket. Configurations used in the study include both 2700 MJ and 350 MJ fusion yields per pulse for 5 meter and 3 meter radius reactor chambers. For the former, an annular jet array is used for the blanket geometry, while in the latter, both annular jet array as well as slab geometries are used. Results of the study indicate that blast venting and wall loading may be manageable in the HYLIFE-II design by a judicious choice of blanket configuration

  3. Hydrothermal Vents and Methane Seeps: Rethinking the Sphere of Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Ann Levin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although initially viewed as oases within a barren deep ocean, hydrothermal vent and methane seep communities are now recognized to interact with surrounding ecosystems on the sea floor and in the water column, and to affect global geochemical cycles. The importance of understanding these interactions is growing as the potential rises for disturbance from oil and gas extraction, seabed mining and bottom trawling. Here we synthesize current knowledge of the nature, extent and time and space scales of vent and seep interactions with background systems. We document an expanded footprint beyond the site of local venting or seepage with respect to elemental cycling and energy flux, habitat use, trophic interactions, and connectivity. Heat and energy are released, global biogeochemical and elemental cycles are modified, and particulates are transported widely in plumes. Hard and biotic substrates produced at vents and seeps are used by benthic background fauna for attachment substrata, shelter, and access to food via grazing or through position in the current, while particulates and fluid fluxes modify planktonic microbial communities. Chemosynthetic production provides nutrition to a host of benthic and planktonic heterotrophic background species through multiple horizontal and vertical transfer pathways assisted by flow, gamete release, animal movements, and succession, but these pathways remain poorly known. Shared species, genera and families indicate that ecological and evolutionary connectivity exists among vents, seeps, organic falls and background communities in the deep sea; the genetic linkages with inactive vents and seeps and background assemblages however, are practically unstudied. The waning of venting or seepage activity generates major transitions in space and time that create links to surrounding ecosystems, often with identifiable ecotones or successional stages. The nature of all these interactions is dependent on water depth, as

  4. Hydrothermal vents and methane seeps: Rethinking the sphere of influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Baco, Amy; Bowden, David; Colaco, Ana; Cordes, Erik E.; Cunha, Marina; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Gobin, Judith; Grupe, Ben; Le, Jennifer; Metaxas, Anna; Netburn, Amanda; Rouse, Greg; Thurber, Andrew; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Vanreusel, Ann; Watling, Les

    2016-01-01

    Although initially viewed as oases within a barren deep ocean, hydrothermal vent and methane seep communities are now recognized to interact with surrounding ecosystems on the sea floor and in the water column, and to affect global geochemical cycles. The importance of understanding these interactions is growing as the potential rises for disturbance from oil and gas extraction, seabed mining and bottom trawling. Here we synthesize current knowledge of the nature, extent and time and space scales of vent and seep interactions with background systems. We document an expanded footprint beyond the site of local venting or seepage with respect to elemental cycling and energy flux, habitat use, trophic interactions, and connectivity. Heat and energy are released, global biogeochemical and elemental cycles are modified, and particulates are transported widely in plumes. Hard and biotic substrates produced at vents and seeps are used by “benthic background” fauna for attachment substrata, shelter, and access to food via grazing or through position in the current, while particulates and fluid fluxes modify planktonic microbial communities. Chemosynthetic production provides nutrition to a host of benthic and planktonic heterotrophic background species through multiple horizontal and vertical transfer pathways assisted by flow, gamete release, animal movements, and succession, but these pathways remain poorly known. Shared species, genera and families indicate that ecological and evolutionary connectivity exists among vents, seeps, organic falls and background communities in the deep sea; the genetic linkages with inactive vents and seeps and background assemblages however, are practically unstudied. The waning of venting or seepage activity generates major transitions in space and time that create links to surrounding ecosystems, often with identifiable ecotones or successional stages. The nature of all these interactions is dependent on water depth, as well as

  5. Multiple-vent programme to test the pressure suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.; Schwan, H.; Vollbrandt, I.

    1979-01-01

    Three pre-tests with a multiple vent configuration have been performed at the GKSS pressure suppression test facility. First test results indicate significant chugging events with occur periodically with 0.4 to 0.2 Hz. These events appear simultaneously in less than 10 ms at the exit of the three vent pipes and cause pressure pulses in the range of 3 bar. This report gives a short description of the test facility and presents the boundary conditions of the test facility and presents the boundary conditions of the three pre-tests, test results and a first valuation of the experimental informations. (orig.) [de

  6. Hunting for Hydrothermal Vents at the Local-Scale Using AUV's and Machine-Learning Classification in the Earth's Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S. M.

    2018-05-01

    New AUV-based mapping technology coupled with machine-learning methods for detecting individual vents and vent fields at the local-scale raise the possibility of understanding the geologic controls on hydrothermal venting.

  7. Environmental & Water Quality Operational Studies: Improvement of Hydropower Release Dissolved Oxygen with Turbine Venting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    VENTED HYDROTURBINE .. 38 Model Development .......................................... 38 Model Application...mouth intake (Figures B26-B27). 37 A F -W V .0P V *W V *. V. VW . i. ~ ~ -% PART V: MODELING OF REAERATION THROUGH A VENTED HYDROTURBINE 75. Development

  8. Population genetic structure of Rufous-Vented Prinia ( Prinia burnesii )

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study is to ascertain genetic variation within Rufous-vented Prinia, Prinia burnesii an endemic species, by DNA fingerprinting applying random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Genetic material was obtained from three distant sites along western bank of River Indus. These sites include ...

  9. The filtered venting system under construction at barseback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    A filter venting containment system, bearing the acronym FILTRA will be installed at the Swedish nuclear power plant Barseback. The Barseback Power Plant is owned by the Southern Sweden Power Supply (Sydkraft AB) and has two 1700-MW boiling water reactors. The reactors are of ASEA-ATOM design with pressure suppression containments (Mark IItype). The installation of the filter venting system is a condition set by the Swedish government for a continued operating license after September 1, 1986. The construction work for the FILTRA plant, the first of its kind ever planned, will be completed at the end of 1985. The FILTRA is designed so that 99.9% of the core inventory of radioactivity, excluding inert gases, is retained in the reactor containment and filter system in the event of containment venting. Another design guideline is to achieve passive functioning of the FILTRA plant during the first 24 h of an accident. The FILTRA plant is common to the two reactors on the site and consists mainly of two systems, a venting system (pressure relief system) and a filtering system. The total cost is approximately U.S. $15 million

  10. Sweden employs a multi venturi scrubber for containment venting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elisson, K.; Waltersten, T.

    1988-01-01

    The Filtra-MVSS for filtered venting of containment overpressure is a flexible system capable of covering a wide range of hypothetical design basis events for BWRs and PWRs. The system encompasses a number of special features, can be optimized for a specified decontamination factor, and can accommodate a wide range of off-gas flow rates. (author)

  11. 49 CFR 192.187 - Vaults: Sealing, venting, and ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... explosive mixture might be ignited, and there must be a means for testing the internal atmosphere before removing the cover; (2) If the vault or pit is vented, there must be a means of preventing external sources... ventilating effect of a pipe 4 inches (102 millimeters) in diameter; (2) The ventilation must be enough to...

  12. GPE-BWR and the containment venting and filtering issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, J.; Santiago, J. de

    1988-01-01

    The Spanish Boiling Water Reactor Owner's Group (GPE-BWR) is formed by three utilities, owning four units: Santa Maria de Garona (46 MWe, BWR3, Mark I containment), Cofrentes (975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) and Valdecaballeros (2x975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) - all of the reactors having been supplied by General Electric. One of the GPE-BWR's several committees is the Safety and Licensing Committee, which follows up the evolution of severe accident topics and particularly the containment venting and filtering issue. In September 1987, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), the Spanish Regulatory Body, asked the GPE-BWR to define its position on the installation of a containment venting system. The GPE-BWR created a Working Group which presented a Report on Containment Venting to the CSN in January 1987 gathered from: the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); some US utilities; and several European countries, especially France, Germany and Sweden. CSN's review of the containment venting Report and the Action Plan proposed by the GPE-BWR finished in April 1988. The conclusion of the Report and the proposed Action Plan take into account the US NRC's identified open items on severe accidents and the R and D programs scheduled to close these items

  13. Fault control on patterns of Quaternary monogenetic vents in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field and remote sensing data are used to examine the distribution of volcanism and fault geometry in the Ethiopian Rift between Omo-Chew Bahir rift and Tendaho graben during the Quaternary and evaluate their influence on the location and shape of individual vents as well as the development of alignments. The results ...

  14. CFD analysis of gas explosions vented through relief pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, G; Di Benedetto, A; Salzano, E; Russo, G

    2006-09-21

    Vent devices for gas and dust explosions are often ducted to safe locations by means of relief pipes. However, the presence of the duct increases the severity of explosion if compared to simply vented vessels (i.e. compared to cases where no duct is present). Besides, the identification of the key phenomena controlling the violence of explosion has not yet been gained. Multidimensional models coupling, mass, momentum and energy conservation equations can be valuable tools for the analysis of such complex explosion phenomena. In this work, gas explosions vented through ducts have been modelled by a two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model based on the unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) approach in which the laminar, flamelet and distributed combustion models have been implemented. Numerical test have been carried out by varying ignition position, duct diameter and length. Results have evidenced that the severity of ducted explosions is mainly driven by the vigorous secondary explosion occurring in the duct (burn-up) rather than by the duct flow resistance or acoustic enhancement. Moreover, it has been found out that the burn-up affects explosion severity due to the reduction of venting rate rather than to the burning rate enhancement through turbulization.

  15. Filtered atmospheric venting of light water reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedgran, A.; Ahlstroem, P.E.; Nilsson, L.; Persson, Aa.

    1982-11-01

    The aim of filtered venting is to improve the function of the reactor containment in connection with very severe accidents. By equipping the containment with a safety valve for pressure relief and allowing the released gases to pass through an effective filter, it should be possible to achieve a considerable protective effect. The work has involved detailed studies of the core meltdown sequence, how the molten core material runs out of the reactor vessel, what effect it has on concrete and other structures and how final cooling of the molten core material takes place. On the basis of previous Swedish studies, the project has chosen to study a filter concept that consists of a gravel bed of large volume. This filter plant shall not only retain the radioactive particles that escape from the containment through the vent line, but shall also condense the accompanying steam. After the government decided in 1981 that Barsebaeck was to be equipped with filtered venting and issued specifications regarding its performance, the project aimed at obtaining results that could be used to design and verify a plant for filtered venting at the Barsebaeck nuclear power station. As far as the other Swedish nuclear power plants at Oskarshamn, Ringhals and Forsmark are concerned, the results are only applicable to a limited extent. Additional studies are required for these nuclear power plants before the value of filtered venting can be assessed. Based on the results of experiments and analyses, the project has made a safety analysis with Barsebaeck as a reference plant in order to study how the introduction of filtered venting affects the safety level at a station. In summary, the venting function appears to entail a not insignificant reduction of risks for boiling water reactors of the Barsebaeck type. For a number of types of such very severe core accident cases, the filter design studied ensures a substantial reduction of the releases. However it has not been possible within the

  16. Geophysical Signatures of cold vents on the northern Cascadia margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, M.; Paull, C. K.; Spence, G.; Hyndman, R. D.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H.; Lundsten, E.; Ussler, W.; Schwalenberg, K.

    2009-12-01

    The accretionary prism of the northern Cascadia margin is a classic gas hydrate research area. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 146 and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 documented that gas hydrate is widely distributed across the margin. In recent years an increased research focus has been on cold vents, where methane gas is actively released. Two recent expeditions funded by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) were conducted in the area of IODP Sites U1327 and U1328. An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) was used to map the seafloor bathymetry followed by dives with the ROV Doc Ricketts for ground truth information of various seafloor morphological features identified. The two cruises revealed many new seafloor features indicative of methane venting that were previously unknown. Bullseye Vent (BV) has been extensively studied using seismic imaging, piston coring, heat-flow, controlled-source EM, and deep drilling. BV is seismically defined by a circular wipe-out zone but the new AUV data show that BV is rather an elongated depression. BV is associated with a shoaling in the BSR, but lacks evidence for the existence of an underlying fault in the previous data. Although a massive gas-hydrate plug was encountered within the top 40 mbsf in the IODP holes, the ROV observations only revealed some platy methane derived carbonate outcrops at the outer-most rim of the depressions, a few beds of Vesicomya clams, and no observed gas vents, which together do not indicate that BV is especially active now. Further northeast of BV, but along the same trend, active gas venting was found associated with seafloor blistering and bacterial mats suggesting that there is an underlying fault system providing a fluid flow conduit. The newly discovered vent area has few seismic line crossings; however the available seismic data surprisingly are not associated with wipe-out zones. Another prominent fault-related gas vent also was investigated during the

  17. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Vi H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratton, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wray, Craig P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    In many residential building retrofit programs, air tightening to increase energy efficiency is constrained by concerns about related impacts on the safety of naturally vented combustion appliances. Tighter housing units more readily depressurize when exhaust equipment is operated, making combustion appliances more prone to backdraft or spillage. Several test methods purportedly assess the potential for depressurization-induced backdrafting and spillage, but these tests are not robustly reliable and repeatable predictors of venting performance, in part because they do not fully capture weather effects on venting performance. The purpose of this literature review is to investigate combustion safety diagnostics in existing codes, standards, and guidelines related to combustion appliances. This review summarizes existing combustion safety test methods, evaluations of these test methods, and also discusses research related to wind effects and the simulation of vent system performance. Current codes and standards related to combustion appliance installation provide little information on assessing backdrafting or spillage potential. A substantial amount of research has been conducted to assess combustion appliance backdrafting and spillage test methods, but primarily focuses on comparing short-term (stress) induced tests and monitoring results. Monitoring, typically performed over one week, indicated that combinations of environmental and house operation characteristics most conducive to combustion spillage were rare. Research, to an extent, has assessed existing combustion safety diagnostics for house depressurization, but the objectives of the diagnostics, both stress and monitoring, are not clearly defined. More research is also needed to quantify the frequency of test “failure” occurrence throughout the building stock and assess the statistical effects of weather (especially wind) on house depressurization and in turn on combustion appliance venting

  18. Water column imaging on hydrothermal vent in Central Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J.; Park, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Water column imaging with Multibeam echosounder systems (MBES) is recently becoming of increasing interest for oceanographic studies. Especially gas bubbles and hot water exposed from hydrothermal vents make acoustic impedance anomalies in cold seawater, water column imaging is very useful for the researchers who want to detect some kinds of hydrothermal activity. We conducted a hydrothermal exploration program, called "INVENT17", using the MBES system, KONGBERG EM122 (12kHz, 1°×1°), mounted on R/V ISABU and we deployed other equipments including video guided hydraulic grab, tow-yo CTD and general CTD with MAPR (Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorder) in 2017. First, to evaluate its capabilities of detection of hydrothermal vent, the surveys using the MBES were conducted at the Solitaire Field, previously identified hydrothermal area of the Central Indian Ridge. The bathymetric data obtained from MBES provided information about detailed morphology of seafloor, but we were not able to achieve the information from the water column imaging data. But the clue of existence of active hydrothermal vent was detected through the values of ΔNTU, dEh/dt, and OPR gained from MAPR, the data means that the hydrothermal activity affects 100m from the seafloor. It could be the reason that we can't find the hydrothermal activity because the range resolution of water column imaging is pretty rough so that the size of 100m-scaled activity has low possibility to distinguish from seafloor. The other reason is there are no sufficient objects to cause strong scattering like as CO2 bubbles or droplets unlike in the mid-Okinawa Trough. And this suggests that can be a important standard to identify properties of hydrothermal vent sites depending on the presence of scattering objects in water mass. To justify this, we should perform more chemical analysis of hot water emanating from hydrothermal vent and collected several bottles of water sample to do that.

  19. Process for retention of iodine and aerosols during containment venting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckardt, B.; Betz, R.; Greger, G.U.; Werner, K.D.

    1990-05-01

    A process for retention of the majority of aerosols and iodine during containment venting was optimized. For this purpose, sections of a two-stage process comprising a venturi scrubber and a metal-fiber filter demister were tested under containment venting conditions assumed to prevail during a hypothetical core - melt accident and optimized with a view to achieving high decontamination factors and loading capacity while minimizing the size of the process. The loading and retention tests performed in a scrubber operating pressure range between 1 and 10 bar, at temperatures from 50 to 200degC (also boiling pools) and in air and steam atmospheres. Under these unfavorable conditions for aerosol retention, the retention efficiencies were determined at various flow rates with soluble and non-soluble aerosols as well as gaseous iodine. The retention efficiencies for BaSO 4 , uranine and SnO 2 aerosols were determined to be 99.95% to 99.99% for venturi scrubbers with metal-fiber filter demister. The retention efficiency for elemental iodine was determined to be ≥99% including revolatization effects over a 24-hour operating period. The high loading capacity of the venturi scrubber unit was verified after process modifications with various aerosols. The use of full-scale process section together with the best possible simulation of containment venting conditions by the test parameters ensured that the results can be transferred to real venting equipment. The aim of ensuring the retention of the majority of the aerosol-borne activity and of elemental iodine activity and minimizing the process size was clearly achieved and verified by means of this optimized venting equipment under an extremely wide range of hypothetical core-melt accident conditions. (orig.) With 17 refs., 3 tabs., 35 annexes [de

  20. Explosive volcanism on Mercury: Analysis of vent and deposit morphology and modes of eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwiak, Lauren M.; Head, James W.; Wilson, Lionel

    2018-03-01

    The MESSENGER mission revealed, for the first time, conclusive evidence of explosive volcanism on Mercury. Several previous works have cataloged the appearance and location of explosive volcanism on the planet using a variety of identifying characteristics, including vent presence and deposit color as seen in multispectral image mosaics. We present here a comprehensive catalog of vents of likely volcanic origin; our classification scheme emphasizes vent morphology. We have analyzed the morphologies of all vents in our catalog, and recognize three main morphologies: "simple vent", "pit vent", and "vent-with-mound". The majority of vents we identify are located within impact craters. The spatial distribution of vents does not correlate with the locations of volcanic smooth plains deposits, in contrast to the Moon, nor do vents correlate with the locations of large impact basins (except for the Caloris and Tolstoj basins). Using the degradation state of the vent host crater as a proxy for maximum age, we suggest that vent formation has been active through the Mansurian and into the Kuiperian periods, although the majority of vents were likely formed much earlier in mercurian history. The morphologies and locations of vents are used to investigate a set of plausible formation geometries. We find that the most likely and most prevalent formation geometry is that of a dike, stalled at depth, which then explosively vents to the surface. We compare the vent and deposit size of mercurian pyroclastic deposits with localized and regional lunar pyroclastic deposits, and find a range of possible eruption energies and corresponding variations in eruption style. Localized lunar pyroclastic deposits and the majority of mercurian pyroclastic deposits show evidence for eruption that is consistent with the magmatic foam at the top of a dike reaching a critical gas volume fraction. A subset of mercurian vents, including the prominent Copland-Rachmaninoff vent to the northeast of the

  1. 40 CFR 63.115 - Process vent provisions-methods and procedures for process vent group determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... this section. (2) The gas volumetric flow rate shall be determined using Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D of 40... accepted chemical engineering principles, measurable process parameters, or physical or chemical laws or...)(3) of this section. (i) The vent stream volumetric flow rate (Qs), in standard cubic meters per...

  2. Degassing during magma ascent in the Mule Creek vent (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiuk, M.V.; Barclay, J.; Carroll, M.R.; Jaupart, Claude; Ratte, J.C.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Tait, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    The structures and textures of the rhyolite in the Mule Creek vent (New Mexico, USA) indicate mechanisms by which volatiles escape from silicic magma during eruption. The vent outcrop is a 300-m-high canyon wall comprising a section through the top of a feeder conduit, vent and the base of an extrusive lava dome. Field relations show that eruption began with an explosive phase and ended with lava extrusion. Analyses of glass inclusions in quartz phenocrysts from the lava indicate that the magma had a pre-eruptive dissolved water content of 2.5-3.0 wt% and, during eruption, the magma would have been water-saturated over the vertical extent of the present outcrop. However, the vesicularity of the rhyolite is substantially lower than that predicted from closed-system models of vesiculation under equilibrium conditions. At a given elevation in the vent, the volume fraction of primary vesicles in the rhyolite increases from zero close to the vent margin to values of 20-40 vol.% in the central part. In the centre the vesicularity increases upward from approximately 20 vol.% at 300 m below the canyon rim to approximately 40 vol.% at 200 m, above which it shows little increase. To account for the discrepancy between observed vesicularity and measured water content, we conclude that gas escaped during ascent, probably beginning at depths greater than exposed, by flow through the vesicular magma. Gas escape was most efficient near the vent margin, and we postulate that this is due both to the slow ascent of magma there, giving the most time for gas to escape, and to shear, favouring bubble coalescence. Such shear-related permeability in erupting magma is supported by the preserved distribution of textures and vesicularity in the rhyolite: Vesicles are flattened and overlapping near the dense margins and become progressively more isolated and less deformed toward the porous centre. Local zones have textures which suggest the coalescence of bubbles to form permeable

  3. Maintenir la continuité des collections à l'heure d'Internet : du catalogue de vente au site web de maison de vente

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquet , Françoise

    2014-01-01

    International audience; La Bibliothèque nationale de France conserve depuis des siècles une importante collection de catalogues de vente sur support papier. Cependant avec l’apparition d’Internet on assiste à une dématérialisation des données documentaires en art. Aujourd’hui les sites des maisons de vente offrent en ligne les adjudications des ventes, récentes ou archivées et certaines ventes sont désormais annoncées uniquement sur Internet. Ces informations qui ne se trouvent pas sur les ca...

  4. Vent rate of superconducting magnets during quench in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    When a superconducting magnet goes normal, resistive heating in the conductor evaporates surrounding LHe, which must be vented. The nature and speed at which the magnet goes normal and He is vented are not subject to rigorous analysis. This paper presents vent data from an existing magnet. An approximate mathematical model is derived and fitted to the data to permit scaling of vent requirements to larger size magnets. The worst case models of the vent employed in Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) cryogenic system design are also presented

  5. Shuttle Gaseous Hydrogen Venting Risk from Flow Control Valve Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Baurle, Robert A.; Gafney, Richard L.; Norris, Andrew T.; Pellett, Gerald L.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a series of studies to assess the potential risk associated with the failure of one of three gaseous hydrogen flow control valves in the orbiter's main propulsion system during the launch of Shuttle Endeavour (STS-126) in November 2008. The studies focused on critical issues associated with the possibility of combustion resulting from release of gaseous hydrogen from the external tank into the atmosphere during assent. The Shuttle Program currently assumes hydrogen venting from the external tank will result in a critical failure. The current effort was conducted to increase understanding of the risk associated with venting hydrogen given the flow control valve failure scenarios being considered in the Integrated In-Flight Anomaly Investigation being conducted by NASA.

  6. A vented pump limiter for the reversed field pinch RFX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonato, P.

    1998-01-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma performance, as in the Tokamak, is strongly correlated with the edge neutral particle control. The drawbacks of the conventional magnetic divertors and throat limiters on the RFP plasma have slackened the application of an active particle control system in existing devices. An advanced solution, based on the idea of the 'vented pump limiter' experimented on Tore Supra, has been conceived for RFX. This type of pump limiter is very attractive for a RFP. In this paper, the design of a 'vented limiter' prototype for RFX is presented. Up to six modules of this limiter can be installed at the equatorial plane of RFX, allowing a particle exhaust efficiency comparable with a divertor or a throat limiter working in a Tokamak. Finally, the optimization of this concept for the next step RFP device is presented. (orig.)

  7. Radiological Design Summary Report for TRU Vent and Purge Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taus, L.B.

    2004-01-01

    This report contains top-level requirements for the various areas of radiological protection for workers. Detailed quotations of the requirements for applicable regulatory documents can be found in the accompanying Implementation Guide. For the purposes of demonstrating compliance with these requirements, per Engineering Standard 01064, shall consider / shall evaluate indicates that the designer must examine the requirement for the design and either incorporate or provide a technical justification as to why the requirement is not incorporated. The Transuranic Vent and Purge process is not a project, but is considered a process change. This process has been performed successfully by Solid Waste on lower activity TRU drums. This summary report applies a graded approach and describes how the Transuranic Vent and Purge process meets each of the applicable radiological design criteria and requirements specified in Manual WSRC-TM-95-1, Engineering Standard Number 01064

  8. Request for approval, vented container annual release fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    In accordance with the approval conditions for Modification to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC). dated August 24,1998, a new release fraction has been developed for submittal to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The proposed annual release fraction of 2.50 E-14 is proposed for use in future NOCs involving the storage and handling operations associated with vented containers on the Hanford Site. The proposed annual release fraction was the largest release fraction calculated from alpha measurements of the NucFil filters from 10 vented containers consisting of nine 55-gallon drums and one burial box with dimensions of 9.3 x 5.7 x 6.4 feet. An annual release fraction of 2.0 E-09 was used in the modification to the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC. This study confirmed that the release fraction used in the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC was conservative

  9. Request for approval, vented container annual release fraction; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    In accordance with the approval conditions for Modification to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC). dated August 24,1998, a new release fraction has been developed for submittal to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The proposed annual release fraction of 2.50 E-14 is proposed for use in future NOCs involving the storage and handling operations associated with vented containers on the Hanford Site. The proposed annual release fraction was the largest release fraction calculated from alpha measurements of the NucFil filters from 10 vented containers consisting of nine 55-gallon drums and one burial box with dimensions of 9.3 x 5.7 x 6.4 feet. An annual release fraction of 2.0 E-09 was used in the modification to the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC. This study confirmed that the release fraction used in the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC was conservative

  10. Acidophiles of saline water at thermal vents of Vulcano, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Susan; Norris, R

    2002-06-01

    DNA was extracted from samples taken from close to acidic hydrothermal vents on shore of the Aeolian Island of Vulcano (Italy). RNA gene sequences were amplified by PCR, cloned, and sequenced. A sequence with an origin in samples at 35 degrees and 45 degrees C corresponded to that of a novel Acidithiobacillus species that was isolated from water close to the vents. Novel, iron-oxidizing mesophilic acidophiles were isolated through enrichment cultures with ferrous iron but were not represented in the clone banks of environmental rDNA. These acidophiles were related to Thiobacillus prosperus, which was isolated previously from Vulcano. The archaeal sequences that comprised a clone bank representing a high-temperature sample (75 degrees C) corresponded to those of Acidianus brierleyi and of thermophiles previously isolated from Vulcano, Thermoplasma volcanium and Acidianus infernus.

  11. TRANSPORT OF WASTE SIMULANTS IN PJM VENT LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, Z

    2007-02-21

    The experimental work was conducted to determine whether there is a potential for waste simulant to transport or 'creep' up the air link line and contaminate the pulse jet vent system, and possibly cause long term restriction of the air link line. Additionally, if simulant creep occurred, establish operating parameters for washing down the line. The amount of the addition of flush fluids and mixer downtime must be quantified.

  12. Implementación de un modelo metodológico para la enseñanza del Inglés como lengua extranjera en el Grado de Educación de la E.U. de Educación de Soria (UVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Cruz Dulce Bermejo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo es una reflexión sobre el Plan Bolonia, el Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior y las implicaciones que tienen en su implementación real en las aulas. El objetivo primordial de este artículo es compartir la experiencia de la implantación del nuevo Grado en Educación en la E.U. de Educación de Soria partiendo del nuevo panorama educativo al que nos enfrentamos y concretando cuáles han sido las acciones específicas desarrolladas en una asignatura particular, Inglés como lengua extranjera.

  13. Primary Formation Path of Formaldehyde in Hydrothermal Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Satoshi

    2018-03-01

    Formaldehyde is abundant in the universe and one of the fundamental molecules for life. Hydrothermal vents produce a substantial amount of hydrogen molecules by serpentinization and promote reductive reactions of single carbon compounds. The abundance of formaldehyde is expected to be low due to the high Gibbs free energy in hydrothermal vents. We consider two competing formation pathways of formaldehyde: (1) the reduction of CO by H2 and (2) the reduction of HCOOH by H2 to form a methanediol, followed by the dehydration of the methanediol. We performed a number of quantum chemical simulations to examine the formation of formaldehyde in the gas phase as well as in aqueous solution. The energy barrier is significantly reduced by the catalytic effect of water molecules in aqueous solution and becomes lowest when a water cluster consisted of 5 water molecules catalyzes the reduction. The energy barrier to form a methanediol by the reduction of HCOOH is lower by 17.5 kcal/mol than that to form a formaldehyde by the reduction of CO. Considering the low energy barrier to dehydrate methanediol, the primary pathway to form formaldehyde in hydrothermal vents is concluded to be the reduction of HCOOH by H2, followed by the dehydration of methanediol.

  14. A helium venting model for a SSC half cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.H.; McAshan, M.S.; Schiesser, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    When a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet quenches, the quench protection system will intentionally quench other magnets in the half cell. The result is that the stored energy of all of these quenched magnets will be absorbed equally among them. These simultaneous quenches produce heat, which diffuses from the magnet coils to the main helium (He) coolant channels and thereby eventually causes an increase in the He pressure. When the quench is detected, vent valves open to minimize the He pressure increase and thus prevent damage to the magnets. The performance of the He venting system has been modeled and simulated to establish whether the venting will take place as required. The model consists of partial differential equation energy balances written radially for the magnet coils, collar, and yoke; and ordinary differential equations of energy and mass balance written for the He in the magnets and relief header. The basic algorithm is the numerical method of lines, with finite difference approximation of the spatial derivatives, and time integration by LSODES. Simulation results are presented for an SSC half cell of the Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) facility. The results are also compared with recent string quench measurements performed at the Fermilab String Test Facility

  15. Reversible Venting Stitch for Fenestrating Valve-less Glaucoma Shunts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akil, Handan; Vu, Priscilla Q; Nguyen, Anhtuan H; Nugent, Alexander; Chopra, Vikas; Francis, Brian A; Tan, James C

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this is to describe a venting stitch modification for valveless glaucoma aqueous shunts and characterize early postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) and glaucoma medication use following the modification. Retrospective chart review of 61 sequential patients undergoing Baerveldt glaucoma implant (BGI)-350 implantation at the Doheny Eye Institute. Twenty-four patients received a glaucoma shunt with venting stitch modification (modified BGI) and 37 patients received an unmodified shunt (BGI-only). IOP, number of glaucoma medications, and number of hypotony cases (intraocular pressure ≤5 mm Hg) were compared between the groups. T-tests were used for statistical analysis. At postoperative-day 1, mean IOP was significantly lower compared with preoperatively in the modified BGI group (14 mm Hg; reduced by 51%; P<0.0001) but not the BGI-only group (27 mm Hg; P=0.06). IOP difference between groups persisted till immediately before tube opening (P=0.005) and fewer IOP-lowering medications needed in the modified BGI group (P<0.0001). One case (4.2%) of postoperative hypotony was encountered with BGI modification, which resolved after the stitch was removed in clinic. The venting stitch valveless shunt modification allows for effective, reliable, and safe control of early postoperative IOP.

  16. Westinghouse containment filtered venting system wet scrubber technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensson, S.; Nilsson, P-O.

    2014-01-01

    Following the Fukushima event Westinghouse has further developed and enhanced its filtered containment venting system (FCVS) product line. The filtration efficiency of the proven FILTRA-MVSS system installed at all Swedish NPPs as well as at the Muhelberg plant in Switzerland has been enhanced and a new wet scrubber design, SVEN (Safety Venting), based on the FILTRA-MVSS tradition, developed. To meet increased filtration requirements for organic iodine these two wet scrubber products have been complemented with a zeolite module. The offering of a select choice of products allows for a better adjustment to the specific constraints and needs of each nuclear power station that is planning for the installation of such a system. The FILTRA-MVSS (MVSS=Multi Venturi Scrubber System) is a wet containment filtered vent system that uses multiple venturies to create an interaction between the vent gases and the scrubber media allowing for removal of aerosols and gaseous iodines in a very efficient manner. The FILTRA-MVSS was originally developed to meet stringent requirements on autonomy and maintained filtration efficiency over a wide range of venting conditions. The system was jointly developed in the late 80's by ABB Atom and ABB Flaekt, today Westinghouse and Alstom. Following installations in Sweden and Switzerland the system was further developed by replacement of the gravel-bed moisture separator with a standard demister and by addition of a set of sintered metal fibre filter cartridges placed after the moisture separator step. The system is today offered as a modular steel tank design to simplify installation at site. To reduce complexity and delivery time Westinghouse has developed an alternative design in which the venturi module is replaced by a submerged metal fibre filter cartridges module. This new wet scrubber design, SVEN (patent pending), provides a flexible, compact, and lower weight system, while still preserving and even enhancing the filtration

  17. Dynamics of hydrocarbon vents: Focus on primary porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, C.; Shedd, W.; Abichou, T.; Pineda-Garcia, O.; Silva, M.; MacDonald, I. R.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of hydrocarbon release by monitoring activity of a single vent at a 1215m deep site in the Gulf of Mexico (GC600). An autonomous camera, deployed by the submersible ALVIN, was programmed to capture a close-up image every 4 seconds for approximately 3.5 hours. The images provided the ability to study the gas hydrate outcrop site (that measured 5.2x16.3cm3) in an undisturbed state. The outcrop included an array of 38 tube-like vents through which dark brown oil bubbles are released at a rate ranging from 8 bubbles per minute to 0 bubbles per minute. The average release of bubbles from all the separate vents was 59.5 bubbles per minute, equating the total volume released to 106.38cm per minute. The rate of bubble release decreased toward the end of the observation interval, which coincided approximately with the tidal minimum. Ice worms (Hesiocaeca methanicola, Desbruyères & Toulmond, 1998) were abundant at the vent site. The image sequence showed the ice-worms actively moving in and out of burrows in the mound. It has been speculated that Hesiocaeca methanicola contribute to gas hydrate decomposition by creating burrows and depressions in the gas hydrate matrix (Fisher et al, 2000). Ice worm burrows could generate pathways for the passage of oil and gas through the gas hydrate mound. Gas hydrates commonly occur along active and/or passive continental margins (Kennicutt et al, 1988a). The release of oil and gas at this particular hydrocarbon seep site is along a passive continental margin, and controlled primarily by active salt tectonics as opposed to the movement of continental tectonic plates (Salvador, 1987). We propose a descriptive model governing the release of gas and oil from deep sub-bottom reservoirs at depths of 3000-5000m (MacDonald, 1998), through consolidated and unconsolidated sediments, and finally through gas hydrate deposits at the sea floor. The oil and gas escape from the source rock and/or reservoir through

  18. Macrofauna of shallow hydrothermal vents on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge at 71N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schander, C.; Rapp, H. T.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2007-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are usually associated with a highly specialized fauna and since their discovery in 1977, more than 400 species of animals have been described. Specialized vent fauna includes various animal phyla, but the most conspicuous and well known are annelids, mollusks and crustaceans. We have investigated the fauna collected around newly discovered hydrothermal vents on the Mohns Ridge north of Jan Mayen. The venting fields are located at 71°N and the venting takes place within two main areas separated by 5 km. The shallowest vent area is at 500-550 m water depth and is located at the base of a normal fault. This vent field stretches approximately 1 km along the strike of the fault, and it is composed of 10-20 major vent sites each with multiple chimney constructions discharging up to 260°C hot fluids. A large area of diffuse, low- temperature venting occurs in the area surrounding the high-temperature field. Here, partly microbial mediated iron-oxide-hydroxide deposits are abundant. The hydrothermal vent sites do not show any high abundance of specialized hydrothermal vent fauna. Single groups (i.e. Porifera and Mollusca) have a few representatives but groups otherwise common in hydrothermal vent areas (e.g. vestimentifera, Alvinellid worms, mussels, clams, galathaeid and brachyuran crabs) are absent. Up until now slightly more than 200 species have been identified from the vent area. The macrofauna found in the vent area is, with few exceptions, an assortment of bathyal species known in the area. One endemic, yet undescribed, species of mollusc has been found so far, an gastropod related to Alvania incognita Warén, 1996 and A. angularis Warén, 1996 (Rissoidae), two species originally described from pieces of sunken wood north and south of Iceland. It is by far the most numerous mollusc species at the vents and was found on smokers, in the bacterial mats, and on the ferric deposits. A single specimen of an undescribed tanaidacean has also

  19. Analysis of design and operational effects of filtered containment venting on depressurization and fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woon; Seol, Wook-Cheol; Kim, Jisu [Dongguk Univ., Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Effects of design and operational parameters of filtered containment venting system during a specified containment depressurization and relative aero sol release amount are analyzed. The analyses is performed by using the MAAP4 code for the APR1400 reactor. Major results uniquely identified from the analyses can be noted as following: Even though containment depressurization is accelerated as the pipe size increases, the venting system solution is also depleted earlier. Elapsed times to reach lower end pressure of 2 bar are nearly identical regardless of the vent initiation pressure and thus early venting is not much beneficial than late venting. Stroke time of the isolation valves has no effect on the depressurization performance and thus slow opening is beneficial for load reduction from the vent effluent.

  20. Modelling of vented dust explosions – empirical foundation and prospects for future validation of CFD codes

    OpenAIRE

    Skjold, Trygve; Wingerden, Kees van; Hansen, Olav R.; Eckhoff, Rolf Kristian

    2008-01-01

    Presented at: HAZARDS XX, Manchester, 23–25 November 2008 Explosion venting is the most frequently used method for mitigating the effects from accidental dust explosions in the process industry. Optimal design of vent systems and credible execution of risk assessments in powder handling plants require practical and reliable ways of predicting the course and consequences of vented dust explosions. The main parameters of interest include flame propagation and pressure build-up ...

  1. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravex, Alain; Flachbart, Robin; Holt, Barney

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses. TVS performance testing demonstrated that the spray bar was effective in providing tank pressure control within a 6

  2. Influence of a Vented Mouthguard on Physiological Responses in Handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Antina; Laessing, Johannes; Kwast, Stefan; Busse, Martin

    2018-05-23

    Schulze, A, Laessing, J, Kwast, S, and Busse, M. Influence of a vented mouthguard on physiological responses in handball. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-Mouthguards (MGs) improve sports safety. However, airway obstruction and a resulting decrease in performance are theoretical disadvantages regarding their use. The study aim was to assess possible limitations of a "vented" MG on aerobic performance in handball. The physiological effects were investigated in 14 male professional players in a newly developed handball-specific course. The measured values were oxygen uptake, ventilation, heart rate, and lactate. Similar oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2) values were observed with and without MG use (51.9 ± 6.4 L·min·kg vs. 52.1 ± 10.9 L·min·kg). During maximum load, ventilation was markedly lower with the vented MG (153.1 ± 25 L·min vs. 166.3 ± 20.8 L·min). The endexpiratory concentrations of O2 (17.2 ± 0.5% vs. 17.6 ± 0.8%) and CO2 (4.0 ± 0.5% vs. 3.7 ± 0.6%) were significantly lower and higher, respectively, when using the MG. The inspiration and expiration times with and without the MG were 0.6 ± 0.1 seconds vs. 0.6 ± 0.1 seconds and 0.7 ± 0.2 seconds vs. 0.6 ± 0.2 seconds (all not significant), respectively, indicating that there was no relevant airflow restriction. The maximum load was not significantly affected by the MG. The lower ventilation for given V[Combining Dot Above]O2 values associated with MG use may be an effect of improved biomechanics and lower respiratory drive of the peripheral musculature.

  3. Pressure suppression pool hydrodynamic studies for horizontal vent exit of Indian PHWR containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, N.; Bajaj, S.S.; Saha, P.

    1994-01-01

    The standard Indian PHWR incorporates a pressure suppression type of containment system with a suppression pool.The design of KAPS (Kakrapar Atomic Power Station) suppression pool system adopts a modified system of downcomers having horizontal vents as compared to vertical vents of NAPS (Narora Atomic Power Station). Hydrodynamic studies for vertical vents have been reported earlier. This paper presents hydrodynamic studies for horizontal type vent system during LOCA. These studies include the phenomenon of vent clearing (where the water slug standing in downcomer initially is injected to wetwell due to rapid pressurization of drywell) followed by pool swell (elevation of pool water due to formation of bubbles due to air mass entering pool at the exit of horizontal vents from drywell). The analysis performed for vent clearing and pool swell is based on rigorous thermal hydraulic calculation consisting of conservation of air-steam mixture mass, momentum and thermal energy and mass of air. Horizontal vent of downcomer is modelled in such a way that during steam-air flow, variation of flow area due to oscillating water surface in downcomer could be considered. Calculation predicts that the vent gets cleared in about 1.0 second and the corresponding downward slug velocity in the downcomer is 4.61 m/sec. The maximum pool swell for a conservative lateral expansion is calculated to be 0.56 m. (author). 3 refs., 12 figs

  4. Explosion hazards of LPG-air mixtures in vented enclosure with obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Yaxing; Lian, Zhen

    2017-07-15

    Numerical simulations were performed to study explosion characteristics of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) explosion in enclosure with a vent. Unlike explosion overpressure and dynamic pressure, explosion temperature of the LPG-air mixture at a given concentration in a vented enclosure has very little variation with obstacle numbers for a given blockage ratio. For an enclosure without obstacle, explosion overpressures for the stoichiometric mixtures and the fuel-lean mixtures reach their maximum within the vent and that for fuel-rich mixture reaches its maximum beyond and near the vent. Dynamic pressures produced by an indoor LPG explosion reach their maximum always beyond the vent no matter obstacles are present or not in the enclosure. A LPG explosion in a vented enclosure with built-in obstacles is strong enough to make the brick and mortar wall with a thickness of 370mm damaged. If there is no obstacle in the enclosure, the lower explosion pressure of several kPa can not break the brick and mortar wall with a thickness of 370mm. For a LPG explosion produced in an enclosure with a vent, main hazards, within the vent, are overpressure and high temperature. However main hazards are dynamic pressure, blast wind, and high temperature beyond the vent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Gas explosion in domestic buildings. The vented gas explosion[sub][/sub

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Chyży

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the basic information, related to the so-called vented gas explosion, has been presented. The vented explosion it is an explosion, during which the destruction of the weakest elements of the structure occurs. Through the resulting holes (decompressing surfaces can flow both combustion products and non-burned gas mixture. In consequence, reduction of the maximum explosion pressure[i] P[sub]red [/sub][/i] may be significant. Often, a gas explosion occurs inside residential buildings. In this case, natural vents are window and door openings.[b]Keywords[/b]: gas, explosion, combustion, explosion vents

  6. Development and analysis of vent-filtered containment conceptual designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, A.S.; Walling, H.C.

    1980-01-01

    Conceptual filtered-vented containment systems have been postulated for a reference large, dry, pressurized water reactor containment, and the systems have been analyzed to determine design parameters, actuation/operation requirements, and overall feasibility. The primary design challenge has been found to emanate from pressure spikes caused by core debris bed interactions with water and by hydrogen deflagrations. Circumvention of the pressure spikes may require a more complicated actuation logic than has previously been considered. Otherwise, major reductions in consequences for certain severe accidents appear to be possible with relatively simple systems. A probabilistic assessment of competing risks remains to be performed

  7. Clad vent set cup closure-weld-zone grinding evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, G.B.; Woods, A.T.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1996-04-01

    Clad vent set (CVS) cups were ground in the closure-weld zone to reduce the wall-thickness variation created by the cup deep-drawing process. A significantly more uniform wall thickness would be beneficial for the CVS closure-weld operation. The goal was to reduce the average within-cup wall-thickness variation (defined as the range of wall thicknesses in the closure-weld zone) approximately 50% from the Cassini production value of 42 microm. This goal was shown to be achievable but, unfortunately, not with the existing blank and formed cup thicknesses

  8. Air-cleaning devices for vented filtered LMFBR containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhlestein, L.D.; Hilliard, R.K.

    1982-07-01

    An effort lasting several years is summarized which evaluated, developed and tested air cleaning devices for potential use in breeder reactor containment venting applications. State-of-technology evaluations were completed for both a hypothetical head release accident and a primary vessel melt-through accident. Commercially available systems or components were tested which included HEPA filters, sand and gravel beds, and aqueous scrubbers. Large-scale demonstration tests were completed and results are presented for two- and three-stage conventional aqueous scrubber systems; and for a newly developed passive, submerged gravel scrubber

  9. Vented fuel experiment for gas-cooled fast reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longest, A.W.; Gat, U.; Conlin, J.A.; Campana, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A pressure-equalized and vented fuel rod is being irradiated in an instrumented capsule designated GB-10 to approximately 100MWd/kg-heavy metal. The fuel is a sol-gel-derived 88 at.% uranium (approximately 9% 235 U) and 12 at.% plutonium oxide, and the cladding is 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel. The capsule is being irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and has exceeded a burnup of 70MWd/kg. The fuel has been operated at linear power rates of 39 and 44kW/m, and peak outer cladding temperature of 565 and 630 0 C respectively. A similar fuel rod in a previous capsule (GB-9) was subjected to 48kW/m (685 0 C). Helium gas sweeps through any portion of the three regions of the fuel rod, namely: fuel, blanket, and charcoal trap. The charcoal trap is operated at about 300 0 C. An on-line Ge(Li) detector is used to analyse release rates of several gamma-emitting noble gas isotopes. Analyses are performed primarily on sweep gas flowing through the entire fuel rod, and for sweeps over the top of the charcoal trap. Sweep gas samples are analyzed for stable noble gas isotopes. Results in the form of ratios of release rate over birth rate (R/B) and venting rate over birth rate (V/B) are derived. R/B rates range from 10 -4 % to 30% while V/B ranges from 10 -6 % to 30%. Flow conductance in the capsule was monitored by recording the flow rate and pressure drop across the fuel rod and inlet sweep line. The flow conductance has been falling with increasing burnup, currently restricting the flow to about 20ml (s.t.p.)/min at a pressure difference of about 1.5MPa. Venting rates of the gaseous fission products as a function of gas pressure in the range 6.9 to 1.4MPa have also been measured. Planned future experiments include the monitoring of tritium release, venting and cladding permeation rates, and its molecular form. First measurements have been made. A simulated leak experiment will determine the mixture of fission gases as a function of flow rate and the most

  10. ACE puts containment venting systems to the test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merilo, M.

    1990-01-01

    Filtered venting of reactor containments has received considerable attention recently as a method for avoiding containment failure due to overpressure during severe accidents. Several proposed filtration devices have been tested in the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) programme, such that a self consistent comparison of the aerosol removal characteristics of these systems could be obtained. Considering the different design, requirements and operating conditions of the filter devices, a direct comparison is not possible, nor appropriate. Nevertheless, large scale models, using full scale elements of the various devices whenever feasible, have been tested with consistent mixtures of aerosols and carrier gases. (author)

  11. AREVA’s Containment Venting Technologies and Experience Worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welker, M.

    2015-07-01

    The AREVA Filtered Containment Venting System (FCVS) is a product family that minimizes the environmental impact in case of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant (NPP). Our experience is based on a large-scale test and qualification program as well as on the design, licensing and installation of more than 80 projects worldwide. The product family provides flexibility regarding the adaptation to respective accident scenarios, applicable codes and standards, seismic design, supply chain, implementation and localization. AREVA has broad experience of managing fleet supplies, successful support of licensing and cooperating with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) of pressurized and boiling water reactors (PWR and BWR). (Author)

  12. Post Fukushima requirement of containment filtered venting system in NPPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, Anuj Kumar; Bera, S.; Nagrale, D.B.; Lakshmanan, S.P.; Baburajan, P.K.; Paul, U.K.; Gaikwad, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Post Fukushima safety enhancement through provision of an additional layer of Defence-in-Depth in the existing and new Indian nuclear power plants has led to the need of containment filtered venting system (CFVS). The regulatory review of the design of CFVS is in progress. In order to assess the same, the regulatory knowledge base had to be generated on the current state of the art of the design of such a system by study of the international experience on this system available in the open literature. The regulatory stand on requirements and implementation status of the CFVS in various countries were also studied. The information available on design features of various kinds of venting systems, relevant design basis and/or acceptance criteria were collected for supporting the design safety review of the Indian CFVS under consideration. During the on-going regulatory review process several analyses have been carried out, some more are in progress, to support the deliberations and decision making. This paper presents the above mentioned information and the summary of the analyses carried out including the status and outcome. Important aspects of the design review and associated analyses are also presented in this paper which includes the descriptions of the work on CFD study of venturi atomization, thermal hydraulics studies, shielding analysis and source term estimation studies carried out by the regulatory body. (author)

  13. Numerical Analysis of a Passive Containment Filtered Venting System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taejoon; Ha, Huiun; Heo, Sun

    2014-01-01

    The passive Containment Filtered Venting system (CFVS) does not have principally any kind of isolation valves or filtering devices which need periodic maintenance. In this study, the hydro-thermal analysis is presented to investigate the existence of flow instability in the passive CFVS and its performance under the pressure change of APR+ containment building with LB-LOCA M/E data. The Passive Containment Filtered Venting System was suggested as a part in i-Power development project and the operation mechanism was investigated by numerical modeling and simulation using GOTHIC8.0 system code. There are four Phases for consideration to investigate the pressurization of the containment building, loss of hydrostatic head in the pipe line of CFVS, opening of pipe line and gas ejection to the coolant tank, and the head recovery inside the pipe as the containment gas exhausted. The simulation results show that gas generation rate determine the timing of head recovery in the CFVS pipe line and that the equipment of various devices inducing pressure loss at the pipe can give the capacity of Phase control of the passive CFVS operation

  14. Performance assessment of containment filtered venting system with Venturi scrubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinarayna, K.N.V.; Ali, Seik Mansoor; Balasubramaniyan, V.

    2015-01-01

    Venting through appropriate filtration systems is now being considered as a severe accident management strategy for maintaining the containment integrity and also as a means to reduce the radiological consequences to the public and environment. The option of filtered containment venting appears to have assumed significance in the post- Fukushima accident backdrop. Back-fitting of a suitable Venturi scrubber based CFVS for the Indian BWRs (TAPS- 1 and 2) at Tarapur is now being contemplated. Several key issues need to be carefully addressed for ensuring the desired functional capability of such a system. At the outset, this paper highlights a few thermal hydraulic issues that are of interest from regulatory perspective. This is followed by a detailed description of the mathematical models developed for assessing the depressurization characteristics of CFVS, energy absorption capacity of the Scrubber Tank (ST) water inventory, iodine removal and aerosol retention capability etc. Finally, application of these models to investigate the response of CFVS under twin unit SBO conditions in TAPS-1 and 2 is presented. The studies presented here give insight into the key variables affecting the CFVS performance and would be useful to both the system designer as well as the regulator. (author)

  15. A finite element analysis of novel vented dental abutment geometries for cement-retained crown restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Lucas C; Saba, Juliana N; Meyer, Clark A; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Wadhwani, Chandur; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2016-11-01

    Recent literature indicates that the long-term success of dental implants is, in part, attributed to how dental crowns are attached to their associated implants. The commonly utilized method for crown attachment - cementation, has been criticized because of recent links between residual cement and peri-implant disease. Residual cement extrusion from crown-abutment margins post-crown seating is a growing concern. This study aimed at (1) identifying key abutment features, which would improve dental cement flow characteristics, and (2) understanding how these features would impact the mechanical stability of the abutment under functional loads. Computational fluid dynamic modeling was used to evaluate cement flow in novel abutment geometries. These models were then evaluated using 3D-printed surrogate models. Finite element analysis also provided an understanding of how the mechanical stability of these abutments was altered after key features were incorporated into the geometry. The findings demonstrated that the key features involved in improved venting of the abutment during crown seating were (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of the vents, (3) location of the vents, (4) addition of a plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of the abutment wall. This study culminated in a novel design for a vented abutment consisting of 8 vents located radially around the abutment neck-margin plus a plastic insert to guide the cement during seating and provide retrievability to the abutment system.Venting of the dental abutment has been shown to decrease the risk of undetected residual dental cement post-cement-retained crown seating. This article will utilize a finite element analysis approach toward optimizing dental abutment designs for improved dental cement venting. Features investigated include (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of vents, (3) location of vents, (4) addition of plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of abutment wall.

  16. A finite element analysis of novel vented dental abutment geometries for cement‐retained crown restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Lucas C.; Saba, Juliana N.; Meyer, Clark A.; Chung, Kwok‐Hung; Wadhwani, Chandur

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent literature indicates that the long‐term success of dental implants is, in part, attributed to how dental crowns are attached to their associated implants. The commonly utilized method for crown attachment – cementation, has been criticized because of recent links between residual cement and peri‐implant disease. Residual cement extrusion from crown‐abutment margins post‐crown seating is a growing concern. This study aimed at (1) identifying key abutment features, which would improve dental cement flow characteristics, and (2) understanding how these features would impact the mechanical stability of the abutment under functional loads. Computational fluid dynamic modeling was used to evaluate cement flow in novel abutment geometries. These models were then evaluated using 3D‐printed surrogate models. Finite element analysis also provided an understanding of how the mechanical stability of these abutments was altered after key features were incorporated into the geometry. The findings demonstrated that the key features involved in improved venting of the abutment during crown seating were (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of the vents, (3) location of the vents, (4) addition of a plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of the abutment wall. This study culminated in a novel design for a vented abutment consisting of 8 vents located radially around the abutment neck‐margin plus a plastic insert to guide the cement during seating and provide retrievability to the abutment system.Venting of the dental abutment has been shown to decrease the risk of undetected residual dental cement post‐cement‐retained crown seating. This article will utilize a finite element analysis approach toward optimizing dental abutment designs for improved dental cement venting. Features investigated include (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of vents, (3) location of vents, (4) addition of plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of abutment wall. PMID

  17. Natural Ventilation Effectiveness of Round Wall-Mounted Vent Caps in Residential Kitchens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Pin Lin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the effect of different numbers of wall-mounted vent caps and their installation locations on the indoor air environment in residential kitchens, for which limited information is available. Wind tunnel tests were performed to study the induced ventilation rates of a vent cap, and the impact of vent caps on the natural ventilation efficiency in residential kitchens was examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD numerical simulations. The results were then applied to determine the appropriate quantity of vent caps and their proper installation location. The wind tunnel test results indicated that outdoor winds with speeds of 0–6 m/s that flow parallel to the wall with a vent cap induce indoor air to exit through the cap with ventilation rates of 0–20 m3/h; when the wind blows perpendicular to the wall, outdoor air with 0–31.9 m3/h flows indoors. CFD numerical simulations showed that the installation of kitchen vent caps can reduce the average carbon monoxide concentration in the cook’s breathing zone. A sufficient quantity of vent caps and the proper installation location are required to ensure the natural ventilation effectiveness of wall-mounted vent caps.

  18. 40 CFR 63.113 - Process vent provisions-reference control technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 63.113 Process vent provisions—reference control technology. (a) The owner or operator of a Group 1... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process vent provisions-reference control technology. 63.113 Section 63.113 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  19. 40 CFR 63.487 - Batch front-end process vents-reference control technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 63.487 Batch front-end process vents—reference control technology. (a) Batch front-end process vents... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batch front-end process vents-reference control technology. 63.487 Section 63.487 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  20. 40 CFR 63.765 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Glycol dehydration unit process vent... Facilities § 63.765 Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards. (a) This section applies to each glycol dehydration unit subject to this subpart with an actual annual average natural gas flowrate equal to or...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1275 - Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Glycol dehydration unit process vent... Facilities § 63.1275 Glycol dehydration unit process vent standards. (a) This section applies to each glycol dehydration unit subject to this subpart with an actual annual average natural gas flowrate equal to or...

  2. Inerting of a Vented Aircraft Fuel Tank Test Article with Nitrogen-Enriched Air

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burns, Michael

    2001-01-01

    ...) required to inert a vented aircraft fuel tank. NEA, generated by a hollow fiber membrane gas separation system, was used to inert a laboratory fuel tank with a single vent on top designed to simulate a transport category airplane fuel tank...

  3. Spatial scaling of bacterial community diversity at shallow hydrothermal vents: a global comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop Ristova, P.; Hassenrueck, C.; Molari, M.; Fink, A.; Bühring, S. I.

