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Sample records for sore throat rr

  1. Sore Throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as those that cause colds, the flu, and mononucleosis) can lead to a sore throat. Bacteria (such ... to the valves of the heart. What is mononucleosis? Mononucleosis (mono) is a viral infection caused by ...

  2. Antibiotics for sore throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, Anneliese; Glasziou, Paul P; Del Mar, Chris B

    2013-11-05

    Sore throat is a common reason for people to present for medical care. Although it remits spontaneously, primary care doctors commonly prescribe antibiotics for it. To assess the benefits of antibiotics for sore throat for patients in primary care settings. We searched CENTRAL 2013, Issue 6, MEDLINE (January 1966 to July week 1, 2013) and EMBASE (January 1990 to July 2013). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of antibiotics versus control assessing typical sore throat symptoms or complications. Two review authors independently screened studies for inclusion and extracted data. We resolved differences in opinion by discussion. We contacted trial authors from three studies for additional information. We included 27 trials with 12,835 cases of sore throat. We did not identify any new trials in this 2013 update. 1. Symptoms Throat soreness and fever were reduced by about half by using antibiotics. The greatest difference was seen at day three. The number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) to prevent one sore throat at day three was less than six; at week one it was 21. 2. Non-suppurative complications The trend was antibiotics protecting against acute glomerulonephritis but there were too few cases to be sure. Several studies found antibiotics reduced acute rheumatic fever by more than two-thirds within one month (risk ratio (RR) 0.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12 to 0.60). 3. Suppurative complications Antibiotics reduced the incidence of acute otitis media within 14 days (RR 0.30; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.58); acute sinusitis within 14 days (RR 0.48; 95% CI 0.08 to 2.76); and quinsy within two months (RR 0.15; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.47) compared to those taking placebo. 4. Subgroup analyses of symptom reduction Antibiotics were more effective against symptoms at day three (RR 0.58; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.71) if throat swabs were positive for Streptococcus, compared to RR 0.78; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.97 if negative. Similarly at week one the RR was 0.29 (95% CI 0.12 to 0

  3. Sore Throats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... since drainage from nose or sinus infections can cause throat infections as well. If you live or work in close quarters such as a child care center, classroom, office, prison, or military installation, ...

  4. Pharyngitis - sore throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A streptococcus. Less commonly, bacterial diseases such as gonorrhea and chlamydia can cause sore throat. Most cases ... physical exam alone. A culture for chlamydia or gonorrhea is positive. Sore throat caused by the flu ( ...

  5. Soothing a Sore Throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hard candies or lozenges, try cold liquids and popsicles. Throat pain might also be soothed by throat ... water or use ice chips. Cold liquids or popsicles can numb the pain. Throat sprays and over- ...

  6. Sore Throat: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck to check for swollen glands (lymph nodes) Listening to your or your child's breathing with a ... of your sore throat, these at-home care strategies can help you ease your symptoms: Rest. And ...

  7. Sore Throat (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... another illness, like a cold , the flu , or mononucleosis . They also can be caused by a strep ... topic for: Parents Kids Teens Strep Throat Coughing Mononucleosis Strep Test: Rapid Strep Test: Throat Culture Flu ...

  8. Sore Throat: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the mouth, throat and voice box. Allergies. Seasonal allergies or ongoing allergic reactions to dust, molds ... HIV, diabetes, treatment with steroids or chemotherapy drugs, stress, fatigue, and ... when soap and water aren't available. Avoid touching public phones or ...

  9. Effects of intravenous diclofenac on postoperative sore throat in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of intravenous diclofenac on postoperative sore throat in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery at Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi: A prospective, randomized, double blind controlled trial.

  10. When a Sore Throat Is a More Serious Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often called Hand, Foot, and Mouth disease). Infectious mononucleosis can produce a sore throat, often with marked ... most young children who are infected with the mononucleosis virus have few or no symptoms. Strep throat ...

  11. Difference between a Sore Throat, Strep, and Tonsillitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often called Hand, Foot, and Mouth disease ). Infectious mononucleosis (often called "Mono") can produce a sore throat, ... most young children who are infected with the mononucleosis virus have few or no symptoms. Strep Throat ...

  12. Worried Your Sore Throat May Be Strep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Injury, Violence & Safety Life Stages & Populations Travelers’ Health Workplace Safety & Health Features Media Sign up for Features ... suspects strep throat, then they order a throat culture. A throat culture involves sending a throat swab ...

  13. Parental contribution to over prescription of antibiotics for sore throat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Antibiotics are often prescribed by physicians for sore throat in children because of the danger of post streptococcal complications. The role of the parents in over prescription of antibiotics is less well known. Objective: To evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and practice of parents to antibiotic prescription for ...

  14. Antibiotic prescribing in patients with self-reported sore throat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehta, Nishchay; Schilder, Anne; Fragaszy, Ellen; E R Evans, Hannah; Dukes, Oliver; Manikam, Logan; Little, Paul; Smith, Sarah C; Hayward, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the predictors of general practitioner (GP) consultation and antibiotic use in those developing sore throat. METHODS: We conducted a prospective population-based cohort study on 4461 participants in two rounds (2010-11) from 1897 households. RESULTS: Participants reported

  15. Sore throat · vaginal discharge · labial ulcer · Dx?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravelli, Ashley; Bhatnagar, Rupal; Ashaye, Adelola

    2016-06-01

    The patient complained of worsening vaginal pain and increased vaginal discharge, but reported resolution of her back and chest pain. She also said that a week earlier, she'd had a fever that reached 104° F and a sore throat. She denied urinary frequency/urgency, sexual activity, or sexual abuse.

  16. Ear Acupuncture for Acute Sore Throat: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ear acupuncture for acute sore throat. A randomized controlled trial...Auncular Acupuncture is a low risk option for acute pain control •Battlefield acupuncture (BFA) IS a specific auncular acupuncture technique •BFA IS...Strengths: Prospect1ve RCT •Weaknesses Small sample stze. no sham acupuncture performed, patients not blinded to treatment •Th1s study represents an

  17. How effective are treatments other than antibiotics for acute sore throat?

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, M; Del Mar, C; Glasziou, P

    2000-01-01

    To estimate the benefits of treatments other than antibiotics for acute sore throat, and the differences between non-antibiotic interventions and controls in patient-perceived pain of sore throat, a systematic review of controlled trials in Medline and the Cochrane Library was carried out. Sixty-six randomised controlled trials (with or without additional antibiotics) were identified and 17 met the selection criteria. Twenty-two non-antibiotic managements for sore throat were compared. Their ...

  18. Prophylaxis of postintubation sore throat by the use of single puff inhalation of clomethasone dipropionate preoperatively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, I.; Masood, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to asses the occurrence and severity of sore throat following endotracheal anesthesia and its reduction by beclomethasone inhalation. Study Design: A randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: This study was carried out at the main operation theatre, Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi from October 2002 to April 2003. Patients and Methods: Two hundred patients undergoing general anaesthesia for elective surgery were included. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups of 100 patients each. The patients in group A were given one puff inhalation of beclomethasone before intubation while group B was control group. The patients were evaluated for occurrence and severity of postoperative sore throat by direct questions 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after surgery. Results: In the beclomethasone group, 10 patients had sore throat as compared to 55 in control group (p<0.01). All 10 patients who experienced symptoms in beclomethasone group had mild sore throat while among the patients in the control group 22 had mild, 13 had moderate and 20 had severe sore throat. After 48 hours, no patient had the symptoms in the study group while 9 of the control group still suffered from sore throat. No drug related side effects were observed. Conclusion: Postoperative sore throat after general anaesthesia is common (occurrence rate of 55%). Beclomethasone inhaler is highly effective in the prevention of postoperative sore throat. It reduces both the occurrence and severity of sore throat. (author)

  19. Flurbiprofen microgranules for relief of sore throat: a randomised, double-blind trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Marc; Bloch, Mark; de Looze, Fred; Morris, Christopher; Shephard, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Background Many people with sore throat seek, and are often inappropriately prescribed, antibiotics. Aim The objective of this study was to determine the analgesic efficacy of flurbiprofen 8.75 mg microgranules versus placebo. These microgranules are a possible alternative treatment for patients with sore throat due to upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). Design and setting Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose study conducted at eight primary care sites in Australia. Method Participants with sore throat of onset within the past 4 days received either flurbiprofen 8.75 mg microgranules or non-medicated placebo microgranules. Throat soreness, difficulty in swallowing, sore throat pain intensity, sore throat relief, oral temperature, and treatment benefits were all assessed at regular intervals. Result Of 373 patients from eight centres, 186 received flurbiprofen 8.75 mg microgranules and 187 received placebo microgranules (intent-to-treat population). Throat soreness was significantly reduced over the first 2 hours after the first dose. Reductions in difficulty in swallowing were observed at all time points from 5 to 360 minutes after the first dose, after taking flurbiprofen microgranules versus placebo. Sore throat relief was also evident at 1 minute and lasted for at least 6 hours. The multiple-dose efficacy results showed reduction of difficulty in swallowing at the end of days 1–3 and sore throat relief at the end of day 1. Conclusion Microgranules containing flurbiprofen 8.75 mg provided fast and effective relief from sore throat due to URTI and represent an alternative treatment option to antibiotic therapy. PMID:23561694

  20. [Prescribing antibiotics for sore throat: a persistent habit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damoiseaux, Roger A M J; Venekamp, Roderick P

    2015-01-01

    Recently the revision of the guideline of the Dutch College of General Practitioners on sore throat has been published. Again, one of the key messages is restricting the use of antibiotics. In the Netherlands general practitioners prescribe antibiotics in 50% of cases of tonsillitis. Although there has been a decrease in the number of antibiotic prescriptions for tonsillitis in the last 30 years, they are still being prescribed twice as often as is recommended by the guideline. The beliefs of both patient and doctor play an important role in prescribing and better communication might help to improve the situation. Public campaigns can also help by providing the best knowledge on the effectiveness of antibiotics to the public.

  1. Gargling with Ketamine Attenuates the Postoperative Sore Throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rudra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative sore throat (POST is a common complication of anaesthesia with endotracheal tube that affects patient satisfaction after surgery. Therefore, this complication remains to be resolved in patients undergoing endotra-cheal intubation. The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of ketamine gargles with placebo in prevent-ing POST after endotracheal intubation. Forty patients scheduled for elective surgery under general anaesthesia were randomized into: Group C, water 30 ml; Group K, ketamine 50 mg in water 29 ml. Patients were asked to gargle this mixture for 40 seconds, 5 minutes before induction of anaesthesia. POST was graded at 4, 8 and 24 hours after operation on a four-point scale (0-3. In the Control group POST occurred more frequently, when compared with patients belonging to Ketamine group, at 4, 8, and 24 hours and significantly more patients suffered severe POST in Control group at 8 and 24 hours compared with Ketamine group (P< 0.05. We demonstrated that gargling with ketamine significantly attenuated POST, with no drug-related side effects were observed.

  2. The usefulness of a clinical 'scorecard' in managing patients with sore throat in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakare Tony MO

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of a clinical scorecard in managing sore throat in general practice. Design: Validation study of scorecard for sore throat with a throat swab culture used as the 'gold standard'. Setting: A solo family practice in rural New South Wales, Australia Participants: Patients attending with sore throat. Methods Patients from the age of 5 years and above presenting with the main symptom of a sore throat, and who have not had any antibiotic treatment in the previous two weeks, were invited to participate in the study. The doctor completed a scorecard for each patient participating and took a throat swab for culture. Adult patients (> 16 yrs were asked to complete a patient satisfaction questionnaire, while guardians accompanying children (5 yr to Main outcome measures: 1. Ability of a new scorecard to differentiate between bacterial and non-bacterial sore throat. 2. Patients' trust in the scorecard. Results The scorecard has a sensitivity of 93.33%, a specificity of 63.16%, a positive predictive value of 50% and a negative predictive value of 96%. The sensitivity is better than other sore throat scorecards that have been published but with a slightly lower specificity. There was a high level of patient trust in the scorecard was (85.8% agreement. Patients also trusted their doctor's judgement based on the scorecard (90.6% agreement. Conclusions As the scorecard has a high sensitivity but only a moderate specificity, this means that it is more reliable for negative results, i.e. when the result suggests a viral infection. When the result favours a bacterial sore throat, then a high sensitivity can mean that there are a number of false positives. GPs can be confident in withholding antibiotics when the scorecard indicates a viral infection.

  3. Ketorolac Tromethamine Spray Prevents Postendotracheal-Intubation-Induced Sore Throat after General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postoperative sore throat is one of the major complaints of general anesthesia in the postanesthesia care unit. This prospective study investigated the preventive effect of ketorolac tromethamine spray in postendotracheal-intubation-induced sore throat after general anesthesia. Methods. Surgical patients undergoing general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation were recruited from a medical center. Patients were randomly assigned to group K (treated with 5% ketorolac tromethamine spray or group D (treated with distilled water spray. Before intubation, each endotracheal tube was sprayed with the appropriate solution by physicians over the 20 cm length of the cuff. Each group comprised 95 patients fitting the inclusion and exclusion criteria for whom complete data sets were collected. The intensity of the sore throat was measured at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after surgery, and data were compared. Results. The two groups had similar characteristics. Postoperative sore throat was significantly less frequent in group K than in group D (p<0.001 and the pain intensity was significantly lower in group K than in group D at each time point (all p<0.001. Conclusions. This study demonstrated that preanesthesia 5% ketorolac tromethamine spray could effectively decrease postendotracheal-intubation-induced sore throat in patients undergoing general anesthesia.

  4. Rational Pharmacotherapy for Sore Throat in Children at Different Stages of the Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Zaychenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with one of the most pressing problems in pediatrics in the autumn and winter — a sore throat in children. The authors give its basic reasons, threatening symptoms that accompany sore throat, indicating an urgent need to visit a doctor, as well as the issues of treatment. It is noted that the most appropriate is the use of combination drugs that have complex (anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, analgesic effect. The characteristics of Strepsils Kids preparation, developed specifically for use in children from 6 years, are given.

  5. Evidence for antibiotic use for sore throat and URTI in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    508 C M E September 2003 Vol.21 No.9. There is a common misconception among many people that antibiotics are necessary for common colds and their symptoms. Evidence- based medicine can provide a rational approach to this problem. Evidence for antibiotic use for sore throat and URTI in general practice. G T J KA ...

  6. Antibiotic prescription strategies for acute sore throat: a prospective observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Hobbs, F D Richard; Butler, Chris C; Hay, Alastair D; Delaney, Brendan; Campbell, John; Broomfield, Sue; Barratt, Paula; Hood, Kerenza; Everitt, Hazel; Mullee, Mark; Williamson, Ian; Mant, David; Moore, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Data from trials suggest that antibiotics reduce the risk of complications of sore throat by at least 50%, but few trials for complications have been done in modern settings, and datasets of delayed antibiotic prescription are underpowered. Observational evidence is important in view of poor compliance with antibiotic treatment outside trials, but no prospective observational cohort studies have been done to date. We generated a large prospective cohort from the DESCARTE study, and the PRISM component of DESCARTE, of 12,829 adults presenting with sore throat (≤ 2 weeks duration) in primary care. Our follow-up of the cohort was based on a detailed and structured review of routine medical records, and analysis of the comparison of three antibiotic prescription strategies (no antibiotic prescription, immediate antibiotic prescription, and delayed antibiotic prescription) to control for the propensity to prescribe antibiotics. Information about antibiotic prescription was recorded in 12,677 individuals (4805 prescribed no antibiotics, 6088 prescribed antibiotics immediately, and 1784 prescribed delayed antibiotics). We documented by review of patients' notes (n=11,950) the development of suppurative complications (eg, quinsy, impetigo and cellulitis, otitis media, and sinusitis) or reconsultation with new or non-resolving symptoms). We used multivariate analysis to control for variables significantly related to the propensity to prescribe antibiotics and for clustering by general practitioner. 164 (1.4%) of the 11,950 patients with information available developed complications; otitis media and sinusitis were the most common complications (101 patients [62%]). Compared with no antibiotic prescription, immediate antibiotic prescription was associated with fewer complications (adjusted risk ratio [RR] 0.62, 95% CI 0.43-0.91, estimated number needed to treat [NNT 193) as was delayed prescription of antibiotics (0.58, 0.34-0.98; NNT 174). 1787 of the 11,950 patients (15

  7. Management of patients with sore throats in relation to guidelines: an interview study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, Katarina; Strandberg, Eva Lena; Gröndal, Hedvig; Brorsson, Annika; Thulesius, Hans; André, Malin

    2014-12-01

    To explore how a group of Swedish general practitioners (GPs) manage patients with a sore throat in relation to current guidelines as expressed in interviews. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse semi-structured interviews. Swedish primary care. A strategic sample of 25 GPs. Perceived management of sore throat patients. It was found that nine of the interviewed GPs were adherent to current guidelines for sore throat and 16 were non-adherent. The two groups differed in terms of guideline knowledge, which was shared within the team for adherent GPs while idiosyncratic knowledge dominated for the non-adherent GPs. Adherent GPs had no or low concerns for bacterial infections and differential diagnosis whilst non-adherent GPs believed that in patients with a sore throat any bacterial infection should be identified and treated with antibiotics. Patient history and examination was mainly targeted by adherent GPs whilst for non-adherent GPs it was often redundant. Non-adherent GPs reported problems getting patients to abstain from antibiotics, whilst no such problems were reported in adherent GPs. This interview study of sore throat management in a strategically sampled group of Swedish GPs showed that while two-thirds were non-adherent and had a liberal attitude to antibiotics one-third were guideline adherent with a restricted view on antibiotics. Non-adherent GPs revealed significant knowledge gaps. Adherent GPs had discussed guidelines within the primary care team while non-adherent GPs had not. Guideline implementation thus seemed to be promoted by knowledge shared in team discussions.

  8. Flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenges for treating sore throat symptoms: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachtel, Bernard P; Shephard, Adrian; Shea, Timothy; Sanner, Kathleen; Savino, Laurie; Rezuke, Jeanne; Schachtel, Emily; Aspley, Sue

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed multiple doses of flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenges for the relief of three prominent symptoms of acute pharyngitis: pain intensity (primary end point), difficulty swallowing and swollen throat. A total of 204 patients (102 in each group) with confirmed pharyngitis (onset ≤4 days) were randomly assigned to take up to five flurbiprofen or placebo lozenges every 3-6 h, for 7 days. Using validated rating scales (sore throat pain intensity, difficulty swallowing and swollen throat) patients rated their symptoms for the duration of the study. Over the first 24 h, patients treated with flurbiprofen lozenges reported significantly greater reductions in sore throat pain (47%) as well as difficulty swallowing (66%) and swollen throat (40%) compared with placebo (all p flurbiprofen lozenges provide effective relief of sore throat pain intensity as well as difficulty swallowing and swollen throat.

  9. Efficacy of flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenge in patients with a swollen and inflamed sore throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspley, Sue; Shephard, Adrian; Schachtel, Emily; Sanner, Kathleen; Savino, Laurie; Schachtel, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Sore throat is often over-treated with antibiotics, therefore there is a need for non-antibiotic treatments that provide effective relief. From the patient's point of view, symptoms of pharyngeal inflammation such as a "swollen" and "inflamed" throat are often considered the most bothersome; so, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug could be an appropriate treatment. We investigated the efficacy and safety of flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenge in adults with a swollen and inflamed throat. We enrolled adults with moderate-to-severe sore throat and evidence of tonsillo-pharyngitis into a randomized, double-blind study. Patients received flurbiprofen 8.75 mg or placebo lozenges every 3-6 hours as needed (up to five lozenges in 24 hours) and rated their symptoms (sore throat pain, difficulty swallowing and the sensation of a swollen throat) on standard linear scales regularly over 24 hours. The efficacy of flurbiprofen lozenge was determined in patients reporting a swollen and inflamed throat at baseline, as well as those with relatively severe symptoms. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01049334. The main outcome measures were the time-weighted summed differences in patient-reported sore throat pain, difficulty swallowing and swollen throat over 24 hours. Out of 204 patients, 124 (60.8%) described their throats as swollen and inflamed at baseline. Flurbiprofen lozenges provided greater relief than placebo over 24 hours: 79.8%, 99.6% and 69.3% (for sore throat pain, difficulty swallowing and swollen throat, respectively, all P ≤ 0.01). These outcomes were more substantial in patients with relatively severe symptoms. No serious or unexpected adverse events occurred. Flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenge appears to provide effective, well-tolerated relief of sore throat, difficulty swallowing and swollen throat in adults with a swollen and inflamed throat, as well as those with relatively severe symptoms. A limitation of these findings is that, while predetermined, these are

  10. Sore Throats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Health Home Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly ... Terms of Use © Copyright 2018. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery 1650 Diagonal Rd Alexandria, ...

  11. Comparative study of patients suffering sore throat after general anesthesia using laryngeal mask airway and cuffed pharyngeal tube in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassani V

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-operative sore throat is one of the most common complications and complaints of patients after general anesthesia especially in operations that need endotracheal intubations. Its causes are: size of endotracheal tube and type of its cuff, inadequate airway humidification, trauma during intubation and suctioning, high flow of inspiratory gases, surgical manipulation of airway and adjacent organs, ect. Use of instruments with less invasion to upper respiratory tract, for example, face mask and airway, LMA or CPT are methods, used for decreasing the rate of post-operative sore throat. This study was performed to compare the rate of sore throat after general anesthesia between Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA and Cuffed Pharyngeal Tube (CPT. From the patients, 120 ASA: PS-I cases, were selected, who were candidates for elective surgery of Orthopedics, Urology, General surgery and Gynecology in Hazrat Rasool-Akram Hospital Complex in the year 2000. Their operation were performed in supine position and did not need muscle relaxation and the patients had spontaneous breathing. Duration of surgery was less than 2 hours. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups: LMA was used for one group and CPT for others. Immediately after operation, in the recovery room and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours after removing the tube, the patients were asked about sore throat and the results were recorded in the related sheets. The results was 31.7 percent of patients in group LMA and 0 percent of patients in group CPT, had sore throat. There were significant difference between groups (LMA and CPT in presentation of sore throat (P<0.001.

  12. Pain relief of sore throat with a new anti-inflammatory throat lozenge, ibuprofen 25 mg: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, international phase III study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouroubi, Athmane; Donazzolo, Yves; Donath, Franck; Eccles, Ron; Russo, Marc; Harambillet, Nadine; Gautier, Stéphanie; Montagne, Agnès

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of a new oromucosal ibuprofen form, ibuprofen 25 mg lozenge, in single and repeat dosing for up to 4 days, to the matched placebo, in the treatment of acute sore throat pain in adults. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, adult patients with non-streptococcal sore throat and signs of moderate-to-severe associated pain (≥5 on the objective Tonsillo-Pharyngitis Assessment 21-point scale and ≥60 mm on the subjective 0-100 mm visual analogue Sore Throat Pain Intensity Scale [STPIS]) were assigned ibuprofen 25 mg (n=194) or matching placebo (n=191) lozenge treatment. Efficacy was assessed (at the investigating centre up to 2 hours after first dosing, then on an ambulatory basis) by parameters derived from patient's scores on scales of pain relief, pain intensity, and global efficacy assessment. The primary efficacy end-point was the time-weighted TOTal PAin Relief (TOTPAR) over 2 hours after first dosing using the Sore Throat Relief Scale (STRS). Safety and local tolerability were assessed. Ibuprofen 25 mg was superior to placebo on numerous pain relief parameters; TOTPAR was significantly higher with ibuprofen 25 mg over 2 hours after first dosing (Ppain (n=128), after an average 4 days (Prelief of sore throat pain and is as well tolerated as placebo. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01785862. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Comparison of the Characteristics and Performance of Flurbiprofen 8.75 mg Spray for Sore Throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Shephard, Adrian; Adams, Verity; Lidster, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Sore throat sprays provide targeted relief by delivering the active ingredient directly to the site of pain. Different sprays vary in characteristics, thus affecting delivery of the active ingredient to the throat, which can impact compliance. The characteristics and performance of FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY were compared with 12 other sprays. Parameters assessed included spray angle and pattern, droplet size distribution, shot weight uniformity and shot weight throughout life. Among all sprays tested WICK Sulagil Halsspray had the smallest spray angle (46°) and also the smallest diameter spray pattern (X=32.8 mm; Y=34.4 mm). Thiovalone® Buccal Spray Suspension had both the largest spray angle (82°) and largest diameter spray pattern (X=62.6 mm; Y=78.0 mm). Hasco Sept® Aerosol Spray had the smallest droplet size (Dv90=118.4 μm) whereas OKi infiammazione e dolore® 0.16% spray had the largest (Dv90=214.34 μm). In terms of shot weight uniformity, TANTUM® VERDE GOLA 0.25% spray showed the least variation (2% RSD) between shots and UNIBEN Aerosol Spray the most (23.4% RSD). Shot weight throughout life studies showed that FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY had the least deviation from shot weight (1.77%) whereas OKi infiammazione e dolore® 0.16% spray deviated the most (44.9%). FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY had the second smallest spray angle/pattern and droplet size distribution and also the least variation in shot weight. Different sore throat sprays vary in different attributes, affecting delivery of the active ingredient. FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY performed well overall, ranking first among all sprays tested, and providing a dose which is targeted and uniformly delivered throughout the life of the bottle. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Sore throat: effective communication delivers improved diagnosis, enhanced self-care and more rational use of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, A W; Bell, J; Sessa, A; Duerden, M; Altiner, A

    2013-11-01

    The majority of throat infections are of viral origin and resolve without antibiotic treatment. Despite this, antibiotic use for sore throat infections remains high, partly because it is difficult to determine when antibiotics may be useful, on the basis of physical findings alone. Antibiotics may be beneficial in bacterial throat infections under certain clinical and epidemiological circumstances; however, even many of those infections in which bacteria play a role do resolve just as quickly without antibiotics. Furthermore, non-medical factors such as patient expectations and patient pressure are also important drivers of antibiotic use. To address these issues, a behavioural change is required that can be facilitated by improved communication between primary healthcare providers and patients. In this article, we provide doctors, nurses and pharmacy staff, working in primary care or in the community, with a structured approach to sore throat management, with the aim of educating and empowering patients to self-manage their condition. The first component of this approach involves identifying and addressing patients' expectations and concerns with regard to their sore throat and eliciting their opinion on antibiotics. The second part is dedicated to a pragmatic assessment of the severity of the condition, with attention to red-flag symptoms and risk factors for serious complications. Rather than just focusing on the cause (bacterial or viral) of the upper respiratory tract infections as a rationale for antibiotic use, healthcare providers should instead consider the severity of the patient's condition and whether they are at high risk of complications. The third part involves counselling patients on effective self-management options and providing information on the expected clinical course. Such a structured approach to sore throat management, using empathetic, non-paternalistic language, combined with written patient information, will help to drive patient

  15. Penicillin for acute sore throat : randomised double blind trial of seven days versus three days treatment or placebo in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, S; Sachs, APE; Ruijs, GJHM; Gubbels, JW; Hoes, AW; de Melker, RA

    2000-01-01

    Objective To assess whether treatment with penicillin for three days and the traditional treatment for seven days were equally as effective at accelerating resolution of symptoms in patients with sore throat compared with placebo. Design Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. Setting 43

  16. Amylmetacresol/2,4-dichlorobenzyl alcohol, hexylresorcinol, or carrageenan lozenges as active treatments for sore throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morokutti-Kurz M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Martina Morokutti-Kurz, Christine Graf, Eva Prieschl-Grassauer Marinomed Biotechnologie GmbH, Vienna, Austria Abstract: Up to 80% of sore throats are caused by viruses. Several over the counter products are available which provide symptomatic, not causal relief. For such lozenges, containing the antiseptics and local anesthetics amylmetacresol (AMC and 2,4-dichlorobenzyl alcohol (DCBA or hexylresorcinol (HR, recently an additional virucidal effect was published. Therefore, we tested a set of Strepsils® lozenges, containing either HR (Max [#2] or AMC/DCBA (Original [#3], Extra Strong [#4], Warm [#5], Orange and Vitamin C [#6], Sugar free Lemon [#7], Children/Strawberry [#8] and Soothing Honey and Lemon [#9] for their antiviral efficiency against representatives of respiratory viruses known to cause sore throat: human rhinovirus (HRV 1a, HRV8, influenza virus A H1N1n, Coxsackievirus A10, and human coronavirus (hCoV OC43. The lozenges were tested head to head with Coldamaris® lozenges (#1, which contain the patented antiviral iota-carrageenan. None of the tested AMC/DCBA or HR containing lozenges shows any antiviral effectiveness against HRV8 at the tested concentrations, whereas all are moderately active against HRV1a. Only lozenge #5 shows any activity against hCoV OC43 and Coxsackievirus A10 at the tested concentrations. Similarly, only lozenge #3 is moderately active against influenza A H1N1n virus. The data indicates that neither the isolated effect of the active ingredients nor the pH but rather one or more of the excipients of the specific formulations are responsible for the antiviral effect of some of the AMC/DCBA or HR containing lozenges. In contrast, carrageenan-containing lozenges are highly active against all viruses tested. In another experiment, we showed that binding and inactivation of virus particles by iota-carrageenan are fast and highly effective. During the residence time of the lozenge in the mouth, the viral titer is

  17. Comparison of Effectiveness of Betamethasone gel Applied to the Tracheal Tube and IV Dexamethasone on Postoperative Sore Throat: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabari, Masumeh; Soltani, Ghasem; Zirak, Nahid; Alipour, Moammad; Khazaeni, Kamran

    2013-09-01

    Postoperative sore throat is a common complaint in patients with endotracheal intubation and has potentially dangerous complications. This randomized controlled trial study investigated the incidence of postoperative sore throat after general anesthesia when betamethasone gel is applied to a tracheal tube compared with when IV dexamethasone is prescribed. Two hundred and twenty five American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA)-class I and II patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery with tracheal intubation were randomly divided into three groups: betamethasone gel, intravenous (IV) dexamethasone, and control groups. In the post-anesthesia care unit, a blinded anesthesiologist interviewed all patients regarding postoperative sore throat at 1,6, and 24 hours after surgery. The incidence of sore throat was significantly lower in the betamethasone gel group compared with the IV dexamethasone and control groups, 1, 6, and 24 hours after surgery. In the first day after surgery 10.7% of the betamethasone group had sore throat whereas 26.7% of the IV dexamethasone group and 30.7% of the control group had sore throat. Bucking before extubation was observed in 14(18.4%), 8(10.4%), and 9(12.2%) patients, in the IV dexamethasone, betamethasone gel, and control group, respectively. We concluded that wide spread application of betamethasone gel over tracheal tubes effectively mitigates postoperative sore throat, compared with IV dexamethasone application.

  18. Comparison of Effectiveness of Betamethasone gel Applied to the Tracheal Tube and IV Dexamethasone on Postoperative sore Throat: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Tabari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative sore throat is a common complaint in patients with endotracheal intubation and has potentially dangerous complications. This randomized controlled trial study investigated the incidence of postoperative sore throat after general anesthesia when betamethasone gel is applied to a tracheal tube compared with when IV dexamethasone is prescribed.   Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty five American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA-class I and II patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery with tracheal intubation were randomly divided into three groups: betamethasone gel, intravenous (IV dexamethasone, and control groups. In the post-anesthesia care unit, a blinded anesthesiologist interviewed all patients regarding postoperative sore throat at 1,6, and 24 hours after surgery.   Results: The incidence of sore throat was significantly lower in the betamethasone gel group compared with the IV dexamethasone and control groups, 1, 6, and 24 hours after surgery. In the first day after surgery 10.7% of the betamethasone group had sore throat whereas 26.7% of the IV dexamethasone group and 30.7% of the control group had sore throat. Bucking before extubation was observed in 14(18.4%, 8(10.4%, and 9(12.2% patients, in the IV dexamethasone, betamethasone gel, and control group, respectively.   Conclusion:  We concluded that wide spread application of betamethasone gel over tracheal tubes effectively mitigates postoperative sore throat, compared with IV dexamethasone application.

  19. Efficacy of flurbiprofen 8.75 mg spray in patients with sore throat due to an upper respiratory tract infection: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Looze, Ferdinandus; Russo, Marc; Bloch, Mark; Montgomery, Barney; Shephard, Adrian; Smith, Gary; Aspley, Sue

    2016-06-01

    Viral infections cause most cases of pharyngitis (sore throat); consequently, antibiotics are generally not warranted. However, a treatment targeting pain and inflammation, e.g. a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory spray, may be helpful for patients. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of flurbiprofen 8.75 mg spray. This randomised, double-blind, parallel group study was conducted at six community-based clinical research centres in Australia and two in New Zealand. Adults with sore throat due to upper respiratory tract infection (onset ≤ four days) took one dose of flurbiprofen (n = 249) or placebo spray (n = 256); after six hours, they could re-dose every three-six hours as required, for three days (max. five doses/day). The primary endpoint was the area under the change from baseline curve in throat soreness from zero-two hours (AUC0-2h). The change from baseline in other sore throat symptoms also assessed efficacy. The mean AUC0-2h for throat soreness was significantly greater with flurbiprofen spray (-1.82; 95% CI: -1.98 to 1.65) compared with placebo (-1.13; 95% CI: -1.27 to 0.99) (P flurbiprofen spray compared with placebo from the first time-points assessed (five minutes for throat soreness/difficulty swallowing, 20 minutes for sore throat pain intensity and 30 minutes for swollen throat) for up to six hours (P Flurbiprofen spray provides rapid and long-lasting relief from sore throat symptoms, and is well-tolerated over three days.

  20. The Effect of Pharyngeal Packing during Nasal Surgery on the Incidence of Post Operative Nausea, Vomiting, and Sore Throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Karbasfrushan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nausea and vomiting after ear, nose and throat (ENT surgery is one of the most common and notable problems facing anesthesiologists in this area. This study was conducted to determine the effect of a pharyngeal pack on the severity of nausea, vomiting, and sore throat among patients after ear, pharynx, and throat surgeries.   Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical study was performed in 140 patients (61 men and 79 women; age range, 20–40 years who had undergone nasal surgery in 2010. Patients were divided into two groups: the first group were treated using a pharyngeal pack (case group and the second group were managed without a pharyngeal pack (control group. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-square test and the Mann-Whitney U test. SPSS software was used for data analysis.   Results: The mean severity of nausea and vomiting in the two groups was 2.057, 1.371 and 1.100, respectively, with no significant differences between groups. However, the mean severity of sore throat was 1.714 in the group with the pharyngeal pack and 1.385 in the group without pharyngeal pack (P=0.010.   Conclusion:  Not only does a pharyngeal pack in ENT surgery not reduce the extent and severity of nausea and vomiting, but it also increases the severity of sore throat in patients when leaving the recovery room and discharging hospital.

  1. Phytochemical, Antimicrobial, and Toxicological Evaluation of Traditional Herbs Used to Treat Sore Throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifa Mehreen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro antibacterial activities of 29 traditional medicinal plants used in respiratory ailments were assessed on multidrug resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the sore throat patients and two reference strains. The methanolic, n-hexane, and aqueous extracts were screened by the agar well diffusion assay. Bioactive fractions of effective extracts were identified on TLC coupled with bioautography, while their toxicity was determined using haemolytic assay against human erythrocytes. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analysis of effective extracts was also performed. Methanolic extract of 18 plants showed antimicrobial activity against test strains. Adhatoda vasica (ZI = 17–21 mm, MIC: 7.12–62.5 μg/mL, Althaea officinalis (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 15.62–31.25 μg/mL, Cordia latifolia (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 12.62–62.5 μg/mL, Origanum vulgare (ZI = 20–22 mm, MIC: 3–15.62 μg/mL, Thymus vulgaris (ZI = 21–25 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL, and Ziziphus jujuba (ZI = 14–20 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL showed significant antibacterial activity. Alkaloid fractions of Adhatoda vasica, Cordia latifolia, and Origanum vulgare and flavonoid fraction of the Althaea officinalis, Origanum vulgare, Thymus Vulgaris, and Ziziphus jujuba exhibited antimicrobial activity. Effective plant extracts show 0.93–0.7% erythrocyte haemolysis. The results obtained from this study provide a scientific rationale for the traditional use of these herbs and laid the basis for future studies to explore novel antimicrobial compounds.

  2. Phytochemical, Antimicrobial, and Toxicological Evaluation of Traditional Herbs Used to Treat Sore Throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehreen, Arifa; Waheed, Muzzamil; Liaqat, Iram; Arshad, Najma

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activities of 29 traditional medicinal plants used in respiratory ailments were assessed on multidrug resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the sore throat patients and two reference strains. The methanolic, n-hexane, and aqueous extracts were screened by the agar well diffusion assay. Bioactive fractions of effective extracts were identified on TLC coupled with bioautography, while their toxicity was determined using haemolytic assay against human erythrocytes. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analysis of effective extracts was also performed. Methanolic extract of 18 plants showed antimicrobial activity against test strains. Adhatoda vasica (ZI = 17–21 mm, MIC: 7.12–62.5 μg/mL), Althaea officinalis (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 15.62–31.25 μg/mL), Cordia latifolia (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 12.62–62.5 μg/mL), Origanum vulgare (ZI = 20–22 mm, MIC: 3–15.62 μg/mL), Thymus vulgaris (ZI = 21–25 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL), and Ziziphus jujuba (ZI = 14–20 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL) showed significant antibacterial activity. Alkaloid fractions of Adhatoda vasica, Cordia latifolia, and Origanum vulgare and flavonoid fraction of the Althaea officinalis, Origanum vulgare, Thymus Vulgaris, and Ziziphus jujuba exhibited antimicrobial activity. Effective plant extracts show 0.93–0.7% erythrocyte haemolysis. The results obtained from this study provide a scientific rationale for the traditional use of these herbs and laid the basis for future studies to explore novel antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27429983

  3. Utility of the sore throat pain model in a multiple-dose assessment of the acute analgesic flurbiprofen: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachtel, Bernard; Aspley, Sue; Shephard, Adrian; Shea, Timothy; Smith, Gary; Schachtel, Emily

    2014-07-03

    The sore throat pain model has been conducted by different clinical investigators to demonstrate the efficacy of acute analgesic drugs in single-dose randomized clinical trials. The model used here was designed to study the multiple-dose safety and efficacy of lozenges containing flurbiprofen at 8.75 mg. Adults (n=198) with moderate or severe acute sore throat and findings of pharyngitis on a Tonsillo-Pharyngitis Assessment (TPA) were randomly assigned to use either flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenges (n=101) or matching placebo lozenges (n=97) under double-blind conditions. Patients sucked one lozenge every three to six hours as needed, up to five lozenges per day, and rated symptoms on 100-mm scales: the Sore Throat Pain Intensity Scale (STPIS), the Difficulty Swallowing Scale (DSS), and the Swollen Throat Scale (SwoTS). Reductions in pain (lasting for three hours) and in difficulty swallowing and throat swelling (for four hours) were observed after a single dose of the flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenge (Pflurbiprofen-treated patients experienced a 59% greater reduction in throat pain, 45% less difficulty swallowing, and 44% less throat swelling than placebo-treated patients (all Pflurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenges were shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for sore throat pain. Other pharmacologic actions (reduced difficulty swallowing and reduced throat swelling) and overall patient satisfaction from the flurbiprofen lozenges were also demonstrated in this multiple-dose implementation of the sore throat pain model. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT01048866, registration date: January 13, 2010.