    2016-02-01

    Marine shallow hydrothermal vents are extreme environments, often characterized by discharge of fluids with e.g. high temperatures, low pH, and laden with elements toxic to higher organisms. They occur at continental margins around the world's oceans, but represent fragmented, isolated habitats of locally small areal coverage. Microorganisms contribute the main biomass at shallow hydrothermal vent ecosystems and build the basis of the food chain by autotrophic fixation of carbon both via chemosynthesis and photosynthesis, occurring simultaneously. Despite their importance and unique capacity to adapt to these extreme environments, little is known about the spatial scales on which the alpha- and beta-diversity of microbial communities vary at shallow vents, and how the geochemical habitat heterogeneity influences shallow vent biodiversity. Here for the first time we investigated the spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity patterns and their interconnectivity at geochemically diverse shallow vents on a global scale. This study presents data on the comparison of bacterial community structures on large (> 1000 km) and small (0.1 - 100 m) spatial scales as derived from ARISA and Illumina sequencing. Despite the fragmented global distribution of shallow hydrothermal vents, similarity of vent bacterial communities decreased with geographic distance, confirming the ubiquity of distance-decay relationship. Moreover, at all investigated vents, pH was the main factor locally structuring these communities, while temperature influenced both the alpha- and beta-diversity.

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Evaluation of Passive Vents in New-Construction Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Puttagunta, S. Maxwell, D. Berger, and M. Zuluaga

    2015-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) conducted research to gain more insight into passive vents. Because passive vents are meant to operate in a general environment of negative apartment pressure, the research assessed whether these negative pressures prevail through a variety of environmental conditions.

  5. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND... function of these systems. High point vents are not required for the tubes in U-tube steam generators...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1322 - Batch process vents-reference control technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Batch process vents-reference control technology. 63.1322 Section 63.1322 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Batch process vents—reference control technology. (a) Batch process vents. The owner or operator of a...

  7. OECD/NEA/CSNI Status Report on Filtered Containment Venting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemain, D.; Guentay, S.; Basu, S.; Sonnenkalb, M.; Lebel, L.; Ball, J.; Allelein, H.J.; Liebana Martinez, B.; Eckardt, B.; Losch, N.; Ammirabile, L.; ); Gryffroy, D.; Sallus, L.; Kroes, A.; Rensonnet, T.; Anden, A.; Gyepi-Garbrah, S.; Viktorov, A.; Duspiva, J.; Routamo, T.; Guieu, S.; Hotta, A.; Nakamura, H.; Song, J.H.; Ha, K.S.; Filio, C.; Kuznetsov, M.V.; Kubisova, L.; Nemec, T.; Frid, W.; Loy, D.; Pellini, D.; Zieger, T.; Herranz Puebla, L.; Amri, A.; Kissane, M.; )

    2014-01-01

    This Status Report provides a comprehensive description of safety requirements associated with Filtered Containment Venting Systems (FCVSs) (Chapter 3) and of the status of FCVS implementation (Chapter 4) as provided by the various contributing countries. The different level of detail describing the accident management situation in different countries in relation to FCVS reflects in part the reality of the different levels of the current regulatory and/or technological appraisal of FCVS internationally. Further, the safety requirements differ in various countries being more-or-less prescriptive with FCVS not necessarily explicitly mandated or not considered as the primary measure to prevent containment over-pressurization. The following requirements may be prescribed for FCVS depending on venting strategies and objectives: vent capacity, vent opening and closing pressures, vent timing, venting system design requirements, consideration of possible hydrogen loads, radiological objectives, FCVS decontamination factors (DFs) for radioactive aerosols, for molecular iodine, etc. These are all discussed in detail in the report. A description of the FCV strategies for emergency operating procedures (EOPs) and SAM domains is provided in Chapter 5. FCVS are considered to be an additional system to protect the containment integrity. FCVSs are typically to be used in SAs as part of the overall applied SAM strategy for PWRs and BWRs, while they are also used in DBA for some PHWRs (CANDUs). Operation of a FCVS is also considered in some countries and for some reactor designs for accident management other than countering the long-term over-pressurization of the containment, e.g., for BWRs in the case of loss of heat sink to remove decay heat or to reduce the hydrogen inventory in the containment. Chapter 6 presents the well-known existing filtration technologies e.g., scrubbers, deep-bed filtration and different sorption systems. Details of systems for which information was

  8. Geomicrobiology of Hydrothermal Vents in Yellowstone Lake: Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis suggest Importance of Geochemistry (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskeep, W. P.; Macur, R.; Jay, Z.; Clingenpeel, S.; Tenney, A.; Lavalvo, D.; Shanks, W. C.; McDermott, T.; Kan, J.; Gorby, Y.; Morgan, L. A.; Yooseph, S.; Varley, J.; Nealson, K.

    2010-12-01

    Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) is a large, high-altitude, fresh-water lake that straddles the most recent Yellowstone caldera, and is situated on top of significant hydrothermal activity. An interdisciplinary study is underway to evaluate the geochemical and geomicrobiological characteristics of several hydrothermal vent environments sampled using a remotely operated vehicle, and to determine the degree to which these vents may influence the biology of this young freshwater ecosystem. Approximately six different vent systems (locations) were sampled during 2007 and 2008, and included water obtained directly from the hydrothermal vents as well as biomass and sediment associated with these high-temperature environments. Thorough geochemical analysis of these hydrothermal environments reveals variation in pH, sulfide, hydrogen and other potential electron donors that may drive primary productivity. The concentrations of dissolved hydrogen and sulfide were extremely high in numerous vents sampled, especially the deeper (30-50 m) vents located in the Inflated Plain, West Thumb, and Mary Bay. Significant dilution of hydrothermal fluids occurs due to mixing with surrounding lake water. Despite this, the temperatures observed in many of these hydrothermal vents range from 50-90 C, and elevated concentrations of constituents typically associated with geothermal activity in Yellowstone are observed in waters sampled directly from vent discharge. Microorganisms associated with elemental sulfur mats and filamentous ‘streamer’ communities of Inflated Plain and West Thumb (pH range 5-6) were dominated by members of the deeply-rooted bacterial Order Aquificales, but also contain thermophilic members of the domain Archaea. Assembly of metagenome sequence from the Inflated Plain vent biomass and to a lesser extent, West Thumb vent biomass reveal the importance of Sulfurihydrogenibium-like organisms, also important in numerous terrestrial geothermal

  9. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry investigations of the mixed convection exchange flow through a horizontal vent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrall, Kevin; Pretrel, Hugues; Vaux, Samuel; Vauquelin, Olivier

    2017-10-01

    The exchange flow through a horizontal vent linking two compartments (one above the other) is studied experimentally. This exchange is here governed by both the buoyant natural effect due to the temperature difference of the fluids in both compartments, and the effect of a (forced) mechanical ventilation applied in the lower compartment. Such a configuration leads to uni- or bi-directional flows through the vent. In the experiments, buoyancy is induced in the lower compartment thanks to an electrical resistor. The forced ventilation is applied in exhaust or supply modes and three different values of the vent area. To estimate both velocity fields and flow rates at the vent, measurements are realized at thermal steady state, flush the vent in the upper compartment using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV), which is original for this kind of flow. The SPIV measurements allows the area occupied by both upward and downward flows to be determined.

  10. Venting krypton-85 from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, H.M.

    1981-01-01

    To permit the less restricted access to the reactor building necessary to maintain instrumentation and equipment, and to proceed towad the total decontamination of the facility, General Public Utilities, operators of the facility referred to hereafter as GPU, asked the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, or NRC, for permission to remove the 85 Kr from the reactor building by venting it to the environment. GPU supported their request with the Safety Analysis and Environmental Assessment Report on the proposed reactor building venting plan. On June 12, 1980, after seven months of licensing deliberations and numerous public hearings, the NRC granted GPU's request. The actual venting took place between June 28 and July 11, 1980. This report presents an overview of the detailed effort involved in the TMI-2 reactor building venting program. The findings reported here are condensed from a published report entitled TMI-2 Reactor Building Purge--Kr-85 Venting

  11. Heavy metals from Kueishantao shallow-sea hydrothermal vents, offshore northeast Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue-Gang; Lyu, Shuang-Shuang; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Lebrato, Mario; Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Ye, Ying

    2018-04-01

    Shallow water hydrothermal vents are a source of heavy metals leading to their accumulation in marine organisms that manage to live under extreme environmental conditions. This is the case at Kueishantao (KST) shallow-sea vents system offshore northeast Taiwan, where the heavy metal distribution in vent fluids and ambient seawater is poorly understood. This shallow vent is an excellent natural laboratory to understand how heavy and volatile metals behave in the nearby water column and ecosystem. Here, we investigated the submarine venting of heavy metals from KST field and its impact on ambient surface seawater. The total heavy metal concentrations in the vent fluids and vertical plumes were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than the overlying seawater values. When compared with deep-sea hydrothermal systems, the estimated KST end-member fluids exhibited much lower concentrations of transition metals (e.g., Fe and Mn) but comparable concentrations of toxic metals such as Pb and As. This may be attributed to the lower temperature of the KST reaction zone and transporting fluids. Most of the heavy metals (Fe, Mn, As, Y, and Ba) in the plumes and seawater mainly originated from hydrothermal venting, while Cd and Pb were largely contributed by external sources such as contaminated waters (anthropogenic origin). The spatial distribution of heavy metals in the surface seawater indicated that seafloor venting impacts ambient seawater. The measurable influence of KST hydrothermal activity, however, was quite localized and limited to an area of heavy metals emanating from the yellow KST hydrothermal vent were: 430-2600 kg Fe, 24-145 kg Mn, 5-32 kg Ba, 10-60 kg As, 0.3-1.9 kg Cd, and 2-10 kg Pb. This study provides important data on heavy metals from a shallow-sea hydrothermal field, and it helps to better understand the environmental impact of submarine shallow hydrothermal venting.

  12. Impact of vent pipe diameter on characteristics of waste degradation in semi-aerobic bioreactor landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guobin; Liu, Dan; Chen, Weiming; Ye, Zhicheng; Liu, Hong; Li, Qibin

    2017-10-01

    The evolution mechanism of a vent pipe diameter on a waste-stabilization process in semi-aerobic bioreactor landfills was analyzed from the organic-matter concentration, biodegradability, spectral characteristics of dissolved organic matter, correlations and principal-component analysis. Waste samples were collected at different distances from the vent pipe and from different landfill layers in semi-aerobic bioreactor landfills with different vent pipe diameters. An increase in vent pipe diameter favored waste degradation. Waste degradation in landfills can be promoted slightly when the vent pipe diameter increases from 25 to 50 mm. It could be promoted significantly when the vent pipe diameter was increased to 75 mm. The vent pipe diameter is important in waste degradation in the middle layer of landfills. The dissolved organic matter in the waste is composed mainly of long-wave humus (humin), short-wave humus (fulvic acid) and tryptophan. The humification levels of the waste that was located at the center of vent pipes with 25-, 50- and 75-mm diameters were 2.2682, 4.0520 and 7.6419 Raman units, respectively. The appropriate vent pipe diameter for semi-aerobic bioreactor landfills with an 800-mm diameter was 75 mm. The effect of different vent pipe diameters on the degree of waste stabilization is reflected by two main components. Component 1 is related mainly to the content of fulvic acid, biologically degradable material and organic matter. Component 2 is related mainly to the content of tryptophan and humin from the higher vascular plants.

  13. Sill intrusion in volcanic calderas: implications for vent opening probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, Giovanni; Martini, Marcello; D'Auria, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Calderas show peculiar behaviors with remarkable dynamic processes, which do not often culminate in eruptions. Observations and studies conducted in recent decades have shown that the most common cause of unrest in the calderas is due to magma intrusion; in particular, the intrusion of sills at shallow depths. Monogenic cones, with large areal dispersion, are quite common in the calderas, suggesting that the susceptibility analysis based on geological features, is not strictly suitable for estimating the vent opening probability in calderas. In general, the opening of a new eruptive vent can be regarded as a rock failure process. The stress field in the rocks that surrounds and tops the magmatic reservoirs plays an important role in causing the rock failure and creating the path that magma can follow towards the surface. In this conceptual framework, we approach the problem of getting clues about the probability of vent opening in volcanic calderas through the study of the stress field produced by the intrusion of magma, in particular, by the intrusion of a sill. We simulate the intrusion of a sill free to expand radially, with shape and dimensions which vary with time. The intrusion process is controlled by the elastic response of the rock plate above the sill, which bends because of the intrusion, and by gravity, that drives the magma towards the zones where the thickness of the sill is smaller. We calculated the stress field in the plate rock above the sill. We found that at the bottom of the rock plate above the sill the maximum intensity of tensile stress is concentrated at the front of the sill and spreads radially with it, over time. For this reason, we think that the front of the spreading sill is prone to open for eruptive vents. Even in the central area of the sill the intensity of stress is relatively high, but at the base of the rock plate stress is compressive. Under isothermal conditions, the stress soon reaches its maximum value (time interval

  14. Vent hood concept for safely unloading TRUPACT-IIs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    Receipt of transuranic (TRU) waste in the TRUPACT-2 shipping package, implies a potential of receiving waste packages contaminated with only alpha emitters or emitting hazardous gases. Due to the difficulty of rapidly detecting low-level alpha contamination, a strict contamination control system has been developed to check incoming waste packages in a controlled environment. A part of this control is the use of a vent hood system for the TRUPACT-2 shipping container unloading process. A clear final shroud with a monitored/filtered exhaust system has been designed and fabricated to permit direct surveillance of TRU waste packages prior to exposing personnel or facilities to possible radioactive contamination or hazardous gases. This concept has also been adapted to similar evolutions in which packages are exposed that hold TRU or hazardous materials but cannot be directly monitored prior to opening

  15. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulant) Thermodynamic Vent System Test Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low-gravity (space) environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leaks. During low-gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. A series of TVS tests was conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using liquid nitrogen (LN2) as a liquid oxygen (LO2) simulant. The tests were performed at tank til1 levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%, and with a specified tank pressure control band. A transient one-dimensional TVS performance program is used to analyze and correlate the test data for all three fill levels. Predictions and comparisons of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature with test data are presented.

  16. Vented fuel experiment for gas-cooled fast reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longest, A.W.; Gat, U.; Conlin, J.A.; Campana, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    A pressure-equalized and vented fuel rod is being irradiated in an instrumented capsule designated GB-10 to approximately 100 MWd/kg-heavy metal. The fuel is a sol-gel derived 88 atom-percent uranium (approximately 9 percent 235 U) 12 atom-percent plutonium oxide, and the cladding is 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel. The capsule is being irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and has exceeded a burnup of 70 MWd/kg. The fuel has been operated at linear power rates of 39 and 44 kW/ m, and peak outer cladding temperature of 565 0 and 630 0 C respectively. A similar fuel rod in a previous capsule (GB-9) was subjected to 48 kW/m (685 0 C). 4 references. (auth)

  17. Photometric analysis of a space shuttle water venting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viereck, R. A.; Murad, E.; Pike, C. P.; Kofsky, I. L.; Trowbridge, C. A.; Rall, D. L. A.; Satayesh, A.; Berk, A.; Elgin, J. B.

    1991-01-01

    Presented here is a preliminary interpretation of a recent experiment conducted on Space Shuttle Discovery (Mission STS 29) in which a stream of liquid supply water was vented into space at twilight. The data consist of video images of the sunlight-scattering water/ice particle cloud that formed, taken by visible light-sensitive intensified cameras both onboard the spacecraft and at the AMOS ground station near the trajectory's nadir. This experiment was undertaken to study the phenomenology of water columns injected into the low-Earth orbital environment, and to provide information about the lifetime of ice particles that may recontact Space Shuttle orbits later. The findings about the composition of the cloud have relevance to ionospheric plasma depletion experiments and to the dynamics of the interaction of orbiting spacecraft with the environment.

  18. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Metal HAP Process Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements for Metal HAP Process Vents 4 Table 4 to Subpart VVVVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... of Part 63—Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Metal HAP Process Vents As required in § 63.11496(f), you must comply with the requirements for metal HAP process vents as shown in the...

  19. Spatial and Temporal Population Genetics at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents Along the East Pacific Rise and Galapagos Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    frequent physical disturbance. Earval dispersal among disjunct vent sites facilitates the persistence of sessile invertebrate species in these...among disjunct vent sites facilitates the persistence of sessile invertebrate species in these geologically and chemically dynamic habitats despite...the reproductive biology of the hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 52, 89-94. Chevaldonne P, Jollivet D

  20. Pito Seamount revisited: the discovery and mapping of new black smoker vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, M. J.; John, B. E.; German, C. R.; Gee, J. S.; Coogan, L. A.; Gillis, K. M.; Swapp, S.

    2017-12-01

    In February 2017, the RV Atlantis PMaG (PaleoMagnetism and Gabbro) cruise re-visited a black smoker site originally discovered 24 years ago on Pito Seamount, by the submersible Nautile during the French Pito expedition (1993). Pito Seamount (111.639oW, 23.333oS) marks the northern tip of the propagating East Pacific Rise, bounding the east side of the Easter Microplate. There the seafloor rises to 2250mbsl and has a 900m wide, 50m deep axial valley, which hosts at least two separate fields of active hydrothermal vents. AUV Sentry mapping of the summit of Pito seamount (0.5-1m resolution) highlights over 50 active and inactive chimneys amid recent basaltic sheet flows, pillow mounds and ponded lava. The vents occur in two fields/sub-fields; the first covers an area of 800 x 200m, and lies parallel to the ridge axis, along incipient faults forming on the northeastern flank of the axial valley. The second field occurs in a 250m diameter area in the centre of the axial valley. Jason II dive 961 visited, sampled, measured vent orifice temperatures, and acquired 4k video of the chimneys, and re-discovered the active (Magnificent Village) vent first found by Nautile, in the now named Nautile vent field, together with five additional active hydrothermal vents (Jason, Medea, Sentry, Abe and Scotty's Castle). The Magnificent Village, the largest active vent, is 25m tall and has multiple active spires in three main groups surrounding a hollow amphitheater. Measured vent orifice temperatures ranged from 338oC (Magnificent Village) to 370oC (Jason). The vents host a fauna of alvinellid worms, bythograidid crabs, alvincardid shrimps, phymorhynchus gastropods, Corallimorphid anenomes and bathymodiolid mussels, but no vestimentiferan worms. Brisingid brittle stars colonize inactive chimneys.

  1. CFD Simulation of rigid venting of the containment of a BWR-5 Mark-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo G, I. F.; Vazquez B, A. K.; Velazquez E, L.; Tijerina S, F.; Tapia M, R.

    2016-09-01

    In conditions of prolonged loss of external energy or a severe accident, venting to the atmosphere is an alternative to prevent overpressure and release of fission products from the primary containment of a nuclear reactor. Due to the importance of flow determination through rigid vents, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is proposed to verify the capacity of rigid vents in the primary containment of a boiling water reactor (BWR) under different operating conditions (pressure, temperature and compositions of the fluids). The model predicts and provides detailed information on variables such as mass flow and velocity of the venting gases. In the proposed model the primary containment gas is vented to the atmosphere via rigid vents (pipes) from the dry and wet pit. Is assumed that the container is pressurized because is in a defined scenario, and at one point the venting is open and the gas released into the atmosphere. The objective is to characterize the flow and validate the CFD model for the overpressure conditions that occur in an accident such as a LOCA, Sbo, etc. The model is implemented with Ansys-Fluent general-purpose CFD software based on the geometry of the venting ducts of the containment of a BWR. The model is developed three-dimensional and resolves at steady state for compressible flow and includes the effects of the turbulence represented by the Reynolds stress model. The CFD results are compared with the values of a one-dimensional and isentropic model for compressible flow. The relative similarity of results leads to the conclusion that the proposed CFD model can help to predict the rigid venting capacity of the containment of a BWR, however more information is required for full validation of the proposed model. (Author)

  2. An abyssal mobilome: viruses, plasmids and vesicles from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossouarn, Julien; Dupont, Samuel; Gorlas, Aurore; Mercier, Coraline; Bienvenu, Nadege; Marguet, Evelyne; Forterre, Patrick; Geslin, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Mobile genetic elements (MGEs) such as viruses, plasmids, vesicles, gene transfer agents (GTAs), transposons and transpovirions, which collectively represent the mobilome, interact with cellular organisms from all three domains of life, including those thriving in the most extreme environments. While efforts have been made to better understand deep-sea vent microbial ecology, our knowledge of the mobilome associated with prokaryotes inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vents remains limited. Here we focus on the abyssal mobilome by reviewing accumulating data on viruses, plasmids and vesicles associated with thermophilic and hyperthermophilic Bacteria and Archaea present in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. On the global distribution of hydrothermal vent fields: One decade later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, S. E.; Baker, E. T.; German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Since the last global compilation one decade ago, the known number of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields has almost doubled. At the end of 2009, a total of 518 active vent fields was catalogued, with about half (245) visually confirmed and others (273) inferred active at the seafloor. About half (52%) of these vent fields are at mid-ocean ridges (MORs), 25% at volcanic arcs, 21% at back-arc spreading centers (BASCs), and 2% at intra-plate volcanoes and other settings. One third are in high seas, and the nations with the most known active vent fields within EEZs are Tonga, USA, Japan, and New Zealand. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. Here, we have comprehensively documented the percentage of strike length at MORs and BASCs that has been systematically explored for hydrothermal activity. As of the end of 2009, almost 30% of the ~60,000 km of MORs had been surveyed at least with spaced vertical profiles to detect hydrothermal plumes. A majority of the vents discovered at MORs in the past decade occurred at segments with vs. weighted-average full spreading rate (u_s), we predicted 676 vent fields remaining to be discovered at MORs. Even accounting for the lower F_s at slower spreading rates, almost half of the vents that are predicted remaining to be discovered at MORs are at ultra-slow to slow spreading rates (explored tend to be at high latitudes, such as the ultra-slow to slow spreading Arctic MORs (e.g., Kolbeinsey and Mohns Ridges), the ultra-slow American-Antarctic Ridge, and the intermediate spreading Pacific-Antarctic Ridge. Although a greater percentage of the ~11,000 km of BASCs has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity, the discoveries at BASCs in the past decade were mainly at segments with intermediate to fast spreading rates. Using the same equation for F_s vs. u_s, we predicted 71 vent fields remaining to

  4. A numerical study of the effect of vent flow angle on the heat transfer rate from a cold window with a below-window hot-air vent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oosthuizen, P.H. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of the discharge angle on air leaving a hot air vent mounted below a window. The window was represented by a plane isothermal section recessed into a wall and was colder than air in the rest of the room. The vent was placed against the wall and had a uniform discharge velocity. Flow was assumed to be steady. Both laminar and turbulent flows were evaluated using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation tool. A k-epsilon turbulence model was used to determine turbulent flow calculations. The study determined the Rayleigh number based on window height, the Reynolds number based on the vent discharge velocity, the angle of the vent discharge flow, the Prandtl number, and dimensionless vent discharge temperature differences. The study showed that a relatively thin layer of cold air adjacent to the floor is present at high Rayleigh numbers, where the downward natural convective flow over the window dominates the overall flow. At low Rayleigh numbers, the cold air flows upward towards the ceiling and temperatures in the room are nearly uniform. 47 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Increased diversity of sessile epibenthos at subtidal hydrothermal vents: seven hypotheses based on observations at Milos Island, Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Nike Bianchi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Research on subtidal hydrothermal vent ecosystems at Milos, Hellenic Volcanic Arc (Aegean Sea, suggested that vent activity increased the species richness of sessile epibenthic assemblages. Based on 303 species found in 6 sites (3 close to vents, 3 farther away, the present paper uses correspondence analysis and species/samples curves to examine the species composition and richness of these assemblages. Differences due to vent proximity were more important than those due to bottom depth and distance from the shore. Diversity was confirmed to be higher near the vents, although none of the 266 species found at the vent sites can be considered as obligate vent-associated species. Seven different, although not mutually exclusive, hypotheses are discussed to explain the pattern of increased epibenthic species diversity at the vent sites, namely: (i vents represent an intermediate disturbance, inducing mortality by the emission of toxic fluids; (ii higher winter temperature allows for the occurrence of warm-water species, which add to the regional background; (iii venting disrupts the homogeneity of the water bottom layer, increasing bottom roughness and hence habitat heterogeneity; (iv deposition of minerals and enhanced bioconstruction by Ca enrichment increment habitat provision; (v fluid emission induces advective mechanisms that favour recruitment; (vi vents emit CO2, nutrients and trace elements that enhance primary productivity; and (vii bacterial chemosynthesis add to photosynthesis to provide a diversity of food sources for the fauna.

  6. AT26-10 Chemosynthetic Microbial Communities at Deep-Sea Vents (EM122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The cruise will include 16 dives with DSV Alvin or ROV Jason, to allow time for deployment and collection of experiments and for extensive sampling of discrete vents...

  7. Central extracorporeal membrane oxygenation requiring pulmonary arterial venting after near-drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Kinoshita, Osamu; Fujimoto, Yoshifumi; Murakami, Arata; Shindo, Takahiro; Kashiwa, Koichi; Ono, Minoru

    2014-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an effective respiratory and circulatory support in patients in refractory cardiogenic shock or cardiac arrest. Peripheral ECMO sometimes requires left heart drainage; however, few reports state that pulmonary arterial (PA) venting is required during ECMO support. We present a case of a 14-year-old boy who required PA venting during ECMO support after resuscitation from near-drowning in freshwater. A biventricular assist device with an oxygenator implantation was intended on day 1; however, we were unable to proceed because of increasing of pulmonary vascular resistance from the acute lung injury. Central ECMO with PA venting was then performed. On day 13, central ECMO was converted to biventricular assist device with an oxygenator, which was removed on day 16. This case suggests that PA venting during ECMO support may be necessary in some cases of respiratory and circulatory failure with high pulmonary vascular resistance after near-drowning.

  8. Arsenic speciation in shrimp and mussel from the Mid-Atlantic hydrothermal vents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Quetel, C. R.; Munoz, R.

    1997-01-01

    Specimens of shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata) and mussel (Bathymodiolus puteoserpentis) were collected 3500 m below the ocean surface at the hydrothermal vents of the mid-Atlantic Ridge (TAG and Snake Pit sites, respectively). Arsenic, a potentially toxic element, is among the substances emitted...... by the hydrothermal vents. The hydrothermal vent shrimp, which are known to be a primary consumer of the primary producing chemolithoautotrophic bacteria, contained arsenic at 13 mu g g(-1) almost exclusively as arsenobetaine (AsB). Arsenic was present in the soft:issues of the mussel at 40 mu g g(-1) and the major...... of arsenic species found in the shrimp and mussel species in the deep-sea is similar to that found in their counterparts from the ocean surface. It is concluded that the autotrophic bacteria of the hydrothermal vent ecosystem and the symbiotic bacteria harboured in the mussel species are responsible...

  9. 76 FR 33179 - Petition Requesting Safeguards for Glass Fronts of Gas Vented Fireplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... 2058. Petitioner notes that the industry standard for gas vented fireplace heaters allows glass fronts... fireplace glass, the accessible location of the glass front, the attractiveness of fire to young children...

  10. Analysis of containment venting at the Peach Bottom atomic power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S.; Nelson, W.R.; Wright, R.E.; Leonard, M.T.; DiSalvo, R.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the extent to which containment venting would be effective in preventing or mitigating the consequences of severe accidents has been completed for the Peach Bottom Units 2 and 3 (BWR-4s with Mark I containments). The analysis indicates that the effectiveness of venting in preventing containment overpressurization highly depends on the sequence of the severe accident. Containment venting can be effective for several classes of sequences, including transients with failure of long-term decay heat removal and loss-of-coolant accidents with breaks inside the containment. However, based on draft procedures and equipment in place at the time of the evaluation, containment venting has limited potential for further reducing the risk associated with three severe accident sequences currently identified as important risk contributors at Peach Bottom. Means of improving the potential for risk reduction is identified, but their influence on risk is not analyzed. (orig./HP)

  11. Analysis of containment venting at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S.; Nelson, W.R.; Wright, R.E.; Leonard, M.T.; DiSalvo, R.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of the extent to which containment venting would be effective in preventing or mitigating the consequences of severe accidents has been completed for the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3 (BWR-4s with Mark I containments). The analysis indicates that the effectiveness of venting in preventing containment overpressurization highly depends on the sequence of the severe accident. Containment venting can be effective for several classes of sequences, including transients with failure of long-term decay heat removal and loss-of-coolant accidents with breaks inside the containment. However, based on draft procedures and equipment in place at the time of the evaluation, containment venting has limited potential for further reducing the risk associated with three severe accident sequences currently identified as important risk contributors at Peach Bottom. Means of improving the potential for risk reduction is identified, but their influence on risk is not analyzed

  12. Analysis of containment venting for the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Wright, R.E.; Jenkins, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of containment venting as a means of preventing or mitigating the consequences of severe accidents was evaluated for Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Units 2 and 3 (BWR-4s with Mark I containments). Results from this evaluation indicate that the effectiveness of venting in preventing containment failure is highly dependent on the severe accident sequence. Containment venting can be effective for several classes of sequences, including loss-of-coolant accidents with breaks in the containment and transients with a failure of containment heat removal. However, based on draft procedures and equipment in place at the time of the evaluation, containment venting has limited potential for further reducing the risk associated with several sequences currently identified as significant contributors to risk. Means of improving the potential for risk reduction were identified, but their influence on risk was not analyzed

  13. Closed-Loop, Non-Venting Thermal Control for Mars EVA Suits, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA seeks new thermal control technology for EVA suits on Mars. The system must be closed-loop and non-venting, have negligible impact on the Martian environment,...

  14. Reactor containment purge and vent valve performance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, J.A.; Steele, R.; Watkins, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Three nuclear-designed butterfly valves typical of those used in domestic nuclear power plant containment purge and vent applications were tested. For a comparison of responses, two eight-inch nominal pipe size valves with differing internal design were tested. For extrapolation insights, a 24-inch nominal pipe size valve was also tested. The valve experiments were performed with various piping configurations and valve disc orientations to the flow, to simulate various installation options in field application. As a standard for comparing the effects of the installation options, testing was also performed in a standard ANSI test section. Test cycles were performed at inlet pressures of 5 to 60 psig, while monitoring numerous test parameters, such as the valve disc position, valve shaft torque, mass flow rate, and the pressure and temperature at multiple locations throughout the test section. An experimental data base was developed to assist in the evaluation of the current analytical methods and to determine the influence of inlet pressure, inlet duct geometry, and valve orientation to the flow media on valve torque requirements, along with any resulting limitations to the extrapolation methods. 2 refs., 15 figs

  15. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for 238 PuO 2 fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors

  16. Microscopic bubble behaviour in suppression pool during wetwell venting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablackaite, G.; Nagasaka, H.; Kikura, H.

    2017-10-01

    During a severe accident PCV failure should be avoided and fission products inside PCV should be confined as much as possible. In order to minimize FPs release, Wetwell venting is conducted by releasing steam-non-condensable gas mixture carrying FPs from the Drywell to Suppression Pool. Steam is condensed by subcooled water in the pool, and most of FPs are retained into water. The removal of FP in the water pool is referred to as “Pool Scrubbing effect”. Hydrodynamic parameters of bubbles have impact on pool scrubbing effect. However, there is only few data available to evaluate quantitatively the bubble behaviour under depressurization and/or thermal stratification conditions. Series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the influence of temperature distribution, non-condensable gas content and pressure in the Wetwell on bubble behaviour. Bubbles were visualized using High Speed Camera and adopting shadowgraphy technique. Applying Particle Tracking Velocimetry, bubble velocity and size distribution were obtained from recorded images. Experimental results show that with increasing suppression pool temperature, bubbles reaching the pool surface decreased in size and traveling velocity became slower. In pressurized wetwell, bubble behaviour was similar to that in the heated up suppression pool case, although bubble parameters were similar to the low temperature case. Higher air content induced water surface movement and bubbles were smaller due to break up.

  17. Modelling of hydrogen deflagration in a vented vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.L.; Wong, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen Deflagration inside closed and vented 2.3 m diameter vessels were simulated by using the GOTHIC lumped-parameter computer code. Different cell arrangements were used in the modelling. Other parameters such as flame speed and hydrogen concentration were studied. It was found that the calculated peak pressures for cases using the experimental measured burn durations were close to the pressures measured from the experiments. When the default flame speed was used, higher peak pressure was predicted by GOTHIC. This could be explained by the the fact that the default flame speed used in the GOTHIC burn model was based on the results of a large scale test with moderate turbulence level. However, the overall results of the pressure transients were comparable with the experimental data. In addition, time and spatial convergencies of the model were also studied. The peak pressure estimated by modelling the sphere as five or more spherical cells was shown to converge to within +/- 3 percent. (author). 8 refs., 6 tabs., 9 figs

  18. Iodine removal in containment filtered venting system during nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, Subrata; Deo, Anuj Kumar; Nagrale, D.B.; Paul, U.K.; Prasad, M.; Gaikwad, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Post Fukushima nuclear accident, containment filtered venting system is being introduced in Indian nuclear power plant to strengthen the defense in depth safety barrier by depressurizing the containment building along with minimization of radioactivity release to environment during a severe accident. Radioactive iodine is one of the major contributors to radiation dose during early release phase of a severe accident. Physical and Chemical form of iodine and iodine bearing compounds includes particulates, elemental and organic. In the most efficient design of CFVS, wet scrubbing mechanism has been employed through use of venture scrubber. The Iodine removal process in wet scrubber involves two processes: chemical reaction in highly alkaline aqueous solution and impingement of particulates with water droplets produced in the venturi nozzle. In this paper, venturi has been modeled using the Calvert model. The variation of efficiency has been estimated for the different particle sizes. The impact of the shape parameter of log-normal distribution on the amount of scrubbed iodine has also been assessed. Release phase wise the scrubbed amount of iodine in the venturi based CFVS system has been estimated for a typical BWR. (author)

  19. Understanding the monotonous life of open vent mafic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Rodriguez, F.; Ruth, D. C. S.; Bornas, M.; Rivera, D. J. V. I.

    2016-12-01

    Mafic open vent volcanoes display prominent degassing plumes during quiescence but also erupt frequently, every few months or years. Their small and mildly explosive eruptions (volatile contents indicate that the magma reservoir system extends at least to 5 km depth. Mg/Fe pyroxene zoning and diffusion modeling suggests that mafic magma intrusion in a shallow, crystal-rich and more evolved reservoir has occurred repeatedly. The time scale for this process is the same for all 9 events, starting about 2 years prior and continuing up to eruption. We estimate the relative proportions of injecting to resident magma that vary from about 0.2 to 0.7, probably reflecting the local crystal-melt interaction during intrusion. The near constant magma composition is probably the result of buffering of new incoming magma by a crystal-rich upper reservoir, and erupted magmas are physical mixtures. However, we do not find evidence of large-scale crystal recycling from one eruption to another, implying the resetting of the system after each event. The recurrent eruptions and intrusions could be driven by the near continuous degassing of the volcano that induces a mass imbalance which leads to magma movement from depth to the shallow system [e.g., 1]. [1] Girona et al. (2016). Science Reports doi:10.1038/srep18212

  20. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulent) Thermodynamic Venting System Test Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low gravity space environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on excessive tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leakage. During low gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. The TVS consists of a recirculation pump, Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion valve, and a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger combined with a longitudinal spray bar. Using a small amount of liquid extracted by the pump and passing it though the J-T valve, then through the heat exchanger, the bulk liquid and ullage are cooled, resulting in lower tank pressure. A series of TVS tests were conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using liquid nitrogen as a liquid oxygen simulant. The tests were performed at fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25% with gaseous nitrogen and helium pressurants, and with a tank pressure control band of 7 kPa. A transient one-dimensional model of the TVS is used to analyze the data. The code is comprised of four models for the heat exchanger, the spray manifold and injector tubes, the recirculation pump, and the tank. The TVS model predicted ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature are compared with data. Details of predictions and comparisons with test data regarding pressure rise and collapse rates will be presented in the final paper.

  1. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E.

    1992-01-01

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for 238 PuO 2 fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors

  2. Unit vent airflow measurements using a tracer gas technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.G. [Union Electric Company, Fulton, MO (United States); Lagus, P.L. [Lagus Applied Technology, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Fleming, K.M. [NCS Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-08-01

    An alternative method for assessing flowrates that does not depend on point measurements of air flow velocity is the constant tracer injection technique. In this method one injects a tracer gas at a constant rate into a duct and measures the resulting concentration downstream of the injection point. A simple equation derived from the conservation of mass allows calculation of the flowrate at the point of injection. Flowrate data obtained using both a pitot tube and a flow measuring station were compared with tracer gas flowrate measurements in the unit vent duct at the Callaway Nuclear Station during late 1995 and early 1996. These data are presented and discussed with an eye toward obtaining precise flowrate data for release rate calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are also described. In those test situations for which many flowrate combinations are required, or in large area ducts, a tracer flowrate determination requires fewer man-hours than does a conventional traverse-based technique and does not require knowledge of the duct area. 6 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Validation testing of radioactive waste drum filter vents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, L.D. [Pall Corp., Port Washington, NY (United States); Rahimi, R.S. [Pall Corp., Cortland, NY (United States); Edling, D. [Edling & Associates, Inc., Russel Springs, KY (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The minimum requirements for Drum Filter Vents (DFVs) can be met by demonstrating conformance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Trupact II Safety Assessment Report (SAR), and conformance with U.S. Federal shipping regulations 49 CFR 178.350, DOT Spec 7A, for Type A packages. These together address a number of safety related performance parameters such as hydrogen diffusivity, flow related pressure drop, filtration efficiency and, separately, mechanical stability and the ability to prevent liquid water in-leakage. In order to make all metal DFV technology (including metallic filter medium) available to DOE sites, Pall launched a product development program to validate an all metal design to meet these requirements. Numerous problems experienced by DOE sites in the past came to light during this development program. They led us to explore enhancements to DFV design and performance testing addressing these difficulties and concerns. The result is a patented all metal DFV certified to all applicable regulatory requirements, which for the first time solves operational and health safety problems reported by DOE site personnel but not addressed by previous DFV`s. The new technology facilitates operations (such as manual, automated and semi-automated drum handling/redrumming), sampling, on-site storage, and shipping. At the same time, it upgrades filtration efficiency in configurations documented to maintain filter efficiency following mechanical stress. 2 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. DIII-D dust particulate characterization (June 1998 Vent)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmack, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Dust is a key component of fusion power device accident source term. Understanding the amount of dust expected in fusion power devices and its physical and chemical characteristics is needed to verify assumptions currently used in safety analyses. An important part of this safety research and development work is to characterize dust from existing experimental tokamaks. In this report, the authors present the collection, data analysis methods used, and the characterization of dust particulate collected from various locations inside the General Atomics DIII-D vacuum vessel following the June 1998 vent. The collected particulate was analyzed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Two methods were used to collect particulate with the goal of preserving the particle size distribution and physical characteristics of the particulate. Choice of collection technique is important because the sampling method used can bias the particle size distribution collected. Vacuum collection on substrates and adhesion removal with metallurgical replicating tape were chosen as non-intrusive sampling methods. Seventeen samples were collected including plasma facing surfaces in lower, upper, and horizontal locations, surfaces behind floor tiles, surfaces behind divert or tiles, and surfaces behind ceiling tiles. The results of the analysis are presented

  5. Analysis of sound absorption performance of an electroacoustic absorber using a vented enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngeun; Wang, Semyung; Hyun, Jaeyub; Oh, Seungjae; Goo, Seongyeol

    2018-03-01

    The sound absorption performance of an electroacoustic absorber (EA) is primarily influenced by the dynamic characteristics of the loudspeaker that acts as the actuator of the EA system. Therefore, the sound absorption performance of the EA is maximum at the resonance frequency of the loudspeaker and tends to degrade in the low-frequency and high-frequency bands based on this resonance frequency. In this study, to adjust the sound absorption performance of the EA system in the low-frequency band of approximately 20-80 Hz, an EA system using a vented enclosure that has previously been used to enhance the radiating sound pressure of a loudspeaker in the low-frequency band, is proposed. To verify the usefulness of the proposed system, two acoustic environments are considered. In the first acoustic environment, the vent of the vented enclosure is connected to an external sound field that is distinct from the sound field coupled to the EA. In this case, the acoustic effect of the vented enclosure on the performance of the EA is analyzed through an analytical approach using dynamic equations and an impedance-based equivalent circuit. Then, it is verified through numerical and experimental approaches. Next, in the second acoustic environment, the vent is connected to the same external sound field as the EA. In this case, the effect of the vented enclosure on the EA is investigated through an analytical approach and finally verified through a numerical approach. As a result, it is confirmed that the characteristics of the sound absorption performances of the proposed EA system using the vented enclosure in the two acoustic environments considered in this study are different from each other in the low-frequency band of approximately 20-80 Hz. Furthermore, several case studies on the change tendency of the performance of the EA using the vented enclosure according to the critical design factors or vent number for the vented enclosure are also investigated. In the future

  6. Geomicrobiology of sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake: Geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Inskeep

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA is a large high-altitude (2200 m, fresh-water lake, which straddles an extensive caldera and is the center of significant geothermal activity. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study was to evaluate the microbial populations inhabiting thermal vent communities in Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone Lake using 16S rRNA gene and random metagenome sequencing, and to determine how geochemical attributes of vent waters influence the distribution of specific microorganisms and their metabolic potential. Thermal vent waters and associated microbial biomass were sampled during two field seasons (2007 - 2008 using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV. Sublacustrine thermal vent waters (circa 50 - 90 oC contained elevated concentrations of numerous constituents associated with geothermal activity including dissolved hydrogen, sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide. Microorganisms associated with sulfur-rich filamentous ‘streamer’ communities of Inflated Plain and West Thumb (pH range 5 - 6 were dominated by bacteria from the Aquificales, but also contained thermophilic archaea from the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Novel groups of methanogens and members of the Korarchaeota were observed in vents from West Thumb and Elliot’s Crater (pH 5 - 6. Conversely, metagenome sequence from Mary Bay vent sediments did not yield large assemblies, and contained diverse thermophilic and nonthermophilic bacterial relatives. Analysis of functional genes associated with the major vent populations indicated a direct linkage to high concentrations of carbon dioxide, reduced sulfur (sulfide and/or elemental S, hydrogen and methane in the deep thermal ecosystems. Our observations show that sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake support novel thermophilic communities, which contain microorganisms with functional attributes not found to date in terrestrial geothermal systems of YNP.

  7. Genetic diversity of archaea in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    OpenAIRE

    Takai, K; Horikoshi, K

    1999-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis of naturally occurring archaeal communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments was carried out by PCR-mediated small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA) sequencing. As determined through partial sequencing of rDNA clones amplified with archaea-specific primers, the archaeal populations in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments showed a great genetic diversity, and most members of these populations appeared to be uncultivated and unidentified organisms. In the...

  8. The dry filter method for passive filtered venting of the containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freis, Daniel; Tietsch, Wolfgang; Obenland, Ralf; Kroes, Bert; Martinsteg, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Filtered Venting is a mitigative emergency measure to protect the containment from pressure failure in case of a severe accident. Filtered vent systems which are based on the Dry Filter Method (DFM) are proven technology, work completely passive, meet all functional requirements and show excellent performance with respect to filter efficiency. With such a system the release of radioactive fission products to the environment can be effectively minimized. Short and long term land contaminations can be avoided. (orig.)

  9. Influence of Hydrodynamics on the Larval Supply to Hydrothermal Vents on the East Pacific Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    the species inhabiting the vents are endenic, sessile , benthic invertebrates , so recovery from large disturbances occurs primarily through the...Dubilier, N. (2007). Species identifi- cation of marine invertebrate early stages by whole-larvae in situ hybridisation of 18S ribosomal RNA. Marine Ecology...31] Tyler, P. A. & Young, C. M. (1999). Reproduction and dispersal at vents and cold seeps. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the

  10. Technology Solutions Case Study: Design Guidance for Passive Vents in New Construction, Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-12

    In an effort to improve indoor air quality in high-performance, new construction, multifamily buildings, dedicated sources of outdoor air are being implemented. Passive vents are being selected by some design teams over other strategies because of their lower first costs and operating costs. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings constructed eight steps, which outline the design and commissioning required for these passive vents to perform as intended.

  11. An abyssal mobilome: Viruses, plasmids and vesicles from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    OpenAIRE

    Lossouarn, Julien; Dupont, Samuel; Gorlas, Aurore; Mercier, Coraline; Bienvenu, Nadege; Marguet, Evelyne; Forterre, Patrick; Geslin, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements (MGEs) such as viruses, plasmids, vesicles, gene transfer agents (GTAs), transposons and transpovirions, which collectively represent the mobilome, interact with cellular organisms from all three domains of life, including those thriving in the most extreme environments. While efforts have been made to better understand deep-sea vent microbial ecology, our knowledge of the mobilome associated with prokaryotes inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vents remains limited. Here...

  12. Management of turbidity current venting in reservoirs under different bed slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Sabine; De Cesare, Giovanni; Schleiss, Anton J

    2017-12-15

    The lifetime and efficiency of dams is endangered by the process of sedimentation. To ensure the sustainable use of reservoirs, many sediment management techniques exist, among which venting of turbidity currents. Nevertheless, a number of practical questions remain unanswered due to a lack of systematic investigations. The present research introduces venting and evaluates its performance using an experimental model. In the latter, turbidity currents travel on a smooth bed towards the dam and venting is applied through a rectangular bottom outlet. The combined effect of outflow discharge and bed slopes on the sediment release efficiency of venting is studied based on different criteria. Several outflow discharges are tested using three different bed slopes (i.e., 0%, 2.4% and 5.0%). Steeper slopes yield higher venting efficiency. Additionally, the optimal outflow discharge leading to the largest venting efficiency with the lowest water loss increases when moving from the horizontal bed to the inclined positions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydrogen venting characteristics of commercial carbon-composite filters and applications to TRU waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callis, E.L.; Marshall, R.S.; Cappis, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    The generation of hydrogen (by radiolysis) and of other potentially flammable gases in radioactive wastes which are in contact with hydrogenous materials is a source of concern, both from transportation and on-site storage considerations. Because very little experimental data on the generation and accumulation of hydrogen was available in actual waste materials, work was initiated to experimentally determine factors affecting the concentration of hydrogen in the waste containers, such as the hydrogen generation rate, (G-values) and the rate of loss of hydrogen through packaging and commercial filter-vents, including a new design suitable for plastic bags. This report deals only with the venting aspect of the problem. Hydrogen venting characteristics of two types of commercial carbon-composite filter-vents, and two types of PVC bag closures (heat-sealed and twist-and-tape) were measured. Techniques and equipment were developed to permit measurement of the hydrogen concentration in various layers of actual transuranic (TRU) waste packages, both with and without filter-vents. A test barrel was assembled containing known configuration and amounts of TRU wastes. Measurements of the hydrogen in the headspace verified a hydrogen release model developed by Benchmark Environmental Corporation. These data were used to calculate revised wattage Emits for TRU waste packages incorporating the new bag filter-vent

  14. Modeling of zero gravity venting: Studies of two-phase heat transfer under reduced gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merte, H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The objective is to predict the pressure response of a saturated liquid-vapor system when undergoing a venting or depressurization process in zero gravity at low vent rates. An experimental investigation of the venting of cylindrical containers partially filled with initially saturated liquids was previously conducted under zero-gravity conditions and compared with an analytical model which incorporated the effect of interfacial mass transfer on the ullage pressure response during venting. A new model is presented to improve the estimation of the interfacial mass transfer. Duhammel's superposition integral is incorporated to approximate the transient temperature response of the interface, treating the liquid as a semi-infinite solid with conduction heat transfer. Account is also taken of the condensation taking place within the bulk of a saturated vapor as isentropic expansion takes place. Computational results are presented for the venting of R-11 from a given vessel and initial state for five different venting rates over a period of three seconds, and compared to prior NASA experiments. An improvement in the prediction of the final pressure takes place, but is still considerably below the measurements.

  15. Community Structure Comparisons of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Mats Along the Mariana Arc and Back-arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, K. W.; Fullerton, H.; Moyer, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents along the Mariana Arc and back-arc represent a hotspot of microbial diversity that has not yet been fully recognized. The Mariana Arc and back-arc contain hydrothermal vents with varied vent effluent chemistry and temperature, which translates to diverse community composition. We have focused on iron-rich sites where the dominant primary producers are iron oxidizing bacteria. Because microbes from these environments have proven elusive in culturing efforts, we performed culture independent analysis among different microbial communities found at these hydrothermal vents. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Illumina sequencing of small subunit ribosomal gene amplicons were used to characterize community members and identify samples for shotgun metagenomics. Used in combination, these methods will better elucidate the composition and characteristics of the bacterial communities at these hydrothermal vent systems. The overarching goal of this study is to evaluate and compare taxonomic and metabolic diversity among different communities of microbial mats. We compared communities collected on a fine scale to analyze the bacterial community based on gross mat morphology, geography, and nearby vent effluent chemistry. Taxa richness and evenness are compared with rarefaction curves to visualize diversity. As well as providing a survey of diversity this study also presents a juxtaposition of three methods in which ribosomal small subunit diversity is compared with T-RFLP, next generation amplicon sequencing, and metagenomic shotgun sequencing.

  16. Containment venting as a mitigation technique for BWR MARK I plant ATWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Containment venting is studied as a mitigation strategy for preventing or delaying severe fuel damage following hypothetical BWR Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) accidents initiated by MSIV-closure, and compounded by failure of the Standby Liquid Control (SLC) system injection of sodium pentaborate solution and by the failure of manually initiated control rod insertion. The venting of primary containment after reaching 75 psia (0.52 MPa) is found to result in the release of the vented steam inside the reactor building, and to result in inadequate Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) for any system pumping from the pressure suppression pool. CONTAIN code calculations show that personnel access to large portions of the reactor building would be lost soon after the initiation of venting and that the temperatures reached would be likely to result in independent equipment failures. It is concluded that containment venting would be more likely to cause or to hasten the onset of severe fuel damage than to prevent or to delay it. Two alternative strategies that do not require containment venting, but that could delay or prevent severe fuel damage, are analyzed. BWR-LTAS code results are presented for a successful mitigation strategy in which the reactor vessel is depressurized, and for one in which the reactor vessel remains at pressure

  17. Experimental investigation on No-Vent Fill (NVF) process using liquid Nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Cheol; Seo, Man Su; Yoo, Dong Gyu; Jeong, Sang Kwon

    2014-01-01

    For a long-term space mission, filling process of cryogenic liquid propellant is operated on a space vehicle in space. A vent process during transfer and filling of cryogenic propellant is needed to maintain the fuel tank pressure at a safe level due to its volatile characteristic. It is possible that both liquid and vapor phases of the cryogenic propellant are released simultaneously to outer space when the vent process occurs under low gravity environment. As a result, the existing filling process with venting not only accompanies wasting liquid propellant, but also consumes extra fuel to compensate for the unexpected momentum originated from the vent process. No-Vent Fill (NVF) method, a filling procedure without a venting process of cryogenic liquid propellant, is an attractive technology to perform a long-term space mission. In this paper, the preliminary experimental results of the NVF process are described. The experimental set-up consists of a 9-liter cryogenic liquid receiver tank and a supply tank. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) is used to simulate the behavior of cryogenic propellant. The whole situation in the receiver tank during NVF is monitored. The major experimental parameter in the experiment is the mass flow rate of the liquid nitrogen. The experimental results demonstrate that as the mass flow rate is increased, NVF process is conducted successfully. The quality and the inlet temperature of the injected LN2 are affected by the mass flow rate. These parameters determine success of NVF.

  18. The discovery of new deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities in the southern ocean and implications for biogeography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D Rogers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the first discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift in 1977, numerous vent sites and endemic faunal assemblages have been found along mid-ocean ridges and back-arc basins at low to mid latitudes. These discoveries have suggested the existence of separate biogeographic provinces in the Atlantic and the North West Pacific, the existence of a province including the South West Pacific and Indian Ocean, and a separation of the North East Pacific, North East Pacific Rise, and South East Pacific Rise. The Southern Ocean is known to be a region of high deep-sea species diversity and centre of origin for the global deep-sea fauna. It has also been proposed as a gateway connecting hydrothermal vents in different oceans but is little explored because of extreme conditions. Since 2009 we have explored two segments of the East Scotia Ridge (ESR in the Southern Ocean using a remotely operated vehicle. In each segment we located deep-sea hydrothermal vents hosting high-temperature black smokers up to 382.8°C and diffuse venting. The chemosynthetic ecosystems hosted by these vents are dominated by a new yeti crab (Kiwa n. sp., stalked barnacles, limpets, peltospiroid gastropods, anemones, and a predatory sea star. Taxa abundant in vent ecosystems in other oceans, including polychaete worms (Siboglinidae, bathymodiolid mussels, and alvinocaridid shrimps, are absent from the ESR vents. These groups, except the Siboglinidae, possess planktotrophic larvae, rare in Antarctic marine invertebrates, suggesting that the environmental conditions of the Southern Ocean may act as a dispersal filter for vent taxa. Evidence from the distinctive fauna, the unique community structure, and multivariate analyses suggest that the Antarctic vent ecosystems represent a new vent biogeographic province. However, multivariate analyses of species present at the ESR and at other deep-sea hydrothermal vents globally indicate that vent biogeography is more

  19. First Survey For Submarine Hydrothermal Vents In NE Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConachy, T.; Binns, R.; Permana, H.

    2001-12-01

    The IASSHA-2001 cruise (Indonesia-Australia Survey for Submarine Hydrothermal Activity) was successfully conducted from June 1 to June 29 on board Baruna Jaya VIII. Preliminary results are reported of the first expedition to locate and study submarine hydrothermal activity in north east Sulawesi. Leg A focussed on Tomini Bay, a virtually unexplored Neogene sedimentary basin. Its objective was to test whether modern sediment-hosted hydrothermal activity occurred on the sea floor. The results of new bathymetric mapping, sediment coring and CTD/transmissometer hydrocasts negate the likely presence in central Tomini Bay of large-scale modern analogues of hydrothermal massive sulfide environments involving hydrothermal venting of basinal or magma-derived fluids into reduced sediments. It is possible that the "heat engine" required to drive circulation of basinal and hydrothermal fluids is today too weak. Surveys around Colo volcano indicate that it may be in its final stage of evolution. Leg B studied the arc and behind-arc sectors of the Sangihe volcanic island chain extending northwards from Quaternary volcanoes on the northeastern tip of Sulawesi's North Arm, near Manado. West of the main active chain and extending northwards from Manado there is a subparallel ridge surmounted by a number of high (>2000 m) seamounts of uncertain age. Fifteen relatively high-standing submarine edifices were crossed during this leg, of which nine were tested for hydrothermal activity by hydrocast and dredging. Eight sites were known from previous bathymetric surveys, and seven are new discoveries made by narrow-beam or multibeam echo sounding. Two submarine edifices at least 1000 m high were discovered in the strait immediately north of Awu volcano on Sangihe Island. One, with crest at 206 m, is surrounded by a circular platform 300m deep which we infer to be a foundered fringing reef to a formerly emergent island. The other, lacking such a platform, appears relatively young and may be

  20. Effects of venting on wind noise levels measured at the eardrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King

    2013-01-01

    Wind noise can be a nuisance to hearing aid users. With the advent of sophisticated feedback reduction algorithms, people with higher degrees of hearing loss are fit with larger vents than previously allowed, and more people with lesser degrees of hearing loss are fit with open hearing aids. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of venting on wind noise levels in the ear canal for hearing aids with omnidirectional and directional microphones. Two behind-the-ear hearing aids were programmed when they were worn on a Knowles Electronics Manikin for Acoustic Research. The hearing aid worn on the right ear was programmed to the omnidirectional microphone mode and the one on the left to the directional microphone mode. The hearing aids were adjusted to linear amplification with flat frequency response in an anechoic chamber. Gains below 10 dB were used to avoid output limiting of wind noise levels at low input levels. Wind noise samples were recorded at the eardrum location in a wind tunnel at wind velocities ranging from a gentle to a strong breeze. The hearing aids were coupled to #13 tubings (i.e., open vent), or conventional skeleton earmolds with no vent, pressure vents, or 3mm vents. Polar and spectral characteristics of wind noise were analyzed off-line using MatLab programs. Wind noise levels in the ear canals were mostly predicted by vent-induced frequency response changes in the conventional earmold conditions for both omnidirectional and directional hearing aids. The open vent condition, however, yielded the lowest levels, which could not be entirely predicted by the frequency response changes of the hearing aids. This indicated that a wind-related vent effect permitted an additional amount of sound reduction in the ear canal, which could not be explained by known vent effects. For the microphone location, form factor, and gain settings tested, open fit hearing aids yielded lower noise levels at the eardrum location than conventional behind

  1. Non-Venting Thermal and Humidity Control for EVA Suits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo; Bue, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Future EVA suits need processes and systems to control internal temperature and humidity without venting water to the environment. This paper describes an absorption-based cooling and dehumidification system as well as laboratory demonstrations of the key processes. There are two main components in the system: an evaporation cooling and dehumidification garment (ECDG) that removes both sensible heat and latent heat from the pressure garment, and an absorber radiator that absorbs moisture and rejects heat to space by thermal radiation. This paper discusses the overall design of both components, and presents recent data demonstrating their operation. We developed a design and fabrication approach to produce prototypical heat/water absorbing elements for the ECDG, and demonstrated by test that these elements could absorb heat and moisture at a high flux. Proof-of-concept tests showed that an ECDG prototype absorbs heat and moisture at a rate of 85 W/ft under conditions that simulate operation in an EVA suit. The heat absorption was primarily due to direct absorption of water vapor. It is possible to construct large, flexible, durable cooling patches that can be incorporated into a cooling garment with this system. The proof-of-concept test data was scaled to calculate area needed for full metabolic loads, thus showing that it is feasible to use this technology in an EVA suit. Full-scale, lightweight absorber/radiator modules have also been built and tested. They can reject heat at a flux of 33 W/ft while maintaining ECDG operation at conditions that will provide a cool and dry environment inside the EVA suit.