  4. Comparing the effect of ketamine and benzydamine gargling with placebo on post-operative sore throat: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hamid Reza Faiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Air way intubation for general anesthesia usually leads to sore throat after surgery. Ketamine plays an important role to block a number of receptors related to pain. Benzydamine hydrochloride is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been used to improve oropharyngeal disorders. In this study, it was intended to compare the effect of gargling different solutions before the surgery on post-operative sore throat (POST in patients who underwent general anesthesia for hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients who underwent the elective hysterectomy were entered to the randomized controlled trial regarding to the eligibility criteria. Patients were simply randomly allocated to three groups and received one code. Every code was representative for a specific drug: 20 cc normal saline (control group or 1.5 mg benzydamine in 20 cc solution or 20 mg ketamine in 20 cc solutions. All the research teams were blinded to the received solutions. POST was evaluated with numerical rating scale. The data were entered to SPSS software and analysis of variance (ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test, were performed. Results: The mean ages of ketamine, benzydamine, and normal saline recipients were not significantly different. The trend of the severity of sore throat during the first 24 h after the operation in ketamine recipients was significantly lower than the other two groups (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The pain scale after surgery was reduced by using both ketamine and benzydamine, but the ketamine effect was more noticeable.

  5. Stakeholders' views of recurrent sore throat, tonsillitis and their management: a qualitative interview study for the NAtional Trial of Tonsillectomy IN Adults (NATTINA Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, L A; Rousseau, N S; Wilson, J A; Wilkes, S; Haighton, C A

    2017-04-01

    To determine the impact of recurrent sore throats and tonsillitis in adults and stakeholder views of treatment pathways. Qualitative semistructured interview design reporting novel data from a feasibility study for a UK national trial of tonsillectomy in adults. Nine study sites linked to ear, nose and throat departments in National Health Service hospitals located across the United Kingdom. Fifteen patients, 11 general practitioners and 22 ear, nose and throat staff consented to in-depth interviews, which were analysed using a framework analysis approach. Views of stakeholder groups. Recurrent sore throats were reported to severely impact patients' family, work and social life. Ear, nose and throat staff stated that patients faced increasing barriers to secondary care service access. General practitioners were under pressure to reduce 'limited clinical value' surgical procedures. The findings from this study suggest that there is a disconnect between the attitudes of the stakeholders and the reality of recurrent sore throat, tonsillectomy procedures and service provision. More evidence for the role of tonsillectomy is needed from randomised controlled trials to determine whether it should continue to be ranked as a procedure of limited clinical effectiveness. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [The practice guideline 'Sore throat' (second revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of otorhinolaryngology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marres, H.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this comment, the practice guideline 'Sore throat' (second revision) is discussed. This guideline, composed by the Dutch College of General Practitioners, offers general practitioners a well-appreciated overview of the common practices regarding diagnostic tests and treatment of pharyngitis and

  7. Importance of diagnostic laboratory methods of beta hemolytic streptococcus group A in comparison with clinical findings in the diagnosis of streptococcal sore throat and unnecessary antibacterial therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Eini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus Pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS is the most important cause of bacterial pharyngitis in children and adolescents. Acute pharyngitis is one of the most common conditions in all ages but it is most common in children. Over diagnosis of acute pharyngitis represents one of the major causes of antibiotic abuse. The goal of this study is to make an estimate of the frequency of group A streptococcus in sore throat patients in Farshchian hospital emergency department and clinic in Hamadan. Methods: For estimation of the clinical features role in diagnosis of streptococcal sore throat, we took samples of 100 patients with average age of 32.96±29.86 years with sore throat. We took samples from pharynx and used standard methods of bacteriology in order to detect streptococcus. Results: Group A Streptococcus (GAS accounts for 3 percent of all cases of pharyngitis. Clinically, all of the patients had sore throat. The percent breakdowns are as follows: 30% had exudate, 78% had fever, 8% had lymphadenopathy and 7.7 percent of exudative pharyngitis was streptococcal. The cost for unnecessary antibiotic therapy for every single patient who had negative pharynx culture was approximately 32160 Rails. Conclusion: The low frequency of streptococcus pharyngitis in treated patients reveal that diagnosis based on clinical features is not reliable. We recommend use of other diagnostic methods such as Rapid Antigen Detection Tests (RATs. Only reliable and scientific protocols for antibiotic to therapy.

  8. Improvements in throat function and qualities of sore throat from locally applied flurbiprofen 8.75 mg in spray or lozenge format: findings from a randomized trial of patients with upper respiratory tract infection in the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burova N

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Natalia Burova,1 Valeria Bychkova,2 Adrian Shephard3 1Federal State Establishment Clinical Diagnostic Medical Center, Saint Petersburg, Russia; 2Reckitt Benckiser (Russia, Moscow, Russia; 3Reckitt Benckiser Healthcare International Ltd, Slough, Berkshire, UK Objective: To assess the speed of relief provided by flurbiprofen 8.75 mg spray and lozenge and their effect on many of the different qualities and characteristics of throat pain and discomfort, and the many articulations of the broad term “sore throat” (ST. Patients and methods: Four hundred and forty adults with recent-onset, moderate-to-severe ST due to upper respiratory tract infection (URTI were randomized to a single dose of either flurbiprofen 8.75 mg spray (n=218 or flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenge (n=222. Throat swabs for bacterial culture were taken at baseline. ST relief was assessed at 1 minute, 1 and 2 hours post-dose using the Sore Throat Relief Rating Scale. The change from baseline at 1 and 2 hours post-dose in difficulty swallowing and swollen throat was assessed using the difficulty swallowing scale and the swollen throat scale, respectively. Patients’ experience of URTI symptoms was assessed using a URTI questionnaire at baseline and 2 hours post-dose. The change in Qualities of Sore Throat Index, a 10-item index of qualities of ST, from baseline at 2 hours post-dose was also measured. Results: ST relief was evident in the spray and the lozenge treatment groups at 1 minute, 1 and 2 hours post-dose (P>0.05. In both groups, scores for difficulty swallowing and swollen throat significantly improved at 1 and 2 hours post-dose compared with baseline. At 2 hours post-dose, the number of patients experiencing URTI symptoms that can be attributed to or associated with ST decreased relative to baseline. The mean change from baseline to 2 hours post-dose for each individual score on the Qualities of Sore Throat Index showed significant improvements for flurbiprofen spray and

  9. Telemedicine Physical Examination Utilizing a Consumer Device Demonstrates Poor Concordance with In-Person Physical Examination in Emergency Department Patients with Sore Throat: A Prospective Blinded Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Moneeb; Van Heukelom, Paul G; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Tranter, Rachel D; White, Erinn; Shekem, Nathaniel; Walz, David; Fairfield, Catherine; Vakkalanka, J Priyanka; Mohr, Nicholas M

    2018-02-22

    Telemedicine allows patients to connect with healthcare providers remotely. It has recently expanded to evaluate low-acuity illnesses such as pharyngitis by using patients' personal communication devices. The purpose of our study was to compare the telemedicine-facilitated physical examination with an in-person examination in emergency department (ED) patients with sore throat. This was a prospective, observational, blinded diagnostic concordance study of patients being seen for sore throat in a 60,000-visit Midwestern academic ED. A telemedicine and a face-to-face examination were performed independently by two advanced practice providers (APP), blinded to the results of the other evaluator. The primary outcome was agreement on pharyngeal redness between the evaluators, with secondary outcomes of agreement and inter-rater reliability on 14 other aspects of the pharyngeal physical examination. We also conducted a survey of patients and providers to evaluate perceptions and preferences for sore throat evaluation using telemedicine. Sixty-two patients were enrolled, with a median tonsil size of 1.0. Inter-rater agreement (kappa) for tonsil size was 0.394, which was worse than our predetermined concordance threshold. Other kappa values ranged from 0 to 0.434, and telemedicine was best for detecting abnormal coloration of the palate and tender superficial cervical lymph nodes (anterior structures), but poor for detecting abnormal submandibular lymph nodes or asymmetry of the posterior pharynx (posterior structures). In survey responses, telemedicine was judged easier to use and more comfortable for providers than patients; however, neither patients nor providers preferred in-person to telemedicine evaluation. Telemedicine exhibited poor agreement with the in-person physical examination on the primary outcome of tonsil size, but exhibited moderate agreement on coloration of the palate and cervical lymphadenopathy. Future work should better characterize the importance of

  10. The Effect of Zinc Lozenge on Postoperative Sore Throat: A Prospective Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhang, Borzoo; Grondin, Lydia

    2018-01-01

    Postoperative sore throat (POST) is commonly seen after endotracheal intubation, and oral zinc prevents oral mucositis associated with chemotherapy. This study is designed to evaluate the effects of administration of zinc lozenges on POST. Seventy-nine patients undergoing low- or moderate-risk surgery with endotracheal intubation were randomly assigned into 2 groups: Control group received placebo and zinc group received 40-mg zinc lozenges 30 minutes preoperatively. Patients were assessed for incidence and severity (4-point scale, 0-3) of POST at 0, 2, 4, and 24 hours postoperatively. The primary outcome was incidence of POST at 4 hours after surgery. The secondary outcomes were the incidence of POST at 0, 2, and 24 hours and the severity of POST. At 4 hours, there was a significantly lower incidence of POST in the zinc group, 7%, than the control group, 29% (P = .046). The incidence of POST at 0 hour was 0% in zinc group and 24% in control group (P = .004). The highest incidence of POST occurred at the second hour after surgery, with the rate of 10% in the zinc group and 34% in the control group (P = .0495). The incidence of POST at 24 hours was 13% in zinc group and 24% in control group (not significant). The severity of POST was significantly lower in the zinc group for mild (P = .003) and moderate (P = .004) POST. The administration of a single dose of 40-mg zinc lozenge 30 minutes preoperatively is effective to reduce both incidence of POST in the first 4 hours and severity of mild and moderate POST in the immediate postoperative period.

  11. The sore throat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    remains the major treatable organism and needs a specific work-up. It also remains the most common bacterial cause of pharyngitis in children and adolescents. The differences in evaluating children and adults need to be understood.

  12. The effect of alternative graphical displays used to present the benefits of antibiotics for sore throat on decisions about whether to seek treatment: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling, Cheryl L L; Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Flottorp, Signe; Fretheim, Atle; Oxman, Andrew D; Schünemann, Holger J; Akl, Elie A; Herrin, Jeph; MacKenzie, Thomas D; Montori, Victor M

    2009-08-01

    We conducted an Internet-based randomized trial comparing four graphical displays of the benefits of antibiotics for people with sore throat who must decide whether to go to the doctor to seek treatment. Our objective was to determine which display resulted in choices most consistent with participants' values. This was the first of a series of televised trials undertaken in cooperation with the Norwegian Broadcasting Company. We recruited adult volunteers in Norway through a nationally televised weekly health program. Participants went to our Web site and rated the relative importance of the consequences of treatment using visual analogue scales (VAS). They viewed the graphical display (or no information) to which they were randomized and were asked to decide whether to go to the doctor for an antibiotic prescription. We compared four presentations: face icons (happy/sad) or a bar graph showing the proportion of people with symptoms on day three with and without treatment, a bar graph of the average duration of symptoms, and a bar graph of proportion with symptoms on both days three and seven. Before completing the study, all participants were shown all the displays and detailed patient information about the treatment of sore throat and were asked to decide again. We calculated a relative importance score (RIS) by subtracting the VAS scores for the undesirable consequences of antibiotics from the VAS score for the benefit of symptom relief. We used logistic regression to determine the association between participants' RIS and their choice. 1,760 participants completed the study. There were statistically significant differences in the likelihood of choosing to go to the doctor in relation to different values (RIS). Of the four presentations, the bar graph of duration of symptoms resulted in decisions that were most consistent with the more fully informed second decision. Most participants also preferred this presentation (38%) and found it easiest to understand (37

  13. Clinical score and rapid antigen detection test to guide antibiotic use for sore throats: randomised controlled trial of PRISM (primary care streptococcal management).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Paul; Hobbs, F D Richard; Moore, Michael; Mant, David; Williamson, Ian; McNulty, Cliodna; Cheng, Ying Edith; Leydon, Geraldine; McManus, Richard; Kelly, Joanne; Barnett, Jane; Glasziou, Paul; Mullee, Mark

    2013-10-10

    To determine the effect of clinical scores that predict streptococcal infection or rapid streptococcal antigen detection tests compared with delayed antibiotic prescribing. Open adaptive pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial. Primary care in United Kingdom. Patients aged ≥ 3 with acute sore throat. An internet programme randomised patients to targeted antibiotic use according to: delayed antibiotics (the comparator group for analyses), clinical score, or antigen test used according to clinical score. During the trial a preliminary streptococcal score (score 1, n=1129) was replaced by a more consistent score (score 2, n=631; features: fever during previous 24 hours; purulence; attends rapidly (within three days after onset of symptoms); inflamed tonsils; no cough/coryza (acronym FeverPAIN). Symptom severity reported by patients on a 7 point Likert scale (mean severity of sore throat/difficulty swallowing for days two to four after the consultation (primary outcome)), duration of symptoms, use of antibiotics. For score 1 there were no significant differences between groups. For score 2, symptom severity was documented in 80% (168/207 (81%) in delayed antibiotics group; 168/211 (80%) in clinical score group; 166/213 (78%) in antigen test group). Reported severity of symptoms was lower in the clinical score group (-0.33, 95% confidence interval -0.64 to -0.02; P=0.04), equivalent to one in three rating sore throat a slight versus moderate problem, with a similar reduction for the antigen test group (-0.30, -0.61 to -0.00; P=0.05). Symptoms rated moderately bad or worse resolved significantly faster in the clinical score group (hazard ratio 1.30, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.63) but not the antigen test group (1.11, 0.88 to 1.40). In the delayed antibiotics group, 75/164 (46%) used antibiotics. Use of antibiotics in the clinical score group (60/161) was 29% lower (adjusted risk ratio 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.50 to 0.95; P=0.02) and in the

  14. Protocol for north of England and Scotland study of tonsillectomy and adeno-tonsillectomy in children (NESSTAC). A pragmatic randomised controlled trial comparing surgical intervention with conventional medical treatment in children with recurrent sore throats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, John; Wilson, Janet; Eccles, Martin; Vanoli, Alessandra; Steen, Nick; Clarke, Ray; Zarod, Andrew; Lock, Catherine; Brittain, Katie; Speed, Chris; Rousseau, Nikki

    2006-08-09

    Uncertainties surrounding the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of childhood tonsillectomy for recurrent sore throat led the NHS Health Technology Assessment Programme to commission this research to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of tonsillectomy and adeno-tonsillectomy in comparison with standard non-surgical management in children aged under 16 with recurrent throat infections. The aim is to evaluate if tonsillectomy and adeno-tonsillectomy reduces the number of episodes of sore throats among children to a clinically significant extent. A simple prospective pragmatic randomised controlled trial with economic analysis and prospective cohort study of non-trial participants comparing surgical intervention with conventional medical treatment. The treatment arm will receive tonsillectomy and adeno-tonsillectomy while in the control arm non-surgical conventional medical treatment only will be used. The primary outcome measure will be reported number of episodes of sore throat over two years with secondary outcomes measures of reported number of episodes of sore throat, otitis media and upper respiratory tract infection which invoke a GP consultation; reported number of symptom-free days; reported severity of sore throats and surgical and anaesthetic morbidity. The study will take place in five hospitals in the UK. The trial population will be 406 children aged 4-15 on their last birthday with recurrent sore throat referred by primary care to the 5 otolaryngology departments. The duration of the study is seven years (July 2001-July 2008). As with all pragmatic randomised controlled trials it is impossible to control the external environment in which the research is taking place. Since this trial began a number of factors have arisen which could affect the outcome including; a reduction in the incidence of respiratory tract infections, marked socio-economic differences in consultation rates, the results from the National Prospective Tonsillectomy

  15. Protocol for north of England and Scotland study of tonsillectomy and adeno-tonsillectomy in children (NESSTAC. A pragmatic randomised controlled trial comparing surgical intervention with conventional medical treatment in children with recurrent sore throats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lock Catherine

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncertainties surrounding the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of childhood tonsillectomy for recurrent sore throat led the NHS Health Technology Assessment Programme to commission this research to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of tonsillectomy and adeno-tonsillectomy in comparison with standard non-surgical management in children aged under 16 with recurrent throat infections. The aim is to evaluate if tonsillectomy and adeno-tonsillectomy reduces the number of episodes of sore throats among children to a clinically significant extent. Methods/design A simple prospective pragmatic randomised controlled trial with economic analysis and prospective cohort study of non-trial participants comparing surgical intervention with conventional medical treatment. The treatment arm will receive tonsillectomy and adeno-tonsillectomy while in the control arm non-surgical conventional medical treatment only will be used. The primary outcome measure will be reported number of episodes of sore throat over two years with secondary outcomes measures of reported number of episodes of sore throat, otitis media and upper respiratory tract infection which invoke a GP consultation; reported number of symptom-free days; reported severity of sore throats and surgical and anaesthetic morbidity. The study will take place in five hospitals in the UK. The trial population will be 406 children aged 4–15 on their last birthday with recurrent sore throat referred by primary care to the 5 otolaryngology departments. The duration of the study is seven years (July 2001- July 2008. Discussion As with all pragmatic randomised controlled trials it is impossible to control the external environment in which the research is taking place. Since this trial began a number of factors have arisen which could affect the outcome including; a reduction in the incidence of respiratory tract infections, marked socio-economic differences in

  16. Production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS by Streptococcus salivarius strains isolated from the tongue and throat of children with and without sore throat Produção de substâncias inibidoras semelhantes à bacteriocina por cepas de Streptococcus salivarius, isoladas da língua e garganta de crianças com e sem dor de garganta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Fantinato

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus salivarius strains, isolated from children with and without sore throat, were tested for bacteriocin production against Streptococcus pyogenes. S. salivarius strains producing bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS against S. pyogenes were more frequently found in children without sore throat. These results suggest that these children may be protected against sore throat by the presence of BLIS-positive S. salivarius strains.Cepas de Streptococcus salivarius, isoladas de crianças com e sem dor de garganta, foram testadas quanto à produção de bacteriocina contra Streptococcus pyogenes. Os resultados mostraram que as crianças que não tinham dor de garganta possuiam, na boca, cepas de bactérias produtoras de substâncias inibidoras semelhantes à bacteriocina contra S. pyogenes.

  17. Efficacy of flurbiprofen 8.75 mg delivered as a spray or lozenge in patients with sore throat due to upper respiratory tract infection: a randomized, non-inferiority trial in the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radkova E

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Eugenia Radkova,1 Natalia Burova,2 Valeria Bychkova,3 Robert DeVito4 1OCT Clinical Trials, Saint Petersburg, Russia; 2Federal State Establishment Clinical Diagnostic Medical Center, Saint Petersburg, Russia; 3Reckitt Benckiser (Russia, Moscow, Russia; 4Reckitt Benckiser, Parsippany, NJ, USA Objective: To assess the efficacy of flurbiprofen 8.75 mg delivered as a spray or lozenge in patients with sore throat due to upper respiratory tract infection (URTI.Materials and methods: This multicenter, double-blind, double-dummy, non-inferiority study randomized 440 adults with recent-onset, moderate-to-severe sore throat due to URTI to a single dose of either flurbiprofen 8.75 mg spray (n=218 or flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenge (n=222. The presence or absence of beta-hemolytic streptococci (A or C was confirmed by culture tests (throat swab. The primary efficacy end point was the difference from baseline to 2 hours post-dose in sore throat pain intensity scale (STPIS pain intensity difference [PID] 2h, a validated 100 mm visual analog scale (from 0=“no pain” to 100=“severe pain”, with a non-inferiority margin of −6 mm. Secondary end points included STPIS PID at 1 hour (STPIS PID 1h and over 2 hours (STPIS sum of sore throat pain intensity differences [SPID]0–2h and ratings of patient satisfaction and investigator assessment of drug efficacy at 2 hours. Safety (adverse events [AEs] was also assessed.Results: Reductions in sore throat pain intensity at 2 hours (STPIS PID 2h were similar for spray (least square mean −40.51 and lozenge (−40.10 (difference: 0.41, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] −3.20, 4.01, with non-inferiority demonstrated. Subgroup analyses showed similar efficacy (STPIS PID 2h for patients testing positive or negative for Strep A or C. There was no significant difference between spray and lozenge in STPIS PID 1h or STPIS SPID0–2h, and patient satisfaction and investigators’ assessment of efficacy at 2

  18. Fever, sore throat and myalgia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occult bacterial abscess. Renal carcinoma. Variants of rheumatoid arthritis. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease. Endocarditis. Atrial myxoma. Systemic lupus erythematosus. Melioidosis. Brucellosis. Temporal arteritis. Polymyalgia rheumatica. Pyrexia of unknown origin defined as temperature >38.3oC for >3 weeks, with >2 outpatient ...

  19. Mononucleosis - view of the throat (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious mononucleosis causes a sore throat, enlarged lymph nodes, and fatigue. The throat may appear red and the tonsils covered with a whitish material. Mononucleosis and severe streptococcal tonsillitis appear quite similar. Unless ...

  20. Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They commonly ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which are ...

  1. Canker sore

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... under one third inch or 1 centimeter across) Gray color as healing starts Less common symptoms include: ... Aphthous ulcer; Ulcer - aphthous Images Canker sore Mouth anatomy Canker sore (aphthous ulcer) Fever blister References Bope ...

  2. Mouth sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To help cold sores or fever blisters, you can also apply ice to the sore. You may reduce your chance of getting common mouth sores by: Avoiding very hot foods or beverages Reducing stress and practicing relaxation techniques like yoga or meditation ...

  3. Canker Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth that move, such as the tongue, soft palate, cheeks, and lips. This condition is recurrent because ... week. Most of the time, canker sores are self-limiting. This means that they will go away ...

  4. Cold Sore

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may reduce how often they return. Symptoms A cold sore usually passes through several stages: Tingling and itching. Many people feel an itching, burning or tingling sensation around their lips for a day or so ...

  5. Canker Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lack of vitamins and minerals, hormonal changes or menstrual periods. In some cases the cause is unknown. In most cases, the sores go away by themselves. Some ointments, creams or rinses may help with the pain. Avoiding hot, spicy food while you have a ...

  6. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What is "sepsis," and why is it dangerous? play_arrow How common are pressure sores ... likely to develop pressure sores? play_arrow Is it true that a pressure sore can develop in ...

  7. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... of a pressure sore required? play_arrow How long is the typical healing time for a pressure ... arrow Why do some pressure sores take so long to heal? play_arrow Can a pressure sore ...

  8. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores ... sores? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By ...

  9. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home ...

  10. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and how can it be increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  11. Genital sores - male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sores - male genitals; Ulcers - male genitals ... A common cause of male genital sores are infections that are spread through sexual contact, such as: Genital herpes (small, painful blisters filled with clear ...

  12. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow ...

  13. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  14. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... especially prone to pressure sores? play_arrow What parts of the body are most likely to develop ... play_arrow How long is the typical healing time for a pressure sore? play_arrow Why do ...

  15. Throat or larynx cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... use tobacco are at risk of developing throat cancer. Drinking too much alcohol over a long time ...

  16. Taking Care of Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Taking Care of Pressure Sores [Download this pamphlet: "Taking Care of Pressure Sores" - ( ... may not show up right away. Stages of pressure sores and how to care for them: STAGE ONE ...

  17. Effects of intravenous diclofenac on postoperative sore throat in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    of a verbally administered numerical rating scale of acute pain for use in the emergency department. Acad Emerg Med 2003; 10(4): 390-. 2. 44. Breivik E.K, Bjornsson G A, Skovlund E. A comparison of pain rating scales by sampling from clinical trial data. Clin J Pain 2000; 16(1):. 22-8. 45. Kremer E, Atkinson J H, Ignelzi R J.

  18. Prevalence and management of sore throats and tonsillitis in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Untreated or poorly treated cases can lead to recurrent episodes, absence from school and therefore the need to study the pattern and management within the boarding schools where the parental care are lacking. Aim: Health is key determinant factor for school entry, as well as an important factor in continued participation ...

  19. Prescribing style and variation in antibiotic prescriptions for sore throat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba Currea, Gloria Cristina; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    never did. After adjusting for patient and GP characteristics, prescribing style in the group of GPs from Russia was about three times more heterogeneous than the prescribing style in the group of GPs from Denmark – Median Odds Ratio ( 6.8, 95%CI 3.1;8.8 ) and ( 2.6, 95%CI 2.2;4.4 ) respectively...

  20. Sore Throat? Know When To Call the Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Physicians ... Media Center The DO JAOA AOA Health Watch Professional Development AOA Board Certification Continuing Medical Education Research ...

  1. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cord injuries? play_arrow Why are pressure sores so serious? play_arrow What is "sepsis," and why ... pressure sores? play_arrow Why is pressure relief so important when sitting in a wheelchair? play_arrow ...

  2. ISCHIECTOMY FOR PRESSURE SORES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Mark; Cozen, Lewis; Aldes, John

    1960-01-01

    Ischiectomy with primary closure was carried out in five paraplegic patients with pressure sores. This operation, less extensive than the wide excision with full thickness graft that is now widely advocated, was successful in four of the five cases. In the fifth case none of the several attempts to heal the sores was in the least successful. PMID:18732351

  3. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and how can it be increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  4. Strep Throat (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... Educators Search English Español Strep Throat KidsHealth / For Teens / Strep Throat What's in this article? What Is ...

  5. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure ...

  6. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What parts of the body are most likely to develop pressure sores? play_arrow Is ... daily skin inspections? play_arrow What are the most important things for someone with a spinal cord ...

  7. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS ... medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. ...

  8. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New ... not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found ...

  9. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... hours? play_arrow What's the best way to do daily skin inspections? play_arrow What are the ... for someone with a spinal cord injury to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow Why is ...

  10. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  11. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from ... Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa ...

  12. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  13. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Cold Sores in Children: About the Herpes Simplex Virus Page Content ​A child's toddler and ... Cold sores (also called fever blisters or oral herpes) start as small blisters that form around the ...

  14. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrow What's the best way to do daily skin inspections? play_arrow What are the most important ... to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What is “skin tolerance” and how can it be increased? play_ ...

  15. Preventing Pressure Sores

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    Full Text Available ... the most important thing to do to prevent pressure sores? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By Topic Resources Blog Peer Counseling About Media Donate Contact Us Terms of ...

  16. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrow Is it true that a pressure sore can develop in a few hours? play_arrow What's ... play_arrow What is “skin tolerance” and how can it be increased? play_arrow What do family ...

  17. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cushion? play_arrow What’s important to know about positioning in bed to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ...

  18. Osteomyelitis beneath pressure sores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugarman, B.; Hawes, S.; Musher, D.M.; Klima, M.; Young, E.J.; Pircher, F.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-eight pressure sores were evaluated prospectively. Osteomyelitis was reported histologically in nine of 28 bones and pressure-related changes were reported in 14 bones. Roentgenograms suggested the presence of osteomyelitis in four instances of histologically proved osteomyelitis. Technetium Tc 99m medronate bone scans were highly sensitive, showing increased uptake in all cases of osteomyelitis; however, increased uptake also occurred commonly in uninfected bones due to pressure-related changes or other noninfectious causes. Cultures of bone biopsy samples usually disclosed anaerobic bacteria, gram-negative bacilli, or both. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis must be considered if a pressure sore does not respond to local therapy. If the technetium Tc 99m medronate uptake is increased in the involved area, or roentgenographic findings are abnormal, the diagnosis can only be made with certainty by histologic examination of bone. Antibacterial treatment should be selected based on the results of bone culture

  19. Incidence, causes, severity and treatment of throat discomfort: a four-region online questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addey, Dilys; Shephard, Adrian

    2012-08-10

    Acute sore throat is commonly associated with viral infections. Consumers typically rely on over-the-counter treatments and other remedies to treat symptoms; however, limited information is available regarding consumer perceptions of sore throat or treatment needs. The aim of this study was to investigate perceptions of throat discomfort and how these influence attitudes and consumer behaviour with regard to treatment. Online consumer surveys were completed by participants invited by email between 2003 and 2004 in four markets: the UK, France, Poland, and Malaysia. The questionnaire consisted of 24 questions that covered key issues surrounding throat discomfort including incidence in the past 12 months, causes, severity, effects on functionality and quality of life, actions taken to relieve throat discomfort, the efficacy of these approaches and the reasons behind using specific products. In total, 6465 men and women aged ≥18 years were surveyed, identifying 3514 participants who had suffered throat discomfort/irritation in the past 12 months (response rate of 54%). These participants completed the full survey. The breakdown of throat discomfort sufferers was: UK, 912; France, 899; Poland, 871; Malaysia, 832. A high proportion of respondents experienced one or more instances of throat discomfort in the previous 12 months, with an overall incidence of 54%. Infections including the common cold/influenza and other bacteria/viruses were commonly perceived causes of throat discomfort (72% and 46%, respectively). Physical and environmental factors were also perceived to be causative, including airborne pollution (28%), smoking (23%), and air conditioning (31%). Symptoms perceived to be caused by an infection were associated with a higher degree of suffering (mean degree of suffering for bacteria/virus and common cold/influenza; 3.4 and 3.0, respectively). Medicinal products were used for all perceived causes, but more commonly for sore throats thought to be caused by

  20. Incidence, causes, severity and treatment of throat discomfort: a four-region online questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addey Dilys

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute sore throat is commonly associated with viral infections. Consumers typically rely on over-the-counter treatments and other remedies to treat symptoms; however, limited information is available regarding consumer perceptions of sore throat or treatment needs. The aim of this study was to investigate perceptions of throat discomfort and how these influence attitudes and consumer behaviour with regard to treatment. Methods Online consumer surveys were completed by participants invited by email between 2003 and 2004 in four markets: the UK, France, Poland, and Malaysia. The questionnaire consisted of 24 questions that covered key issues surrounding throat discomfort including incidence in the past 12 months, causes, severity, effects on functionality and quality of life, actions taken to relieve throat discomfort, the efficacy of these approaches and the reasons behind using specific products. Results In total, 6465 men and women aged ≥18 years were surveyed, identifying 3514 participants who had suffered throat discomfort/irritation in the past 12 months (response rate of 54%. These participants completed the full survey. The breakdown of throat discomfort sufferers was: UK, 912; France, 899; Poland, 871; Malaysia, 832. A high proportion of respondents experienced one or more instances of throat discomfort in the previous 12 months, with an overall incidence of 54%. Infections including the common cold/influenza and other bacteria/viruses were commonly perceived causes of throat discomfort (72% and 46%, respectively. Physical and environmental factors were also perceived to be causative, including airborne pollution (28%, smoking (23%, and air conditioning (31%. Symptoms perceived to be caused by an infection were associated with a higher degree of suffering (mean degree of suffering for bacteria/virus and common cold/influenza; 3.4 and 3.0, respectively. Medicinal products were used for all perceived causes, but more

  1. The ubiquitous throat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebecker, A.; March-Russell, J.

    2007-01-01

    We attempt to quantify the widely-held belief that large hierarchies induced by strongly-warped geometries are common in the string theory landscape. To this end, we focus on the arguably best-understood subset of vacua-type IIB Calabi-Yau orientifolds with non-perturbative Kaehler stabilization and a SUSY-breaking uplift (the KKLT setup). Within this framework, vacua with a realistically small cosmological constant are expected to come from Calabi-Yaus with a large number of 3-cycles. For appropriate choices of flux numbers, many of these 3-cycles can, in general, shrink to produce near-conifold geometries. Thus, a simple statistical analysis in the spirit of Denef and Douglas allows us to estimate the expected number and length of Klebanov-Strassler throats in the given set of vacua. We find that throats capable of explaining the electroweak hierarchy are expected to be present in a large fraction of the landscape vacua while shorter throats are essentially unavoidable in a statistical sense

  2. Temperature in the throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Kaviani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the temperature of extended objects in string theory. Rotating probe D-branes admit horizons and temperatures a la Unruh effect. We find that the induced metrics on slow rotating probe D1-branes in holographic string solutions including warped Calabi–Yau throats have distinct thermal horizons with characteristic Hawking temperatures even if there is no black hole in the bulk Calabi–Yau. Taking the UV/IR limits of the solution, we show that the world volume black hole nucleation depends on the deformation and the warping of the throat. We find that world volume horizons and temperatures of expected features form not in the regular confining IR region but in the singular nonconfining UV solution. In the conformal limit of the UV, we find horizons and temperatures similar to those on rotating probes in the AdS throat found in the literature. In this case, we also find that activating a background gauge field form the U(1 R-symmetry modifies the induced metric with its temperature describing two different classes of black hole solutions.

  3. How to care for pressure sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000740.htm How to care for pressure sores To use the sharing features on this page, ... Shoulders Back Back of head Caring for a Pressure Sore Stage I or II sores will heal if ...

  4. Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies on flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenges in patients with/without group A or C streptococcal throat infection, with an assessment of clinicians' prediction of 'strep throat'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, A; Smith, G; Aspley, S; Schachtel, B P

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing group A streptococcus (Strep A) throat infection by clinical examination is difficult, and misdiagnosis may lead to inappropriate antibiotic use. Most patients with sore throat seek symptom relief rather than antibiotics, therefore, therapies that relieve symptoms should be recommended to patients. We report two clinical trials on the efficacy and safety of flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenge in patients with and without streptococcal sore throat. The studies enrolled adults with moderate-to-severe throat symptoms (sore throat pain, difficulty swallowing and swollen throat) and a diagnosis of pharyngitis. The practitioner assessed the likelihood of Strep A infection based on historical and clinical findings. Patients were randomised to flurbiprofen 8.75 mg or placebo lozenges under double-blind conditions and reported the three throat symptoms at baseline and at regular intervals over 24 h. A total of 402 patients received study medication (n = 203 flurbiprofen, n = 199 placebo). Throat culture identified Strep A in 10.0% of patients and group C streptococcus (Strep C) in a further 14.0%. The practitioners' assessments correctly diagnosed Strep A in 11/40 cases (sensitivity 27.5%, and specificity 79.7%). A single flurbiprofen lozenge provided significantly greater relief than placebo for all three throat symptoms, lasting 3-4 h for patients with and without Strep A/C. Multiple doses of flurbiprofen lozenges over 24 h also led to symptom relief, although not statistically significant in the Strep A/C group. There were no serious adverse events. The results highlight the challenge of identifying Strep A based on clinical features. With the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, non-antibiotic treatments should be considered. As demonstrated here, flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenges are an effective therapeutic option, providing immediate and long-lasting symptom relief in patients with and without Strep A/C infection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Pressure sores and hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, S; Heinert, G; Parker, M J

    2008-02-01

    Development of pressure sores during hospital admission causes morbidity and distress to the patient, increases strain on nursing resources, delaying discharge and possibly increasing mortality. A hip fracture in elderly patients is a known high-risk factor for development of pressure sores. We aimed to determine the current incidence of pressure sores and identify those factors which were associated with an increased risk of pressure sores. We retrospectively analysed prospectively collected data of 4654 consecutive patients admitted to a single unit. One hundred and seventy-eight (3.8%) of our patients developed pressure sores. Patient factors that increased the risk of pressure sores were increased age, diabetes mellitus, a lower mental test score, a lower mobility score, a higher ASA score, lower admission haemoglobin and an intra-operative drop in blood pressure. The risk was higher in patients with an extracapsular neck of femur fracture and patients with an increased time interval between admission to hospital and surgery. Our studies indicate that while co-morbidities constitute a substantial risk in an elderly population, the increase in incidence of pressure sores can be reduced by minimising delays to surgery.

  6. [Randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of Corpitolinol 60 in the prevention of pressure sores in patients undergoing surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiari, Paolo; Giorgi, Sabina; Ugolini, Daniela; Montanari, Morena; Giudanella, Pietro; Gramantieri, Antonella; Collesi, Franca; Pau, Michelina; Smaldone, Maddalena; Matarasso, Maddalena; Mazzini, Cinzia; Russo, Francesca; Gazineo, Domenica; Fontana, Mirella; Taddia, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    Randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of Corpitolinol 60 in the prevention of pressure sores in surgical patients. The risk of pressure sores in surgical patients is widely recognised. The Corpitolinol 60 (Sanyréne®) applied on compressed areas seems to reduce the risk of pressure sores. To assess the efficacy of Corpitolinol 60 in preventing pressure sores in the operatory theatre. The open label randomized clinical trial was conducted in 5 operating theatres of Northen Italy. Patients were randomized to receive Corpitolinol 60 in areas undergoing compression. Experimental group and controls were treated with usual measures for preventing pressure sores. The lesions were staged according to NPUAP up to 24 hours after surgery. Three-hundred-one patients were randomized (155 in the Sanyréne® group and 143 controls). The main variables predictive of pressure sores risk (ASA class, sex, age, duration of the surgery, and BMI) were comparable across groups. At the end of the surgery 71 patients (23.8%) in the experimental group and 47 controls (30.8%) had a pressure sore (p 0.006; RR 1.81 IC95% 1.17-2.79). Twelve and 24 hours after surgery the differences between groups were not significant. The aim of reducing pressure sores was not reached for patients treated with Corpitolinol 60.

  7. Tuvan Throat Singing and Harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Wilken, David

    2018-01-01

    Tuvan throat singing, also called overtone singing, provides for an exotic demonstration of the physics of harmonics as well as introducing an Asian musical aesthetic. A low fundamental is sung and the singer skillfully alters the resonances of the vocal system to enhance an overtone (harmonic above the fundamental). The result is that the…

  8. Practical Management of Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure sores are common in the debilitated elderly. Causal factors are unrelieved pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture. Preventive measures should be used for all high-risk patients, defined by general condition, mental status, degree of incontinence, amount of activity, and mobility. Principles of treating ulcers include pressure relief, reducing bacterial counts, debriding necrotic tissue, and providing a moist, clean environment. Imagesp2385-ap2389-ap2392-a PMID:21221298

  9. Recurring Strep Throat: When Is Tonsillectomy Useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... throat: When is tonsillectomy useful? My 7-year-old daughter has been diagnosed with strep throat four ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  10. Strep Test: Throat Culture (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Strep Test: Throat Culture KidsHealth / For Parents / Strep Test: Throat Culture What's ...

  11. Tuvan throat singing and harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Wilken, David

    2018-05-01

    Tuvan throat singing, also called overtone singing, provides for an exotic demonstration of the physics of harmonics as well as introducing an Asian musical aesthetic. A low fundamental is sung and the singer skillfully alters the resonances of the vocal system to enhance an overtone (harmonic above the fundamental). The result is that the listener hears two pitches simultaneously. Harmonics such as H8, H9, H10, and H12 form part of a pentatonic scale and are commonly selected for melody tones by Tuvan singers. A real-time spectrogram is provided in a video (Ruiz M J 2018 Video: Tuvan Throat Singing and Harmonics http://mjtruiz.com/ped/tuva/) so that Tuvan harmonics can be visualized as they are heard.

  12. Life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis of the neck: an unusual consequence of a sore throat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persaud, R.; Krahé, D.; Georgalas, C.; Kaniyur, S.; Das, S.; Alusi, G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing fasciitis is life-threatening bacterial infection which spreads with frightening speed along the fascial planes resulting in extensive tissue necrosis and often death. The infection is caused by either Group A streptococci or a combination of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

  13. Evidence-based medicine: pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Carolyn A; Phillips, Linda G

    2013-12-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Cite risk factors for pressure sore development. 2. Detail the pathophysiology of pressure sores. 3. List the types and classification of pressure sores. 4. Consider the various nonsurgical conservative wound management strategies. 5. Describe the appropriate surgical interventions for each pressure sore type. 6. Understand the causes of recurrent pressure sores and methods of avoiding recurrence. Pressure sores are the result of unrelieved pressure, usually over a bony prominence. With an estimated 2.5 million pressure ulcers treated annually in the United States at a cost of $11 billion, pressure sores represent a costly and labor-intensive challenge to the health care system. A comprehensive team approach can address both prevention and treatment of these recalcitrant wounds. Consideration must be given to the patient's medical and socioeconomic condition, as these factors are significantly related to outcomes. Mechanical prophylaxis, nutritional optimization, treatment of underlying infection, and spasm control are essential in management. A variety of pressure sore patterns exist, with surgical approaches directed to maximize future coverage options. A comprehensive approach is detailed in this article to provide the reader with the range of treatment options available.

  14. [Sacral pressure sores and their treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecki, Marek; Skowroński, Rafał; Skowroński, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Sacral bed sores still present a serious problem in most surgery departments. They occur mainly in elderly patients of limited mobility. The treatment of such sores extends over long periods of time and therefore involves considerable costs. The material consisted of 11 sacral pressure ulcers treated surgically. The sores occurred in 4 severely disabled patients suffering from proximal third femur fractures, 4 patients with traumatic brain injury (treated in the Intensive Care Unit), and 3 patients suffering from bed sores after spinal cord injury. In 6 patients a fasciocutaneous flap was applied to the sores and in 5 cases a pedicled musculocutaneous gluteus maximus flap. The end results were assessed using Seiler's criteria. Complications of the "seroma" type were observed in 3 patients, and in 2 marginal necrosis. In all our patients complete healing was achieved within 2-4 weeks. On analysing our experience to date in surgical treatment of bed sores we are of the opinion that even extensive sacral sores can be covered with unilateral pedicled flaps provided that they are appropriately planned. Deep sores of the 4th degree sometimes with concomitant osteomyelitis require pedicled muscle flaps or in some cases musculocutaneous flaps to improve local circulation. The preparation of the patient for reconstruction surgery is just as important as the operation itself and therefore such preparation should never be neglected.

  15. Bifid Throats for Axion Monodromy Inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retolaza, Ander

    2015-04-01

    We construct a simple explicit local geometry providing a 'bifid throat' for 5-brane axion monodromy. A bifid throat is a throat that splits into two daughter throats in the IR, containing a homologous 2-cycle family reaching down into each daughter throat. Our example consists of a deformed Z 3 x Z 2 orbifold of the conifold, which provides us with an explicit holographic dual of the bifid throat including D3-branes and fractional 5-branes at the toric singularities of our setup. Having the holographic description in terms of the dual gauge theory allows us to address the effect of 5-brane-antibrane pair backreaction including the warping effects. This leads to the size of the backreaction being small and controllable after imposing proper normalization of the inflaton potential and hence the warping scales.

  16. A re-examination of throats

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, J.-W.; Kim, D.; Lindquist, W. B.

    2013-01-01

    We critically re-examine the concept of a throat in a porous medium as a geometric quantity defined independently of an entry meniscus in a drainage process. To maintain the standard notion of a throat as a locally minimum-area cross section in the pore network, we demonstrate with examples that throats must intersect each other. Using flow simulation, we show that these intersecting throats correspond to capillary pressure controlled entry points during drainage. We have designed a throat-finding algorithm that explicitly locates intersecting throats, using a planar approximation for robustness and speed. The capability of the new algorithm was compared against an existing algorithm in the construction of pore-throat networks from X-ray computed tomography images of consolidated sandstones (7.5–22% porosity) and of an unconsolidated sand pack (32.5% porosity). We show that the probability of throat intersection increases significantly with porosity above 20%; in the sand pack, over 1/4 of all throats intersect with another.

  17. A re-examination of throats

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, J.-W.

    2013-11-01

    We critically re-examine the concept of a throat in a porous medium as a geometric quantity defined independently of an entry meniscus in a drainage process. To maintain the standard notion of a throat as a locally minimum-area cross section in the pore network, we demonstrate with examples that throats must intersect each other. Using flow simulation, we show that these intersecting throats correspond to capillary pressure controlled entry points during drainage. We have designed a throat-finding algorithm that explicitly locates intersecting throats, using a planar approximation for robustness and speed. The capability of the new algorithm was compared against an existing algorithm in the construction of pore-throat networks from X-ray computed tomography images of consolidated sandstones (7.5–22% porosity) and of an unconsolidated sand pack (32.5% porosity). We show that the probability of throat intersection increases significantly with porosity above 20%; in the sand pack, over 1/4 of all throats intersect with another.

  18. [Pressure sores in a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbut, Frédéric; Parzybut, Bérengère; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Neyme, Denis; Farid, Rachida; Kosmann, Marie-Jeanne; Luquel, Laurence

    2006-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of pressure sores, their risk factors, and the responsible microbial agents in an acute-care hospital and to evaluate their management. A prevalence survey was conducted from 5 July through 9 July 2004. Investigators completed a standardized questionnaire for each hospitalized patient, including demographic data (age, sex, previous hospitalizations, etc.) and Braden scale risk factors (sensory perception, humidity, activity, mobility, nutrition, and friction and shear). Two experts in skin care detected pressure sores by physical examination of the patients. Each pressure sore was swabbed and inoculated on selective media. Management was evaluated by reviewing the clinical charts of each patient with a pressure sore. The study included 535 adult patients (aged 59 +/- 19 years): 75 ulcer sores were observed in 37 patients (prevalence=6.9%). Stage I sores accounted for 24% of the total, stage II for 29%, stage III 31%, and stage IV 16%. The most frequent site was the heel (41%), followed by the sacrum (20%), elbow (11%), back (7%) and ischial tuberosities (7%). Sixty (80%) were acquired while hospitalized. Age-adjusted multivariate analyses found that the risk factors significantly associated with pressure sores were Braden scorepressure sores (OR=5.0 95% CI: 2.2-11.6, psores (24.5%), mostly stage III and IV, were colonized by multiple-drug-resistant bacteria (i.e., methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended spectrum beta-lactamase Enterobacteriaceae). Seven (9.3%) of the 75 ulcers were diagnosed only during the survey, by the experts; of the 68 diagnosed before the survey, 57 (83.8%) had been under treatment. Treatment was considered inappropriate according to French guidelines in 31.6% of the cases. This prospective prevalence study resulted in better awareness of the patients at risk for pressure sores. It also made the recently created mobile geriatrics unit better known within the hospital.

  19. Plugging regime in the pump limiter throat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghendrih, P.; Grosman, A.; Samain, A.; Capes, H.; Morera, J.P.

    1988-08-01

    The plugging regime -with no outstreaming neutral flux- is studied for a closed configuration pump limiter (throat). We derive the plugging length and the neutral density build-up at the neutralizer plate. The analytical expressions are supported by numerical evidence. We find an improved efficiency related to the throat effect mainly due to neutral-sidewall interactions

  20. Scoop on Strep Throat (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Educators Search English Español Strep Throat KidsHealth / For Kids / Strep Throat What's in this article? What Is ...

  1. Small Numbers From Tunneling Between Brane Throats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachru, Shamit

    2001-07-25

    Generic classes of string compactifications include ''brane throats'' emanating from the compact dimensions and separated by effective potential barriers raised by the background gravitational fields. The interaction of observers inside different throats occurs via tunneling and is consequently weak. This provides a new mechanism for generating small numbers in Nature. We apply it to the hierarchy problem, where supersymmetry breaking near the unification scale causes TeV sparticle masses inside the standard model throat. We also design naturally long-lived cold dark matter which decays within a Hubble time to the approximate conformal matter of a long throat. This may soften structure formation at galactic scales and raises the possibility that much of the dark matter of the universe is conformal matter. Finally, the tunneling rate shows that the coupling between throats, mediated by bulk modes, is stronger than a naive application of holography suggests.

  2. Spectrophotometry of RR Telescopii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, A.R.

    1977-01-01

    The strongest emission lines in the nova-like variable RR Telescopii were measured during late 1974 using a spectrum scanner. The wavelength range 3350 to 7700 A was scanned with a resolution of 50 A. The results are compared with published spectrophotometry covering the period 1961 to 72, with the conclusion that few changes have taken place in the last 6 yr. No evidence was found that suggested the existence of a cool star, nor was there any indication of night-to-night changes in the emission line intensities. The spectrophotometry of the past 15 yr is consistent with an expanding shell, the emission from this shell being caused by high-energy radiation from an underlying star. (author)

  3. SUSY breaking mediation by throat fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, F.; Hebecker, A.; Trapletti, M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate, in the general framework of KKLT, the mediation of supersymmetry breaking by fields propagating in the strongly warped region of the compactification manifold ('throat fields'). Such fields can couple both to the supersymmetry breaking sector at the IR end of the throat and to the visible sector at the UV end. We model the supersymmetry breaking sector by a chiral superfield which develops an F term vacuum expectation value (also responsible for the uplift). It turns out that the mediation effect of vector multiplets propagating in the throat can compete with modulus-anomaly mediation. Moreover, such vector fields are naturally present as the gauge fields arising from isometries of the throat (most notably the SO(4) isometry of the Klebanov-Strassler solution). Their mediation effect is important in spite of their large 4d mass. The latter is due to the breaking of the throat isometry by the compact manifold at the UV end of the throat. The contribution from heavy chiral superfields is found to be subdominant

  4. [Options for flap coverage in pressure sores].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nae, S; Antohi, N; Stîngu, C; Stan, V; Parasca, S

    2010-01-01

    Despite improvements in reconstructive techniques for pressure sores, recurrences are still seen frequently, and success rate remains variable. During 2003 - 2007, at the Emergency Hospital for Plastic Surgery and Burns in Bucharest, 27 patients underwent surgical repair of 45 pressure sores located at sacral (22 ulcers), ischial (12 ulcers) and trochanteric (11 ulcers) regions. The mean patient age was 57, 1 years (range 26 to 82 years). Mean postoperative follow-up was 6 months (range 2 months - 2 years). There were 18 complications for the 45 sores (40%). At 6 months postoperatively, recurrence was noted in 12 ulcers (27%). Details regarding indications, contraindications, advantages and disadvantages for different coverage options are outlined. The authors advocate the importance of surgical coverage in reducing morbidity, mortality and treatment costs.

  5. Occipital pressure sores in two neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Xiao, Bin; Zhang, Cheng; Su, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    The preference for a specific head shape can be influenced by people's culture, religious beliefs and race. Modern Chinese people prefer a "talented" head shape, which is rounded and has a long profile. To obtain their preferred head shape, some parents try to change their neonates' sleeping position. Due to these forced sleeping positions, positional skull deformities, such as plagiocephaly, may be present during the first few months of life. In this article, we report two neonatal cases, of Hui nationality and Dongxiang nationality, with occipital pressure sores that were caused by using hard objects as pillows with the intention of obtaining a flattened occiput. The pressure sores were deep to the occipital bone and needed surgical management. These pressure sores caused wounds that were repaired by local skin flaps, after debridement, and the use of external constraints from a dense sponge-made head frame for approximately two weeks. One case recovered with primary healing after surgical operation. The other case suffered from a disruption of the sutured wound, and a secondary operation was performed to cover the wound. These occipital pressure sores are avoidable by providing guidance to the parents in ethnic minorities' area regarding the prevention, diagnosis and management of positional skull deformity.

  6. [Pressure sores unit--a one year study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaul, E

    2001-10-01

    The phenomenon of pressure sores in the elderly patient often requires an alternative management policy to that of the standard treatment. In general, the therapeutic approach to pressure sores in the elderly should be different to that in younger patients. This modification is due to the accompanying comorbidity so often associated with aging. Due to accompanying illnesses, the aging population is at high risk and more predisposed to the development of pressure sores. The importance of the establishment of a unit for pressure sores arises from the specific geriatric team approach to the patient and the need to focus carefully on the pressure sores. The management of this special Pressure Sores Unit with a permanent capable staff requires skilled treatment, both localized and systemic, since pressure sores are very often a result of systemic failure or an indication of a terminal condition in the elderly patient. Over six months we followed-up on the number and location of the pressure sores in 47 patients in addition to other functional and nutritional parameters, in order to investigate any connection between the pressure sores and nutritional parameters. The results of the study indicate that the nutritional state of the patients admitted for pressure sores was very poor. Two thirds of the patients suffered from either dementia or stroke, and 90 percent were bedridden, incontinent and enterally fed. Despite the poor general condition of the patient, the study shows improvement in the pressure sores with a reduction from an average of 2.8 to 1.8 pressure sores per patient. The improvement in the pressure sore located on the legs was three times greater than those located in the pelvic area. By the end of the study, 50% of the patients had died, 33% of the original patients who were still in the unit showed improvement in the pressure sores and 15% were discharged showing complete recovery from the sores. No significant correlation was found between changes in the

  7. Small numbers from tunneling between brane throats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2003-01-01

    In generic string compactifications with branes, the regions of space in the vicinity of brane horizons, or brane throats, support effective potential barriers, raised by the back-ground gravitational fields. A familiar example is the AdS brane throats in the Randall-Sundrum model. The barriers obstruct the interaction of observers inside different throats, whose communication is effectively described by tunneling through the barriers. Consequently the interactions between different throats are exponentially weak. This provides for a new mechanism for explaining small numbers in Nature. We review the applications to the hierarchy problem where supersymmetry breaking scale is reduced by tunneling, long-lived cold dark matter particles which decay into hot CFT, and consider the implications for holography. We finally discuss the important interplay between the tunneling suppression and our recent conjecture that black holes stuck on a brane in AdS D+1 should be interpreted as duals of quantum-corrected D-dimensional black holes, rather than classical ones, of a CFT coupled to gravity. (author)

  8. Etiologic predictive value of a rapid immunoassay for the detection of group A Streptococcus antigen from throat swabs in patients presenting with a sore throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Orda

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the point-of-care test Alere Test Pack +Plus Strep A has a high positive predictive value and is able to rule in GAS infection as long as the proportion of carriers is low. Also the negative predictive value for ruling out GAS as the etiologic agent is very high irrespective of the carrier rate. Hence, this test is always useful to rule out GAS infection.

  9. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium. ...

  10. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium. ...

  11. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium. ...

  12. NONLINEAR ASTEROSEISMOLOGY OF RR LYRAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, L.; Kollath, Z.; Szabo, R. [Konkoly Observatory, MTA CSFK, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 15-17 (Hungary); Bryson, S.; Mullally, F.; Thompson, S. E. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 244-30, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kolenberg, K., E-mail: molnar.laszlo@csfk.mta.hu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    The observations of the Kepler Space Telescope revealed that fundamental-mode RR Lyrae stars may show various radial overtones. The presence of multiple radial modes may allow us to conduct nonlinear asteroseismology: comparison of mode amplitudes and frequency shifts between observations and models. Here we report the detection of three radial modes in the star RR Lyr, the eponym of the class, using the Kepler short cadence data: besides the fundamental mode, both the first and the ninth overtones can be derived from the data set. RR Lyrae shows period doubling, but switches occasionally to a state where a pattern of six pulsation cycles repeats instead of two. We found hydrodynamic models that show the same three modes and the period-six state, allowing for comparison with the observations.

  13. The ′reading man flap′ for pressure sore reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatis Sapountzis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment of pressure sores represents a significant challenge to health care professionals. Although, pressure wound management demands a multidisciplinary approach, soft tissue defects requiring reconstruction are often considered for surgical management. Myocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps can provide stable coverage of pressure sores. Purpose: Here, we describe our experience using a recent fasciocutaneous flap, which is named ′reading man′ flap, in sacral, ischial, and trochanteric pressure sores. Materials and Methods: During a period of 1 year the authors operated 16 patients, 11 men, and 5 women, using the reading man flap. The ages of the patients ranged from 24 to 78 years. The location of pressure sores was 8 sacral, 5 ischial, and 3 trochanteric pressure sores. The mean size of pressure sores was 8 cm × 9 cm. Results: All pressure sores covered bt the Reading Man flap healed asymptomatically. After follow-up of 2-8 months, no recurrences were encountered and no further surgical intervention was required. Conclusion: The reading man flap was found to be a useful technique for the closure of pressure sore in different anatomic locations. The advantage of tension-free closure and the minimal additional healthy skin excision made this flap a useful tool in pressure sore reconstructions.

  14. Throat gases against the CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaut, C.

    2006-01-01

    The steel production needs carbon consumption and generates carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gases. It represents about 6 % of the greenhouse gases emissions in the world. That is why the steel industry began last year a research program, Ideogaz, to reduce its CO 2 releases. The first results on the throat gases recovery seems very promising: it uses 25 % less of carbon. The author presents the program and the main technical aspects of the method. (A.L.B.)

  15. Pressure sores and underlying bone infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugarman, B.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure sores are a serious complication of hospitalized and chronically ill patients. Evaluation for underlying bone infection can be made difficult by radiographic, nuclear imaging, and soft-tissue culture studies that are abnormal and suggest the presence of bone infection, when no infection is present. Evaluation by bone biopsy with histologic and microbiological studies can accurately and promptly diagnose whether bone infection is present. This allows appropriate treatment when infection is present, and prevents unneeded and potentially toxic antibiotic therapy when preliminary studies incorrectly suggest that infection is present

  16. Laser homeostatics on delayed onset muscle soreness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T C Y; Fu, D R; Liu, X G; Tian, Z X, E-mail: liutcy@scnu.edu.cn [Lab Laser Sports Medicine, South China Normal University, University Town, Guangzhou, GD 510006 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and its photobiomodulation were reviewed from the viewpoint of function-specific homeostasis (FSH) in this paper. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stressor may destroy a FSH. A stress is a response of a biosystem to a stressor and may also be in stress-specific homeostasis (StSH). A low level light (LLL) is so defined that it has no effects on a function in its FSH or a stress in its StSH, but it modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. For DOMS recovery, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is the essential process, but the inflammation, pain and soreness are non-essential processes. For many DOMS phenomena, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is in protein metabolism-specific homeostasis (PmSH) so that there are no effects of LLL although the inflammation can be inhibited and the pain can be relieved. An athlete or animal in the dysfunctional conditions such as blood flow restriction and exercise exhaustion is far from PmSH and the protein metabolism can be improved with LLL.

  17. [The prevention of pressure sores in paediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thueux, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    In paediatric intensive care, children develop pressure sores as a result of various mechanical and clinical factors. The prevention and assessment of the risk of pressure sores constitute a key concern for the nursing teams which establish prevention strategies adapted to the young patients.

  18. New concepts in the prevention of pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogie, Kath; Powell, Heather L; Ho, Chester H

    2012-01-01

    Pressure sores are a serious, and costly, complication for many patients with reduced mobility and sensation. Some populations, such as those with spinal cord injury (SCI), remain at high risk throughout their lifetime. Prevention is highly preferable and while the concept is readily definable, it is much more challenging to develop valid preventative measures. Subjective and objective approaches to risk factor assessment before pressure sores develop are reviewed, including risk status scales and emerging techniques to assess deep tissue injury. Devices to prevent pressure sores have traditionally focused on pressure-relieving cushions and mattresses. Technological advances being applied in the development of new pressure sore prevention devices are presented. Clinical evidence-based practice is integral to pressure sore prevention. Comprehensive assessment must include evaluation of systemic diseases, anatomical and physiological factors, together with environmental and psychosocial factors, which can all contribute to pressure sore development. Extrinsic factors need to be considered in conjunction with intrinsic tissue health factors and are reviewed together with an evaluation of currently available clinical practice guidelines. This chapter presents the broad diversity of factors associated with pressure sore development and highlights the need for an interdisciplinary team approach in order to maximize successful prevention of pressure sores. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Prevalence of pressure sores in a university hospital in 2003].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daideri, G; Berthier, F; Brocker, P; Darmon, M-J; Mignolet, F; Quaranta, J-F; Staccini, P

    2006-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of pressure sores in a university hospital and to assess the risk of developing a pressure sore. A one-day survey was performed in all hospitalized patients, day hospital excepted. The Garches scale was used to assess the severity of pressure sores and the Braden scale was used to measure the patient's risk for the development of pressure ulcers. One thousand six hundred and eleven patients were included, mean age was 62+/-23 years and 53.3% were over 65 years old. In hospitalized patients, 64% were in acute care, 29% in intermediate medicine and long-term care and 7% in intensive care units. We have found 675 pressure sores in 268 patients, mean age of 76 years; 263 decubitus ulcers were acquired during hospitalization. The most frequent sites were heels (46%) and sacrum (26%). Stage 1 pressure ulcers showed 33% of the total. The total prevalence was 16.6%, 95% CI (14.9-18.6), the hospital acquired pressure sores prevalence was 7.5%, all stages included. A Braden score less than or equal to 15 was found in 29.1% of hospitalized patients. Standard mattresses were used in 37% of patients with pressure sores. Multivariate analysis showed that age and a Braden score less than or equal to 15 were significantly associated with pressure sores. Pressure sores are still an important problem in hospital; occurrence must be considered as an iatrogenic event and management requires a multidisciplinary approach.

  20. Sacral pressure sore reconstruction – the pedicled superior gluteal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pressure sore reconstruction has always been challenging. Immobile patients are prone to develop pressure sores from unre- lieved pressure on tissue over the sacral area, with shear, friction, moisture and malnutrition as contributing factors. Up to one-third of immobilised patients in long-term care facilities will develop.

  1. Pressure sores following elective total hip arthroplasty: pitfalls of misinterpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keong, Nicole; Ricketts, David; Alakeson, Nuki; Rust, Philippa

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of reporting protocols regarding pressure sores. METHODS: Retrospective data were collected regarding pressure sore rates following total hip arthroplasty operations carried out during 2001 at two orthopaedic units in an NHS hospital (Princess Royal Hospital) and in a local private hospital. RESULTS: Preliminary results presented in audit and interim reports indicated an alarmingly high pressure sore rate across the two sites (17/172 [9.9%] NHS, 23/71 [32.4%] private hospital). On analysis, the data collection system was revealed to be flawed. Grade 1 areas (erythema with no ulceration) were included, leading to a dramatic discrepancy between reported and confirmed pressure sores. Re-analysis showed the confirmed pressure sore rates to be much lower (2.3% NHS, 1.0% private hospital). CONCLUSIONS: This audit suggests that both poor data collection and education lead to inaccurate audit. This may lead to subsequent inappropriate management and inappropriate NHS star ratings. PMID:15140301

  2. Speech Intelligibility in Noise Using Throat and Acoustic Microphones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Acker-Mills, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    ... speech intelligibility. Speech intelligibility for signals generated by an acoustic microphone, a throat microphone, and the two microphones together was assessed using the Modified Rhyme Test (MRT...

  3. [Surgical coverage technics of pressure sores and their outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilkay, Ufuk; Helvaci, Evren; Tokat, Cenk; Ozek, Cüneyt; Akin, Yalçin

    2006-04-01

    We reviewed the outcome of 66 patients with 100 pressure sores between 1984 and 2002. In the current study, 100 pressure sores in 66 patients (45 male, 21 female; mean age 39.4; range 13 to 80 years) who underwent surgical repair of pressure sores reconstructed using myocutaneous or fasciocutaneous flaps, skin grafts, excision and closure. The risk factors for pressure sores included acute trauma-induced spinal cord injury in 40 (61%) patients with paraplegia and in 5 (7%) patients with quadriplegia; congenital spina bifida and multiple sclerosis in 7 (11%) patients and prolonged immobilization in 14 (21 patients) patients. We achieved an overall pressure sore recurrence rate of 22% and overall patient recurrence of 24% in a-3-year follow-up. The recurrence rates according to anatomic sites; 23% (10 of 43) for the ischial pressure sore, sacral 21% (8 of 37), and trochanteric 20% (4 of 20). Fasciocutaneous and myocutaneous flap reconstructions were the most durable, as they were associated with 17% (6 of 34) and 12% recurrence rates (5 of 39). To reduce the recurrence rates the authors advocate the use of myocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps instead of skin grafts or direct closure for the coverage of pressure sores.

  4. Prevention of pressure sores by identifying patients at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, K E; Jensen, O; Kvorning, S A; Bach, E

    1982-01-01

    The risk of pressure sores developing in patients admitted with acute conditions was assessed by a simple risk score system based on age, reduced mobility, incontinence, pronounced emaciation, redness over bony prominences, unconsciousness, dehydration, and paralysis in a prospective clinical study. During seven months in 1977, 600 of 3571 patients were classified as at risk. Of these 35 (5.8%) developed sores compared with five (0.2%) of those not at risk. The results of this study compared with those over the same period in 1976 show that close observation of at-risk patients and early detection of pressure sores prevents their development. PMID:6803980

  5. Prevention of pressure sores by identifying patients at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Jensen, O; Kvorning, S A

    1982-01-01

    The risk of pressure sores developing in patients admitted with acute conditions was assessed by a simple risk score system based on age, reduced mobility, incontinence, pronounced emaciation, redness over bony prominences, unconsciousness, dehydration, and paralysis in a prospective clinical stu...... of pressure sores prevents their development.......The risk of pressure sores developing in patients admitted with acute conditions was assessed by a simple risk score system based on age, reduced mobility, incontinence, pronounced emaciation, redness over bony prominences, unconsciousness, dehydration, and paralysis in a prospective clinical study...

  6. Prospects of inflation with perturbed throat geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Amna; Chingangbam, R.; Panda, Sudhakar; Sami, M.

    2009-01-01

    We study brane inflation in a warped deformed conifold background that includes general possible corrections to the throat geometry sourced by coupling to the bulk of a compact Calabi-Yau space. We focus specifically, on the perturbation by chiral operator of dimension 3/2 in the CFT. We find that the effective potential in this case can give rise to required number of e-foldings and the spectral index n S consistent with observation. The tensor to scalar ratio of perturbations is generally very low in this scenario. The COBE normalization, however, poses certain difficulties which can be circumvented provided model parameters are properly fine tuned. We find the numerical values of parameters which can give rise to enough inflation, observationally consistent values of density perturbations, scalar to tensor ratio of perturbations and the spectral index n S .

  7. Experimental and raytrace results for throat-to-throat compound parabolic concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviton, D. B.; Leitch, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Compound parabolic concentrators are nonimaging cone-shaped optics with useful angular transmission characteristics. Two cones used throat-to-throat accept radiant flux within one well-defined acceptance angle and redistribute it into another. If the entrance cone is fed with Lambertian flux, the exit cone produces a beam whose half-angle is the exit cone's acceptance angle and whose cross section shows uniform irradiance from near the exit mouth to infinity. (The pair is a beam angle transformer). The design of one pair of cones is discussed, also an experiment to map the irradiance of the emergent beam, and a raytracing program which models the cones fed by Lambertian flux. Experimental results compare favorably with raytrace results.

  8. Mouth Sores Caused by Cancer Treatment: How to Cope

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading to sores and infections. Both chemotherapy and radiation can impair your body's germ-fighting system (immune system). With an impaired immune system, viruses, bacteria and fungi can more easily infect your mouth, ...

  9. Spotlight on Psoriasis: Preventing Patches of Itchy, Sore Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe August 2016 Print this issue Spotlight on Psoriasis Preventing Patches of Itchy, Sore Skin En español ... Sun Damage Sun and Skin Wise Choices Avoid Psoriasis Triggers Factors that may trigger psoriasis or make ...

  10. Effect of pump limiter throat on pumping efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghendrih, P.; Grosman, A.; Samain, A.; Capes, H.; Morera, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The necessary control of plasma edge density has led to the development of pump limiters to achieve this task. On Tore Supra, where a large part of the program is devoted to plasma edge studies, two types of such density control apparatus have been implemented, a set of pump limiters and the pumps associated to the ergodic divertor (magnetically assisted pump limiters). Generally two different kinds of pump limiters can be used, those with a throat which drives the plasma from the open edge plasma (SOL) to the neutralizer plate, and those without or with a very short throat. We are interested here in this aspect of the pump limiter concept, i.e. on the throat effect on neutral density build-up in the vicinity of the pumping plates (and hence on pumping efficieny). The underlying idea of this throat effect can be readily understood; indeed while the neutral capture in pump limiters without throats is only a ballistic effect, on expects the plasma to improve the efficiency of pump-limiters via plasma-neutral-sidewall interactions in the throat. This problem has been studied both numerically and analytically. The paper is divided as follows. In section 2, we describe the basic features of pump-limiters which are modelized by the numerical code Cezanne. Section 3 is devoted to the throat length effect considering in particular the neutral density profile in the throat and the neutral density buil-up as a function of the throat lenght. In section 4, we show that the plugging effect occurs for reasonnable values of throat lengths. An analytical value of the plugging length is discussed and compared to the values obtained numerically

  11. [Treatment of pubic osteomyelitis secondary to pressure sores].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Anne-Sophie; Téot, Luc; Lamy, Brigitte; Masson, Raphaël; Morquin, David; Reynes, Jacques; Le Moing, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding the diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for pubic osteomyelitis secondary to pelvic pressure sores. Diagnosis is often difficult and bone biopsies with microbiological and anatomical-pathological examination remain the gold standard. The rate of cicatrisation of pressure sores is low. Cleansing and negative pressure treatment are key elements of the treatment. Optimising the care management with medical-surgical collaboration is being studied in the Ostear protocol.

  12. Aetiology of pressure sores in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan, C; Silver, J R

    1984-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients admitted to the National Spinal Injuries Centre, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, with pressure sores were studied to assess the relative importance of factors known to predispose to the development of scores. Loss of feeling was critical, because patients were unable to appreciate pain when the sore was developing. Risk of developing a sore increased with age, but duration of the paralysis was of equal importance. After discharge from hospital the presence of a caring relative or friend was essential for survival. Many patients developed sores because of poor facilities at home or inappropriate advice from those who looked after them. An even more distressing factor was the number of patients who developed sores in hospital owing to inadequate nursing care. There are relatively few paralysed patients in the community, but the lessons learnt in this study may be applied to all patients with orthopaedic injuries and to geriatric patients with limited mobility. Nursing and medical staff must turn patients regularly and ensure that there is proper equipment to relieve pressure on the skin. Patients should not be allowed to sit in a chair if they develop a sacral or trochanteric sore. More effort should be directed towards the appropriate education of patients, their relatives, and all those who are concerned with their welfare. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 PMID:6439284

  13. [Pressure sores in geriatric medicine: the role of nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Juliette; Raynaud-Simon, Agathe

    2008-01-01

    Malnutrition is frequent in geriatric patients: it affects 30 to 60% of elderly residents of institutions and 30 to 70% of patients admitted for short-term hospitalization. Malnutrition is a risk factor for developing pressure sores, and patients with them are more often and more severely malnourished than patients without them. In elderly subjects, multiple and interlinked factors may trigger or aggravate malnutrition; they may be physical, psychological or social and may be worsened by drugs and some diets. Malnutrition has been recognized as a risk factor for the onset and perpetuation of pressure sores. Of the dietary factors, protein intake seems most important. A low body mass index (BMI), low serum albumin, and weight loss are associated with an increased risk of pressure sores. A physician observing pressure sores must conduct a nutritional assessment, using clinical and laboratory screening tools. The criteria for malnutrition in elderly subjects are weight loss > or =5% in 3 months or > or =10% in 6 months, BMIpressure sores in geriatric medicine. It must be adapted for each patient. The recommended calorie intake in malnourished patients at risk of or with pressure sores is 30-40 kcal/kg/d, with 1.2-1.5 g of proteins/kg/d.

  14. Muscular soreness following prolonged intermittent high-intensity shuttle running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D; Nicholas, C W; Williams, C

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of prolonged intermittent high-intensity shuttle running on soreness and markers of muscle damage. Sixteen males took part in the study, half of whom were assigned to a running group and half to a resting control group. The exercise protocol involved 90 min of intermittent shuttle running and walking (Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test: LIST), reflecting the activity pattern found in multiple-sprint sports such as soccer. Immediately after exercise, there was a significant increase (P < 0.05) in serum activities of creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase, and values remained above baseline for 48 h (P < 0.05). Median peak activities of creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase occurred 24 h post-exercise and were 774 and 43 U x l(-1), respectively. The intensity of general muscle soreness, and in the specific muscles investigated, was greater than baseline for 72 h after the shuttle test (P < 0.05), peaking 24-48 h post-exercise (P < 0.05). Muscle soreness was not correlated with either creatine kinase or aspartate aminotransferase activity. Soreness was most frequently reported in the hamstrings. Neither soreness nor serum enzyme activity changed in the controls over the 4 day observation period. It appears that unaccustomed performance of prolonged intermittent shuttle running produces a significant increase in both soreness and markers of muscle damage.

  15. Exploring M33 Through RR Lyrae Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Pritzl, Barton J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent surveys have detected RR Lyrae stars in M33, the Triangulum Galaxy. These variable stars are excellent tracers of ancient stellar populations. The RR Lyrae stars have been used to estimate metallicities at various locations within M33, as well as determining the distance to the galaxy. A summary of the M33 RR Lyrae stars is presented here as well as an analysis on what their properties imply for the unique M33 galaxy

  16. Hypocycloidal throat for 2 + 1-dimensional thin-shell wormholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazharimousavi, S.H.; Halilsoy, M. [Eastern Mediterranean University, Department of Physics, Gazimagusa (Turkey)

    2015-11-15

    Recently we have shown that for 2 + 1-dimensional thin-shell wormholes a non-circular throat may lead to a physical wormhole in the sense that the energy conditions are satisfied. By the same token, herein we consider an angular dependent throat geometry embedded in a 2 + 1-dimensional flat spacetime in polar coordinates. It is shown that, remarkably, a generic, natural example of the throat geometry is provided by a hypocycloid. That is, two flat 2 + 1 dimensions are glued together along a hypocycloid. The energy required in each hypocycloid increases with the frequency of the roller circle inside the large one. (orig.)

  17. Dual throat engine design for a SSTO launch vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrien, C. J.; Salmon, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    A propulsion system analysis of a dual fuel, dual throat engine for launch vehicle application was conducted. Basic dual throat engine characterization data are presented to allow vehicle optimization studies to be conducted. A preliminary baseline engine system was defined. Dual throat engine performance, envelope, and weight parametric data were generated over the parametric range of thrust from 890 to 8896 KN (200K to 2M lb-force), chamber pressure from 6.89 million to 34.5 million N/sq m (1000 to 5000 psia) thrust ratio from 1.2 to 5, and a range of mixture ratios for the two tripropellant combinations: LO2/RP-1 + LH2 and LO2/LCH4 + LH2. The results of the study indicate that the dual fuel dual throat engine is a viable single stage to orbit candidate.

  18. Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Pediatric Obesity ... self-esteem, and isolation from their peers. Pediatric obesity and otolaryngic problems Otolaryngologists, or ear, nose, and ...

  19. Actualities of Management of Aural, Nasal, and Throat Foreign Bodies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and served as a motivation to conduct this retrospective analysis on the ages at presentation, modes of presentation, and management options available for the removal of Fbs ..... event that the foreign body in the throat is nonobstructing.

  20. Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Pediatric ... of self-esteem, and isolation from their peers. Pediatric obesity and otolaryngic problems Otolaryngologists, or ear, nose, ...

  1. Response to nestling throat ligatures by three songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, G.L.; Conway, C.J.; Kirkpatrick, C.; Laroche, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    We attempted to collect diet samples using throat ligatures from nestlings of three songbird species in a riparian woodland in southeastern Arizona from May to August 2009. We had success with Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia), observed adult Yellow-breasted Chats (Icteria virens) reclaim food from nestlings, and discontinued the use of throat ligatures when we observed an adult Abert's Towhee (Pipilo aberti) remove two, 34-day-old ligatured nestlings from its nest. Previous studies have reported problems (e.g., aggression toward nestlings by adults) with throat ligatures, but we are the first to document removal (and subsequent nestling mortality) in response to this technique. We urge investigators to exercise caution when using throat ligatures on species for which evidence of the safety and efficacy of this method are lacking, especially when nestlings are small in size relative to adults. ?? 2010 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  2. Treatment of ischial pressure sores with double adipofascial turnover flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haodong; Hou, Chunlin; Xu, Zhen; Chen, Aiming

    2010-01-01

    Despite a variety of flap reconstruction options, the ischium remains the most difficult pressure sore site to treat. This article describes the authors' successful surgical procedure for coverage of ischial ulcers using double adipofascial turnover flaps.After debridement, the adipofascial flaps are harvested both cephalad and caudal to the defect. The flaps are then turned over to cover the exposed bone in a manner so as to overlap the 2 flaps. The skin is then closed with sutures in 2 layers. A total of 15 patients with ischial sores were treated using this surgical procedure.The follow-up period ranged from 11 to 159 months, with a mean of 93.6 months. Overall, 86.7% of the flaps (13 of 15) healed primarily. One patient had a recurrent grade II ischial pressure sore again 11 months after the operation. The other 14 patients did not have a recurrence.Treatment of ischial pressure sores with adipofascial turnover flaps provides an easy, minimally invasive procedure, with preservation of future flap options, and a soft-tissue supply sufficient for covering the bony prominence and filling dead space. This technique is a reliable and safe reconstructive modality for the management of minor ischial pressure sores.