  2. Analysis of flame acceleration in open or vented obstructed pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, Vitaly; Sadek, Jad; Akkerman, V'yacheslav

    2017-01-01

    While flame propagation through obstacles is often associated with turbulence and/or shocks, Bychkov et al. [V. Bychkov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 164501 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.164501] have revealed a shockless, conceptually laminar mechanism of extremely fast flame acceleration in semiopen obstructed pipes (one end of a pipe is closed; a flame is ignited at the closed end and propagates towards the open one). The acceleration is devoted to a powerful jet flow produced by delayed combustion in the spaces between the obstacles, with turbulence playing only a supplementary role in this process. In the present work, this formulation is extended to pipes with both ends open in order to describe the recent experiments and modeling by Yanez et al. [J. Yanez et al., arXiv:1208.6453] as well as the simulations by Middha and Hansen [P. Middha and O. R. Hansen, Process Safety Prog. 27, 192 (2008) 10.1002/prs.10242]. It is demonstrated that flames accelerate strongly in open or vented obstructed pipes and the acceleration mechanism is similar to that in semiopen ones (shockless and laminar), although acceleration is weaker in open pipes. Starting with an inviscid approximation, we subsequently incorporate hydraulic resistance (viscous forces) into the analysis for the sake of comparing its role to that of a jet flow driving acceleration. It is shown that hydraulic resistance is actually not required to drive flame acceleration. In contrast, this is a supplementary effect, which moderates acceleration. On the other hand, viscous forces are nevertheless an important effect because they are responsible for the initial delay occurring before the flame acceleration onset, which is observed in the experiments and simulations. Accounting for this effect provides good agreement between the experiments, modeling, and the present theory.

  3. Evaluation of Passive Vents in New Construction Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Sean [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Berger, David [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Zuluaga, Marc [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Exhaust ventilation and corresponding outdoor air strategies are being implemented in high-performance new construction multifamily buildings to meet program or code requirements for improved indoor air quality, but a lack of clear design guidance is resulting in poor performance of these systems despite the best intentions of the programs or standards. CARB's 2014 'Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings' consistently demonstrated that commonly used outdoor air strategies are not performing as expected. Of the four strategies evaluated in 2014, the exhaust ventilation system that relied on outdoor air from a pressurized corridor was ruled out as a potential best practice due to its conflict with meeting requirements within most fire codes. Outdoor air that is ducted directly to the apartments was a strategy determined to have the highest likelihood of success, but with higher first costs and operating costs. Outdoor air through space conditioning systems was also determined to have good performance potential, with proper design and execution. The fourth strategy, passive systems, was identified as the least expensive option for providing outdoor air directly to apartments, with respect to both first costs and operating costs. However, little is known about how they actually perform in real-world conditions or how to implement them effectively. Based on the lack of data available on the performance of these low-cost systems and their frequent use in the high-performance building programs that require a provision for outdoor air, this research project sought to further evaluate the performance of passive vents.

  4. Investigations of a novel fauna from hydrothermal vents along the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, H.; Schander, C.; Halanych, K. M.; Levin, L. A.; Sweetman, A.; Tverberg, J.; Hoem, S.; Steen, I.; Thorseth, I. H.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Arctic deep ocean hosts a variety of habitats ranging from fairly uniform sedimentary abyssal plains to highly variable hard bottoms on mid ocean ridges, including biodiversity hotspots like seamounts and hydrothermal vents. Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are usually associated with a highly specialized fauna, and since their discovery in 1977 more than 400 species of animals have been described. This fauna includes various animal groups of which the most conspicuous and well known are annelids, mollusks and crustaceans. The newly discovered deep sea hydrothermal vents on the Mohns-Knipovich ridge north of Iceland harbour unique biodiversity. The Jan Mayen field consists of two main areas with high-temperature white smoker venting and wide areas with low-temperature seepage, located at 5-700 m, while the deeper Loki Castle vent field at 2400 m depth consists of a large area with high temperature black smokers surrounded by a sedimentary area with more diffuse low-temperature venting and barite chimneys. The Jan Mayen sites show low abundance of specialized hydrothermal vent fauna. Single groups have a few specialized representatives but groups otherwise common in hydrothermal vent areas are absent. Slightly more than 200 macrofaunal species have been identified from this vent area, comprising mainly an assortment of bathyal species known from the surrounding area. Analysis of stable isotope data also indicates that the majority of the species present are feeding on phytodetritus and/or phytoplankton. However, the deeper Loki Castle vent field contains a much more diverse vent endemic fauna with high abundances of specialized polychaetes, gastropods and amphipods. These specializations also include symbioses with a range of chemosynthetic microorganisms. Our data show that the fauna composition is a result of high degree of local specialization with some similarities to the fauna of cold seeps along the Norwegian margin and wood-falls in the abyssal Norwegian Sea

  5. Hydrothermal vent fields discovered in the southern Gulf of California clarify role of habitat in augmenting regional diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffredi, Shana K; Johnson, Shannon; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Caress, David; Clague, David; Escobar, Elva; Lundsten, Lonny; Paduan, Jennifer B; Rouse, Greg; Salcedo, Diana L; Soto, Luis A; Spelz-Madero, Ronald; Zierenberg, Robert; Vrijenhoek, Robert

    2017-07-26

    Hydrothermal vent communities are distributed along mid-ocean spreading ridges as isolated patches. While distance is a key factor influencing connectivity among sites, habitat characteristics are also critical. The Pescadero Basin (PB) and Alarcón Rise (AR) vent fields, recently discovered in the southern Gulf of California, are bounded by previously known vent localities (e.g. Guaymas Basin and 21° N East Pacific Rise); yet, the newly discovered vents differ markedly in substrata and vent fluid attributes. Out of 116 macrofaunal species observed or collected, only three species are shared among all four vent fields, while 73 occur at only one locality. Foundation species at basalt-hosted sulfide chimneys on the AR differ from the functional equivalents inhabiting sediment-hosted carbonate chimneys in the PB, only 75 km away. The dominant species of symbiont-hosting tubeworms and clams, and peripheral suspension-feeding taxa, differ between the sites. Notably, the PB vents host a limited and specialized fauna in which 17 of 26 species are unknown at other regional vents and many are new species. Rare sightings and captured larvae of the 'missing' species revealed that dispersal limitation is not responsible for differences in community composition at the neighbouring vent localities. Instead, larval recruitment-limiting habitat suitability probably favours species differentially. As scenarios develop to design conservation strategies around mining of seafloor sulfide deposits, these results illustrate that models encompassing habitat characteristics are needed to predict metacommunity structure. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. Variations in deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near the Azores plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbruyères, D.; Biscoito, M.; Caprais, J.-C.; Colaço, A.; Comtet, T.; Crassous, P.; Fouquet, Y.; Khripounoff, A.; Le Bris, N.; Olu, K.; Riso, R.; Sarradin, P.-M.; Segonzac, M.; Vangriesheim, A.

    2001-05-01

    Near the Azores Triple Junction as the Azores Plateau is approached, the ridge axis becomes shallower; its depth decreases from ca. 2400 m in the R AINBOW vent field (36°13'N) to ca. 850 m in the M ENEZ G WEN vent field (37°35'N). In this area, extensive mussel beds of the mytilid Bathymodiolus azoricus dominate the hydrothermal vent fauna, along with populations of three shrimps ( Rimicaris exoculata, Mirocaris fortunata and Chorocaris chacei). The main physical and chemical characteristics of the vent habitat were studied by discrete sampling, in situ analysis and sediment trap moorings. The vent fauna is distributed along a variable band where the vent fluids and seawater mix, with R. exoculata living in the most concentrated areas and Bathymodiolus azoricus in the most diluted zones. Various non-endemic species live at the border of the vent field. The variations observed in structure and composition of the communities along the depth gradient are most likely due to changes in vent fluid toxicity (metallic and sulphide content) and suspended mineral particles, which render the fluids harsher for species living there. The main faunal differences observed between L UCKY S TRIKE and M ENEZ G WEN hydrothermal fields are due to an impoverishment in the hydrothermal endemic species and to the penetration of bathyal species. The comparison of the three studied vent fields suggests the existence of a succession of several biogeographic islands rather than a single province.

  7. Direct torus venting analysis for Chinshan BWR-4 plant with MARK-I containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuann, Yng-Ruey, E-mail: ryyuann@iner.gov.tw

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Study the effectiveness of Direct Torus Venting System (DTVS) during extended SBO of 24 h for Chinshan MARK-I plant. • Containment response is analyzed by GOTHIC based on boundary conditions from RETRAN calculation. • Analyses are performed with and without DTVS, respectively. • Suppression pool is sub-divided and thermal stratification is observed. - Abstract: The Chinshan plant, owned by Taiwan Power Company, has twin units of BWR-4 reactor and MARK-I containment. Both units have been operating at rated core thermal power of 1840 MWt. The existing Direct Torus Venting System (DTVS) is the main system used for venting the containment during the extended station blackout event. The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of the DTVS venting on the response of the containment pressure and temperature. The reactor is depressurized by manually opening the safety relief valves (SRVs) during the SBO, which causes the mass and energy to be discharged into and heat up the suppression pool. The RETRAN model is used to calculate the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) response and generate the SRV blowdown conditions, including SRV pressure, enthalpy, and mass flow rate. These conditions are then used as the time-dependent boundary conditions for the GOTHIC code to calculate the containment pressure and temperature response. The DTVS model is established in the GOTHIC model based on the venting size, venting piping loss, venting initiation time, and venting source. The lumped volume model, 1-D coarse-mesh model, and 3-D coarse-mesh model are considered in the torus volume. The calculation is first done without DTVS venting to establish a reference basis. Then a case with DTVS available is performed. Comparison of the two cases shows that the existing DTVS design is effective in mitigating the severity of the containment pressure and temperature transients. The results also show that the 1-D coarse-mesh model may not be appropriate since a

  8. Modelling hydrothermal venting in volcanic sedimentary basins: Impact on hydrocarbon maturation and paleoclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel W.; Planke, Sverre; Millett, John

    2017-06-01

    Vent structures are intimately associated with sill intrusions in sedimentary basins globally and are thought to have been formed contemporaneously due to overpressure generated by gas generation during thermogenic breakdown of kerogen or boiling of water. Methane and other gases generated during this process may have driven catastrophic climate change in the geological past. In this study, we present a 2D FEM/FVM model that accounts for 'explosive' vent formation by fracturing of the host rock based on a case study in the Harstad Basin, offshore Norway. Overpressure generated by gas release during kerogen breakdown in the sill thermal aureole causes fracture formation. Fluid focusing and overpressure migration towards the sill tips results in vent formation after only few tens of years. The size of the vent depends on the region of overpressure accessed by the sill tip. Overpressure migration occurs in self-propagating waves before dissipating at the surface. The amount of methane generated in the system depends on TOC content and also on the type of kerogen present in the host rock. Generated methane moves with the fluids and vents at the surface through a single, large vent structure at the main sill tip matching first-order observations. Violent degassing takes place within the first couple of hundred years and occurs in bursts corresponding to the timing of overpressure waves. The amount of methane vented through a single vent is only a fraction (between 5 and 16%) of the methane generated at depth. Upscaling to the Vøring and Møre Basins, which are a part of the North Atlantic Igneous Province, and using realistic host rock carbon content and kerogen values results in a smaller amount of methane vented than previously estimated for the PETM. Our study, therefore, suggests that the negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) observed in the fossil record could not have been caused by intrusions within the Vøring and Møre Basins alone and that a contribution

  9. Subseafloor Microbial Life in Venting Fluids from the Mid Cayman Rise Hydrothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, J. A.; Reveillaud, J.; Reddington, E.; McDermott, J. M.; Sylva, S. P.; Breier, J. A.; German, C. R.; Seewald, J.

    2012-12-01

    In hard rock seafloor environments, fluids emanating from hydrothermal vents are one of the best windows into the subseafloor and its resident microbial community. The functional consequences of an extensive population of microbes living in the subseafloor remains unknown, as does our understanding of how these organisms interact with one another and influence the biogeochemistry of the oceans. Here we report the abundance, activity, and diversity of microbes in venting fluids collected from two newly discovered deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the ultra-slow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR). Fluids for geochemical and microbial analysis were collected from the Von Damm and Piccard vent fields, which are located within 20 km of one another, yet have extremely different thermal, geological, and depth regimes. Geochemical data indicates that both fields are highly enriched in volatiles, in particular hydrogen and methane, important energy sources for and by-products of microbial metabolism. At both sites, total microbial cell counts in the fluids ranged in concentration from 5 x 10 4 to 3 x 10 5 cells ml-1 , with background seawater concentrations of 1-2 x 10 4 cells ml-1 . In addition, distinct cell morphologies and clusters of cells not visible in background seawater were seen, including large filaments and mineral particles colonized by microbial cells. These results indicate local enrichments of microbial communities in the venting fluids, distinct from background populations, and are consistent with previous enumerations of microbial cells in venting fluids. Stable isotope tracing experiments were used to detect utilization of acetate, formate, and dissolve inorganic carbon and generation of methane at 70 °C under anaerobic conditions. At Von Damm, a putatively ultra-mafic hosted site located at ~2200 m with a maximum temperature of 226 °C, stable isotope tracing experiments indicate methanogenesis is occurring in most fluid samples. No activity was detected

  10. LH2 tank pressure control by thermodynamic vent system (TVS) at zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Huang, Y. H.; Chen, Z. C.; Wu, J. Y.; Li, P.; Sun, P. J.

    2017-02-01

    Thermodynamic vent system (TVS) is employed for pressure control of propellant tanks at zero gravity. An analytical lumped parameter model is developed to predict pressure variation in an 18.09 m3 liquid hydrogen tank equipped with TVS. Mathematical simulations are carried out assuming tank is filled up to 75% volume (liquid mass equals to 945 kg) and is subjected to heat flux of 0.76 W/m2. Tank pressure controls at 165.5-172.4, 165.5-179.3 and 165.5-182.2 kPa are compared with reference to number of vent cycles, vent duration per cycle and loss of hydrogen. Analysis results indicate that the number of vent cycles significantly decreases from 62 to 21 when tank pressure control increases from 6.9 to 20.4 kPa. Also, duration of vent cycle increases from 63 to 152 and cycle duration decreases from 3920 to 3200 s. Further, the analysis result suggests that LH2 evaporation loss per day decreases from 0.17 to 0.14%. Based on the results of analysis, TVS is found effective in controlling the propellant tank pressure in zero gravity.

  11. Bayesian optimization analysis of containment-venting operation in a boiling water reactor severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Xiaoyu; Ishikawa, Jun; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Maryyama, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Containment venting is one of several essential measures to protect the integrity of the final barrier of a nuclear reactor during severe accidents, by which the uncontrollable release of fission products can be avoided. The authors seek to develop an optimization approach to venting operations, from a simulation-based perspective, using an integrated severe accident code, THALES2/KICHE. The effectiveness of the containment-venting strategies needs to be verified via numerical simulations based on various settings of the venting conditions. The number of iterations, however, needs to be controlled to avoid cumbersome computational burden of integrated codes. Bayesian optimization is an efficient global optimization approach. By using a Gaussian process regression, a surrogate model of the “black-box” code is constructed. It can be updated simultaneously whenever new simulation results are acquired. With predictions via the surrogate model, upcoming locations of the most probable optimum can be revealed. The sampling procedure is adaptive. Compared with the case of pure random searches, the number of code queries is largely reduced for the optimum finding. One typical severe accident scenario of a boiling water reactor is chosen as an example. The research demonstrates the applicability of the Bayesian optimization approach to the design and establishment of containment-venting strategies during severe accidents

  12. Bayesian optimization analysis of containment-venting operation in a boiling water reactor severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xiaoyu; Ishikawa, Jun; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Maryyama, Yu [Nuclear Safety Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Containment venting is one of several essential measures to protect the integrity of the final barrier of a nuclear reactor during severe accidents, by which the uncontrollable release of fission products can be avoided. The authors seek to develop an optimization approach to venting operations, from a simulation-based perspective, using an integrated severe accident code, THALES2/KICHE. The effectiveness of the containment-venting strategies needs to be verified via numerical simulations based on various settings of the venting conditions. The number of iterations, however, needs to be controlled to avoid cumbersome computational burden of integrated codes. Bayesian optimization is an efficient global optimization approach. By using a Gaussian process regression, a surrogate model of the “black-box” code is constructed. It can be updated simultaneously whenever new simulation results are acquired. With predictions via the surrogate model, upcoming locations of the most probable optimum can be revealed. The sampling procedure is adaptive. Compared with the case of pure random searches, the number of code queries is largely reduced for the optimum finding. One typical severe accident scenario of a boiling water reactor is chosen as an example. The research demonstrates the applicability of the Bayesian optimization approach to the design and establishment of containment-venting strategies during severe accidents.

  13. Genetic diversity of archaea in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, K; Horikoshi, K

    1999-08-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis of naturally occurring archaeal communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments was carried out by PCR-mediated small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA) sequencing. As determined through partial sequencing of rDNA clones amplified with archaea-specific primers, the archaeal populations in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments showed a great genetic diversity, and most members of these populations appeared to be uncultivated and unidentified organisms. In the phylogenetic analysis, a number of rDNA sequences obtained from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were placed in deep lineages of the crenarchaeotic phylum prior to the divergence of cultivated thermophilic members of the crenarchaeota or between thermophilic members of the euryarchaeota and members of the methanogen-halophile clade. Whole cell in situ hybridization analysis suggested that some microorganisms of novel phylotypes predicted by molecular phylogenetic analysis were likely present in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments. These findings expand our view of the genetic diversity of archaea in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments and of the phylogenetic organization of archaea.

  14. Microbial Community Structure of Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vents on the Ultraslow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ding

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR is a typical oceanic ultraslow spreading ridge with intensive hydrothermal activities. The microbial communities in hydrothermal fields including primary producers to support the entire ecosystem by utilizing geochemical energy generated from rock-seawater interactions. Here we have examined the microbial community structures on four hydrothermal vents from SWIR, representing distinct characteristics in terms of temperature, pH and metal compositions, by using Illumina sequencing of the 16S small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes, to correlate bacterial and archaeal populations with the nature of the vents influenced by ultraslow spreading features. Epsilon-, Gamma-, Alpha-, and Deltaproteobacteria and members of the phylum Bacteroidetes and Planctomycetes, as well as Thaumarchaeota, Woesearchaeota, and Euryarchaeota were dominant in all the samples. Both bacterial and archaeal community structures showed distinguished patterns compared to those in the fast-spreading East Pacific Ridge or the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge as previously reported. Furthermore, within SWIR, the microbial communities are highly correlated with the local temperatures. For example, the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were dominant within bacteria from low-temperature vents, but were not represented as the dominating group recovered from high temperature (over 300°C venting chimneys in SWIR. Meanwhile, Thaumarchaeota, the ammonium oxidizing archaea, only showed high relative abundance of amplicons in the vents with high-temperature in SWIR. These findings provide insights on the microbial community in ultraslow spreading hydrothermal fields, and therefore assist us in the understanding of geochemical cycling therein.

  15. Severe accident consequence mitigation by filtered containment venting at Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebel, Luke S.; Morreale, Andrew C.; Korolevych, Volodymyr; Brown, Morgan J.; Gyepi-Garbrah, Sam

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Use of filtered containment venting during a severe accident assessed. • Severe accident simulations performed using MAAP-CANDU and ADDAM. • Flow capacity, initiation protocols, efficiency, mass and thermal loading evaluated. • Efficient, robust system drastically reduces accident consequences. - Abstract: Having the capability to use filtered containment venting during a severe nuclear accident can significantly reduce its overall consequences. This study employs the MAAP-CANDU severe accident analysis code and the ADDAM atmospheric dispersion code to study the progression of: an unmitigated station blackout accident at a generic pressurized heavy water reactor, the release of radioactive material into the environment, the subsequent dispersion of the fission products through the atmosphere and the subsequent consequences (evacuation radius). The goal is to evaluate the application of filtered venting as an accident mitigation technology. Several aspects of filtered containment venting system design, like flow capacity, initiation protocols, filter efficiency, mass loading, and thermal loading are considered. An efficient and robust filtered containment venting system can reduce the amount of radiological materials emitted during an accident by 25 times or more, and as a result considerably reduce the off-site consequences of an accident.

  16. Arsenic speciation in food chains from mid-Atlantic hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Vivien F.; Jackson, Brian P.; Siegfried, Matthew R.; Navratilova, Jana; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Kirshtein, Julie; Voytek, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic concentration and speciation were determined in benthic fauna collected from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents. The shrimp species, Rimicaris exoculata, the vent chimney-dwelling mussel, Bathymodiolus azoricus, Branchipolynoe seepensis, a commensal worm of B. azoricus and the gastropod Peltospira smaragdina showed variations in As concentration and in stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) signature between species, suggesting different sources of As uptake. Arsenic speciation showed arsenobetaine to be the dominant species in R. exoculata, whereas in B. azoricus and B. seepensis arsenosugars were most abundant, although arsenobetaine, dimethylarsinate and inorganic arsenic were also observed, along with several unidentified species. Scrape samples from outside the vent chimneys covered with microbial mat, which is a presumed food source for many vent organisms, contained high levels of total As, but organic species were not detectable. The formation of arsenosugars in pelagic environments is typically attributed to marine algae, and the pathway to arsenobetaine is still unknown. The occurrence of arsenosugars and arsenobetaine in these deep sea organisms, where primary production is chemolithoautotrophic and stable isotope analyses indicate food sources are of vent origin, suggests that organic arsenicals can occur in a foodweb without algae or other photosynthetic life.

  17. Arsenic speciation in food chains from mid-Atlantic hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Vivien F; Jackson, Brian P; Siegfried, Matthew; Navratilova, Jana; Francesconi, Kevin A; Kirshtein, Julie; Voytek, Mary

    2012-05-04

    Arsenic concentration and speciation were determined in benthic fauna collected from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents. The shrimp species, Rimicaris exoculata , the vent chimney-dwelling mussel, Bathymodiolus azoricus , Branchipolynoe seepensis , a commensal worm of B. azoricus , and the gastropod Peltospira smaragdina showed variations in As concentration and in stable isotope (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) signature between species, suggesting different sources of As uptake. Arsenic speciation showed arsenobetaine to be the dominant species in R. exoculata , whereas in B. azoricus and B. seepensis arsenosugars were most abundant, although arsenobetaine, dimethylarsinate, and inorganic arsenic were also observed, along with several unidentified species. Scrape samples from outside the vent chimneys, covered with microbial mat, which is a presumed food source for many vent organisms, contained high levels of total As, but organic species were not detectable. The formation of arsenosugars in pelagic environments is typically attributed to marine algae, and the pathway to arsenobetaine is still unknown. The occurrence of arsenosugars and arsenobetaine in these deep sea organisms, where primary production is chemolithoautotrophic and stable isotope analyses indicate food sources are of vent origin, suggests that organic arsenicals can occur in a food web without algae or other photosynthetic life.

  18. Program plan for the investigation of vent-filtered containment conceptual designs for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, A.S.

    1979-10-01

    The implementation of a containment venting and filtration capability has been suggested as a means for reducing the risk from fuel melt accidents in light water reactors. The risk reduction potential of such systems depends upon the dual function of venting containment to prevent overpressurization from the generation of steam and noncondensibles and filtering the effluent to limit the release of radioactive materials. This report addresses the major issues involved in such an accident mitigation system and discusses the engineering, technical, and economic questions that will have to be studied before judgments can be made regarding feasibility and effectiveness. A program plan is presented for research leading to the formulation of design requirements for vent-filter containment systems and to a comprehensive assessment of the values versus impacts of such systems

  19. Field Testing of an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation, Tiles, and Vapor Diffusion Venting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design.

  20. The invasive Red-vented bulbul (Pycnonotus cafer) outcompetes native birds in a tropical biodiversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Martin; Vidal, Eric; Potter, Murray Alan; Sanchez, Thierry; Brescia, Fabrice

    2018-01-01

    Invasive alien species are a major cause of biodiversity loss globally, but especially on islands where high species richness and levels of endemism accentuate their impacts. The Red vented bulbul (Pycnonotus cafer), a tropical passerine bird that has been introduced widely across locations of high conservation value, is considered an extreme pest. It is currently expanding its range in New Caledonia, one of the world's biodiversity hotspots. Decisive recommendations on management strategies are required urgently to inform local managers and policy makers, but they should be based on quantitative local evidence, not just on expert opinion. The Red-vented bulbul is widely blamed for its impacts on biodiversity, especially through competition. We used data from 2,472 point counts to explore the abundance relationships between the Red-vented bulbul and 14 other species of bird. Our results revealed a negative relationship between the occurrence of the bulbul and the mean abundance of nine species, all native (or endemic, n = 3) to the New Caledonia archipelago. In contrast, the abundance of other introduced species such as Acridotheres tristis (Common myna), Passer domesticus (House sparrow) and Spilopelia chinensis (Spotted dove) were not affected by the Red-vented bulbul. Moreover, temporal trends in the abundance of impacted species suggest that the Red-vented bulbul may cause niche contractions rather than mortality for native species in man-modified habitats. Monitoring and control of the Red-vented bulbul is recommended to prevent on-going impacts on native bird communities throughout New Caledonia, and its impact on native bird communities elsewhere should be quantified.

  1. Filtered atmospheric venting of LWR containments: the Swedish research programme and design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeslund, C.; Johansson, K.; Nilsson, L.; Tiren, I.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of filtered atmospheric venting of LWR containments has been recommended by a governmental reactor safety committee as a means of reducing the large releases of radioactivity which it is believed could arise as a result of accidents beyond the design bases (class 9) in nuclear power plants. The purpose of the project is to provide the technical basis for evaluating the feasibility, effectiveness and costs of some vent filter design concepts. The main design objective is substantially to reduce releases to the atmosphere of those radioactive substances which could cause long-lasting contamination of large land areas resulting from accidents beyond the design basis. The degree to which that objective can be reached by applying vent-filter functions becomes the main design evaluation criterion. The governing principle for the vent filter design is to utilize passive components and functions to the greatest possible extent. The design concept is to vent the stream and gases from the containment into an underground tunnel containing a large bed of gravel where the steam is condensed. Non-condensable gases are vented through a sand filter at the outlet of the tunnel via a stack to the atmosphere. The tunnel volume envisaged is of the order of 100,000m 3 , and the length about 1000m. A deep tunnel in rock can be made to withstand the pressures from the burning of hydrogen-air mixtures. As an alternative method the condensing and filtering functions can be achieved by utilizing water pools built sub-surface in concrete structures. Concrete structures can also be built to withstand hydrogen burning. (author)

  2. The invasive Red-vented bulbul (Pycnonotus cafer outcompetes native birds in a tropical biodiversity hotspot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Thibault

    Full Text Available Invasive alien species are a major cause of biodiversity loss globally, but especially on islands where high species richness and levels of endemism accentuate their impacts. The Red vented bulbul (Pycnonotus cafer, a tropical passerine bird that has been introduced widely across locations of high conservation value, is considered an extreme pest. It is currently expanding its range in New Caledonia, one of the world's biodiversity hotspots. Decisive recommendations on management strategies are required urgently to inform local managers and policy makers, but they should be based on quantitative local evidence, not just on expert opinion. The Red-vented bulbul is widely blamed for its impacts on biodiversity, especially through competition. We used data from 2,472 point counts to explore the abundance relationships between the Red-vented bulbul and 14 other species of bird. Our results revealed a negative relationship between the occurrence of the bulbul and the mean abundance of nine species, all native (or endemic, n = 3 to the New Caledonia archipelago. In contrast, the abundance of other introduced species such as Acridotheres tristis (Common myna, Passer domesticus (House sparrow and Spilopelia chinensis (Spotted dove were not affected by the Red-vented bulbul. Moreover, temporal trends in the abundance of impacted species suggest that the Red-vented bulbul may cause niche contractions rather than mortality for native species in man-modified habitats. Monitoring and control of the Red-vented bulbul is recommended to prevent on-going impacts on native bird communities throughout New Caledonia, and its impact on native bird communities elsewhere should be quantified.

  3. A model for the calculation of vent clearing transients in pressure suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosche, D.

    1975-01-01

    For the layout of a pressure suppression system of a light water cooled reactor (boiling water reactor) it is important to know the time dependent behavior of the vent clearing transient after a loss-of-coolant accident for two main reasons: time of the end of the vent clearing transient influences strongly the pressure and temperature maxima in the drywell and wetwell. Time-dependent behavior of the vent clearing transient influences pressure loads in the condensation pool of the wetwell and therefore pressure induced stresses to the structure. The time-dependent behavior of the water masses in the vent pipes and wetwell are described by the basic equations for a nonstationary incompressible friction flow: momentum equation, continuity equation and a correlation for the variation of the state of the gas volume in the wetwell above the water level. After many algebraic operations and integrations along the flow path, a single ordinary nonlinear differential equation for the variations of the water levels in the vent pipes and wetwell is obtained. Therefore the time-dependent velocities and accelerations of the water levels and the moment of the end clearing transient are known. The time-dependent pressure behavior in the drywell, geometrical conditions, initial submergence depth of the vent pipes and different friction and pressure loss factors are presented. The theoretical model has been tested at corresponding experiments performed at a full scale 1/48 segment of the Humboldt Bay pressure suppression containment in the USA and at the pressure suppression containment at the Marviken nuclear power station in Sweden. All these comparisons have shown good agreement between theory and experiment

  4. Examining Design Factors for Safe and Effective Hydrogen Vents for Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of a nuclear renaissance, and the possibility of large scale new build to meet both the concerns of the environmental lobby and the economic imperatives created by the political hostage taking of unreliable fossil fuel markets throughout the world, coupled with the need to resolve issues still outstanding from a previous generation of wastes create the need for a widely accepted understanding of the needs for venting waste packages which are being prepared for term storage. In the US the technologies to immobilising the legacy wastes are being developed, in the UK the NDA is gearing up to decommission a range of sites and throughout Europe facilities are being demolished and the wastes taken to term storage. In several cases, the waste containers require venting, both to allow the thermal relief of the container during climatic variation and to allow the venting of generated gases from radiolysis, decomposition and corrosion of the contents, including Hydrogen and Hydrocarbons. The paper will examine the disparate demands of the market place, and propose strategies to rationalise the specification of filter breathers so that both producers and users have a common framework from which to determine their individual venting needs. Examining the mutually exclusive demands of permeability (affecting both pressure differential and Hydrogen diffusion) and filtration efficiency, the paper will explore economic solutions in an attempt to provide a framework against which the large number of waste containers requiring venting in the future can have their vent filters designed to meet both the best possible combination of efficiency and permeability, as well as exploring the limits of knowledge of corrosion of the filter media and suggesting strategies to tackle the possibility of the filter media failing before the waste container, and the consequences of such an event. (authors)

  5. Detection of putatively thermophilic anaerobic methanotrophs in diffuse hydrothermal vent fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Alexander Y; Huber, Julie A; Chernyh, Nikolay A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Lebedinsky, Alexander V

    2013-02-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is carried out by a globally distributed group of uncultivated Euryarchaeota, the anaerobic methanotrophic arachaea (ANME). In this work, we used G+C analysis of 16S rRNA genes to identify a putatively thermophilic ANME group and applied newly designed primers to study its distribution in low-temperature diffuse vent fluids from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. We found that the G+C content of the 16S rRNA genes (P(GC)) is significantly higher in the ANME-1GBa group than in other ANME groups. Based on the positive correlation between the P(GC) and optimal growth temperatures (T(opt)) of archaea, we hypothesize that the ANME-1GBa group is adapted to thrive at high temperatures. We designed specific 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers for the ANME-1 cluster to detect all phylogenetic groups within this cluster, including the deeply branching ANME-1GBa group. The primers were successfully tested both in silico and in experiments with sediment samples where ANME-1 phylotypes had previously been detected. The primers were further used to screen for the ANME-1 microorganisms in diffuse vent fluid samples from deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Ocean, and sequences belonging to the ANME-1 cluster were detected in four individual vents. Phylotypes belonging to the ANME-1GBa group dominated in clone libraries from three of these vents. Our findings provide evidence of existence of a putatively extremely thermophilic group of methanotrophic archaea that occur in geographically and geologically distinct marine hydrothermal habitats.

  6. Potential Flammable Gas Explosion in the TRU Vent and Purge Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, A

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the analysis was to determine the failure of the Vent and Purge (V and P) Machine due to potential explosion in the Transuranic (TRU) drum during its venting and/or subsequent explosion in the V and P machine from the flammable gases (e.g., hydrogen and Volatile Organic Compounds [VOCs]) vented into the V and P machine from the TRU drum. The analysis considers: (a) increase in the pressure in the V and P cabinet from the original deflagration in the TRU drum including lid ejection, (b) pressure wave impact from TRU drum failure, and (c) secondary burns or deflagrations resulting from excess, unburned gases in the cabinet area. A variety of cases were considered that maximized the pressure produced in the V and P cabinet. Also, cases were analyzed that maximized the shock wave pressure in the cabinet from TRU drum failure. The calculations were performed for various initial drum pressures (e.g., 1.5 and 6 psig) for 55 gallon TRU drum. The calculated peak cabinet pressures ranged from 16 psig to 50 psig for various flammable gas compositions. The blast on top of cabinet and in outlet duct ranged from 50 psig to 63 psig and 12 psig to 16 psig, respectively, for various flammable gas compositions. The failure pressures of the cabinet and the ducts calculated by structural analysis were higher than the pressure calculated from potential flammable gas deflagrations, thus, assuring that V and P cabinet would not fail during this event. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 68 calculations showed that for a failure pressure of 20 psig, the available vent area in the V and P cabinet is 1.7 to 2.6 times the required vent area depending on whether hydrogen or VOCs burn in the V and P cabinet. This analysis methodology could be used to design the process equipment needed for venting TRU waste containers at other sites across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex

  7. Population subdivision of hydrothermal vent polychaete Alvinella pompejana across equatorial and Easter Microplate boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sook-Jin; Park, Eunji; Lee, Won-Kyung; Johnson, Shannon B; Vrijenhoek, Robert C; Won, Yong-Jin

    2016-10-28

    The Equator and Easter Microplate regions of the eastern Pacific Ocean exhibit geomorphological and hydrological features that create barriers to dispersal for a number of animals associated with deep-sea hydrothermal vent habitats. This study examined effects of these boundaries on geographical subdivision of the vent polychaete Alvinella pompejana. DNA sequences from one mitochondrial and eleven nuclear genes were examined in samples collected from ten vent localities that comprise the species' known range from 23°N latitude on the East Pacific Rise to 38°S latitude on the Pacific Antarctic Ridge. Multi-locus genotypes inferred from these sequences clustered the individual worms into three metapopulation segments - the northern East Pacific Rise (NEPR), southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR), and northeastern Pacific Antarctic Ridge (PAR) - separated by the Equator and Easter Microplate boundaries. Genetic diversity estimators were negatively correlated with tectonic spreading rates. Application of the isolation-with-migration (IMa2) model provided information about divergence times and demographic parameters. The PAR and NEPR metapopulation segments were estimated to have split roughly 4.20 million years ago (Mya) (2.42-33.42 Mya, 95 % highest posterior density, (HPD)), followed by splitting of the SEPR and NEPR segments about 0.79 Mya (0.07-6.67 Mya, 95 % HPD). Estimates of gene flow between the neighboring regions were mostly low (2 Nm  SEPR > PAR. Highly effective dispersal capabilities allow A. pompejana to overcome the temporal instability and intermittent distribution of active hydrothermal vents in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Consequently, the species exhibits very high levels of genetic diversity compared with many co-distributed vent annelids and mollusks. Nonetheless, its levels of genetic diversity in partially isolated populations are inversely correlated with tectonic spreading rates. As for many other vent taxa, this pioneering colonizer is

  8. Investigating pyroclast ejection dynamics using shock-tube experiments: temperature, grain size and vent geometry effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigala, V.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions eject large quantities of gas and particles into the atmosphere. The portion directly above the vent commonly shows characteristics of underexpanded jets. Understanding the factors that influence the initial pyroclast ejection dynamics is necessary in order to better assess the resulting near- and far-field hazards. Field observations are often insufficient for the characterization of volcanic explosions due to lack of safe access to such environments. Fortunately, their dynamics can be simulated in the laboratory where experiments are performed under controlled conditions. We ejected loose natural particles from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25˚ and 500˚C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), sample-to-vent distance and vent geometry. For each explosion we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle and the production of fines. Further, we varied the setup to allow for different sample-to-gas ratios and deployed four different vent geometries: 1) cylindrical, 2) funnel with a flaring of 30˚, 3) funnel with a flaring of 15˚ and 4) nozzle. The results showed maximum particle velocities up to 296 m/s, gas spreading angles varying from 21˚ to 37˚ and particle spreading angles from 3˚ to 40˚. Moreover we observed dynamically evolving ejection characteristics and variations in the production of fines during the course of individual experiments. Our experiments mechanistically mimic the process of pyroclast ejection. Thus the capability for constraining the effects of input parameters (fragmentation conditions) and conduit/vent geometry on ballistic pyroclastic plumes has been clearly established. These data obtained in the presence of well-documented conduit and vent conditions, should greatly enhance our ability to numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  9. Stratigraphic architecture of hydromagmatic volcanoes that have undergone vent migration: a review of Korean case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies show that the architecture of hydromagmatic volcanoes is far more complex than formerly expected. A number of external factors, such as paleohydrology and tectonics, in addition to magmatic processes are thought to play a role in controlling the overall characteristics and architecture of these volcanoes. One of the main consequences of these controls is the migration of the active vent during eruption. Case studies of hydromagmatic volcanoes in Korea show that those volcanoes that have undergone vent migration are characterized by superposition or juxtaposition of multiple rim deposits of partial tuff rings and/or tuff cones that have contrasting lithofacies characteristics, bed attitudes, and paleoflow directions. Various causes of vent migration are inferred from these volcanoes. Large-scale collapse of fragile substrate is interpreted to have caused vent migration in the Early Pleistocene volcanoes of Jeju Island, which were built upon still unconsolidated continental shelf sediments. Late Pleistocene to Holocene volcanoes, which were built upon a stack of rigid, shield-forming lava flows, lack features due to large-scale substrate collapse and have generally simple and circular morphologies either of a tuff ring or of a tuff cone. However, ~600 m shift of the eruptive center is inferred from one of these volcanoes (Ilchulbong tuff cone). The vent migration in this volcano is interpreted to have occurred because the eruption was sourced by multiple magma batches with significant eruptive pauses in between. The Yangpori diatreme in a Miocene terrestrial half-graben basin in SE Korea is interpreted to be a subsurface equivalent of a hydromagmatic volcano that has undergone vent migration. The vent migration here is inferred to have had both vertical and lateral components and have been caused by an abrupt tectonic activity near the basin margin. In all these cases, rimbeds or diatreme fills derived from different source vents are bounded by either

  10. 50 CFR 697.21 - Gear identification and marking, escape vent, maximum trap size, and ghost panel requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... vent, maximum trap size, and ghost panel requirements. 697.21 Section 697.21 Wildlife and Fisheries... identification and marking, escape vent, maximum trap size, and ghost panel requirements. (a) Gear identification... Administrator finds to be consistent with paragraph (c) of this section. (d) Ghost panel. (1) Lobster traps not...

  11. 40 CFR 63.7925 - What emissions limitations and work practice standards must I meet for closed vent systems and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... What emissions limitations and work practice standards must I meet for closed vent systems and control... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What emissions limitations and work practice standards must I meet for closed vent systems and control devices? 63.7925 Section 63.7925...

  12. Calculation and analysis of hydrogen volume concentrations in the vent pipe rigid proposed for NPP-L V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez T, A. M.; Xolocostli M, V.; Lopez M, R.; Filio L, C.; Royl, P.

    2014-10-01

    In 2012 was modeled of primary and secondary container of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) for the CFD Gas-Flow code. These models were used to calculate hydrogen volume concentrations run release the reactor building in case of a severe accident. The results showed that the venting would produce detonation conditions in the venting level (level 33) and flammability at ground level of reload. One of the solutions to avoid reaching critical concentrations (flammable or detonable) inside the reactor building and thus safeguard the contentions is to make a rigid venting. The rigid vent is a pipe connected to the primary container could go to the level 33 of the secondary container and style fireplace climb to the top of the reactor building. The analysis of hydrogen transport inside the vent pipe can be influenced by various environmental criteria and factors vent, so a logical consequence of the 2012 analysis is the analysis of the gases transport within said pipe to define vent ideal conditions. For these evaluations the vent pipe was modeled with a fine mesh of 32 radial interior nodes and a coarse mesh of 4 radial interior nodes. With three-dimensional models were realized calculations that allow observing the influence of heat transfer in the long term, i.e. a complete analysis of exhaust (approx. 700 seconds). However, the most interesting results focus on the first milliseconds, when the H 2 coming from the atmosphere of the primary container faces the air in the vent pipe. These first milliseconds besides allowing evaluating the detonation criteria in great detail in the different tubular sections similarly allow evaluating the pressure wave that occurs in the pipe and that at some point slows to the fluid on the last tubular section and could produce a detonation inside the pipe. Results are presented for venting fixed conditions, showing possible detonations into the pipe. (Author)

  13. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Brugger, Ronald P.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  14. Chemistry and Vent Pressure of Very High-Temperature Gases Emitted from Pele Volcano on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, M. Y.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Galileo data for magma temperature at Pele and HST chemical data (SO2, S2, and SO) for Pele plumes were used to evaluate vent pressure (10 -4 -2 bar), the oxidation state (2-3 log fO2 units below Ni-NiO), and chemistry of volcanic gases. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Electron microscopy study of microbial mat in the North Fiji basin hydrothermal vent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Kim, J. W.; Lee, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems consisting of hydrothermal vent, hydrothermal sediment and microbial mat are widely spread around the ocean, particularly spreading axis, continental margin and back-arc basin. Scientists have perceived that the hydrothermal systems, which reflect the primeval earth environment, are one of the best places to reveal the origin of life and extensive biogeochemical process of microbe-mineral interaction. In the present study multiline of analytical methods (X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)) were utilized to investigate the mineralogy/chemistry of microbe-mineral interaction in hydrothermal microbial mat. Microbial mat samples were recovered by Canadian scientific submersible ROPOS on South Pacific North Fiji basin KIOST hydrothermal vent expedition 1602. XRD analysis showed that red-colored microbial mat contains Fe-oxides and Fe-oxyhydroxides. Various morphologies of minerals in the red-colored microbial mat observed by SEM are mainly showed sheath shaped, resembled with Leptothrix microbial structure, stalks shaped, similar with Marioprofundus microbial structure and globule shaped microbial structures. They are also detected with DNA analysis. The cross sectional observation of microbial structures encrusted with Fe-oxide and Fe-oxyhydroxide at a nano scale by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technique was developed to verify the structural/biogeochemical properties in the microbe-mineral interaction. Systematic nano-scale measurements on the biomineralization in the microbial mat leads the understandings of biogeochemical environments around the hydrothermal vent.

  16. Passive soil venting at the Chemical Waste Landfill Site at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelan, J.M.; Reavis, B.; Cheng, W.C.

    1995-05-01

    Passive Soil Vapor Extraction was tested at the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) site at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNLIW). Data collected included ambient pressures, differential pressures between soil gas and ambient air, gas flow rates into and out of the soil and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vented soil gas. From the differential pressure and flow rate data, estimates of permeability were arrived at and compared with estimates from other studies. Flow, differential pressure, and ambient pressure data were collected for nearly 30 days. VOC data were collected for two six-hour periods during this time. Total VOC emissions were calculated and found to be under the limit set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Although a complete process evaluation is not possible with the data gathered, some of the necessary information for designing a passive venting process was determined and the important parameters for designing the process were indicated. More study is required to evaluate long-term VOC removal using passive venting and to establish total remediation costs when passive venting is used as a polishing process following active soil vapor extraction

  17. Simulating Electrochemistry of Hydrothermal Vents on Enceladus and Other Ocean Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, L. M.; Krause, F. C.; Jones, J. P.; Billings, K.; Sobron, P.

    2017-12-01

    Gradients generated in hydrothermal systems provide a significant source of free energy for chemosynthetic life, and may play a role in present-day habitability on ocean worlds such as Enceladus that are thought to host hydrothermal activity. Hydrothermal vents are similar in some ways to typical fuel cell devices: redox/pH gradients between seawater and hydrothermal fluid are analogous to the oxidant and fuel reservoirs; conductive natural mineral deposits are analogous to electrodes; and, in hydrothermal chimneys, the porous chimney wall can function as a separator or ion-exchange membrane. Electrochemistry, founded on quantitative study of redox and other chemical disequilibria as well as the chemistry of interfaces, is uniquely suited to studying these systems. We have performed electrochemical studies to better understand the catalytic potential of seafloor minerals and vent chimneys, using samples from a black smoker vent chimney as an initial demonstration. Fuel cell experiments with electrodes made from black smoker chimney material accurately simulated the redox reactions that occur in a geological setting with this particular catalyst. Similar methods with other geo-catalysts (natural or synthetic) could be utilized to test which redox reactions or metabolisms could be driven in other hydrothermal systems, including putative vent systems on other worlds.

  18. 40 CFR 60.482-10a - Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Performance for Equipment Leaks of VOC in the Synthetic Organic Chemicals Manufacturing Industry for Which... vent system is operated under a vacuum, it is exempt from the inspection requirements of paragraphs (f... as a consequence of complying with paragraphs (f)(1)(i) or (f)(2) of this section; and (2) The owner...

  19. 40 CFR 60.482-10 - Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Performance for Equipment Leaks of VOC in the Synthetic Organic Chemicals Manufacturing Industry for which... unit shutdown. (i) If a vapor collection system or closed vent system is operated under a vacuum, it is... would be exposed to an imminent or potential danger as a consequence of complying with paragraphs (f)(1...

  20. 40 CFR 63.107 - Identification of process vents subject to this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (b) Some, or all, of the gas stream originates as a continuous flow from an air oxidation reactor... process vents associated with an air oxidation reactor, distillation unit, or reactor that is in a source... specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section. (1) Is directly from an air oxidation reactor...

  1. Recovery process of wall condition in KSTAR vacuum vessel after temporal machine-vent for repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Pyo, E-mail: kpkim@nfri.er.ke; Hong, Suk-Ho; Lee, Hyunmyung; Song, Jae-in; Jung, Nam-Yong; Lee, Kunsu; Chu, Yong; Kim, Hakkun; Park, Kaprai; Oh, Yeong-Kook

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Efforts have been made to obtain vacuum condition that is essential for the plasma experiments. • For example, the vacuum vessel should be vented to repair in-vessel components such as diagnostic shutter, and PFC damaged by high energy plasma. • Here, we present the recovery process of wall condition in KSTAR after temporal machine-vent for repair. • It is found that an acceptable vacuum condition has been achieved only by plasma based wall conditioning techniques such as baking, GDC, and boronization. • This study was that the proper recovering method of the vacuum condition should be developed according to the severity of the accident. - Abstract: Efforts have been made to obtain vacuum condition that is essential for the plasma experiments. Under certain situations, for example, the vacuum vessel should be vented to repair in-vessel components such as diagnostic shutter, exchange of window for diagnostic equipment, and PFC damaged by high energy plasma. For the quick restart of the campaign, a recovery process was established to make the vacuum condition acceptable for the plasma experiment. In this paper, we present the recovery process of wall condition in KSTAR after temporal machine-vent for repair. It is found that an acceptable vacuum condition has been achieved only by plasma based wall conditioning techniques such as baking, GDC, and boronization. This study was that the proper recovering method of the vacuum condition should be developed according to the severity of the accident.

  2. Vitellibacter nionensis sp. nov., isolated from shallow water hydrothermal vent of Espalamaca, Azores.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajasabapathy, R.; Mohandass, C; Yoon, J; Dastager, S.G.; Liu, Q.; Khieu, T.-N.; Son, C; Li, W.-J; Colaco, A.

    A novel, Gram-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped yellow pigmented bacterium, designated VBW088T was isolated from shallow water hydrothermal vent of Espalamaca, Azores. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain VBW088...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1104 - Process vents from continuous unit operations: applicability assessment procedures and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Necessitating that the owner or operator make product in excess of demand. (e) TOC or Organic HAP concentration....306×10 −2 a Use according to procedures outlined in this section. MJ/scm = Mega Joules per standard cubic meter. scm/min = Standard cubic meters per minute. (2) Nonhalogenated process vents. The owner or...

  4. Mitigation options : flare and vent mitigation undercuts CCS in trimming CO{sub 2} emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2010-11-15

    This article reported on a study aimed at reducing flaring and venting associated with conventional heavy oil production. In particular, the study analyzed parameters such as the variability in flare volumes, flare gas composition and statistical distribution of volumes flared. The objective was to determine the most viable economic solution to reducing flare and vent volumes. In particular, the study focused on various scenarios to tie-in currently flared and vented solution gas. Solution gas volume variability was found to be wide ranging, with 90 percent of sites handling less than 32 percent of the volume and 10 percent of the sites handling more than two-thirds of the volume. Composition also varied, and was difficult to measure. One scenario assumed that wells were unconnected and had to be tied in with their own compressors and pipe, while another scenario considered the wells to be individual wells. A first comprehensive analysis of flare and vent mitigation opportunities in Alberta revealed that tying in solution gas at battery sites could create emissions reductions at much lower cost than the province's carbon capture and storage (CCS) plan. The study of mitigation options primarily targeted the conventional heavy oil belt of eastern Alberta near Lloydminster. The most optimistic scenario included a $15 per tonne carbon credit, that up to 55 megatonnes could be trimmed over 10 years at no cost to the industry.1 fig.

  5. Blast from pressurized carbon dioxide released into a vented atmospheric chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, P. M.; Gaathaug, A. V.; Bjerketvedt, D.; Vaagsaether, K.

    2018-03-01

    This study describes the blast from pressurized carbon dioxide (CO2) released from a high-pressure reservoir into an openly vented atmospheric chamber. Small-scale experiments with pure vapor and liquid/vapor mixtures were conducted and compared with simulations. A motivation was to investigate the effects of vent size and liquid content on the peak overpressure and impulse response in the atmospheric chamber. The comparison of vapor-phase CO2 test results with simulations showed good agreement. This numerical code described single-phase gas dynamics inside a closed chamber, but did not model any phase transitions. Hence, the simulations described a vapor-only test into an unvented chamber. Nevertheless, the simulations reproduced the incident shock wave, the shock reflections, and the jet release inside the atmospheric chamber. The rapid phase transition did not contribute to the initial shock strength in the current test geometry. The evaporation rate was too low to contribute to the measured peak overpressure that was in the range of 15-20 kPa. The simulation results produced a calculated peak overpressure of 12 kPa. The liquid tests showed a significantly higher impulse compared to tests with pure vapor. Reducing the vent opening from 0.1 to 0.01 m2 resulted in a slightly higher impulse calculated at 100 ms. The influence of the vent area on the calculated impulse was significant in the vapor-phase tests, but not so clear in the liquid/vapor mixture tests.

  6. CFD application on IRWST hydrodynamic analysis during the sparger air venting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. I.; Hwang, Y. D.; Kim, H. Y.; Bae, Y. Y.; Park, J. K.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical study was performed using preleased FLUENT V4.5 to investigate the applicability of the CFD model for IRWST hydrodynamic analysis during the sparger air venting. Transient calculations were performed with the compressible VOF model on the selected ABB-Atom Unit Cell Test data. This study was mainly focused on the simulation of the bubble formation process in the water pool and time varying pressure history during the air venting from the sparger. The simulated peak pressure was over-predicted in general, but the main frequency is in good agreement with the simulated data. It was shown that there was a strong dependence on the mass discharge rate of the air trapped in the vent line. The peak pressure acceptable for the conservative evaluation of the sparger performance was obtained by reducing the air discharge velocity. This indicates that the proper estimations of the air venting velocity consistent with the sparger design and operating conditions is essential for the application of FLUENT V4.5 to the sparger performance analysis of KNGR

  7. Human reliability analysis for venting a BWR Mark I during a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Blackman, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    A Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) was performed for the operator actions necessary to achieve containment venting for the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. This study was funded by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and performed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The goal of the analysis was to estimate Human Error Probabilities (HEPs) to determine the likelihood that operators would fail to complete the venting process. The analysis was performed for two generic accident sequences: anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) and station blackout. Two major methods were used to estimate the HEPs: Technique for Human Error rate Prediction (THERP) and Success Likelihood Index Methodology (SLIM). For the ATWS scenarios analyzed, the calculated HEPs ranged from 0.23 to 0.35, depending on the number of vent paths that are required to reduce the containment pressure. It should be noted that the confidence bounds around these HEPs are large, However, even when considering the large confidence range, the failure probabilities are larger than what is typical for normal operator actions. For station blackout, the HEP is 1.0, resulting from the dangerous environmental conditions that are present, assuming that plant management would not deliberately expose personnel to a potentially fatal environment. These results are based on the analysis of draft procedures for containment venting. It is probable that careful revision of the procedures could reduce the human error probabilities

  8. An Assessment for A Filtered Containment Venting Strategy Using Decision Tree Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hoyoung; Jae, Moosung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a probabilistic assessment of the severe accident management strategy through a filtered containment venting system was performed by using decision tree models. In Korea, the filtered containment venting system has been installed for the first time in Wolsong unit 1 as a part of Fukushima follow-up steps, and it is planned to be applied gradually for all the remaining reactors. Filtered containment venting system, one of severe accident countermeasures, prevents a gradual pressurization of the containment building exhausting noncondensable gas and vapor to the outside of the containment building. In this study, a probabilistic assessment of the filtered containment venting strategy, one of the severe accident management strategies, was performed by using decision tree models. Containment failure frequencies of each decision were evaluated by the developed decision tree model. The optimum accident management strategies were evaluated by comparing the results. Various strategies in severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) could be improved by utilizing the methodology in this study and the offsite risk analysis methodology

  9. An Assessment for A Filtered Containment Venting Strategy Using Decision Tree Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hoyoung; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, a probabilistic assessment of the severe accident management strategy through a filtered containment venting system was performed by using decision tree models. In Korea, the filtered containment venting system has been installed for the first time in Wolsong unit 1 as a part of Fukushima follow-up steps, and it is planned to be applied gradually for all the remaining reactors. Filtered containment venting system, one of severe accident countermeasures, prevents a gradual pressurization of the containment building exhausting noncondensable gas and vapor to the outside of the containment building. In this study, a probabilistic assessment of the filtered containment venting strategy, one of the severe accident management strategies, was performed by using decision tree models. Containment failure frequencies of each decision were evaluated by the developed decision tree model. The optimum accident management strategies were evaluated by comparing the results. Various strategies in severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) could be improved by utilizing the methodology in this study and the offsite risk analysis methodology.

  10. E-njoy the first CERN Global Network e-vent!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Empowered by the considerable interest it received after it was launched, the CERN Global Network takes off and organizes the first e-vent, which will be a special talk on science communication that will be held on 29 June at 4.30 p.m. in the Council Chamber. You can experience it live on the Global Network site and, if you are a Member, provide feedback. Stay linked!   On the CERN Global Network webpage, you will be able to choose the topic of the next e-vents. Seven weeks after its launch, about 600 people have already joined the CERN Global Network and six thematic groups have been created. The whole idea of joining the Network is to stay connected or reconnect with life at CERN where seminars, talks and discussions are undoubtedly a very important and much appreciated part of it. This is where the e-vents come into play. “The e-vents enable members of the Global Network to participate in selected events taking place at CERN, such as lectures or panel discussions. They will...

  11. PINEX-2: pinhole-TV imaging of fuel ejection from an internally vented capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzins, G.J.; Lumpkin, A.H.

    1979-01-01

    The LASL pinhole-intensified TV system was used at the TREAT reactor to image an internally vented, fuel-ejection capsule designed and built by HEDL. Several improvements in the imaging system over PINEX-1 were incorporated. A sequence of 16-ms TV frames shows axial expansion, expulsion of fuel from the pin, and retention of clad integrity during the time of coverage

  12. 40 CFR 63.693 - Standards: Closed-vent systems and control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... concentration level, design average temperature of the condenser exhaust vent stream, and the design average... requirements specified in paragraphs (d) through (h) of this section as applicable to the type and design of... paragraphs (d) through (h) of this section as applicable to the type and design of the control device...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1426 - Process vent requirements for determining organic HAP concentration, control efficiency, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., recovery or recapture device (except for condensers) performance may be determined by using the design... is introduced into the flame zone. (iii) For a condenser, in the design evaluation the owner or... vent stream, and the design average temperatures of the coolant fluid at the condenser inlet and outlet...

  14. Comparison of dehumidification and heat and vent drying of hem-fir softwood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackay, J F.G.; Nielson, R W

    1988-03-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the performance of dehumidifier kilns, compared to gas-fired, hot-air kilns in drying a commercial grade of softwood lumber. To accomplish this, drying tests were conducted with matched loads of lumber in a new test facility which was constructed to operate as a conventional heat and vent kiln or as a dehumidifier kiln. Comparisons were made of drying times, shrinkage and quality of dried product and total drying energy consumptions. Data from these tests were used in conjunction with capital, energy and other costs obtained from suppliers and operators of existing kilns to make economic comparisons between commercial-sized dehumidifier and heat and vent kilns. These comparisons were made on the basis of equivalent uniform annual costs. Dehumidification drying took about 20% longer and used about 50% of energy compared to heat and vent drying. Analysis of the test runs indicated that further improvements in the energy utilization efficiencies of dehumidifier kilns are feasible since one run indicated an energy consumption of only 36% of that in heat and vent drying. No differences in shrinkage or degrade were apparent. Economic comparisons for three sizes of kilns showed total drying costs by dehumidification to be less for a small-size kiln but more for medium- and large-size operations. Sensitivity analyses were performed to observe the effect of alternate energy prices, dehumidifier energy consumptions, dehumidifier drying times, building costs and degrade. 9 refs., 7 figs., 36 tabs.

  15. Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility: Initial hydrogen and nitrogen no-vent fill data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.; Papell, S. Stephen

    1990-01-01

    The Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility is a versatile testbed for ground-based cryogenic fluid storage, handling, and transfer experimentation. The test rig contains two well instrumented tanks, and a third interchangeable tank, designed to accommodate liquid nitrogen or liquid hydrogen testing. The internal tank volumes are approx. 18, 5, and 1.2 cu. ft. Tank pressures can be varied from 2 to 30 psia. Preliminary no vent fill tests with nitrogen and hydrogen were successfully completed with the test rig. Initial results indicate that no vent fills of nitrogen above 90 percent full are achievable using this test configuration, in a 1-g environment, and with inlet liquid temperatures as high as 143 R, and an average tank wall temperature of nearly 300 R. This inlet temperature corresponds to a saturation pressure of 19 psia for nitrogen. Hydrogen proved considerably more difficult to transfer between tanks without venting. The highest temperature conditions resulting in a fill level greater than 90 percent were with an inlet liquid temperature of 34 R, and an estimated tank wall temperature of slightly more than 100 R. Saturation pressure for hydrogen at this inlet temperature is 10 psia. All preliminary no vent fill tests were performed with a top mounted full cone nozzle for liquid injection. The nozzle produces a 120 degree conical droplet spray at a differential pressure of 10 psi. Pressure in the receiving tank was held to less than 30 psia for all tests.

  16. Food-web complexity across hydrothermal vents on the Azores triple junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portail, Marie; Brandily, Christophe; Cathalot, Cécile; Colaço, Ana; Gélinas, Yves; Husson, Bérengère; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Sarrazin, Jozée

    2018-01-01

    The assessment and comparison of food webs across various hydrothermal vent sites can enhance our understanding of ecological processes involved in the structure and function of biodiversity. The Menez Gwen, Lucky Strike and Rainbow vent fields are located on the Azores triple junction of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These fields have distinct depths (from 850 to 2320 m) and geological contexts (basaltic and ultramafic), but share similar faunal assemblages defined by the presence of foundation species that include Bathymodiolus azoricus, alvinocarid shrimp and gastropods. We compared the food webs of 13 faunal assemblages at these three sites using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses (SIA). Results showed that photosynthesis-derived organic matter is a negligible basal source for vent food webs, at all depths. The contribution of methanotrophy versus autotrophy based on Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) or reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycles varied between and within vent fields according to the concentrations of reduced compounds (e.g. CH4, H2S). Species that were common to vent fields showed high trophic flexibility, suggesting weak trophic links to the metabolism of chemosynthetic primary producers. At the community level, a comparison of SIA-derived metrics between mussel assemblages from two vent fields (Menez Gwen & Lucky Strike) showed that the functional structure of food webs was highly similar in terms of basal niche diversification, functional specialization and redundancy. Coupling SIA to functional trait approaches included more variability within the analyses, but the functional structures were still highly comparable. These results suggest that despite variable environmental conditions (physico-chemical factors and basal sources) and faunal community structure, functional complexity remained relatively constant among mussel assemblages. This functional similarity may be favoured by the propensity of species to adapt to fluid variations and

  17. Effect of steam condensation on pressure and temperature under hydrogen jet fire in a vented enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Mike; Xiao, Jianjun; Travis, Jack

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen release through leaks due to the LOCA and MCCI accidents and its immediate ignition leads to formation of hydrogen jet fire in a containment of reactor building. An experimental study of hydrogen jet fire in a chamber of 1x1x1 m 3 volume with different vent position, vent areas from 1 to 90 cm 2 and hydrogen mass flow rates from 0.027 to 1.087 g/s were performed in current work. Depending on hydrogen mass flow rate and vent area a well-ventilated or under-ventilated jet fire regime may occur. In the case of relatively small hydrogen release rate and large vent area, relatively stable jet fire behaviour for well-ventilated jet fire leading to over-pressure not more than 0.8 mbar was found. Three different scenarios of under-ventilated jet fire behaviour with self-extinction, re-ignition and external flame leading to relatively high overpressure of 10-100 mbar were found experimentally and numerically. Numerical simulations with GASFLOW-MPI code were performed with/without modelling heat conduction in solid walls, steam condensation, convective heat transfer and thermal radiation. With heat transfer modelling, both initial pressure peak and pressure decay were very well predicted compared to the experimental data. Numerical simulations were then compared with experimental Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS) images obtained to visualize the hydrogen combustion process. Self-extinction and re-ignition events were captured in the numerical simulation as well. An adiabatic case indicates that heat transfer and steam condensation must be included into the combustion model to accurately predict the physical phenomena of turbulent hydrogen jet flames in a vented enclosure. (author)

  18. Experimental investigation of passive thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Junhyuk; Yoo, Junghyun; Jin, Lingxue; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2018-01-01

    Thermodynamic vent system (TVS) is an attractive technology to maintain an allowable pressure level of a cryogenic propellant storage in a spacecraft under micro-gravity condition. There are two types of TVS; active or passive. In this paper, the passive TVS which does not utilize a cryogenic liquid circulation pump is experimentally investigated with liquid nitrogen and numerically analyzed by thermodynamic and heat transfer model. A cylindrical copper tank, which is 198 mm in inner diameter and 216 mm in height, is utilized to suppress a thermal-stratification effect of inside cryogenic fluid. A coil heat exchanger, which is 3 m in length and 6.35 mm in outer diameter, and a fixed size orifice of which diameter is 0.4 mm are fabricated to remove heat from the stored fluid to the vented flow. Each vent process is initiated at 140 kPa and ended at 120 kPa with liquid nitrogen fill levels which are 30%, 50% and 70%, respectively. In the numerical model, the fluid in the tank is assumed to be homogeneous saturated liquid-vapor. Mass and energy balance equations with heat transfer conditions suggested in this research are considered to calculate the transient pressure variation in the tank and the amount of heat transfer across the heat exchanger. We achieve the average heat rejection rate of more than 9 W by TVS and conclude that the passive TVS operates satisfactorily. In addition, the prediction model is verified by experimental results. Although the model has limitation in providing accurate results, it can surely predict the tendency of pressure and temperature changes in the tank. Furthermore, the model can suggest how we can improve the heat exchanger design to enhance an overall efficiency of passive TVS. Moreover, the performance of passive TVS is compared with other cryogenic vent systems (direct vent system and active TVS) by suggested performance indicator.

  19. Feasibility and Safety Assessment for Advanced Reactor Concepts Using Vented Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Andrew; Lenhof, Renae; Deason, Wesley; Harter, Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Recent interest in fast reactor technology has led to renewed analysis of past reactor concepts such as Gas Fast Reactors and Sodium Fast Reactors. In an effort to make these reactors more economic, the fuel is required to stay in the reactor for extended periods of time; the longer the fuel stays within the core, the more fertile material is converted into usable fissile material. However, as burnup of the fuel-rod increases, so does the internal pressure buildup due to gaseous fission products. In order to reach the 30 year lifetime requirements of some reactor designs, the fuel pins must have a vented-type design to allow the buildup of fission products to escape. The present work aims to progress the understanding of the feasibility and safety issues related to gas reactors that incorporate vented fuel. The work was separated into three different work-scopes: 1. Quantitatively determine fission gas release from uranium carbide in a representative helium cooled fast reactor; 2. Model the fission gas behavior, transport, and collection in a Fission Product Vent System; and, 3. Perform a safety analysis of the Fission Product Vent System. Each task relied on results from the previous task, culminating in a limited scope Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Fission Product Vent System. Within each task, many key parameters lack the fidelity needed for comprehensive or accurate analysis. In the process of completing each task, the data or methods that were lacking were identified and compiled in a Gap Analysis included at the end of the report.

  20. Comparative composition, diversity and trophic ecology of sediment macrofauna at vents, seeps and organic falls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo F Bernardino

    Full Text Available Sediments associated with hydrothermal venting, methane seepage and large organic falls such as whale, wood and plant detritus create deep-sea networks of soft-sediment habitats fueled, at least in part, by the oxidation of reduced chemicals. Biological studies at deep-sea vents, seeps and organic falls have looked at macrofaunal taxa, but there has yet to be a systematic comparison of the community-level attributes of sediment macrobenthos in various reducing ecosystems. Here we review key similarities and differences in the sediment-dwelling assemblages of each system with the goals of (1 generating a predictive framework for the exploration and study of newly identified reducing habitats, and (2 identifying taxa and communities that overlap across ecosystems. We show that deep-sea seep, vent and organic-fall sediments are highly heterogeneous. They sustain different geochemical and microbial processes that are reflected in a complex mosaic of habitats inhabited by a mixture of specialist (heterotrophic and symbiont-associated and background fauna. Community-level comparisons reveal that vent, seep and organic-fall macrofauna are very distinct in terms of composition at the family level, although they share many dominant taxa among these highly sulphidic habitats. Stress gradients are good predictors of macrofaunal diversity at some sites, but habitat heterogeneity and facilitation often modify community structure. The biogeochemical differences across ecosystems and within habitats result in wide differences in organic utilization (i.e., food sources and in the prevalence of chemosynthesis-derived nutrition. In the Pacific, vents, seeps and organic-falls exhibit distinct macrofaunal assemblages at broad-scales contributing to ß diversity. This has important implications for the conservation of reducing ecosystems, which face growing threats from human activities.

  1. Diversity and phylogenetic analyses of bacteria from a shallow-waterhydrothermal vent in Milos island (Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato eGiovannelli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of shallow-water hydrothermal vents have been lagging behind their deep-sea counterparts. Hence, the importance of these systems and their contribution to the local and regional diversity and biogeochemistry is unclear. This study analyzes the bacterial community along a transect at the shallow-water hydrothermal vent system of Milos island, Greece. The abundance and biomass of the prokaryotic community is comparable to areas not affected by hydrothermal activity and was, on average, 1.34×108 cells g-1. The abundance, biomass and diversity of the prokaryotic community increased with the distance from the center of the vent and appeared to be controlled by the temperature gradient rather than the trophic conditions. The retrieved 16S rRNA gene fragments matched sequences from a variety of geothermal environments, although the average similarity was low (94 %, revealing previously undiscovered taxa. Epsilonproteobacteria constituted the majority of the population along the transect, with an average contribution to the total diversity of 60%. The larger cluster of 16S rRNA gene sequences was related to chemolithoautotrophic Sulfurovum spp., an Epsilonproteobacterium so far detected only at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The presence of previously unknown lineages of Epsilonproteobacteria could be related to the abundance of organic matter in these systems, which may support alternative metabolic strategies to chemolithoautotrophy. The relative contribution of Gammaproteobacteria to the Milos microbial community increased along the transect as the distance from the center of the vent increased. Further attempts to isolate key species from these ecosystems will be critical to shed light on their evolution and ecology.

  2. Comparison of five methods for the estimation of methane production from vented in vitro systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Hess, P S; Eckard, R J; Jacobs, J L; Hannah, M C; Moate, P J

    2018-05-23

    There are several methods for estimating methane production (MP) from feedstuffs in vented in vitro systems. One method (A; "gold standard") measures methane proportions in the incubation bottle's head space (HS) and in the vented gas collected in gas bags. Four other methods (B, C, D and E) measure methane proportion in a single gas sample from HS. Method B assumes the same methane proportion in the vented gas as in HS, method C assumes constant methane to carbon dioxide ratio, method D has been developed based on empirical data and method E assumes constant individual venting volumes. This study aimed to compare the MP predictions from these methods to that of the gold standard method under different incubation scenarios, to validate these methods based on their concordance with a gold standard method. Methods C, D and E had greater concordance (0.85, 0.88 and 0.81), lower root mean square error (RMSE) (0.80, 0.72 and 0.85) and lower mean bias (0.20, 0.35, -0.35) with the gold standard than did method B (concordance 0.67, RMSE 1.49 and mean bias 1.26). Methods D and E were simpler to perform than method C and method D was slightly more accurate than method E. Based on precision, accuracy and simplicity of implementation, it is recommended that, when method A cannot be used, methods D and E are preferred to estimate MP from vented in vitro systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploring the Ecology of Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents in a Metacommunity Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren S. Mullineaux

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Species inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vents are strongly influenced by the geological setting, as it provides the chemical-rich fluids supporting the food web, creates the patchwork of seafloor habitat, and generates catastrophic disturbances that can eradicate entire communities. The patches of vent habitat host a network of communities (a metacommunity connected by dispersal of planktonic larvae. The dynamics of the metacommunity are influenced not only by birth rates, death rates and interactions of populations at the local site, but also by regional influences on dispersal from different sites. The connections to other communities provide a mechanism for dynamics at a local site to affect features of the regional biota. In this paper, we explore the challenges and potential benefits of applying metacommunity theory to vent communities, with a particular focus on effects of disturbance. We synthesize field observations to inform models and identify data gaps that need to be addressed to answer key questions including: (1 what is the influence of the magnitude and rate of disturbance on ecological attributes, such as time to extinction or resilience in a metacommunity; (2 what interactions between local and regional processes control species diversity, and (3 which communities are “hot spots” of key ecological significance. We conclude by assessing our ability to evaluate resilience of vent metacommunities to human disturbance (e.g., deep-sea mining. Although the resilience of a few highly disturbed vent systems in the eastern Pacific has been quantified, these values cannot be generalized to remote locales in the western Pacific or mid Atlantic where disturbance rates are different and information on local controls is missing.

  4. Feasibility and Safety Assessment for Advanced Reactor Concepts Using Vented Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Andrew [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics; Matthews, Topher [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Lenhof, Renae [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Deason, Wesley [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Harter, Jackson [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-01-16

    Recent interest in fast reactor technology has led to renewed analysis of past reactor concepts such as Gas Fast Reactors and Sodium Fast Reactors. In an effort to make these reactors more economic, the fuel is required to stay in the reactor for extended periods of time; the longer the fuel stays within the core, the more fertile material is converted into usable fissile material. However, as burnup of the fuel-rod increases, so does the internal pressure buildup due to gaseous fission products. In order to reach the 30 year lifetime requirements of some reactor designs, the fuel pins must have a vented-type design to allow the buildup of fission products to escape. The present work aims to progress the understanding of the feasibility and safety issues related to gas reactors that incorporate vented fuel. The work was separated into three different work-scopes: 1. Quantitatively determine fission gas release from uranium carbide in a representative helium cooled fast reactor; 2. Model the fission gas behavior, transport, and collection in a Fission Product Vent System; and, 3. Perform a safety analysis of the Fission Product Vent System. Each task relied on results from the previous task, culminating in a limited scope Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Fission Product Vent System. Within each task, many key parameters lack the fidelity needed for comprehensive or accurate analysis. In the process of completing each task, the data or methods that were lacking were identified and compiled in a Gap Analysis included at the end of the report.

  5. Seafloor geomorphic manifestations of gas venting and shallow subbottom gas hydrate occurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, C K; Caress, D W; Thomas, Hans; Lundsten, Eve M.; Anderson, Kayce; Gwiazda, Roberto; Riedel, M; McGann, Mary; Herguera, J C

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution multibeam bathymetry data collected with an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) complemented by compressed high-intensity radar pulse (Chirp) profiles and remotely operated vehicle (ROV) observations and sediment sampling reveal a distinctive rough topography associated with seafloor gas venting and/or near-subsurface gas hydrate accumulations. The surveys provide 1 m bathymetric grids of deep-water gas venting sites along the best-known gas venting areas along the Pacific margin of North America, which is an unprecedented level of resolution. Patches of conspicuously rough seafloor that are tens of meters to hundreds of meters across and occur on larger seafloor topographic highs characterize seepage areas. Some patches are composed of multiple depressions that range from 1 to 100 m in diameter and are commonly up to 10 m deeper than the adjacent seafloor. Elevated mounds with relief of >10 m and fractured surfaces suggest that seafloor expansion also occurs. Ground truth observations show that these areas contain broken pavements of methane-derived authigenic carbonates with intervening topographic lows. Patterns seen in Chirp profiles, ROV observations, and core data suggest that the rough topography is produced by a combination of diagenetic alteration, focused erosion, and inflation of the seafloor. This characteristic texture allows previously unknown gas venting areas to be identified within these surveys. A conceptual model for the evolution of these features suggests that these morphologies develop slowly over protracted periods of slow seepage and shows the impact of gas venting and gas hydrate development on the seafloor morphology.

  6. Toward an integrated genetic model for vent-distal SEDEX deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, D. F.

    2018-04-01

    Although genetic models have been proposed for vent-proximal SEDEX deposits, an equivalent model for vent-distal deposits has not yet appeared. In view of this, it is the object of this paper to present a preliminary integrated vent-distal genetic model through exploration of four major components: (i) nature of the ore-forming fluid, (ii) role of density of the unconsolidated host sediments, (iii) dynamics of sulfate reduction and (iv) depositional environment. Two sub-groups of SEDEX Pb-Zn deposits, vent-proximal and vent-distal, are widely recognized today. Of the two, the latter is by far the largest in terms of metal content with each of the 13 largest containing in excess of 7.5 M (Zn+Pb) metal. In contrast, only one vent-proximal deposit (Sullivan) falls within this size range. Vent-proximal deposits are characteristically underlain by local networks of sulfide-filled veins (commonly regarded as feeder veins) surrounded by a discordant complex of host rock alteration. These attributes are missing in vent-distal deposits, which has led to the widespread view that vent-distal ore-forming fluids have migrated unknown distances away from their vent sites. Because of the characteristic fine grain size of ore minerals, critical fluid inclusion data are lacking for vent-distal ore-stage sulfides. Consequently, hypothetical fluids such as those which formed MVT deposits (120 °C, 20% NaCl equiv.) are considered to represent vent-distal fluids as well. Such high-salinity fluids are capable of carrying significant concentrations of Pb and Zn as chloride complexes while the relatively low temperatures preclude high Cu contents. Densities of such metalliferous brines result in bottom-hugging fluids that collect in shallow saucer-shaped depressions (collector basins). Lateral metal zoning in several deposits reveals the direction from which the brines came. Relative densities of the ore-forming fluid and sediment determine whether the ore-forming fluid stabilizes on top

  7. An analysis of containment venting as a severe accident mitigation strategy for the BWR Mark II containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.L.; Galyean, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation of a BWR/4 reactor with a Mark-II containment has identified the effects of containment venting on core damage frequency and containment failure mode, and has performed a limited evaluation of the effects on the off-site consequences. The analysis was founded upon an existing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) with the addition of a proposed filtered containment venting system, based on the Swedish Filtra system installed at the Barseback nuclear power station in southern Sweden. Three different containment venting strategies were examined for their effects on plant risk. These are discussed

  8. 3D imaging of vents and sand injectites produced by Lower Cretaceous hydrothermal activity in the southern North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien

    Ma. Strong amplitude anomalies present within the salt are good indication of the presence of igneous intrusions. The vents are imaged as sub-transparent agglomeration of sub-vertical pipe structures emanating above the seismic amplitude anomalies. The vents were analyzed through distinct categories......: size, shape, upper part shape and source bed. Most of the vents originate from the Lower Germanic Triassic Group (Bundsandstein). They are conical in shape and have an eye-shaped upper dome. At the top, numerous domes have been eroded. A few domes have jacked up the overburden, sometimes including...

  9. Technical note: In vitro total gas and methane production measurements from closed or vented rumen batch culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani, M; Tagliapietra, F; Maccarana, L; Hansen, H H; Bailoni, L; Schiavon, S

    2014-03-01

    This study compared measured gas production (GP) and computed CH4 production values provided by closed or vented bottles connected to gas collection bags. Two forages and 3 concentrates were incubated. Two incubations were conducted, where the 5 feeds were tested in 3 replicates in closed or vented bottles, plus 4 blanks, for a total of 64 bottles. Half of the bottles were not vented, and the others were vented at a fixed pressure (6.8 kPa) and gas was collected into one gas collection bag connected to each bottle. Each bottle (317 mL) was filled with 0.4000 ± 0.0010 g of feed sample and 60 mL of buffered rumen fluid (headspace volume = 257 mL) and incubated at 39.0°C for 24 h. At 24 h, gas samples were collected from the headspace of closed bottles or from headspace and bags of vented bottles and analyzed for CH4 concentration. Volumes of GP at 24 h were corrected for the gas dissolved in the fermentation fluid, according to Henry's law of gas solubility. Methane concentration (mL/100mL of GP) was measured and CH4 production (mL/g of incubated DM) was computed using corrected or uncorrected GP values. Data were analyzed for the effect of venting technique (T), feed (F), interaction between venting technique and feed (T × F), and incubation run as a random factor. Closed bottles provided lower uncorrected GP (-18%) compared with vented bottles, especially for concentrates. Correction for dissolved gas reduced but did not remove differences between techniques, and closed bottles (+25 mL of gas/g of incubated DM) had a greater magnitude of variation than did vented bottles (+1 mL of gas/g of incubated DM). Feeds differed in uncorrected and corrected GP, but the ranking was the same for the 2 techniques. The T × F interaction influenced uncorrected GP values, but this effect disappeared after correction. Closed bottles provided uncorrected CH4 concentrations 23% greater than that of vented bottles. Correction reduced but did not remove this difference. Methane

  10. Lipid Biomarkers and Molecular Carbon Isotopes for Elucidating Carbon Cycling Pathways in Hydrothermal Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. L.; Dai, J.; Campbell, B.; Cary, C.; Sun, M.

    2003-12-01

    Increasing molecular evidence suggests that hydrothermal vents in mid-ocean ridges harbor large populations of free-living bacteria, particularly the epsilon Proteobacteria. However, pathways for carbon metabolism by these bacteria are poorly known. We are addressing this question by analyzing the lipid biomarkers and their isotope signatures in environments where the epsilon Proteobacteria are likely predominant. Solid materials were collected from hydrothermal vents in the East Pacific Rise and at the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California. Fatty acids extracted from these samples are dominated by 16:0 (27-41%), 18:0 (16-48%), 18:1 (11-42%), 16:1 (7-12%), and 14:0 (5-28%). In addition, 15:0 and anteiso-15:0 are significantly present (2-3%) in samples from the Guaymas Basin. The isotopic compositions of these fatty acids range from -15.0\\permil to -33.1\\permil with the most positive values occurring only in monounsaturated fatty acids (16:1 and 18:1). We are currently unable to assign these biomarkers to any of the epsilon Proteobacteria because biomarkers are poorly known for these organisms isolated from the vents. However, no polyunsaturated fatty acids were detected in these samples, which are consistent with the absence of vent animals at the sampling sites. Signature biomarkers of 20:1 and cy21:0, which are characteristic of the thermophilic chemolithoautotrophs such as Aquificales, are also absent in these samples. These results imply that the deeply branched Aquificales species do not constitute the major microbial community in these vent environments. The large range of molecular isotopic compositions suggests that these lipids are synthesized from various carbon sources with different isotopic compositions or through different biosynthetic pathways, or both. We are currently measuring the isotopic compositions of the total organic carbon in the bulk samples and will determine the fractionations between lipid biomarkers and the total organic carbon

  11. Analysis of Depressurization Performance in Containment of Wolsong NPP Unit 1 through Containment Filtered Venting System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sunghan; Kim, Jinhyuck; Suh, Nam Duk; Cho, Songwon

    2014-01-01

    Containment filtered venting system (CFVS) is designed to open and to close isolation valves passively by an operator. CFVS is operated when the containment pressure exceeds the design pressure (225 kPa(a)) and is closed when the containment pressure decreases below 151 kPa(a). The aim of this study is to analyze the depressurization performance of Wolsong unit 1 through CFVS during SBO. The thermal-hydraulic behavior in containment of Wolsong unit 1 was evaluated using the MELCOR 1.8.6 code developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In addition, in order to evaluate the effects of the CFVS according to the venting area, a sensitivity study depending on different venting area of the CFVS was conducted. Finally, an analysis of the effects of filtering and scrubbing of radioactive material for CFVS is important but not treated in this paper. The SBO accident is chosen to analyze the thermal-hydraulic behavior of Wolsong unit 1. During SBO, the analysis of CFVS affecting on the depressurization of the containment was conducted using MELCOR 1.8.6 code. Also, a sensitivity study was carried out to evaluate the depressurization performance according to the venting area of CFVS. The results show that the containment pressure is considerably decreased and the integrity of the containment could be maintained in case of CFVS operating. Therefore, CFVS has the capacity to keep the containment pressure below the design pressure during SBO. In addition, there are large differences in the containment pressure depending on venting area. We found that the decreasing rate of the pressure in the containment and water level in CFVS depends on the venting area. In the future, a proper requirement for CFVS sizing criteria according to accident scenarios such as LBLOCA, SBLOCA and SGTR, etc. should be evaluated in order to review the licensing for CFVS. Finally, analyses of aerosols, fission product, and radioactive material

  12. Food-Web Complexity in Guaymas Basin Hydrothermal Vents and Cold Seeps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Portail

    Full Text Available In the Guaymas Basin, the presence of cold seeps and hydrothermal vents in close proximity, similar sedimentary settings and comparable depths offers a unique opportunity to assess and compare the functioning of these deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems. The food webs of five seep and four vent assemblages were studied using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses. Although the two ecosystems shared similar potential basal sources, their food webs differed: seeps relied predominantly on methanotrophy and thiotrophy via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycle and vents on petroleum-derived organic matter and thiotrophy via the CBB and reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA cycles. In contrast to symbiotic species, the heterotrophic fauna exhibited high trophic flexibility among assemblages, suggesting weak trophic links to the metabolic diversity of chemosynthetic primary producers. At both ecosystems, food webs did not appear to be organised through predator-prey links but rather through weak trophic relationships among co-occurring species. Examples of trophic or spatial niche differentiation highlighted the importance of species-sorting processes within chemosynthetic ecosystems. Variability in food web structure, addressed through Bayesian metrics, revealed consistent trends across ecosystems. Food-web complexity significantly decreased with increasing methane concentrations, a common proxy for the intensity of seep and vent fluid fluxes. Although high fluid-fluxes have the potential to enhance primary productivity, they generate environmental constraints that may limit microbial diversity, colonisation of consumers and the structuring role of competitive interactions, leading to an overall reduction of food-web complexity and an increase in trophic redundancy. Heterogeneity provided by foundation species was identified as an additional structuring factor. According to their biological activities, foundation species may have the potential to

  13. Adherence evaluation of vented chest seals in a swine skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Françoise; Maudlin-Jeronimo, Eric; Higgins, Adam; Kheirabadi, Bijan; McCarron, Richard; Kennedy, Daniel; Housler, Greggory

    2016-10-01

    Perforation of the chest (open pneumothorax) with and without lung injury can cause air accumulation in the chest, positive intrapleural pressure and lead to tension pneumothorax if untreated. The performance of chest seals to prevent tension physiology depends partially on their ability to adhere to the skin and seal the chest wound. Novel non-occlusive vented chest seals were assessed for their adhesiveness on skin of live swine under normal and extreme environmental conditions to simulate austere battlefield conditions. Chest seals were applied on the back of the swine on skin that was soiled by various environmental contaminants to represent battlefield situations. A peeling (horizontal rim peeling) and detachment and breaching (vertical pulling) techniques were used to quantify the adhesive performance of vented chest seals. Among eight initially selected vented seals, five (Bolin, Russell, Fast breathe, Hyfin and SAM) were further down-selected based on their superior adherence scores at ambient temperatures. The adherence of these seals was then assessed after approximately 17h storage at extreme cold (-19.5°C) and hot (71.5°C) temperatures. Adherence scores for peeling (above 90%) and detachment scores (less than 25%) were comparable for four vented chest seals when tested at ambient temperature, except for the Bolin seal which had higher breaching. Under extreme storage temperatures, adherence peeling scores were comparable to those at ambient temperatures for four chest seals. Scores were significantly lower for the Bolin seal at extreme temperatures. This seal also had the highest detachment and breaching scores. In contrast, the Russell, Fast breathe, Hyfin and SAM seals showed similar ability to stay air tight without breaching after hot storage. No significant difference was found in skin adherence of the five vented chest seals at ambient temperature and the four seals (Russell, Fast breathe, Hyfin and SAM) maintained superior adherence even after

  14. Chemistry of a serpentinization-controlled hydrothermal system at the Lost City hydrothermal vent field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. A.; Kelley, D. S.; Butterfield, D. A.; Nelson, B. K.; Karson, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF), at 30° N near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, is an off-axis, low temperature, high-pH, ultramafic-hosted vent system. Within the field, carbonate chimneys tower up to 60 m above the seafloor, making them the tallest vent structures known. The chemistry of the vent structures and fluids at the LCHF is controlled by reactions between seawater and ultramafic rocks beneath the Atlantis massif. Mixing of warm alkaline vent fluids with seawater causes precipitation of calcium carbonate and growth of the edifaces, which range from tall, graceful pinnacles to fragile flanges and colloform deposits. Geochemical and petrological analyses of the carbonate rocks reveal distinct differences between the active and extinct structures. Actively venting chimneys and flanges are extremely porous, friable formations composed predominantly of aragonite and brucite. These structures provide important niches for well-developed microbial communities that thrive on and within the chimney walls. Some of the active chimneys may also contain the mineral ikaite, an unstable, hydrated form of calcium carbonate. TIMS and ICP-MS analyses of the carbonate chimneys show that the most active chimneys have low Sr isotope values and that they are low in trace metals (e.g., Mn, Ti, Pb). Active structures emit high-pH, low-Mg fluids at 40-90° C. The fluids also have low Sr values, indicating circulation of hydrothermal solutions through the serpentinite bedrock beneath the field. In contrast to the active structures, extinct chimneys are less porous, are well lithified, and they are composed predominantly of calcite that yields Sr isotopes near seawater values. Prolonged lower temperature seawater-hydrothermal fluid interaction within the chimneys results in the conversion of aragonite to calcite and in the enrichment of some trace metals (e.g., Mn, Ti, Co, Zn). It also promotes the incorporation of foraminifera within the outer, cemented walls of the carbonate

  15. European type NPP electric power and vent systems. For safety improvement and proposal of international center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Kenichiro

    2011-01-01

    For prevention of reactor accidents of nuclear power plants, multiplicity and redundancy of emergency power would be most important. At station blackout accident, European type manually operated vent operation could minimize release amount of radioactive materials and keep safety of neighboring residents. After Fukushima Daiichi accident, nuclear power plants could not restart operation even after completion of periodical inspection. This article introduced European type emergency power and vent systems in Swiss, Sweden and Germany with state of nuclear power phaseout for reference at considering to upgrade safety and accident mitigation measures for better understanding of the public. In addition, it would be important to recover trust of nuclear technology to continue to disseminate latest information on new knowledge of accident site and decontamination technologies to domestic and overseas people. As its implementation, establishment of Fukushima international center was proposed. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Vent-induced prosthetic leaflet thrombosis treated by open-heart valve-in-valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Christof; Pasic, Miralem; Buz, Semih; Hetzer, Roland

    2015-09-01

    A patient required emergency mitral valve replacement and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support for acute biventricular failure. The left ventricular (LV) vent inserted via the left upper pulmonary vein induced thrombotic immobilization of a prosthetic valve leaflet, with significant intra-prosthesis regurgitation after ECMO explantation. Therefore, the left atrium was opened on the beating heart during conventional extracorporeal circulation, all prosthesis leaflets were excised and a 29-mm expandable Edwards Sapien prosthesis was inserted within the scaffold of the original prosthesis under direct vision. This case illustrates the benefits and potential problems of LV venting on ECMO support, and a rapid and safe way of replacing the prosthesis leaflets in a critical situation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Liquid Methane Testing With a Large-Scale Spray Bar Thermodynamic Vent System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, L. J.; Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Hedayat, A.; Flachbart, R. H.; Sisco, J. D.; Schnell. A. R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center conducted liquid methane testing in November 2006 using the multipurpose hydrogen test bed outfitted with a spray bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS). The basic objective was to identify any unusual or unique thermodynamic characteristics associated with densified methane that should be considered in the design of space-based TVSs. Thirteen days of testing were performed with total tank heat loads ranging from 720 to 420 W at a fill level of approximately 90%. It was noted that as the fluid passed through the Joule-Thompson expansion, thermodynamic conditions consistent with the pervasive presence of metastability were indicated. This Technical Publication describes conditions that correspond with metastability and its detrimental effects on TVS performance. The observed conditions were primarily functions of methane densification and helium pressurization; therefore, assurance must be provided that metastable conditions have been circumvented in future applications of thermodynamic venting to in-space methane storage.

  18. Modelling Venting and Pressure Build-up in a 18650 LCO Cell during Thermal Runaway (ABSTRACT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coman, Paul Tiberiu; Veje, Christian; White, Ralph

    Li-ion batteries are a very popular type of electric storage devices that possess high energy density when compared to the other battery chemistries. Due to this property, when operating under abusive conditions such as high ambient temperature, the batteries can experience thermal runaway, which...... may lead to fires and explosions. To prevent this, it is therefore important to model thermal runaway considering different events such as venting and the pressure development inside the battery cell, which makes the main purpose of this paper. A model consisting of the different decomposition....... By fitting the activation energies, and measuring experimentally the mass of the ejecta during thermal runaway, the model is compared and validated against an extensive experiment performed by Golukbov et al. [1] during oven heating. When analysing the results, it is found that by including the venting...

  19. CO2 laser welding of galvanized steel sheets using vent holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weichiat; Ackerson, Paul; Molian, Pal

    2009-01-01

    Joining of galvanized steels is a challenging issue in the automotive industry because of the vaporization of zinc at 906 deg. C during fusion welding of steel (>1530 deg. C). In this work, hot-dip galvanized steel sheets of 0.68 mm thick (24-gage) were pre-drilled using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to form vent holes along the weld line and then seam welded in the lap-joint configuration using a continuous wave CO 2 laser. The welds were evaluated through optical and scanning electron microscopy and tensile/hardness tests. The vent holes allowed zinc vapors to escape through the weld zone without causing expulsion of molten metal, thereby eliminating the defects such as porosity, spatter, and loss of penetration. In addition, riveting of welds occurred so long as the weld width was greater than the hole diameter that in turn provided much higher strength over the traditional 'joint gap' method

  20. Application of response theory to steam venting during a loss of AC power transient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cady, K.B.; Miller, R.J.

    1987-05-01

    We have applied the theory of response to the loss of AC power transient for an LMFBR design to determine the ultimate loss of coolant inventory and the sensitivity of this figure with respect to the initial conditions and input parameters. Using a simple four region heat transfer model, the analysis shows that 3717 kg coolant are vented after feed water is lost and before venting stops. The sensitivity analysis reveals that this figure is strongly dependent on design parameters and system assumptions. The uncertainty in the lost inventory caused by the uncertainties and correlations in the input parameters and initial conditions is found to be 3464 kg. We thus report the result of the calculation as lost inventory (kg)=3717+-3464 and conclude that the available inventory of 8775 kg is sufficient to ensure an adequate heat sink.

  1. Development of evaluation method for hydraulic behavior in Venturi scrubber for filtered venting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Naoki; Nakao, Yasuhiro; Kaneko, Akiko; Abe, Yutaka; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Filtered venting systems have been installed to restart Nuclear Power Plants in Japan after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster. Venturi scrubber is main component of one of the systems. To evaluate decontamination performance of the Venturi scrubber for filtered venting, mechanistic evaluation method for hydrodynamic behavior is important. In this paper, our objective is to develop the method. As approaches, we conducted experimental observation under adiabatic (air-water) condition, developed a numerical simulation code with one-dimensional two-fluid model and made verification and validation by comparison between these results in terms of superficial gas, static pressure, superficial liquid velocity, droplet ratio and droplet diameter in Venturi scrubber. As results, we observed the hydrodynamic behavior, developed the code and confirmed that it has capability to evaluate the parameters with following accuracy, superficial gas velocity with +30%, static pressure in throat part with +-10%, superficial liquid velocity with +-80%, droplet diameter with +-30% and droplet ratio with -50%. (author)

  2. Effects of explosively venting aerosol-sized particles through earth-containment systems on the cloud-stabilization height

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyckes, G.W.

    1980-07-01

    A method of approximating the cloud stabilization height for aerosol-sized particles vented explosively through earth containment systems is presented. The calculated values for stabilization heights are in fair agreement with those obtained experimentally

  3. Imprint of past environmental regimes on structure and succession of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullineaux, Lauren S; Micheli, Fiorenza; Peterson, Charles H; Lenihan, Hunter S; Markus, Nilauro

    2009-08-01

    Dramatic perturbations of ecological communities through rapid shifts in environmental regime do not always result in complete mortality of residents. Instead, legacy individuals may remain and influence the succession and composition of subsequent communities. We used a reciprocal transplant experiment to investigate whether a legacy effect is detectable in communities experiencing an abrupt increase or decrease in hydrothermal fluid flux at deep-sea vents. Vent habitats are characterized by strong gradients in productivity and physico-chemical stressors, both of which tend to increase with increasing vent fluid flux. In our experiments, many species survived transplantation from cool (water temperatures theory developed in the rocky intertidal that predicts the predominance of physical control at the high-stress end of an environmental gradient. Prediction of successional transitions in vents and other habitats experiencing regime shifts in which remnant species may survive must take into account the possible influence of historical effects.

  4. Bacterial diversity and their adaptations in the shallow water hydrothermal vent at D. Joao de Castro Seamount (DJCS), Azores, Portugal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohandass, C.; Rajasabapathy, R.; Ravindran, C.; Colaco, A.; Santos, R.S.; Meena, R.M.

    Bacterial diversity investigations were made from the shallow vent of D joao de castro, Azores, Portugal and their adaptations to a nutrient rich environment was investigated from 2004 and 2005 cruise samples. Assesment of the qualitative...

  5. GASFLOW simulations for containment venting system of Emsland nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhanjie; Jordan, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    In a hypothetical core melt severe accident in nuclear power plants, a large amount of burnable gas, such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide, with certain amount of oxygen is released into the containment. In case of high containment pressure a filtered venting is designed as a mitigation measure. After aerosols and condensable portions of the gas mixture from the containment are purged, the remaining burnable gases flows into a chamber connected to horizontal venting pipes and further to a vertical stack, which is open to free atmosphere at the top. The main goal of the study is to investigate the chemical sensitivity of the burnable and potentially detonable gas mixture in the venting system by means of computational fluid dynamic computer simulations. Based on the calculations with different boundary conditions for different scenarios, it is concluded that the venting system has no risk of flame acceleration and detonation if the power supply of the ventilation fans can be maintained. In case of station blackout, the whole system has no risk of detonation if the scrubber - purging water pool - can get boiling in 10 minutes, owing to the heating effect resulted from the latent heat of the condensable gases into the water pool. It is because the injected steam from the boiling scrubber inerts the mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide plus oxygen, effectively and significantly. In this case, a gas mixture only in a very local region in the stack, as small as about 0.16 cubic meter, is in a risk of flame acceleration. It is in principle ignorable owing to the tiny volume and thus only a small amount of hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  6. 40 CFR 63.118 - Process vent provisions-periodic reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... device or other means to achieve and maintain a TRE index value greater than 1.0 but less than 4.0 as... subpart and who elects to demonstrate compliance with the TRE index value greater than 4.0 under § 63.113... § 63.115(e) of this subpart, is made that causes a Group 2 process vent with a TRE greater than 4.0 to...

  7. Pratiques de publicité au point de vente dans l'industrie du tabac ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Des études menées dans des pays comme le Canada démontrent que la publicité au point de vente exerce une influence importante sur les écoliers et peut les prédisposer à devenir fumeurs. De plus, les ... Articles de revue. Tobacco point-of-sale advertising in Guatemala city, Guatemala and Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  8. Assessment and control design for steam vent noise in an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Golmohammadi, Rostam; Nourollahi, Maryam; Momen Bellah Fard, Samaneh

    2011-06-13

    Noise is one of the most important harmful agents in work environment. Noise pollution in oil refinery industries is related to workers' health. This study aimed to determine the overall noise pollution of an oil refinery operation and its frequency analysis to determine the control plan for a vent noise in these industries. This experimental study performed in control unit of Tehran Oil Refinery in 2008. To determine the noise distributions, environmental noise measurements were carried out by lattice method according to basic information and technical process. The sound pressure level and frequency distribution was measured for each study sources subject separately was performed individually. According to the vent's specification, the measured steam noise characteristics reviewed and compared to the theoretical results of steam noise estimation. Eventually, a double expansion muffler was designed. Data analysis and graphical design were carried out using Excel software. The results of environmental noise measurements indicated that the level of sound pressure was above the national permitted level (85 dB (A)). The Mean level of sound pressure of the studied steam jet was 90.3 dB (L). The results of noise frequency analysis for the steam vents showed that the dominant frequency was 4000 Hz. To obtain 17 dB noise reductions, a double chamber aluminum muffler with 500 mm length and 200 mm diameter consisting pipe drilled was designed. The characteristics of steam vent noise were separated from other sources, a double expansion muffler was designed using a new method based on the level of steam noise, and principle sound frequency, a double expansion muffler was designed.

  9. Hydrodynamic calculation of a filter washing in liquids type used in containment venting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes G, A. A.; Sainz M, E.; Ortiz V, J.

    2015-09-01

    From the nuclear accident of Chernobyl, the European nuclear power plants have chosen to install filters on the venting pipes of the containment, whose function is to help to mitigate the consequences of a severe accident, by controlled depressurization of the containment passively through a filtered venting of the containment system. These systems are designed to relieve the internal pressure of the containment by means of the deliberate opening of pressure relief devices, either a valve or rupture disc during a severe accident and be channeled to the filter unit. In this paper the hydraulic response of a filter system of gases washing by liquid is evaluated, due to this information is necessary to estimate the effect that has the pressure increase of the contention on the discharge capacity of the venting pipes. By simulation of computational of fluid dynamics with the programs: CAELINUX-2014 and OpenFOAM, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the Multi Venturi System for gases washing from the containment, which could be included in the general model of the venting pipe, were obtained. Representative models of the Venturi tubes of each concentric area that forming the washing system were generated; and using parametric calculations the average mass flow rate established through each venturi, depending on its size and depth in which it is located inside the tank was estimated. Also, the pressure and mass flow rate required to activate each concentric area depending on the pressure and mass load from the containment were calculated, to estimate the maximum flow that is established through the filter. Finally, the velocity profiles and the characteristic pressure at which each area operates as well as the pressure drop of local and global discharge also were calculated. (Author)

  10. Heat Source for Active Venting at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. E.; Germanovich, L. N.; Lowell, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Located at the inside corner high of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), 30°N and the Atlantis Transform Fault (ATF), the Atlantis Massif has been uplifted over the past ~2 my. The Southern Ridge of this massif hosts the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF), an off-axis hydrothermal vent field with carbonate chimney ages surpassing 120,000 yrs. The fluids discharging at LCHF carry geochemical signals that show a direct interaction with serpentinites. However, mineralogical evidence suggests that peridotite hydration began early in the formation of oceanic core complexes and previous modeling results indicate that serpentinization is unlikely to generate the heat necessary to maintain current levels of discharge at LCHF. This work develops a model for the LCHF venting based on the evidence of tectonic strain, detachment faulting, serpentinization, and convective fluid flow. We constrain fluid flow at the LCHF by vent geochemistry, vent temperature, seismically inferred faulting, and expected geothermal gradient ≈100°C/km. Present understanding of tectonic processes at the intersection of MAR and ATF suggests that unroofing of the footwall and crustal flexing of the massif induced normal faults, which run parallel to the MAR, throughout the Southern Ridge. In the absence of the evidence of magmatism, we test the feasibility of the geothermal gradient to cause fluid circulation in the high-permeability, sub-vertical fault zone. Fluid circulation in the fault zone is complemented by the bulk porous flow driven through the Southern Ridge by the lateral temperature gradient between the cold water on the steep face along the ATF side and the hot interior of the massif. In this scenario, the high pH hydrothermal fluids pass through the serpentinized zone before discharging as both high-temperature focused flow (40°-91°C) and low-temperature (≈15°C) diffuse flow at the LCHF.

  11. Modeling Lithium Ion Battery Safety: Venting of Pouch Cells; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram.; Yang, Chuanbo.; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2013-07-01

    This report documents the successful completion of the NREL July milestone entitled “Modeling Lithium-Ion Battery Safety - Complete Case-Studies on Pouch Cell Venting,” as part of the 2013 Vehicle Technologies Annual Operating Plan with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This work aims to bridge the gap between materials modeling, usually carried out at the sub-continuum scale, and the

  12. LES of explosions in venting chamber: A test case for premixed turbulent combustion models

    OpenAIRE

    Vermorel , Olivier; Quillatre , Pierre; Poinsot , Thierry

    2017-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a new experimental and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) database to study upscaling effects in vented gas explosions. The propagation of premixed flames in three setups of increasing size is investigated experimentally and numerically. The baseline model is the well-known laboratory-scale combustion chamber from Sydney (Kent et al., 2005; Masri et al., 2012); two exact replicas at scales 6 and 24.4 were set up by GexCon (Bergen, Norway). The volume ratio...

  13. Clearing the air: Alberta a model of success in decreasing venting, flaring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.

    2004-01-01

    An historical review of flaring and venting in the Alberta oilfields is presented. The story begins with gas production in the Turner Valley, Alberta in 1931, Western Canada's first, largest and most productive source of oil and naphtha until the discovery of Leduc in 1947. Gas production at Turner Valley reached 500 mmcf per day, of which about 486 mmcf was flared. Through the efforts of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) and its predecessors venting and flaring was drastically cut, to the point where in 2003 the World Bank Group, an agency of the United Nations, approached the EUB to present the Alberta flaring and venting reduction model to developing countries. Accordingly, a Flaring Workshop was held at Calgary in October 2003, attended by delegates from Algeria, Angola, Cameroon, Indonesia and Nigeria. The article also details the EUB's requirements for upstream flaring in Alberta, as laid down in 'Guide 60'. The draft Guide was released in January 2003, the final draft is targeted for February 2004. In brief, the Guide requires operators, by means of a 'decision tree analysis' method which is described in the Guide, to evaluate whether it is possible to reduce or eliminate flaring and venting; it also requires operators to evaluate economic feasibility, and to determine the feasibility of conserving as much gas as possible. New developments in the field of sensors, controls and optical flow meters are also reviewed. An appended statistical summary of gas flaring trends in selected countries, compiled by the World Bank in 2000 shows Nigeria, Iran, Russia, Algeria and Mexico as the countries with the highest volumes of flaring. To give an indication of the volume of gas wasted through flaring, it is reliably estimated that the amount of gas flared in 2000 by African countries alone, could have fuelled power plants to generate sufficient electric power to meet fully half of the continent's needs for electric power. 1 tab., 2 figs

  14. Empirical Profiling of Cold Hydrogen Plumes Formed from Venting Of LH2 Storage Vessels: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rivkin, Carl H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schmidt, Kara [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hartmann, Kevin S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wright, Hannah [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Weidner, Eveline [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Ciotti, Michael [H2 Fueling and CIP Markets Engineering

    2017-11-16

    Liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage is a viable approach to assuring sufficient hydrogen capacity at commercial fuelling stations. Presently, LH2 is produced at remote facilities and then transported to the end-use site by road vehicles (i.e., LH2 tanker trucks). Venting of hydrogen to depressurize the transport storage tank is a routine part of the LH2 delivery process. The behaviour of cold hydrogen plumes has not been well-characterized because empirical field data is essentially non-existent. The NFPA 2 Hydrogen Storage Safety Task Group, which consists of hydrogen producers, safety experts, and CFD modellers, has identified the lack of understanding of hydrogen dispersion during LH2 venting of storage vessel as a critical gap for establishing safety distances at LH2 facilities, especially commercial hydrogen fuelling stations. To address this need, the NREL sensor laboratory, in collaboration with the NFPA 2 Safety Task Group developed the Cold Hydrogen Plume Analyzer to empirically characterize the hydrogen plume formed during LH2 storage tank venting. A prototype Analyzer was developed and field-deployed at an actual LH2 venting operation with critical findings that included: - H2 being detected as much as 2 m lower than the release point, which is not predicted by existing models - A small and inconsistent correlation between oxygen depletion and the hydrogen concentration - A negligible to non-existent correlation between in-situ temperature and the hydrogen concentration The Analyzer is currently being upgraded for enhanced metrological capabilities including improved real-time spatial and temporal profiling of the plume and tracking of prevailing weather conditions. Additional deployments are planned to monitor plume behaviour under different wind, humidity, and temperatures. This data will be shared with the NFPA 2 Safety Task Group and ultimately will be used support theoretical models and code requirements prescribed in NFPA 2.

  15. Left Atrial Decompression by Percutaneous Left Atrial Venting Cannula Insertion during Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Eun Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO frequently suffer from pulmonary edema due to left ventricular dysfunction that accompanies left heart dilatation, which is caused by left atrial hypertension. The problem can be resolved by left atrium (LA decompression. We performed a successful percutaneous LA decompression with an atrial septostomy and placement of an LA venting cannula in a 38-month-old child treated with venoarterial ECMO for acute myocarditis.

  16. Characterization of voic volume VOC concentration in vented TRU waste drums. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.J.

    1994-12-01

    A test program has been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to demonstrate that the concentration of volatile organic compounds within the innermost layer of confinement in a vented waste drum can be estimated using a model incorporating diffusion and permeation transport principles and limited waste drum sampling data. This final report summarizes the experimental measurements and model predictions for transuranic waste drums containing solidified sludges and solid waste.

  17. Field Testing of an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation, Tiles and Vapor Diffusion Venting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design. The unvented roof had extended winter periods of 95-100% RH, and wafer (wood surrogate RH sensor) measurements indicating possible condensation; high moisture levels were concentrated at the roof ridge. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions, with most peak MCs (sheathing) below 20%. In the spring, as outdoor temperatures warmed, all roofs dried well into the safe range (10% MC or less). Some roof-wall interfaces showed moderately high MCs; this might be due to moisture accumulation at the highest point in the lower attic, and/or shading of the roof by the adjacent second story. Monitoring will be continued at least through spring 2016 (another winter and spring).

  18. Experimentally Testing Hydrothermal Vent Origin of Life on Enceladus and Other Icy/Ocean Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M; White, Lauren M

    2017-09-01

    We review various laboratory strategies and methods that can be utilized to simulate prebiotic processes and origin of life in hydrothermal vent systems on icy/ocean worlds. Crucial steps that could be simulated in the laboratory include simulations of water-rock chemistry (e.g., serpentinization) to produce hydrothermal fluids, the types of mineral catalysts and energy gradients produced in vent interfaces where hydrothermal fluids interface with the surrounding seawater, and simulations of biologically relevant chemistry in flow-through gradient systems (i.e., far-from-equilibrium experiments). We describe some examples of experimental designs in detail, which are adaptable and could be used to test particular hypotheses about ocean world energetics or mineral/organic chemistry. Enceladus among the ocean worlds provides an ideal test case, since the pressure at the ocean floor is more easily simulated in the lab. Results for Enceladus could be extrapolated with further experiments and modeling to understand other ocean worlds. Key Words: Enceladus-Ocean worlds-Icy worlds-Hydrothermal vent-Iron sulfide-Gradient. Astrobiology 17, 820-833.

  19. Evolutionary strategies of viruses, bacteria and archaea in hydrothermal vent ecosystems revealed through metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rika E; Sogin, Mitchell L; Baross, John A

    2014-01-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent habitat hosts a diverse community of archaea and bacteria that withstand extreme fluctuations in environmental conditions. Abundant viruses in these systems, a high proportion of which are lysogenic, must also withstand these environmental extremes. Here, we explore the evolutionary strategies of both microorganisms and viruses in hydrothermal systems through comparative analysis of a cellular and viral metagenome, collected by size fractionation of high temperature fluids from a diffuse flow hydrothermal vent. We detected a high enrichment of mobile elements and proviruses in the cellular fraction relative to microorganisms in other environments. We observed a relatively high abundance of genes related to energy metabolism as well as cofactors and vitamins in the viral fraction compared to the cellular fraction, which suggest encoding of auxiliary metabolic genes on viral genomes. Moreover, the observation of stronger purifying selection in the viral versus cellular gene pool suggests viral strategies that promote prolonged host integration. Our results demonstrate that there is great potential for hydrothermal vent viruses to integrate into hosts, facilitate horizontal gene transfer, and express or transfer genes that manipulate the hosts' functional capabilities.