  3. Generating Small Numbers by Tunneling in Multi-Throat Compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverstein, Eva M

    2001-07-25

    A generic F-theory compactification containing many D3 branes develops multiple brane throats. The interaction of observers residing inside different throats involves tunneling suppression and, as a result, is very weak. This suggests a new mechanism for generating small numbers in Nature. One application is to the hierarchy problem: large supersymmetry breaking near the unification scale inside a shallow throat causes TeV-scale SUSY-breaking inside the standard-model throat. Another application, inspired by nuclear-decay, is in designing naturally long-lived particles: a cold dark matter particle residing near the standard model brane decays to an approximate CFT-state of a longer throat within a Hubble time. This suggests that most of the mass of the universe today could consist of CFT-matter and may soften structure formation at sub-galactic scales. The tunneling calculation demonstrates that the coupling between two throats is dominated by higher dimensional modes and consequently is much larger than a naive application of holography might suggest.

  4. Pressure sores--a multifaceted approach to prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staas, W. E.; Cioschi, H. M.

    1991-01-01

    The incidence and effect of pressure sores on the disabled and elderly population have created a challenge to physicians and health care professionals, from emergency departments to rehabilitation units, and in the community. If not prevented, the morbidity and mortality of patients and the direct and indirect costs to both patients and the health care system are radically increased. In this article we define the impact on our health care system of pressure sores, provide an overview of a multifaceted approach to their prevention and management, and introduce successful behavioral and educational approaches for patients with chronic, recurrent sores. A coordinated approach with patients as informed participants and their care givers enhances the chances for success. PMID:1830985

  5. Medial circumflex femoral artery flap for ischial pressure sore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanivelu S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new axial pattern flap based on the terminal branches of the medial circumflex femoral artery is described for coverage of ischial pressure sore. Based on the terminal branches of the transverse branch of medial circumflex femoral artery, which exit through the gap between the quadratus femoris muscle above and the upper border of adductor magnus muscle below, this fascio cutaneous flap is much smaller than the posterior thigh flap but extremely useful to cover ischeal pressure sores. The skin redundancy below the gluteal fold allows a primary closure of the donor defect. It can also be used in combination with biceps femoris muscle flap.

  6. NESDIS Blended Rain Rate (RR) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The blended Rain Rate (RR) product is derived from multiple sensors/satellites. The blended products were merged from polar-orbiting and geostationary satellite...

  7. RR Lyrae Stars in M4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Moskalik, Pawel; Drury, Jason A.

    2017-10-01

    Observations by Kepler/K2 have revolutionized the study of RR Lyrae stars by allowing the detection of new phenomna, such as low amplitude additional modes and period doubling, which had not previously been seen from the ground. During campaign 2, K2 observed the globular cluster M4, providiing the first opportunity to study a sizeable group of RR Lyrae stars that belong to a single population; the other RR Lyrae stars that have been observed from space are field stars in the galactic halo and thus belong to an assortment of populations. In this poster we present the results of our study of the RR Lyrae variables in M4 from K2 photometry. We have identified additional, low amplitude pulsation modes in both observed RRc stars. In 3 RRab stars we have found the Blazhko effect with periods of 16.6d, 22.4d, and 44.5d.

  8. RR Lyrae Stars in M4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuehn Charles A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations by Kepler/K2 have revolutionized the study of RR Lyrae stars by allowing the detection of new phenomna, such as low amplitude additional modes and period doubling, which had not previously been seen from the ground. During campaign 2, K2 observed the globular cluster M4, providiing the first opportunity to study a sizeable group of RR Lyrae stars that belong to a single population; the other RR Lyrae stars that have been observed from space are field stars in the galactic halo and thus belong to an assortment of populations. In this poster we present the results of our study of the RR Lyrae variables in M4 from K2 photometry. We have identified additional, low amplitude pulsation modes in both observed RRc stars. In 3 RRab stars we have found the Blazhko effect with periods of 16.6d, 22.4d, and 44.5d.

  9. [An assessment scale for the prevention of pressure sores in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Corinne; Poirier, Marie-Renée; Sourisseau, Petronela Rachieru; Béduneau, Denis; Soulard, Anthony; Delacroix, Delphine

    2015-04-01

    Pressure sores in children are rare. However, when they do occur they can have significant consequences. Professionals in paediatric units realised the importance of assessing the risk of pressure sores and developed a pressure sore assessment scale specific to children. This project, carried out through a hospital-training school partnership, emphasises the importance of clinical reasoning in nursing practices.

  10. [Support devices for the prevention and treatment of pressure sores].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrouin-Verbe, Brigite

    2014-12-01

    There is a strategy to be followed in the treatment of patients with specific pathologies placing them at high risk of pressure sores. In some cases, sophisticated support devices are used.These techniques must be combined with basic good practices.

  11. Reconstruction of pressure sores with perforator-based propeller flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubietz, Rafael G; Jakubietz, Danni F; Zahn, Robert; Schmidt, Karsten; Meffert, Rainer H; Jakubietz, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    Perforator flaps have been successfully used for reconstruction of pressure sores. Although V-Y advancement flaps approximate debrided wound edges, perforator-based propeller flaps allow rotation of healthy tissue into the defect. Perforator-based propeller flaps were planned in 13 patients. Seven pressure sores were over the sacrum, five over the ischial tuberosity, and one on the tip of the scapula. Three patients were paraplegic, six were bedridden, and five were ambulatory. In three patients, no perforators were found. In 10 patients, propeller flaps were transferred. In two patients, total flap necrosis occurred, which was reconstructed with local advancement flaps. In two cases, a wound dehiscence occurred and had to be revised. One hematoma required evacuation. No further complications were noted. No recurrence at the flap site occurred. Local perforator flaps allow closure of pressure sores without harvesting muscle. The propeller version has the added benefit of transferring tissue from a distant site, avoiding reapproximation of original wound edges. Twisting of the pedicle may cause torsion and venous obstruction. This can be avoided by dissecting a pedicle of at least 3 cm. Propeller flaps are a safe option for soft tissue reconstruction of pressure sores. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  12. [Surgical issues and outcomes in ischial pressure sores treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulliaume, D; Grecea, M; Viard, R; Brun, A; Comparin, J-P; Foyatier, J-L

    2011-12-01

    Ischiatic pressure sores are frequent in spinal cord injury patients, associated with bad prognosis and high recurrence rate. Many surgical techniques were described, including surgical debridement followed by pedicled flap coverage. We aim to propose a practical decision tree for primary or secondary ischial pressure sore treatment. Our series of 48 operated ischial sores with an average follow up of 4 years (range 2 to 8years) is analyzed and compared to previously published reports. Surgical techniques are discussed according to their specific indications. The optimal recurrence rate in published reports about pressure sore treatment is 20%; a rate inferior to 19% is found in our series, showing the equal importance of flap selection and postoperative care and education. Depending on each situation, various available flaps are described and compared: gluteus maximus flap, biceps femoris flap, gracilis flap, tensor fascia lata flap, fasciocutaneous thigh flaps, rectus femoris and vastus lateralis flap, rectus abdominis flap. Specific surgical indications for more extensive wounds are studied: resection arthroplasty of the hip, hip disarticulation, fillet flaps from the leg, microsurgery. Based upon our experience, a decision tree summarizes our proposition of flap selection, depending on the wound size and the patient background. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Medicinal Plants for Healing Sores and Wounds among the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicinal Plants for Healing Sores and Wounds among the Communities Surrounding Ungoye Forest, Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa. ... The focus was on the medicinal plants that grow in the Ungoye forest and around the homesteads. The survey ... Keywords: Traditional medicine, documentation, Ethno-survey, wounds.

  14. Pressure sores in spinal cord injury: Active intervention saves costs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-07-22

    Jul 22, 2008 ... interrogated for all cervical spine injuries. Patients were identified retrospectively for the period April 2003 to May 2006 and divided into 4 groups according to the level of intervention they received to prevent pressure sores. Group A. These were the first 100 patients with cervical injuries managed in the unit ...

  15. Multiple dark matter scenarios from ubiquitous stringy throats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chialva, D.; Dev, P.S.B.; Mazumdar, A.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of having multiple Kaluza-Klein dark matter candidates which arise naturally in generic type-IIB string theory compactification scenarios. These dark matter candidates reside in various throats of the Calabi-Yau manifold. In principle, they can come with a varied range......, we find that the mass scales allowed for the Kaluza-Klein dark matter particles in various throats can vary between 0.1 eV and 10 TeV, depending upon the throat geometry. Thus, there could be simultaneously more than one kind of cold (and possibly warm and hot) dark matter components residing...... in the Universe. This multiple dark matter scenario could weaken the bound on a conventional supersymmetric dark matter candidate and could also account for extra relativistic degrees of freedom in our Universe....

  16. Antimicrobial activity of moringa on ear, nose and throat associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed at evaluating the antimicrobial activity of Moringa on ear, nose and throat associated fungi and vancomycin resistant cocci. The plant material was extracted with methanol and petroleum ethe and screened for phytochemical contents. The microbial isolates were obtained from females and males ...

  17. Nose and throat complications associated with passive smoking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess associations between nose-throat (NT) diseases and passive smoking prevalence among school children. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out on a randomized multistage sample of 381 school children (50.9% males, aged 9.8 ± 3.5 years) from Kinshasa town. Parents and children were ...

  18. Economic Evaluation pf Antibacterial Usage in Ear, Nose and Throat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To carry out economic evaluation of antibacterial usage for Ear, Nose and Throat infections in a tertiary health care facility in Nigeria. Methods: Antibacterial utilisation evaluation was carried out retrospectively over one year period by reviewing 122 case notes containing 182 prescriptions of patient with Ear Nose ...

  19. Long-throated flumes and broad-crested weirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Vital for water management are structures that can measure the flow in a wide variety of channels. Chapter 1 introduces the long-throated flume and the broad-crested weir; it explains why this family of structures can meet the boundary conditions and hydraulic demands of most measuring

  20. [Skin care and prevention of bed sores in bedridden patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Cuervo, Fernando; Soldevilla Agreda, J Javier; Verdú Soriano, José; Segovia Gómez, Teresa; García Fernández, Francisco Pedro; Pancorbo Hidalgo, Pedro Luís

    2007-12-01

    The aging process and environmental aggressions will leave their imprints on the state of a person's skin, possibly compromising some of its functions. Age is a risk factor for the development of bed sores, but not the only factor nor the most important one; therefore, we need to develop prevention programs directed to all patients who spend long periods of time sedentary or bedridden. Prevention programs for bed sores must be based on the best evidence available and include a risk evaluation on these factors: suffering a lesion due to pressure, specific skin treatment, incontinence control, excessive humidity posture changes and the use of special surfaces to manage pressure during an increase in mobility or activity by the patient, local pressure reducing devices as well as paying attention to special situations. All of these care measures have to be developed based on a continuity of treatment among the institutions and caretakers involved with treating each patient.

  1. [Effects of massage on delayed-onset muscle soreness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakowski, Paweł; Musielak, Bartosz; Sip, Paweł; Biegański, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is the pain or discomfort often felt 12 to 24 hours after exercising and subsides generally within 4 to 6 days. Once thought to be caused by lactic acid buildup, a more recent theory is that it is caused by inflammatory process or tiny tears in the muscle fibers caused by eccentric contraction, or unaccustomed training levels. Exercises that involve many eccentric contractions will result in the most severe DOMS. Fourteen healthy men with no history of upper arm injury and no experience in resistance training were recruited. The mean age, height, and mass of the subjects were 22.8 +/- 1.2 years, 178.3 +/- 10.3 cm, and 75.0 +/- 14.2 kg, respectively. Subjects performed 8 sets of concentric and eccentric actions of the elbow flexors with each arm according to Stay protocol. One arm received 10 minutes of massage 30 minutes after exercise, the contralateral arm received no treatment. Measurements were taken at 9 assessment times: pre-exercise and postexercise at 10 min, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Dependent variables were range of motion, perceived soreness and upper arm circumference. There was noticed difference in perceived soreness across time between groups. The analysis indicated that massage resulted in a 10% to 20% decrease in the severity of soreness, but the differences were not significant. Difference in range of motion and arm circumference was not observed. Massage administered 30 minutes after exercises could have a beneficial influence on DOMS but without influence on muscle swelling and range of motion.

  2. Pressure sores and blood and serum dysmetabolism in spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scivoletto, G; Fuoco, U; Morganti, B; Cosentino, E; Molinari, M

    2004-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients with pressure sores were studied before and after surgical intervention for ulcer healing and compared with matched SCI patients without sores and with patients with pressure sores and other diseases. To analyse the relationship between pressure sores and anaemia and serum protein alteration in SCI patients. To study the pathogenesis of these alterations and suggest appropriate therapy. Spinal cord unit in Rome, Italy. A total of 13 SCI patients with pressure sores, 13 comparable patients without pressure sores and four patients with other diseases and pressure sores. Haematochemical parameters. Patients with pressure sore showed significant decreased red cells, decreased haemoglobin and haematocrit, increased white cells and ferritin and decreased transferrin and transferrin saturation; total hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia with increased Alfa-1 and gamma globulins increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were also present. The alterations returned to normal after surgical intervention for pressure sore healing. Patients with pressure sores suffer from anaemia and serum protein alteration that fells within the range of metabolic alteration of chronic disorders and neoplastic diseases. The alterations depend on a decreased utilisation of iron stores in the reticuloendothelial system and on inhibition of the hepatic synthesis of albumin. With regard to treatment, iron treatment should be avoided because of the risk of haemochromatosis.

  3. Approach to the pressure sores in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre İnözü

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the follow-up results of nutritionally supported geriatric patientswho were admitted for their pressure sores then plannedtheir treatment.Materials and methods: In this study, we analyzed thehospitalized geriatric pressure sore patients in our clinicwho were admitted between 2006 and 2011. We calculatedBody Mass Index and the blood albumin levels of allhospitalized geriatric patients. In this patient group proteinenergy malnutrition and deficiency were analyzed andproper nutrition support was provided accordingly. Afterrecovering from malnutrition further treatment surpassed.Results: The mean albumin levels of the hospitalized patientswas 2,53 ± 0,25 g/dL after nutritional support thoselevels increased to mean 3,95 ± 0,42 g/dL . Of all thosepatients 75% were operated when their general conditionallowed us for a surgery. Due to their high risk wedid not perform any surgical operation to the remaining25%.. Post operative mean hospitalization period was 12(8-21 days. Majority of the patients (78.6% were treatedsuccessfully either with surgical or conservative treatmentmodalities.Conclusions: The success of the geriatric pressure soretreatment is highly related with the proper nutritional supportfor the ongoing malnutrition-like pathologies. Beforeoperation nutritional support not only makes a healthygranulation tissue but also yields fast and reliable woundhealing. Despite their chronic health problems many ofour geriatric patients were treated surgically for their pressuresores.Key words: Pressure sore, geriatric medicine, malnutrition,nutritional support

  4. First Kepler Results on RR Lyrae Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolenberg, K.; Szabó, R.; Kurtz, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first results of our analyses of selected RR Lyrae stars for which data have been obtained by the Kepler Mission. As expected, we find a significant fraction of the RRab stars to show the Blazhko effect, a still unexplained phenomenon that manifests itself as periodic amplitude and...

  5. QT/RR Coupling and Gender Differences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halámek, Josef; Jurák, Pavel; Lipoldová, J.; Leinveber, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 37, - (2010), s. 365-368 ISSN 0276-6574 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/08/1129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : THEW * QT/RR model * EXPDC Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering http://cinc.mit.edu/archives/2010/pdf/0365.pdf

  6. Radial velocities of RR Lyrae stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, S.L.; Barnes, T.G. III

    1985-01-01

    283 spectra of 57 RR Lyrae stars have been obtained using the 2.1-m telescope at McDonald Observatory. Radial velocities were determined using a software cross-correlation technique. New mean radial velocities were determined for 46 of the stars. 11 references

  7. Open-label taste-testing study to evaluate the acceptability of both strawberry-flavored and orange-flavored amylmetacresol/2,4-dichlorobenzyl alcohol throat lozenges in healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alex; Reader, Sandie; Field, Emma; Shephard, Adrian

    2013-06-01

    Acute sore throat (pharyngitis) is one of the most common illnesses for which children are seen by primary care physicians. Most cases are caused by viruses and are benign and self-limiting. Clinically proven, over-the-counter throat lozenges provide rapid and effective relief of acute sore throat symptoms, and are increasingly important in self-management of this condition. The purpose of this study (International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number: ISRCTN34958871) was to evaluate the acceptability of two licensed, commercially available sore throat lozenges containing amylmetacresol and 2,4-dichlorobenzyl (AMC/DCBA)--one strawberry flavored and the other orange flavored--in healthy children. This was an open-label, single-dose, crossover, taste-testing study in children recruited via a clinical database and advertisements over a 3.5-week period. Potentially eligible participants were invited to attend the taste-testing session at a clinic. At the screening session, which took place either before or on the day of taste testing, details of relevant medical history, medication, and demographics were recorded. Of the 108 screened subjects, 102 were recruited. These were healthy male and female children aged 6-12 years. Each child cleansed their palate with water and water biscuits before tasting a strawberry-flavored lozenge (Strepsils® strawberry sugar free, Reckitt Benckiser Healthcare Limited, Nottingham, UK; PL 00063/0395), which was sucked for 1 minute and then expelled. The orange-flavored lozenge (Strepsils® orange with vitamin C, Reckitt Benckiser Healthcare Limited, Nottingham, UK; PL 016242152) was tasted at least 15 minutes later following further cleansing of the palate. The spontaneous reaction of the child on tasting each lozenge was observed and recorded. Subjects were asked to indicate their liking for each lozenge, using a 7-point hedonic facial scale, and were required to answer a series of questions relating to what they liked and

  8. An audit of Ear, Nose and Throat diseases in a tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study showed that otitis media, obstructive adenoid, foreign bodies in the ear and throat infections were the common ear, nose, throat disorders seen in patients aged ≤15years whereas, hearing loss, rhinosinusitis and tumors were the common disorders of ear, nose and throat seen in patients aged 16 ...

  9. 21 CFR 874.3620 - Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material. 874.3620 Section 874.3620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., and throat synthetic polymer material. (a) Identification. Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer...

  10. Accidental Entry of Fish into Throat While Bathing in a Pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradipta Kumar Parida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While fish bones are common foreign bodies in the throat, a whole live fish in the pharynx is very rare. We report a case where a whole fish accidentally entered the throat of a 52-year-old male, where it became lodged causing throat pain and dysphagia. The fish was removed as an emergency procedure.

  11. Reduction of the incidence of pressure sores by an education program on nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisupan, Vijitr; Senaratana, Wilawan; Picheansatian, Wilawan; Chittreecheur, Jittaporn; Watanakool, Malinee; Chaisri, Pratin; Singhakumfu, Laddawan; Tribuddharat, Chanwit; Danchaivijitr, Somwang

    2005-12-01

    To determine whether an education and campaign program would reduce the incidence of pressure sores. The study was performed in a 1,400-bed teaching hospital in Thailand with a total number of 697patients from 47 wards for a point prevalence study; 1,201 and 1,268 patients from 12 wards to determine whether reduction of pressure sore occurrence would be obtained by an education program. The point prevalence of pressure sores was 10.8%. The significant risk factors were age older than 60 years, fecal incontinence, and history of diarrhea. The occurrence of pressure sores was significantly reduced after the educational program from 9.91% to 5. 76%. The education on patient care aiming at reduction of the occurrence of pressure sores could be adopted nation-wide in order to reduce the morbidity, mortality and expenses. The education program was effective in reducing the incidence of pressure sores.

  12. Risk factors for pressure sores in adult patients with myelomeningocele – a questionnaire-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaum, Pål-Erik; Riemer, Gunnar; Frøslie, Kathrine Frey

    2006-01-01

    Background Myelomeningocele (MMC) is a part of a complex neural tube defect and a disorder of the cerebrospinal fluid system. Pressure sores are a frequent complication for patients with MMC. Little is known about the risk factors for pressure sores in adults with MMC. The aim of this study was to investigate an association between the presence of pressure sores and other patient characteristics, in order to develop an improved strategy for the management of sores. Methods A structured questionnaire regarding sores, medical condition, function and living factors was designed and sent to the 193 patients with MMC registered in the year 2003 at TRS, a National Centre for Rare Disorders in Norway. Results Out of 193 total, 87 patients participated and 71 patients (82%) reported sores; 26 (30%) at the time of the interview and 45 (52%) during the last 5 years. Sores were mostly localized on toes and feet and occurred exclusively in regions with reduced or missing sensibility. A significant association was found between sores and memory deficit (p = 0.02), Arnold Chiari malformation (p = 0.02) and a record of previous sores (p = 0.004). Sores were not significantly associated with hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, nutrition, body mass index, smoking, physical activity, employment or living together with other persons. Some patients (18, 21%) reported skin inspection by others and the remainder relied on self-inspection. Conclusion Patients with sensory deficit, memory problems, and Arnold Chiari malformation had a higher risk of having pressure sores. This patient group needs improved skin inspection routines and sore treatment. PMID:17196099

  13. Risk factors for pressure sores in adult patients with myelomeningocele--a questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaum, Pål-Erik; Riemer, Gunnar; Frøslie, Kathrine Frey

    2006-12-29

    Myelomeningocele (MMC) is a part of a complex neural tube defect and a disorder of the cerebrospinal fluid system. Pressure sores are a frequent complication for patients with MMC. Little is known about the risk factors for pressure sores in adults with MMC. The aim of this study was to investigate an association between the presence of pressure sores and other patient characteristics, in order to develop an improved strategy for the management of sores. A structured questionnaire regarding sores, medical condition, function and living factors was designed and sent to the 193 patients with MMC registered in the year 2003 at TRS, a National Centre for Rare Disorders in Norway. Out of 193 total, 87 patients participated and 71 patients (82%) reported sores; 26 (30%) at the time of the interview and 45 (52%) during the last 5 years. Sores were mostly localized on toes and feet and occurred exclusively in regions with reduced or missing sensibility. A significant association was found between sores and memory deficit (p = 0.02), Arnold Chiari malformation (p = 0.02) and a record of previous sores (p = 0.004). Sores were not significantly associated with hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, nutrition, body mass index, smoking, physical activity, employment or living together with other persons. Some patients (18, 21%) reported skin inspection by others and the remainder relied on self-inspection. Patients with sensory deficit, memory problems, and Arnold Chiari malformation had a higher risk of having pressure sores. This patient group needs improved skin inspection routines and sore treatment.

  14. Risk factors for pressure sores in adult patients with myelomeningocele – a questionnaire-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frøslie Kathrine

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myelomeningocele (MMC is a part of a complex neural tube defect and a disorder of the cerebrospinal fluid system. Pressure sores are a frequent complication for patients with MMC. Little is known about the risk factors for pressure sores in adults with MMC. The aim of this study was to investigate an association between the presence of pressure sores and other patient characteristics, in order to develop an improved strategy for the management of sores. Methods A structured questionnaire regarding sores, medical condition, function and living factors was designed and sent to the 193 patients with MMC registered in the year 2003 at TRS, a National Centre for Rare Disorders in Norway. Results Out of 193 total, 87 patients participated and 71 patients (82% reported sores; 26 (30% at the time of the interview and 45 (52% during the last 5 years. Sores were mostly localized on toes and feet and occurred exclusively in regions with reduced or missing sensibility. A significant association was found between sores and memory deficit (p = 0.02, Arnold Chiari malformation (p = 0.02 and a record of previous sores (p = 0.004. Sores were not significantly associated with hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, nutrition, body mass index, smoking, physical activity, employment or living together with other persons. Some patients (18, 21% reported skin inspection by others and the remainder relied on self-inspection. Conclusion Patients with sensory deficit, memory problems, and Arnold Chiari malformation had a higher risk of having pressure sores. This patient group needs improved skin inspection routines and sore treatment.

  15. [Program for lowering the incidence of pressure sores in neurosurgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chau-Hui; Chen, Hui-Ling; Chen, Hsiang-Chi

    2007-12-01

    Pressure sores are one of the well known problems that occur in hospitals. As the literature on the subject indicates, a lot of money is expended in managing this problem every year, and 12-66% of pressure sores are caused during surgery. Patients who undergo neurosurgical procedures are susceptible to pressure sores because of lengthy operations. We collected data on patients with pressure sores who underwent surgery between May 2004 and August 2004, and found that the incidence of pressure sore in neurosurgical patients was 9.5%, which was the highest among all surgical patients. This project was developed to solve the problem of pressure sores by setting up standard preventive procedures, a nursing follow up system and continuing education courses, and utilizing cotton rolls to pad sites of pressure sores. The incidence of pressure sore in neurosurgical patients was reduced from 9.5% to 7% after the improvement project was carried out. The more concerned nurses are about pressure sores, the better the quality of operative nursing care.

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy for throat cancer detection using human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pavan; Singh, Ashutosh; Zaffar, Mohammad; Pradhan, Asima

    2018-02-01

    Throat precancer detection using fluorescence from human saliva is reported here. It may be noted that accessing the throat for investigation is cumbersome and use of saliva as a diagnostic medium may ease the process. The study has been conducted on three groups of patients: oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), dysplasia, and normal (control). An in-house developed compact set-up has been used for fluorescence measurements. The compact system consist of a 375 nm laser diode, collimating lens, long pass filter, fibers, and cuvette holder. Major and minor bands of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and porphyrin are observed in the spectra. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis has been used to evaluate the diagnostic performance. Area under the spectra has been chosen for discrimination among the groups and is able to differentiate OSCC to normal, dysplasia to normal, and OSCC to dysplasia with sensitivities 100% (48/48), 92% (32/35), 77% (37/48), and specificities 96% (50/52), 96% (50/52), 89% (31/35) with the accuracy of 98%, 94% and 82% respectively. Sensitivity and specificity, when differentiating OSCC to normal and dysplasia to normal, are significantly large, which indicates that human saliva may be an excellent diagnostic medium for early detection of throat cancer.

  17. Cat in the Throat: Caroline Bergvall's plurilingual bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Camerlynck

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available How does Caroline Bergvall's plurilingual poetic practice reimagine language embodiment? What are the implications for cultural identity and linguistic belonging? For the gendered and sexualised body? 'Fighting off one language with another,' Bergvall displaces standard English and crosses national borders. Her work explores how this crossing, this fighting and resistance, is physically articulated. Though accessible to a monolingual English reader, the texts collected in Meddle English incorporate elements of French and Norwegian, and seek to distort and undermine standard English. The Deleuze-Guattarian concepts of minorization and deterritorialization are explored and adapted to a feminist understanding of poetic practice. 'Cat in the Throat' is a literal translation of the French expression un chat dans la gorge - the equivalent in English being 'a frog in the throat.' In French chatte (female cat is equivalent to the colloquial English 'pussy.' The cat (in the throat is symbolic of Bergvall's cultural and sexual resistance to standard English. Her language incorporates these stuttering moments of untranslatablity, and is characterised by ellipsis, plurilingual puns, misspellings and linguistic contamination. This article will explore the ways in which these characteristics are used to assert a queer experience of language embodiment.

  18. Development of a cushion to prevent ischial pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, P; Davidson, L M

    1979-01-01

    A study was carried out jointly by nursing staff and technologists in an attempt to develop a cushion based on scientific principles and measurement that might prevent pressure sores. At each stage in the development clinical trials were carried out, and using the results of these together with the opinions of medical staff and patients who used the cushion the design was suitably modified. Over four years a seat was evolved that was simple to construct and fulfilled the clinical requirements for a wide range of patients while providing maximum relief of high-pressure points. The design was subsequently taken up commercially. Images Fig 3 PMID:509176

  19. An autopsy study of 74 cases of cut throat injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Rao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present prospective autopsy study was carried out during the period July 2009 to May 2012 in Kingston, Jamaica. A total of 74 cases of cut throat injury were studied. All the cut throat injuries irrespective of those directly or indirectly contributing to the death were studied. Males dominated the list of victims, contributing to 71.62% (n = 53. Majority of those were in the age group 21–30 (n = 25 and 31–40 (n = 26 which contributed to 33.78% and 35.13% respectively. Majority of the cases were homicides contributing to 97.29% (n = 72 of cases, only 2.7% were suicides and accidental cut throat were never reported. Males dominated the homicides category contributing to 72.22% (n = 52 of the cases. Gang and relationship crisis (homosexual and heterosexual were the major motivating factors, each contributing to 39.19% (n = 29 and 32.43% (n = 24 of the cases, respectively. The disease suffered by individuals were the least motivating factors contributing to 1.35% of cases (n = 01. The most common cause of death was exsanguinations in 49.95% (n = 34 of cases followed closely by asphyxia due to aspiration of blood i.e. 36.49% (n = 27 of cases and air embolism was the least cause of death, contributing to 4.05% (n = 03 of cases. Cut throat injury was associated with other injuries like gunshot wound, chop wounds and stab wounds in 13.52% of (n = 10 autopsies. Chop injuries contributed to maximum number of other injuries in homicides (n = 46. The most preferred place for the crime was an open field or farm (n = 26. Majority of the cut throat wounds were situated in zone II level contributing to 66.21% (n = 49 of cases. Majority of the wounds were directed from left to right in 75.68% (n = 56 of cases and the cervical vertebra was affected in 8.11% (n = 06 of cases. Major weapon of choice was machete contributing to 83.78% (n = 62 of injuries. The low income group was the most affected group contributing to 91

  20. Antioxidants for preventing and reducing muscle soreness after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchordas, Mayur K; Rogerson, David; Soltani, Hora; Costello, Joseph T

    2017-12-14

    Muscle soreness typically occurs after intense exercise, unaccustomed exercise or actions that involve eccentric contractions where the muscle lengthens while under tension. It peaks between 24 and 72 hours after the initial bout of exercise. Many people take antioxidant supplements or antioxidant-enriched foods before and after exercise in the belief that these will prevent or reduce muscle soreness after exercise. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of antioxidant supplements and antioxidant-enriched foods for preventing and reducing the severity and duration of delayed onset muscle soreness following exercise. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Embase, SPORTDiscus, trial registers, reference lists of articles and conference proceedings up to February 2017. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of all forms of antioxidant supplementation including specific antioxidant supplements (e.g. tablets, powders, concentrates) and antioxidant-enriched foods or diets on preventing or reducing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). We excluded studies where antioxidant supplementation was combined with another supplement. Two review authors independently screened search results, assessed risk of bias and extracted data from included trials using a pre-piloted form. Where appropriate, we pooled results of comparable trials, generally using the random-effects model. The outcomes selected for presentation in the 'Summary of findings' table were muscle soreness, collected at times up to 6 hours, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours post-exercise, subjective recovery and adverse effects. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE. Fifty randomised, placebo-controlled trials were included, 12 of which used a cross-over design. Of the 1089 participants, 961 (88.2%) were male and 128 (11.8%) were female. The age range for

  1. Nonlinear Convective Models of RR Lyrae Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuchtinger, M.; Dorfi, E. A.

    The nonlinear behavior of RR Lyrae pulsations is investigated using a state-of-the-art numerical technique solving the full time-dependent system of radiation hydrodynamics. Grey radiative transfer is included by a variable Eddington-factor method and we use the time-dependent turbulent convection model according to Kuhfuss (1986, A&A 160, 116) in the version of Wuchterl (1995, Comp. Phys. Comm. 89, 19). OPAL opacities extended by the Alexander molecule opacities at temperatures below 6000 K and an equation of state according to Wuchterl (1990, A&A 238, 83) close the system. The resulting nonlinear system is discretized on an adaptive mesh developed by Dorfi & Drury (1987, J. Comp. Phys. 69, 175), which is important to provide the necessary spatial resolution in critical regions like ionization zones and shock waves. Additionally, we employ a second order advection scheme, a time centered temporal discretizaton and an artificial tensor viscosity in order to treat discontinuities. We compute fundamental as well first overtone models of RR Lyrae stars for a grid of stellar parameters both with and without convective energy transport in order to give a detailed picture of the pulsation-convection interaction. In order to investigate the influence of the different features of the convection model calculations with and without overshooting, turbulent pressure and turbulent viscosity are performed and compared with each other. A standard Fourier decomposition is used to confront the resulting light and radial velocity variations with recent observations and we show that the well known RR Lyrae phase discrepancy problem (Simon 1985, ApJ 299, 723) can be resolved with these stellar pulsation computations.

  2. Decubitus grade IV (deep pressure sore) with intact skin in a patient with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, C.C.W.; Zeilstra, J.T.; van Voorst Vader, P.C.; Kardaun, S.H.; Leeman, F.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    Even with intact skin the possibility of pressure sores should not be dismissed. Early recognition of a pressure sore is important for adequate treatment and prevention of progression. Multidisciplinary intervention is essential. A wheelchair patient with spinal cord injury is described, who

  3. Evaluation of blood and serum markers in spinal cord injured patients with pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Gurcay, Ahmet G; Cakci, Aytul

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate blood and serum markers in traumatic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients, with and without pressure sores. This cross-sectional study was performed at the Ministry of Health Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit, and Numune Education and Research Hospitals, Ankara, Turkey, from 2006-2008. A total of 23 SCI patients with pressure sores (group I) and a control group of 25 SCI patients without pressure sores (group II) were evaluated. Characteristics of sores were examined with respect to duration, location, grade, tissue types, surface area, and exudate amount. Recorded laboratory parameters included erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Htc), lymphocytes, white blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), serum iron, transferrin, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), ferritin, total protein, albumin, vitamin B12, and zinc. The most common pressure sore location was the sacrum (38%). Compared to the control group, the patients with pressure sores showed anemia with reduced serum iron, transferrin, TIBC, and increased ferritin. They also had increased ESR, CRP, and WBC and reduced lymphocytes, total protein, albumin and zinc. Statistically significant correlations were found between CRP, Hb, Htc, lymphocytes, RBC, WBC, and serum protein levels, and grade of pressure sores. Clinicians should regularly screen patients with respect to blood and serum markers, in order to determine any risks for pressure sores, and they should perform immediate preventive measures based on the patient's condition.

  4. [A scale for the assessment of the risk of pressure sores in paediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Pressure sores are a frequent complication in paediatric intensive care. A multi-disciplinary nursing team has drawn up an assessment scale for the risk of pressure sores and has put in place guidelines for caring for children in intensive care. Prevention actions are thereby adapted to each young patient.

  5. Cost analysis of surgically treated pressure sores stage III and IV.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filius, A.; Damen, T.H.; Schuijer-Maaskant, K.P.; Polinder, S.; Hovius, S.E.R.; Walbeehm, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Health-care costs associated with pressure sores are significant and their financial burden is likely to increase even further. The aim of this study was to analyse the direct medical costs of hospital care for surgical treatment of pressure sores stage III and IV. We performed a retrospective chart

  6. What role can nurse leaders play in reducing the incidence of pressure sores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Pressure sores have plagued the nursing profession for many years as a major health care problem in terms of a patient's suffering and financial cost. Pressure sores are increasingly common in hospitalized patients in the United States with a 63% increase from 1993 to 2003. The nurse leader is accountable for the occurrence of pressure sores, a nurse-sensitive indicator, by a scorecard which is benchmarked against other facilities. The nurse leader must take a systematic approach in the prevention of pressure sores, with the strategy being consistent and motivating to the staff in order to improve patient outcome. The chief nursing officer, the unit manager, and the bedside nurse must all collaborate to prevent tissue injury in patients at risk for developing pressure sores and to promote wound healing in patients with existing breakdown.

  7. Cost analysis of surgically treated pressure sores stage III and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filius, A; Damen, T H C; Schuijer-Maaskant, K P; Polinder, S; Hovius, S E R; Walbeehm, E T

    2013-11-01

    Health-care costs associated with pressure sores are significant and their financial burden is likely to increase even further. The aim of this study was to analyse the direct medical costs of hospital care for surgical treatment of pressure sores stage III and IV. We performed a retrospective chart study of patients who were surgically treated for stage III and IV pressure sores between 2007 and 2010. Volumes of health-care use were obtained for all patients and direct medical costs were subsequently calculated. In addition, we evaluated the effect of location and number of pressure sores on total costs. A total of 52 cases were identified. Average direct medical costs in hospital were €20,957 for the surgical treatment of pressure sores stage III or IV; average direct medical costs for patients with one pressure sore on an extremity (group 1, n = 5) were €30,286, €10,113 for patients with one pressure sore on the trunk (group 2, n = 32) and €40,882 for patients with multiple pressure sores (group 3, n = 15). The additional costs for patients in group 1 and group 3 compared to group 2 were primarily due to longer hospitalisation. The average direct medical costs for surgical treatment of pressure sores stage III and IV were high. Large differences in costs were related to the location and number of pressure sores. Insight into the distribution of these costs allows identification of high-risk patients and enables the development of specific cost-reducing measures. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ear, nose, and throat disorders in a nigerian rural community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waheed Atilade Adegbiji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: This study aimed at assessing the prevalence of ear, nose, and throat with head and neck diseases in a rural community in Oyo State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective community-based study of ear, nose, and throat diseases. The study was carried out over a period of 3 months (January to March 2017. Verbal consent was obtained from the village head and participants. A total of 738 individuals were enrolled into the study. Interview-assisted questionnaire was administered to obtain bio data and otorhinolaryngological history from all participants, followed by examination and investigation. Data obtained were collated and statistically analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: A total of 738 consented participants had various forms of ear, nose, and throat disorders. They constituted 435 (58.9% males and 303 (41.1% females, with a male: female ratio of 1:1. Majority of enrollee were dependent age groups. These age groups were 27.4% (1–10, 25.5% (11–20, and 14.1% (51–60. The occupational status revealed that 28.9% were employed; 9.3% were retired; 45.5% were children/students/apprenticeship; and 16.3% were artisans, homemakers, and farmers. Nasal diseases (34.4% were the most common otorhinolaryngological, head and neck disorders while ear, nose, and throat with head and neck diseases were responsible for 43.4%, 14.6%, and 7.6%, respectively. The common diseases were wax impaction (11.7%, sinusitis (14.4%, and allergic rhinitis (22.6%. Less prevalent otorhinolaryngological, head and neck diseases were vertigo/balance disorder (0.9%, cervical spondylosis (1.6%, and pharyngitis/tonsillitis (2.0%. Common procedures performed included impacted earwax removal (22.8%, aural toilet/dressing (14.4%, pure tone audiometry (32.5%, tympanometry (18.4%, endoscopy (9.8%, and antral irrigation (5.7%. Referred cases of 7.2% were recorded. The barriers experienced by these villagers in seeking otorhinolaryngological

  9. Male tawny dragons use throat patterns to recognize rivals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Louise; Umbers, Kate D L; Backwell, Patricia R Y; Keogh, J Scott

    2012-10-01

    The ability to distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics is important for many animals, especially territorial species since it allows them to avoid unnecessary interactions with individuals that pose little threat. There are very few studies, however, that identify the proximate cues that facilitate such recognition in visual systems. Here, we show that in tawny dragons (Ctenophorus decresii), males can recognize familiar and unfamiliar conspecific males based on morphological features alone, without the aid of chemical or behavioural cues. We further show that it is the colour pattern of the throat patches (gular) that facilitates this recognition.

  10. Delayed onset muscle soreness : treatment strategies and performance factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Karoline; Hume, Patria; Maxwell, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a familiar experience for the elite or novice athlete. Symptoms can range from muscle tenderness to severe debilitating pain. The mechanisms, treatment strategies, and impact on athletic performance remain uncertain, despite the high incidence of DOMS. DOMS is most prevalent at the beginning of the sporting season when athletes are returning to training following a period of reduced activity. DOMS is also common when athletes are first introduced to certain types of activities regardless of the time of year. Eccentric activities induce micro-injury at a greater frequency and severity than other types of muscle actions. The intensity and duration of exercise are also important factors in DOMS onset. Up to six hypothesised theories have been proposed for the mechanism of DOMS, namely: lactic acid, muscle spasm, connective tissue damage, muscle damage, inflammation and the enzyme efflux theories. However, an integration of two or more theories is likely to explain muscle soreness. DOMS can affect athletic performance by causing a reduction in joint range of motion, shock attenuation and peak torque. Alterations in muscle sequencing and recruitment patterns may also occur, causing unaccustomed stress to be placed on muscle ligaments and tendons. These compensatory mechanisms may increase the risk of further injury if a premature return to sport is attempted.A number of treatment strategies have been introduced to help alleviate the severity of DOMS and to restore the maximal function of the muscles as rapidly as possible. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have demonstrated dosage-dependent effects that may also be influenced by the time of administration. Similarly, massage has shown varying results that may be attributed to the time of massage application and the type of massage technique used. Cryotherapy, stretching, homeopathy, ultrasound and electrical current modalities have demonstrated no effect on the alleviation of

  11. QT/RR hysteresis as a function of RR excitation – implications for risk

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halámek, Josef; Jurák, Pavel; Somers, V. K.; Nykodým, J.; Leinveber, P.; Fráňa, P.; Eisenberger, M.; Kára, T.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2005), s. 98 [World Congress on Heart Disease - New Trends in Research, Diagnosis and Treatment /12./. 16.07.2005-19.07.2005, Vancouver] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : ventricular repolarization * RR intervals Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Disease s incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  12. Ear nose throat manifestations in hypoidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callea, Michele; Teggi, Roberto; Yavuz, Izzet; Tadini, Gianluca; Priolo, Manuela; Crovella, Sergio; Clarich, Gabriella; Grasso, Domenico Leonardo

    2013-11-01

    The ectodermal dysplasias (EDs) are a large and complex group of inherited disorders. In various combinations, they all share anomalies in ectodermal derived structures: hair, teeth, nails and sweat gland function. Clinical overlap is present among EDs. Few causative genes have been identified, to date. Altered gene expression is not limited to the ectoderm but a concomitant effect on developing mesenchymal structures, with modification of ectodermal-mesenchymal signaling, takes place. The two major categories of ED include the hidrotic and hypohidrotic form, the latter more frequent; they differentiate each other for the presence or absence of sweat glands. We report Ear Nose Throat manifestations of ED, linked to the reduction of mucous glands in the nasal fossae with reduced ciliar function, and decrease salivary glands function. Often patients report an increased rate of infections of the upper respiratory tract and of the ear. Nasal obstruction due to the presence of nasal crusting, hearing loss and throat hoarseness are the most represented symptoms. Environmental measures, including a correct air temperature and humidification, is mandatory above all in subjects affected by hypohidrotic form. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation of air flow in open-throat wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Eastman N

    1930-01-01

    Tests were conducted on the 6-inch wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to form a part of a research on open-throat wind tunnels. The primary object of this part of the research was to study a type of air pulsation which has been encountered in open-throat tunnels, and to find the most satisfactory means of eliminating such pulsations. In order to do this it was necessary to study the effects of different variable on all of the important characteristics of the tunnel. This paper gives not only the results of the study of air pulsations and methods of eliminating them, but also the effects of changing the exit-cone diameter and flare and the effects of air leakage from the return passage. It was found that the air pulsations in the 6-inch wind tunnel could be practically eliminated by using a moderately large flare on the exit cone in conjunction with leakage introduced by cutting holes in the exit cone somewhat aft of its minimum diameter.

  14. 3 + 1-dimensional thin shell wormhole with deformed throat can be supported by normal matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazharimousavi, S.H.; Halilsoy, M. [Eastern Mediterranean University, Department of Physics, Gazimagusa (Turkey)

    2015-06-15

    From the physics standpoint the exotic matter problem is a major difficulty in thin shell wormholes (TSWs) with spherical/cylindrical throat topologies.We aim to circumvent this handicap by considering angle dependent throats in 3 + 1 dimensions. By considering the throat of the TSW to be deformed spherical, i.e., a function of θ and φ, we present general conditions which are to be satisfied by the shape of the throat in order to have the wormhole supported by matter with positive density in the static reference frame. We provide particular solutions/examples to the constraint conditions. (orig.)

  15. Passive Rocket Diffuser Theory: A Re-Examination of Minimum Second Throat Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Second-throat diffusers serve to isolate rocket engines from the effects of ambient back pressure during testing without using active control systems. Among the most critical design parameters is the relative area of the diffuser throat to that of the nozzle throat. A smaller second throat is generally desirable because it decreases the stagnation-to-ambient pressure ratio the diffuser requires for nominal operation. There is a limit, however. Below a certain size, the second throat can cause pressure buildup within the diffuser and prevent it from reaching the start condition that protects the nozzle from side-load damage. This paper presents a method for improved estimation of the minimum second throat area which enables diffuser start. The new 3-zone model uses traditional quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow theory to approximate the structure of two distinct diffuser flow fields observed in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and combines them to provide a less-conservative estimate of the second throat size limit. It is unique among second throat sizing methods in that it accounts for all major conical nozzle and second throat diffuser design parameters within its limits of application. The performance of the 3-zone method is compared to the historical normal shock and force balance methods, and verified against a large number of CFD simulations at specific heat ratios of 1.4 and 1.25. Validation is left as future work, and the model is currently intended to function only as a first-order design tool.

  16. [Plastic surgery treatment techniques for interdisciplinary therapy of pressure sores].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Karin; Becker, Frederic; Pfau, Matthias; Werdin, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Pressure sores in geriatric patients represent a challenge for all disciplines involved in the treatment process; however, the prerequisite for successful treatment is the elaboration of an interdisciplinary treatment concept. The treatment goals should be adapted to the individual needs of the patients including the life situation, general condition and local findings. In addition to general basic operative techniques, such as wound cleansing and conditioning, plastic and reconstructive surgery provides a wide range of highly specialized operative techniques for the treatment of these patients by which a definitive defect coverage can be achieved. The aim of this article is to raise awareness for these complex and highly specialized procedures for all disciplines participating in the treatment in order to improve the interdisciplinary cooperation and ultimately the quality of treatment.

  17. Parasacral Perforator Flaps for Reconstruction of Sacral Pressure Sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Ta; Chen, Shih-Yi; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Chang, Shun-Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Despite advances in reconstruction techniques, pressure sores continue to present a challenge to the plastic surgeon. The parasacral perforator flap is a reliable flap that preserves the entire contralateral side as a future donor site. On the ipsilateral side, the gluteal muscle itself is preserved and all flaps based on the inferior gluteal artery are still possible. We present our experience of using parasacral perforator flaps in reconstructing sacral defects. Between August 2004 and January 2013, 19 patients with sacral defects were included in this study. All the patients had undergone surgical reconstruction of sacral defects with a parasacral perforator flap. The patients' sex, age, cause of sacral defect, flap size, flap type, numbers of perforators used, rotation angle, postoperative complications, and hospital stay were recorded. There were 19 parasacral perforator flaps in this series. All flaps survived uneventfully except for 1 parasacral perforator flap, which failed because of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. The overall flap survival rate was 95% (18/19). The mean follow-up period was 17.3 months (range, 2-24 months). The average length of hospital stay was 20.7 days (range, 9-48 days). No flap surgery-related mortality was found. Also, there was no recurrence of sacral pressure sores or infected pilonidal cysts during the follow-up period. Perforator-based flaps have become popular in modern reconstructive surgery because of low donor-site morbidity and good preservation of muscle. Parasacral perforator flaps are durable and reliable in reconstructing sacral defects. We recommend the parasacral perforator flap as a good choice for reconstructing sacral defects.

  18. Pressure drop in ET-RR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Mina, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of pressure drop through a bundle comprising 16 rods and their lower arrangement grid as well as orifices similar to those of ET-RR-1 core have been done. Experiments are carried out under adiabatic turbulent flow conditions at about 35 degree C. Bundle Reynolds number range is 4 x 10 -2 x 10. Orifices of diameters 4.5, 3.25 or 2.5 cm. are mounted underneath the bundle. The bundle and lower grid pressure drop coefficients are 3.75 and 1.8 respectively. Orifices pressure drop coefficients are 2.65, 19.67 and 53.55 respectively. The ratio of bundle pressure drop to that of 4.5 cm. Orifice diameter is 1.415. The pressure drop coefficients are utilizer to calculate flow through bundles. The flow rate per bundle is 39.1, 20.4 or 13.1 m 3 /hr. Depending on orifice diameter

  19. Oxidative stress and acute-phase response in patients with pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Maria Bernarda Cavalcanti; Antonelli, Elida Juliana; da Cunha, Daniel Ferreira; Júnior, Alceu Afonso Jordão; Júnior, Virmondes Rodrigues; Vannucchi, Helio

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the relation between oxidative stress and the occurrence of the acute-phase response with serum ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol levels in patients with pressure sores. The following groups of patients were studied: 1) those who had patients with pressure sores, 2) those who had pneumonia, and 3) those who did not develop pressure sores or any type of infection (control). Concentrations of total proteins, albumin, creatinine, iron, ferritin, transferrin, C-reactive protein, alpha1-acid glycoprotein, total iron-binding capacity, ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, and malondialdehyde were measured during the first days of hospitalization. Albumin concentrations were significantly lower (P pressure sores compared with controls. Concentrations of ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol were significantly decreased (P pressure sores or infection, whereas malondialdehyde concentrations were significantly increased (P pressure sores and 10 of 12 patients (83.33%) with pneumonia presented serum ascorbic acid concentrations below the reference value (34 to 91 micromol/L). Concentrations of ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol versus malondialdehyde were significantly correlated in the three patient groups (r = -0.44, P pressure sores and acute infection present a systemic inflammatory response accompanied by an increase in lipid peroxidation that is associated with decreased serum ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol levels, suggesting that these patients may be at risk for important nutritional deficiencies.

  20. A comparative analysis of pressure sore treatment modalities in community settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Small

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The management of pressure sores in community settings, poses a clinical problem which challenges the patient’s tolerance and the clinician’s diligence and ingenuity. Pressure sores can be painful, lead to infection and are associated with considerable morbidity and increased mortality (Patterson & Bennett, 1995:919; Bale, Banks, Hagelstein & Harding, 1998:65. Treatment costs of these wounds are high in terms of resources (Colin 1995:65; Wood, Griffiths & Stoner, 1997:256. However, since there are untold cost in terms of pain and suffering to the patient, it is impossible to calculate the true cost of pressure sores (Dealey, 1994:87.

  1. [Primary investigation on fumigation and moxibustion in treatment ulcer and sore of yin syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chao-Jun; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Ma, Jing; Li, Pin-Chuan; Liu, Xian-Zhou; Yin, Yue; Tian, Ying

    2011-09-01

    To explore the fumigation and moxibustion therapy in treatment of ulcer and sore of yin syndrome. The fumigation and moxibustion therapy is the combination of fumigation and moxibustion, in which, smoking fumigation is provided with warming effect and the actions as moxibustion. This therapy works on the efficacy of both fumigation and moxibustion. In treatment, different herbal medicines can be selected flexibly, acting on dispersing yin and rescuing yang. The fumigation and moxibustion therapy can drain toxin and remove ulcer and sore. It contributes to the treatment of boils and chronic sores of yin syndrome and promotes wound healing.

  2. RR-Interval variance of electrocardiogram for atrial fibrillation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryani, N.; Solikhah, M.; Nugoho, A. S.; Afdala, A.; Anzihory, E.

    2016-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a serious heart problem originated from the upper chamber of the heart. The common indication of atrial fibrillation is irregularity of R peak-to-R-peak time interval, which is shortly called RR interval. The irregularity could be represented using variance or spread of RR interval. This article presents a system to detect atrial fibrillation using variances. Using clinical data of patients with atrial fibrillation attack, it is shown that the variance of electrocardiographic RR interval are higher during atrial fibrillation, compared to the normal one. Utilizing a simple detection technique and variances of RR intervals, we find a good performance of atrial fibrillation detection.

  3. Lightlike branes as natural candidates for wormhole throats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guendelman, E.I.; Kaganovich, A.; Pacheva, S.; Nissimov, E.

    2009-01-01

    We first briefly present a consistent world-volume Lagrangian description of lightlike p-branes (LL-branes) in two equivalent forms - a Polyakov-type and a dual to it Nambu-Goto-type formulations. The most important characteristic features of LL-brane dynamics are: (i) the brane tension appears as a non-trivial additional dynamical degree of freedom; (ii) consistency of LL-brane dynamics in a spherically or axially symmetric gravitational background of codimension one requires the presence of an event horizon which is automatically occupied by the LL-brane (''horizon straddling''). Next we consider a bulk Einstein-Maxwell system interacting self-consistently with a codimension one LL-brane. We find spherically symmetric traversable wormhole solutions of Misner-Wheeler type produced by the LL-brane sitting at the wormhole throat with wormhole parameters being functions of the dynamical LL-brane tension. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. The effects of spatial dynamics on a wormhole throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, Anuar; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies on dynamic wormholes were focused on the dynamics of the wormhole itself, be it either rotating or evolutionary in character and also in various frameworks from classical to braneworld cosmological models. In this work, we modeled a dynamic factor that represents the spatial dynamics in terms of spacetime expansion and contraction surrounding the wormhole itself. Using an RS2-based braneworld cosmological model, we modified the spacetime metric of Wong and subsequently employed the method of Bronnikov, where it is observed that a traversable wormhole is easier to exist in an expanding brane universe, however it is difficult to exist in a contracting brane universe due to stress-energy tensors requirement. This model of spatial dynamic factor affecting the wormhole throat can also be applied on the cyclic or the bounce universe model.

  5. 21 CFR 874.4500 - Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... laser. 874.4500 Section 874.4500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser is a device intended for the surgical excision of tissue from the ear, nose...

  6. Evaluation of the effectiveness of kinesiotaping in reducing delayed onset muscle soreness of the biceps brachii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boguszewski Dariusz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available biological regeneration in athletes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the application of lymphatic kinesiotaping in reducing delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

  7. Delayed onset muscle soreness: No pain, no gain? The truth behind ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is muscle pain and stiffness that develops ... limited success in reducing the symptoms.1,4-6 The DOMS phenomenon ... Nutritional supplementation (antioxidants and L-carnitine) shows promise, but ...

  8. How elderly patients with femoral fracture develop pressure sores in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluysen, M

    1986-01-01

    The routine hospital management of 100 consecutive elderly patients was studied to determine the reason for the high incidence of pressure sores among patients admitted to hospital for femoral fractures. Of these patients, 66 developed sores, 83% occurring by the fifth day in hospital. This was due to the long periods that patients were immobilised on high pressure surfaces in the casualty department, wards, and theatres before repair of the fracture and restoration of their weight bearing function. Sores are not simply a ward or nursing problem, but an unintended consequence of hospital treatment. To reduce the incidence of sores elderly patients should be treated on low pressure patient support systems from the point of entry to hospital until mobility is restored. PMID:3085827

  9. Diabetes: Good Diabetes Management and Regular Foot Care Help Prevent Severe Foot Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation and diabetes: How to protect your feet Good diabetes management and regular foot care help prevent severe foot sores that ... and may require amputation. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes complications can include nerve damage and poor blood ...

  10. RR Lyrae and BL Herculis variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, A.N.

    1980-01-01

    The RR Lyrae variables are currently believed to have masses between about 0.5 and 0.8 M/sub solar mass/, effective surface temperatures between 6350 and 7500 0 K, radii from about 4.0 to 6.0 R/sub solar mass/ and luminosities between log L/L/sub solar mass/ of 1.5 and 2.0. Since they are found in population II locations, they generally have Y = 0.3 and Z = 10 -3 , but there are exceptions for both higher Z like the sun and lower Z like 0.0002. In globular clusters the periods range from 0.25 to 0.45 day for the first overtone pulsators and 0.40 to 0.80 day for those in the fundamental mode, depending on their luminosity. At transition lines, discussed in detail, the switch from fundamental to first overtone, or maybe vice versa, involves a period change factor of about 0.74 to 0.75

  11. ASPECTS REGARDING THE EFFECT OF ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS ON DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Honceriu C.; Hagiu B.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to investigate the effects of using Diclofenac ointment for delayed onset muscle soreness. The research has been conducted on two groups of junior football players, males, the number of 9 each (control and treated), which has been induced by this type of muscle soreness with specific exercises. The treated group used Diclofenac gel for the relief of musculoskeletal pain. The evaluation of values of muscular strength (Squat Jump, Jump Countermovement, Free Jump,...

  12. Cutaneous flaps in the treatment of 338 pressure sores: a better choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Manfredi; Marchetti, Francesco; Tempesta, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Marcasciano, Marco; Carlesimo, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Muscular flaps are considered by many surgeons as a treatment of choice for pressure sores. Nevertheless fasciocutaneous and adipofascial flaps are less sensitive to ischemia, more resistant to pressure and have higher mechanical resistance. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of our integrated rehabilitative and surgical protocol in pressure sore management based on the use of cutaneous flaps. Since 1998, we treated 338 pressure sores (PS) in 195 patients (120 males; 75 females), 189 patients were affected by paraplegia and tetraplegia and 6 of them by neurological disorders. Ninety sacral, 156 ischiatic, 75 trochanteric, 9 calcanean and 8 sores of the iliac-crest were succesfully treated. All showed an involvement of the bone element, with osteitis and/or periosteitis. 14 cases of trocanteric sores showed a deeper bone involvement, with evidences of osteomyelitis. Follow up ranges from 7 years to 2 months. Median time for wound healing was 18 days. The use of fasciocutaneous flaps, as an alternative to the traditional muscolocutaneous flaps in the treatment of pressure sores leads to good and statistically comparable, healing rate, time and incidence of complications. Reconstructive plastic surgery as is a decisive factor to reach a good rehabilitative outcome, minimizing the time of rehabilitation with a following decrease of hospitalization costs. In spinal cord injured patients, surgical treatment of pressure sores is not proposed as the main procedure, but it is an important stage during the natural history of pressure sores. Cutaneous, adipofascial and fasciocutaneous flaps are less invasive, of a relatively easy execution, provided by a reliable vascular pedicle and they could be "re-used" in case of recurrences.

  13. Pressure Sore at an Unusual Site- the Bilateral Popliteal Fossa: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Kataria

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sore is tissue ulceration due to unrelieved pressure, altered sensory perception, and exposure to moisture. Geriatric patients with organic problems and patients with spinal cord injuries are the high-risk groups. Soft tissues over bony prominences are the common sites for ulcer development. About 95% of pressure ulcers occur in the lower part of the body. Ischial tuberosity, greater trochanter, sacrum and heel are common sites. In addition to these, pressure sores at unusual sites like nasal alae, malar eminences, cervical region and medial side of knee have also been described. Only 1.6% of the patients present with sores in areas outside the pelvis and lower extremity. In a paraplegic patient, pressure sores are usually over extensor surface of knee and heel but pressure ulcer over popliteal fossa are extremely rare. We herein report a case of a 36-years-old diabetic and paraplegic male, who presented with multiple bed sores involving the sacral area, heels and bilateral popliteal fossa. Popliteal fossa is an unusual site for pressure sores. Only one similar case has been previously reported in the literature.

  14. [Urinary incontinence as a risk factor for pressure sores does not withstand a critical examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Tom; Anders, Jennifer; von Renteln-Kruse, Wolfgang

    2005-10-01

    The association between urinary incontinence and pressure sores is put down to various causes. Most frequently urinary wet and following maceration of the skin are mentioned. However, it is possible that urinary incontinence is only an indicator for other risk factors or a measure of the need for care without any causal relation to pressure sores. There are hardly any controlled or randomised studies; this lack of scientific evidence is problematic. Based on a case-control-study including data of 200 patients as well as on the existing models of explanation, the following study tries to examine critically the connections between pressure sores and urinary incontinence. Out of the patients in our study population 97.5 percent were incontinent. Different categories of the risk factor urinary incontinence and different dichotomisations have led to different statistical results. Statements concerning the connection between urinary incontinence and pressure sores have to be interpreted critically. The dependence of urinary incontinence on other risk factors such as patients' need for care or compliance suggests that the causal connection to pressure sores be not reduced to the influence of wetness. We advise to research connections between urinary incontinence and pressure sores in a methodologically appropriate setting.

  15. Treatment of ischial pressure sores with both profunda femoris artery perforator flaps and muscle flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Min; Yun, In Sik; Lee, Dong Won; Lew, Dae Hyun; Rah, Dong Kyun; Lee, Won Jai

    2014-07-01

    Reconstruction of ischial pressure sore defects is challenging due to extensive bursas and high recurrence rates. In this study, we simultaneously applied a muscle flap that covered the exposed ischium and large bursa with sufficient muscular volume and a profunda femoris artery perforator fasciocutaneous flap for the management of ischial pressure sores. We retrospectively analyzed data from 14 patients (16 ischial sores) whose ischial defects had been reconstructed using both a profunda femoris artery perforator flap and a muscle flap between January 2006 and February 2014. We compared patient characteristics, operative procedure, and clinical course. All flaps survived the entire follow-up period. Seven patients (50%) had a history of surgery at the site of the ischial pressure sore. The mean age of the patients included was 52.8 years (range, 18-85 years). The mean follow-up period was 27.9 months (range, 3-57 months). In two patients, a biceps femoris muscle flap was used, while a gracilis muscle flap was used in the remaining patients. In four cases (25%), wound dehiscence occurred, but healed without further complication after resuturing. Additionally, congestion occurred in one case (6%), but resolved with conservative treatment. Among 16 cases, there was only one (6%) recurrence at 34 months. The combination of a profunda femoris artery perforator fasciocutaneous flap and muscle flap for the treatment of ischial pressure sores provided pliability, adequate bulkiness and few long-term complications. Therefore, this may be used as an alternative treatment method for ischial pressure sores.

  16. Treatment of ischial pressure sores using a modified gracilis myofasciocutaneous flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haodong; Hou, Chunlin; Chen, Aimin; Xu, Zhen

    2010-04-01

    Despite the availability of a variety of flap reconstruction options, ischial pressure sores continue to be the most difficult pressure sores to treat. This article describes a successful surgical procedure for the coverage of ischial ulcers using a modified gracilis myofasciocutaneous flap. From August 2000 to April 2004, 12 patients with ischial sores were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent early aggressive surgical debridement followed by surgical reconstruction with a modified gracilis myofasciocutaneous flap. The follow-up period ranged from 13 to 86 months, with a mean of 44 months. Overall, 91.7% of the flaps (11 of 12) survived primarily. Partial flap necrosis occurred in one patient. Primary wound healing occurred without complications at both the donor and recipient sites in all cases. In one patient, grade II ischial pressure sores recurred 13 months after the operation. There was no recurrence in other 11 patients. A modified gracilis myofasciocutaneous flap provides a good cover for ischial pressure sores. Because it is easy to use and has favorable results, it can be used in the primary treatment for large and deep ischial pressure sores. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  17. The evaluation of daily living activities, pressure sores and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Gökçen; Mucuk, Salime

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess daily living activities, pressure sores and risk factors. This was a descriptive study. The study was conducted at a rehabilitation center with 188 individuals participating in the study. Data were collected with a questionnaire form, Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADLS), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADLS) and Braden Risk Assessment Scale (BRAS). Among the participants, 48.9% were dependent according to activities of daily living and 71.8% were dependent on instrumental activities of daily living. It was noted that 4.8% had pressure sores and 38.8% were at high risk. A strong and positive correlation was found among ADLS, IADLS, and BRAS scores (p pressure sores (p pressure sores. Individuals who are treated at rehabilitation centers should be periodically assessed in terms of risk. Pressure sore development can be prevented with appropriate nursing interventions. To reduce the risk of developing pressure sores, nurses should describe the individual's degree of dependency according to ADLS and IADLS and initiate preventive nursing care. © 2014 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  18. Pressure Sore at an Unusual Site- the Bilateral Popliteal Fossa: A Case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Kamal; Sagar, Sushma; Singhal, Manish; Yadav, Rajni

    2012-01-01

    Pressure sore is tissue ulceration due to unrelieved pressure, altered sensory perception, and exposure to moisture. Geriatric patients with organic problems and patients with spinal cord injuries are the high-risk groups. Soft tissues over bony prominences are the common sites for ulcer development. About 95% of pressure ulcers occur in the lower part of the body. Ischial tuberosity, greater trochanter, sacrum and heel are common sites. In addition to these, pressure sores at unusual sites like nasal alae, malar eminences, cervical region and medial side of knee have also been described. Only 1.6% of the patients present with sores in areas outside the pelvis and lower extremity. In a paraplegic patient, pressure sores are usually over extensor surface of knee and heel but pressure ulcer over popliteal fossa are extremely rare. We herein report a case of a 36-years-old diabetic and paraplegic male, who presented with multiple bed sores involving the sacral area, heels and bilateral popliteal fossa. Popliteal fossa is an unusual site for pressure sores. Only one similar case has been previously reported in the literature. PMID:29181131

  19. [Indication of sclerotherapy in the treatment of ischiatic pressure sore: about 13 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahé, L; Prud'homme, A; Penaud, A; Formé, N; Zakine, G

    2012-12-01

    Ischiatic pressure sore is a common pathology of the paraplegic patient. Usually treated after medical therapy, with fasciocutaneous or musculocutaneous local flaps, despite this treatment the recurrence rate is high. Sclerotherapy, injection of pure ethanol in the cavity of the pressure sore could be an interesting solution in the armentarium of the plastic surgeon in some indications. Sclerotherapy was used for 13 patients in the plastic surgery department to treat ischiatic pressure sores with a cavity, beneath the defect. The mean length of stay was 24 days. The ischiatic pressure sore was completely healed with no skin defect or cavity for nine patients (65%). For two patients, there was a delay of healing of the skin defect but no cavity beneath. There were two early recurrences of the pressure sore. They were treated by sclerotherapy with a complete recovery in 2 months with simple hydrocolloid dressings. The mean post op follow-up was 14,6 months (4 to 24). Only one recurrence was observed after 12 months. The injection of pure ethanol in the cavity of specifics ischiatics pressure sores is a simple, fast and effective technique with a good and stable long term wound healing. The mean length of stay is shorter and the recurrence rate is equivalent to other techniques. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Marjolin's Ulcer Complicating a Pressure Sore: The Clock is Ticking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kamran; Giannone, Anna Lucia; Mehrabi, Erfan; Khan, Ayda; Giannone, Roberto E

    2016-02-22

    Malignant degeneration in any chronic wound is termed a Marjolin's ulcer (MU). The overall metastatic rate of MU is approximately 27.5%. However, the prognosis of MU specific to pressure sores is poor, with a reported metastatic rate of 61%. This is due to insidious, asymptomatic malignant degeneration, a lack of healthcare provider awareness, and, ultimately, delayed management. An 85-year-old white male was noted by his wound-care nurse to have a rapidly developing growth on his lower back over a period of 4 months. There was history of a non-healing, progressive pressure ulcer of the lower back for the past 10 years. On examination, there was a 4 × 4 cm pressure ulcer of the lower back, with a superimposed 1.5 × 2 cm growth in the superior region. There was an absence of palpable regional lymphadenopathy. Punch biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma consistent with Marjolin's ulcer. The ulcer underwent excision with wide margins, and a skin graft was placed. Due to the prompt recognition of an abnormality by the patient's wound-care nurse, metastasis was not evident on imaging. There are no signs of recurrence at 1-year follow-up. Marjolin's ulcer has a rapid progression from local disease to widespread metastasis. Therefore, it is essential that wound-care providers are aware of the clinical signs and symptoms of malignant degeneration in chronic wounds.

  1. Specific and cross over effects of massage for muscle soreness: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Kenneth; Sundstrup, Emil; Søndergaard, Stine D; Behm, David; Brandt, Mikkel; Særvoll, Charlotte A; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-02-01

    Muscle soreness can negatively interfere with the activities of daily living as well as sports performance. In the working environment, a common problem is muscle tenderness, soreness and pain, especially for workers frequently exposed to unilateral high repetitive movements tasks. The aim of the study is therefore to investigate the acute effect of massage applied using a simple device Thera-band roller Massager on laboratory induced hamstring muscle soreness, and the potential cross over effect to the non-massaged limb. 22 healthy untrained men (Mean age 34 +/- 7 years; mean height 181.7 +/- 6.9 cm; mean weight 80.6 +/- 6.4 kg; BMI: 24.5 +/- 1.3) with no prior history of knee, low back or neck injury or other adverse health issues were recruited. Participants visited the researchers on two separate occasions, separated by 48 hours, each time providing a soreness rating (modified visual analog scale 0-10), and being tested for pressure pain threshold (PPT) and active range of motion (ROM) of the hamstring muscles. During the first visit, delayed onset muscular soreness of the hamstring muscles was induced by 10 x 10 repetitions of the stiff-legged dead-lift. On the second visit participants received either 1) 10 minutes of roller massage on one leg, while the contralateral leg served as a cross over control, or 2) Resting for 10 minutes with no massage at all. Measurement of soreness, PPT and ROM were taken immediately before and at 0, 10, 30 and 60 min. after treatment. There was a significant group by time interaction for soreness (p < 0.0001) and PPT (p = 0.0007), with the massage group experiencing reduced soreness and increasing PPT compared with the control group. There was no group by time interaction for ROM (p = 0.18). At 10 min. post massage there was a significant reduction in soreness of the non-massaged limb in the cross over control group compared to controls but this effect was lost 30 minutes post massage. Massage with a roller device reduces

  2. Throat hit in users of the electronic cigarette: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    A cross-sectional survey on the Internet in 2012-2014 was used to study the "throat hit," the specific sensation in the throat felt by users of e-cigarettes. Participants were 1672 current users of e-cigarettes, visitors of Websites dedicated to e-cigarettes and to smoking cessation. It was assessed whether the strength of the throat hit was associated with the characteristics of e-cigarettes and e-liquids, modifications of the devices, patterns of use, reasons for use, satisfaction with e-cigarettes, dependence on e-cigarettes, smoking behavior, and perceived effects on smoking. The strongest throat hit was obtained by using better-quality models and liquids with high nicotine content. Those who reported a "very strong" throat hit used liquids with 17.3 mg/mL nicotine, versus 7.1 mg/mL for those reporting a "very weak" hit (p e-cigarette models that provide high levels of nicotine, a strong throat hit, high satisfaction, and more effects on smoking, but may also be addictive, and models than contain less nicotine and are less addictive, but produce a weaker throat hit, are less satisfactory, and are possibly less efficient at helping people quit smoking. This trade-off must be kept in mind when regulating e-cigarettes. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Does a foamy-block mattress system prevent pressure sores ? A prospective randomised clinical trial in 1729 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthe, J V; Bustillo, A; Mélot, C; de Fontaine, S

    2007-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a frequent complication of bed rest. The development of an efficient and low cost pressure relieving system for the prevention of bed-sores would be of considerable hospital health and economic interest. Our study was designed to determine the effectiveness in pressure-sore prevention of an interface pressure-decreasing mattress, the Kliniplot mattress, used in our institution since 1978. In a prospective randomised controlled 7-month clinical trial we compared the Kliniplot mattress with our standard hospital mattress in 1729 patients admitted to medical and surgical departments (neurology, cardiology, oncology-haematology, neurosurgery, thoracic surgery and orthopaedic surgery). Two groups (Klinipot mattress and standard hospital mattress) were monitored for the prevention of pressure sores. The patients were evaluated on a daily basis from their admission until the eventual occurrence of a bed-sore. Patients' characteristics and pressure-sore risk factors were similar at the baseline in both groups. Patients presenting with a pressure sore at the time of admission were excluded. Forty-two of the 1729 patients (2.4%) who entered the study developed at least one pressure sore. Twenty-one of the 657 patients (3.2%) nursed on the Kliniplot mattress, and 21 of the 1072 patients (1.9%) on the standard mattress developed bed-sores (p = 0.154). The median time for the occurrence of pressure sores was 31 days (range 6-87) with the Kliniplot mattress and 18 days (range 2 to 38) with the standard mattress (p sores using the modified Ek's scale were no different at the baseline between both groups (p = 0.764). The severity of the pressure sores was no different between both groups (p = 0.918). Our results show that the occurrence of pressure sores is not reduced but is delayed when patients are nursed on a Kliniplot pressure-decreasing mattress.

  4. Improving outcomes following reconstruction of pressure sores in spinal injury patients: A multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadiparthi, S; Hartley, A; Alzweri, L; Mecci, M; Siddiqui, H

    2016-07-01

    Pressure sore treatment in spinal injury patients is challenging. A multidisciplinary approach with joint management by the plastic surgery and spinal injury teams was initiated at our institution in 2005 to improve patient care and surgical outcomes following reconstruction. This study assessed the surgical outcomes following reconstruction using the team approach and to compare inpatient stay and readmissions for complications before and after the multidisciplinary protocol was introduced. A retrospective review of consecutive patients in the multidisciplinary pressure sore clinic was performed. Data were collected on patient demographics, reconstructive techniques, surgical outcomes and readmission for any complications. In total, 45 patients with 60 pressure sores (grade 3 or 4) were reviewed in the joint clinic between 2005 and 2011. The majority of patients were paraplegic (78%), while the remaining 22% were tetraplegic. Ischial sores were the most common (45%) followed by trochanteric (23%) and sacral (20%) sores. Multiple sores were noted in 44% of patients. Flap reconstruction was required in 32 patients (71%); after a mean follow-up time of 33 months (range 25-72 months), there were three (9%) major complications (two recurrences of pressure sores and one sinus) and seven (22%) minor complications. After introduction of patient care pathways through the multidisciplinary approach, the rate of readmission for complications decreased from 14% to 5.5% and inpatient stay upon readmission reduced from 65 to 45 days. Implementation of a multidisciplinary approach was key to optimising surgical outcomes, achieving a low recurrence rate (6%) and reducing readmissions. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [A clinical audit on the use of medications for pressure sores, after the implementation of guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiari, Paolo; Fontana, Mirella; Bianchi, Tommaso; Bonzagni, Cristina; Galetti, Caterina

    2006-01-01

    Although guidelines for the management of pressure sores are widely available, their implementation is not always easy and sometimes does not produce the desired changes. To describe the results of a clinical audit aiming at assessing the appropriate use of medications for pressure sores, after the implementation of guidelines. The audit group, with an expert in assessment, a nurse expert in pressure sores, a microbiologist, a dermatologist and a chemist analysed the clinical and nursing records of all the patients with a pressure sore, discharged during the first trimester of 2005 and 2006, after the implementation of the guidelines, from wards with higher prevalence of pressure sores: geriatric, medical, intensive care, rehabilitation and post acute wards. Each documented treatment was classified as appropriate, not appropriate or "grey area", treatments inappropriate according to guidelines but not according to expert or current knowledge (e.g. poliurethane medications for heel pressure sores). After each stage, the results were returned and discussed with the involved wards. One hundred 74 patients were surveyed in 2005 and 199 in 2006, with a total of respectively 287 and 326 sores. The percentage of inappropriate treatments was 20% in 2005 and 12.8% in 2006 (OR 1.79 I.C. 95% 1.10- 2.91), while an increase of treatments considered grey area (from 7% to 13.5%) was observed. The medium number of medications used was 17.3 per lesion, in 2005 and 16.4 in 2006 with a cost respectively of 83.6 and 67.35 per lesion, but the two populations were not strictly comparable. Clinical audit is a strategy that involving doctors and nurses, may promote positive changes. The rate of inappropriate treatments (higher in areas with high turnover of nurses) can be improved with educational interventions. The identification of treatments of the grey area highlights the need of periodically revising guidelines to update their contents according to new knowledge and technologies.

  6. [Clinical application of modified upper gluteal rhomboid fasciocutaneous flap in repairing sacrococcygeal pressure sores].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Maohua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Wei, Bangmin; Li, Yinghao

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the method and effectiveness of repairing sacrococcygeal pressure sores with modified upper gluteal rhomboid fasciocutaneous flap. Between January 2004 and March 2011, 43 patients with sacrococcygeal pressure sores were treated. There were 25 males and 18 females with an average age of 63 years (range, 38-95 years). The disease duration was 3 months to 2 years and 6 months (mean, 8.5 months). The size of pressure sores ranged from 6 cm x 5 cm to 18 cm x 13 cm. According to the extent and lesion degree of pressure scores, 23 pressure sores were rated as degree III and 20 pressure sores as degree IV. The modified upper gluteal rhomboid flap was designed, one-side upper gluteal fasciocutaneous flaps were transplanted to repair sacrococcygeal pressure sores in 19 cases and two-side flaps in 24 cases. The size of one side flap ranged from 6.5 cm x 4.5 cm to 18.0 cm x 11.5 cm. Fluid under flap occurred in 1 case and edge necrosis of the flaps in 3 cases at 7 days after operation, which were cured after drainage and dressing change; the other flaps survived, and incisions healed by first intention. All patients were followed up 6 months to 3 years with an average of 11 months. Two patients relapsed at 5 months and 8 months, respectively; the other patients had no recurrence. The color of the flaps was normal, and the appearance and elasticity of the flaps were good. The modified upper gluteal rhomboid fasciocutaneous flap has the advantages of simple design and operation, less injury, and reliable effect in repairing sacrococcygeal pressure sores.

  7. [High-grade pressure sores in frail older high-risk persons. A retrospective postmortem case-control-study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Renteln-Kruse, W; Krause, T; Anders, J; Kühl, M; Heinemann, A; Püschel, K

    2004-04-01

    Some old persons at risk do develop, but others, at comparable risk, do not develop high-grade pressure sores. To evaluate potentially different risk factors, we performed a post mortem case-control study in old persons who developed high-grade pressure sores within six months until 14 days before death. Consecutive cases with pressure sores grade >/=3 and potential controls at comparably high risk for pressure sores were examined before cremation. After written informed consent had been obtained by the next relatives, all available nursing and medical records of the deceased were thoroughly evaluated. Cases and controls were matched according to age, gender, immobility, and cachexia.A total of 100 cases with 71 pressure sores grade 3 and 29 pressure sores grade 4 were compared to 100 controls with 27 pressure sores grade pressure sores in frail older high-risk persons. Sedative drug effects and impaired patient compliance with preventive and therapeutic measures may also be associated with the development of high-grade pressure sores in old persons at high risk.