  20. A new yeti crab phylogeny: Vent origins with indications of regional extinction in the East Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roterman, Christopher Nicolai; Lee, Won-Kyung; Liu, Xinming; Lin, Rongcheng; Li, Xinzheng; Won, Yong-Jin

    2018-01-01

    The recent discovery of two new species of kiwaid squat lobsters on hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Ocean and in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean has prompted a re-analysis of Kiwaid biogeographical history. Using a larger alignment with more fossil calibrated nodes than previously, we consider the precise relationship between Kiwaidae, Chirostylidae and Eumunididae within Chirostyloidea (Decapoda: Anomura) to be still unresolved at present. Additionally, the placement of both new species within a new "Bristly" clade along with the seep-associated Kiwa puravida is most parsimoniously interpreted as supporting a vent origin for the family, rather than a seep-to-vent progression. Fossil-calibrated divergence analysis indicates an origin for the clade around the Eocene-Oligocene boundary in the eastern Pacific ~33-38 Ma, coincident with a lowering of bottom temperatures and increased ventilation in the Pacific deep sea. Likewise, the mid-Miocene (~10-16 Ma) rapid radiation of the new Bristly clade also coincides with a similar cooling event in the tropical East Pacific. The distribution, diversity, tree topology and divergence timing of Kiwaidae in the East Pacific is most consistent with a pattern of extinctions, recolonisations and radiations along fast-spreading ridges in this region and may have been punctuated by large-scale fluctuations in deep-water ventilation and temperature during the Cenozoic; further affecting the viability of Kiwaidae populations along portions of mid-ocean ridge.

  1. Genetic diversity and demographic instability in Riftia pachyptila tubeworms from eastern Pacific hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coykendall, D.K.; Johnson, S.B.; Karl, S.A.; Lutz, R.A.; Vrijenhoek, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals occupy patchy and ephemeral habitats supported by chemosynthetic primary production. Volcanic and tectonic activities controlling the turnover of these habitats contribute to demographic instability that erodes genetic variation within and among colonies of these animals. We examined DNA sequences from one mitochondrial and three nuclear gene loci to assess genetic diversity in the siboglinid tubeworm, Riftia pachyptila, a widely distributed constituent of vents along the East Pacific Rise and Galpagos Rift. Results: Genetic differentiation (FST) among populations increased with geographical distances, as expected under a linear stepping-stone model of dispersal. Low levels of DNA sequence diversity occurred at all four loci, allowing us to exclude the hypothesis that an idiosyncratic selective sweep eliminated mitochondrial diversity alone. Total gene diversity declined with tectonic spreading rates. The southernmost populations, which are subjected to superfast spreading rates and high probabilities of extinction, are relatively homogenous genetically. Conclusions: Compared to other vent species, DNA sequence diversity is extremely low in R. pachyptila. Though its dispersal abilities appear to be effective, the low diversity, particularly in southern hemisphere populations, is consistent with frequent local extinction and (re)colonization events. ?? 2011 Coykendall et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  2. Microbial communities and chemosynthesis in Yellowstone Lake sublacustrine hydrothermal vent waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting eYang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Five sublacustrine hydrothermal vent locations from 1-109 m water depth in Yellowstone Lake were surveyed by ribosomal RNA sequencing in relation to their chemical composition and dark CO2 fixation rates. They harbor distinct chemosynthetic bacterial communities, depending on temperature (16 - 110ºC and electron donor supply (H2S <1 - >100µM; NH3 <0.5 - >10µM. Members of the Aquificales, most closely affiliated with the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium, are the most frequently recovered bacterial 16S rRNA gene phylotypes in the hottest samples; the detection of these thermophilic sulfur-oxidizing autotrophs coincided with maximal dark CO2 fixation rates reaching near 9 µM C h-1 at temperatures of 50 to 60°C. Vents at lower temperatures yielded mostly phylotypes related to the mesophilic gammaproteobacterial sulfur oxidizer Thiovirga. In contrast, cool vent water with low chemosynthetic activity yielded predominantly phylotypes related to freshwater Actinobacterial clusters with a cosmopolitan distribution.

  3. A conservation vent is not a safe substitute for a flame arrester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siestrup, Francisco Hubertus Grosse [Protego Leser do Brasil Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    For several decades state organizations and engineering societies have published strict engineering guidelines for the design and safe management of storage tanks. Storage tanks in refineries and chemical plants can contain flammable and hazardous chemicals. Accidents in these systems resulting from explosions can cause million dollar property loss and production interruption. In severe cases lawsuits may result and companies can even be driven into bankruptcy. This article focuses on tests which have been conducted by the PROTEGO Research and Development Group in Braunschweig, Germany. Latest research, in which conservation vents have been tested in accordance to the new ISO 16852 test method, have proven that conservation vents cannot be used to substitute a flame arrester if potentially explosive atmospheres are present in storage tanks. This research was conducted during the development of ISO 28300 and the test results are considered in this standard. This paper will prove that the use of conservation vents to protect tanks from atmospheric explosion is not a reliable protection method when the vapor/air mixtures in the tank have a concentration between the Upper and Lower Explosive Limits (UEL and LEL). This is very common for Ethanol storage which is globally in evidence. (author)

  4. Solution gas flaring and venting at Alberta primary crude bitumen operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruff, C. [Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-11-01

    The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board is mandated by the Government of Alberta to ensure fair, responsible development and delivery of energy resources and utilities services in Alberta while maintaining the best public interest. One of the agencies' priorities is the reduction of solution gas flaring and venting. The performance of solution gas flaring and venting in Alberta and best practices respecting solution gas conservation are discussed. Data was presented on solution gas production, solution gas conserved, and solution gas conservation efficiency. The paper described best practices solutions such as increased gas to oil (GOR) test frequency; predetermination of economic gas conservation; collaboration with county gas utilities; and utilization of portable and scalable gas compression. The paper also presents a discussion of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA), a non-profit multistakeholder that recommended enhancements to Guide 60. Requirements discussed include the requirement to conserve solution gas at certain sites exceeding established flare and vent volumes, gas conservation prebuild requirements, and enhanced economic evaluation process. 5 figs.

  5. Evolutionary strategies of viruses, bacteria and archaea in hydrothermal vent ecosystems revealed through metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika E Anderson

    Full Text Available The deep-sea hydrothermal vent habitat hosts a diverse community of archaea and bacteria that withstand extreme fluctuations in environmental conditions. Abundant viruses in these systems, a high proportion of which are lysogenic, must also withstand these environmental extremes. Here, we explore the evolutionary strategies of both microorganisms and viruses in hydrothermal systems through comparative analysis of a cellular and viral metagenome, collected by size fractionation of high temperature fluids from a diffuse flow hydrothermal vent. We detected a high enrichment of mobile elements and proviruses in the cellular fraction relative to microorganisms in other environments. We observed a relatively high abundance of genes related to energy metabolism as well as cofactors and vitamins in the viral fraction compared to the cellular fraction, which suggest encoding of auxiliary metabolic genes on viral genomes. Moreover, the observation of stronger purifying selection in the viral versus cellular gene pool suggests viral strategies that promote prolonged host integration. Our results demonstrate that there is great potential for hydrothermal vent viruses to integrate into hosts, facilitate horizontal gene transfer, and express or transfer genes that manipulate the hosts' functional capabilities.

  6. Biogeography and ecology of the rare and abundant microbial lineages in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rika E; Sogin, Mitchell L; Baross, John A

    2015-01-01

    Environmental gradients generate countless ecological niches in deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems, which foster diverse microbial communities. The majority of distinct microbial lineages in these communities occur in very low abundance. However, the ecological role and distribution of rare and abundant lineages, particularly in deep, hot subsurface environments, remain unclear. Here, we use 16S rRNA tag sequencing to describe biogeographic patterning and microbial community structure of both rare and abundant archaea and bacteria in hydrothermal vent systems. We show that while rare archaeal lineages and almost all bacterial lineages displayed geographically restricted community structuring patterns, the abundant lineages of archaeal communities displayed a much more cosmopolitan distribution. Finally, analysis of one high-volume, high-temperature fluid sample representative of the deep hot biosphere described a unique microbial community that differed from microbial populations in diffuse flow fluid or sulfide samples, yet the rare thermophilic archaeal groups showed similarities to those that occur in sulfides. These results suggest that while most archaeal and bacterial lineages in vents are rare and display a highly regional distribution, a small percentage of lineages, particularly within the archaeal domain, are successful at widespread dispersal and colonization. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Concept for a cyclonic spray scrubber as a fission product removal system for filtered containment venting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebel, Luke S., E-mail: Luke.Lebel@cnl.ca; Piro, Markus H., E-mail: Markus.Piro@cnl.ca; MacCoy, Reilly, E-mail: Reilly.MacCoy@cnl.ca; Clouthier, Anthony, E-mail: Tony.Clouthier@cnl.ca; Chin, Yu-Shan, E-mail: Sammy.Chin@cnl.ca

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A new cyclonic spray scrubber concept for filtered containment venting is presented. • Mechanistic particle removal model paired with discrete particle CFD simulations. • Calculations predict that very high decontamination factors can be achieved. - Abstract: The application of a cyclonic spray scrubber as a technology for filtered containment venting is proposed in this paper. This study has paired a mechanistic model for the kinetic particle coagulation of with Euler–Lagrange discrete particle simulations in order to predict particle decontamination factors. The continuous phase behavior has been investigated using computational fluid dynamics simulations together with phase Doppler anemometry measurements. Calculations show that spray scrubbing of radionuclide-bearing aerosols could be very effective, and predict that decontamination factors can be in excess of 10{sup 6} for micron sized particles and excess of 10{sup 3} for submicron particles. In the wake of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, filtered containment venting is being viewed as an increasingly important severe accident mitigation technology. Cyclonic spray scrubbing could be implemented as a passive technology for decontaminating containment gases in an emergency prior to their discharge to the atmosphere, and is a novel approach for this application.

  8. Concept for a cyclonic spray scrubber as a fission product removal system for filtered containment venting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebel, Luke S.; Piro, Markus H.; MacCoy, Reilly; Clouthier, Anthony; Chin, Yu-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A new cyclonic spray scrubber concept for filtered containment venting is presented. • Mechanistic particle removal model paired with discrete particle CFD simulations. • Calculations predict that very high decontamination factors can be achieved. - Abstract: The application of a cyclonic spray scrubber as a technology for filtered containment venting is proposed in this paper. This study has paired a mechanistic model for the kinetic particle coagulation of with Euler–Lagrange discrete particle simulations in order to predict particle decontamination factors. The continuous phase behavior has been investigated using computational fluid dynamics simulations together with phase Doppler anemometry measurements. Calculations show that spray scrubbing of radionuclide-bearing aerosols could be very effective, and predict that decontamination factors can be in excess of 10 6 for micron sized particles and excess of 10 3 for submicron particles. In the wake of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, filtered containment venting is being viewed as an increasingly important severe accident mitigation technology. Cyclonic spray scrubbing could be implemented as a passive technology for decontaminating containment gases in an emergency prior to their discharge to the atmosphere, and is a novel approach for this application.

  9. Application of soil venting at a large scale: A data and modeling analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, J.C.; Baca, R.G.; Sisson, J.B.; Wood, T.R.

    1990-02-27

    Soil venting will be applied at a demonstration scale to a site at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory which is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride and other organic vapors. The application of soil venting at the site is unique in several aspects including scale, geology, and data collection. The containmented portion of the site has a surface area of over 47,000 square meters (12 acres) and the depth to the water table is approximately 180 meters. Migration of contaminants through the entire depth of the vadose zone is evidenced by measured levels of chlorinated solvents in the underlying aquifer. The geology of the site consists of a series of layered basalt flows interspersed with sedimentary interbeds. The depth of the vadose zone, the nature of fractured basalt flows, and the degree of contamination all tend to make drilling difficult and expensive. Because of the scale of the site, extent of contamination, and expense of drilling, a computer model has been developed to simulate the migration of the chlorinated solvents during plume growth and cleanup. The demonstration soil venting operation has been designed to collect pressure drop and plume migration data to assist with calibration of the transport model. The model will then be used to help design a cost-effective system for site cleanup which will minimize the drilling required. This paper discusses mathematical models which have been developed to estimate the growth and eventful cleanup of the site. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Optimizing the night time with dome vents and SNR-QSO at CFHT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devost, Daniel; Mahoney, Billy; Moutou, Claire; CFHT QSO Team, CFHT software Group

    2017-06-01

    Night time is a precious and costly commodity and it is important to get everything we can out of every second of every night of observing. In 2012 the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope started operating 12 new vent doors installed on the dome over the course of the previous two years. The project was highly successful and seeing measurements show that venting the dome greatly enhances image quality at the focal plane. In order to capitalize on the gains brought by the new vents, the observatory started exploring a new mode of observation called SNR-QSO. This mode consist of a new implementation inside our Queued Service Observation (QSO) system. Exposure times are adjusted for each frame depending on the weather conditions in order to reach a specific depth, Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) at a certain magnitude. The goal of this new mode is to capitalize on the exquisite seeing provided by Maunakea, complemented by the minimized dome turbulence, to use the least amount of time to reach the depth required by the science programs. Specific implementations were successfully tested on two different instruments, our wide field camera MegaCam and our high resolution spectrograph ESPaDOnS. I will present the methods used for each instrument to achieve SNR observing and the gains produced by these new observing modes in order to reach the scientific goals of accepted programs in a shorter amount of time.

  11. Development of a submerged gravel scrubber for containment venting applications: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, R.K.; McCormack, J.D.; Postma, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    Although hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDAs) are not design basis accidents for breeder reactor plants, extensive assessments of HCDA consequences have been made and design features for providing margins beyond the design base have been considered for future fast reactor plants. One feature proposed for increasing the safety margin is a containment vent and/or purge system which would mitigate the challenge to containment integrity resulting from excessive temperature and pressure or excessive hydrogen. A cleanup system would be required for removal of vented aerosols and condensible vapors to mitigate radiological consequences to the environment. A study is in progress at HEDL to select and develop a suitable air cleaning system for use in potential breeder reactor containment venting applications. A concept was conceived whereby the passiveness and high loading capacity of a water pool scrubber was combined with the high efficiency of a sand and gravel bed. It was termed a Submerged Gravel Scrubber (SGS). A schematic drawing of the concept is shown. The SGS consists of a bed of gravel (or other packing) submerged in a pool of water

  12. Development of aerosol decontamination factor evaluation method for filtered containment venting system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae bong; Kim, Sung Il; Jung, Jaehoon; Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Fission products would be released from molten corium pools which are relocated into the lower plenum of reactor pressure vessel, on the concrete pit and in the core catcher. In addition, steam, hydrogen and noncondensable gases such as CO and CO2 are generated during the core damage progression due to loss of coolant and the molten core-concrete interaction. Consequently, the pressure inside the containment could be increased continuously. Filtered containment venting is one action to prevent an uncontrolled release of radioactive fission products caused by an overpressure failure of the containment. After the Fukushima-Daiichi accident which was demonstrated the containment failure, many countries to consider the implementation of filtered containment venting system(FCVS) on nuclear power plant where these are not currently applied. In general evaluation for FCVS is conducted to determine decontamination factor on several conditions (aerosol diameter, submergence depth, water temperature, gas flow, steam flow rate, pressure, operating time,...). It is essential to quantify the mass concentration before and after FCVS for decontamination factor. This paper presents the development of the evaluation facility for filtered containment venting system at KAERI and an experimental investigation for aerosol removal performance. Decontamination factor for the FCVS is determined by filter measurement. The result of the aerosol size distribution measurement shows the aerosol removal performance by an aerosol size.

  13. The role of flooding in the design of vent and reflux condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacramento, Julio C.; Heggs, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Reflux and vent condensers are vertical separators where film condensation occurs. A vapour mixture is supplied at the bottom of the tubes and encounters vertical cold surfaces. A falling film forms and exits from the bottom of the tubes, flowing counter-current to the vapour, but co-current to the coolant on the shell side. Flooding occurs when the condensate flow moves from a gravity regime to a shear regime. Vapour velocities at or above the flooding velocity will cause the liquid to exit from the top of the tubes rather than from the bottom. The main disadvantage of these condensers is the limited flooding velocity allowed. Several investigators propose correlations to predict the flooding velocity. In most cases these correlations come from isothermal experiments data, thus the general recommendation of using safety factors of at least 30%. This work compares these correlations to new experimental values of flooding in steam/air vent condensation. The experimental apparatus is a 3 m long, double-pipe condenser with an internal diameter of 0.028 m. The conclusions presented here will aid the design engineer to understand better the applicability of the discussed correlations in the design of steam/air vent condensers

  14. Biogeography of Persephonella in deep-sea hydrothermal vents of the Western Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka eMino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields are areas on the seafloor with high biological productivity fueled by microbial chemosynthesis. Members of the Aquificales genus Persephonella are obligately chemosynthetic bacteria, and appear to be key players in carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen cycles in high temperature habitats at deep-sea vents. Although this group of bacteria has cosmopolitan distribution in deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystem around the world, little is known about their population structure such as intraspecific genomic diversity, distribution pattern, and phenotypic diversity. We developed the multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA scheme for their genomic characterization. Sequence variation was determined in five housekeeping genes and one functional gene of 36 P. hydrogeniphila strains originated from the Okinawa Trough and the South Mariana Trough. Although the strains share > 98.7% similarities in 16S rRNA gene sequences, MLSA revealed 35 different sequence types, indicating their extensive genomic diversity. A phylogenetic tree inferred from all concatenated gene sequences revealed the clustering of isolates according to the geographic origin. In addition, the phenotypic clustering pattern inferred from whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS analysis can be correlated to their MLSA clustering pattern. This study represents the first MLSA combined with phenotypic analysis indicative of allopatric speciation of deep-sea hydrothermal vent bacteria.

  15. The effects of venting and decompression on Yellow Tang (Zebrasoma flavescens in the marine ornamental aquarium fish trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S. Munday

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Each year, over 45 countries export 30 million fish from coral reefs as part of the global marine ornamental aquarium trade. This catch volume is partly influenced by collection methods that cause mortality. Barotrauma in fish resulting from forced ascent from depth can contribute to post-collection mortality. However, implementing decompression stops during ascent can prevent barotrauma. Conversely, venting (puncturing the swim bladder to release expanded internal gas following ascent can mitigate some signs of barotrauma like positive buoyancy. Here, we evaluate how decompression and venting affect stress and mortality in the Yellow Tang (Zebrasoma flavescens. We examined the effects of three ascent treatments, each with decompression stops of varying frequency and duration, coupled with or without venting, on sublethal effects and mortality using histology and serum cortisol measurements. In fish subjected to ascent without decompression stops or venting, a mean post-collection mortality of 6.2% occurred within 24 h of capture. Common collection methods in the fishery, ascent without decompression stops coupled with venting, or one long decompression stop coupled with venting, resulted in no mortality. Histopathologic examination of heart, liver, head kidney, and swim bladder tissues in fish 0d and 21d post-collection revealed no significant barotrauma- or venting-related lesions in any treatment group. Ascent without decompression stops resulted in significantly higher serum cortisol than ascent with many stops, while venting alone did not affect cortisol. Future work should examine links in the supply chain following collection to determine if further handling and transport stressors affect survivorship and sublethal effects.

  16. Culturable bacterial phylogeny from a shallow water hydrothermal vent of Espalamaca (Faial, Azores) reveals a variety of novel taxa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajasabapathy, R.; Mohandass, C.; Colaco, A.; Dastager, S.G.; Santos, R.S.; Meena, R.M.

    by 1% agarose gel elec- trophoresis with TAE buffer. The PCR products were gel- purified using a Gel Extraction Kit or purified with PCR cleanup kit (Sigma) according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The purified PCR products were sequenced... productivity at the deep sea hydrothermal vents (> 200 m) is not maintained by photosynthetic products, but by the chemosynthesis of organic matter by vent microbes, using energy from chemical oxidation to produce organic matter from CO2 and mineral...

  17. The spatial scale of genetic subdivision in populations of Ifremeria nautilei, a hydrothermal-vent gastropod from the southwest Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaler Andrew D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep-sea hydrothermal vents provide patchy, ephemeral habitats for specialized communities of animals that depend on chemoautotrophic primary production. Unlike eastern Pacific hydrothermal vents, where population structure has been studied at large (thousands of kilometres and small (hundreds of meters spatial scales, population structure of western Pacific vents has received limited attention. This study addresses the scale at which genetic differentiation occurs among populations of a western Pacific vent-restricted gastropod, Ifremeria nautilei. Results We used mitochondrial and DNA microsatellite markers to infer patterns of gene flow and population subdivision. A nested sampling strategy was employed to compare genetic diversity in discrete patches of Ifremeria nautilei separated by a few meters within a single vent field to distances as great as several thousand kilometres between back-arc basins that encompass the known range of the species. No genetic subdivisions were detected among patches, mounds, or sites within Manus Basin. Although I. nautilei from Lau and North Fiji Basins (~1000 km apart also exhibited no evidence for genetic subdivision, these populations were genetically distinct from the Manus Basin population. Conclusions An unknown process that restricts contemporary gene flow isolates the Manus Basin population of Ifremeria nautilei from widespread populations that occupy the North Fiji and Lau Basins. A robust understanding of the genetic structure of hydrothermal vent populations at multiple spatial scales defines natural conservation units and can help minimize loss of genetic diversity in situations where human activities are proposed and managed.

  18. Analysis of the preliminary trajectory of emergency venting of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde using RELAP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecenas F, M.; Jimenez S, R.; Ovando C, R.; Tijerina S, F.; Tapia M, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    For a commercial nuclear plant, the availability of a vent line to the atmosphere is an improvement to achieve the prevention and mitigation of the consequences of a severe accident. The importance of this system received greater attention after the Fukushima accident in 2011. Subsequently, in 2012 and 2013, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued documents stating that the venting must be able to dislodge 1% of the rated thermal power of the core without over pressurizing the primary container. To analyze the venting of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, the line and the primary container are modeled using the thermo-hydraulic code RELAP5, simulating a release of 1% of the nominal licensed power to the container in the form of saturated steam. The vent has no problem to evacuate the energy and manages to keep the container without exceeding its design limit, and the highest percentage of thermal power that can channel the vent to the outside is approximately 3%. A sensitivity analysis increasing the diameter of the line to 14 inches allows increasing in 10% the percentage of power that can be vented to the outside without problem for the containment. (Author)

  19. Trace element profiles of the sea anemone Anemonia viridis living nearby a natural CO2 vent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rael Horwitz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA is not an isolated threat, but acts in concert with other impacts on ecosystems and species. Coastal marine invertebrates will have to face the synergistic interactions of OA with other global and local stressors. One local factor, common in coastal environments, is trace element contamination. CO2 vent sites are extensively studied in the context of OA and are often considered analogous to the oceans in the next few decades. The CO2 vent found at Levante Bay (Vulcano, NE Sicily, Italy also releases high concentrations of trace elements to its surrounding seawater, and is therefore a unique site to examine the effects of long-term exposure of nearby organisms to high pCO2 and trace element enrichment in situ. The sea anemone Anemonia viridis is prevalent next to the Vulcano vent and does not show signs of trace element poisoning/stress. The aim of our study was to compare A. viridis trace element profiles and compartmentalization between high pCO2 and control environments. Rather than examining whole anemone tissue, we analyzed two different body compartments—the pedal disc and the tentacles, and also examined the distribution of trace elements in the tentacles between the animal and the symbiotic algae. We found dramatic changes in trace element tissue concentrations between the high pCO2/high trace element and control sites, with strong accumulation of iron, lead, copper and cobalt, but decreased concentrations of cadmium, zinc and arsenic proximate to the vent. The pedal disc contained substantially more trace elements than the anemone’s tentacles, suggesting the pedal disc may serve as a detoxification/storage site for excess trace elements. Within the tentacles, the various trace elements displayed different partitioning patterns between animal tissue and algal symbionts. At both sites iron was found primarily in the algae, whereas cadmium, zinc and arsenic were primarily found in the animal tissue. Our data

  20. Trace element profiles of the sea anemone Anemonia viridis living nearby a natural CO2 vent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Rael; Borell, Esther M; Fine, Maoz; Shaked, Yeala

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is not an isolated threat, but acts in concert with other impacts on ecosystems and species. Coastal marine invertebrates will have to face the synergistic interactions of OA with other global and local stressors. One local factor, common in coastal environments, is trace element contamination. CO2 vent sites are extensively studied in the context of OA and are often considered analogous to the oceans in the next few decades. The CO2 vent found at Levante Bay (Vulcano, NE Sicily, Italy) also releases high concentrations of trace elements to its surrounding seawater, and is therefore a unique site to examine the effects of long-term exposure of nearby organisms to high pCO2 and trace element enrichment in situ. The sea anemone Anemonia viridis is prevalent next to the Vulcano vent and does not show signs of trace element poisoning/stress. The aim of our study was to compare A. viridis trace element profiles and compartmentalization between high pCO2 and control environments. Rather than examining whole anemone tissue, we analyzed two different body compartments-the pedal disc and the tentacles, and also examined the distribution of trace elements in the tentacles between the animal and the symbiotic algae. We found dramatic changes in trace element tissue concentrations between the high pCO2/high trace element and control sites, with strong accumulation of iron, lead, copper and cobalt, but decreased concentrations of cadmium, zinc and arsenic proximate to the vent. The pedal disc contained substantially more trace elements than the anemone's tentacles, suggesting the pedal disc may serve as a detoxification/storage site for excess trace elements. Within the tentacles, the various trace elements displayed different partitioning patterns between animal tissue and algal symbionts. At both sites iron was found primarily in the algae, whereas cadmium, zinc and arsenic were primarily found in the animal tissue. Our data suggests that A. viridis

  1. Coupled analysis of passive safety injection and containment filtered venting for passive decay heat removal - 15140

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Ham, J.H.; Jeong, Y.H.; Chang, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Lots of interests for the safety of nuclear power plants have risen these days. The safety has to be continuously reviewed and enhanced in nuclear power plants currently operating as well as those designed and constructed in future. After the Fukushima accidents, many additional safety systems which can be applied to nuclear power plants in operation have been proposed. Those include alternating power source such as movable diesel generators and DC batteries in non-safety grade. Also, emergency preparedness for the prevention of a core damage accident was proposed to cope with the extended-SBO (station blackout) by using fire protection systems. In order to prevent the release of radioactive materials, safety systems for preserving the integrity of containment were proposed in two views of cooling and venting containment. Two approaches are effective for mitigating a severe accident. The design concept installing big water tanks besides containment at high level was proposed for various safety functions. One of the functions in the system is to inject the coolant from the elevated tank into a reactor vessel in the case of loss of coolant accident. When the pressure in reactor coolant system is sufficiently low, the coolant can be injected by gravity. If not, the depressurization in reactor vessel would be needed considering the containment pressure. Containment cooling in conventional pressurized water reactors is dependent on containment cooling pumps and sprays. Additional containment cooling systems cannot be simply and easily applied in the current nuclear power plants without major modifications. Therefore, for the operation of passive safety injection system, containment filtered venting system can be adopted for the depressurization of containment. In the design and operation of the passive safety injection system and the containment filtered venting system, main operating points related with open and close pressures in the filtered venting system were

  2. Carbon Dioxide Washout Testing Using Various Inlet Vent Configurations in the Mark-III Space Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korona, F. Adam; Norcross, Jason; Conger, Bruce; Navarro, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Requirements for using a space suit during ground testing include providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout for the suited subject. Acute CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms including headache, dyspnea, lethargy, and eventually unconsciousness or even death. Symptoms depend on several factors including inspired partial pressure of CO2 (ppCO2), duration of exposure, metabolic rate of the subject, and physiological differences between subjects. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has predicted that the configuration of the suit inlet vent has a significant effect on oronasal CO2 concentrations. The main objective of this test was to characterize inspired oronasal ppCO2 for a variety of inlet vent configurations in the Mark-III suit across a range of workload and flow rates. Data and trends observed during testing along with refined CFD models will be used to help design an inlet vent configuration for the Z-2 space suit. The testing methodology used in this test builds upon past CO2 washout testing performed on the Z-1 suit, Rear Entry I-Suit, and the Enhanced Mobility Advanced Crew Escape Suit. Three subjects performed two test sessions each in the Mark-III suit to allow for comparison between tests. Six different helmet inlet vent configurations were evaluated during each test session. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid. Suited test subjects walked on a treadmill to generate metabolic workloads of approximately 2000 and 3000 BTU/hr. Supply airflow rates of 6 and 4 actual cubic feet per minute were tested at each workload. Subjects wore an oronasal mask with an open port in front of the mouth and were allowed to breathe freely. Oronasal ppCO2 was monitored real-time via gas analyzers with sampling tubes connected to the oronasal mask. Metabolic rate was calculated from the CO2 production measured by an additional gas analyzer at the air outlet from the suit. Real-time metabolic rate measurements were used to adjust the treadmill workload to meet

  3. Dispersion of deep-sea hydrothermal vent effluents and larvae by submesoscale and tidal currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vic, Clément; Gula, Jonathan; Roullet, Guillaume; Pradillon, Florence

    2018-03-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents provide sources of geochemical materials that impact the global ocean heat and chemical budgets, and support complex biological communities. Vent effluents and larvae are dispersed and transported long distances by deep ocean currents, but these currents are largely undersampled and little is known about their variability. Submesoscale (0.1-10 km) currents are known to play an important role for the dispersion of biogeochemical materials in the ocean surface layer, but their impact for the dispersion in the deep ocean is unknown. Here, we use a series of nested regional oceanic numerical simulations with increasing resolution (from δx = 6 km to δx = 0.75 km) to investigate the structure and variability of highly-resolved deep currents over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and their role on the dispersion of the Lucky Strike hydrothermal vent effluents and larvae. We shed light on a submesoscale regime of oceanic turbulence over the MAR at 1500 m depth, contrasting with open-ocean - i.e., far from topographic features - regimes of turbulence, dominated by mesoscales. Impacts of submesoscale and tidal currents on larval dispersion and connectivity among vent populations are investigated by releasing neutrally buoyant Lagrangian particles at the Lucky Strike hydrothermal vent. Although the absolute dispersion is overall not sensitive to the model resolution, submesoscale currents are found to significantly increase both the horizontal and vertical relative dispersion of particles at O(1-10) km and O(1-10) days, resulting in an increased mixing of the cloud of particles. A fraction of particles are trapped in submesoscale coherent vortices, which enable transport over long time and distances. Tidal currents and internal tides do not significantly impact the horizontal relative dispersion. However, they roughly double the vertical dispersion. Specifically, particles undergo strong tidally-induced mixing close to rough topographic features

  4. ITER vent filter conceptual study. Final report ITER Task S71 TD 70 (NID-9e) EU Task SEA 3-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomquist, R.; Johansson, Kjell; Natalizio, A.; Nilsson, Lars; Shen, K.; Sjoeberg, A.

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate vent filter technologies that could be applied to ITER in accidental situations and to discuss how effective they could be in reducing accidental releases of gases, vapors and aerosols to the atmosphere. The study's main contents are: A description of vent filter technologies as they are used for fission reactors; A review of appropriate tritium removal technologies. The vent filter part deals mainly with aerosol removal. The tritium part includes removal of both elemental and oxidized tritium from the vent flow. An important conclusion is that current fission reactor vent filter systems do not remove elemental tritium from the vent stream. A third part of the study is scoping thermal-hydraulic and aerosol transport analyses in order to find realistic vent flow rates and aerosol transport characteristics. Theses analyses, which are based on ITER design data assumed at the time of analysis, have been performed by means of the codes RELAP5 and CONTAIN. Release estimates are also included. Suggestions and recommendations are given regarding how to design a reliable vent filter system. Suggested vent systems include: Vent ducts from vacuum vessel and heat exchanger departments, a water pool for condensation of steam, and equipment for removal of aerosols, elemental tritium and oxidized tritium. 42 refs, 6 tabs, 34 figs

  5. ITER vent filter conceptual study. Final report ITER Task S71 TD 70 (NID-9e) EU Task SEA 3-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomquist, R; Johansson, Kjell; Natalizio, A; Nilsson, Lars; Shen, K; Sjoeberg, A

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate vent filter technologies that could be applied to ITER in accidental situations and to discuss how effective they could be in reducing accidental releases of gases, vapors and aerosols to the atmosphere. The study`s main contents are: A description of vent filter technologies as they are used for fission reactors; A review of appropriate tritium removal technologies. The vent filter part deals mainly with aerosol removal. The tritium part includes removal of both elemental and oxidized tritium from the vent flow. An important conclusion is that current fission reactor vent filter systems do not remove elemental tritium from the vent stream. A third part of the study is scoping thermal-hydraulic and aerosol transport analyses in order to find realistic vent flow rates and aerosol transport characteristics. Theses analyses, which are based on ITER design data assumed at the time of analysis, have been performed by means of the codes RELAP5 and CONTAIN. Release estimates are also included. Suggestions and recommendations are given regarding how to design a reliable vent filter system. Suggested vent systems include: Vent ducts from vacuum vessel and heat exchanger departments, a water pool for condensation of steam, and equipment for removal of aerosols, elemental tritium and oxidized tritium. 42 refs, 6 tabs, 34 figs.

  6. Las facies Keuper al SW de la provincia de Soria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando, S.

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sedimentological analysis of the materials that correspond to the Keuper facies in the area situated between the Iberian Ranges and the Central System. Acording to the obtained data, two main aspects are emphasized: - During the Upper Triassic, a c1ear retreat of the roast line towards the East took place, since this area constituted the litoral zone during the sedimentation of the Rot and Muschelkalk. - Facies change lateraly from West to East as proximal alluvial Can sediments pass into facies interpreted as distal alluvial fans and continental sabkha environment.Se analizan, desde el punto de vista sedimentológico, unos materiales correspondientes a las facies Keuper entre la Cordillera Ibérica y el Sistema Central. Dos aspectos resaltan tras este análisis: - Desplazamiento de la línea de costa (que durante la sedimentación del Rot y del Muschelkalk estaba situada en esta zona hacia el Este. - Marcado cambio lateral de facies desde el Oeste hacia el Este, pasando de unas facies proximales-medias de abanico aluvial a unas facies distales y ambiente de sabkha continental.

  7. Loki's Castle: Discovery and geology of a black smoker vent field at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, R.; Thorseth, I. H.; Lilley, M. D.; Barriga, F. J.; Früh-Green, G.; Nakamura, K.

    2010-12-01

    Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting at the ultraslow spreading and magma starved parts of the Arctic Mid Ocean Ridge (AMOR) have been unsuccessful. A black smoker vent field was eventually discovered at the Mohns-Knipovich bend at 73.5°N in 2008, and the field was revisited in 2009 and 2010. The Loki’s Castle vent field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge that is bordered by a tectonic terrain dominated by core complexes to the NW, and a ridge flank that is buried by sediments from the Bear Island Fan to the SE. Fluid compositions are anomalous to other basalt-hosted fields and indicate interactions with sediments at depths. The vent field is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting occurs at ultraslow spreading ridges despite the strongly reduced magmatic heat budget. ROV surveys have shown that venting occurs in two areas separated by around 100 m. Micro-bathymetry acquired by a Hugin AUV documents that two 20-30 tall mounds that coalesce at the base have developed around the vent sites. The micro-bathymetry also shows that the venting is located above two normal faults that define the NW margin of a rift that runs along the crest of the volcano. The black smoker fluids reach 317 °C, with an end-member SiO2 content of 16 mmol/kg. End-member chlorinity is around 85% of seawater suggesting that the fluids have phase-separated at depth. The fluid compositions indicate that the rock-water reactions occur around 2 km below the seafloor. The crustal thickness is estimated to be 4 +/- 0.5 km in the area. Whereas the depth of the reaction zone is comparable with faster spreading ridges, the fraction of crust cooled convectively by hydrothermal circulation is two times that of vent fields at ridges with normal crustal thickness.

  8. The uptake and excretion of partially oxidized sulfur expands the repertoire of energy resources metabolized by hydrothermal vent symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinart, R A; Gartman, A; Sanders, J G; Luther, G W; Girguis, P R

    2015-05-07

    Symbiotic associations between animals and chemoautotrophic bacteria crowd around hydrothermal vents. In these associations, symbiotic bacteria use chemical reductants from venting fluid for the energy to support autotrophy, providing primary nutrition for the host. At vents along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center, the partially oxidized sulfur compounds (POSCs) thiosulfate and polysulfide have been detected in and around animal communities but away from venting fluid. The use of POSCs for autotrophy, as an alternative to the chemical substrates in venting fluid, could mitigate competition in these communities. To determine whether ESLC symbioses could use thiosulfate to support carbon fixation or produce POSCs during sulfide oxidation, we used high-pressure, flow-through incubations to assess the productivity of three symbiotic mollusc genera-the snails Alviniconcha spp. and Ifremeria nautilei, and the mussel Bathymodiolus brevior-when oxidizing sulfide and thiosulfate. Via the incorporation of isotopically labelled inorganic carbon, we found that the symbionts of all three genera supported autotrophy while oxidizing both sulfide and thiosulfate, though at different rates. Additionally, by concurrently measuring their effect on sulfur compounds in the aquaria with voltammetric microelectrodes, we showed that these symbioses excreted POSCs under highly sulfidic conditions, illustrating that these symbioses could represent a source for POSCs in their habitat. Furthermore, we revealed spatial disparity in the rates of carbon fixation among the animals in our incubations, which might have implications for the variability of productivity in situ. Together, these results re-shape our thinking about sulfur cycling and productivity by vent symbioses, demonstrating that thiosulfate may be an ecologically important energy source for vent symbioses and that they also likely impact the local geochemical regime through the excretion of POSCs.

  9. Characterizing the metatranscriptomic profile of archaeal metabolic genes at deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Mid-Cayman Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, D.; Reveillaud, J. C.; Anderson, R.; Huber, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems host a wide diversity of bacteria, archaea and viruses. Although the geochemical conditions at these vents are well-documented, the relative metabolic activity of microbial lineages, especially among archaea, remains poorly characterized. The deep, slow-spreading Mid-Cayman Rise, which hosts the mafic-influenced Piccard and ultramafic-influenced Von Damm vent fields, allows for the comparison of vent sites with different geochemical characteristics. Previous metagenomic work indicated that despite the distinct geochemistry at Von Damm and Piccard, the functional profile of microbial communities between the two sites was similar. We examined relative metabolic gene activity using a metatranscriptomic analysis and observed functional similarity between Von Damm and Piccard, which is consistent with previous results. Notably, the relative expression of the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcr) gene was elevated in both vent fields. Additionally, we analyzed the ratio of RNA expression to DNA abundance of fifteen archaeal metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) across the two fields. Previous work showed higher archaeal diversity at Von Damm; our results indicate relatively even expression among archaeal lineages at Von Damm. In contrast, we observed lower archaeal diversity at Piccard, but individual archaeal lineages were very highly expressed; Thermoprotei showed elevated transcriptional activity, which is consistent with higher temperatures and sulfur levels at Piccard. At both Von Damm and Piccard, specific Methanococcus lineages were more highly expressed than others. Future analyses will more closely examine metabolic genes in these Methanococcus MAGs to determine why some lineages are more active at a vent field than others. We will conduct further statistical analyses to determine whether significant differences exist between Von Damm and Piccard and whether there are correlations between geochemical metadata and metabolic gene or

  10. Highly sensitive avoidance plays a key role in sensory adaptation to deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ogino

    Full Text Available The environments around deep-sea hydrothermal vents are very harsh conditions for organisms due to the possibility of exposure to highly toxic compounds and extremely hot venting there. Despite such extreme environments, some indigenous species have thrived there. Alvinellid worms (Annelida are among the organisms best adapted to high-temperature and oxidatively stressful venting regions. Although intensive studies of the adaptation of these worms to the environments of hydrothermal vents have been made, little is known about the worms' sensory adaptation to the severe chemical conditions there. To examine the sensitivity of the vent-endemic worm Paralvinella hessleri to low pH and oxidative stress, we determined the concentration of acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide that induced avoidance behavior of this worm, and compared these concentrations to those obtained for related species inhabiting intertidal zones, Thelepus sp. The concentrations of the chemicals that induced avoidance behavior of P. hessleri were 10-100 times lower than those for Thelepus sp. To identify the receptors for these chemicals, chemical avoidance tests were performed with the addition of ruthenium red, a blocker of transient receptor potential (TRP channels. This treatment suppressed the chemical avoidance behavior of P. hessleri, which suggests that TRP channels are involved in the chemical avoidance behavior of this species. Our results revealed for the first time hypersensitive detection systems for acid and for oxidative stress in the vent-endemic worm P. hessleri, possibly mediated by TRP channels, suggesting that such sensory systems may have facilitated the adaptation of this organism to harsh vent environments.

  11. Testing of a Spray-Bar Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System for Upper Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lak, Tibor; Flachbart, Robin; Nguyen, Han; Martin, James

    1999-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a fundamental technology need that involves practically all uses of subcritical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule- Thomson (J-T) valve to extract then-nal energy from the propellant. In a cooperative effort, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (N4HTB) was used to test a unique "spray bar" TVS system developed by Boeing. A schematic of this system is included in Figure 1. The system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it radially into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the spray bar heat exchanger element, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. Figure 2 is a plot of ullage pressure (P4) and liquid vapor pressure (PSAI) versus time. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses. The primary advantage of the

  12. Microbiological characterization of post-eruption "snowblower" vents at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Meyer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial processes within the subseafloor can be examined during the ephemeral and uncommonly observed phenomena known as snowblower venting. Snowblowers are characterized by the large quantity of white floc that is expelled from the seafloor following mid-ocean ridge eruptions. During these eruptions, rapidly cooling lava entrains seawater and hydrothermal fluids enriched in geochemical reactants, creating a natural bioreactor that supports a subseafloor microbial bloom. Previous studies hypothesized that the eruption-associated floc is made by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria; however, the microbes involved were never identified. Here we present the first molecular analysis combined with microscopy of microbial communities in snowblower vents from samples collected shortly after the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We obtained fluid samples and white flocculent material from active snowblower vents as well as orange flocculent material found on top of newly formed lava flows. Both flocculent types revealed diverse cell types and particulates when examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy. Distinct archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in each sample type through Illumina tag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and through sequencing of the sulfide oxidation gene, soxB. In fluids and white floc, the dominant bacteria were sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and the dominant archaea were thermophilic Methanococcales. In contrast, the dominant organisms in the orange floc were Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I. In all samples, bacteria greatly outnumbered archaea. The presence of anaerobic methanogens and microaerobic Epsilonproteobacteria in snowblower communities provides evidence that these blooms are seeded by subseafloor microbes, rather than from microbes in bottom seawater. These eruptive events thus provide a unique opportunity to observe subseafloor

  13. Preliminary Design of Molecular Sieve for Removing Organic Iodide in Containment Filtered Venting System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Tong Kyu; Shin, So Eun; Lee, Byung Chul [Heungdeok IT Valley Bldg., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jun [Gemvax and KAEL Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, to increase the DF for gaseous iodine species, especially organic iodide, molecular sieve filled by silver exchanged zeolites is proposed and designed preliminarily. Its aerodynamic analysis is also performed and presented. In order to increase the DF for gaseous organic iodide, deep-bed type molecular sieve was proposed and designed preliminarily. Total 1,620kg of silver exchanged zeolites were filled evenly in 10 beds of the molecular sieve. The safety factor in the case of 20m{sup 3}/s will be smaller than the counterpart of the standard case (6m{sup 3}/s). However, if the adsorption capacity of the zeolites is larger than 3.09mg/g when the residence time is 0.09 second, the designed molecular sieve can be used at 20m3/s of volumetric flow rate. The removal efficiency for organic iodide should be considered as well as economical aspects in the design of molecular sieve. In the event of nuclear power plant (NPP) severe accident, the nuclear reactor containment might suffer damage resulting from overpressure caused by decay heat. In order to prevent this containment damage, containment venting has been considered as one of effective methods. However, since vented gases contain radioactive fission products, they should be filtered to be released to environment. Generally, containment filtered venting system (CFVS) is installed on NPP to achieve this aim. Even though great amount of efforts have been devoted to developing the CFVS using various filtering methods, the decontaminant factor (DF) for radioactive gaseous iodide is still unsatisfactory while DFs for radioactive aerosols and elemental iodine are very high.

  14. Hydrodynamic calculation of a filter sand bed type used in the containment venting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas V, D.; Sainz M, E.; Ortiz V, J.

    2015-09-01

    The filtered venting of the containment has been adopted in European countries to mitigate the consequences of excess pressure containment during a severe accident. When venting has taken place, the fission products are released directly into the environment, unless a filter on the same path is placed, so that various types of filters are used to trap the fission products. The venting filters of the containment currently installed use different filtration technologies that involve more than one medium. Those using water as the first stage of filtration are called wet systems and are equipped with additional steps to remove water drops and fine aerosols emissions. And even they may also be equipped with an element containing certain absorption means for the filtration of gaseous iodine species. Other designs based on filtration of deep bed as the primary retention step; called dry filters, use filtration media of metal fiber, ceramic or sand to trap aerosols. This paper evaluates the hydraulic characteristics of the filter sand bed type designed by EDF as a candidate to be installed in the containment of BWR Mark II (type of primary containment of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde). The evaluation of filter sand bed type was performed using the software package of open source OpenFOAM. Models of each zone of the filtered device were generated and through a series of parametric calculations of computational fluid mechanics relevant hydrodynamic characteristics of the device were obtained, such as pressure drops against mass flow rate and pressure fields and speed at different operating conditions. On the other hand, the model validation of the sand bed filter when comparing the results of experimental tests on a sand column of PITEAS program (1985-1986) against OpenFOAM simulation was realized. The results are very close to those obtained experimentally. (Author)

  15. Vented chest seals for prevention of tension pneumothorax in a communicating pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotora, Joseph G; Henao, Jose; Littlejohn, Lanny F; Kircher, Sara

    2013-11-01

    Tension pneumothorax accounts for 3%-4% of combat casualties and 10% of civilian chest trauma. Air entering a wound via a communicating pneumothorax rather than by the trachea can result in respiratory arrest and death. In such cases, the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care advocates the use of unvented chest seals to prevent respiratory compromise. A comparison of three commercially available vented chest seals was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of tension pneumothorax prevention after seal application. A surgical thoracostomy was created and sealed by placing a shortened 10-mL syringe barrel (with plunger in place) into the wound. Tension pneumothorax was achieved via air introduction through a Cordis to a maximum volume of 50 mL/kg. A 20% drop in mean arterial pressure or a 20% increase in heart rate confirmed hemodynamic compromise. After evacuation, one of three vented chest seals (HyFin(®), n = 8; Sentinel(®), n = 8, SAM(®), n = 8) was applied. Air was injected to a maximum of 50 mL/kg twice, followed by a 10% autologous blood infusion, and finally, a third 50 mL/kg air bolus. Survivors completed all three interventions, and a 15-min recovery period. The introduction of 29.0 (±11.5) mL/kg of air resulted in tension physiology. All three seals effectively evacuated air and blood. Hemodynamic compromise failed to develop with a chest seal in place. HyFin(®), SAM(®), and Sentinel(®) vented chest seals are equally effective in evacuating blood and air in a communicating pneumothorax model. All three prevented tension pneumothorax formation after penetrating thoracic trauma. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Impact of the filtered venting system design upon the total radioactive release in case of a severe accident and a comparison of European requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederqvist, H.; Elisson, K.; Loewenhielm, G.; Appelgren, E.

    1991-01-01

    Filtered containment venting systems have been introduced in several nuclear power plants in Europe. The objective is to relieve the containment overpressure in a controlled way during a severe accident involving core-melt. The release of fission products when operating the venting system has been compared to that resulting from diffuse leakage from the containment. The conclusion is that the diffuse leakage of gaseous and particulate species can not be neglected in comparison to that resulting from operating the filtered containment venting system. Representative European requirements related to filtered containment venting have been analyzed and compared

  17. Diversity and distribution of microbes in deep-sea sub-vent systems, using newly designed in situ growth chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Y.; Sunamura, M.; Utsumi, M.; Urabe, T.; Maruyama, A.

    2004-12-01

    Subsurface of deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments is one of the most difficult fields on the Earth to approach and collect reliable samples for microbiological study. In our Archaean Park project, we developed in situ incubation instruments to directly collect microbes from sub-vent fields through a drilled borehole. After excavation using a portable submarine driller (BMS) around deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Suiyo Seamount on the Izu-Bonin Arc (2001, 2002) and the South Mariana (2003), microbial diversity was examined in samples collected from the boreholes, as well as natural vents, using catheter- and column-type in situ growth chambers. In the catheter samples collected from the Suiyo Seamount, several novel phylotypes of microbial SSU rRNA genes were assigned within epsilon-Proteobacteria and hyperthermophile-related Euryarchaea groups. The former novel epsilon group (SSSV-BE1) was also detected in the South Mariana, but they only appeared in the catheter samples collected just below the venting seafloor. These suggest that the group must be significant in warm, shallow and microaerobic sub-vent layers over the sea, at least in the northwest Pacific Ocean. The column-type in situ growth chamber was specially designed for creating and maintaining physico-chemical gradients in a ca. 40-cm-long column situated on an active vent. In Suiyo Seamount samples (vent temp.: ca. 30-100 degree C), a unique vertical profile was found in the diversity of Archaea. At the column bottom, most of the clones were assigned to be members within the lithoautotrophic thermophilic Ignicoccus, while heterotrophic thermophilic Thermococcus were abundant at the column top. Similar vertical profile has also been appeared in the column samples from the South Mariana. Further quantitative population analysis is now under going using these samples. Our approach to the sub-vent biosphere by the combination of drilling and in situ incubation is almost sure to give us important clues

  18. DUCKS: Low cost thermal monitoring units for near-vent deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A.; Pirie, D.; Horton, K.; Garbeil, H.; Pilger, E.; Ramm, H.; Hoblitt, R.; Thornber, C.; Ripepe, M.; Marchetti, E.; Poggi, P.

    2005-01-01

    During 1999 we designed and tested a thermal monitoring system to provide a cheap, robust, modular, real-time system capable of surviving the hostile conditions encountered proximal to active volcanic vents. In November 2000 the first system was deployed at Pu'u 'O'o (Kilauea, Hawai'i) to target persistently active vents. Aside from some minor problems, such as sensor damage due to tampering, this system remained operational until January 2004. The success of the prototype system led us to use the blueprint for a second installation at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands, Italy). This was deployed, dug into a bomb-proof bunker, during May 2002 and survived the April 2003 paroxysmal eruption despite being located just 250 m from the vent. In both cases, careful waterproofing of connectors and selection of suitable protection has prevented water damage and corrosion in the harsh atmosphere encountered at the crater rim. The Pu'u 'O'o system cost ???US$10,000 and comprises four modules: sensors, transmission and power hub, repeater station and reception site. The sensor component consists of three thermal infrared thermometers housed in Pelican??? cases fitted with Germanium-Arsenide-Selenium windows. Two 1?? field of view (FOV) sensors allow specific vents to be targeted and a 60?? FOV sensor provides a crater floor overview. A hard wire connection links to a Pelican???-case-housed microprocessor, modem and power module. From here data are transmitted, via a repeater site, to a dedicated PC at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Here data are displayed with a delay of ???3 s between acquisition and display. The modular design allows for great flexibility. At Stromboli, 1?? and 15?? FOV sensor modules can be switched depending changes in activity style and crater geometry. In addition a direct line of site to the Stromboli reception center negates the repeater site requirement, reducing the cost to US$5500 for a single sensor system. We have also constructed self-contained units

  19. Preliminary Results on Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Loki's Castle Arctic Vents and Host Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Fernando; Carvalho, Carlos; Inês Cruz, M.; Dias, Ágata; Fonseca, Rita; Relvas, Jorge; Pedersen, Rolf

    2010-05-01

    The Loki's Castle hydrothermal vent field was discovered in the summer of 2008, during a cruise led by the Centre of Geobiology of the University of Bergen, integrated in the H2Deep Project (Eurocores, ESF). Loki's Castle is the northernmost hydrothermal vent field discovered to date. It is located at the junction between the Mohns Ridge and the South Knipovich Ridge, in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, at almost 74°N. This junction shows unique features and apparently there is no transform fault to accommodate the deformation generated by the bending of the rift valley from WSW-ENE to almost N-S. The Knipovich Rigde, being a complex structure, is an ultra-slow spreading ridge, with an effective spreading rate of only ~ 6 mm/y. It is partly masked by a substantial cover of glacial and post-glacial sediments, estimated to be between 12 and 20 ky old, derived from the nearby Bear Island fan, to the East of the ridge. The Loki's Castle vent site is composed of several active, over 10 m tall chimneys, producing up to 320°C fluid, at the top of a very large sulphide mound, which is estimated to be around 200 m in diameter. About a dozen gravity cores were obtained in the overall area. From these we collected nearly 200 subsamples. Eh and pH were measured in all subsamples. The Portuguese component of the H2Deep project is aimed at characterizing, chemically and mineralogically, the sulphide chimneys and the collected sediments around the vents (up to 5 meters long gravity cores). These studies are aimed at understanding the ore-forming system, and its implications for submarine mineral exploration, as well as the relation of the microbial population with the hydrothermal component of sediments. Here we present an overview of preliminary data on the mineralogical assemblage found in the analyzed sediments and chimneys. The identification of the different mineral phases was obtained through petrographic observations of polished thin sections under the microscope (with both

  20. Analyse du vent sur l'aérodrome de Brasov-Ghimbav (Roumanie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Ilie Briceag

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cette analyse du vent est destinée à préciser les conditions météorologiques locales qui conditionnent le fonctionnement de l'aérodrome de Brasov-Ghimbav. En aviation, la direction et l'intensité du vent sont très importantes pour le décollage et plus encore pour l'atterrissage des aéronefs. L'étude de cet élément météorologique est réalisée à partir d'une analyse climatologique portant sur 39 années, de 1971 à 2009, et d'une analyse aérologique sur 10 années, de 2000 à 2009 (les observations météorologiques ont été fournies par l'Administration Nationale de la Météorologie. Les résultats obtenus montrent la distribution prédominante du vent selon certaines directions, les directions nord-ouest et sud-ouest, pour les observations visuelles anciennes, et les directions ouest-nord-ouest et sud-sud-ouest, pour les observations automatiques au cours des six dernières années. Quelle que soit la méthode d'observation, c'est le vent de travers (directions ouest qui atteint les vitesses les plus élevées sur la piste principale de l'aérodrome de Brasov-Ghimbav, comme du reste sur la piste projetée pour le futur aéroport international de Brasov. Cela constitue un problème pour les aéronefs les plus légers, dont les valeurs limites pour le vent de travers sont faibles. Dans ce contexte, la prévision des vents violents est très importante. La distribution horaire des vents sur la période 2000­2009, montre notamment qu'au printemps et en été, les vents de nord-ouest sont largement dominants durant le jour, en particulier pour les vitesses [10-15 m/s, avec une fréquence maximale entre 10 et 15 heures. L'analyse aérologique des situations météorologiques apporte des éléments d'explication à certaines observations. Ainsi les vitesses du vent ≥ 20 m/s ont été enregistrées majoritairement en présence du cyclone Islandais, lors du passage du front atmosphérique froid, le contraste barrique étant

  1. DUCKS: Low cost thermal monitoring units for near-vent deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Andrew; Pirie, Dawn; Horton, Keith; Garbeil, Harold; Pilger, Eric; Ramm, Hans; Hoblitt, Rick; Thornber, Carl; Ripepe, Maurizio; Marchetti, Emanuele; Poggi, Pasquale

    2005-05-01

    During 1999 we designed and tested a thermal monitoring system to provide a cheap, robust, modular, real-time system capable of surviving the hostile conditions encountered proximal to active volcanic vents. In November 2000 the first system was deployed at Pu'u 'O'o (Kilauea, Hawai'i) to target persistently active vents. Aside from some minor problems, such as sensor damage due to tampering, this system remained operational until January 2004. The success of the prototype system led us to use the blueprint for a second installation at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands, Italy). This was deployed, dug into a bomb-proof bunker, during May 2002 and survived the April 2003 paroxysmal eruption despite being located just 250 m from the vent. In both cases, careful waterproofing of connectors and selection of suitable protection has prevented water damage and corrosion in the harsh atmosphere encountered at the crater rim. The Pu'u 'O'o system cost ˜US10,000 and comprises four modules: sensors, transmission and power hub, repeater station and reception site. The sensor component consists of three thermal infrared thermometers housed in Pelican™ cases fitted with Germanium-Arsenide-Selenium windows. Two 1° field of view (FOV) sensors allow specific vents to be targeted and a 60° FOV sensor provides a crater floor overview. A hard wire connection links to a Pelican™-case-housed microprocessor, modem and power module. From here data are transmitted, via a repeater site, to a dedicated PC at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Here data are displayed with a delay of ˜3 s between acquisition and display. The modular design allows for great flexibility. At Stromboli, 1° and 15° FOV sensor modules can be switched depending changes in activity style and crater geometry. In addition a direct line of site to the Stromboli reception center negates the repeater site requirement, reducing the cost to US5500 for a single sensor system. We have also constructed self-contained units

  2. Venting temperature determines surface chemistry of magnetron sputtered TiN films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greczynski, G. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Mráz, S.; Schneider, J. M. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Hultman, L. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-01-25

    Surface properties of refractory ceramic transition metal nitride thin films grown by magnetron sputtering are essential for resistance towards oxidation necessary in all modern applications. Here, typically neglected factors, including exposure to residual process gases following the growth and the venting temperature T{sub v}, each affecting the surface chemistry, are addressed. It is demonstrated for the TiN model materials system that T{sub v} has a substantial effect on the composition and thickness-evolution of the reacted surface layer and should therefore be reported. The phenomena are also shown to have impact on the reliable surface characterization by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  3. Bacterial Sulfate Reduction Above 100-Degrees-C in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; ISAKSEN, MF; JANNASCH, HW

    1992-01-01

    -reducing bacteria was done in hot deep-sea sediments at the hydrothermal vents of the Guaymas Basin tectonic spreading center in the Gulf of California. Radiotracer studies revealed that sulfate reduction can occur at temperatures up to 110-degrees-C, with an optimum rate at 103-degrees to 106-degrees......-C. This observation expands the upper temperature limit of this process in deep-ocean sediments by 20-degrees-C and indicates the existence of an unknown groUp of hyperthermophilic bacteria with a potential importance for the biogeochemistry of sulfur above 100-degrees-C....