  8. An intelligent artificial throat with sound-sensing ability based on laser induced graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lu-Qi; Tian, He; Liu, Ying; Ju, Zhen-Yi; Pang, Yu; Chen, Yuan-Quan; Wang, Dan-Yang; Tian, Xiang-Guang; Yan, Jun-Chao; Deng, Ning-Qin; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2017-02-01

    Traditional sound sources and sound detectors are usually independent and discrete in the human hearing range. To minimize the device size and integrate it with wearable electronics, there is an urgent requirement of realizing the functional integration of generating and detecting sound in a single device. Here we show an intelligent laser-induced graphene artificial throat, which can not only generate sound but also detect sound in a single device. More importantly, the intelligent artificial throat will significantly assist for the disabled, because the simple throat vibrations such as hum, cough and scream with different intensity or frequency from a mute person can be detected and converted into controllable sounds. Furthermore, the laser-induced graphene artificial throat has the advantage of one-step fabrication, high efficiency, excellent flexibility and low cost, and it will open practical applications in voice control, wearable electronics and many other areas.

  9. Vitamin C depletion and pressure sores in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, H. F.; Burns, E.; Walker, B. E.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the contribution of specific nutritional deficiencies (as indicated by zinc; vitamin A, C, and E; albumin; and haemoglobin concentrations) to the risk of pressure sores. DESIGN--Observational cohort study. SETTING--St James's University Hospital, Leeds. SUBJECTS--21 elderly patients presenting consecutively to the orthopaedic unit with femoral neck fracture. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Full thickness epidermal break over a pressure bearing surface. RESULTS--10 patients (48%) developed a pressure sore during their hospital stay. Indices of zinc status and concentrations of albumin, haemoglobin, and vitamins A and E were similar in patients who developed a pressure sore and those who did not. Mean leucocyte vitamin C concentration, however, was 6.3 (SD 2.2) micrograms/10(8) cells in patients who developed a pressure sore as compared with 12.8 (4.6) micrograms/10(8) cells in patients who did not. CONCLUSIONS--Low concentrations of leucocyte vitamin C appear to be associated with subsequent development of pressure sores in elderly patients with femoral neck fractures. PMID:1458073

  10. Detection and Isolation of Digital Dermatitis Treponemes from Bovine Pressure Sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, S R; Crosby-Durrani, H E; Bell, J; Blundell, R; Blowey, R W; Carter, S D; Evans, N J

    2016-05-01

    Pressure sores cause severe pain and discomfort in hospitalized people and in farmed cattle and are often infected with unknown bacteria. Pressure sores occur on the upper legs of 6-10% of recumbent cattle and are generally considered to be caused by constant pressure, commonly on bony areas of the limbs. This study analyzed pressure sores taken from the upper limbs of 14 cattle using isolation in culture and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect treponemes associated with digital dermatitis (DD). A 100% association of DD treponemes with the pressure sores was demonstrated, but treponemes were shown not to be part of the normal skin microbiota. Immunohistochemistry showed an association of DD treponemes with lesions and particularly with the hair follicles in lesions, identifying the bacteria deep within wounds, thereby suggesting that they could contribute to lesion pathogenesis. The bacteria isolated from the pressure sore lesions were similar or identical on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene to those found in DD foot lesions in cattle, suggesting the same bacteria can infect multiple lesions. Indeed, the results of this study suggest that these spirochaetal bacteria may be expanding in host range and in their ability to colonize different tissues and contribute to a range of disease manifestations in farm animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Indirect and direct methods for measuring a dynamic throat diameter in a solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbaugh, Lauren

    In a solid rocket motor, nozzle throat erosion is dictated by propellant composition, throat material properties, and operating conditions. Throat erosion has a significant effect on motor performance, so it must be accurately characterized to produce a good motor design. In order to correlate throat erosion rate to other parameters, it is first necessary to know what the throat diameter is throughout a motor burn. Thus, an indirect method and a direct method for determining throat diameter in a solid rocket motor are investigated in this thesis. The indirect method looks at the use of pressure and thrust data to solve for throat diameter as a function of time. The indirect method's proof of concept was shown by the good agreement between the ballistics model and the test data from a static motor firing. The ballistics model was within 10% of all measured and calculated performance parameters (e.g. average pressure, specific impulse, maximum thrust, etc.) for tests with throat erosion and within 6% of all measured and calculated performance parameters for tests without throat erosion. The direct method involves the use of x-rays to directly observe a simulated nozzle throat erode in a dynamic environment; this is achieved with a dynamic calibration standard. An image processing algorithm is developed for extracting the diameter dimensions from the x-ray intensity digital images. Static and dynamic tests were conducted. The measured diameter was compared to the known diameter in the calibration standard. All dynamic test results were within +6% / -7% of the actual diameter. Part of the edge detection method consists of dividing the entire x-ray image by an average pixel value, calculated from a set of pixels in the x-ray image. It was found that the accuracy of the edge detection method depends upon the selection of the average pixel value area and subsequently the average pixel value. An average pixel value sensitivity analysis is presented. Both the indirect

  12. Spectral of electrocardiographic RR intervals to indicate atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryani, Nuryani; Satrio Nugroho, Anto

    2017-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a serious heart diseases, which is associated on the risk of death, and thus an early detection of atrial fibrillation is necessary. We have investigated spectral pattern of electrocardiogram in relation to atrial fibrillation. The utilized feature of electrocardiogram is RR interval. RR interval is the time interval between a two-consecutive R peaks. A series of RR intervals in a time segment is converted to a signal with a frequency domain. The frequency components are investigated to find the components which significantly associate to atrial fibrillation. A segment is defined as atrial fibrillation or normal segments by considering a defined number of atrial fibrillation RR in the segment. Using clinical data of 23 patients with atrial fibrillation, we find that the frequency components could be used to indicate atrial fibrillation.

  13. Genetic divergence of roundup ready (RR) soybean cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic diversity in 74 RR soybean cultivars from different Brazilian breeding programs. ... chosen SSR markers were effective in assessing the genetic diversity among genotypes, besides proving to be ...

  14. Studying RR Lyrae Stars in M4 with K2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Drury, Jason; Moskalik, Pawel

    2017-01-01

    Observations by Kepler/K2 have revolutionized the study of RR Lyrae stars by allowing the detection of new phenomena, such as low amplitude additional modes and period doubling, which had not previously been seen from the ground. During its campaign 2, K2 observed the globular cluster M4, providing the first opportunity to study a sizeable group of RR Lyrae stars that belong to a single population; the other RR Lyrae stars that have been observed from space are field stars in the galactic halo and thus belong to an assortment of populations. We present the results of our study of the RR Lyrae variables in M4 from K2 photometry. We have identified additional, low amplitude pulsation modes in the two observed RRc stars. In three RRab stars we have found the Blazhko effect with periods of 16.6 days, 22.4 days, and 44.5 days.

  15. Experimental investigation on motive nozzle throat diameter for an ejector expansion refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilir Sag, Nagihan; Ersoy, H. Kursad

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of nozzle throat diameter and its location on performance were investigated. • The nozzle has an optimum throat diameter under the experiment condition. • The maximum performance has been achieved by using optimum nozzle throat diameter. • The variation of nozzle throat diameter with condenser water inlet temperature was examined. • Motive nozzle has no optimum position in the ejector refrigeration system. - Abstract: In this study, ejector was used to reduce throttling losses in a vapour compression refrigeration system. Effects on system performance of throat diameter and position of motive nozzle of ejector were investigated experimentally. An ejector was designed based on the established mathematical model and manufactured. The experiments were carried out by using different primary nozzle throat diameters. The experiments were further conducted by changing condenser water inlet temperature, which is one of the external parameters. The experimental results of the ejector system and those of the classic system were compared under same external operating conditions and for the same cooling capacity. In order to obtain same external operating conditions in both systems, the inlet conditions of the brine supplied to the evaporator and inlet water conditions (flow rate and temperature) to the condenser were kept constant. Maximum performance was obtained when the primary nozzle throat diameter was 2.3 mm within the areas considered in this study. When compared, it was experimentally determined that the ejector system that uses the optimum motive nozzle throat diameter exhibits higher COP than the classic system by 5–13%. Furthermore, it was found that the variation of coefficient of performance based on position of motive nozzle in two-phase ejector expander refrigeration cycle is lower than 1%.

  16. Contamination of RR Lyrae stars from Binary Evolution Pulsators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczmarek, Paulina; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Belczyński, Krzysztof; Stępień, Kazimierz; Wiktorowicz, Grzegorz; Iłkiewicz, Krystian

    2016-06-01

    Binary Evolution Pulsator (BEP) is an extremely low-mass member of a binary system, which pulsates as a result of a former mass transfer to its companion. BEP mimics RR Lyrae-type pulsations but has different internal structure and evolution history. We present possible evolution channels to produce BEPs, and evaluate the contamination value, i.e. how many objects classified as RR Lyrae stars can be undetected BEPs. In this analysis we use population synthesis code StarTrack.

  17. Study of role of streptococcal throat infection in pityriasis rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parija Madhuri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pityriasis rosea is a common, acute exanthem of uncertain etiology. The exact cause of pityriasis rosea is not known but various hypotheses have been postulated incriminating infective agents such as viruses, bacteria, spirochete and noninfective etiologies such as atopy and autoimmune causes have also been investigated. Aim: We undertook a study to investigate the role of Streptococcus haemolyticus in the causation of pityriasis rosea and study the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and ASLO titer in patients with pityriasis rosea. Materials and Methods: The study included 20 patients with pityriasis rosea attending the outpatient dermatology department at JIPMER hospital during the period from June to December 2004. Corresponding number of age- and sex-matched controls were chosen from amongst healthy individuals and patients attending skin OPD with dermatological disorders other than pityriasis rosea. Results: On analyzing the data collected from 20 cases of pityriasis rosea, the average age was found to be 15.3 years and ranged from 5 years to 30 years. The male to female ratio was found to be 1.5:1. The average duration of illness was 14.5 days (median and 29.3 days (mean. CRP was negative in all the cases as well as the controls. ASLO titer was found to be raised in 2 (10% cases, while it remained below the critical value in all the controls. On comparing the cases and controls, the raised ASLO titer in the cases was found to be not statistically significant (p = 0.147. From the throat swab culture, Streptococcus haemolyticus was isolated from only one case and none of the controls. This finding was not statistically significant (p = 0.310. Conclusion: As per the findings of the present study, we arrived at conclusion that there is no association between streptococcus pharyngitis and pityriasis rosea.

  18. Performance optimization for a variable throat ejector in a solar refrigeration system

    KAUST Repository

    Yen, R.H.; Huang, B.J.; Chen, C.Y.; Shiu, T.Y.; Cheng, C.W.; Chen, S.S.; Shestopalov, K.

    2013-01-01

    In a solar vapor ejector refrigeration system, the solar heat supply may vary because of variations in solar irradiation intensity, making it difficult to maintain a steady generator temperature. To improve ejector performance, this study proposes a variable throat ejector (VTEJ) and analyzes its performance using CFD simulations. The following conclusions can be drawn. An ejector with a greater throat area and larger solar collector allows a wider operating range of generator temperatures, but may be overdesigned and expensive. Conversely, decreasing the throat area limits the operating range of generator temperatures. Thus the ejector with a fixed throat area may be unsuitable to use solar energy as a heat source. For a VTEJ, this study derives a curve-fitting relationship between the optimum throat area ratio and the operating temperatures. Using this relationship to adjust the throat area ratio, the ejector can consistently achieve optimal and stable performances under a varying solar heat supply. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and IIR. All rights reserved.

  19. Performance optimization for a variable throat ejector in a solar refrigeration system

    KAUST Repository

    Yen, R.H.

    2013-08-01

    In a solar vapor ejector refrigeration system, the solar heat supply may vary because of variations in solar irradiation intensity, making it difficult to maintain a steady generator temperature. To improve ejector performance, this study proposes a variable throat ejector (VTEJ) and analyzes its performance using CFD simulations. The following conclusions can be drawn. An ejector with a greater throat area and larger solar collector allows a wider operating range of generator temperatures, but may be overdesigned and expensive. Conversely, decreasing the throat area limits the operating range of generator temperatures. Thus the ejector with a fixed throat area may be unsuitable to use solar energy as a heat source. For a VTEJ, this study derives a curve-fitting relationship between the optimum throat area ratio and the operating temperatures. Using this relationship to adjust the throat area ratio, the ejector can consistently achieve optimal and stable performances under a varying solar heat supply. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and IIR. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute effects of massage or active exercise in relieving muscle soreness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Jay, Kenneth; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2013-01-01

    Massage is commonly believed to be the best modality for relieving muscle soreness. However, actively warming up the muscles with exercise may be an effective alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effect of massage with active exercise for relieving muscle soreness. Twenty...... healthy female volunteers (mean age 32 years) participated in this examiner-blind randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01478451). The participants performed eccentric contractions for the upper trapezius muscle on a Biodex dynamometer. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) presented 48 hours...... later, at which the participants (a) received 10 minutes of massage of the trapezius muscle or (b) performed 10 minutes of active exercise (shoulder shrugs 10 × 10 reps) with increasing elastic resistance (Thera-Band). First, 1 treatment was randomly applied to 1 shoulder while the contralateral...

  1. Pressure sores--a constant problem for plegic patients and a permanent challenge for plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuglea, Carmen; Marinescu, Sllviu; Florescu, Ioan Petre; Jecan, Crenguta

    2010-01-01

    Pressure sores can be defined as lesions caused by unrelieved pressure resulting in damage of the underlying tissue. They represent a common problem in the pathology of plegic patients and, plastic surgery has a significant role in their treatment. Pressure sores occur over bony prominences and so, they are most commonly seen at the sacrum and trochanters in paralyzed patients and at ischium for the patients who sit in a wheelchair for a long time. For these patients, surgical treatment is very important because on one hand, it stops the loss of nutrients and proteins at the site of the pressure sore, and on the other hand, it permits the initiation of neuromuscular recuperation treatment much faster.

  2. An audit of the physiotherapy management of paraplegic patients with sacral pressure sores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pather

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pressure sores are the most common complication post spinal cord injury that requires patients to be on bed rest. Patient bed rest delay rehabilitation and may lead to other complications associated with immobility. This study sought to establish the treatment interventions physiotherapists provide to patients with sacral pressure sores and the factors that they consider when deciding whether the patient should receive physiotherapy in the ward or gym. Methods: This was a questionnaire based survey of physiotherapists working in spinal cord injury rehabilitation units in South Africa. The self-designed questionnaire was sent to all the main spinal rehabilitation units in the country (14 located in Gauteng, Kwa-Zulu Natal, Western Cape, Eastern Cape and Free State provinces. Results: Thirty-nine physiotherapists from a total of 51 completed the questionnaires (76% response rate. The most common treatment practice for patients with sacral pressure sores was bed rest (98%. The most common physio-therapy practices (70% included were upper limb muscle strengthening, upper and lower limb passive movements, positioning into prone and side lying and passive stretching. The choice of treatment environment was influenced by doctors’ orders and the size, grade and duration of the pressure sores. Conclusion: Direct involvement in pressure sore management in South Africa seem to be less than in other parts of the world. If we are to minimise the pressure sore impact, it appears like we need more focus on gait re-education and standardised ADL programmes and patient treatment in the gym to possibly maximise healing and rehabilitation.

  3. Treatment of Ischial Pressure Sores with Both Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Flaps and Muscle Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Min Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Reconstruction of ischial pressure sore defects is challenging due to extensive bursas and high recurrence rates. In this study, we simultaneously applied a muscle flap that covered the exposed ischium and large bursa with sufficient muscular volume and a profunda femoris artery perforator fasciocutaneous flap for the management of ischial pressure sores. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from 14 patients (16 ischial sores whose ischial defects had been reconstructed using both a profunda femoris artery perforator flap and a muscle flap between January 2006 and February 2014. We compared patient characteristics, operative procedure, and clinical course. Results All flaps survived the entire follow-up period. Seven patients (50% had a history of surgery at the site of the ischial pressure sore. The mean age of the patients included was 52.8 years (range, 18-85 years. The mean follow-up period was 27.9 months (range, 3-57 months. In two patients, a biceps femoris muscle flap was used, while a gracilis muscle flap was used in the remaining patients. In four cases (25%, wound dehiscence occurred, but healed without further complication after resuturing. Additionally, congestion occurred in one case (6%, but resolved with conservative treatment. Among 16 cases, there was only one (6% recurrence at 34 months. Conclusions The combination of a profunda femoris artery perforator fasciocutaneous flap and muscle flap for the treatment of ischial pressure sores provided pliability, adequate bulkiness and few long-term complications. Therefore, this may be used as an alternative treatment method for ischial pressure sores.

  4. Sports Mass Age Therapy on the Reduction of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness of the Quadriceps Femoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boguszewski Dariusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Massage therapy is one of most commonly applied treatments during athletic training. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of sports massage therapy on reducing post-exercise quadriceps muscle soreness. Methods. A sample of 29 women aged 24-26 years was divided into an experimental group (n = 15 receiving classic sports massage therapy and a control group (n = 14 given no treatment. An exercise session consisting of five sets of deep squat jumps was administered after which lower limb power as assessed via the vertical jump test. Muscle soreness was assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS and exercise intensity with the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale. Subsequent measurements of lower limb power and muscle soreness were performed 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after the exercise session. Differences between the measurements were assessed by the Friedman and least significant difference tests while between-group comparisons involved the Mann-Whitney U test. Results. The largest decrease in lower limb power was observed between the first measurement after the exercise session and 24 h later (p < 0.01. The smallest decrease in power was observed in the massage group. The highest levels of muscle soreness were noted 24 h post-exercise in the massage group and 48 h post-exercise in the control group. The experimental group showed a decrease in muscle soreness in each subsequent measurement, with the results close to zero on the VAS 96 h postexercise. Conclusions. Massage therapy quickened recovery and improved muscle efficiency post-exercise and may serve as an effective treatment of muscle soreness. The analgesic effect of massage suggests it should be widely applied in sport, physical therapy and rehabilitation.

  5. Pressure Sores and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome: UC Davis Quality Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairam, Abhishek; Song, Ping; Patel, Nirav B; Wong, Michael S

    2018-05-01

    The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel estimates pressure sore care to approach $11 billion annually. It is not uncommon for these patients to present to the emergency department (ED) with a chief concern of a pressure sore, while concurrently carrying an undiagnosed infectious process that is the culprit for the acute presentation, rather than the chronic pressure injury. We aim to identify patients who met systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria at ED presentation who were referred to plastic and reconstructive surgery for pressure sore debridement prior to a complete medical workup. We hypothesize that a restructuring of the ED triaging system would help conserve hospital resources, reduce costs of pressure sore management, and improve patient care and outcomes by first treating primary, underlying pathologies. This is a retrospective chart review of 36 patients who presented to the University of California, Davis Medical Center Emergency Department with a pressure sore and met SIRS criteria, but obtained a plastic surgery consult prior to a full medical workup. We defined SIRS based on standardized criteria: temperature greater than 100.4°F or less than 96.8°F, pulse rate greater than 90 beats/min, respiratory rate greater than 20 breaths/min or PaCO2 less than 32 mm Hg, white blood cell count greater than 12,000, less than 4000, or greater than 10% bands. Fifty percent of patients (18/36) met SIRS criteria at ED presentation for their pressure sores. Of these SIRS patients, 9 (50%) had a diagnosis of urinary tract infection or urosepsis, 6 (33.3%) had sepsis of undefined origin, and 3 (16.7%) had other diagnoses such as osteomyelitis or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Half of patients consulted while in the University of California, Davis Medical Center Emergency Department with pressure sores met SIRS criteria and received a plastic and reconstructive surgery consult prior to a full medical workup. We propose a new algorithm for

  6. [A variant of island flaps for the covering of pressure sores: the hatchet flap. Apropos of 31 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillot, M; Lodde, J P; Pegorier, O; Reynaud, J P; Cormerais, A

    1994-08-01

    The authors propose a modification of the classical design of island flaps for cover of pressure sores, applied to gluteus maximus and tensor fascia lata muscles: the hatchet flap. 31 flaps have been used including 13 gluteus maximus superior flaps for sacral pressure sores, 9 gluteal inferior flaps for ischial pressure sores and 9 tensor fascia lata flaps for trochanteric pressure sores. A small partial necrosis and two cases of sepsis were observed in this series, but did not require surgical revision. The authors emphasize the value of this modification of the classical flap design, which preserves an even better musculocutaneous capital in these patients, who are often already multi-operated. The very rapid recovery of patients supports the authors' application of hatchet flaps to the surgery of pressure sores, and suggests the extension to other musculocutaneous flaps in the future.

  7. Gauging the Galactic thick disk with RR Lyrae stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz G.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we present results from the QUEST RR Lyrae Survey of the thick disk. The survey spans ~480 sq. deg. at low latitude |b| < 30°, with multi-epoch VRI observations, obtained with the QUEST-I camera at the 1m Jürgen Stock Schmidt telescope located at the National Astronomical Observatory of Venezuela. This constitutes the first deep RR Lyrae survey of the Galactic thick disk conducted at low galactic latitudes, covering simultaneously a large range in radial (8RR Lyrae stars having accurate distances (errors <7% and individual reddenings derived from each star’s color curve at minimum light. Moreover, the use of RR Lyrae stars as tracers ensures negligible contamination from the Galactic thin disk. We find a thick disk mean scale height hZ = 0.94 ± 0.11kpc and scale length hR = 3.2 ± 0.4kpc, derived from the vertical and radial mean density profiles of RR Lyrae stars. We also find evidence of thick disk flaring and results that may suggest the thick disk radial density profile shows signs of antitruncation. We discuss our findings in the context of recent thick disk formation models.

  8. RR lyrae variable pulsations and the Oosterhoff groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    It is concluded that Oosterhoff group I clusters have 0.55 M/sub sun/ stars and group II clusters have 0.65 M/sub sun/ stars. The Y value is always about 0.29. Mean log L/L/sub sun/ values are 1.66 and 1.78 giving M/sub bol/ = 0.60 and 0.30 for the RR Lyrae variables in these two groups of clusters. For field RR Lyrae variables at M = approx. 0.5 M/sub sun/ or less, perhaps M/sub bol/ = 0.90 or even larger as Clube and Jones propose. Apparently all evolution is blueward for RR Lyrae variables, and the color overlap of F and 1H pulsators is not real

  9. Brown-headed Cowbird parasitism of the Black-throated Sparrow in central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.J.; van Riper, Charles

    2004-01-01

    From 1994-1996 we investigated effects of Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism on Black-throated Sparrow (Amphispiza bilineata) nesting success in the Verde Valley of central Arizona. Of 56 Black-throated Sparrow nests, 52% were parasitized. Black-throated Sparrows appear to respond to natural parasitism by accepting the cowbird egg, deserting the nest, or burying the cowbird egg. Removal and damage of host eggs by female cowbirds effectively reduced clutch size from an average of 3.4 to 1.9 eggs. Because of this reduced clutch size, Black-throated Sparrow reproductive success was significantly lower in parasitized nests (0.2 young fledged/ nest) as compared to nonparasitized nests (1.6 young fledged/nest). When comparing cowbird parasitism between two habitat types, we found significantly higher parasitism frequencies in crucifixion-thorn (Canotia holacantha) versus creosote-bush (Larrea divaricata) habitat. We argue that this difference in parasitism is due to the greater number of tall perches (e.g., shrubs >4 m) available in crucifixion-thorn habitat, providing vantage points for female cowbirds to better find Black-throated Sparrow nests.

  10. CLINICAL CORRELATIONS BETWEEN GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE AND CHILDREN'S THROAT AND LARYNX CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.L. Soldatskiy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the impact exerted by the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERB on the throat and larynx status, the authors examined 39 children (main group, suffering from GERB, and 15 patients (control group, suffering from the chronic gastrointestinal tract pathology, who did not confirm GERB. All the patients underwent a 24'hour рН-monitoring of the esophagus and laryngeal part of the throat and upper airways endoscopy. They discovered that for the children, suffering from the extraesophageal GERB (i.e. regurgitation of the sourreflux substance above the upper esophageal sphincter into the hypopharynx, it is also typical for chronic throat and larynx pathology: the endoscopy identified the accompanied pathology among 80%, chronic pharyngitis among 62,5%, and their combination among 48% of patients. Normalization of an mucous membrane of esophagus is highly likely to correlate (r = 0,54, р<0,01 with the throat and larynx status normalization. Thus, it is very likely that GERB and its extraesophageal variant in particular plays a great role in pathogenesis of the throat and larynx disease development. This circumstance should be consider both in therapy of the patients with GERB and detection of pathologies in the ENT organs.Key words: gastroesophageal reflux, chronic pharyngitis, chronic laryngitis, children.

  11. Impact of an Exhaust Throat on Semi-Idealized Rotating Detonation Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model of a rotating detonation engine (RDE) is used to examine the impact of an exhaust throat (i.e., a constriction) on performance. The model simulates an RDE which is premixed, adiabatic, inviscid, and which contains an inlet valve that prevents backflow from the high pressure region directly behind the rotating detonation. Performance is assessed in terms of ideal net specific impulse which is computed on the assumption of lossless expansion of the working fluid to the ambient pressure through a notional diverging nozzle section downstream of the throat. Such a semi-idealized analysis, while not real-world, allows the effect of the throat to be examined in isolation from, rather than coupled to (as it actually is) various loss mechanisms. For the single Mach 1.4 flight condition considered, it is found that the addition of a throat can yield a 9.4 percent increase in specific impulse. However, it is also found that when the exit throat restriction gets too small, an unstable type of operation ensues which eventually leads to the detonation failing. This behavior is found to be somewhat mitigated by the addition of an RDE inlet restriction across which there is an aerodynamic loss. Remarkably, this loss is overcome by the benefits of the further exhaust restrictions allowed. The end result is a configuration with a 10.3 percent improvement in ideal net specific thrust.

  12. Treatment of pressure sores in spina bifida patients with calcium alginate and foam dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausili, E; Paolucci, V; Triarico, S; Maestrini, C; Murolo, D; Focarelli, B; Rendeli, C

    2013-06-01

    Prospective study on local treatment of pressure sores using calcium alginate and foam dressings in spina bifida patients. Investigate if this sequential approach is valid and safe for selected patients with neurological impairments. Using European Pressure Ulcer Grading System, after clinical evaluation of local sore, selected patients of Spina Bifida Center of Rome were treated with sequential calcium alginate and foam dressings for 12 weeks. Pressure ulcere surfaces were measured monthly by ulcer tracing. The endpoints were the mean absolute areas surface reduction during every month and number of patients achieving a 50% or more during study. 14 patients (7 males aged 12-24 years) with spina bifida and pressure sores were treated. Mean and standard deviation of mean surface area reduction were 12.5 ± 7.5 cm 2 at start of the study versus 3.7 ± 5.2 cm 2 after 12 weeks, p pressure sores in selected patients with spina bifida. In fact, they protect the wound and create an environment favorable to healing.

  13. [Assessment of patients with pressure sores admitted in a tertiary care center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Adriana; Maurici, Alice; do Valle, Juliana Barros; Zaclikevis, Viviane Renata; Kleinubing, Harry

    2007-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and analyze the profile of patients with pressure sores, focusing on risk factors, the patients' clinical characteristics at a tertiary care center, as well as stage and location of the lesions on the body. This was a cross sectional not controlled observational study, all patients admitted from April to June of 2005 were observed daily to identify all cases of pressure sores. The affected patients were evaluated by a standard questionnaire and the Scale of Braden was applied to define the risk of developing ulcers. Of the 690 patients admitted during the referred period, a prevalence of 5.9% of patients with lesions was observed, equivalent to 41 patients 63.9% of which were elderly and the average length of stay was 18 days. In the sample studied 41.5% of patients were found in the internal medicine section and the intensive care unit, ICU. The most common location for sores was the sacral area, corresponding to 73.1% of the patients, and stage II was the most frequent, observed in 58.5% of those patients. According to the Braden scale, most patients, 80.4%, had a high risk of developing pressure ulcers, compared to 9.7% of patients with moderate risk and 7.4% with low risk. The affected patients were at high risk of developing pressure sores. Prevalence of these lesions and the clinical and demographic profile of the affected patients are in accordance with the data in literature.

  14. An audit of pressure sores caused by intermittent compression devices used to prevent venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Joanna; Thomas, Sunil

    2011-12-01

    When intermittent compression devices (ICDs) are used to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) they can cause pressure sores in a selected group of women, undergoing long operations. A prospective audit pre and post intervention showed a reduced risk with an alternative device, without increasing the risk of VTE.

  15. [Pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps for repair of large sacrococcygeal pressure sores].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Henglin; Li, Huatao; Chen, Yang; Li, Qiang; Wu, Shenggang; Lili, Wang; Yan, Lei; Xiaoying, Zhou

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps for repairing large sacrococcygeal pressure sores. Between June 2003 and August 2011, 6 paraplegia patients with large sacrococcygeal pressure sores were repaired with the pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps. There were 2 males and 4 females with an average age of 45.6 years (range, 37-62 years). The mean disease duration was 8.4 months (range, 3-26 months). According to National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) standard, 6 cases rated as degree IV. The size of pressure sores ranged from 15 cm x 13 cm to 18 cm x 16 cm. The size of flaps ranged from 18 cm x 14 cm to 21 cm x 15 cm. After operation, all flaps survived successfully. The wounds healed by first intention in 5 cases; partial dehiscence of incision occurred in 1 case, which was cured after dressing change for 26 days. Six patients were followed up 6-24 months (mean, 12.5 months). The appearance and texture of the flaps were smooth and soft with good elasticity and no ulceration. Pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps can repair large sacrococcygeal pressure sores. The appearance of flaps is smooth and has good compression-resistance effect.

  16. Evaluating the effects of pentoxifylline administration on experimental pressure sores in rats by biomechanical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaei, Kobra; Bayat, Mohammad; Torkman, Giti; Rezaie, Fatemealsadat; Amini, Abdollah; Noruzian, Mohsen; Tavassol, Azaedh; Bayat, Mehernoush

    2012-09-01

    This study used a biomechanical test to evaluate the effects of pentoxifylline administration on the wound healing process of an experimental pressure sore induced in rats. Under general anesthesia and sterile conditions, experimental pressure sores generated by no. 25 Halsted mosquito forceps were inflicted on 12 adult male rats. Pentoxifylline was injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 50 mg/kg daily from the day the pressure sore was generated, for a period of 20 days. At the end of 20 days, rats were sacrificed and skin samples extracted. Samples were biomechanically examined by a material testing instrument for maximum stress (N mm(2)), work up to maximum force (N), and elastic stiffness (N/mm). In the experimental group, maximum stress (2.05±0.15) and work up to maximum force (N/mm) (63.75±4.97) were significantly higher than the control group (1.3±0.27 and 43.3±14.96, P=0.002 and P=0.035, respectively). Pentoxifylline administration significantly accelerated the wound healing process in experimental rats with pressure sores, compared to that of the control group.

  17. Interleukin-6 and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Do Not Vary during the Menstrual Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Morgan E.; Berg, Kris E.; Meendering, Jessica R.; Llewellyn, Tamra L.; French, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Jeremy E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a difference in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and delayed onset muscles soreness (DOMS) exists in two different phases of the menstrual cycle. Nine runners performed one 75-min high-intensity interval running session during the early follicular (EF) phase and once during the midluteal (ML) phase of the…

  18. Pattern of Pressure Sores in Spinal Injured Patients with in the First ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Before 2006, all our spinal injured patients were nursed on conventional form mattress without pressure redistributing support surface. Pressure sore was a common complication and was a major contributing factor to prolonged hospitalization. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the pattern of pressure ...

  19. The globular cluster ω Centauri and its RR Lyrae variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    The significance of some of the unusual characteristics of the globular cluster ωCentauri in various fundamental problems is explored. Interest is centred on the properties of the cluster RR Lyraes, and what they can contribute to studies of early cluster chemical enrichment, stellar pulsation, the distance scale, stellar evolution, stellar ages and the Oosterhoff period-shift problem. This article, which is intended to highlight problems and progress rather than give a comprehensive review, includes new results based on photometry of the RR Lyraes, red giants, subgiants, horizontal-branch and main sequence stars in the cluster. (author)

  20. Period Changes of 23 Field RR Lyrae Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Chang Rey

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The secular period behavior of 23 field RR Lyrae stars is studied in order to determine if the observed period changes could be attributed, at least in the mean, to stellar evolution. The sample of stars is subdivided into two Oosterhoff groups based on the metallicity and period-shift. Despite the small sample size, we found a distinct bias toward positive period changes in the group variables. The period changes of the group variables in globular clusters. This provides yet another support for the Lee, Demarque, and Zinn(1990 evolutionary models of RR Lyrae stars and their explanation of the Sandage period-shift effect.

  1. Steam in RR Telescopii and Henize 2-38

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D A [Anglo-Australian Observatory, Epping (Australia); Beattie, D H; Lee, T J; Stewart, J M; Williams, P M

    1978-03-01

    Low-resolution scans in the 1.9-2.6..mu..m atmospheric window reveal steam (H/sub 2/O) and CO adsorption bands in the spectra of the symbiotic stars RR Tel and He 2-38. The steam absorption in RR Tel is particularly intense while the CO is weak, implying the presence in the system of a Mira variable seen near minimum light. In He 2-38 the steam band is weaker while the CO is stronger, as expected for a Mira seen near maximum.

  2. Evaluation of local muscle soreness treatment with anterior bite splint made of soft putty impression material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Laksono

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Local muscle soreness is the most common temporomandibular disorders complaint of patients seeking treatment in the dental clinics. The emergency treatment that can be done in the clinics to manage this disorder is by making anterior bite splint. Anterior bite splint is usually made of acrylic, but currently there is a soft putty impression material that can also be used for making anterior bite splint. The effectiveness of soft putty anterior bite splint in local muscle soreness treatment still has not clear. Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of the soft putty impression material as a material used for making anterior bite splint in the treatment of local muscle soreness. Case: Six patients was reported five female patients aged 20-40 years old and one male patient aged 37 years old with local muscle soreness. Four female patients with a “click” sound on TMJ. Case management: Make differential diagnosis with screening history (anamnesis, clinical examination consists of extra oral examination such as muscle and temporomandibular joint palpation, measure the mandibular movement, end-feel, load test, intra oral examination and radiographic evaluation. Record the results and make the diagnosis. Make a soft putty anterior bite splint, adjusted and inserted in the maxillary anterior teeth. Record the results based on signs and symptoms. Conclusion: It can be concluded that anterior bite splint made of soft putty impression material is effective for treatment the local muscle soreness.Latar belakang: Salah satu tipe temporomandibular disorders yang paling sering dijumpai di klinik dokter gigi adalah local muscle soreness. Perawatan yang dapat dengan segera dilakukan di klinik untuk mengelola gangguan tersebut adalah dengan pembuatan anterior bite splint. Biasanya anterior bite splint terbuat dari akrilik, namun saat ini telah ada bahan cetak soft putty yang memungkinkan untuk dipakai sebagai bahan pembuatan anterior bite splint

  3. Comparison of gluteal perforator flaps and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flaps for reconstruction of sacral pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chou; Huang, Eng-Yen; Lin, Pao-Yuan

    2014-03-01

    The gluteus maximus myocutaneous flap was considered the workhorse that reconstructed sacral pressure sores, but was gradually replaced by fasciocutaneous flap because of several disadvantages. With the advent of the perforator flap technique, gluteal perforator (GP) flap has gained popularity nowadays. The aim of this study was to compare the complications and outcomes between GP flaps and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation (FR) flaps in the treatment of sacral pressure sores. Between April 2007 and June 2012, 63 patients underwent sacral pressure sore reconstructions, with a GP flap used in 31 cases and an FR flap used in 32 cases. Data collected on the patients included patient age, gender, co-morbidity for being bedridden and follow-up time. Surgical details collected included the defect size, operative time and estimated blood loss. Complications recorded included re-operation, dehiscence, flap necrosis, wound infection, sinus formation, donor-site morbidity and recurrence. The complications and clinical outcomes were compared between these two groups. We found that there was no significant difference in patient demographics, surgical complications and recurrence between these two groups. In gluteal FR flap group, all recurrent cases (five) were treated by reuse of previous flaps. Both methods are comparable, good and safe in treating sacral pressure sores. Gluteal FR flap can be performed without microsurgical dissection, and re-rotation is feasible in recurrent cases. The authors suggest using gluteal FR flaps in patients with a high risk of sore recurrence. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A composite gluteofemoral flap for reconstruction of large pressure sores over the sacrococcygeal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yun; Zhuang, Yue-Hong; Xue, Lan; Zheng, He-Ping; Lin, Jian-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Gigantic pressure sores pose a daunting challenge for plastic surgeons. This paper presents a composite gluteofemoral flap for reconstruction of large pressure sores over the sacrococcygeal region. In this anatomical study, 30 embalmed cadaveric lower limbs were used for dissection to observe the musculocutaneous perforators of the inferior gluteal artery and the longitudinal nutritional vascular chain of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve. In this clinical study, eight patients underwent surgical harvest of the composite gluteofemoral flap for coverage of grade IV sacrococcygeal pressure sores. The size of the pressure sores ranged between 16 × 9 cm and 22 × 10 cm. The inferior gluteal artery was present in 26 cases and absent in four cases. It gave off two to four musculocutaneous branches with a diameter larger than 0.5 mm to the gluteus maximus. A direct cutaneous branch was given off at the inferior margin of the gluteus maximus, serving as a nutritional artery for the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve. The size of the flap harvested ranged between 22 × 9 cm and 32 × 10 cm. Flaps in seven patients survived uneventfully and developed epidermal necrosis at the distal margin in one case. An average 2-year follow-up revealed no recurrence of pressure sores. The composite gluteofemoral flap, being robust in blood supply, simple in surgical procedure, and large in donor territory, is an important addition to the armamentarium. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Capillary pressure at irregularly shaped pore throats: Implications for water retention characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Hyoung Suk; Kang, Dong Hun; Jang, Jaewon; Kim, Kwang Yeom; Yun, Tae Sup

    2017-12-01

    The random shapes of pore throats in geomaterials hinder accurate estimation of capillary pressure, and conventional pore network models that simply use the Young-Laplace equation assuming circular pore throats overestimate the capillary pressure. As a solution to this problem that does not complicate the pore network model or slow its implementation, we propose a new morphological analysis method to correlate the capillary pressure at an irregular pore channel with its cross-sectional geometry using lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulation and Mayer and Stowe-Princen theory. Geometry-based shape factors for pore throats are shown here to correlate strongly with the capillary pressure obtained by LB simulation. Water retention curves obtained by incorporating the morphological calibration into conventional pore network simulation and their correlative scheme agree well with experimental data. The suggested method is relevant to pore-scale processes such as geological CO2 sequestration, methane bubbling from wetlands, and enhanced carbon recovery.