  4. Bacterial and archaeal communities in the deep-sea sediments of inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest India Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likui; Kang, Manyu; Xu, Jiajun; Xu, Jian; Shuai, Yinjie; Zhou, Xiaojian; Yang, Zhihui; Ma, Kesen

    2016-05-01

    Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents harbor abundant thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms. However, microbial communities in inactive hydrothermal vents have not been well documented. Here, we investigated bacterial and archaeal communities in the two deep-sea sediments (named as TVG4 and TVG11) collected from inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest India Ridge using the high-throughput sequencing technology of Illumina MiSeq2500 platform. Based on the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene, sequence analysis showed that bacterial communities in the two samples were dominated by Proteobacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Furthermore, archaeal communities in the two samples were dominated by Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Comparative analysis showed that (i) TVG4 displayed the higher bacterial richness and lower archaeal richness than TVG11; (ii) the two samples had more divergence in archaeal communities than bacterial communities. Bacteria and archaea that are potentially associated with nitrogen, sulfur metal and methane cycling were detected in the two samples. Overall, we first provided a comparative picture of bacterial and archaeal communities and revealed their potentially ecological roles in the deep-sea environments of inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest Indian Ridge, augmenting microbial communities in inactive hydrothermal vents.

  5. Dietary carbon sources of mussels and tubeworms from Galapagos hydrothermal vents determined from tissue adC activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P M; Smith, K L; Druffel, E M; Linick, T W

    1981-07-30

    The large quantities of reduced carbon that are required to support the filter-feeding mytilid mussels (Mytilus sp.), vesicomyid clams (Clayptogena sp.) and various other animals in the Galapagos hydrothermal vent systems are thought to be derived from either the in situ synthesis of particulate organic matter by chemoautotrophic, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria or by the advection of sedimentary organic carbon into the vent environment from surrounding areas. In contrast, the dense populations of vestimentiferan tubeworms (Riftia pachyptila), which lack mouth organs and digestive tracts, apparently utilize organic carbon synthesized by symbiotic chemoautotrophs. We present evidence here, based on adC activities and acC/abC ratios, that the principal source of dietary carbon for mussels and tubeworms is derived from the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIOC) in the vent effluent waters.

  6. Metatranscriptomics reveal differences in in situ energy and nitrogen metabolism among hydrothermal vent snail symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J G; Beinart, R A; Stewart, F J; Delong, E F; Girguis, P R

    2013-08-01

    Despite the ubiquity of chemoautotrophic symbioses at hydrothermal vents, our understanding of the influence of environmental chemistry on symbiont metabolism is limited. Transcriptomic analyses are useful for linking physiological poise to environmental conditions, but recovering samples from the deep sea is challenging, as the long recovery times can change expression profiles before preservation. Here, we present a novel, in situ RNA sampling and preservation device, which we used to compare the symbiont metatranscriptomes associated with Alviniconcha, a genus of vent snail, in which specific host-symbiont combinations are predictably distributed across a regional geochemical gradient. Metatranscriptomes of these symbionts reveal key differences in energy and nitrogen metabolism relating to both environmental chemistry (that is, the relative expression of genes) and symbiont phylogeny (that is, the specific pathways employed). Unexpectedly, dramatic differences in expression of transposases and flagellar genes suggest that different symbiont types may also have distinct life histories. These data further our understanding of these symbionts' metabolic capabilities and their expression in situ, and suggest an important role for symbionts in mediating their hosts' interaction with regional-scale differences in geochemistry.

  7. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogena XCL-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Kathleen M.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Abril, Fereniki N.; Ball,Lois A.; Barrett, Chantell J.; Blake, Rodrigo A.; Boller, Amanda J.; Chain, Patrick S.G.; Clark, Justine A.; Davis, Carisa R.; Detter, Chris; Do, Kimberly F.; Dobrinski, Kimberly P.; Faza, BrandonI.; Fitzpatrick,Kelly A.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Harmer, Tara L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Hugler, Michael; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Klotz, Martin G.; Kong, William W.; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Larimer, Frank W.; Longo, Dana L.; Lucas,Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Massey, Steven E.; Martin, Darlene D.; McCuddin, Zoe; Meyer, Folker; Moore, Jessica L.; Ocampo, Luis H.; Paul,John H.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Reep, Douglas K.; Ren, Qinghu; Ross, Rachel L.; Sato, Priscila Y.; Thomas, Phaedra; Tinkham, Lance E.; Zeruth, Gary T.

    2006-08-23

    Presented here is the complete genome sequence ofThiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitouschemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-seahydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome(2,427,734 bp), and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations thathave enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-acceptingchemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioningit in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of CDSs encoding regulatoryproteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes,multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as wellas a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety ofoptions for acquiring these substrates from the environment. T. crunogenaXCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur oxidizing bacteria in relying onthe Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. A 38 kbprophage is present, and a high level of prophage induction was observed,which may play a role in keeping competing populations of close relativesin check. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligatelychemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted tohave organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scatteredthroughout the genome.

  8. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, K M; Sievert, S M; Abril, F N; Ball, L A; Barrett, C J; Blake, R A; Boller, A J; Chain, P G; Clark, J A; Davis, C R; Detter, C; Do, K F; Dobrinski, K P; Faza, B I; Fitzpatrick, K A; Freyermuth, S K; Harmer, T L; Hauser, L J; Hugler, M; Kerfeld, C A; Klotz, M G; Kong, W W; Land, M; Lapidus, A; Larimer, F W; Longo, D L; Lucas, S; Malfatti, S A; Massey, S E; Martin, D D; McCuddin, Z; Meyer, F; Moore, J L; Ocampo Jr., L H; Paul, J H; Paulsen, I T; Reep, D K; Ren, Q; Ross, R L; Sato, P Y; Thomas, P; Tinkham, L E; Zerugh, G T

    2007-01-10

    Presented here is the complete genome sequence of Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitous chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome (2,427,734 bp), and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations that have enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioning it in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of CDSs encoding regulatory proteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes, multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as well as a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety of options for acquiring these substrates from the environment. T. crunogena XCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur oxidizing bacteria in relying on the Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. A 38 kb prophage is present, and a high level of prophage induction was observed, which may play a role in keeping competing populations of close relatives in check. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligately chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted to have organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scattered throughout the genome.

  9. Observation of trapped gas during electrical resistance heating of trichloroethylene under passive venting conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E. J.; Kueper, B. H.

    2011-11-01

    A two-dimensional experiment employing a heterogeneous sand pack incorporating two pools of trichloroethylene (TCE) was performed to assess the efficacy of electrical resistance heating (ERH) under passive venting conditions. Temperature monitoring displayed the existence of a TCE-water co-boiling plateau at 73.4 °C, followed by continued heating to 100 °C. A 5 cm thick gas accumulation formed beneath a fine-grained capillary barrier during and after co-boiling. The capillary barrier did not desaturate during the course of the experiment; the only pathway for gas escape being through perforated wells traversing the barrier. The thickness of the accumulation was dictated by the entry pressure of the perforated well. The theoretical maximum TCE soil concentration within the region of gas accumulation, following gas collapse, was estimated to be 888 mg/kg. Post-heating soil sampling revealed TCE concentrations in this region ranging from 27 mg/kg to 96.7 mg/kg, indicating removal of aqueous and gas phase TCE following co-boiling as a result of subsequent boiling of water. The equilibrium concentrations of TCE in water corresponding to the range of post-treatment concentrations in soil (6.11 mg/kg to 136 mg/kg) are calculated to range from 19.8 mg/l to 440 mg/l. The results of this experiment illustrate the importance of providing gas phase venting during the application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media.

  10. ectures de l’espace dans Un vent prodigue de Simone Chaput

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Sechin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Le dernier roman de Simone Chaput, Un vent prodigue, nous présente l’entrelacs conflictuel de cadrages contemporains effectué par les quatre personnages sur les paysages, et illustre ainsi la problématique très actuelle du difficile positionnement du sujet par rapport à la « nature » dans un sens très large. Ce cadrage traduit, comme une sorte de prisme ou de filtre, le mode de relation au monde : le positionnement du sujet (son inscription, son détachement, son bagage (culturel et historique, ontologique et épistémologique par rapport au monde, et plus largement l’interaction entre la Terre et l’humain. The four main characters in Simone Chaput’s latest novel, Un vent prodigue, are, each in their own way, centering the landscapes that surround them. Each one embodies a specific mode of being in relation with the world, thus illustrating the difficult matter of how the subject ought to position itself towards “nature”. Their focus reveals this mode of being, whether the subject choses to be part of the world or outside of it, which also reveals their cultural, historical, ontological and epistemological values and, in a broader sense, questions the modes of interaction between humans and the Earth.

  11. Spray Bar Zero-Gravity Vent System for On-Orbit Liquid Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Martin, J. J.; Hedayat, A.; Fazah, M.; Lak, T.; Nguyen, H.; Bailey, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    During zero-gravity orbital cryogenic propulsion operations, a thermodynamic vent system (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure control without propellant resettling. In this case, a longitudinal spray bar mixer system, coupled with a Joule-Thompson (J-T) valve and heat exchanger, was evaluated in a series of TVS tests using the 18 cu m multipurpose hydrogen test bed. Tests performed at fill levels of 90, 50, and 25 percent, coupled with heat tank leaks of about 20 and 50 W, successfully demonstrated tank pressure control within a 7-kPa band. Based on limited testing, the presence of helium constrained the energy exchange between the gaseous and liquid hydrogen (LH2) during the mixing cycles. A transient analytical model, formulated to characterize TVS performance, was used to correlate the test data. During self-pressurization cycles following tank lockup, the model predicted faster pressure rise rates than were measured; however, once the system entered the cyclic self-pressurization/mixing/venting operational mode, the modeled and measured data were quite similar. During a special test at the 25-percent fill level, the J-T valve was allowed to remain open and successfully reduced the bulk LH2 saturation pressure from 133 to 70 kPa in 188 min.

  12. Production of iridium-alloy clad vent sets for the Cassini mission to Saturn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helle, K.J.; Moore, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., has successfully produced the iridium-alloy clad vent sets required for encapsulation of plutonia for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Cassini mission to Saturn. Numerous improvements were made to the manufacturing process in various areas including dye-penetrant examination of cups, foil part stamping, chemical analysis, tungsten fixturing for laser welding, and enhanced inspections at high magnification. In addition, systems were initiated to ensure process control, and a detailed quality and technical surveillance program was prepared and followed to detect any incipient production problem early in the process so that corrective action could be taken immediately. The quality of the resulting iridium components has been high, and production yields have been above 90%. During the course of the production campaign for the Cassini mission, worker efficiencies lowered production costs, and further cost reductions are possible if operations are consolidated into a single area and bare-forming of the iridium alloys cups can be qualified for flight-quality clad vent sets

  13. Risk reduction by filtered venting in PWR large dry-containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazzillo, F.; Kastenberg, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The potential risk reduction associated with a Filtered-Vented Containment System is evaluated. A low-volume venting strategy has been considered and data referring to the Zion power plant, along with the results of the Zion Probabilistic Safety Study, have been used. An estimate of the reduction factor is first made for a single core melt accident sequence whose containment failure mode is late overpressure. The result, interpreted as a reduction factor applicable to the release category associated with containment late overpressure is then used for the estimation of the overall risk reduction factor. In particular, the case of internal and external risk for the Zion power plant are considered. Because the contribution from seismic events dominates the overall risk, the importance of different assumptions for seismic fragility is also assessed. Finally an uncertainty analysis of the risk reduction factor for a single accident sequence is performed. An estimate is also obtained on the level of confidence with which certain required values of risk reduction can be achieved. (orig.)

  14. An Estimation of Human Error Probability of Filtered Containment Venting System Using Dynamic HRA Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seunghyun; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The human failure events (HFEs) are considered in the development of system fault trees as well as accident sequence event trees in part of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). As a method for analyzing the human error, several methods, such as Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP), Human Cognitive Reliability (HCR), and Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) are used and new methods for human reliability analysis (HRA) are under developing at this time. This paper presents a dynamic HRA method for assessing the human failure events and estimation of human error probability for filtered containment venting system (FCVS) is performed. The action associated with implementation of the containment venting during a station blackout sequence is used as an example. In this report, dynamic HRA method was used to analyze FCVS-related operator action. The distributions of the required time and the available time were developed by MAAP code and LHS sampling. Though the numerical calculations given here are only for illustrative purpose, the dynamic HRA method can be useful tools to estimate the human error estimation and it can be applied to any kind of the operator actions, including the severe accident management strategy.

  15. Modeling of interaction of multiple vent pipes in a pressure suppression pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timperi, A.; Chauhan, M.; Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2012-04-15

    Calculations of direct-contact condensation in the pressure suppression pool have been performed. Partial pressure model for the condensation of pure vapor is used for the condensation, which makes possible modeling of the condensation of pure vapor. The heat and mass transfer during condensation is studied in detail for experiment PAR-10 in the PPOOLEX facility. The rapid collapse of a steam bubble in PPOOLEX experiment COL-01 has been analyzed with the new Eulerian model of Abaqus. By observing the collapse behavior, the pressure variation inside the bubble was fitted with the experiment. The effect of system size on the pressure peak was also examined; these results can be used for studying more thoroughly the scaling of the experimental results to full-scale in future. The desynchronization of chugging events in the two vent experiment PAR-10 was studied. The statistical distribution of desynchronization was determined from the measured pressure data and compared to results obtained in a seven vent pipe experiment found from literature. The response of BWR containment during desynchronized chugging events and with varying speeds of sound was numerically computed using direct time integration and modal dynamics procedure available in Abaqus. (Author)

  16. Vent System Analysis for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage Transfer Ground Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A

    2013-01-01

    To test and validate key capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements such as large cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots, NASA is leading the efforts to develop and design the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) payload. The primary objectives of CPST payload are to demonstrate: 1) in-space storage of cryogenic propellants for long duration applications; and 2) in-space transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Ground Test Article (GTA) is a technology development version of the CPST payload. The GTA consists of flight-sized and flight-like storage and transfer tanks, liquid acquisition devices, transfer, and pressurization systems with all of the CPST functionality. The GTA is designed to perform integrated passive and active thermal storage and transfer performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a vacuum environment. The GTA storage tank is designed to store liquid hydrogen and the transfer tank is designed to be 5% of the storage tank volume. The LH2 transfer subsystem is designed to transfer propellant from one tank to the other utilizing pressure or a pump. The LH2 vent subsystem is designed to prevent over-pressurization of the storage and transfer tanks. An in-house general-purpose computer program was utilized to model and simulate the vent subsystem operation. The modeling, analysis, and the results will be presented in the final paper.

  17. Microbial utilization of naturally occurring hydrocarbons at the Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylinski, D.A.; Wirsen, C.O.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California; depth, 2,000 m) is a site of hydrothermal activity in which petroliferous materials is formed by thermal alteration of deposited planktonic and terrestrial organic matter. We investigated certain components of these naturally occurring hydrocarbons as potential carbon sources for a specific microflora at these deep-sea vent sites. Respiratory conversion of [1- 14 C]hexadecane and [1(4,5,8)- 14 C]naphthalene to 14 CO 2 was observed at 4 degree C and 25 degree C, and some was observed at 55 degree C, but none was observed at 80 degree C. Bacterial isolates were capable of growing on both substrates as the sole carbon source. All isolates were aerobic and mesophilic with respect to growth on hydrocarbons but also grew at low temperatures (4 to 5 degree C). These results correlate well with previous geochemical analyses, indicating microbial hydrocarbon degradation, and show that at least some of the thermally produced hydrocarbons at Guaymas Basin are significant carbon sources to vent microbiota

  18. Experimental study of mixed convection flow through a horizontal orifice or vent linking two compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varrall, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    To answer building issues and fire safety challenges, this thesis deals with the mixed convection flow through a horizontal orifice or vent linking two compartments. The aim is to improve the understanding and the modeling of the exchange of gas through the opening. A small scale experimental study and a theoretical approach are proposed. The study focuses first on the influence of the geometrical ratio L/D of the opening on the flow rate at the vent for free convection regime. Non-intrusive measurements, via the tracking of the interface between two non miscible liquids in an isothermal approach, and thanks to the SPIV in a thermal approach, permit to describe the bidirectional exchange process and to consolidate existing correlations. Experiments for mixed convection regime aim to study the impact of mechanical ventilation (in blowing and extracting modes) on the exchanged flow rates. The comparison between existing correlations and experimental data shows large differences. A modification of the correlation of Cooper is proposed. A theoretical approach from the simplified Navier Stokes equations and with the Boussinesq approximation permits to discuss the construction of existing correlations. From this theory, a more accurate model than those available in the literature is proposed thanks to an adjustment of discharge coefficients from experimental data. (author)

  19. Forecasting Effusive Dynamics and Decompression Rates by Magmastatic Model at Open-vent Volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Pistolesi, Marco; Coppola, Diego; Delle Donne, Dario; Genco, Riccardo; Lacanna, Giorgio; Laiolo, Marco; Marchetti, Emanuele; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Valade, Sébastien

    2017-06-20

    Effusive eruptions at open-conduit volcanoes are interpreted as reactions to a disequilibrium induced by the increase in magma supply. By comparing four of the most recent effusive eruptions at Stromboli volcano (Italy), we show how the volumes of lava discharged during each eruption are linearly correlated to the topographic positions of the effusive vents. This correlation cannot be explained by an excess of pressure within a deep magma chamber and raises questions about the actual contributions of deep magma dynamics. We derive a general model based on the discharge of a shallow reservoir and the magmastatic crustal load above the vent, to explain the linear link. In addition, we show how the drastic transition from effusive to violent explosions can be related to different decompression rates. We suggest that a gravity-driven model can shed light on similar cases of lateral effusive eruptions in other volcanic systems and can provide evidence of the roles of slow decompression rates in triggering violent paroxysmal explosive eruptions, which occasionally punctuate the effusive phases at basaltic volcanoes.

  20. Metal interactions between the polychaete Branchipolynoe seepensis and the mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus from Mid-Atlantic-Ridge hydrothermal vent fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebianno, Maria João; Cardoso, Cátia; Gomes, Tânia; Blasco, Julian; Santos, Ricardo Serrão; Colaço, Ana

    2018-04-01

    The vent blood-red commensal polynoid polychaete Branchipolynoe seepensis is commonly found in the pallial cavity of the vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus, the dominant bivalve species along the Mid-Atlantic-Ridge (MAR) and is known to be kleptoparasitic. Mussels were collected from three hydrothermal vent fields in the MAR: Menez Gwen (850 m depth, MG2, MG3 and MG4), Lucky Strike (1700 m depth, Montségur-MS and Eiffel Tower-ET) and Rainbow (2300 m depth). Polychaetes were absent in all Menez Gwen vent mussels, while the highest percentage was detected in mussels from Lucky Strike, where more than 70% of the mussels had at least one polychaete in their mantle cavity, followed by Rainbow with 33% of mussels with polychaetes. Total metal concentrations (Ag, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn) were determined in polychaetes whole body and in the mussel tissues (gills, digestive gland and mantle). To understand the possible metal interactions between symbiont and host, the activity of antioxidant defence (catalase (CAT), metallothioneins (MTs)), biotransformation enzymes (glutathione-s-transferases (GST)) activities and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were determined in polychaete whole soft tissues and in mussel tissues (gills, digestive gland and mantle). Metal concentrations in polychaetes and mussels tissues indicated that the accumulation patterns were species specific and also influenced by, and possibly dependent upon, the inter- and intra-variation of vent physico-chemistry between hydrothermal fields. Despite not detecting any strong correlations between metal and enzymes activities in polychaetes and mussels, when in presence of polychaetes, mussels presented less metal concentrations in the gills and digestive gland and lower activity of enzymatic biomarkers. This leads to infer that the polychaete plays a role on the detoxification process, and the interaction between the polychaete mussel association is probably an adaptation to metals concentrations at the

  1. Borders of life: lessons from Microbiology of deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieur, D.

    Thirty years ago, the deep-sea was known as a low density biotope due to coldness, darkness and famine-like conditions. The discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Eastern Pacific in 1977 and the associated black smokers in 1979 considerably changed our views about life on Earth. For the first time, an ecosystem almost independent (at least for tens of years) of solar nergy was discovered. Besides the spectacular and unexpected communities of invertebrates based on symbiotic associations with chemo-litho-autotrophic bacteria, prokaryotic communities associated with high temperature black smokers fascinated microbiologists of extreme environments. Within mineral structures where temperature gradients may fluctuate from ambient seawater temperatures (2°C) up to 350°C, thermophilic (optimal growth above 60°C) and hyperthermophilic (optimal growth above 80°C) microorganisms thrived under very severe conditions due to elevated hydrostatic pressure, toxic compounds or strong ionizing radiations. These organisms belong to both domains of Bacteria and Archaea and live aerobically but mostly anaerobically, using a variety of inorganic and organic carbon sources, and a variety of electron donnors and acceptors as well. The most thermophilic organism known on Earth was isolated from a mid-Atlantic-Ridge hydrotermal vent: Pyrolobus fumarii grows optimally at 110°c and its upper temperature limit for life is 113°C. Such an organism survived to autoclaving conditions currently used for sterilization procedures. Many other hyperthermophilic organisms were isolated and described, including fermenters, sulphate and sulphur reducers, hydrogen oxidizers, nitrate reducers, methanogens, etc. Although most of anaerobes are killed when exposed to oxygen, several deep-sea hyperthermophiles appeared to survive to both oxygen and starvation exposures, indicating that they probably can colonize rather distant environments Because of elevated hydrostatic pressure that exists at

  2. In situ Raman-based detections of the hydrothermal vent and cold seep fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Du, Zengfeng; Zheng, Ronger; Luan, Zhendong; Qi, Fujun; Cheng, Kai; Wang, Bing; Ye, Wangquan; Liu, Xiaorui; Chen, Changan; Guo, Jinjia; Li, Ying; Yan, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, and their associated biological communities play an important role in global carbon and sulphur biogeochemical cycles. Most of the studies of fluid composition geochemistry are based on recovered samples, both with gas-tight samplers and as open specimens, but the in situ conditions are difficult to maintain in recovered samples. Determination in situ of the chemical signals of the emerging fluids are challenging due to the high pressure, often strongly acidic and temperature in which few sensors can survive. Most of those sensors used so far are based on electrochemistry, and can typically detect only a few chemical species. Here we show that direct measurement of critical chemical species of hydrothermal vents and cold seeps can be made rapidly and in situ by means of a new hybrid version of earlier deep-sea pore water Raman probe carried on the ROV (Remote Operated Vehicle) Faxian. The fluid was drawn through the probe by actuating a hydraulic pump on the ROV, and measured at the probe optical cell through a sapphire window. We have observed the concentrations of H2S, HS-, SO42-, HSO4-, CO2, and H2 in hydrothermal vent fluids from the Pacmanus and Desmos vent systems in the Manus back-arc basin, Papua New Guinea. Two black smokers (279° C and 186° C) at the Pacmanus site showed the characteristic loss of SO42-, and the increase of CO2 and well resolved H2S and HS- peaks. At the white smoker of Onsen site the strong HSO4-peak observed at high temperature quickly dropped with strong accompanying increase of SO42-and H2 peaks when the sample contained in the Raman sensing cell was removed from the hot fluid due to rapid thermal deprotonation. We report here also the finding of a new lower temperature (88° C) white smoker "Kexue" field at the Desmos site with strong H2S, HS- and CO2 signals. We also have detected the concentrations of CH4,H2S, HS-, SO42-, and S8 in cold seep fluids and the surrounding sediment pore water from

  3. 40 CFR 63.2465 - What requirements must I meet for process vents that emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... process vents that emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP metals? 63.2465 Section 63.2465 Protection... and halogen HAP or HAP metals? (a) You must meet each emission limit in Table 3 to this subpart that... section. (b) If any process vents within a process emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP, you must...

  4. Krohne Flow Indicator and High Flow Alarm - Local Indicator and High Flow Alarm of Helium Flow from the SCHe Purge Lines C and D to the Process Vent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    Flow Indicators/alarms FI/FSH-5*52 and -5*72 are located in the process vent lines connected to the 2 psig SCHe purge lines C and D. They monitor the flow from the 2 psig SCHe purge going to the process vent. The switch/alarm is non-safety class GS

  5. Severe Accident Mitigation through Improvements in Filtered Containment Vent Systems and Containment Cooling Strategies for Water Cooled Reactors. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-05-01

    One of the most important lessons from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is that a reliable containment venting system can be crucial for effective accident management during severe accidents, especially for smaller volume containments in relation to the rated nuclear power. Containment venting can enhance the capability to maintain core cooling and containment integrity as well as reduce uncontrolled radioactive releases to the environment if the venting system has a filtration capacity. In general, a filtered containment vent system increases the flexibility of plant personnel in coping with unforeseen events. This publication provides the overview of the current status of related activities with the goal to share information between Member States on actions, upgrades, and new technologies pertaining to containment cooling and venting.

  6. Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Viruses Compensate for Microbial Metabolism in Virus-Host Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tianliang; Li, Hongyun; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2017-07-11

    Viruses are believed to be responsible for the mortality of host organisms. However, some recent investigations reveal that viruses may be essential for host survival. To date, it remains unclear whether viruses are beneficial or harmful to their hosts. To reveal the roles of viruses in the virus-host interactions, viromes and microbiomes of sediment samples from three deep-sea hydrothermal vents were explored in this study. To exclude the influence of exogenous DNAs on viromes, the virus particles were purified with nuclease (DNase I and RNase A) treatments and cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation. The metagenomic analysis of viromes without exogenous DNA contamination and microbiomes of vent samples indicated that viruses had compensation effects on the metabolisms of their host microorganisms. Viral genes not only participated in most of the microbial metabolic pathways but also formed branched pathways in microbial metabolisms, including pyrimidine metabolism; alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism; nitrogen metabolism and assimilation pathways of the two-component system; selenocompound metabolism; aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis; and amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism. As is well known, deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems exist in relatively isolated environments which are barely influenced by other ecosystems. The metabolic compensation of hosts mediated by viruses might represent a very important aspect of virus-host interactions. IMPORTANCE Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans and have very important roles in regulating microbial community structure and biogeochemical cycles. The relationship between virus and host microbes is broadly thought to be that of predator and prey. Viruses can lyse host cells to control microbial population sizes and affect community structures of hosts by killing specific microbes. However, viruses also influence their hosts through manipulation of bacterial metabolism. We found

  7. Bacterial and Archaeal Community Dynamics at CO2-RICH Shallow-Sea Hydrothermal Vents (panarea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubotz, F.; Huang, C.; Meyerdierks, A.; Amend, J.; Price, R. E.; Amann, R.; Hinrichs, K.; Summons, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Shallow marine hydrothermal vents are highly dynamic systems with unique habitats that can support both chemosynthetic and photosynthetic communities at steep temperature and geochemical gradients. Here, we present a combined organic geochemical and microbiological approach to describe the microbial community composition and their metabolism at the CO2-rich shallow hydrothermal vents off Panarea Island, in Sicily. We investigated two contrasting hydrothermal environments: Hot Lake, a depression filled with hydrothermal fluids diffusing gradually out of the seafloor, with temperatures ranging from 40 to 70°C, and Blackpoint, a site with vigorous venting of hydrothermal gasses and fluids with temperatures as high as 135°C. At Hot Lake, Bacteria dominate the microbial community composition in the sediments. 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed Bacteriodetes-, Epsilonproteobacteria- and Deltaproteobacteria-related sequences as the most abundant members. Bacterial intact polar membrane lipids (IPLs) were dominated by the non-phosphorous containing ornithine lipids throughout all depths, indicating an important role of this aminolipid at elevated temperatures and/or low pH. At Hot Lake, archaeal IPLs were comprised mainly of glycosidic tetraethers and increased up to 20% of total IPLs with increasing temperature and depth. At the same site, archaeal 16S rRNA clone libraries were mainly comprised of Euryarchaea-affiliated sequences; crenarchaeotal sequences were only found in deeper sediment layers with temperatures of ca. 70°C. In contrast to Hot Lake, Archaea dominated sediments at the much hotter site at Blackpoint. Here, novel methylated H-shaped archaeal tetraethers, with multiple sugars as head groups, were the most abundant membrane lipids. Reports on these lipids in cultures are very limited, but their abundant occurrence at elevated temperatures suggests an important role in membrane homeostastis in thermophilic Archaea. Stable carbon isotope values of -35‰ to

  8. Study of Containment Vent Strategies During Severe Accident Progression for the CANDU6 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Youngho; Ahn, K. I. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In March, 2011, Fukushima daichi nuclear power plants experienced a long term station blackout. Severe core damage occurred and a large amount of radioactive materials are released outside of the plants. After this terrible accident Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC) enforced to increase nuclear safety for all operating plants in Korea. To increase plant safety, both hardware reinforcement and software improvement are encouraged. Hardware reinforcement includes the preparation of the external water injection paths to the RCS and the spent fuel pool, a filtered containment venting system (CFVS), and AC power generating truck. Software improvement includes the increase of the effectiveness of the severe accident management guidance (SAMG) and plant staff training. To comply with NSSC's request, Wolsong Unit 1 has fulfilled the hardware reinforcement including the installation of a CFVS and started the extension of a SAMG to the low power and shutdown operation mode. Current SAMG deals accident occurred during full power operation only. The CFVS is designed to open and to close isolation valves manually. It does not require AC power. The operation of the CFVS prevents the reactor containment building failure due to the over-pressurization but it may release radioactive materials out of the reactor containment building. This paper discusses the radiological source terms for the containment vent strategy during severe accident progression which occurred during shutdown operation mode. This work is a part of the development of shutdown SAMG.. The CFVS is an effective means to control the containment pressure when the local air coolers are unavailable. Radioactive materials may release through the CFVS, but their amounts are reduced significantly. The alternative means, i.e., containment vent through the ventilation system which does not have an effective filter, is not a good choice to control the containment condition. It can maintain the containment

  9. Gas Chemistry of Submarine Hydrothermal Venting at Maug Caldera, Mariana Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embley, R. W.; Lupton, J. E.; Butterfield, D. A.; Lilley, M. D.; Evans, L. J.; Olson, E. J.; Resing, J. A.; Buck, N.; Larson, B. I.; Young, C.

    2014-12-01

    Maug volcano consists of 3 islands that define the perimeter of a submerged caldera that was formed by an explosive eruption. The caldera reaches a depth of ~225 meters, and has a prominent central cone or pinnacle that ascends within 20 meters of the sea surface. Our exploration of Maug began in 2003, when a single hydrocast in the caldera detected a strong suspended particle and helium plume reaching a maximum of δ3He = 250% at ~180 meters depth, clearly indicating hydrothermal activity within the caldera. In 2004 we returned armed with the ROPOS ROV, and two ROPOS dives discovered and sampled low temperature (~4 °C) diffuse venting associated with bacterial mats on the NE flank of the central pinnacle at 145 m depth. Samples collected with titanium gas tight bottles were badly diluted with ambient seawater but allowed an estimate of end-member 3He/4He of 7.3 Ra. Four vertical casts lowered into the caldera in 2004 all had a strong 3He signal (δ3He = 190%) at 150-190 meters depth. A recent expedition in 2014 focused on the shallow (~10 m) gas venting along the caldera interior. Scuba divers were able to collect samples of the gas bubbles using evacuated SS bottles fitted with plastic funnels. The gas samples had a consistent ~170 ppm He, 8 ppmNe, 60% CO2, 40%N2, and 0.8% Ar, and an end-member 3He/4He ratio of 6.9 Ra. This 3He/4He ratio falls within the range for typical arc volcanoes. The rather high atmospheric component (N2, Ar, Ne) in these samples is not contamination but appears to be derived from subsurface exchange between the ascending CO2 bubbles and air saturated seawater. A single vertical cast in 2014 had a maximum δ3He = 55% at 140 m depth, much lower than in 2003 and 2004. This decrease is possibly due to recent flushing of the caldera by a storm event, or may reflect a decrease in the deep hydrothermal activity. This area of shallow CO2 venting in Maug caldera is of particular interest as a natural laboratory for studying the effects of ocean

  10. Three-Dimensional Slowness Images of the Upper Crust Beneath the Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Vent Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seher, T.; Crawford, W.; Singh, S.; Canales, J. P.; Combier, V.; Cannat, M.; Carton, H.; Dusunur, D.; Escartin, J.; Miranda, M. J.; Pouillet-Erguy, A.

    2005-12-01

    In June-July 2005 we carried out the SISMOMAR cruise, as part of the MOMAR project (Monitoring the Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Within this cruise, we conducted a 3D seismic reflection survey over an 18 km km x 3.8 km area covering both the Lucky Strike volcano and hydrothermal vents field. In order to have a full coverage inside the 3D box, shots continued for 2.25 km on either side of the box and extended out to the median valley bounding faults. To complement the streamer measurements 25 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) were placed in an 18 km x 18 km area. 11 OBS positions lie inside the 3D box and can be used to determine a very detailed image of the 3D velocity structure beneath the Lucky Strike volcano and hydrothermal vents field. For the 3D box a tuned array of 14 air guns (2600 cubic inches) was fired at an interval of 37.5 m for a total of 39 lines. We will present the first results of the OBS measurements near the Lucky Strike volcano. As a first step towards a joint 3D travel time and slowness (the inverse of velocity at turning depth) tomography, we present the 3D slowness function (latitude, longitude, offset), which can be considered as a 3D brute stack velocity image of the sub-surface (c.f. Barton and Edwards, 1999). The presence of fluid in the upper crust due to hydrothermal circulation should appear as a low velocity anomaly beneath the hydrothermal vents. In the next step the OBS measurements will be used to corroborate the reflection images of layer 2A observed in the streamer data for the 3D box. The OBS inside the 3D box recorded turning ray arrivals from the upper crust at a very fine sampling interval (37.5 m x 100 m) over a large azimuth. This provides the unique opportunity for jointly inverting travel time and slowness. Hence the measurements contain information on local gradients and should provide a very detailed velocity model of the subsurface, including information on hydrothermal systems and a possilbe anisotropy (e.g. Cherret and Singh

  11. Characterization of chemosynthetic microbial mats associated with intertidal hydrothermal sulfur vents in White Point, San Pedro, CA, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla J Miranda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The shallow-sea hydrothermal vents at White Point (WP in Palos Verdes (PV on the southern California coast support microbial mats and provide easily accessed settings in which to study chemolithoautotrophic sulfur cycling. Previous studies have cultured sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from the WP mats; however, almost nothing is known about the in situ diversity and activity of the microorganisms in these habitats. We studied the diversity, micron-scale spatial associations and metabolic activity of the mat community via sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and aprA genes, Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH microscopy and sulfate-reduction rate (SRR measurements. Sequence analysis revealed a diverse group of bacteria, dominated by sulfur cycling gamma-, epsilon- and deltaproteobacterial lineages such as Marithrix, Sulfurovum and Desulfuromusa. FISH microscopy suggests a close physical association between sulfur-oxidizing and sulfur-reducing genotypes, while radiotracer studies showed low, but detectable, SRR. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicate the WP sulfur vent microbial mat community is similar, but distinct from other hydrothermal vent communities representing a range of biotopes and lithologic settings. These findings suggest a complete biological sulfur cycle is operating in the WP mat ecosystem mediated by diverse bacterial lineages, with some similarity with deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities.

  12. Immunomodulatory N-acyl Dopamine Glycosides from the Icelandic Marine Sponge Myxilla incrustans Collected at a Hydrothermal Vent Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Eydis; Liu, Hong Bing; Freysdottir, Jona

    2016-01-01

    A chemical investigation of the sponge (Porifera) Myxilla incrustans collected from the unique submarine hydrothermal vent site Strytan, North of Iceland, revealed a novel family of closely related N-acyl dopamine glycosides. Three new compounds, myxillin A (1), B (2) and C (3), were isolated...

  13. Citreicella manganoxidans sp. nov., a novel manganese oxidizing bacterium isolated from a shallow water hydrothermal vent in Espalamaca (Azores)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajasabapathy, R.; Mohandass, C; Dastager, S.G.; Liu, Q.; Li, W.-J; Colaco, A.

    A Gram-stain negative, non-motile, non-spore forming, aerobic and rod or narrow lemon-shaped bacterial strain, VSW210T, was isolated from surface seawater in a shallow water hydrothermal vent region in Espalamaca (Azores). Strain VSW210...

  14. Building America Case Study: Design Guidance for Passive Vents in New Construction Multifamily Buildings, New York, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-02-01

    This document addresses the use of passive vents as a source of outdoor air in multifamily buildings. The challenges associated with implementing passive vents and the factors affecting performance are outlined. A comprehensive design methodology and quantified performance metrics are provided. Two hypothetical design examples are provided to illustrate the process. This document is intended to be useful to designers, decision-makers, and contractors implementing passive ventilation strategies. It is also intended to be a resource for those responsible for setting high-performance building program requirements, especially pertaining to ventilation and outdoor air. To ensure good indoor air quality, a dedicated source of outdoor air is an integral part of high-performance buildings. Presently, there is a lack of guidance pertaining to the design and installation of passive vents, resulting in poor system performance. This report details the criteria necessary for designing, constructing, and testing passive vent systems to enable them to provide consistent and reliable levels of ventilation air from outdoors.

  15. Microbial Sulfate Reduction in Deep-Sea Sediments at the Guaymas Basin - Hydrothermal Vent Area - Influence of Temperature and Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ELSGAARD, L.; ISAKSEN, MF; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction was studied by a S-35 tracer technique in sediments from the hydrothermal vent site in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Mexico. In situ temperatures ranged from 2.7-degrees-C in the overlying seawater to > 120-degrees-C at 30 cm depth in the hydrothermal sediment...

  16. 78 FR 58574 - Maintenance, Testing, and Replacement of Vented Lead-Acid Storage Batteries for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ...-Acid Storage Batteries for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... for Nuclear Power Plants.'' The guide describes methods that the NRC staff considers acceptable for... replacement of vented lead-acid storage batteries in nuclear power plants. ADDRESSES: Please refer to Docket...

  17. 78 FR 15753 - Maintenance, Testing, and Replacement of Vented Lead-Acid Storage Batteries for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ...-Acid Storage Batteries for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft...-Acid Storage Batteries for Nuclear Power Plants.'' The draft guide describes methods that the NRC staff..., testing, and replacement of vented lead-acid storage batteries in nuclear power plants. DATES: Submit...

  18. A lumped model of venting during thermal runaway in a cylindrical lithium cobalt oxide lithium-ion cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coman, Paul Tiberiu; Rayman, Sean; White, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model built for analyzing the intricate thermal behavior of a 18650 LCO (Lithium Cobalt Oxide) battery cell during thermal runaway when venting of the electrolyte and contents of the jelly roll (ejecta) is considered. The model consists of different ODEs (Ordinary...

  19. 40 CFR 63.7927 - What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for closed vent systems and control devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are my inspection and monitoring... Pollutants: Site Remediation Closed Vent Systems and Control Devices § 63.7927 What are my inspection and... temperature at the inlet of the catalyst bed, the hourly average temperature at the outlet of the catalyst bed...

  20. A lumped model of venting during thermal runaway in a cylindrical Lithium Cobalt Oxide lithium-ion cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Paul T.; Rayman, Sean; White, Ralph E.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model built for analyzing the intricate thermal behavior of a 18650 LCO (Lithium Cobalt Oxide) battery cell during thermal runaway when venting of the electrolyte and contents of the jelly roll (ejecta) is considered. The model consists of different ODEs (Ordinary Differential Equations) describing reaction rates and electrochemical reactions, as well as the isentropic flow equations for describing electrolyte venting. The results are validated against experimental findings from Golubkov et al. [1] [Andrey W. Golubkov, David Fuchs, Julian Wagner, Helmar Wiltsche, Christoph Stangl, Gisela Fauler, Gernot Voitice Alexander Thaler and Viktor Hacker, RSC Advances, 4:3633-3642, 2014] for two cases - with flow and without flow. The results show that if the isentropic flow equations are not included in the model, the thermal runaway is triggered prematurely at the point where venting should occur. This shows that the heat dissipation due to ejection of electrolyte and jelly roll contents has a significant contribution. When the flow equations are included, the model shows good agreement with the experiment and therefore proving the importance of including venting.

  1. Hydrothermal vents in Lake Tanganyika harbor spore-forming thermophiles with extremely rapid growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars; Prieur, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A thermophilic anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a sublacustrine hydrothermal vent site in Lake Tanganyika (East Africa) with recorded fluid temperatures of 66–103 °C and pH values of 7.7–8.9. The bacterium (strain TR10) was rod-shaped, about 1 by 5 μm in size, and readily formed distal...... and peptone. The optimum temperature for growth was 60 °C, while minimum and maximum temperatures were 40 and 75 °C. The pH response was alkalitolerant with optimum pH at 7.4 and 8.5 depending on the growth medium. The distinct feature of rapid proliferation and endospore formation may allow the novel...

  2. Modified performance test of vented lead acid batteries for stationary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlir, K.W.; Fletcher, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of a modified performance test for vented lead acid batteries in stationary applications has been developed by the IEEE Battery Working Group. The modified performance test is defined as a test in the ''as found'' condition of the battery capacity and its ability to provide a high rate, short duration load (usually the highest rate of the duty cycle) that will confirm the battery's ability to meet the critical period of the load duty cycle, in addition to determining its percentage of rated capacity. This paper will begin by reviewing performance and service test requirements and concerns associated with both types of tests. The paper will then discuss the rationale for developing a modified performance test along with the benefits that can be derived from performing a modified performance test in lieu of a capacity test and/or a service test. The paper will conclude with an example on how to apply a modified performance test and test acceptance criteria

  3. Large-scale tests of aqueous scrubber systems for LMFBR vented containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormack, J.D.; Hilliard, R.K.; Postma, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    Six large-scale air cleaning tests performed in the Containment Systems Test Facility (CSTF) are described. The test conditions simulated those postulated for hypothetical accidents in an LMFBR involving containment venting to control hydrogen concentration and containment overpressure. Sodium aerosols were generated by continously spraying sodium into air and adding steam and/or carbon dioxide to create the desired Na 2 O 2 , Na 2 CO 3 or NaOH aerosol. Two air cleaning systems were tested: (a) spray quench chamber, educator venturi scrubber and high efficiency fibrous scrubber in series; and (b) the same except with the spray quench chamber eliminated. The gas flow rates ranged up to 0.8 m 3 /s (1700 acfm) at temperatures to 313 0 C (600 0 F). Quantities of aerosol removed from the gas stream ranged up to 700 kg per test. The systems performed very satisfactorily with overall aerosol mass removal efficiencies exceeding 99.9% in each test

  4. Influence of ambient humidity on the current delivered by air-vented ionization chambers revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, Aurelie; Douysset, Guilhem

    2006-01-01

    The influence of ambient humidity on the current delivered by a vented ionization chamber has been re-investigated. A Nucletron 077.091 well-type chamber together with a 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy source was enclosed in a climatic test chamber and the current was recorded for various humidity values. Great care has been taken for the design of the experimental setup in order to obtain reliable measurements of currents and humidity values inside the chamber active volume. A ±0.35% linear variation of the measured currents has been observed over a common range of humidities. This result is larger than the expected variation. No formal explanation of such a discrepancy has been found yet, however the present results could lead to a set of recommendations

  5. The Delphic oracle: a multidisciplinary defense of the gaseous vent theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, Henry A; Hale, John R; De Boer, Jelle Z

    2002-01-01

    Ancient historical references consistently describe an intoxicating gas, produced by a cavern in the ground, as the source of the power at the oracle of Delphi. These ancient writings are supported by a series of associated geological findings. Chemical analysis of the spring waters and travertine deposits at the site show these gases to be the light hydrocarbon gases methane, ethane, and ethylene. The effects of inhaling ethylene, a major anesthetic gas in the mid-20th century, are similar to those described in the ancient writings. We believe the probable cause of the trancelike state of the Priestess (the Pythia) at the oracle of Delphi during her mantic sessions was produced by inhaling ethylene gas or a mixture of ethylene and ethane from a naturally occurring vent of geological origin.

  6. Influence of ambient humidity on the current delivered by air-vented ionization chambers revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, Aurelie; Douysset, Guilhem [Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel-LNE, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-10-07

    The influence of ambient humidity on the current delivered by a vented ionization chamber has been re-investigated. A Nucletron 077.091 well-type chamber together with a {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source was enclosed in a climatic test chamber and the current was recorded for various humidity values. Great care has been taken for the design of the experimental setup in order to obtain reliable measurements of currents and humidity values inside the chamber active volume. A {+-}0.35% linear variation of the measured currents has been observed over a common range of humidities. This result is larger than the expected variation. No formal explanation of such a discrepancy has been found yet, however the present results could lead to a set of recommendations.

  7. Testing the benthic foraminiferal B/Ca proxy in a hydrothermal vent environment to determine its validity under extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, V.; Haynes, L.; Hoenisch, B.; Costa, K.; McManus, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    The boron to calcium ratio (B/Ca) and boron isotopic composition of the benthic foraminifer C. wuellerstorfi have become frequently used proxies for reconstructing carbonate chemistry in ocean bottom waters. However, elevated boron isotope data from a site proximal to the Clipperton Fracture Zone on the East Pacific Rise have led to the hypothesis that boron derived from hydrothermal fluids may be incorporated into benthic foraminifer shells (1). To date there is no comparable evidence for B/Ca at sites adjacent to hydrothermal vent systems, but hydrothermal vent fluid at the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeast Pacific Ocean can have boron concentrations nearly twice as high as ambient seawater (2), and other studies have documented increased levels of trace element incorporation in foraminifers living near hydrothermal vents (3). If the same effect holds true for B/Ca, the proxy may be compromised in sediments near hydrothermal vent sites. Here we present C. wuellerstorfi B/Ca data from a sediment core 5 km west of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, North Cleft Segment, to study the influence of vent fluid chemistry and partial shell dissolution on B/Ca and other trace element ratios. Our results do not show a strong hydrothermal signature on B/Ca despite the elevated boron concentrations of modern vent fluids and close proximity to the ridge. However, partial shell dissolution appears to have a significant impact on B/Ca ratios, calling for careful sample selection in future reconstructions from the region. Analysis of B/Ca and other trace element ratios across a ridge transect at a time of documented high hydrothermal activity—as indicated by high sediment hydrothermal Fe fluxes—may determine whether the hydrothermal signal is recorded further downstream from the vent fluid source. (1) Raitzsch, M. and Hönisch, B. (2010). Geology 40(5). (2) Seyfried Jr., W.E. et al. (2003). Journal of Geophys. Res.:Solid Earth 108(B9). (3) Munsel, D. et al. (2010). Biogeosci. 7.7.

  8. Microbial anaerobic methane cycling in the subseafloor at the Von Damm hydrothermal vent field, Mid-Cayman Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, J. A.; Reveillaud, J. C.; Stepanauskas, R.; McDermott, J. M.; Sylva, S. P.; Seewald, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR) is Earth's deepest and slowest spreading mid-ocean ridge located in the western Caribbean. With an axial rift valley floor at a depth of ~4200-6500 m, it represents one of the deepest sections of ridge crest worldwide. In 2009, the world's deepest hydrothermal vents (Piccard at 4960 m) and an ultramafic-influenced system only 20 km away on top of an oceanic core complex (Von Damm at 2350 m) were discovered along the MCR. Each site is hosted in a distinct geologic setting with different thermal and chemical regimes. The Von Damm site is a particularly interesting location to examine chemolithoautotrophic subseafloor microbial communities due to the abundant hydrogen, methane, and organic compounds in the venting fluids. Here, we used a combination of stable isotope tracing, next-generation sequencing, and single cell techniques to determine the identity, activity, and genomic repertoire of subseafloor anaerobic archaea involved in methane cycling in hydrothermal fluids venting at the Von Damm site. Molecular sequencing of phylogenetic marker genes revealed the presence of diverse archaea that both generate and consume methane across a geochemical and thermal spectrum of vents. Stable isotope tracing experiments were used to detect biological utilization of formate and dissolved inorganic carbon, and methane generation at 70 °C under anaerobic conditions. Results indicate that methanogenesis with formate as a substrate is occurring at 70 °C at two Von Damm sites, Ginger Castle and the Main Orifice. The results are consistent with thermodynamic predictions for carbon speciation at the temperatures encountered at the ultramafic-hosted Von Damm, where formate is predicted to be thermodynamically stable, and may thus serve as a an important source of carbon. Diverse thermophilic methanogenic archaea belonging to the genera Methanothermococcus were detected at all vent sites with both 16S rRNA tag sequencing and single cell sorting. Other

  9. Metagenomic Signatures of Microbial Communities in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Sediments of Azores Vent Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Teresa; Barroso, Cristina; Froufe, Hugo; Egas, Conceição; Bettencourt, Raul

    2018-01-21

    The organisms inhabiting the deep-seafloor are known to play a crucial role in global biogeochemical cycles. Chemolithoautotrophic prokaryotes, which produce biomass from single carbon molecules, constitute the primary source of nutrition for the higher organisms, being critical for the sustainability of food webs and overall life in the deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems. The present study investigates the metabolic profiles of chemolithoautotrophs inhabiting the sediments of Menez Gwen and Rainbow deep-sea vent fields, in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Differences in the microbial community structure might be reflecting the distinct depth, geology, and distance from vent of the studied sediments. A metagenomic sequencing approach was conducted to characterize the microbiome of the deep-sea hydrothermal sediments and the relevant metabolic pathways used by microbes. Both Menez Gwen and Rainbow metagenomes contained a significant number of genes involved in carbon fixation, revealing the largely autotrophic communities thriving in both sites. Carbon fixation at Menez Gwen site was predicted to occur mainly via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, likely reflecting the dominance of sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria at this site, while different autotrophic pathways were identified at Rainbow site, in particular the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle. Chemolithotrophy appeared to be primarily driven by the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds, whether through the SOX-dependent pathway at Menez Gwen site or through reverse sulfate reduction at Rainbow site. Other energy-yielding processes, such as methane, nitrite, or ammonia oxidation, were also detected but presumably contributing less to chemolithoautotrophy. This work furthers our knowledge of the microbial ecology of deep-sea hydrothermal sediments and represents an important repository of novel genes with potential biotechnological interest.

  10. Reentrainment of aerosols during the filtered venting after a severe core melt accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project is the experimental determination of the aerosol reentrainment from boiling pool during controlled filtered venting of the containment vessel after a severe core melt accident. For this reason a linear downscaled (1:20) model containment with an inner free volume of 5 m 3 is provided. Both, water soluble and unsoluble model substances are used as fission product simulants. The major advantage of the pilot plant is the ability to run it at steady state conditions of any period of time. Further, modelling of the aerosol reentrainment from boiling pool allows upscaling of results on nuclear power plants. The deterministic aerosol reentrainment model can also be used to calculate entrainment phenomena in the process industries such at distillation columns or at flash evaporators. Steady state experiments with water soluble model substances clearly reveal enhanced aerosol reentrainment from boiling pool due to increasing boiling pool concentration of fission product simulants and due to increasing gas velocities above the boiling pool surface. But there can be seen no influence of corium concrete interactions on the aerosol reentrainment. Compared to the steam production due to the decay heat the resulting gas volume flux is negligible. Next, there can be seen aerosol reentrainment from boiling pool only above boiling pool areas. Further, experiments under steady state conditions with unsoluble fission product simulants show on the one hand scrubbing effects in the boiling pool, on the other hand no aerosol reentrainment of solid particles 3 μm. The so called reentrainment factor - ratio between fission product simulant in the venting system and in the boiling pool - is for water soluble model substances in the range of 10 -5 , for unsoluble fission product simulants in the range of 10 -6 . (author) figs., tabs., 57 refs

  11. Diffuse flow environments within basalt- and sediment-based hydrothermal vent ecosystems harbor specialized microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Barbara J; Polson, Shawn W; Zeigler Allen, Lisa; Williamson, Shannon J; Lee, Charles K; Wommack, K Eric; Cary, S Craig

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents differ both in surface input and subsurface geochemistry. The effects of these differences on their microbial communities are not clear. Here, we investigated both alpha and beta diversity of diffuse flow-associated microbial communities emanating from vents at a basalt-based hydrothermal system along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and a sediment-based hydrothermal system, Guaymas Basin. Both Bacteria and Archaea were targeted using high throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analyses. A unique aspect of this study was the use of a universal set of 16S rRNA gene primers to characterize total and diffuse flow-specific microbial communities from varied deep-sea hydrothermal environments. Both surrounding seawater and diffuse flow water samples contained large numbers of Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaea and Gammaproteobacteria taxa previously observed in deep-sea systems. However, these taxa were geographically distinct and segregated according to type of spreading center. Diffuse flow microbial community profiles were highly differentiated. In particular, EPR dominant diffuse flow taxa were most closely associated with chemolithoautotrophs, and off axis water was dominated by heterotrophic-related taxa, whereas the opposite was true for Guaymas Basin. The diversity and richness of diffuse flow-specific microbial communities were strongly correlated to the relative abundance of Epsilonproteobacteria, proximity to macrofauna, and hydrothermal system type. Archaeal diversity was higher than or equivalent to bacterial diversity in about one third of the samples. Most diffuse flow-specific communities were dominated by OTUs associated with Epsilonproteobacteria, but many of the Guaymas Basin diffuse flow samples were dominated by either OTUs within the Planctomycetes or hyperthermophilic Archaea. This study emphasizes the unique microbial communities associated with geochemically and geographically distinct hydrothermal diffuse flow environments.