  6. Mapping Speech Spectra from Throat Microphone to Close-Speaking Microphone: A Neural Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yegnanarayana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Speech recorded from a throat microphone is robust to the surrounding noise, but sounds unnatural unlike the speech recorded from a close-speaking microphone. This paper addresses the issue of improving the perceptual quality of the throat microphone speech by mapping the speech spectra from the throat microphone to the close-speaking microphone. A neural network model is used to capture the speaker-dependent functional relationship between the feature vectors (cepstral coefficients of the two speech signals. A method is proposed to ensure the stability of the all-pole synthesis filter. Objective evaluations indicate the effectiveness of the proposed mapping scheme. The advantage of this method is that the model gives a smooth estimate of the spectra of the close-speaking microphone speech. No distortions are perceived in the reconstructed speech. This mapping technique is also used for bandwidth extension of telephone speech.

  7. Erythromycine resistance in streptococcus pyogenes group a throat isolates in sukkur city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, B.

    2007-01-01

    To examine and evaluate the predominant and common etiologic agent(s) of pharyngitis in Sukkur city and to determine their current antibiotic susceptibility/resistance trends. Out of 257 throat samples, 149 positive for Streptococcus pyogenes Group A between November 2001 and May 2003 from adult population of Sukkur city were tested for their susceptibility to erythromycin, clindamycin, azithromycin and clairithromycin. The throat samples (swabs) were examined by Gram-stain, API system, and for presence of a hemolysis. Samples were further cultured on Muller Hinton agar for determination of antibiotic sensitivity patterns. The sensitivity was performed on only those samples which were positive for S. pyogenes. Of all throat isolates, 95% were predominantly resistant to erythromycin. Their sensitivity towards clindamycin was 30%, azithromycin 44% and clairithromycin 76% respectively. The current pharyngeal isolates of S. pyogenes exhibited frequent and alarmingly high erythromycin resistance which may be due to both intrinsic and acquired mechanisms. (author)

  8. Electroosmotic transport in fine grained sediments with respect to pore throats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, H.; Zorn, R.; Haus, R.; Czurda, K. [Dept. of Applied Geology, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Electroosmotic experiments were performed with two different fine grained soils, which were consolidated in different ways. The electroosmotic permeability was calculated using the transported volume of water under a dc electric field. In addition to the pH-values prior and after the experiments near the anode and cathode the dominating pore throat-diameters of the samples were analysed by mercury porosimetry. The electroosmotic permeability can be correlated with the dominating pore throat-diameter. Not only chemical parameters like zeta-potential or ion-concentration but also the kind and structure of the soil particles characterize electroosmotic transport. (orig.)

  9. TREATMENT OF ACUTE INFLAMMATORY DISEASES ACCOMPANIED BY THROAT IRRITATION AND PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Petrovskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenetically, prescription of local action drugs containing a wide spectrum antiseptic is reasonable for the upper respiratory tract diseases accompanied by throat irritation and pain. It should be noted that such drugs are very popular among parents; however, most of these drugs may have a range of side effects, which considerably complicate their use in children. That is why the right choice of local action drugs for the acute inflammatory diseases accompanied by throat irritation and pain is a guarantee of treatment efficacy and high compliance. This article examines pharmacological qualities of an antiseptic-containing local action drug permitted to use in children over 4 years of age.

  10. Menopause, hormone replacement and RR and QT modulation during sleep

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lanfranchi, P. A.; Gosselin, N.; Kára, T.; Jurák, Pavel; Somers, V. K.; Denesle, R.; Petit, D.; Carrier, J.; Nadeau, R.; Montplaisir, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 6 (2005), s. 561-566 ISSN 1389-9457 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0402 Keywords : Sleep * Menopause * RR interval * QT interval * Gender * Hormones Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2005

  11. Cirugía reconstructiva de las úlceras por presión Reconstructive surgery of pressure sores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sores are frequent in certain group of patients with predisposing conditions. In their evolution, this type of sores may require surgery, but the incidence of postoperative complications is high in this type of patients, given the confluence of factors that go against the sucessful surgery of these lesions in these patients. A retrospective cross-sectional descriptive study was made to evaluate the results of surgical treatment of pressure sores in a 3 years-period. Taking into account the studied variables, the drawn conclusions will allow designing new strategies for care of these patients, in order to reduce postoperative morbidity and lenght of stay at hospital

  12. APLIKASI PEMESANAN MAKANAN ONLINE BERBASIS WEB PADA RUMAH MAKAN PAGI SORE SIPIN JAMBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novhirtamely Kahar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rumah Makan Pagi Sore Sipin Jambi merupakan rumah makan yang menyediakan bermacam-macam menu makanan khas minang dan memiliki banyak pelanggan. Pemesanan makanan bagi pelanggan tetap jika jarak tempat tinggal dengan rumah makan berjauhan selama ini dilakukan melalui telepon. Cara tersebut memiliki kendala, salah satunya pelanggan tidak mengetahui daftar menu dan harga yang ditawarkan oleh rumah makan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk membangun aplikasi pemesanan makanan online sehingga penyampaian informasi menjadi cepat, akurat, memiliki jangkauan yang luas, serta dapat memesan makanan secara online. Sistem aplikasi pemesanan ini terdiri dari aplikasi untuk pelanggan dan admin. Aplikasi untuk pelanggan terdiri dari : Home, Profil, Menu, Paket Catering, Promotion, Info, dan Pemesanan. Aplikasi pemesanan untuk pelanggan terdiri dari Delivery Service, Paket Catering Service, dan Paket Catering Ruang Minang. Sedangkan aplikasi untuk admin terdiri dari olah data menu utama, transaksi, dan laporan. Untuk transaksi pembayaran dilakukan secara cash kepada bagian pengiriman. Sistem aplikasi ini dibangun dengan menggunakan PHP dan database MySQL. Dengan dibangunnya aplikasi ini, maka pelanggan dengan mudah mendapatkan informasi tentang Rumah Makan Pagi Sore Sipin Jambi dan dapat melakukan pemesanan makanan dimana saja dan kapan saja, sehingga dapat meningkatkan jumlah pelanggan dan berdampak pada peningkatan profit Rumah Makan Pagi Sore tersebut.Rumah Makan Pagi Sore Sipin Jambi merupakan rumah makan yang menyediakan bermacam-macam menu makanan khas minang dan memiliki banyak pelanggan. Pemesanan makanan bagi pelanggan tetap jika jarak tempat tinggal dengan rumah makan berjauhan selama ini dilakukan melalui telepon. Cara tersebut memiliki kendala, salah satunya pelanggan tidak mengetahui daftar menu dan harga yang ditawarkan oleh rumah makan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk membangun aplikasi pemesanan makanan online sehingga penyampaian informasi menjadi

  13. Inferior gluteal artery perforator flap: a viable alternative for ischial pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Seok; Lew, Dae Hyun; Roh, Tai Suk; Yoo, Won Min; Lee, Won Jai; Tark, Kwan Chul

    2009-10-01

    The ischial area is by far the most common site for pressure sores in wheelchair-bound paraplegic patients, because most of the pressure of the body is exerted on this area in the seated position. Even after a series of successful pressure sore treatments, the site is very prone to relapse from the simplest everyday tasks. Therefore, it is crucial to preserve the main pedicle during primary surgery. Several surgical procedures, such as myocutaneous flap and perforator flap, have been introduced for the treatment of pressure sores. During a 4-year time period at our institute, we found favourable clinical results using the inferior gluteal artery perforator (IGAP) procedure for ischial sore treatment. A total of 23 patients (20 males and three females) received IGAP flap surgery in our hospital from January 2003 to January 2007. Surgery was performed on the same site again in 10 (43%) patients who had originally relapsed after undergoing the conventional method of pressure sore surgery. The average age of patients was 47.4 years (range 26-71 years). Most of the patients were paraplegic (16 cases, 70%) and others were either quadriplegic (four cases, 17%) or ambulatory (three cases, 13%). Based on hospital records and clinical photographs, we attempted to assess the feasibility and practicability of the IGAP flap procedure through comparative analysis of several parameters including the size of the defective area, treatment modalities, relapses, complications, and postoperative treatments. The average follow-up duration for 23 subjects was 25.4 months (range 5-42 months). All flaps survived without major complications. Partial flap necrosis developed in one case but secondary healing was achieved and the final outcome was not impaired. Most of the cases healed well during the follow-up period. Postoperative complications such as wound dehiscence and fistula developed in some subjects, but all healed well with a secondary treatment. A total of five cases relapsed

  14. THE RR LYRAE VARIABLES AND HORIZONTAL BRANCH OF NGC 6656 (M22) {sup ,}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunder, Andrea; Walker, Alistair R.; Paredes Alvarez, Leonardo [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Stetson, Peter B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, NRC-Herzberg, National Research Council, Victoria BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Cassisi, Santi [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Layden, Andrew [Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403 (United States); Bono, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Catelan, Márcio [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Clem, James L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Matsunaga, Noriyuki [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Salaris, Maurizio [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Lee, Jae-Woo [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Chaboyer, Brian, E-mail: akunder@ctio.noao.edu, E-mail: mcatelan@astro.puc.cl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The first calibrated broadband UBVI time-series photometry is presented for the RR Lyrae variable stars in NGC 6656 (M22), with observations spanning a range of 22 years. We have also redetermined the variability types and periods for the RR Lyrae stars identified previously by photographic observations, revising the number of fundamental-mode RR Lyrae variables (RR0) to 10 and the number of first-overtone variables (RR1) to 16. The mean periods of the RR0 and RR1 variables are (P) {sub RR0} = 0.66 ± 0.02 days and (P) {sub RR1} = 0.33 ± 0.01 days, respectively, supporting an Oosterhoff II classification for the cluster. The number ratio of RR1-type to all RR-type variables is N {sub 1}/N{sub RR} = 0.61, also consistent with an Oosterhoff II designation. Both the RR Lyrae stars' minimum light colors and the blue edge of the RR Lyrae instability strip suggest E( B – – V) = 0.36 ± 0.02 mag toward M22. Regarding the HB morphology of M22, we find (B-R)/(B+V+R) = +0.97 ± 0.1 and at least one ''gap'' located in an unusual part of the blue HB, in the middle of the so-called hot HB stars.

  15. Dual throat NaK pump performance evaluation (conceptual design of prototype)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation of the performance of the dual throat NaK pump for the 5 Kwe Reactor TE System is discussed. Performance at nominal operating conditions and at startup conditions is predicted. The basis for selection of this pump design is presented. (U.S.)

  16. The Comparison of Haemophilus Influenza in the Throat of Healthy Infants with Different Feeding Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kazemi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Haemophilus influenza (HI is the most commonly found pathogenic bacteria in pediatric otitis media and lower respiratory tract infections. Bacterial attachment to pharyngeal cells and proliferation may be necessary for infection. In the presence of human milk, attachment of HI to pharyngeal cells and colonization may be inhibited. To evaluate the protecting role of breast milk, we investigated the incidence of HI isolated from the throat of healthy infants with different feeding methods. Methods: Between August 2002 and March 2003, 210 healthy infants (70 purely breast-fed, 70 purely formula-fed, 70 mixed-fed, aged 1-6 months were enrolled into the study and a throat culture was taken in all of them. The incidence of HI was evaluated using Haemophilus Test Agar Bose (HTAB plates. Results: The incidence of HI in purely breast-fed, mixed-fed and purely formula-fed infants was 2.9%, 42.9% and 75.7% respectively (P = 0.000. The mean age and weight of cases in the three groups were not statistically different. Conclusion: These data suggest that human milk protects the throat of healthy infants from HI colonization especially in purely breast-fed cases. Keywords: Breast milk, Haemophilus influenza, Throat culture

  17. Passive Rocket Diffuser Testing: Reacting Flow Performance of Four Second-Throat Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel R.; Allgood, Daniel C.; Saunders, Grady P.

    2016-01-01

    Second-throat diffusers serve to isolate rocket engines from the effects of ambient back pressure. As one of the nation's largest rocket testing facilities, the performance and design limitations of diffusers are of great interest to NASA's Stennis Space Center. This paper describes a series of tests conducted on four diffuser configurations to better understand the effects of inlet geometry and throat area on starting behavior and boundary layer separation. The diffusers were tested for a duration of five seconds with a 1455-pound thrust, LO2/GH2 thruster to ensure they each reached aerodynamic steady state. The effects of a water spray ring at the diffuser exits and a water-cooled deflector plate were also evaluated. Static pressure and temperature measurements were taken at multiple axial locations along the diffusers, and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were used as a tool to aid in the interpretation of data. The hot combustion products were confirmed to enable the diffuser start condition with tighter second throats than predicted by historical cold-flow data or the theoretical normal shock method. Both aerodynamic performance and heat transfer were found to increase with smaller diffuser throats. Spray ring and deflector cooling water had negligible impacts on diffuser boundary layer separation. CFD was found to accurately capture diffuser shock structures and full-flowing diffuser wall pressures, and the qualitative behavior of heat transfer. However, the ability to predict boundary layer separated flows was not consistent.

  18. Throat Colonization of Neonatal Nursery Staff by Ureaplasma urealyticum: an Infection Control or Occupational Health Consideration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne E Embree

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Very low birth weight infants often have protracted respiratory tract colonization with Ureaplasma urealyticum. To determine whether prolonged contact with very low birth weight infants resulted in higher rates of upper respiratory tract colonization with this organism for caregivers, throat swabs for U urealyticum culture were obtained from medical, nursing and other support staff working in the neonatal intensive care and level II nurseries at the Health Sciences Centre and the St Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Throat colonization by U urealyticum was demonstrated in 7.3% (95% ci 0 to 15.6% of 41 nurses working in the intensive care nurseries but in none of the 48 nurses working in other locations or the 66 other individuals tested (P=0.02. However, throat colonization was not significantly higher among the neonatal intensive care nurses than among the women delivering at one of the study institutions. Close contact with very low birth weight infants appears to constitute a minimal risk for increased throat colonization with U urealyticum among hospital staff members.

  19. Throat ache ans swelling of the neck: first symptoms of Lemierre's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, J.; Ybema, A; Baas, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome, a thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, is a rare disorder, usually caused by the microorganism Fusobacterium necrophorum. Throat ache and swelling of the neck are often the first symptoms. Without adequate treatment, Lemierre's syndrome may result in thrombosis of the

  20. Study on Compatibility of Polymer Hydrodynamic Size and Pore Throat Size for Honggang Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Yin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long core flow experiment was conducted to study problems like excessive injection pressure and effective lag of oil wells during the polymer flooding in Honggang reservoir in Jilin oilfield. According to the changes in viscosity and hydrodynamic dimensions before and after polymer solution was injected into porous media, the compatibility of polymer hydrodynamic dimension and the pore throat size was studied in this experiment. On the basis of the median of radius R of pore throats in rocks with different permeability, dynamic light scattering method (DLS was adopted to measure the hydrodynamic size Rh of polymer solution with different molecular weights. The results state that three kinds of 1500 mg/L concentration polymer solution with 2000 × 104, 1500 × 104, and 1000 × 104 molecular weight matched well with the pore throat in rocks with permeability of 300 mD, 180 mD, and 75 mD in sequence. In this case, the ratios of core pore throat radius median to the size of polymer molecular clew R/Rh are 6.16, 5.74, and 6.04. For Honggang oil reservoir in Jilin, when that ratio ranges from 5.5 to 6.0, the compatibility of polymer and the pore structure will be relatively better.

  1. Increased number of ear-nose-throat malpractice complaints in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikoghosyan-Bossen, Gohar; Hauberg, Agnes; Homøe, Preben

    2012-01-01

    Danish ear, nose and throat (ENT) physicians have little knowledge of the type of decisions made at the Danish National Board of Patients' Complaints (NBPC). The aim of this study was to analyze and describe the epidemiology of ENT malpractice complaints by showing their distribution and volume i...

  2. Systematic analysis of ear-nose-throat malpractice complaints may be beneficial for patient safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikoghosyan-Bossen, Gohar; Hauberg, Agnes; Homøe, Preben

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of malpractice complaints can provide valuable information on patient safety. This study offers a detailed examination of the backgrounds concerning reasons and outcomes of ear, nose and throat (ENT) malpractice complaints handled by the National Board of Patients' Complaints (NBPC),...

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of rat throat and trachea following the effects of radon decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, J.; Vaupotic, J.; Kobal, I.; Draslar, K.

    1996-01-01

    In two preliminary experiments, five laboratory rats were exposed in a small chamber to radon-rich air. In both experiments the exposure was about 0.9 WLM. The surface of throat and trachea was examined by scanning electron microscope. (author)

  4. An overview of the microbiology of acute ear, nose and throat infections requiring hospitalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusan, M; Klug, T E; Ovesen, T

    2009-01-01

    This study is the first to provide an extensive overview of the microbiology of acute ear, nose and throat infections requiring hospitalisation. All 2,028 cases of acute infections admitted between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2006 were reviewed to assess the use of pre-admission antibiotics, m...

  5. Chronic cough management: dealing with a sensation of irritation in the throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Haruhiko; Fujimura, Masaki; Ohkura, Noriyuki; Makimura, Koichi

    2013-11-01

    Among the various types of laryngeal paraesthesia suffered by chronic cough patients, we often encounter 'a sensation of irritation in the throat (SIT)'. Our study indicated that capsaicin cough threshold was significantly (P sensation. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  6. The impact of recurrent throat infection on children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howel, Denise; Webster, Simon; Hayes, Jane; Barton, Andrew; Donaldson, Liam

    2002-06-01

    Recurrent throat problems in children are common and have an impact on the family. The appropriateness of surgery will depend on both clinical and social factors. The aim of this study was to assess the impact on the whole family when a child is suffering from recurrent throat problems, and investigate related parental attitudes. A total of 1190 parents of children in northern England for whom tonsillectomy or adeno-tonsillectomy was a possible treatment option were sent a questionnaire covering social and clinical issues such as children's symptoms, the impact on family life and parental attitudes. The majority of children had experienced more than four episodes in the previous year, had their sleep affected and time off school. Most parents were worried and reported disruption to the family, including taking time off work and cross-infection. Parental disruption, worry and eagerness for surgery were significantly associated with the duration of episodes of throat problems and the number of episodes in the previous year, but not with duration of tonsillitis. Time off school, or parental time off work was significantly associated with parental worry and disruption, but not with eagerness for surgery. This work highlights the impact of recurrent throat problems and related parental attitudes, and will aid in striking a balance between clinical requirements and the needs and wishes of the family.

  7. Effects of cryotherapy on muscle damage markers and perception of delayed onset muscle soreness after downhill running: A Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rossato

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Use of cryotherapy after exercise with eccentric contractions was effective to reestablish the level of biochemical markers of muscle damage and reduce muscle soreness and pain perception in subjects submitted to downhill running.

  8. Influence of ginger and cinnamon intake on inflammation and muscle soreness endued by exercise in Iranian female athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Shokri Mashhadi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Administration of ginger and cinnamon in athlete women for six weeks did not show any significant change in the IL-6 level, but showed a decrease in muscle soreness in the cinnamon and ginger groups.

  9. Giant trochanteric pressure sore: Use of a pedicled chimeric perforator flap for cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrotra Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sores are increasing in frequency commensurate with an ageing population with multi-system disorders and trauma. Numerous classic options are described for providing stable wound cover. With the burgeoning knowledge on perforator anatomy, recent approaches focus on the use of perforator-based flaps in bedsore surgery. A giant neglected trochanteric pressure sore in a paraplegic is presented. Since conventional options of reconstruction appeared remote, the massive ulcer was successfully managed by a chimeric perforator-based flap. The combined muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps were raised as separate paddles based on the anterolateral thigh perforator branches and provided stable cover without complications. Perforators allow versatility in managing complex wounds without compromising on established principles.

  10. [Discovery of Chlamydia trachomatis in the throat during diagnosis of secondary syphilis in an HIV+ patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniaud, François; Scieux, Catherine; Spindler, Edith; Janier, Michel

    2003-09-20

    Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) pharyngitis has rarely been described in the literature. Studies in the last decade have shown a prevalence of less than 5%, with more women than men infected in the pharynx. Among homosexual men, only one study, conducted more than 5 years ago, detected the presence of CT in the throat (in one patient out of 13 tested). A 33 year-old homosexual man consulted for cutaneous lesions on the palms and the chest. Infected by HIV, he was taking antiretroviral therapy but no antibiotic prophylaxis. He admitted practising unprotected (insertive and receptive) fellatio with unknown partners. The lesions were those of secondary syphilis but the location of the chancre remained unknown. An enlarged screening for sexually transmitted infections detected the presence, through molecular amplification, of CT in the throat without further localisation (urethra, anus). After intramuscular injection of Extencillin and an 8-day-regimen of cycline, CT was no longer detected in the throat. The course of HIV infection did not appear modified by this infectious episode. According to a review of the literature, the 4 most recent studies have not revealed CT in the throat of homosexuals although the bacteria was detected in the urethra of 3 to 4% of them. Chlamydia trachomatis is more frequently detected in the genital tract rather than the pharynx of women also screened in various localisations. These results must be tempered by the participant recruitment methods, diagnostic methods used, sample size and history of recent antibiotherapy. The pharyngeal mucosa might be less receptive to CT than the urethral mucosa. Association of CT pharyngitis with syphilis or its occurrence during HIV infection are not documented. The molecular amplification technique detects CT in the throat with sensitivity and specificity. A one-week regimen of cycline can cure this pharyngitis. Cost-effectiveness of screening for pharyngeal CT has not yet been assessed in persons 'at risk'.

  11. International migration patterns of Red-throated Loons (Gavia stellata) from four breeding populations in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Sarah E.; Uher-Koch, Brian D.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Fondell, Thomas F.

    2018-01-01

    Identifying post-breeding migration and wintering distributions of migratory birds is important for understanding factors that may drive population dynamics. Red-throated Loons (Gavia stellata) are widely distributed across Alaska and currently have varying population trends, including some populations with recent periods of decline. To investigate population differentiation and the location of migration pathways and wintering areas, which may inform population trend patterns, we used satellite transmitters (n = 32) to describe migration patterns of four geographically separate breeding populations of Red-throated Loons in Alaska. On average (± SD) Red-throated Loons underwent long (6,288 ± 1,825 km) fall and spring migrations predominantly along coastlines. The most northern population (Arctic Coastal Plain) migrated westward to East Asia and traveled approximately 2,000 km farther to wintering sites than the three more southerly populations (Seward Peninsula, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, and Copper River Delta) which migrated south along the Pacific coast of North America. These migration paths are consistent with the hypothesis that Red-throated Loons from the Arctic Coastal Plain are exposed to contaminants in East Asia. The three more southerly breeding populations demonstrated a chain migration pattern in which the more northerly breeding populations generally wintered in more northerly latitudes. Collectively, the migration paths observed in this study demonstrate that some geographically distinct breeding populations overlap in wintering distribution while others use highly different wintering areas. Red-throated Loon population trends in Alaska may therefore be driven by a wide range of effects throughout the annual cycle.

  12. Therapeutic Effect of External Application of Ligustrazine Combined with Holistic Nursing on Pressure Sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Junzhi; Han, Lin; Gong, Fen

    2016-08-15

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to explore the therapeutic effect of external application of ligustrazine combined with holistic nursing on pressure sores, as well as the underlying mechanism. MATERIAL AND METHODS From February 2014 to March 2015, a total of 32 patients with Phase II and Phase III pressure sores were enrolled and randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group. The clinical data were comparable between the 2 groups. In addition to holistic nursing, the patients in the experimental group received 4 weeks of continuous external application of ligustrazine, whereas patients in the control group received compound clotrimazole cream. Therapeutic effect and healing time were recorded. HaCaT cells were used as an in vitro model for mechanism analysis of the effect of ligustrazine in treating pressure sores. After culturing with different concentrations of ligustrazine or the inhibitor of AKT (LY294002) for 72 h, cell viability, clone formation numbers, and levels of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), p-AKT, and p-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) were determined. RESULTS Compared to the control group, the total effective rate in the experimental group was significantly higher, and the healing time was significantly reduced. Cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly upregulated by ligustrazine in a dose-dependent manner. Both the cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly inhibited by application of LY294002. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that ligustrazine combined with holistic nursing is an effective treatment of pressure sores. The protective effect may be associated with the promotion of cell growth by activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway.

  13. Flap surgery for pressure sores: should the underlying muscle be transferred or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, Filip E; Andrades, Patricio; Blondeel, Philip N; Hamdi, Moustapha; Roche, Nathalie; Stillaert, Filip; Van Landuyt, Koenraad; Monstrey, Stan

    2011-01-01

    Musculocutaneous flaps have become the first choice in the surgical repair of pressure sores, but the indication for including muscle in the transferred flaps still remains poorly defined. This study compares outcomes after muscle and non-muscle flap coverage of pressure sores to investigate whether it is still necessary to incorporate muscle tissue as part of the surgical treatment of these ulcers. A retrospective revision of 94 consecutive patients with ischial or sacral pressure sores operated between 1996 and 2002 was performed. Depending on the inclusion of muscle into the flap, the patients were divided in two groups: musculocutaneous flap group and fasciocutaneous flap group. Charts were reviewed for patient characteristics, ulcer features and reconstructive information. Data between groups were compared with emphasis on early (haematoma or seroma, dehiscence, infections, necrosis and secondary procedures) and late (recurrence) postoperative complications. A total of 37 wounds were covered with muscle and 57 wounds covered without muscle tissue. The groups were comparable in relation to age, gender, ulcer characteristics and timing for surgery. There were no significant differences in early complications between the study groups. The mean follow-up period was 3.10 ± 1.8 years (range: 0.5 to 6.7). There were no statistical differences in ulcer recurrence between the groups. The type of flap used was not associated with postoperative morbidity or recurrence in the univariate and multivariate analyses. The findings of this clinical study indicate that the musculocutaneous flaps are as good as fasciocutaneous flaps in the reconstruction of pressure sores, and they question the long-standing dogma that muscle is needed in the repair of these ulcers. Copyright © 2010 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical effects of Angelica dahurica dressing on patients with I-II phase pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fen; Niu, Junzhi; Pei, Xing

    2016-11-02

    Angelica dahurica is a well-known traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), while little information is available about its effects on pressure sores. We aimed to investigate the clinical effect of Angelica dahurica on patients with I-II phase pressure sores, as well as the underlying mechanism. Patients (n = 98) with phase I and phase II pressure sores were enrolled and randomly assigned to control and treated groups. In addition to holistic nursing, patients in the control group received compound clotrimazole cream, while patients in the treated group received continuous 4 weeks of external application of Angelica dahurica dressing. Therapeutic effect was recorded, along with the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Besides, HaCaT cells were cultured with different concentrations of Angelica dahurica, and then cell viability, clone formation numbers, cell cycle, and levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 were determined. The total effective rate in the treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Levels of IL-8, EGF, TGF-β, and VEGF were statistically increased by Angelica dahurica. In addition, the cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly upregulated by Angelica dahurica in a dose-dependent manner. Also, the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, and levels of cyclin D1 and CDK2 were significantly elevated. Our results suggest that Angelica dahurica may provide an effective clinical treatment for I-II phase pressure sores.

  15. Marine oil dietary supplementation reduces delayed onset muscle soreness after a 30 km run

    OpenAIRE

    Baum, Klaus; Telford, Richard D; Cunningham, Ross B

    2013-01-01

    Klaus Baum,1 Richard D Telford,2 Ross B Cunningham,3 1Trainingsinstitut Prof Baum, Köln, Germany; 2College of Medicine, Biology, and Environment, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 3The Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia Objective: Runners are prone to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) during long distance training. This especially holds for unaccustomed training volumes at moderate to high int...

  16. Efficiency of Magnetic Field Treatment on Pressure Sores in Bedridden Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferda Özdemir

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pressure sores are an important source of complications in patients who are immobilized and bedridden. We aimed to investigate the efficiency of magnetic field treatment in pressure sores. Material and Methods: This was a randomized, double blind controlled design study. 20 patients in the study group received magneto-therapy, once a day for 30 minutes and with 150G, keeping to the BTL09 magnetotherapy device’s program. In the control group, 20 patients received the dressing only once a day. The surface areas of the pressure sores were evaluated at the onset of the treatment (1st day, and on the 7th and 15th days.Results: When within group comparisons were conducted, a significant difference was observed between the 1st and 7th day, 7th and 15th day, and 1st and 15th day measures in both the groups in terms of the scar area. The average healing time for the treatment group was 10.80±4.06 (6-20 days, and the average healing time for the control group was 18.85±9.75 (5-32 days. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (z=-2.114, p=0.034. Also, there was a significant difference in the scar area between the two groups in the 15th day measure (z=-3.818, p=0.000.Conclusion: The healing process of the tissue can be accelerated.with the use of magnetotherapy in the treatment of pressure sores of stage II and III,

  17. Adsorção dos corantes RO16, RR2 e RR141 utilizando lodo residual da indústria têxtil Adsorption of dyes RO16, RR2 and RR141 using residual sludge of textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Regina Vasques

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A adsorção é uma das técnicas empregadas com sucesso para remoção efetiva da cor presente em efluentes têxteis. Com o objetivo de avaliar os diferentes parâmetros adsortivos, bem como determinar a eficiência de um adsorvente alternativo desenvolvido a partir de lodo residual têxtil na remoção de corantes, foram determinadas curvas de cinética de adsorção e isotermas. Por meio dos dados cinéticos e de equilíbrio obtidos, verificou-se que a 25ºC a adsorção foi favorável para todos os corantes, sendo esta a melhor condição para os corantes RO16 e RR2 na ausência de sais. Para o corante RR141, a adição de NaCl aumentou a capacidade de adsorção do adsorvente no equilíbrio e a adição de Na2SO4 favoreceu a adsorção para o corante RO16, ao contrário do que se observou para os outros dois corantes. A quantidade máxima de corante adsorvida por unidade de massa de adsorvente (q max nas melhores condições adsortivas para os corantes RO16, RR2 e RR141 foi de 81,30, 53,48 e 78,74 mg.g-1, respectivamente.The adsorption is one of the techniques that have been successfully used for effective removal of the dyes present in textile effluents. With the objective to evaluate the different adsorptive parameters, as well as determining the efficiency of one alternative adsorbent in the removal of dyes, kinetics and equilibrium data of adsorption were determined. By the kinetic data and of equilibrium, it was verified that the adsorption was favorable for all the dyes in 25ºC, being the best condition for the dye RO16 and RR2 in the total absence of salt. For the dye RR141, the addition of NaCl increased the adsorption capacity of adsorbent in the equilibrium and the addition of Na2SO4 favored the adsorption for the dye RO16, in contrast to what was observed for the two other dyes. The maximum quantity of dye adsorbed per unit mass of adsorbent (q max in the best adsorptive conditions for the dyes RO16, RR2 and RR141 was of 81

  18. RR LYRAE ATMOSPHERICS: WRINKLES OLD AND NEW. A PREVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, George W.

    2011-01-01

    I report some results of an echelle spectroscopic survey of RR Lyrae stars begun in 2006 that I presented in my Henry Norris Lecture of 2010 January 4. Topics include (1) atmospheric velocity gradients, (2) phase-dependent envelope turbulence as it relates to Peterson's discoveries of axial rotation on the horizontal branch and to Stothers' explanation of the Blazhko effect, (3) the three apparitions of hydrogen emission during a pulsation cycle, (4) the occurrence of He I lines in emission and absorption, (5) detection of He II emission and metallic line doubling in Blazhko stars, and finally (6) speculation about what helium observations of RR Lyrae stars in omega Centauri might tell us about the putative helium populations and the horizontal branch of that strange globular cluster.

  19. Long-term outcome of using posterior-thigh fasciocutaneous flaps for the treatment of ischial pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haodong; Hou, Chunlin; Chen, Aimin; Xu, Zhen

    2010-08-01

    Among the many difficult problems presented by patients with spinal cord injuries, management of ischial pressure ulcers remains challenging for reconstructive surgeons. This study describes the long-term outcome of using posterior-thigh fasciocutaneous flaps for the treatment of ischial pressure sores. Between January 1999 and June 2003, 12 patients with ischial sores were enrolled in this study. All the patients underwent early aggressive surgical debridement followed by surgical reconstruction with a laterally based posterior-thigh fasciocutaneous flap. The follow-up period ranged from 24 months to 97 months (mean, 62 months). All the flaps survived, and there were no partial flap losses. Primary-wound healing occurred in all the cases. In two patients, Grade II ischial pressure sores recurred 24 months and 27 months after the operation. There was no recurrence in the other 10 patients. The posterior-thigh fasciocutaneous pedicled flap was a good method for treating ischial bed sores. This flap could be used to treat recurrences observed after primary bed-sore treatment with other methods. The flap was easy to raise, and it did not cause any donor-site morbidity. The long-term outcome of using posterior-thigh fasciocutaneous flaps for the treatment of ischial pressure sores was generally good. (c) Thieme Medical Publishers.

  20. An Intelligent FPGA Based Anti-Sweating System for Bed Sore Prevention in a Clinical Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Jaichandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bed sores, a common problem among immobile patients occur as a result of continuous sweating due to increase in skin to bed surface temperature in patients lying on same posture for prolonged period. If left untreated, the skin can break open and become infected. Currently adopted methods for bed sores prevention include: use of two hourly flip chat for repositioning patient or use of air fluidized beds. However, the setbacks of these preventive measures include either use of costly equipment or wastage of human resources. This paper introduces an intelligent low cost FPGA based anti-sweating system for bed sores prevention in a clinical environment. The developed system consists of bed surface implanted temperature sensors interfaced with an FPGA chip for sensing the temperature change in patient’s skin to bed surface. Based on the temperature change, the FPGA chip select the - mode (heater/cooler and speed of the fan module. Furthermore, an alarm module was implemented to alert the nurse to reposition the patient only if patient’s skin to bed surface temperature exceeds a predefined threshold thereby saving human resources. By integrating the whole system into a single FPGA chip, we were able to build a low cost compact system without sacrificing processing power and flexibility.

  1. Reconstruction of trochanteric pressure sores with pedicled anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Hsin; Chen, Shih-Yi; Fu, Ju-Peng; Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Chen, Shao-Liang; Chen, Tim-Mo; Chen, Shyi-Gen

    2011-05-01

    To provide an alternative choice for covering trochanteric pressure sores, we report on a modified pedicle anterolateral thigh (ALT) myocutaneous flap based on the descending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery. From August 2007 to January 2010, 20 consecutive patients (10 men and 10 women) underwent 21 pedicled ALT myocutaneous flaps for reconstruction of trochanteric pressure sores. The flap was designed and elevated, resembling the ALT perforator flap including part of the vastus lateralis muscle but without skeletonisation of the perforators. The mean age of patients was 79.4 years (range: 46-103). The mean follow-up period was 13.9 months (range: 3-32). The flaps were 8-21 cm long and 5-11 cm wide. All flaps healed without major complications. All donor sites were closed primarily without skin grafting and showed good aesthetic results. No recurrence was observed. This modified design of pedicled ALT myocutaneous flap without skeletonisation of perforators is a reliable and easily harvested flap for reconstruction of trochanteric pressure sores with limited morbidity. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Propeller Flap: A Valid Method to Cover Complicated Ischiatic Pressure Sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Pierangeli, Marina; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old paraplegic man with a complicated grade III/IV ischiatic pressure sore treated with a propeller flap based on the first perforator of the profunda femoris artery. Our aim was to surgically reconstruct an ischiatic pressure sore in a patient with ankylosis using a fasciocutaneous perforator propeller flap obtained from the posterior region of the thigh. Our decision to perform a profunda femoris artery perforator propeller flap reconstruction was mainly due to the anatomical contiguity of the flap with the site of the lesion and the good quality of the skin harvested from the posterior region of the thigh. The use of the perforator fasciocutaneous flap represents a muscle-sparing technique, providing a better long-term result in surgical reconstruction. The choice of the 180-degree propeller flap was due to its ability to provide a good repair of the pressure ulcer and to pass over the ischiatic prominence in the patient in the forced decubitus position. The operatory course did not present any kind of complication. Using this reconstructive treatment, we have obtained complete coverage of the ischiatic pressure sore.

  3. The operative treatment of pressure sores in the pelvic region: A 10-year period overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jósvay, János; Klauber, András; Both, Béla; Kelemen, Péter B; Varga, Zsombor Z; Pesthy, Pál Cs

    2015-07-01

    Pelvic region pressure sores often develop following spinal cord injury. Surgery is often necessary for long standing, large-sized pressure sores not responding to conservative treatment. Authors analyze their results of a 10-year period, and identify factors contributing to the reduction of the recurrence rate. A total of 119 pressure sores were operated on 98 patients in two institutions during a 10-year period (1 January 2003 to 31 December 2012). The encountered perioperative complications are summarized, and the recurrence rate is analyzed with a patient follow-up questionnaire. We experienced 15 perioperative complications (12.6%). All complications were fully resolved by conservative treatment. Fifty-eight returned patient replies were processed. The average follow-up time after surgery was 5.2 years. The recurrence rate was 5.47%. The strict adherence to surgical indications, full patient compliance, specialized pre- and post-operative patient care, our routinely used preferred surgical method, all contribute to a low post-operative complication rate, long-term flap survival, and an extended recurrence free period.

  4. Muscle fascicle behavior during eccentric cycling and its relation to muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñailillo, Luis; Blazevich, Anthony J; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-04-01

    A single bout of eccentric exercise confers a protective effect against muscle damage and soreness in subsequent eccentric exercise bouts, but the mechanisms underpinning this effect are unclear. This study compared vastus lateralis (VL) muscle-tendon behavior between two eccentric cycling bouts to test the hypothesis that muscle-tendon behavior would be different between bouts and would be associated with the protective effect. Eleven untrained men (27.1 ± 7.0 yr) performed two bouts of eccentric cycling (ECC1 and ECC2) separated by 2 wk for 10 min at 65% of maximal concentric workload (191.9 ± 44.2 W) each. Muscle soreness (by visual analog scale) and maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque of the knee extensors were assessed before and 1-2 d after exercise. Using ultrasonography, VL fascicle length and angle changes during cycling were assessed, and tendinous tissue (TT) length changes were estimated. VL EMG amplitude, crank torque, and knee joint angles were measured during cycling. Soreness was greater (P tendon behavior may be an important mechanism underpinning the protective effect.