  12. Thermodynamic Vent System for an On-Orbit Cryogenic Reaction Control Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; Romig, Kris A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Flores, Sam

    2012-01-01

    A report discusses a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) that integrates a Joule-Thompson (JT) device (expansion valve) and thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with a cryogenic distribution system to allow fine control of the propellant quality (subcooled liquid) during operation of the device. It enables zero-venting when coupled with an RCS engine. The proper attachment locations and sizing of the orifice are required with the propellant distribution line to facilitate line conditioning. During operations, system instrumentation was strategically installed along the distribution/TVS line assembly, and temperature control bands were identified. A sub-scale run tank, full-scale distribution line, open-loop TVS, and a combination of procured and custom-fabricated cryogenic components were used in the cryogenic RCS build-up. Simulated on-orbit activation and thruster firing profiles were performed to quantify system heat gain and evaluate the TVS s capability to maintain the required propellant conditions at the inlet to the engine valves. Test data determined that a small control valve, such as a piezoelectric, is optimal to provide continuously the required thermal control. The data obtained from testing has also assisted with the development of fluid and thermal models of an RCS to refine integrated cryogenic propulsion system designs. This system allows a liquid oxygenbased main propulsion and reaction control system for a spacecraft, which improves performance, safety, and cost over conventional hypergolic systems due to higher performance, use of nontoxic propellants, potential for integration with life support and power subsystems, and compatibility with in-situ produced propellants.

  13. Study of Hydrothermal Particulate Matter from a Shallow Venting System, offshore Nayarit, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Osorio, A.; Prol-Ledesma, R. M.; Reyes, A. G.; Rubio-Ramos, M. A.; Torres-Vera, M. A.

    2001-12-01

    A shallow (30 ft) hydrothermal site named ``Cora'' (after the indigenous people thereby) was surveyed and sampled throughout direct observation with SCUBA diving during November 25 to December 4, 2000. A total of 10 dives were conducted in order to obtain representative samples from an 85oC fluid source of approximately 10 cm in diameter. Inherent difficulties to the sampling, such as poor visibility and strong bottom currents were overcome and samples of hydrothermal fluid, gas, rocks, and particulate matter were collected directly from the vent. Water samples and hydrothermal fluid were taken with a homemade 1 l cylindrical bottles of two lines by flushing in from the bottom for about ten minutes until total displacement of the seawater; similar procedure was carried out for gas samples. Particulate matter was collected with 0.4mm polycarbonate membrane filters and preserved in a desiccators at a fridge temperature until analysis onshore. Preliminary description of the rock samples suggest that pyritization is the main mineralisation process. Filters containing hydrothermal particulate matter were surveyed under the scanning electron microscope in order to identify the nature (inorganic and organic), as well as the chemistry of the particles. SEM examination revealed the presence of particles of different kind that suggests high degree of mixing and re-suspension: Planctonic organisms and organic matter appeared to be abundant; 25 micron particles of different carbonate faces and inorganic particles of silicates were also recognized. Distinctive euhedral colloidal grains were identified as the resulting process of precipitation from the solution. Microanalysis of iron and sulfur content of 10 micron particles indicate a very likely sulphide mineral face (greigite); 8 micron cinnabar particles are consistent with the mineralization conditions, observed as well in the inner walls of the vent. Analyses of dissolved and particulate trace metals are still ongoing at

  14. Extreme Morphologic and Venting Changes in Methane Seeps at Southern Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, K.; Kelley, D. S.; Solomon, E. A.; Delaney, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Two highly active methane hydrate seeps have been visited over a 7-year period as part of the construction and operation of NSF's Ocean Observatory Initiative's Regional Cable Array at Southern Hydrate Ridge. The site is located 90 km west of Newport, Oregon, at a water depth of 800 m. The seeps, Einstein's Grotto (OOI instrument deployment site) and Smokey Tavern (alternate site to the north), have been visited yearly from 2010 to 2017 with ROVs. Additionally, a digital still camera deployed from 2014 to 2017 at Einstein's Grotto, has been documenting the profound morphologic and biological changes at this site. A cabled pressure sensor, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, hydrophone, seismometer array, and uncabled fluid samplers have also been operational at the site for the duration of the camera's deployment. During this time, Einstein's Grotto has evolved from a gentle mound with little venting, to a vigorously bubbling pit bounded by a near vertical wall. Early on bubble emissions blew significant amounts of sediment into the water column and thick Beggiatoa mats coverd the mound. Most recently the face of the pit has collapsed, although bubble plumes are still emitted from the site. The Smokey Tavern site has undergone more extreme changes. Similar to Einstein's Grotto it was first characterized by gentle hummocks with dispersed bacterial mats. In subsequent years, it developed an extremely rugged, elongated collapsed area with vertical walls and jets of methane bubbles rising from small pits near the base of the collapse zone. Meter-across nearly sediment-free blocks of methane hydrate were exposed on the surface and in the walls of the collapse zone. In 2016, this area was unrecognizable with a much more subdued topography, and weak venting of bubbles. Exposed methane hydrate was not visible. From these observations new evolutionary models for methane seeps are being developed for Southern Hydrate Ridge.

  15. Venting of Heat and Carbon Dioxide from Urban Canyons at Night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmond, J. A.; Oke, T. R.; Grimmond, C. S. B.; Roberts, S.; Offerle, B.

    2005-08-01

    Turbulent fluxes of carbon dioxide and sensible heat were observed in the surface layer of the weakly convective nocturnal boundary layer over the center of the city of Marseille, France, during the Expérience sur Sites pour Contraindre les Modèles de Pollution Atmosphérique et de Transport d'Emission (ESCOMPTE) field experiment in the summer of 2001. The data reveal intermittent events or bursts in the time series of carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and air temperature that are superimposed upon the background values. These features relate to intermittent structures in the fluxes of CO2 and sensible heat. In Marseille, CO2 is primarily emitted into the atmosphere at street level from vehicle exhausts. In a similar way, nocturnal sensible heat fluxes are most likely to originate in the deep street canyons that are warmer than adjacent roof surfaces. Wavelet analysis is used to examine the hypothesis that CO2 concentrations can be used as a tracer to identify characteristics of the venting of pollutants and heat from street canyons into the above-roof nocturnal urban boundary layer. Wavelet analysis is shown to be effective in the identification and analysis of significant events and coherent structures within the turbulent time series. Late in the evening, there is a strong correlation between the burst structures observed in the air temperature and CO2 time series. Evidence suggests that the localized increases of temperature and CO2 observed above roof level in the urban boundary layer (UBL) are related to intermittent venting of sensible heat from the warmer urban canopy layer (UCL). However, later in the night, local advection of CO2 in the UBL, combined with reduced traffic emissions in the UCL, limit the value of CO2 as a tracer of convective plumes in the UBL.

  16. A Geographical Information System to Manage the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, K. L.; Hillier, M. C. J.; Thornborough, K. J.; Jenkyns, R.; Juniper, K.

    2016-02-01

    The Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (EHVMPA) is located approximately 250 km offshore of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Since its discovery in 1982, there have been hundreds of dives, samples collected, measurements made, and debris left behind at the EHVMPA. In 2003, the Canadian government declared the region as a Marine Protected Area (MPA) under Canada's Oceans Act, to be managed by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO). Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) operates a cabled observatory in the EHVMPA, and streams data in near real-time via the Internet to science communities worldwide. ONC's observatory data, combined with observations made during maintenance expeditions provides insight assisting the management and preservation of the MPA. In 2014, DFO partnered with ONC to build a geodatabase to enhance and inform the knowledge base of the EHVMPA Management Plan. The geodatabase, built in ArcGIS, contains data integrated from ONC's Oceans 2.0 database, third parties, and relevant publications. Layers include annual observatory infrastructure deployments, remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive tracks, sampling activity, anthropogenic debris, high-resolution bathymetry, observations of species of interest, and locations of hydrothermal vents. The combined data show both efforts to better understand the environment and the resulting stressors that impact the MPA. The tool also links observed features such as debris and biological observations to the time-correlated ROV dive video using ONC's SeaTube video viewing tool allowing for further analysis. Through 2017, the geodatabase will be maintained by ONC and enriched with expedition data from organizations such as Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, and the University of Washington. The end result is a tool that can integrate many types of data obtained from the MPA, and encourages systematic management of a remote, dynamic and fragile environment.

  17. A new astrophysical solution to the Too Big To Fail problem. Insights from the moria simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeke, R.; Papastergis, E.; Ponomareva, A. A.; Rathi, S.; De Rijcke, S.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We test whether or not realistic analysis techniques of advanced hydrodynamical simulations can alleviate the Too Big To Fail problem (TBTF) for late-type galaxies. TBTF states that isolated dwarf galaxy kinematics imply that dwarfs live in halos with lower mass than is expected in a Λ cold

  18. Altered epiphyte community and sea urchin diet in Posidonia oceanica meadows in the vicinity of volcanic CO2 vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Patricia; Gambi, Maria Cristina; Vizzini, Salvatrice; Califano, Gianmaria; Tavares, Ana Mafalda; Santos, Rui; Martínez-Crego, Begoña

    2017-06-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) predicted for 2100 is expected to shift seagrass epiphyte communities towards the dominance of more tolerant non-calcifying taxa. However, little is known about the indirect effects of such changes on food provision to key seagrass consumers. We found that epiphyte communities of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica in two naturally acidified sites (i.e. north and south sides of a volcanic CO 2 vent) and in a control site away from the vent at the Ischia Island (NW Mediterranean Sea) significantly differed in composition and abundance. Such differences involved a higher abundance of non-calcareous crustose brown algae and a decline of calcifying polychaetes in both acidified sites. A lower epiphytic abundance of crustose coralline algae occurred only in the south side of the vents, thus suggesting that OA may alter epiphyte assemblages in different ways due to interaction with local factors such as differential fish herbivory or hydrodynamics. The OA effects on food items (seagrass, epiphytes, and algae) indirectly propagated into food provision to the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, as reflected by a reduced P. oceanica exploitation (i.e. less seagrass and calcareous epiphytes in the diet) in favour of non-calcareous green algae in both vent sites. In contrast, we detected no difference close and outside the vents neither in the composition of sea urchin diet nor in the total abundance of calcareous versus non-calcareous taxa. More research, under realistic scenarios of predicted pH reduction (i.e. ≤ 0.32 units of pH by 2100), is still necessary to better understand cascading effects of this altered urchin exploitation of food resources under acidified conditions on ecosystem diversity and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of filtered containment venting system and application for Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit 6, 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Soutarou; Hiranuma, Naoki; Kimura, Takeo; Omori, Shuichi; Watanabe, Fumitoshi; Sasa, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (1F) of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) had experienced severe radio-active release to the environment in the Tohoku Region Pacific Coast Earthquake (alias: the Great East Japan Earthquake) in 2011. Under the Station Black-Out (SBO) conditions caused by tsunami with the earthquake, the 1F operators had tried to vent the gasses in the Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) of the unit 1, 2 and 3 to the environment through the water pools in the suppression chambers of the PCVs. Its venting, however, was imperfect and, as a result, major direct radio-active release to the environment was caused. After this disaster, TEPCO launched a project to develop the Filtered Containment Venting System (FCVS), in which our very bitter experiences in the 1F accident as described above are reflected. One of the main purposes of the development of the FCVS is to enhance operability of venting under the severe plant conditions such as the SBO during progressing of severe core damage, and another is to enhance removal performance of radio-nuclides with the newly added filtering equipment, which is installed in the venting line from the PCV to the outer. The Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS unit 6 and 7 will be the first reactors applied the FCVSs. In this paper, we show the design concept of the TEPCO's FCVS, the brief overview of the system design and the summary of experiment which has been performed for getting the performance data of the FCVS such as decontamination factor in various conditions. (author)

  20. Sulfur Metabolism of Hydrogenovibrio thermophilus Strain S5 and Its Adaptations to Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijing Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogenovibrio bacteria are ubiquitous in global deep-sea hydrothermal vents. However, their adaptations enabling survival in these harsh environments are not well understood. In this study, we characterized the physiology and metabolic mechanisms of Hydrogenovibrio thermophilus strain S5, which was first isolated from an active hydrothermal vent chimney on the Southwest Indian Ridge. Physiological characterizations showed that it is a microaerobic chemolithomixotroph that can utilize sulfide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, tetrathionate, thiocyanate or hydrogen as energy sources and molecular oxygen as the sole electron acceptor. During thiosulfate oxidation, the strain produced extracellular sulfur globules 0.7–6.0 μm in diameter that were mainly composed of elemental sulfur and carbon. Some organic substrates including amino acids, tryptone, yeast extract, casamino acids, casein, acetate, formate, citrate, propionate, tartrate, succinate, glucose and fructose can also serve as carbon sources, but growth is weaker than under CO2 conditions, indicating that strain S5 prefers to be chemolithoautotrophic. None of the tested organic carbons could function as energy sources. Growth tests under various conditions confirmed its adaption to a mesophilic mixing zone of hydrothermal vents in which vent fluid was mixed with cold seawater, preferring moderate temperatures (optimal 37°C, alkaline pH (optimal pH 8.0, microaerobic conditions (optimal 4% O2, and reduced sulfur compounds (e.g., sulfide, optimal 100 μM. Comparative genomics showed that strain S5 possesses more complex sulfur metabolism systems than other members of genus Hydrogenovibrio. The genes encoding the intracellular sulfur oxidation protein (DsrEF and assimilatory sulfate reduction were first reported in the genus Hydrogenovibrio. In summary, the versatility in energy and carbon sources, and unique physiological properties of this bacterium have facilitated its adaptation to deep

  1. Estimating the Total Heat Flux from the ASHES Hydrothermal Vent Field Using the Sentry Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, T. J.; Kinsey, J. C.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting at mid-ocean ridges influences ocean chemistry, the thermal and chemical structure of the oceanic crust, and the evolution of unique and diverse autolithotrophically-supported ecosystems. Axially-hosted hydrothermal systems are responsible for 20-25% of the total heat flux out of Earth's interior, and likely play a large role in local as well as global biogeochemical cycles. Despite the importance of these systems, only a few studies have attempted to constrain the volume and heat flux of an entire hydrothermal vent field. In July of 2014 we used the Sentry autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to survey the water column over the ASHES hydrothermal vent field which is located within the caldera of Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. To estimate the total heat and mass flux from this vent field, we equipped Sentry with a Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV), an inertial measurement unit (IMU), two acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), and two SBE3 temperature probes, allowing us to obtain precise measurements of fluid temperature and water velocity. The survey was designed using a control volume approach in which Sentry was pre-programmed to survey a 150-m-square centered over the vent field flying a grid pattern with 5-m track line spacing followed by a survey of the perimeter. This pattern was repeated multiple times during several 10-h dives at different altitudes, including 10, 20, 40, and 60 m above the seafloor, and during one 40-h survey at an altitude of 10 m. During the 40-h survey, the pattern was repeated nine times allowing us to obtain observations over several tidal cycles. Water velocity data obtained with Sentry were corrected for platform motion and then combined with the temperature measurements to estimate heat flux. The analysis of these data will likely provide the most accurate and highest resolution heat and mass flux estimates at a seafloor hydrothermal field to date.

  2. Diversity and phylogenetic analyses of bacteria from a shallow-water hydrothermal vent in Milos island (Greece).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Donato; d'Errico, Giuseppe; Manini, Elena; Yakimov, Michail; Vetriani, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Studies of shallow-water hydrothermal vents have been lagging behind their deep-sea counterparts. Hence, the importance of these systems and their contribution to the local and regional diversity and biogeochemistry is unclear. This study analyzes the bacterial community along a transect at the shallow-water hydrothermal vent system of Milos island, Greece. The abundance and biomass of the prokaryotic community is comparable to areas not affected by hydrothermal activity and was, on average, 1.34 × 10(8) cells g(-1). The abundance, biomass and diversity of the prokaryotic community increased with the distance from the center of the vent and appeared to be controlled by the temperature gradient rather than the trophic conditions. The retrieved 16S rRNA gene fragments matched sequences from a variety of geothermal environments, although the average similarity was low (94%), revealing previously undiscovered taxa. Epsilonproteobacteria constituted the majority of the population along the transect, with an average contribution to the total diversity of 60%. The larger cluster of 16S rRNA gene sequences was related to chemolithoautotrophic Sulfurovum spp., an Epsilonproteobacterium so far detected only at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The presence of previously unknown lineages of Epsilonproteobacteria could be related to the abundance of organic matter in these systems, which may support alternative metabolic strategies to chemolithoautotrophy. The relative contribution of Gammaproteobacteria to the Milos microbial community increased along the transect as the distance from the center of the vent increased. Further attempts to isolate key species from these ecosystems will be critical to shed light on their evolution and ecology.

  3. Analysis of a Multi-Venturi filter for the venting of the primary container of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes G, A. A.; Sainz M, E.; Ortiz V, J.

    2017-09-01

    Since the Chernobyl nuclear accident, European nuclear power plants have opted to install filters in the containment vent pipes, whose function is to help mitigate the consequences of a severe accident, by means of the controlled depressurization of the containment passively through of a containment filtering vent system. These systems are designed to relieve the internal pressure of containment by deliberately opening pressure relief devices, either a valve or rupture disk during a severe accident and being channeled to the filtering unit. In this work, the hydraulic response of a liquid gas washing filtration system is evaluated, since this information is necessary to estimate the effect of the increase of the containment pressure on the venting capacity of the vent pipes. Through CFD simulation, using the programs with open source license CaeLinux-2014 and OpenFoam, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the Multi-Venturi system were obtained for the washing of the gases coming from the containment, which could be included in the general model of the vent pipe. Representative models of the venturi tubes of each concentric sector that are part of the washing system were generated and by parametric calculations the average mass expense established by each venturi was estimated, according to its dimensions and depth to which is located inside the tank. In the same way, the pressure and mass expense required to activate each concentric sector was calculated according to the pressure and mass load from the containment, in order to estimate the maximum expenditure that is established through the filter. The velocity profiles and the characteristic pressure at which each sector operates were also calculated, as well as the local and global discharge pressure drop. (Author)

  4. FLAME facility: The effect of obstacles and transverse venting on flame acceleration and transition on detonation for hydrogen-air mixtures at large scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, M.P.; Tieszen, S.R.; Benedick, W.B.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes research on flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) for hydrogen-air mixtures carried out in the FLAME facility, and describes its relevance to nuclear reactor safety. Flame acceleration and DDT can generate high peak pressures that may cause failure of containment. FLAME is a large rectangular channel 30.5 m long, 2.44 m high, and 1.83 m wide. It is closed on the ignition end and open on the far end. The three test variables were hydrogen mole fraction (12--30%), degree of transverse venting (by moving steel top plates---0%, 13%, and 50%), and the absence or presence of certain obstacles in the channel (zero or 33% blockage ratio). The most important variable was the hydrogen mole fraction. The presence of the obstacles tested greatly increased the flame speeds, overpressures, and tendency for DDT compared to similar tests without obstacles. Different obstacle configurations could have greater or lesser effects on flame acceleration and DDT. Large degrees of transverse venting reduced the flame speeds, overpressures, and possibility of DDT. For small degrees of transverse venting (13% top venting), the flame speeds and overpressures were higher than for no transverse venting with reactive mixtures (>18% H 2 ), but they were lower with leaner mixtures. The effect of the turbulence generated by the flow out the vents on increasing flame speed can be larger than the effect of venting gas out of the channel and hence reducing the overpressure. With no obstacles and 50% top venting, the flame speeds and overpressures were low, and there was no DDT. For all other cases, DDT was observed above some threshold hydrogen concentration. DDT was obtained at 15% H 2 with obstacles and no transverse venting. 67 refs., 62 figs

  5. Comparison Of Vented And Absolute Pressure Transducers For Water-Level Monitoring In Hanford Site Central Plateau Wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcdonald, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The

  6. Geochemistry of seafloor hydrothermal vent fluids at EPR 9°50'N: Time series data from 2004-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, P.; Pester, N. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Simmons, S. F.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal fluids were collected from vent sites along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°50'N in 2004, 2008 and 2016 in isobaric gas-tight titanium samplers. These dates bracket the seafloor eruption that occurred at EPR 9°50'N between 2005 and 2006. The reported data focus on P vent and Bio9, as these vents were active during all three sampling periods. The concentration of aqueous volatiles reached maxima at both vents in 2008. At P vent, CO2, H2, and H2S were 124 mM/kg, 0.55 mM/kg and 12.2 mM/kg, respectively. The concentrations at Bio9 in 2008 were, 106 mM/kg CO2, 1.1 mM/kg H2, and 12.6 mM/kg H2S. Fe and Mn concentrations were the highest at both vent sites in 2004, and then decreased in 2008 and again in 2016. The range at P vent was 1.5-6.3 mM/kg Fe and 315-1212 uM/kg Mn, while at Bio9 the concentrations were 1.6-3.7 mM/kg Fe and 301-650 uM/kg Mn. The trends in CO2, H2, and H2S at P vent (2008 and 2016) and Bio9 (all years) are consistent with changes in subsurface pressure and temperature as a result of the eruption that alter the conditions at which dissolved components partition between vapor and liquid phases in the NaCl-H2O system. The trend in Fe and Mn concentrations is surprising and highlights the complex partitioning behavior of these elements in systems in which the concentrations are controlled by fluid-mineral equilibria as well as phase separation. Between 2004 and 2008, fluids at P vent transitioned from single-phase (535 mM/kg Cl) to a low-density vapor (370 mM/kg). Upon phase separation, the concentrations of H2S and H2 increased, while Fe and Mn concentrations decreased considerably. These changes highlight the importance of phase separation on controlling mass transfer from the crust to overlying ocean. In contrast to the other aqueous volatiles, CH4 concentrations in 2008 (47 µM) were lower or equal to concentrations in 2004 or 2016, 50-100 µM. CH4 is decoupled from the effects of phase separation, and is likely extracted from fluid

  7. Imaging microbial metal metabolism in situ under conditions of the deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oger, P. M.; Daniel, I.; Simionovici, A.; Picard, A.

    2006-12-01

    High-pressure biotopes are the most widely spread biotopes on Earth. They represent one possible location for the origin of life. They also share striking similarities with extraterrestrial biotopes such as those postulated for Europe or Mars. In absence of light, dissimilatory reduction of metals (DMR) is fueling the ecosystem. Monitoring the metabolism of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent microbial fauna under P, T and chemical conditions relevant to their isolation environment can be difficult because of the confinement and because most spectroscopic probes do not sense metallic ions in solution. We demonstrated the possibility to use Xray spectroscopy to monitor the speciation of metallic species in solution. Experiments were performed at The ESRF using Selenium (Se) detoxification by Agrobacterium tumefaciens as an analog of DMR. The reduction of Se from selenite to the metal was monitored by a combiantion of two Xray spectroscopic techniques (XANES and μXRF). Cells were incubated in the low pressure DAC in growth medium supplemented with 5mM Selenite and incubated under pressures up to 60 Mpa at 30°C for 24h. The evolution of the speciation can be easily monitored and the concentration of each Se species determined from the Xray spectra by linear combinations of standard spectra. Selenite is transformed by the bacterium into a mixture of metal Se and methylated Se after 24 hours. Se detoxification is observed in situ up to at least 25 MPa. The technique, developped for Se can be adapted to monitor other elements more relevant to DMR such as As, Fe or S, which should allow to monitor in situ under controlled pressure and temperature the metabolism of vent organisms. It is also amenable to the monitoring of toxic metals. Xray spectroscopy and the lpDAC are compatible with other spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman, UV or IR spectroscopies, allowing to probe other metabolic activities. Hence, enlarging the range of metabolic information that can be obtained in

  8. 3D Photo Mosaicing of Tagiri Shallow Vent Field by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Toshihiro; Kondo, Hayato; Ura, Tamaki; Sakamaki, Takashi; Mizushima, Hayato; Yanagisawa, Masao

    Although underwater visual observation is an ideal method for detailed survey of seafloors, it is currently a costly process that requires the use of Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) or Human Occupied Vehicles (HOVs), and can cover only a limited area. This paper proposes an innovative method to navigate an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to create both 2D and 3D photo mosaics of seafloors with high positioning accuracy without using any vision-based matching. The vehicle finds vertical pole-like acoustic reflectors to use as positioning landmarks using a profiling sonar based on a SLAM (Simultaneous Localization And Mapping) technique. These reflectors can be either artificial or natural objects, and so the method can be applied to shallow vent fields where conventional acoustic positioning is difficult, since bubble plumes can also be used as landmarks as well as artificial reflectors. Path-planning is performed in real-time based on the positions and types of landmarks so as to navigate safely and stably using landmarks of different types (artificial reflector or bubble plume) found at arbitrary times and locations. Terrain tracker switches control reference between depth and altitude from the seafloor based on a local map of hazardous area created in real-time using onboard perceptual sensors, in order to follow rugged terrains at an altitude of 1 to 2 meters, as this range is ideal for visual observation. The method was implemented in the AUV Tri-Dog 1 and experiments were carried out at Tagiri vent field, Kagoshima Bay in Japan. The AUV succeeded in fully autonomous observation for more than 160 minutes to create a photo mosaic with an area larger than 600 square meters, which revealed the spatial distribution of detailed features such as tube-worm colonies, bubble plumes and bacteria mats. A fine bathymetry of the same area was also created using a light-section ranging system mounted on the vehicle. Finally a 3 D representation of the environment was

  9. Shallow vent architecture of Puyehue Cordón-Caulle, as revealed by direct observation of explosive activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, C. I.; Tuffen, H.; Castro, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    On June 4, 2011, an explosive eruption of rhyodacitic magma began at the Puyehue Cordón-Caulle volcanic complex (PCCVC), southern Chile. Initial Plinian phases of the eruption produced tephra plumes reaching > 14 km high, the ash from which quickly circumnavigated the globe to cause widespread disruption to air traffic in the Southern Hemisphere. Within two weeks, the continuing explosive eruption was joined by synchronous effusion of lava. We present observations of complex vent activity made 7 months after the eruption onset, on January 4th and 10th, 2012, when explosive activity from PCCVC continued at a lower level of intensity. Fortuitous climatic conditions permitted direct, ground-based observation and video recording of transient vent dynamics within the asymmetrical tephra cone around the main eruptive vent complex and site of lava effusion, as well as real-time collection of juvenile ash as it rained out directly from the active plume. On Jan. 4, explosive activity was semi-continuous ash jetting punctuated by Vulcanian-like blasts. In the ~50m-diameter sub-circular base of the ~400 m-wide, asymmetrical tephra cone, near-continuous ash jetting was observed from two primary point sources. The northerly source was clearly visible, with time-averaged diameter of ~10 m, and the apparently larger southerly source was mostly obscured from view by the ash plume. Activity was at all times somewhat erratic, but followed a rough cyclicity on 30-45 s timescales, consisting of: (1) restriction of the point source into a focused ash jet up to ~50 m high, producing coarse ash dominated by tube pumice (with minor free pyroxene crystals); followed by (2) Vulcanian-like failure of the region around the point source, producing incandescent ballistic bombs thrown up to 100-200 m from the vent. Jetting from the two main point sources combined in the crater to produce a low gas-thrust region and sustained buoyant plume. Directed ash plumes that climbed and breached the inner

  10. 40 CFR 63.117 - Process vent provisions-reporting and recordkeeping requirements for group and TRE determinations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... provisions for Group 2 process vents with a TRE index value greater than 1.0 but less than or equal to 4.0 in... report the following when achieving and maintaining a TRE index value greater than 1.0 but less than 4.0... than 4.0 as specified in § 63.113(e) of this subpart, shall maintain records and submit as part of the...

  11. Biotic and Abiotic Interactions of Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent-Endemic Fish on the East Pacific Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    variable oxygen levels in comparison to ambient bottom water. A fragment of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase was successfully amplified from T. hollisi mRNA...Zoarcide des sites hydrothermaux de la dorsale medio -Atlantiqu. Cybium 18(2): 109-115. Geistdoerfer P (1996) L’ichthyofaune des ecosystems associés à...mixed with the hydrothermal fluid, the habitat chemistry is still measurably different from that of ambient temperature, non vent-influenced areas

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Analyses Indicate High Diversity, Expansive Population Growth and High Genetic Connectivity of Vent Copepods (Dirivultidae) across Different Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollner, Sabine; Stuckas, Heiko; Kihara, Terue C; Laurent, Stefan; Kodami, Sahar; Martinez Arbizu, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Communities in spatially fragmented deep-sea hydrothermal vents rich in polymetallic sulfides could soon face major disturbance events due to deep-sea mineral mining, such that unraveling patterns of gene flow between hydrothermal vent populations will be an important step in the development of conservation policies. Indeed, the time required by deep-sea populations to recover following habitat perturbations depends both on the direction of gene flow and the number of migrants available for re-colonization after disturbance. In this study we compare nine dirivultid copepod species across various geological settings. We analyze partial nucleotide sequences of the mtCOI gene and use divergence estimates (FST) and haplotype networks to infer intraspecific population connectivity between vent sites. Furthermore, we evaluate contrasting scenarios of demographic population expansion/decline versus constant population size (using, for example, Tajima's D). Our results indicate high diversity, population expansion and high connectivity of all copepod populations in all oceans. For example, haplotype diversity values range from 0.89 to 1 and FST values range from 0.001 to 0.11 for Stygiopontius species from the Central Indian Ridge, Mid Atlantic Ridge, East Pacific Rise, and Eastern Lau Spreading Center. We suggest that great abundance and high site occupancy by these species favor high genetic diversity. Two scenarios both showed similarly high connectivity: fast spreading centers with little distance between vent fields and slow spreading centers with greater distance between fields. This unexpected result may be due to some distinct frequency of natural disturbance events, or to aspects of individual life histories that affect realized rates of dispersal. However, our statistical performance analyses showed that at least 100 genomic regions should be sequenced to ensure accurate estimates of migration rate. Our demography parameters demonstrate that dirivultid

  13. Heat transfer system safety: Comparing the effectiveness of batch venting and a light-ends removal kit (LERK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ian Wright

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer fluids (HTF should be analysed at least once per year to determine the extent of thermal degradation. Under normal operating conditions, mineral-based HTFs will thermally degrade and the bonds between hydrocarbons break to form shorter-chain hydrocarbons known as “light-ends”. These light-ends accumulate in a HTF system and present a future potential fire risk. Light-ends can be removed from a HTF system via a batch vent or installation of a temporary or permanently installed light-ends removal kit (LERK. Data was collected prior to and following batch venting or installation of a LERK. The main study parameter was closed flash temperature as open flash temperature and fire point did not change considerably. Analysis showed that both methods increased closed flash temperature in excess of 130 °C three months after the intervention, so both methods were deemed effective. Data showed that the percentage change achieved with the LERK, compared to batch venting, was 2-fold higher at three months and 10-fold higher at 6 months. The duration of effect was longer with the LERK with closed flash temperature being stable and consistently above 130 °C for 50 months after being permanently installed. This case highlights the effectiveness of a permanently fitted LERK which is effective for the longer-term control of closed flash temperature. However, mobile LERKs could be an option for manufacturers looking to manage closed flash temperature on a shorter-term basis or as an alternative to batch venting.

  14. Challenges of using an AUV to find and map hydrothermal vent sites in deep and rugged terrains

    OpenAIRE

    McPhail, S.D.; Stevenson, P.; Pebody, M.; Furlong, M.; Perrett, J.; LeBas, T.

    2010-01-01

    In March 2010, the Autosub6000 AUV embarked on a cruise to discover, locate and map hydrothermal vent sites in an active spreading centre, the Cayman trough in the Caribbean sea. The environment provided the challenge of steep and rugged terrain together with deep water (in places greater than 5000 m). Autosub6000 is a flight class, hydrodynamically shaped AUV, with good endurance capability, making it well suited for searching for plume signals and mapping terrain over the required ...

  15. Molecular isotopic evidence for anaerobic oxidation of methane in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment in Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, M.; Takai, K.; Inagaki, F.

    2003-04-01

    Large amount of methane in anoxic marine sediments as well as cold seeps and hydrothermal vents is recycled through for an anoxic oxidation of methane processes. Now that combined results of field and laboratory studies revealed that microbiological activity associated with syntrophic consortium of archaea performing reversed methanogenesis and sulfate-reducing bacteria is significant roles in methane recycling, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). In this study, we examined the diversity of archaeal and bacterial assemblages of AOM using compound-specific stable carbon isotopic and phylogenetic analyses. "Iheya North" in Okinawa Trough is sediment-rich, back arc type hydrothermal system (27^o47'N, 126^o53'E). Sediment samples were collected from three sites where are "bubbling sites", yellow-colored microbial mats are formed with continuous bubbling from the seafloor bottom, vent mussel's colonies site together with slowly venting and simmering, and control site off 100 m distance from thermal vent. This subsea floor structure has important effect in the microbial ecosystem and interaction between their activity and geochemical processes in the subseafloor habitats. Culture-independent, molecular biological analysis clearly indicated the presence of thermophilic methanogens in deeper area having higher temperatures and potential activity of AMOs consortium in the shallower area. AMO is composed with sulfate-reducing bacterial components (Desulfosarcina spp.) and anoxic methane oxidizing archaea (ANME-2). These results were consistent with the results of compound-specific carbon analysis of archaeal biomarkers. They showed extremely depleted 13C contents (-80 ppm ˜ -100 ppm), which also appeared to be capable of directly oxidizing methane.

  16. Assessing future vent opening locations at the Somma-Vesuvio volcanic complex: 1. A new information geodatabase with uncertainty characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadini, A.; Bisson, M.; Neri, A.; Cioni, R.; Bevilacqua, A.; Aspinall, W. P.

    2017-06-01

    This study presents new and revised data sets about the spatial distribution of past volcanic vents, eruptive fissures, and regional/local structures of the Somma-Vesuvio volcanic system (Italy). The innovative features of the study are the identification and quantification of important sources of uncertainty affecting interpretations of the data sets. In this regard, the spatial uncertainty of each feature is modeled by an uncertainty area, i.e., a geometric element typically represented by a polygon drawn around points or lines. The new data sets have been assembled as an updatable geodatabase that integrates and complements existing databases for Somma-Vesuvio. The data are organized into 4 data sets and stored as 11 feature classes (points and lines for feature locations and polygons for the associated uncertainty areas), totaling more than 1700 elements. More specifically, volcanic vent and eruptive fissure elements are subdivided into feature classes according to their associated eruptive styles: (i) Plinian and sub-Plinian eruptions (i.e., large- or medium-scale explosive activity); (ii) violent Strombolian and continuous ash emission eruptions (i.e., small-scale explosive activity); and (iii) effusive eruptions (including eruptions from both parasitic vents and eruptive fissures). Regional and local structures (i.e., deep faults) are represented as linear feature classes. To support interpretation of the eruption data, additional data sets are provided for Somma-Vesuvio geological units and caldera morphological features. In the companion paper, the data presented here, and the associated uncertainties, are used to develop a first vent opening probability map for the Somma-Vesuvio caldera, with specific attention focused on large or medium explosive events.

  17. Vented versus unvented chest seals for treatment of pneumothorax and prevention of tension pneumothorax in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Terrazas, Irasema B; Koller, Alexandra; Allen, Paul B; Klemcke, Harold G; Convertino, Victor A; Dubick, Michael A; Gerhardt, Robert T; Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2013-07-01

    Unvented chest seals (CSs) are currently recommended for the management of penetrating thoracic injuries in the battlefield. Since no supporting data exist, we compared the efficacy of a preferred unvented with that of a vented CS in a novel swine model of pneumothorax (PTx). An open chest wound was created in the left thorax of spontaneously air-breathing anesthetized pigs (n = 8). A CS was applied over the injury, then tension PTx was induced by incremental air injections (0.2 L) into the pleural cavity via a cannula that was also used to measure intrapleural pressure (IP). Both CS were tested on each pig in series. Tidal volume (V(T)), respiratory rate, IP, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, venous and peripheral oxygen saturations (SvO2, SpO2) were recorded. Tension PTx was defined as a mean IP equal to or greater than +1 mm Hg plus significant (20-30%) deviation in baseline levels of the previously mentioned parameters and confirmed by chest x-ray study. PaO2 and PaCo2 were also measured. PTx produced immediate breathing difficulty and significant rises in IP and pulmonary arterial pressure and falls in V(T), SpO2, and SvO2. Both CSs returned these parameters to near baseline within 5 minutes of application. After vented CS was applied, serial air injections up to 2 L resulted in no significant change in the previously mentioned parameters. After unvented CS application, progressive deterioration of all respiratory parameters and onset of tension PTx were observed in all subjects after approximately 1.4-L air injection. Both vented and unvented CSs provided immediate improvements in breathing and blood oxygenation in our model of penetrating thoracic trauma. However, in the presence of ongoing intrapleural air accumulation, the unvented CS led to tension PTx, hypoxemia, and possible respiratory arrest, while the vented CS prevented these outcomes.

  18. Experimental and numerical study of smoke propagation through a vent separating two mechanically ventilated rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouin, Laurent; Pretrel, Hugues; Vaux, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental and numerical study about smoke propagation through a horizontal opening between two superposed compartments, as can be encountered in nuclear installations, in case of a fire taking place in the lower room. The experimental configuration proposed in this study consists in two rooms mechanically ventilated and connected each other by a horizontal opening. The fire source is simulated by a propane burner located in the lower room. The inlet ventilation duct is located in the lower room and the exhaust ventilation duct is located in the upper room. For such experimental configuration, several flow regimes at the horizontal opening connecting the two rooms can be encountered depending on the fire power, the opening size (diameter, depth) and the ventilation set-up (location of inlet/outlet ducts, flow rate). Indeed, flow at the opening is governed by buoyant forces due to the hot gases produced by the fire, the inertia effect due to the forced ventilation and the momentum effect due to smoke flow nearby the horizontal opening (for instance, ceiling jet or thermal plume from fire). Consequently, such complex mixed (natural/ forced) convective flows are still a challenge for CFD fire codes to make properly calculations of these experimental scenarios. The objective of this paper is to assess the capability of ISIS code (CFD) to simulate the behaviour of smoke propagation inside these two superposed compartments. Results of this study are presented with details (especially, thermal stratification and flow rates through the horizontal vent) and are discussed thoroughly.

  19. THERMAL HYDRAULIC ISSUES OF CONTAINMENT FILTERED VENTING SYSTEM FOR A LONG OPERATING TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOUNG SU NA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the thermal hydraulic issues in the Containment Filtered Venting System (CFVS for a long operating time using the MELCOR computer code. The modeling of the CFVS, including the models for pool scrubbing and the filter, was added to the input file for the OPR-1000, and a Station Blackout (SBO was chosen as an accident scenario. Although depressurization in the containment building as a primary objective of the CFVS was successful, the decontamination feature by scrubbing and filtering in the CFVS for a long operating time could fail by the continuous evaporation of the scrubbing solution. After the operation of the CFVS, the atmosphere temperature in the CFVS became slightly above the water saturation temperature owing to the release of an amount of steam with high temperature from the containment building to the scrubbing solution. Reduced pipe diameters at the inlet and outlet of the CFVS vessel mitigated the evaporation of scrubbing water by controlling the amount of high-temperature steam and the water saturation temperature.

  20. A Simple and Efficient RNA Extraction Method from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Chimney Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Hisashi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Hirai, Miho; Mino, Sayaka; Sawayama, Shigeki; Takai, Ken; Nakagawa, Satoshi

    2017-12-27

    RNA-based microbiological analyses, e.g., transcriptome and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, require a relatively large amount of high quality RNA. RNA-based analyses on microbial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal environments often encounter methodological difficulties with RNA extraction due to the presence of unique minerals in and the low biomass of samples. In the present study, we assessed RNA extraction methods for deep-sea vent chimneys that had complex mineral compositions. Mineral-RNA adsorption experiments were conducted using mock chimney minerals and Escherichia coli total RNA solution, and showed that detectable RNA significantly decreased possibly due to adsorption onto minerals. This decrease in RNA was prevented by the addition of sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs), salmon sperm DNA, and NaOH. The addition of STPP was also effective for RNA extraction from the mixture of E. coli cells and mock chimney minerals when TRIzol reagent and the RNeasy column were used, but not when the RNeasy PowerSoil total RNA kit was used. A combination of STPP, TRIzol reagent, the RNeasy column, and sonication resulted in the highest RNA yield from a natural chimney. This indirect extraction procedure is simple, rapid, inexpensive, and may be used for large-scale RNA extraction.

  1. Vented spikes improve delivery from intravenous bags with no air headspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galush, William J; Horst, Travis A

    2015-07-01

    Flexible plastic bags are the container of choice for most intravenous (i.v.) infusions. Under certain circumstances, however, the air-liquid interface present in these i.v. bags can lead to physical instability of protein biopharmaceuticals, resulting in product aggregation. In principle, the air headspace present in the bags can be removed to increase drug stability, but experiments described here show that this can result in incomplete draining of solution from the bag using gravity delivery, or generation of negative pressure in the bag when an infusion pump is used. It is expected that these issues could lead to incomplete delivery of medication to patients or pump-related problems, respectively. However, here it is shown that contrary to the standard pharmacy practice of using nonvented spikes with i.v. bags, the use of vented spikes with i.v. bags that lack air headspace allows complete delivery of the dose solution without impacting the physical stability of a protein-based drug. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  2. Recent developments in the thermophilic microbiology of deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, Margarita L; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2006-04-01

    The diversity of thermophilic prokaryotes inhabiting deep-sea hot vents was actively studied over the last two decades. The ever growing interest is reflected in the exponentially increasing number of novel thermophilic genera described. The goal of this paper is to survey the progress in this field made in the years 2000-2005. In this period, representatives of several new taxa of hyperthermophilic archaea were obtained from deep-sea environments. Two of these isolates had phenotypic features new for this group of organisms: the presence of an outer cell membrane (the genus Ignicoccus) and the ability to grow anaerobically with acetate and ferric iron (the genus Geoglobus). Also, our knowledge on the diversity of thermophilic bacteria from deep-sea thermal environments extended significantly. The new bacterial isolates represented diverse bacterial divisions: the phylum Aquificae, the subclass Epsilonproteobacteria, the order Thermotogales, the families Thermodesulfobacteriaceae, Deferribacteraceae, and Thermaceae, and a novel bacterial phylum represented by the genus Caldithrix. Most of these isolates are obligate or facultative lithotrophs, oxidizing molecular hydrogen in the course of different types of anaerobic respiration or microaerobic growth. The existence and significant ecological role of some of new bacterial thermophilic isolates was initially established by molecular methods.

  3. Static Vented Chamber and Eddy Covariance Methane Flux Comparisons in Mid-South US Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reba, M. L.; Fong, B.; Adviento-Borbe, A.; Runkle, B.; Suvocarev, K.; Rival, I.

    2017-12-01

    Rice cultivation contributes higher amounts of GHG emissions (CO2 and CH4) due to flooded field conditions. A comparison between eddy covariance and static vented flux chamber measurement techniques is presented. Rice GHG emissions originating from plot level chambers may not accurately describe the aggregate effects of all the soil and micrometeorological variations across a production field. Eddy covariance (EC) is a direct, integrated field measurement of field scale trace gases. Flux measurements were collected in NE Arkansas production size rice fields (16 ha, 40 ac) during the 2015 and 2016 production seasons (June-August) in continuous flood (CF) irrigation. The study objectives included quantifying the difference between chamber and EC measurements, and categorizing flux behavior to growth stage and field history. EC daily average emissions correlated with chamber measurements (R2=0.27-0.54) more than average from 09:00-12:00 which encompassed chamber measurement times (R2=0.23-0.32). Maximum methane emissions occurred in the late afternoon from 14:00-18:00 which corresponded with maximum soil heat flux and air temperature. The total emissions from the study fields ranged from 27-117 kg CH4-C ha-1 season-1. The emission profile was lower in 2015, most likely due to higher rainfall and cooler temperatures during the growing season compared to 2016. These findings improve our understanding of GHG emissions at the field scale under typical production practices and validity of chamber and EC flux measurement techniques.

  4. Investigations into the design of a filter system for PWR containment venting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillmann, H.G.; Wilhelm, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The reactors of power stations in the Federal Republic of Germany are being or have already been equipped with systems for containment venting under severe accident conditions. Two different offgas cleaning systems are available. One system, realizing a complete passive filtering concept, consists of a multistage metal fiber filter for coarse particulates and aerosol removal and an additional molecular sieve filter for gaseous iodine retention connected in series. The requirements made with respect to aerosol filtration includes among others the capability of retaining 60 kg of a recondensing aerosol with a 0.5 μm mean geometric mass diameter. BaSO 4 and SnO 2 were used as tracer aerosols in the experiments. All the decontamination factors were > 1,000. Vaporous iodine is removed on molecular sieve filters (zeolite filters) subsequent to airborne particulate filtration. As Ag-zeolites act as catalysts in the H 2 O 2 reaction and thus might give rise to a violent exothermal reaction, the catalytic effect was suppressed by substituting mixed doping for doping solely with silver. The removal efficiencies achieved with Ag-zeolites and zeolites with mixed doping in air-steam mixtures are indicated, and investigations of the catalytic behavior in air-steam-H 2 mixtures are described

  5. Clad vent set cup open end (closure weld zone) wall-thickness study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, G.B.; Sherrill, M.W.

    1994-09-01

    The wall thickness at the open end of Clad Vent Set (CVS) cups is a very important parameter for maintaining control of the fueled CVS closure weld process. Ideally, the wall thickness in the closure weld zone should be constant. The DOP-26 iridium alloy is very difficult to machine; therefore, key dimensional features are established during the two-draw warm-forming operation. Unfortunately, anisotropy in the forming blanks produces four ears at the open end of each cup. Formation of these ears produces axial and circumferential variations in wall thickness. The cup certification requirement is that the wall thickness in the closure weld zone, defined as the 2.5-mm band at the open end of a cup, measure from 0.63 to 0.73 mm. The wall thickness certification data for the open end of the CVS cups have been statistically evaluated. These data show that the cups recently produced for the Cassini mission have well-controlled open-end wall thicknesses.

  6. Development of high efficiency filtered containment venting system by using AgX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narabayashi, Tadashi; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Chiba, Go; Tsuji, Masashi; Ishii, Tasuku

    2014-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident would be terminated, if sufficient accident countermeasures, such as water proof door, mobile power, etc. In case of Europe, it had already installed the heat removal system and filtered containment venting system (FCVS) from the lessons of TMI and Chernobyl Accidents. Decay heat removal system and CV spray cooling system with FCVS are ensured by using mobile generators and heat exchangers to keep the ultimate heat sink even in any natural disaster, such as large earthquake, big tsunami, sudden flooding etc. In this paper we introduce high decontamination factor FCVS that used Silver Zeolite named AgX, developed by Rasa Industries, Ltd. Hokkaido University has tested wet type FCVS using venturi scrubber in water pool and dry type FCVS using metallic filter for 1st stage, and AgX for 2nd stage. Since the AgX needs super heat steam, it is possible to heat up steam by heat exchanger. It is confirmed by TRAC analysis. (author)

  7. Liquid film thickness and interfacial wave propagate in venturi scrubber for filtered venting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Yasuhiro; Horiguchi, Naoki; Kanagawa, Tetsuya; Kaneko, Akiko; Abe, Yutaka; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    As one of filtered venting systems which should be installed in light water reactors from the viewpoint of protecting a containment vessel and suppressing the diffusion of radioactive materials, there is a system composed of venturi scrubbers. The radioactive materials in the contaminated gas are collected into liquid. By forming dispersed flow in the venturi scrubber, interfacial area between liquid and gas is enhanced, finally, large decontamination factor is realized. In evaluation for the decontamination performance of the venturi scrubber, interface characteristics of droplets and liquid film are important. In this study, as a part of evaluation method of the interfacial area, the liquid film thickness in the venturi scrubber was measured. And evaluate the results of investigation experimentally for each ruffling average thickness and liquid film in a fluidized condition. The cross section area of a venturi scrubber is a rectangular one manufactured a transparent acrylic for visualization. In the venturi scrubber, a pressure drop occurs in the throat part by the inflow of air from the compressor. Water flows from the tank by a pressure difference between a suctioned hole with head pressure and a throat part. An annular spray flow is then formed in the venturi scrubber. (author)

  8. Communication value of displays and postures in Red-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus cafer (Aves: Pycnonotidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available I investigated visual signals mediated through displays and postures and their importance in communication in Red-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus cafer. Observations revealed that this species used five types (namely mate acquisition display, greeting display, alarm display, crest position and begging display of visual signals for communication and showed three types of sleeping postures and broken-wing display. Mate acquisition display was performed to maintain pair bond and when two individuals met, one of them would use greeting display along with low amplitude complex vocalisations. The position of the crest seemed to vary with different behavioural contexts; it was raised erect in alarm and recumbent during greeting. Nestlings/ fledglings used specific begging displays that included gaping with or without vocal signals. The presence of a predator in close vicinity of bird/nesting site, elicited alarm displays along with alarm calls. The present study revealed that the displays and postures are important means of communication under various social contexts and were often accompanied with vocalisations thus making them multi-component. It is believed that the multi-component signals provide more reliable information for receivers and increase the efficacy of communication.

  9. Application of filtered containment venting system to the Shimane No.2 NPP, July 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzawa, Katsunori; Usui, Toshimitsu; Naitou, Keita; Kashiwakura, Jun; Kushima, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    Urgent safety measures which secure power supply and cooling function and prevent flood are being implemented promptly in Shimane nuclear power station to prevent damage of nuclear reactors and the spent fuel based on Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident from tsunami caused by the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake on March 11, 2011. In order to improve the safety of the power station furthermore, various safety measures such as enhancement of basic design facilities to prevent severe accident from happening and installation of additional facilities to prevent it from expanding are also being implemented earnestly with consideration for multiplicity and diversity of the measures to secure its safety. As for safety measures for Shimane No.2 nuclear power plant, the plan of the safety measures have been submitted to NRA as applications for Establishment Permission, Construction Permission and applications of amendments to be assessed on the basis of the New Regulation effectuated on July, 2013. The validity of the plan is now under review. This paper explains the outline of the safety measures of Shimane No.2 nuclear power plant and the design outline and current status of the installation of Filtered Containment Venting System (FCVS). FCVS is one of the important facilities of all safety measures to prevent severe accident from expanding, and it is applied to Japanese nuclear power plant for the first time. (author)

  10. Testing of a Spray-bar Thermodynamic Vent System in Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Tucker, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    To support development of a microgravity pressure control capability for liquid oxygen, thermodynamic vent system (TVS) testing was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using liquid nitrogen (LN2) as a LOX simulant. The spray bar TVS hardware used was originally designed by the Boeing Company for testing in liquid hydrogen (LH2). With this concept, a small portion of the tank fluid is passed through a Joule-Thomson (J-T) device, and then through a longitudinal spray bar mixed-heat exchanger in order to cool the bulk fluid. To accommodate the larger mass flow rates associated with LN2, the TVS hardware was modified by replacing the recirculation pump with an LN2 compatible pump and replacing the J-T valve. The primary advantage of the spray-bar configuration is that tank pressure control can be achieved independent of liquid and vapor location, enhancing the applicability of ground test data to microgravity conditions. Performance testing revealed that the spray-bar TVS was effective in controlling tank pressure within a 6.89 kPa band for fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%. Tests were also conducted with gaseous helium (GHe) in the ullage. The TVS operated nominally with GHe in the ullage, with performance similar to the tests with gaseous nitrogen (GN2). Testing demonstrated that the spray-bar TVS design was flexible enough for use in two different propellants with minimal hardware modifications.

  11. Control of waste well casing vent gas from a thermal enhanced oil recovery operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peavy, M.A.; Braun, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a waste gas treatment system designed to control emissions from thermally enhanced oil recovery wells. This case study discusses the need, design, installation and operations of the system. Oryx Energy Company (Oryx) operates approximately 940 wells in the Midway-Sunset (MWSS) field under casing vapor recovery systems. The emissions collected from well casing vent gas cotaining hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide that are collected and processed through casing vapor recovery skids. These skids are composed of condensers, compressors, and pumps that separate fluids from the waste gas stream. The non-condensible gas is then disposed of in incinerators that reduce the hydrocarbon and sulfur emissions into the atmosphere. Approximately 91,000 lbs/day of hydrocarbon and 10,116 lbs/day of sulfur dioxide are removed from the atmosphere from wells contained within these systems operated by Oryx. These hydrocarbons yield approximately 550 barrels of oil per day (BOPD). The system helps manage the pressure differential from the reservoir into each wellbore and contributes to improved ambient air quality in Kern County, California

  12. Airflow and Heat Transfer in the Slot-Vented Room with Radiant Floor Heating Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Long Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiant floor heating has received increasing attention due to its diverse advantages, especially the energy saving as compared to the conventional dwelling heating system. This paper presents a numerical investigation of airflow and heat transfer in the slot-vented room with the radiant floor heating unit. Combination of fluid convection and thermal radiation has been implemented through the thermal boundary conditions. Spatial distributions of indoor air temperature and velocity, as well as the heat transfer rates along the radiant floor and the outer wall, have been presented and analyzed covering the domains from complete natural convection to forced convection dominated flows. The numerical results demonstrate that the levels of average temperature in the room with lateral slot-ventilation are higher than those without slot-ventilation, but lower than those in the room with ceiling slot-ventilation. Overall, the slot-ventilation room with radiant floor heating unit could offer better indoor air quality through increasing the indoor air temperature and fresh air exchanging rate simultaneously. Concerning the airborne pollutant transports and moisture condensations, the performance of radiant floor heating unit will be further optimized in our future researches.

  13. Iron oxide deposits associated with the ectosymbiotic bacteria in the hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Compère

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The Rimicaris exoculata shrimp is considered as a primary consumer that dominates the fauna of most Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR hydrothermal ecosystems. These shrimps harbour in their gill chambers an important ectosymbiotic community of chemoautotrophic bacteria associated with iron oxide deposits. The structure and elemental composition of the mineral concretions associated with these bacteria have been investigated by using LM, ESEM, TEM STEM and EDX microanalyses. The nature of the iron oxides in shrimps obtained from the Rainbow vent field has also been determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. This multidisciplinary approach has revealed that the three layers of mineral crust in the Rimicaris exoculata shrimps consist of large concretions formed by aggregated nanoparticles of two-line ferrihydrite and include other minor elements as Si, Ca, Mg, S and P, probably present as silicates cations, sulphates or phosphates respectively that may contribute to stabilise the ferrihydrite form of iron oxides. TEM-observations on the bacteria have revealed their close interactions with these minerals. Abiotic and biotic precipitation could occur within the gill chamber of Rimicaris exoculata, suggesting the biologically-mediated formation of the iron oxide deposits. The difference of the bacterial density in the three-mineral crust layers could be correlated to the importance of the iron oxide concretions and suggest that the first mineral particles precipitates on the lower layer which could be considered as the most likely location of iron-oxidizing bacteria.

  14. Engineering work plan for container venting system drill press assembly troubleshooting. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prather, M.C.

    1994-11-01

    This work plan is for troubleshooting the current CVS drill press to ensure that the drill bit assembly doesn't bind in the press plate. A drill press assembly has been fabricated for the Container Venting System (CVS). The drill bit assembly has bound in the press plate in previous revisions of this design. Initial troubleshooting of the drill press per Rev. 0 of this work plan was performed at the 200W Kaiser Machine Shop under Work Package 2H9401670F, Internal Work Order E20027. The drill press operated without jamming. Then, during the pre-operational test on 11/14/17 and the operational test on 11/17/94, two drum lids were drilled. Immediately after the test on 11/17/94, the drill was again operated, and it jammed. An inspection found shavings at the bottom of the drill bit assembly, between the drill bit sleeve and the press plate bore. This revised work plan provides direction for the machine shop to diagnose and correct this recent problem

  15. The Biological Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent as a Model to Study Carbon Dioxide Capturing Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premila D. Thongbam

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep sea hydrothermal vents are located along the mid-ocean ridge system, near volcanically active areas, where tectonic plates are moving away from each other. Sea water penetrates the fissures of the volcanic bed and is heated by magma. This heated sea water rises to the surface dissolving large amounts of minerals which provide a source of energy and nutrients to chemoautotrophic organisms. Although this environment is characterized by extreme conditions (high temperature, high pressure, chemical toxicity, acidic pH and absence of photosynthesis a diversity of microorganisms and many animal species are specially adapted to this hostile environment. These organisms have developed a very efficient metabolism for the assimilation of inorganic CO2 from the external environment. In order to develop technology for the capture of carbon dioxide to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, enzymes involved in CO2 fixation and assimilation might be very useful. This review describes some current research concerning CO2 fixation and assimilation in the deep sea environment and possible biotechnological application of enzymes for carbon dioxide capture.

  16. Comparative assessment of CFD Tools and the Eurocode Methodology in describing Externally Venting Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asimakopoulou Eleni K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of currently available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD tools to adequately describe Externally Venting Flames (EVF is assessed, aiming to demonstrate compliance with performance-based fire safety regulations. The Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS CFD tool is used to simulate the EVF characteristics in a corridor-compartment-façade configuration exposed to natural fire conditions. Numerical results of the temporal evolution of gas velocity, gas temperatures and flame shape are obtained for both the interior and the exterior of the compartment. Predictions are compared to respective experimental data, as well as to correlations suggested by the Eurocode methodology. The effects of ventilation conditions are investigated by simulating both Forced Draught (FD and No Forced Draught (NoFD test cases. The obtained results suggest that currently available CFD tools are capable of achieving good qualitative agreement with experimental data and, in certain cases (e.g. FD conditions, adequate quantitative agreement, that generally outperforms the Eurocode prescriptive methodology.

  17. Experimental and numerical study of smoke propagation through a vent separating two mechanically ventilated rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audouin, Laurent; Pretrel, Hugues; Vaux, Samuel [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-12-15

    The paper presents an experimental and numerical study about smoke propagation through a horizontal opening between two superposed compartments, as can be encountered in nuclear installations, in case of a fire taking place in the lower room. The experimental configuration proposed in this study consists in two rooms mechanically ventilated and connected each other by a horizontal opening. The fire source is simulated by a propane burner located in the lower room. The inlet ventilation duct is located in the lower room and the exhaust ventilation duct is located in the upper room. For such experimental configuration, several flow regimes at the horizontal opening connecting the two rooms can be encountered depending on the fire power, the opening size (diameter, depth) and the ventilation set-up (location of inlet/outlet ducts, flow rate). Indeed, flow at the opening is governed by buoyant forces due to the hot gases produced by the fire, the inertia effect due to the forced ventilation and the momentum effect due to smoke flow nearby the horizontal opening (for instance, ceiling jet or thermal plume from fire). Consequently, such complex mixed (natural/ forced) convective flows are still a challenge for CFD fire codes to make properly calculations of these experimental scenarios. The objective of this paper is to assess the capability of ISIS code (CFD) to simulate the behaviour of smoke propagation inside these two superposed compartments. Results of this study are presented with details (especially, thermal stratification and flow rates through the horizontal vent) and are discussed thoroughly.

  18. Diversity of bacteria and archaea from two shallow marine hydrothermal vents from Vulcano Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antranikian, Garabed; Suleiman, Marcel; Schäfers, Christian; Adams, Michael W W; Bartolucci, Simonetta; Blamey, Jenny M; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta; da Costa, Milton S; Cowan, Don; Danson, Michael; Forterre, Patrick; Kelly, Robert; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Littlechild, Jennifer; Moracci, Marco; Noll, Kenneth; Oshima, Tairo; Robb, Frank; Rossi, Mosè; Santos, Helena; Schönheit, Peter; Sterner, Reinhard; Thauer, Rudolf; Thomm, Michael; Wiegel, Jürgen; Stetter, Karl Otto

    2017-07-01

    To obtain new insights into community compositions of hyperthermophilic microorganisms, defined as having optimal growth temperatures of 80 °C and above, sediment and water samples were taken from two shallow marine hydrothermal vents (I and II) with temperatures of 100 °C at Vulcano Island, Italy. A combinatorial approach of denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and metagenomic sequencing was used for microbial community analyses of the samples. In addition, enrichment cultures, growing anaerobically on selected polysaccharides such as starch and cellulose, were also analyzed by the combinatorial approach. Our results showed a high abundance of hyperthermophilic archaea, especially in sample II, and a comparable diverse archaeal community composition in both samples. In particular, the strains of the hyperthermophilic anaerobic genera Staphylothermus and Thermococcus, and strains of the aerobic hyperthermophilic genus Aeropyrum, were abundant. Regarding the bacterial community, ε-Proteobacteria, especially the genera Sulfurimonas and Sulfurovum, were highly abundant. The microbial diversity of the enrichment cultures changed significantly by showing a high dominance of archaea, particularly the genera Thermococcus and Palaeococcus, depending on the carbon source and the selected temperature.

  19. Expression patterns of mRNAs for methanotrophy and thiotrophy in symbionts of the hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus puteoserpentis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendeberg, Annelie; Zielinski, Frank U; Borowski, Christian; Dubilier, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus puteoserpentis (Mytilidae) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hosts symbiotic sulfur- and methane-oxidizing bacteria in its gills. In this study, we investigated the activity and distribution of these two symbionts in juvenile mussels from the Logatchev hydrothermal vent field (14°45′N Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Expression patterns of two key genes for chemosynthesis were examined: pmoA (encoding subunit A of the particulate methane monooxygenase) as an indicator for methanotrophy, and aprA (encoding the subunit A of the dissimilatory adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase) as an indicator for thiotrophy. Using simultaneous fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of rRNA and mRNA we observed highest mRNA FISH signals toward the ciliated epithelium where seawater enters the gills. The levels of mRNA expression differed between individual specimens collected in a single grab from the same sampling site, whereas no obvious differences in symbiont abundance or distribution were observed. We propose that the symbionts respond to the steep temporal and spatial gradients in methane, reduced sulfur compounds and oxygen by modifying gene transcription, whereas changes in symbiont abundance and distribution take much longer than regulation of mRNA expression and may only occur in response to long-term changes in vent fluid geochemistry. PMID:21734728

  20. High potential for temperate viruses to drive carbon cycling in chemoautotrophy-dominated shallow-water hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastelli, Eugenio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Tangherlini, Michael; Martorelli, Eleonora; Ingrassia, Michela; Chiocci, Francesco L; Lo Martire, Marco; Danovaro, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    Viruses are the most abundant life forms in the world's oceans and they are key drivers of biogeochemical cycles, but their impact on the microbial assemblages inhabiting hydrothermal vent ecosystems is still largely unknown. Here, we analysed the viral life strategies and virus-host interactions in the sediments of a newly discovered shallow-water hydrothermal field of the Mediterranean Sea. Our study reveals that temperate viruses, once experimentally induced to replicate, can cause large mortality of vent microbes, significantly reducing the chemoautotrophic carbon production, while enhancing the metabolism of microbial heterotrophs and the re-cycling of the organic matter. These results provide new insights on the factors controlling primary and secondary production processes in hydrothermal vents, suggesting that the inducible provirus-host interactions occurring in these systems can profoundly influence the functioning of the microbial food web and the efficiency in the energy transfer to the higher trophic levels. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Molecular biomineralization: toward an understanding of the biogenic origin of polymetallic nodules, seamount crusts, and hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Wiens, Matthias; Schröder, Heinz C; Schloßmacher, Ute; Müller, Werner E G

    2011-01-01

    Polymetallic nodules and crusts, hydrothermal vents from the Deep Sea are economically interesting, since they contain alloying components, e.g., manganese or cobalt, that are used in the production of special steels; in addition, they contain rare metals applied for plasma screens, for magnets in hard disks, or in hybrid car motors. While hydrothermal vents can regenerate in weeks, polymetallic nodules and seamount crusts grow slowly. Even though the geochemical basis for the growth of the nodules and crusts has been well studied, the contribution of microorganisms to the formation of these minerals remained obscure. Recent HR-SEM (high-resolution scanning electron microscopy) analyses of nodules and crusts support their biogenic origin. Within the nodules, bacteria with surface S-layers are arranged on biofilm-like structures, around which Mn deposition starts. In crusts, coccoliths represent the dominant biologically formed structures that act as bio-seeds for an initial Mn deposition. In contrast, hydrothermal vents have apparently an abiogenic origin; however, their minerals are biogenically transformed by bacteria. In turn, strategies can now be developed for biotechnological enrichment as well as selective dissolution of metals from such concretions. We are convinced that the recent discoveries will considerably contribute to our understanding of the participation of organic matrices in the enrichment of those metals and will provide the basis for feasibility studies for biotechnological applications.

  2. Unveiling the transformation and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter in contrasting hydrothermal vents using fluorescence EEM-PARAFAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liyang; Zhuang, Wan-E; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Wang, Bing-Jye; Kuo, Fu-Wen

    2017-03-15

    The submarine hydrothermal systems are extreme environments where active cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM) may occur. However, little is known about the optical properties and bioavailability of hydrothermal DOM, which could provide valuable insights into its transformation processes and biogeochemical reactivity. The quantity, quality, and bioavailability of DOM were investigated for four very different hydrothermal vents east of Taiwan, using dissolved organic carbon (DOC), absorption spectroscopy, and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices-parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC). The DOC and absorption coefficient a 280 were both lower in the two hydrothermal vents off the Orchid Island and on the Green Island than in the surrounding seawater and the two vents off the Kueishantao Island, indicating effective removals of DOM in the former two hydrothermal systems owing to possible adsorption/co-precipitation and thermal degradation respectively. The four hydrothermal DOM showed notable differences in the absorption spectral slope S 275-295 , humification index HIX, biological index BIX, EEM spectra, and the relative distributions of seven PARAFAC components. The results demonstrated a high diversity of chemical composition and transformation history of DOM under contrasting hydrothermal conditions. The little change in the hydrothermal DOC after 28-day microbial incubations indicated a low bioavailability of the bulk DOM, and different PARAFAC components showed contrasting bioavailability. The results have profound implications for understanding the biogeochemical cycling and environmental effects of hydrothermal DOM in the marine environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The large-scale vented combustion test facility at AECL-WL: description and preliminary test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loesel Sitar, J.; Koroll, G.W.; Dewit, W.A.; Bowles, E.M.; Harding, J.; Sabanski, C.L.; Kumar, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Implementation of hydrogen mitigation systems in nuclear reactor containments requires testing the effectiveness of the mitigation system, reliability and availability of the hardware, potential consequences of its use and the technical basis for hardware placement, on a meaningful scale. Similarly, the development and validation of containment codes used in nuclear reactor safety analysis require detailed combustion data from medium- and large-scale facilities. A Large-Scale Combustion Test Facility measuring 10 m x 4 m x 3 m (volume, 120 m 3 ) has been constructed and commissioned at Whiteshell Laboratories to perform a wide variety of combustion experiments. The facility is designed to be versatile so that many geometrical configurations can be achieved. The facility incorporates extensive capabilities for instrumentation and high speed data acquisition, on-line gas sampling and analysis. Other features of the facility include operation at elevated temperatures up to 150 degrees C, easy access to the interior, and remote operation. Initial thermodynamic conditions in the facility can be controlled to within 0.1 vol% of constituent gases. The first series of experiments examined vented combustion in the full 120 m 3 -volume configuration with vent areas in the range of 0.56 to 2.24 m 2 . The experiments were performed at ∼27 degrees C and near-atmospheric pressures, with hydrogen concentrations in the range of 8 to 12% by volume. This paper describes the Large-Scale Vented Combustion Test Facility and preliminary results from the first series of experiments. (author)

  4. Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project evaluation of multi-canister overpack venting and monitoring options during staging of K basins fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiborg, J.C.

    1995-12-01

    This engineering study recommends whether multi-canister overpacks containing spent nuclear fuel from the Hanford K Basins should be staged in vented or a sealed, but ventable, condition during staging at the Canister Storage Building prior to hot vacuum conditioning and interim storage. The integrally related issues of MCO monitoring, end point criteria, and assessing the practicality of avoiding venting and Hot Vacuum Conditioning for a portion of the spent fuel are also considered.

  5. Effect of moisture control and air venting on H2S production and leachate quality in mature C&D debris landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianye; Dubey, Brajesh; Townsend, Timothy

    2014-10-21

    The effect of air venting and moisture variation on H2S production and the leaching of metals/metalloids (arsenic, copper, chromium, and boron) from treated wood in aged mature construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills were examined. Three simulated C&D debris landfill lysimeters were constructed and monitored, each containing as a major debris component either wooden pallets, chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood, or alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) treated wood. The lysimeters were operated with alternating periods of water addition (a total of 160 L in four equal amounts) and air venting (68.4 m(3)per day for 121 days in two phases). Moisture addition did not increase H2S levels in the long term, and a significant drop in H2S concentration was observed (up to 99%) when aerobic conditions were promoted through air venting. H2S concentrations increased after venting stopped up to values approximately two orders of magnitude lower than observed prior to venting. Venting had the immediate consequence of suppressing biological H2S production, and the longer-term effect of decreasing organic matter that could otherwise be utilized in this process. Under aerobic conditions, the levels of arsenic, chromium, and boron in leachate decreased up to 96%, 49%, and 68%, respectively, while copper was found to increase up to 200% in CCA and 445% in ACQ column leachates.

  6. Study on the natural air cooling design of electronic equipment casings: Effects of the height and size of outlet vent on the flow resistances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, M; Hatakeyama, T; Kibushi, R; Inoue, M

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of the outlet vent size and the distance between the outlet vent location and the power heater position on the flow resistance in natural-air-cooled electronic equipment casings. An experiment was carried out using a simple model casing simulated for the practical natural-air-cooled casing which is composed of 4 side walls, a top plate and bottom plate which has an inlet opening. A power heater to served as a power dissipation unit was placed at its open bottom. An outlet opening was set on one of the side walls. The opening area, the height of the outlet and the heater location were varied. The experimental results were analyzed using the flow resistance coefficient K which was related to the distance between the outlet vent and the power heater position and the heat removal from the outlet vent, and K values were plotted against a pair of Reynolds numbers Re and the outlet vent porosity β which is defined as the ratio of outlet vent open area to the top surface area of the casing.

  7. Archaeal and Bacterial Variation Across Geochemical Gradients in an Arsenic-Rich, Shallow Submarine Vent, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Osburn, M. R.; Amend, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    Near the Feni Islands of Papua New Guinea, reduced hydrothermal fluids mix with seawater, establishing redox disequilibria that may serve as energy sources for chemotrophic Archaea and Bacteria. Of particular interest are elevated arsenite concentrations (1000 μg/L) in the vent water and arsenate-rich ferrihydrite deposits (up to 7 wt.%) that envelope the sediment and coral. In sediment pore waters out to > 200m from the vents, a steeply decreasing arsenic gradient is observed. To establish a baseline of microbial community composition at the vent fluid-seawater interface, bulk DNA was extracted from ferrihydrite coatings, then amplified (16S rRNA, targeting both Archaea and Bacteria), cloned, and sequenced. Red and green biofilms associated with the coatings revealed archaeal communities exclusively composed of deeply-branching, uncultured Crenarchaea. The bacterial members of the community differed in the two biofilms; the red biofilm is primarily composed of gamma Proteobacteria, Chloroflexis, and Planctomycetes, but 60% of clones from the green biofilm community affiliates with the alpha Proteobacteria and candidate group OP11. The remaining portion of the bacterial community in the red coating is made of Thermotogales, Aquificales, Thermales phylotypes and uncultured Bacteria, while OP10, Chloroflexis and Plantomycetales complete the community in the green coatings. No clones associating with thermophilic bacterial groups were found in the green coatings. To provide a comparison to the vent source communities, a sediment core was taken 2.5m from the vent and two depths (10 and 40cm) were analyzed by similar molecular analysis. In both core horizons, the archaeal community is composed of > 75% uncultured Crenarchaea, similar to phylotypes found in deep-sea and terrestrial hydrothermal locations, with the remainder of the communities from known crenarchaeal phylotypes. The bacterial communities are primarily Chloroflexis and gamma Proteobacteria-like phylotypes

  8. Vent Complexes above Dolerite Sills in Phanerozoic LIPs: Implications for Proterozoic LIPs and IOCG Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, R. E.; Bleeker, W.; Svensen, H.; Planke, S.; Polozov, A. G.

    2009-05-01

    New insights into the origin of IOCG (iron oxide copper gold) deposits [e.g., 1, 2, 3] follow from recent studies of Phanerozoic Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs). Detailed seismic studies of the 62-55 Ma North Atlantic Igneous Province and complementary studies in the 183 Ma Karoo and 250 Ma Siberian LIPs reveal thousands of hydrothermal vent complexes (HVCs). Up to 5-10 km across at the paleosurface, these vents connect to underlying dolerite sills at paleodepths of up to 8 km [4, 5, 6, 7]. They originate from explosive release of gases generated when thick sills (>50 m) are emplaced into volatile-rich but low-permeability sedimentary strata. HVCs are phreatomagmatic in origin. Their architecture, economic potential for IOCG-type deposits, and effects on climate strongly depend on the type of host rocks (black shales at Karoo and evaporites at Siberian LIPs) and its fluid (brines) saturation at the time of emplacement. About 250 HVCs associated with the Siberian LIP are mineralized having magnetite in the matrix. Some are being mined for Fe (Korshunovskoe and Rudnogorskoe), but their economic potential for copper and gold mineralization is understudied. These observations from the Phanerozoic LIP record suggest that HVCs should also be an essential component of sill provinces associated with Proterozoic LIPs, with a potential for causing major climatic shifts and IOCG-type deposits, particularly if the host sediments include substantial evaporites. Two examples are discussed here. The 725 Ma Franklin LIP covers 1.1 Mkm2 in northern Canada [8]; in the Minto Inlier of Victoria Island, this event comprises volcanics, sills, and breccia pipes [9, 10]. The breccia pipes appear identical to HVCs and, furthermore, the presence of evaporites in the host sediments of the Shaler Supergroup suggests (based on the Siberian trap example) the potential for IOCG-type mineralization. Could 1.59 Ga sills, as exemplified by the exposed Western Channel Diabase sills on the eastern

  9. Spatial vent opening probability map of El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Laura; Cappello, Annalisa; Galindo, Inés; Neri, Marco; Del Negro, Ciro

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of the probable spatial distribution of new eruptions is useful to manage and reduce the volcanic risk. It can be achieved in different ways, but it becomes especially hard when dealing with volcanic areas less studied, poorly monitored and characterized by a low frequent activity, as El Hierro. Even though it is the youngest of the Canary Islands, before the 2011 eruption in the "Las Calmas Sea", El Hierro had been the least studied volcanic Island of the Canaries, with more historically devoted attention to La Palma, Tenerife and Lanzarote. We propose a probabilistic method to build the susceptibility map of El Hierro, i.e. the spatial distribution of vent opening for future eruptions, based on the mathematical analysis of the volcano-structural data collected mostly on the Island and, secondly, on the submerged part of the volcano, up to a distance of ~10-20 km from the coast. The volcano-structural data were collected through new fieldwork measurements, bathymetric information, and analysis of geological maps, orthophotos and aerial photographs. They have been divided in different datasets and converted into separate and weighted probability density functions, which were then included in a non-homogeneous Poisson process to produce the volcanic susceptibility map. Future eruptive events on El Hierro is mainly concentrated on the rifts zones, extending also beyond the shoreline. The major probabilities to host new eruptions are located on the distal parts of the South and West rifts, with the highest probability reached in the south-western area of the West rift. High probabilities are also observed in the Northeast and South rifts, and the submarine parts of the rifts. This map represents the first effort to deal with the volcanic hazard at El Hierro and can be a support tool for decision makers in land planning, emergency plans and civil defence actions.

  10. Seagrass ecosystem response to long-term high CO2 in a Mediterranean volcanic vent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolaki, Eugenia T; Vizzini, Salvatrice; Hendriks, Iris E; Olsen, Ylva S

    2014-08-01

    We examined the long-term effect of naturally acidified water on a Cymodocea nodosa meadow growing at a shallow volcanic CO2 vent in Vulcano Island (Italy). Seagrass and adjacent unvegetated habitats growing at a low pH station (pH = 7.65 ± 0.02) were compared with corresponding habitats at a control station (pH = 8.01 ± 0.01). Density and biomass showed a clear decreasing trend at the low pH station and the below- to above-ground biomass ratio was more than 10 times lower compared to the control. C content and δ(13)C of leaves and epiphytes were significantly lower at the low pH station. Photosynthetic activity of C. nodosa was stimulated by low pH as seen by the significant increase in Chla content of leaves, maximum electron transport rate and compensation irradiance. Seagrass community metabolism was intense at the low pH station, with significantly higher net community production, respiration and gross primary production than the control community, whereas metabolism of the unvegetated community did not differ between stations. Productivity was promoted by the low pH, but this was not translated into biomass, probably due to nutrient limitation, grazing or poor environmental conditions. The results indicate that seagrass response in naturally acidified conditions is dependable upon species and geochemical characteristics of the site and highlight the need for a better understanding of complex interactions in these environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Model for eruption behavior of a volcanic vent in Eastern Mare Serenitatis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, G.; McKay, D.S.

    1977-01-01

    Homogeneous glass droplets with an ilmenite pyroxenite composition sampled at the Apollo 17 landing site were apparently formed by lava fountaining of a low-viscosity magma. The droplets studied were collected from the top and bottom of an 80-cm-deep section within a block of clastic material located on the rim of Shorty Crater. At a depth of 80 cm, the samples consist of mostly compound and simple droplets which are nearly all partly crystalline (sample 74001,2). Near the top of the section simple orange noncrystalline glass spheres predominate, although some are partly crystalline (sample 74220). Although texturally different, both samples have identical bulk compositions. Individual droplets within each of the grain size fractions for morphology, amount of glass, and olivine texture. It is clear that ranges of cooling rates varied by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude. It is also apparent that the droplets of the unit represented by sample 74001,2 cooled much more slowly on the average than those within the unit represented by 74220. The two samples may represent parts of an eruption sequence. In a well-collimated vertical fountain, many of the droplets would have fallen back into the fountain and been ''recycled'' to produce compound forms. Slower cooling rates would have allowed time for crystal growth. The resulting deposit would have been relatively thick and centered near the vent. This may have been the eruptive phase during which sample 74001,2 was deposited. As the jet became more dispersed, melt droplets would have cooled rapidly and formed mainly simple glassy droplets. This phase of activity would have formed a thinner tephra blanket and may be represented by sample 74220 and orange glass spheres collected throughout the valley of Taurus-Littrow. 8 figs., 2 tables

  12. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  13. A molecular gut content study of Themisto abyssorum (Amphipoda) from Arctic hydrothermal vent and cold seep systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Bernt Rydland; Troedsson, Christofer; Hadziavdic, Kenan; Pedersen, Rolf B; Rapp, Hans Tore

    2014-08-01

    The use of DNA as a marker for prey inside the gut of predators has been instrumental in further understanding of known and unknown interactions. Molecular approaches are in particular useful in unavailable environments like the deep sea. Trophic interactions in the deep sea are difficult to observe in situ, correct deep-sea experimental laboratory conditions are difficult to obtain, animals rarely survive the sampling, or the study organisms feed during the sampling due to long hauls. Preliminary studies of vent and seep systems in the Nordic Seas have identified the temperate-cold-water pelagic amphipod Themisto abyssorum as a potentially important predator in these chemosynthetic habitats. However, the prey of this deep-sea predator is poorly known, and we applied denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) to investigate the predator-prey interactions of T. abyssorum in deep-water vent and seep systems. Two deep-water hydrothermally active localities (The Jan Mayen and Loki's Castle vent fields) and one cold seep locality (The Håkon Mosby mud volcano) in the Nordic Seas were sampled, genomic DNA of the stomachs of T. abyssorum was extracted, and 18S rDNA gene was amplified and used to map the stomach content. We found a wide range of organisms including micro-eukaryotes, metazoans and detritus. Themisto abyssorum specimens from Loki's Castle had the highest diversity of prey. The wide range of prey items found suggests that T. abyssorum might be involved in more than one trophic level and should be regarded as an omnivore and not a strict carnivore as have previously been suggested. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. NATURAL CO2 FLOW FROM THE LOIHI VENT: IMPACT ON MICROBIAL PRODUCTION AND FATE OF THE CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard B. Coffin; Thomas J. Boyd; David L. Knies; Kenneth S. Grabowski; John W. Pohlman; Clark S. Mitchell

    2004-02-27

    The program for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration was initiated December 1997. Preliminary steps involved surveying a suite of biogeochemical parameters off the coast of Kona on the Big Island of Hawaii. The preliminary survey was conducted twice, in 1999 and 2000, to obtain a thorough data set including measurements of pH, current profiles, CO{sub 2} concentrations, microbial activities, and water and sediment chemistries. These data were collected in order to interpret a planned CO{sub 2} injection experiment. After these preliminary surveys were completed, local environment regulation forced moving the project to the coast north east of Bergen, Norway. The preliminary survey along the Norwegian Coast was conducted during 2002. However, Norwegian government revoked a permit, approved by the Norwegian State Pollution Control Authority, for policy reasons regarding the CO{sub 2} injection experiment. As a result the research team decided to monitor the natural CO{sub 2} flow off the southern coast of the Big Island. From December 3rd-13th 2002 scientists from four countries representing the Technical Committee of the International Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Experiment examined the hydrothermal venting at Loihi Seamount (Hawaiian Islands, USA). Work focused on tracing the venting gases, the impacts of the vent fluids on marine organisms, and CO{sub 2} influence on biogeochemical cycles. The cruise on the R/V Ka'imikai-O-Kanaloa (KOK) included 8 dives by the PISCES V submarine, 6 at Loihi and 2 at a nearby site in the lee of the Big Island. Data for this final report is from the last 2 dives on Loihi.

  15. Biodiversity and trophic ecology of hydrothermal vent fauna associated with tubeworm assemblages on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelièvre, Yann; Sarrazin, Jozée; Marticorena, Julien; Schaal, Gauthier; Day, Thomas; Legendre, Pierre; Hourdez, Stéphane; Matabos, Marjolaine

    2018-05-01

    Hydrothermal vent sites along the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the north-east Pacific host dense populations of Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms that promote habitat heterogeneity and local diversity. A detailed description of the biodiversity and community structure is needed to help understand the ecological processes that underlie the distribution and dynamics of deep-sea vent communities. Here, we assessed the composition, abundance, diversity and trophic structure of six tubeworm samples, corresponding to different successional stages, collected on the Grotto hydrothermal edifice (Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge) at 2196 m depth. Including R. piscesae, a total of 36 macrofaunal taxa were identified to the species level. Although polychaetes made up the most diverse taxon, faunal densities were dominated by gastropods. Most tubeworm aggregations were numerically dominated by the gastropods Lepetodrilus fucensis and Depressigyra globulus and polychaete Amphisamytha carldarei. The highest diversities were found in tubeworm aggregations characterised by the longest tubes (18.5 ± 3.3 cm). The high biomass of grazers and high resource partitioning at a small scale illustrates the importance of the diversity of free-living microbial communities in the maintenance of food webs. Although symbiont-bearing invertebrates R. piscesae represented a large part of the total biomass, the low number of specialised predators on this potential food source suggests that its primary role lies in community structuring. Vent food webs did not appear to be organised through predator-prey relationships. For example, although trophic structure complexity increased with ecological successional stages, showing a higher number of predators in the last stages, the food web structure itself did not change across assemblages. We suggest that environmental gradients provided by the biogenic structure of tubeworm bushes generate a multitude of ecological niches and contribute to the partitioning

  16. Analysis of the implementation of a sand bed type filter for the venting of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas V, D.; Sainz M, E.; Ortiz V, J.

    2017-09-01

    The filtered venting of the containment has been adopted in European countries to mitigate the consequences derived from the excess pressure of the containment during a severe accident. When venting has taken place, the fission products are released directly into the environment, unless a filter is placed in the path of the same, so various types of filters are used to trap the fission products. The containment venting filters currently installed use different filtering technologies that involve more than one medium. Those who use water as the first stage of filtration are called wet systems, are equipped with additional stages to eliminate water drops and emissions of fine aerosols, and may even be equipped with an element that contains certain means of absorption for the gaseous iodine species filtration. Other designs, based on deep bed filtration as the main retention stage, called dry filters; use metal fiber, ceramic or sand filtration media to trap aerosols. The present work evaluates the hydraulic characteristics of the sand bed type filter designed by EDF as a candidate to be installed in the containment of the BWR Mark II (primary containment type of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant). The evaluation of the sand bed filter was performed using the OpenFOAM open source software package. Models of each zone of the filtering device were generated and by means of a series of parametric calculations of computational fluid mechanics, the relevant hydrodynamic characteristics of the device were obtained, such as pressure drops against mass flow and pressure fields and velocity under different operating conditions. On the other hand, the validation of the sand bed filter model was made when comparing the results of experimental tests carried out in a sand column of the PITEAS program (1985-1986) against the simulation in OpenFOAM. The results obtained are very close to those obtained experimentally. (Author)

  17. Copepod colonization of organic and inorganic substrata at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum, Christoph; Pradillon, Florence; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Sarrazin, Jozée

    2017-03-01

    The few existing studies on deep-sea hydrothermal vent copepods indicate low connectivity with surrounding environments and reveal high endemism among vents. However, the finding of non-endemic copepod species in association with engineer species at different reduced ecosystems poses questions about the dispersal of copepods and the colonization of hydrothermal vents as well as their ecological connectivity. The objective of this study is to understand copepod colonization patterns at a hydrothermal vent site in response to environmental factors such as temperature and fluid flow as well as the presence of different types of substrata. To address this objective, an in situ experiment was deployed using both organic (woods, pig bones) and inorganic (slates) substrata along a gradient of hydrothermal activity at the Lucky Strike vent field (Eiffel Tower, Mid-Atlantic Ridge). The substrata were deployed in 2011 during the MoMARSAT cruise and were recovered after two years in 2013. Overall, copepod density showed significant differences between substrata types, but was similar among different hydrothermal activity regimes. Highest densities were observed on woods at sites with moderate or low fluid input, whereas bones were the most densely colonized substrata at the 2 sites with higher hydrothermal influence. Although differences in copepod diversity were not significant, the observed trends revealed overall increasing diversity with decreasing temperature and fluid input. Slates showed highest diversity compared to the organic substrata. Temperature and fluid input had a significant influence on copepod community composition, resulting in higher similarity among stations with relatively high and low fluid inputs, respectively. While vent-specialists such as dirivultids and the tegastid Smacigastes micheli dominated substrata at high vent activity, the experiment demonstrated increasing abundance and dominance of non-vent taxa with decreasing temperature and fluid

  18. e-Vent näitab e-õppe ja uusmeedia tarkvaralahendusi / Krista Männa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Männa, Krista

    2007-01-01

    4. aprillil toimub Tallinna Ülikoolis esitluspäev e-Vent, kus tutvustatakse projekte ja tarkvaralahendusi, mille loomisele on kaasa aidanud ka üliõpilased. Projektide ja tarkvaralahenduste käivitamisel on tehtud koostööd Tiigrihüppe sihtasutuse ja Eesti Infotehnoloogia Sihtasutusega. Esitluspäeva juhatab sisse informaatikaprofessor Peeter Normak, kes tutvustab TLÜ informaatika osakonna teadus- ja arendusprojekte ning räägib kogemustest seoses eelmisel sügisel käivitunud rahvusvahelise uusmeedia magistriprogrammiga "Interaktiivne meedia ja teadmuskeskkonnad"

  19. Uniformity and diversity in the composition of mineralizing fluids from hydrothermal vents on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpotts, J.A.; Aruscavage, P. J.; Von Damm, Karen L.

    1987-01-01

    Abundances of Li, Na, K, Rb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Fe, Zn, and Si have been determined in fluid samples from 7 vents located in three areas on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The hydrothermal component estimated from the Mg contents of the samples ranges from 7% to 76%. Concentrations of Fe and Si, among other elements, in acid-stabilized solutions appear to be generally representative of the parental hydrothermal fluids, but some Zn determinations and most Ba values appear to be too low.-from Authors

  20. Successful Left-Heart Decompression during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in an Adult Patient by Percutaneous Transaortic Catheter Venting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hee Hong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO is widely used in patients with cardiogenic shock. Insufficient decompression of the left ventricle (LV is considered a major factor preventing adequate LV recovery. A 40-year-old male was diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction, and revascularization was performed using percutaneous stenting. However, cardiogenic shock occurred, and VA ECMO was initiated. Severe LV failure developed, and percutaneous transaortic catheter venting (TACV was incorporated into the venous circuit of VA ECMO under transthoracic echocardiography guidance. The patient was successfully weaned from VA ECMO. Percutaneous TACV is an effective, relatively noninvasive, and rapid method of LV decompression in patients undergoing VA ECMO.

  1. Multinode analysis of small breaks for B and W's 205-fuel-assembly nuclear plants with internals vent valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.C.; Dunn, B.M.; Parks, C.E.

    1976-03-01

    Multinode analyses were conducted for several small breaks in the reactor coolant system of B and W's 205-fuel-assembly nuclear plants with internals vent valves. The multinode blowdown code CRAFT was used to evaluate the hydrodynamics and transient water inventories of the reactor coolant system. The FOAM code was used to compute a swell level history for the core, and the THETA1-B code was used to perform transient fuel pin thermal calculations. Curves showing the parameters of interest are presented. The results are well within the Final Acceptance Criteria

  2. Multinode analysis of small breaks for B and W's 145-fuel-assembly nuclear plants with internals vent valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.E.; Allen, R.J.; Cartin, L.R.

    1976-03-01

    Multinode analyses were conducted for several small breaks in the reactor coolant system of B and W's 145 fuel-assembly nuclear plants with internals vent valves. The multinode blowdown code CRAFT was used to evaluate the hydrodynamics and transient water inventories of the reactor coolant system. The FOAM code was used to compute a swell level history for the core, and the THETA1-B code was used to perform transient fuel pin thermal calculations. Curves showing the parameters of interest are presented. These results are well within the Final Acceptance Criteria

  3. Chronology and volcanology of the 1949 multi-vent rift-zone eruption on La Palma (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klügel, A.; Schmincke, H.-U.; White, J. D. L.; Hoernle, K. A.

    1999-12-01

    The compositionally zoned San Juan eruption on La Palma emanated from three eruptive centers located along a north-south-trending rift zone in the south of the island. Seismic precursors began weakly in 1936 and became strong in March 1949, with their foci progressing from the north of the rift zone towards its south. This suggests that magma ascended beneath the old Taburiente shield volcano and moved southward along the rift. The eruption began on June 24, 1949, with phreatomagmatic activity at Duraznero crater on the ridgetop (ca. 1880 m above sea level), where five vents erupted tephritic lava along a 400-m-long fissure. On June 8, the Duraznero vents shut down abruptly, and the activity shifted to an off-rift fissure at Llano del Banco, located at ca. 550 m lower elevation and 3 km to the northwest. This eruptive center issued initially tephritic aa and later basanitic pahoehoe lava at high rates, producing a lava flow that entered the sea. Two days after basanite began to erupt at Llano del Banco, Hoyo Negro crater (ca. 1880 m asl), located 700 m north of Duraznero along the rift, opened on July 12 and produced ash and bombs of basanitic to phonotephritic composition in violent phreatomagmatic explosions ( White and Schmincke, 1999). Llano del Banco and Hoyo Negro were simultaneously active for 11 days and showed a co-variance of their eruption rates indicating a shallow hydraulic connection. On July 30, after 3 days of quiescence at all vents, Duraznero and Hoyo Negro became active again during a final eruptive phase. Duraznero issued basanitic lava at high rates for 12 h and produced a lava flow that descended towards the east coast. The lava contains ca. 1 vol.% crustal and mantle xenoliths consisting of 40% tholeiitic gabbros from the oceanic crust, 35% alkaline gabbros, and 20% ultramafic cumulates. The occurrence of xenoliths almost exclusively in the final lava is consistent with their origin by wall-rock collapse at depth near the end of the eruption

  4. An Unusual Conformational Isomer of Verrucosidin Backbone from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus, Penicillium sp. Y-50-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chengqian; Shi, Yutong; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Xuegang; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Tao, Xinyi; Wu, Bin

    2016-08-18

    A new verrucosidin derivative, methyl isoverrucosidinol (1), was isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. Y-50-10, dwelling in sulfur rich sediment in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The structure was established by spectroscopic means including HRMS and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration was defined mainly by comparison of quantum chemical TDDFT calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among hitherto known compounds with a verrucosidine backbone isolated from natural resource, compound 1 represents the first example of a new conformational isomer of its skeleton, exhibiting antibiotic activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC value 32 μg/mL.

  5. An Unusual Conformational Isomer of Verrucosidin Backbone from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus, Penicillium sp. Y-50-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqian Pan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A new verrucosidin derivative, methyl isoverrucosidinol (1, was isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. Y-50-10, dwelling in sulfur rich sediment in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The structure was established by spectroscopic means including HRMS and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration was defined mainly by comparison of quantum chemical TDDFT calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among hitherto known compounds with a verrucosidine backbone isolated from natural resource, compound 1 represents the first example of a new conformational isomer of its skeleton, exhibiting antibiotic activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC value 32 μg/mL.

  6. Variability of streambed hydraulic conductivity in an intermittent stream reach regulated by Vented Dams: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganna, Sujay Raghavendra; Deka, Paresh Chandra

    2018-07-01

    The hydro-geological properties of streambed together with the hydraulic gradients determine the fluxes of water, energy and solutes between the stream and underlying aquifer system. Dam induced sedimentation affects hyporheic processes and alters substrate pore space geometries in the course of progressive stabilization of the sediment layers. Uncertainty in stream-aquifer interactions arises from the inherent complex-nested flow paths and spatio-temporal variability of streambed hydraulic properties. A detailed field investigation of streambed hydraulic conductivity (Ks) using Guelph Permeameter was carried out in an intermittent stream reach of the Pavanje river basin located in the mountainous, forested tract of western ghats of India. The present study reports the spatial and temporal variability of streambed hydraulic conductivity along the stream reach obstructed by two Vented Dams in sequence. Statistical tests such as Levene's and Welch's t-tests were employed to check for various variability measures. The strength of spatial dependence and the presence of spatial autocorrelation among the streambed Ks samples were tested by using Moran's I statistic. The measures of central tendency and dispersion pointed out reasonable spatial variability in Ks distribution throughout the study reach during two consecutive years 2016 and 2017. The streambed was heterogeneous with regard to hydraulic conductivity distribution with high-Ks zones near the backwater areas of the vented dam and low-Ks zones particularly at the tail water section of vented dams. Dam operational strategies were responsible for seasonal fluctuations in sedimentation and modifications to streambed substrate characteristics (such as porosity, grain size, packing etc.), resulting in heterogeneous streambed Ks profiles. The channel downstream of vented dams contained significantly more cohesive deposits of fine sediment due to the overflow of surplus suspended sediment-laden water at low velocity

  7. Sonar backscatter differentiation of dominant macrohabitat types in a hydrothermal vent field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Sébastien; Legendre, Pierre; Juniper, S Kim

    2006-08-01

    Over the past 20 years, sonar remote sensing has opened ways of acquiring new spatial information on seafloor habitat and ecosystem properties. While some researchers are presently working to improve sonar methods so that broad-scale high-definition surveys can be effectively conducted for management purposes, others are trying to use these surveying techniques in more local areas. Because ecosystem management is scale-dependent, there is a need to acquire spatiotemporal knowledge over various scales to bridge the gap between already-acquired point-source data and information available at broader scales. Using a 675-kHz single-pencil-beam sonar mounted on the remotely operated vehicle ROPOS, 2200 m deep on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, East Pacific Rise, five dominant habitat types located in a hydrothermal vent field were identified and characterized by their sonar signatures. The data, collected at different altitudes from 1 to 10 m above the seafloor, were depth-normalized. We compared three ways of handling the echoes embedded in the backscatters to detect and differentiate the five habitat types; we examined the influence of footprint size on the discrimination capacity of the three methods; and we identified key variables, derived from echoes that characterize each habitat type. The first method used a set of variables describing echo shapes, and the second method used as variables the power intensity values found within the echoes, whereas the last method combined all these variables. Canonical discriminant analysis was used to discriminate among the five habitat types using the three methods. The discriminant models were constructed using 70% of the data while the remaining 30% were used for validation. The results showed that footprints 20-30 cm in diameter included a sufficient amount of spatial variation to make the sonar signatures sensitive to the habitat types, producing on average 82% correct classification. Smaller footprints produced lower percentages of

  8. Introduction to Test Facility for Iodine Retention in Filtered Containment Venting System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jaehoon; An, Sang Mo; Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In many countries the implementation of FCVS's is under discussion to mitigate fission product release not only in the short-term but also in the long-term view. To verify the performance of FCVS, the large-scaled tests have been performed such as advanced containment experiments (ACE), the iodine and aerosol retention rate test facility (JAVA), etc. The elemental and organic iodides are the main gaseous iodine species in the containment atmosphere. For the iodine retention, experimental programs have confirmed the existence of gaseous organic iodine in some cases in higher concentrations than for gaseous molecular iodine (I{sub 2}). The Reaction of Methyl iodide (CH{sub 3}I) with surfaces and the removal by containment filters and scrubbers is less efficient in comparison to molecular iodine. In the recent years, an experimental and analytical work has been conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) to develop a process leading to a fast, comprehensive and reliable retention of volatile iodine species in aqueous solutions. New FCVS test facility to verify the performance of FCVS is designed and under construction. The iodine retention tests are planned with elemental iodine or with organic iodide loaded carrier gas consisting of pure non-condensable gas, pure steam and of typical mixtures of non-condensable gas/steam. This paper introduces the iodine generation and measurement system for the iodine retention test of FCVS. In severe accidents elemental and organic iodides are the main gaseous iodine species in the containment atmosphere. Release of the gaseous species in sufficient quantities from containment to environment generates a risk for public health. The filtered containment venting systems (FCVS) can considerably reduce the leakage of radioactive materials to the environment. New integral test facility is prepared to verify a performance of the FCVS. The test facility consists of a test vessel, thermal-hydraulic, and aerosol/iodine generation and

  9. Effect of Operating Pressure on Hydrogen Risk in Filtered Containment Venting System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Young Su; Cho, Song-Won; Ha, Kwang Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The FCVS (Filtered Containment Venting System) has the main objectives of both the depressurization in the containment building and the decontamination of fission products generated under a severe accident. One of the commercial wet-type FCVSs consists of a cylindrical pressure vessel including a scrubbing solution and filters. A FCVS vessel can be installed on the outside of the containment building, and is connected with the containment through a pipe. When the pressure in the containment building approaches the setting value, a valve on a pipe between the containment and the FCVS opens to operate the FCVS. The amount of steam and gas mixtures generated under a severe accident can be released into the FCVS, where the nozzles of a pipe are submerged into a scrubbing solution in a FCVS vessel. Non-condensable gases and fine aerosols can enter a scrubbing solution, and they then pass the filters. The decontaminated gases are finally discharged from the FCVS into the outside environment. Previous studies have introduced critical issues with the operation of the FCVS. Reference [2] assessed the effect of the operating pressure of the FCVS on the hydrogen risk in a FCVS vessel. The volumetric concentrations of hydrogen and steam in a postulated FCVS with a 3 m diameter and 6.5 m height were calculated using the MELCOR computer code (v. 1.8.6). After the operation of the FCVS, the pressure and temperature in the FCVS vessel jumped from the initial conditions of the atmosphere pressure and room temperature. For the FCVS operating pressure of 5 bar, the hydrogen concentration increased from 6% in the containment to 14% in a FCVS vessel, whereas the steam concentration decreased from 58% in the containment to 3% in a FCVS vessel. The increased hydrogen concentration with air in a FCVS vessel can exists within the region of the burn limit in the Shapiro diagram. This possibility of the hydrogen combustion can threaten the integrity of the FCVS. To mitigate the hydrogen risk

  10. High-pressure hydrogen respiration in hydrothermal vent samples from the deep biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Smith, D.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Cultivation of organisms from the deep biosphere has met with many challenges, chief among them the ability to replicate this extreme environment in a laboratory setting. The maintenance of in situ pressure levels, carbon sources, and gas concentrations are important, intertwined factors which may all affect the growth of subsurface microorganisms. Hydrogen in particular is of great importance in hydrothermal systems, but in situ hydrogen concentrations are largely disregarded in attempts to culture from these sites. Using modified Hungate-type culture tubes (Bowles et al. 2011) within pressure-retaining vessels, which allow for the dissolution of higher concentrations of gas than is possible with other culturing methods, we have incubated hydrothermal chimney and hydrothermally-altered rock samples from the Lost City and Mid-Cayman Rise hydrothermal vent fields. Hydrogen concentrations up to 15 mmol/kg have been reported from Lost City (Kelley et al. 2005), but data are not yet available from the recently-discovered Mid-Cayman site, and the elevated concentration of 30 mmol/kg is being used in all incubations. We are using a variety of media types to enrich for various metabolic pathways including iron and sulfur reduction under anoxic or microaerophilic conditions. Incubations are being carried out at atmospheric (0.1 MPa), in situ (9, 23, or 50 MPa, depending on site), and elevated (50 MPa) pressure levels. Microbial cell concentrations, taxonomic diversity, and metabolic activities are being monitored during the course of these experiments. These experiments will provide insight into the relationships between microbial activities, pressure, and gas concentrations typical of deep biosphere environments. Results will inform further culturing studies from both fresh and archived samples. References cited: Bowles, M.W., Samarkin, V.A., Joye, S.B. 2011. Improved measurement of microbial activity in deep-sea sediments at in situ pressure and methane concentration

  11. Analysis on the effect of risk from containment failure by over-pressurization during the operation of containment filtered venting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Jaehyun; Kang, Hyun Gook; Chang, Soon Heung

    2015-01-01

    Passive safety systems which are operated without power source are suggested as a solution SBO. For containment protection system, Containment Filtered Venting System (CFVS) is suggested. CFVS controls the containment pressure by releasing the containment gas through filter passively without any power source. But because still small amount of radioactive material have no choice but to release to the environment, starting time and operation method of CFVS have to be determined carefully. Later starting time brings not only lower release but also higher risk from containment failure by over-pressurization, so it is a problem. In this research, the effect of risk from containment failure by over-pressurization during the operation of containment filtered venting system was analyzed. In this research, optimized values for variables of the CFVS operation method are found as 0.67 MPa, 9 cm, 0.1 MPa each for open pressure, pressure interval, and vent pipe diameter when DF as a function of time and risk from containment over-pressurization failure are considered. Generally in this research, release without risk get lower values in higher pressure, and lower vent pipe diameter. Release with risk get sharply high values when the containment pressure exceeds the design pressure because of the effect of risk from containment failure by over-pressurization. In conclusion, highest pressure, and lowest vent pipe diameter which are not influenced by risk is the optimized values for CFVS operation method because amount of risk is much larger than release through the CFVS

  12. DRAMA, IDYLL OG EVENTYR. GUNNAR SOMMERFELDTS FILMADAPTASJON (1921 AV HAMSUNS MARKENS GRØDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth P. Wærp

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines Gunnar Sommerfeldt’s 1921 silent movie adaptation of Knut Hamsun’s Nobel Prize novel Markens Grøde [Growth of the Soil] (1917. The article argues that what characterizes this very first Hamsun film adaptation is its emphasis on the dramatic and the spectacular and its foregrounding of northern Norwegian nature. Inspired by Martin Lefebvre’s distinction in Landscape and Film (2006 between nature-as-setting and nature-as-landscape, this article argues that the film not only uses nature as its main setting, but that it also makes use of a series of autonomous landscapes with a fairy tale dimension. Several of its visual compositions of persons and landscapes seem to be inspired by Norwegian nature and fairy tale painter Theodor Kittelsen’s work, e.g. Soria Moria Slott, Nøkken, Pesta and Norge, Norge.

  13. Method of estimating maximum VOC concentration in void volume of vented waste drums using limited sampling data: Application in transuranic waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    A test program has been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to demonstrate that the concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within the innermost layer of confinement in a vented waste drum can be estimated using a model incorporating diffusion and permeation transport principles as well as limited waste drum sampling data. The model consists of a series of material balance equations describing steady-state VOC transport from each distinct void volume in the drum. The primary model input is the measured drum headspace VOC concentration. Model parameters are determined or estimated based on available process knowledge. The model effectiveness in estimating VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement was examined for vented waste drums containing different waste types and configurations. This paper summarizes the experimental measurements and model predictions in vented transuranic waste drums containing solidified sludges and solid waste

  14. Linking geology, fluid chemistry, and microbial activity of basalt- and ultramafic-hosted deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, M; Hansen, M; Seifert, R; Strauss, H; Koschinsky, A; Petersen, S

    2013-07-01

    Hydrothermal fluids passing through basaltic rocks along mid-ocean ridges are known to be enriched in sulfide, while those circulating through ultramafic mantle rocks are typically elevated in hydrogen. Therefore, it has been estimated that the maximum energy in basalt-hosted systems is available through sulfide oxidation and in ultramafic-hosted systems through hydrogen oxidation. Furthermore, thermodynamic models suggest that the greatest biomass potential arises from sulfide oxidation in basalt-hosted and from hydrogen oxidation in ultramafic-hosted systems. We tested these predictions by measuring biological sulfide and hydrogen removal and subsequent autotrophic CO2 fixation in chemically distinct hydrothermal fluids from basalt-hosted and ultramafic-hosted vents. We found a large potential of microbial hydrogen oxidation in naturally hydrogen-rich (ultramafic-hosted) but also in naturally hydrogen-poor (basalt-hosted) hydrothermal fluids. Moreover, hydrogen oxidation-based primary production proved to be highly attractive under our incubation conditions regardless whether hydrothermal fluids from ultramafic-hosted or basalt-hosted sites were used. Site-specific hydrogen and sulfide availability alone did not appear to determine whether hydrogen or sulfide oxidation provides the energy for primary production by the free-living microbes in the tested hydrothermal fluids. This suggests that more complex features (e.g., a combination of oxygen, temperature, biological interactions) may play a role for determining which energy source is preferably used in chemically distinct hydrothermal vent biotopes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Reduction of Carbon Dioxide in Filtering Facepiece Respirators with an Active-Venting System: A Computational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Birgersson

    Full Text Available During expiration, the carbon dioxide (CO2 levels inside the dead space of a filtering facepiece respirator (FFR increase significantly above the ambient concentration. To reduce the CO2 concentration inside the dead space, we attach an active lightweight venting system (AVS comprising a one-way valve, a blower and a battery in a housing to a FFR. The achieved reduction is quantified with a computational-fluid-dynamics model that considers conservation of mass, momentum and the dilute species, CO2, inside the FFR with and without the AVS. The results suggest that the AVS can reduce the CO2 levels inside the dead space at the end of expiration to around 0.4% as compared to a standard FFR, for which the CO2 levels during expiration reach the same concentration as that of the expired alveolar air at around 5%. In particular, during inspiration, the average CO2 volume fraction drops to near-to ambient levels of around 0.08% with the AVS. Overall, the time-averaged CO2 volume fractions inside the dead space for the standard FFR and the one with AVS are around 3% and 0.3% respectively. Further, the ability of the AVS to vent the dead-space air in the form of a jet into the ambient - similar to the jets arising from natural expiration without a FFR - ensures that the expired air is removed and diluted more efficiently than a standard FFR.

  16. Ballistic blocks around Kīlauea Caldera: Their vent locations and number of eruptions in the late 18th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Donald A.; Zolkos, Scott P.; Haravitch, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of ballistic blocks occur around Kīlauea Caldera and record part of the latest major period of explosive activity on the volcano, in late 1790 or within a few years thereafter. The sizes of the blocks – the largest of which is more than 2 m in nominal diameter – and differences in rock types allow the definition of at least 6 dispersal lobes of mostly undetermined relative age. The orientations of the lobes help approximate the locations of vents or explosion sources on the floor of the caldera, now deeply buried by younger lava flows. The vents may have been distributed northward for about 2 km from near the site of the modern Halema'uma'u Crater and were apparently confined to the western half of the caldera. The blocks are entirely lithic except for those in one dispersal lobe, which contains cored bombs and blocks as well as juvenile lapilli. Eruption parameters calculated from EJECT! suggest that the phreatic and phreatomagmatic explosions could have been generated at the water table, about 600 m below the high point on the caldera rim.

  17. Characterization and function of the first antibiotic isolated from a vent organism: the extremophile metazoan Alvinella pompejana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Tasiemski

    Full Text Available The emblematic hydrothermal worm Alvinella pompejana is one of the most thermo tolerant animal known on Earth. It relies on a symbiotic association offering a unique opportunity to discover biochemical adaptations that allow animals to thrive in such a hostile habitat. Here, by studying the Pompeii worm, we report on the discovery of the first antibiotic peptide from a deep-sea organism, namely alvinellacin. After purification and peptide sequencing, both the gene and the peptide tertiary structures were elucidated. As epibionts are not cultivated so far and because of lethal decompression effects upon Alvinella sampling, we developed shipboard biological assays to demonstrate that in addition to act in the first line of defense against microbial invasion, alvinellacin shapes and controls the worm's epibiotic microflora. Our results provide insights into the nature of an abyssal antimicrobial peptide (AMP and into the manner in which an extremophile eukaryote uses it to interact with the particular microbial community of the hydrothermal vent ecosystem. Unlike earlier studies done on hydrothermal vents that all focused on the microbial side of the symbiosis, our work gives a view of this interaction from the host side.

  18. Biogeographical distribution of Rimicaris exoculata resident gut epibiont communities along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Lucile; Roumagnac, Marie; Cueff-Gauchard, Valérie; Jan, Cyrielle; Guri, Mathieu; Tessier, Claire; Haond, Marine; Crassous, Philippe; Zbinden, Magali; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne

    2015-10-01

    Rimicaris exoculata is a deep-sea hydrothermal vent shrimp whose enlarged gill chamber houses a complex trophic epibiotic community. Its gut harbours an autochthonous and distinct microbial community. This species dominates hydrothermal ecosystem megafauna along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, regardless of contrasting geochemical conditions prevailing in them. Here, the resident gut epibiont community at four contrasted hydrothermal vent sites (Rainbow, TAG, Logatchev and Ashadze) was analysed and compiled with previous data to evaluate the possible influence of site location, using 16S rRNA surveys and microscopic observations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses). Filamentous epibionts inserted between the epithelial cell microvilli were observed on all examined samples. Results confirmed resident gut community affiliation to Deferribacteres, Mollicutes, Epsilonproteobacteria and to a lesser extent Gammaproteobacteria lineages. Still a single Deferribacteres phylotype was retrieved at all sites. Four Mollicutes-related operational taxonomic units were distinguished, one being only identified on Rainbow specimens. The topology of ribotype median-joining networks illustrated a community diversification possibly following demographic expansions, suggesting a more ancient evolutionary history and/or a larger effective population size at Rainbow. Finally, the gill chamber community distribution was also analysed through ribotype networks based on sequences from R. exoculata collected at the Rainbow, Snake Pit, TAG, Logatchev and Ashadze sites. Results allow the refining of hypotheses on the epibiont role and transmission pathways. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Dynamics of cell proliferation and apoptosis reflect different life strategies in hydrothermal vent and cold seep vestimentiferan tubeworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugfelder, Bettina; Cary, S Craig; Bright, Monika

    2009-07-01

    Deep-sea vestimentiferan tubeworms, which live in symbiosis with bacteria, exhibit different life strategies according to their habitat. At unstable and relatively short-lived hydrothermal vents, they grow extremely fast, whereas their close relatives at stable and long-persisting cold seeps grow slowly and live up to 300 years. Growth and age differences are thought to occur because of ecological and physiological adaptations. H