  5. Measurement and theory of turbulence in RR Lyrae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, W.; Stellingwerf, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    CORAVEL observations of time-dependent turbulence in RR Lyrae are presented. Variation in the width of the mean velocity correlation function implies turbulent velocities that peak at 10 to 15 km/sec for a brief interval of phase near minimum radius. Comparison with a nonlinear pulsation model shows that these amplitudes of the turbulent velocity are expected near the hydrogen ionization zone, again only near minimum radius

  6. Flow distribution in ET-RR-1 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Mina, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    In nuclear reactors the flow may be arranged through individual bundles by orifices to achieve better thermal performance. A model based on constant pressure drop across different core regions is developed to determine the flow distribution in reactor core. The friction and grids in the bundles as well as the orifices diameters have an influence on modifying the flow distribution. The application of the proposed model on ET-RR-1 gives reasonable prediction of flow distribution

  7. DISTANCE SCALE ZERO POINTS FROM GALACTIC RR LYRAE STAR PARALLAXES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Barnes, Thomas G. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Feast, Michael W. [Centre for Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravitation, Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Harrison, Thomas E. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Bean, Jacob L.; Kolenberg, Katrien [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Menzies, John W.; Laney, C. D. [South African Astronomical Observatory, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Chaboyer, Brian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Fossati, Luca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Nesvacil, Nicole [Institute of Astronomy, University of Vienna, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Smith, Horace A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Kochukhov, Oleg [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Nelan, Edmund P.; Taylor, Denise [STScI, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Shulyak, D. V. [Institute of Astrophysics, Georg-August-University, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Freedman, Wendy L. [The Observatories, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We present new absolute trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions for seven Population II variable stars-five RR Lyr variables: RZ Cep, XZ Cyg, SU Dra, RR Lyr, and UV Oct; and two type 2 Cepheids: VY Pyx and {kappa} Pav. We obtained these results with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors, white-light interferometers on Hubble Space Telescope. We find absolute parallaxes in milliseconds of arc: RZ Cep, 2.12 {+-} 0.16 mas; XZ Cyg, 1.67 {+-} 0.17 mas; SU Dra, 1.42 {+-} 0.16 mas; RR Lyr, 3.77 {+-} 0.13 mas; UV Oct, 1.71 {+-} 0.10 mas; VY Pyx, 6.44 {+-} 0.23 mas; and {kappa} Pav, 5.57 {+-} 0.28 mas; an average {sigma}{sub {pi}}/{pi} = 5.4%. With these parallaxes, we compute absolute magnitudes in V and K bandpasses corrected for interstellar extinction and Lutz-Kelker-Hanson bias. Using these RR Lyrae variable star absolute magnitudes, we then derive zero points for M{sub V} -[Fe/H] and M{sub K} -[Fe/H]-log P relations. The technique of reduced parallaxes corroborates these results. We employ our new results to determine distances and ages of several Galactic globular clusters and the distance of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The latter is close to that previously derived from Classical Cepheids uncorrected for any metallicity effect, indicating that any such effect is small. We also discuss the somewhat puzzling results obtained for our two type 2 Cepheids.

  8. Unmixing the Galactic halo with RR Lyrae tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belokurov, V.; Deason, A. J.; Koposov, S. E.; Catelan, M.; Erkal, D.; Drake, A. J.; Evans, N. W.

    2018-06-01

    We show that tagging RR Lyrae stars according to their location in the period-amplitude diagram can be used to shed light on the genesis of the Galactic stellar halo. The mixture of RR Lyrae of ab type, separated into classes along the lines suggested by Oosterhoff, displays a strong and coherent evolution with Galactocentric radius. The change in the RR Lyrae composition appears to coincide with the break in the halo's radial density profile at ˜25 kpc. Using simple models of the stellar halo, we establish that at least three different types of accretion events are necessary to explain the observed RRab behaviour. Given that there exists a correlation between the RRab class fraction and the total stellar content of a dwarf satellite, we hypothesize that the field halo RRab composition is controlled by the mass of the progenitor contributing the bulk of the stellar debris at the given radius. This idea is tested against a suite of cosmological zoom-in simulations of Milky Way-like stellar halo formation. Finally, we study some of the most prominent stellar streams in the Milky Way halo and demonstrate that their RRab class fractions follow the trends established previously.

  9. Response of Haloalkaliphilic Archaeon Natronococcus Jeotgali RR17 to Hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombre, Rebecca S.; Bhalerao, Aniruddha R.; Shinde, Vinaya D.; Dhar, Sunil Kumar; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2017-06-01

    The survival of archaeabacteria in extreme inhabitable environments on earth that challenge organismic survival is ubiquitously known. However, the studies related to the effect of hypergravity on the growth and proliferation of archaea are unprecedented. The survival of organisms in hypergravity and rocks in addition to resistance to cosmic radiations, pressure and other extremities is imperative to study the possibilities of microbial travel between planets and endurance in hyperaccelerative forces faced during ejection of rocks from planets. The current investigation highlights the growth of an extremophilic archaeon isolated from a rocky substrate in hypergravity environment. The haloalkaliphilic archaeon, Natronococcus jeotgali RR17 was isolated from an Indian laterite rock, submerged in the Arabian sea lining Coastal Maharashtra, India. The endolithic haloarchaeon was subjected to hypergravity from 56 - 893 X gusing acceleration generated by centrifugal rotation. The cells of N. jeotgali RR17 proliferated and demonstrated good growth in hypergravity (223 X g). This is the first report on isolation of endolithic haloarchaeon N. jeotgali RR17 from an Indian laterite rock and its ability to proliferate in hypergravity. The present study demonstrates the ability of microbial life to survive and proliferate in hypergravity. Thus the inability of organismic growth in hypergravity may no longer be a limitation for astrobiology studies related to habitability of substellar objects, brown dwarfs and other planetary bodies in the universe besides planet earth.

  10. Identification of atrial fibrillation using electrocardiographic RR-interval difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliana, M.; Nuryani, N.

    2017-11-01

    Automated detection of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an interesting topic. It is an account of very dangerous, not only as a trigger of embolic stroke, but it’s also related to some else chronical disease. In this study, we analyse the presence of AF by determining irregularities of RR-interval. We utilize the interval comparison to measure the degree of irregularities of RR-interval in a defined segment. The series of RR-interval is segmented with the length of 10 of them. In this study, we use interval comparison for the method. We were comparing all of the intervals there each other. Then we put the threshold to define the low difference and high difference (δ). A segment is defined as AF or Normal Sinus by the number of high δ, so we put the tolerance (β) of high δ there. We have used this method to test the 23 patients data from MIT-BIH. Using the approach and the clinical data we find accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 84.98%, 91.99%, and 77.85% respectively.

  11. 77 FR 27085 - R.R. Donnelley, Inc., Bloomsburg, PA; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-80,485] R.R. Donnelley, Inc... workers of R.R. Donnelley, Inc., Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania (subject firm). The Department's Notice of... eligibility to apply for worker adjustment assistance for workers and former workers of R.R. Donnelley, Inc...

  12. Accidental cut-throat injuries from the broken windshield of an auto rickshaw: Two unusual cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Rajanikanta; Dhaka, Shivani; Sharma, Munish; Bakshi, Mantaran Singh; Murty, O P; Sikary, Asit Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Accidental cut-throat injuries are extremely rare and usually involve a sharp-edged weapon. In this paper, two cases of a cut-throat wound to two auto-rickshaw drivers are presented where the broken windshield of the auto-rickshaws was responsible for the wounds. In both the cases, fatal incised wounds were present over the neck, cutting the soft tissue along with the major vessels. The death occurred due to exsanguination caused by neck-vessel injury in one case and trachea along with neck-vessel injury in the second case. Although the wounds on the neck initially suggested homicide, they were found to have occurred accidentally as a result of a road traffic accident involving a head-on collision of auto rickshaws. The injuries were inflicted by the shattered glass of the windshield.

  13. Chemical abundances and physical parameters of RR Lyrae stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manduca, A.

    1980-01-01

    A grid of model stellar atmospheres has been calculated with a range of physical parameters which effectively cover RR Lyrae stars over all phases of their pulsation cycle. The models, calculated with the computer program MARCS, are flux-constant and include the effects of convection and line blanketing. Synthetic spectra were calculated for these models from 3000 A to 9600 A at 0.1 A resolution using the computer program SSG. These spectra were used directly in the applications below and were also used to computer theoretical colors on the UBVR, Stromgren uvby, and Walraven systems for the models. The uvby colors were used in determinations of effective temperature and surface gravity from photometry by various observers. The models, synthetic spectra, and colors were then applied to the problems detailed below. The data collected by Freeman and Rodgers (1975) for 25 RR Lyrae stars in ω Cen was reanalyzed with an alternative, synthetic spectrum approach to the calibration of their theoretical relations. The results confirm a wide range in calcium abundance for the stars in the cluster but at much lower values than reported by Freeman and Rodgers: a range of [Ca/H] = -1.0 to -1.9 was found. A theoretical calibration was performed for the ΔS system of determining metal abundances for RR Lyrae stars. The results support the existing empirical calibration of Butler in the range [Fe/H] = -0.6 to -2.2 and indicate how the calibration should be extrapolated to even lower metal abundances. For higher metal abundances, however, our calibration yields [Fe/H] values lower than Butler by as much as 0.4. Possible explanations of this discrepancy are investigated and the implications are discussed

  14. Extended Aperture Photometry of K2 RR Lyrae stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plachy Emese

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the method of the Extended Aperture Photometry (EAP that we applied on K2 RR Lyrae stars. Our aim is to minimize the instrumental variations of attitude control maneuvers by using apertures that cover the positional changes in the field of view thus contain the stars during the whole observation. We present example light curves that we compared to the light curves from the K2 Systematics Correction (K2SC pipeline applied on the automated Single Aperture Photometry (SAP and on the Pre-search Data Conditioning Simple Aperture Photometry (PDCSAP data.

  15. Reddening and blanketing of RR-Lyrae stars, ch. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lub, J.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of metal line blanketing and interstellar reddening upon the colours of the RR-Lyrae Stars are discussed. Due to the faintness of these stars in the ultraviolet W channel (at lambda 3720 A) the photometry is in most cases reduced to a four-colour VBLU photometry, i.e. there are only three colour indices available for the determination of the four quantities: interstellar reddening, effective temperature, atmospheric pressure (or effective gravity), and metal line strength which determine the energy distribution that was measured

  16. Extended Aperture Photometry of K2 RR Lyrae stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachy, Emese; Klagyivik, Péter; Molnár, László; Sódor, Ádám; Szabó, Róbert

    2017-10-01

    We present the method of the Extended Aperture Photometry (EAP) that we applied on K2 RR Lyrae stars. Our aim is to minimize the instrumental variations of attitude control maneuvers by using apertures that cover the positional changes in the field of view thus contain the stars during the whole observation. We present example light curves that we compared to the light curves from the K2 Systematics Correction (K2SC) pipeline applied on the automated Single Aperture Photometry (SAP) and on the Pre-search Data Conditioning Simple Aperture Photometry (PDCSAP) data.

  17. Role of the pump limiter throat-ergodic divertor effect on edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosman, A.; Samain, A.; Ghendrih, P.; Capes, H.; Morera, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    A large part of the Tore Supra programme is devoted to plasma edge studies. Two types of such density control apparatus have been implemented, a set of pumps limiters and the ergodic divertor. The goal of the present paper is to investigate the effect of the pump limiter throat on pumping efficiency. We present also the possibilities of the ergodic divertor device to facilitate plasma pumping and power exhaust

  18. Inverse estimation of heat flux and temperature on nozzle throat-insert inner contour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Tsung-Chien [Department of Power Vehicle and Systems Engineering, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Ta-Hsi, Tao-Yuan 33509 (China); Liu, Chiun-Chien [Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Lung-Tan, Tao-Yuan 32526 (China)

    2008-07-01

    During the missile flight, the jet flow with high temperature comes from the heat flux of propellant burning. An enormous heat flux from the nozzle throat-insert inner contour conducted into the nozzle shell will degrade the material strength of nozzle shell and reduce the nozzle thrust efficiency. In this paper, an on-line inverse method based on the input estimation method combined with the finite-element scheme is proposed to inversely estimate the unknown heat flux on the nozzle throat-insert inner contour and the inner wall temperature by applying the temperature measurements of the nozzle throat-insert. The finite-element scheme can easily define the irregularly shaped boundary. The superior capability of the proposed method is demonstrated in two major time-varying estimation cases. The computational results show that the proposed method has good estimation performance and highly facilitates the practical implementation. An effective analytical method can be offered to increase the operation reliability and thermal-resistance layer design in the solid rocket motor. (author)

  19. Mach Stability Improvements Using an Existing Second Throat Capability at the National Transonic Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David T.; Balakrishna, Sundareswara; Walker, Eric L.; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent data quality improvements at the National Transonic Facility have an intended goal of reducing the Mach number variation in a data point to within plus or minus 0.0005, with the ultimate goal of reducing the data repeatability of the drag coefficient for full-span subsonic transport models at transonic speeds to within half a drag count. This paper will discuss the Mach stability improvements achieved through the use of an existing second throat capability at the NTF to create a minimum area at the end of the test section. These improvements were demonstrated using both the NASA Common Research Model and the NTF Pathfinder-I model in recent experiments. Sonic conditions at the throat were verified using sidewall static pressure data. The Mach variation levels from both experiments in the baseline tunnel configuration and the choked tunnel configuration will be presented and the correlation between Mach number and drag will also be examined. Finally, a brief discussion is given on the consequences of using the second throat in its location at the end of the test section.

  20. 'Food Sticking in My Throat': Videofluoroscopic Evaluation of a Common Symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Aarthi; Carnaby, Giselle D; Crary, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Prevalence of the symptom of food 'sticking' during swallowing has been reported to range from 5 to 50%, depending on the assessment setting. However, limited objective evidence has emerged to clarify factors that contribute to this symptom. Three hundred and fifteen patient records from an outpatient dysphagia clinic were reviewed to identify patients with symptoms of 'food sticking in the throat.' Corresponding videofluoroscopic swallowing studies for patients with this complaint were reviewed for the following variables: accuracy of symptom localization, identification and characteristics (anatomic, physiologic) of an explanatory cause for the symptom, and the specific swallowed material that identified the explanatory cause. One hundred and forty one patients (45%) were identified with a complaint of food 'sticking' in their throat during swallowing. Prevalence of explanatory findings on fluoroscopy was 76% (107/141). Eighty five percent (91/107) of explanatory causes were physiologic in nature, while 15% (16/107) were anatomic. The majority of explanatory causes were identified in the esophagus (71%). Symptom localization was more accurate when the explanatory cause was anatomic versus physiologic (75 vs. 18%). A non-masticated marshmallow presented with the highest diagnostic yield in identification of explanatory causes (71%). Patients complaining of 'food sticking in the throat' are likely to present with esophageal irregularities. Thus, imaging studies of swallowing function should include the esophagus. A range of materials, including a non-masticated marshmallow, is helpful in determining the location and characteristics of swallowing deficits contributing to this symptom.

  1. Aridification driven diversification of fan-throated lizards from the Indian subcontinent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, V; Karanth, Praveen

    2018-03-01

    The establishment of monsoon climate and the consequent aridification has been one of the most important climate change episodes in the Indian subcontinent. However, little is known about how these events might have shaped the diversification patterns among the widely distributed taxa. Fan-throated lizards (FTL) (Genus: Sitana, Sarada) are widespread, diurnal and restricted to the semi-arid zones of the Indian subcontinent. We sampled FTL in 107 localities across its range. We used molecular species delimitation method and delineated 15 species including six putative species. Thirteen of them were distinguishable based on morphology but two sister species were indistinguishable and have minor overlaps in distribution. Five fossils were used to calibrate and date the phylogeny. Diversification of fan-throated lizards lineage started ~18 mya and higher lineage diversification was observed after 11 my. The initial diversification corresponds to the time when monsoon climate was established and the latter was a period of intensification of monsoon and initiation of aridification. Thirteen out of the fifteen FTL species delimited are from Peninsular India; this is probably due to the landscape heterogeneity in this region. The species poor sister genus Otocryptis is paraphyletic and probably represents relict lineages which are now confined to forested areas. Thus, the seasonality led changes in habitat, from forests to open habitats appear to have driven diversification of fan-throated lizards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cut throat injuries and honor killings: review of 15 cases in eastern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Bora; Celbis, Osman; Kaya, Atılhan

    2013-05-01

    Throat cuts could be of homicidal, suicidal or accidental origin. In the cases of death from cut throat, suicide can be distinguished from homicide based on the type and location of the wound and crime scene investigation. The purpose of the current study is to attract attention to the instructive findings for origin determination in deaths by cut throat according to the number and characteristics of the wounds and crime scene investigation. We have reviewed the files of autopsies performed between the years of 2000 and 2010, and compared with previously published case reports; all results were summarized in the current study. The results showed that 60% of cases were male, 40% were female, with 27.9 years of average age. The mean number of wounds was calculated to be 34.3 per case for honor homicides, 7.4 per case for other homicides, and 2.0 per case for suicides. Numbers of wounds were approximately 5 times higher in the honor homicides compared to other homicides. If the number of wounds were excessive, possibility of honor killings should be taken into account. When the killer was a parent not in psychosis, hesitation cuts were detected. Additional lesions were present in 46.7% of the cases, and they were assessed as homicide. Presence of vertebral notch and spinal cord cuts, which require a substantial amount of force and pressure via sharp tools, indicates homicide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. Social and cognitive functions of music based on the example of Tuvan throat singing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Mou Hsu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Music is pervasive across human cultures and throughout times. Particularly, music serves great importance at social functions. Like many cultures’ use of music, throat singing or khöömei, the most distinguished aspect of Tuva’s music, contributes significantly to social communication, emotional expression, social bonding and religious rituals. Acknowledgment and consideration of current social cognitive findings of music may thus provide a better insight into the nature of throat singing. To date, evidence has indicated that similar to language, music is a fundamental channel of communication, and these two constructs may have common origins in a single communicative system. Moreover, music may modulate neural activity in the brain structures associated with emotions and alter our autonomic responses. In addition to information sharing, music thus has the capacity to convey emotions. This ability may further render music a powerful mechanism to facilitate social bonding and ritual practice, as individuals’ internal states during these social events become synchronized through musical engagement. In conclusion, I suggest that those social cognitive perspectives may point toward new directions for a continuing discourse on our understanding of throat singing.

  4. Preventing pressure sores of the nasal ala after nasotracheal tube intubation: from animal model to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tze-Ta; Tseng, Chih-En; Lee, Tsan-Mu; Yeh, Jen-Ying; Lai, Yu-Yung

    2009-03-01

    Nasal-ala pressure sores induced by nasotracheal intubation are common complications of oral and maxillofacial surgery, but are easily ignored. To determine whether such sores could be prevented, we studied the effects of a combination of cushioning material in an animal model, and then analyzed the efficacy of this combination clinically. Four pigs received nasotracheal intubation. Each pig received intubation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 hours. Outcomes from pigs undergoing 500-gram-weight compression on each nostril were compared: one nostril received an application of cushioning materials, and the contralateral nostril did not. After the required study period, clinical assessment and further evaluation were performed by measuring pressure-sore dimensions and performing incisional biopsies. Clinical applications of this protective technique were then undertaken. Eight patients who underwent intubation without Soft Liner (GC Co, Tokyo, Japan) and DuoDERM CGF (ConvaTec, Inc, Princeton, NJ) protection, and 10 patients with Soft Liner and DuoDERM protection, were evaluated. The protective efficacy of the cushioning materials was significant in the animal model as well as in clinical practice. Pressure sores were avoided on the protected side, with severe tissue necrosis documented on the control side. We found that the combined use of Soft Liner and DuoDERM reduced the size and severity of nasal-ala pressure sores attributable to nasotracheal intubation during oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  5. At-Home Application of Autologous Platelet Rich Plasma as Treatment for Pressure Sore and Related Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendas, Andrea; Niscola, Pasquale; Giovannini, Marco; Costa, Adriana; Venditti, Daniela; Volta, Laura; Malandruccolo, Luigi; Sabbadini, Stefania; Lasorella, Rosa; Fabritiis, Paolo de; Cassetta, Rita; Perrotti, Alessio P

    2017-01-01

    Pressure sores are a major complication in the bed-ridden older patient. In this report, we present the case of platelet rich plasma (PRP) application for the treatment of a pressure sore in an 88-year-old female affected by transfusion-dependent chronic inflammatory disease anemia associated with the congenital and inherited condition of thalassemic trait carrier. A weekly application schedule was planned athome, given the patient's debilitation and her decreased performance status as well as personal and family difficulties to go as outpatients at our treatment center. After 9 PRP applications, a remarkable sore improvement was achieved so that PRP was discontinued; nevertheless, sore rapidly improved until the full resolution and the complete closing after 4 months from the start of PRP treatment. Noteworthy, transfusion support was interrupted and a significant recovery and a sustained stabilization of hemoglobin (Hb) level at 1 year after ulcer healing were observed. The present case suggests that PRP application, performed athome in our case, is a feasible and effective treatment for pressure sores and related complications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. EFFECT OF CAFFEINE ON THE AMOUNT OF PERCEIVED PAIN, JOINT RANGE OF MOTION AND EDEMA AFTER DELAYED MUSCLE SORENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karabalaeifar Sara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed onset muscle soreness usually occurs after doing a new unusual physical activity, especially when, associated with repeated eccentric contractions and then it gradually disappears. There is not an extensive agreement in the case of treatment method of soreness signs quick reduction. This research was carried out with the aim of investigation caffeine consumption effect to find a good way in order to reduce the signs of delayed onset muscle soreness. In this semi-experimental with Double-blind design, 16 female volleyball player with an age average of 22.5+2.5 in 2 homogeneous 8 subject control and experimental group were studied. In this research, the effect of caffeine existing in coffee in 5 stages (24h before exercise, 12h before, immediately before exercise, after exercise and 12h after it and 1mg per 1kg of body weight on amount of perceived pain and range of motion of the joint and edema due to delay onset muscle soreness because of 50 jumps and lands of a 1 meter stage was investigated. The results showed that caffeine consumption has a meaningful effect on reduction of all the expressed signs after eccentric contractions. So it is recommended that physio thrapysts, doctors and athletes use this method to reduce delayed onset muscle soreness consequences after the injury.

  7. Activation of lower back muscles via FES for pressure sores prevention in paraplegia: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanoncini, M; Holderbaum, W; Andrews, B J

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to show the feasibility of the use of functional electrical stimulation (FES) applied to the lower back muscles for pressure sores prevention in paraplegia. The hypothesis under study is that FES induces a change in the pressure distribution on the contact area during sitting. Tests were conducted on a paraplegic subject (T5), sitting on a standard wheelchair and cushion. Trunk extensors (mainly the erector spinae) were stimulated using surface electrodes placed on the skin. A pressure mapping system was used to measure the pressure on the sitting surface in four situations: (a) no stimulation; (b) stimulation on one side of the spine only; (c) stimulation on both sides, at different levels; and (d) stimulation at the same level on both sides, during pressure-relief manoeuvres. A session of prolonged stimulation was also conducted. The experimental results show that the stimulation of the erector spinae on one side of the spine can induce a trunk rotation on the sagittal plane, which causes a change in the pressure distribution. A decrease of pressure on the side opposite to the stimulation was recorded. The phenomenon is intensified when different levels of stimulation are applied to the two sides, and such change can be sustained for a considerable time (around 5 minutes). The stimulation did not induce changes during pressure-relief manoeuvres. Finally, from this research we can conclude that the stimulation of the trunk extensors can be a useful tool for pressure sores prevention, and can potentially be used in a routine for pressure sores prevention based on periodical weight shifts.

  8. The Effect of Early Complications on Flap Selection on Sacral Pressure Sores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Kemal Keleş

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pressure sores occur in bedridden patients in intensive care units, clinics, and even at their own places. Care for sick relatives and working with doctors to address treatment options and ensure proper follow-up are some of the problems associated with these types of wounds. Surgical therapy in the treatment of pressure ulcers is associated with significant complications. In comparison to non-surgical treatment, surgical treatment has a low complication rate and is more cost-effective. The surgical treatment enables the patients to return to their social life sooner than non-surgical treatment. Patient's ability to early return to their social life is advantageous in terms of reducing morbidity and the need for additional operations. This study is aimed to review the flap choices used to treat sacral pressure sores and the resulting acute complications rates retrospectively. Material and Methods: Patients treated for stage 3 and stage 4 sacral pressure sores in our clinic in the past 5 years were included in the study. Patient records were analyzed retrospectively. Patients' demographic data and surgical treatment they received were documented. Surgical method and surgical outcomes were evaluated and early complication rates were determined. Result: Fifty patients were included in the study; 10 of them were female, 40 of were male cases. The most common causative agent was paraplegia after traffic accident. Conclusion: A significant difference was not observed between the type of flap used in the surgical treatment and the rate of complications. Consequently, the surgical treatment of pressure ulcers in the sacral region depends on the patient's individual situation, the cooperation of the family, and previously applied treatments

  9. Massage Alleviates Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness after Strenuous Exercise: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Guo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of massage on alleviating delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS and muscle performance after strenuous exercise.Method: Seven databases consisting of PubMed, Embase, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CNKI and Wanfang were searched up to December 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs were eligible and the outcomes of muscle soreness, performance (including muscle maximal isometric force (MIF and peak torque and creatine kinase (CK were used to assess the effectiveness of massage intervention on DOMS.Results: Eleven articles with a total of 23 data points (involving 504 participants satisfied the inclusion criteria and were pooled in the meta-analysis. The findings demonstrated that muscle soreness rating decreased significantly when the participants received massage intervention compared with no intervention at 24 h (SMD: –0.61, 95% CI: –1.17 to –0.05, P = 0.03, 48 h (SMD: –1.51, 95% CI: –2.24 to –0.77, P < 0.001, 72 h (SMD: –1.46, 95% CI: –2.59 to –0.33, P = 0.01 and in total (SMD: –1.16, 95% CI: –1.60 to –0.72, P < 0.001 after intense exercise. Additionally, massage therapy improved MIF (SMD: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.21–0.90, P = 0.002 and peak torque (SMD: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.04–0.71, P = 0.03 as total effects. Furthermore, the serum CK level was reduced when participants received massage intervention (SMD: –0.64, 95% CI: –1.04 to –0.25, P = 0.001.Conclusion: The current evidence suggests that massage therapy after strenuous exercise could be effective for alleviating DOMS and improving muscle performance.

  10. Lignification of the plant and seed quality of RR soybeans sprayed with herbicide glyphosate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Fortes Gris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Differences in levels of lignin in the plant between conventional and transgenic cultivars RR has been reported by several authors, however, there are few studies evaluating the influence of spraying of glyphosate on the lignin in the plant and RR soybean seeds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physiological quality of RR transgenic soybean seeds and the lignin contents of plants sprayed with the herbicide glyphosate. The assays were conducted both in greenhouse and field in the municipality of Lavras, MG, in the agricultural year 2007/08. The experiment was arranged in a splitplot design with four replicates, considering the treatments hand weeding and herbicide glyphosate as plots, and five RR soybean cultivars (BRS 245 RR, BRS 247 RR, Valiosa RR, Silvânia RR and Baliza RR as splitplots. In the greenhouse, the cultivars tested were BRS 245 RR and Valiosa RR in a randomized block design with four replicates. The sprayings were carried out at stages V3, V7 and early R5 (3L/ha. The 1000 seed weight, mechanical injury, germination and germination velocity index, emergence velocity index, accelerated aging, electrical conductivity and water soaking seed test, lignin content in the seed coat, in the stem and legumes were determined. The spraying of glyphosate herbicide, in greenhouse and field, did not alter the physiological quality of seeds and the lignin contents in the plant.

  11. A surface brightness analysis of eight RR Lyrae stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, S.L.; Barnes, T.G. III; Moffett, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have used a surface brightness, (V-R) relation to analyze new contemporaneous photometry and radial velocity data for 6 RR-ab type stars and to re-analyze previously published data for RR Lyrae and X Arietis. Systematic effects were found in the surface brightness at phases near minimum radius. Excluding these phases, they determine the slope of the surface brightness relation and the mean radius for each star. They also find a zero point which includes both a distance term and the zero point of the surface brightness relation. The sample includes stars with Preston's metallicity indicator ΔS = 0 to 9, with periods ranging from 0.397 days to 0.651 days. Their results indicate a log(R/R solar ) vs. log P relation in the sense that stars with longer periods have larger radii, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Their radii are consistent with bolometric magnitudes in the range 0.2 - 0.8 magnitude but accurate magnitudes must await a reliable T e - color calibration

  12. Multiscale Pore Throat Network Reconstruction of Tight Porous Media Constrained by Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R.; Prodanovic, M.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the low porosity and permeability of tight porous media, hydrocarbon productivity strongly depends on the pore structure. Effective characterization of pore/throat sizes and reconstruction of their connectivity in tight porous media remains challenging. Having a representative pore throat network, however, is valuable for calculation of other petrophysical properties such as permeability, which is time-consuming and costly to obtain by experimental measurements. Due to a wide range of length scales encountered, a combination of experimental methods is usually required to obtain a comprehensive picture of the pore-body and pore-throat size distributions. In this work, we combine mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements by percolation theory to derive pore-body size distribution, following the work by Daigle et al. (2015). However, in their work, the actual pore-throat sizes and the distribution of coordination numbers are not well-defined. To compensate for that, we build a 3D unstructured two-scale pore throat network model initialized by the measured porosity and the calculated pore-body size distributions, with a tunable pore-throat size and coordination number distribution, which we further determine by matching the capillary pressure vs. saturation curve from MICP measurement, based on the fact that the mercury intrusion process is controlled by both the pore/throat size distributions and the connectivity of the pore system. We validate our model by characterizing several core samples from tight Middle East carbonate, and use the network model to predict the apparent permeability of the samples under single phase fluid flow condition. Results show that the permeability we get is in reasonable agreement with the Coreval experimental measurements. The pore throat network we get can be used to further calculate relative permeability curves and simulate multiphase flow behavior, which will provide valuable

  13. Canker Sore

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... base of your gums, or on your soft palate. You might notice a tingling or burning sensation ... border) Pain that you can't control with self-care measures Extreme difficulty eating or drinking High ...

  14. Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to strengthen your muscles and improve your overall health. Talk to your doctor if physical activity is hard for you. He or she ... and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food ...

  15. Sore Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2014-01-01

    This is not brand new; in fact, I do not even mention the word selfie. However, it was very rewarding for me in terms of the intellectual and emotional richness and challenge, I got in return from working with this article and the questions and the answers it deals with. Maybe it will be good...

  16. Mouth Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Health Home Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly ... Terms of Use © Copyright 2018. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery 1650 Diagonal Rd Alexandria, ...

  17. Cold Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Men? The History of Dental Advances Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)? What is a Composite Resin (White Filling)? Learn what those dental words mean. Check out how your teeth and mouth change in every stage of life. More RSS ...

  18. Throat Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plasma Free Metanephrines Platelet Count Platelet Function Tests Pleural Fluid Analysis PML-RARA Porphyrin Tests Potassium Prealbumin ... infection and inoculating the sample into solid or liquid nutrient media (e.g., agar, gelatin) in order ...

  19. [Reliability and validity of the Braden Scale for predicting pressure sore risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, C

    2000-12-01

    For more accurate and objective pressure sore risk assessment various risk assessment tools were developed mainly in the USA and Great Britain. The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk is one such example. By means of a literature analysis of German and English texts referring to the Braden Scale the scientific control criteria reliability and validity will be traced and consequences for application of the scale in Germany will be demonstrated. Analysis of 4 reliability studies shows an exclusive focus on interrater reliability. Further, even though examination of 19 validity studies occurs in many different settings, such examination is limited to the criteria sensitivity and specificity (accuracy). The range of sensitivity and specificity level is 35-100%. The recommended cut off points rank in the field of 10 to 19 points. The studies prove to be not comparable with each other. Furthermore, distortions in these studies can be found which affect accuracy of the scale. The results of the here presented analysis show an insufficient proof for reliability and validity in the American studies. In Germany, the Braden scale has not yet been tested under scientific criteria. Such testing is needed before using the scale in different German settings. During the course of such testing, construction and study procedures of the American studies can be used as a basis as can the problems be identified in the analysis presented below.

  20. A simple concept for covering pressure sores: wound edge-based propeller perforator flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelahmetoglu, Osman; Van Landuyt, Koenraad; Yagmur, Caglayan; Sommeling, Casper E; Keles, Musa K; Tayfur, Volkan; Simsek, Tekin; Demirtas, Yener; Guneren, Ethem

    2017-12-01

    We present a new surgical modification to allow propeller perforator flaps to cover pressure sores at various locations. We used a propeller perforator flap concept based on the detection of newly formed perforator vessels located 1 cm from the wound margin and stimulated by the chronic inflammation process. Between January 2009 and January 2017, 33 wound edge-based propeller perforator flaps were used to cover pressure sores at various locations in 28 patients. In four cases more than one flap was used on the same patient. The patients comprised 18 males and 10 females with a mean age of 41·25 (range, 16-70) years. All patients underwent follow-up for 0-12 months. The mean follow-up duration was 5·03 months. Venous congestion was observed in three flaps that were rotated by 180° (9·1%). However, there was a significant difference between flaps rotated by 90° and 180° according to the complication rate (P = 0·034). Out of 33 flaps, 29 flaps healed uneventfully. Patients were able to sit and lie on their flaps three weeks after surgery. In our study, we were able to obtain satisfying final results using these novel flaps. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH PRESSURE SORES IN A UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Gustavo Palmeiro; Seidel, William; Giustina, Renata Della; Bins-Ely, Jorge; Maurici, Rosemeri; Narciso-Schiavon, Janaína Luz

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in medical care, patients who are hospitalized or have spinal cord injuries often develop pressure sores. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological characteristics of pressure sores and evaluate factors associated with recurrence and cure. In this historical cohort study, clinical and laboratory data were collected from medical records between 1997 and 2016. Sixty individuals with pressure ulcers were included; mean patient age was 38.1±16.5 (37.0) years, 83.3% were men, and 86.8% identified as white. Most patients (85.1%) had paraplegia, amputation, or trauma of the lower limbs with motor sequelae; the remainder (14.9%) were quadriplegic. Most (78.3%) underwent surgery, and the mean follow-up time was 1.8±2.5 years. The lesions were cured in 25 patients; they recurred in 25% of the patients, and recurrence was seen to be associated with the location of the lesions. Patients with recurrent lesions had more medical consultations and a longer treatment time. Individuals whose ulcers had healed had fewer lesions, higher body mass index (BMI), and a higher proportion of these patients underwent surgery. BMI and location and number of lesions are prognostic factors. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series.

  2. Dual-dermal-barrier fashion flaps for the treatment of sacral pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yen-Chang; Chuang, Shiow-Shuh

    2015-02-01

    The sacral region is one of the most vulnerable sites for the development of pressure sores. Even when surgical reconstruction is performed, there is a high chance of recurrence. Therefore, the concept of dual-dermal-barrier fashion flaps for sacral pressure sore reconstruction was proposed. From September 2007 to June 2010, nine patients with grade IV sacral pressures were enrolled. Four patients received bilateral myocutaneous V-Y flaps, four patients received bilateral fasciocutaneous V-Y flaps, and one patient received bilateral rotation-advanced flaps for sacral pressure reconstruction. The flaps were designed based on the perforators of the superior gluteal artery in one patient's reconstructive procedure. All flaps' designs were based on dual-dermal-barrier fashion. The mean follow-up time was 16 months (range = 12-25). No recurrence was noted. Only one patient had a complication of mild dehiscence at the middle suture line, occurring 2 weeks after the reconstructive surgery. The dual-dermal fashion flaps are easily duplicated and versatile. The study has shown minimal morbidity and a reasonable outcome.

  3. Combined V-Y Fasciocutaneous Advancement and Gluteus Maximus Muscle Rotational Flaps for Treating Sacral Sores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ho Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sacral area is the most common site of pressure sore in bed-ridden patients. Though many treatment methods have been proposed, a musculocutaneous flap using the gluteus muscles or a fasciocutaneous flap is the most popular surgical option. Here, we propose a new method that combines the benefits of these 2 methods: combined V-Y fasciocutaneous advancement and gluteus maximus muscle rotational flaps. A retrospective review was performed for 13 patients who underwent this new procedure from March 2011 to December 2013. Patients’ age, sex, accompanying diseases, follow-up duration, surgical details, complications, and recurrence were documented. Computed tomography was performed postoperatively at 2 to 4 weeks and again at 4 to 6 months to identify the thickness and volume of the rotational muscle portion. After surgery, all patients healed within 1 month; 3 patients experienced minor complications. The average follow-up period was 13.6 months, during which time 1 patient had a recurrence (recurrence rate, 7.7%. Average thickness of the rotated muscle was 9.43 mm at 2 to 4 weeks postoperatively and 9.22 mm at 4 to 6 months postoperatively (p=0.087. Muscle thickness had not decreased, and muscle volume was relatively maintained. This modified method is relatively simple and easy for reconstructing sacral sores, provides sufficient padding, and has little muscle donor-site morbidity.

  4. Watermelon juice: potential functional drink for sore muscle relief in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazona-Díaz, Martha P; Alacid, Fernando; Carrasco, María; Martínez, Ignacio; Aguayo, Encarna

    2013-08-07

    l-Citrulline is an excellent candidate to reduce muscle soreness, and watermelon is a fruit rich in this amino acid. This study investigated the potential of watermelon juice as a functional drink for athletes. An in vitro study of intestinal absorption of l-citrulline in Caco-2 cells was performed using unpasteurized (NW), pasteurized (80 °C for 40 s) watermelon juice (PW) and, as control, a standard of l-citrulline. l-citrulline bioavailability was greater when it was contained in a matrix of watermelon and when no heat treatment was applied. In the in vivo experiment (maximum effort test in a cycloergometer), seven athletes were supplied with 500 mL of natural watermelon juice (1.17 g of l-citrulline), enriched watermelon juice (4.83 g of l-citrulline plus 1.17 g from watermelon), and placebo. Both watermelon juices helped to reduce the recovery heart rate and muscle soreness after 24 h.

  5. Reducing risk of pressure sores: effects of watch prompts and alarm avoidance on wheelchair push-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, G W; Mathews, R M; Fawcett, S B

    1989-01-01

    People who use wheelchairs are at risk for developing pressure sores. Regular pressure relief, in the form of a wheelchair push-up, is one way to reduce the likelihood of pressure sores. We examined the effects of antecedent (i.e., instructions, audible prompts) and consequent (i.e., alarm avoidance) events on wheelchair push-ups, using a multiple baseline analysis with 2 participants with spina bifida. Results suggest that the combined procedure was more effective than either antecedent or consequent events alone, and there is some evidence suggesting maintenance of effects over time. PMID:2793635

  6. A novel technique for preventing skin pressure sores using a rubber tube during surgical treatment of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase-Koga, Yoko; Mori, Yoshiyuki; Hoshi, Kazuhito; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Craniofacial surgery occasionally results in sores and necrosis of the facial skin because of pressure from surgical instruments. During surgical treatment of mandibular condylar process fractures, the main mandibular fragment is routinely retracted downward using a wire to achieve a satisfactory anatomic reduction. This procedure may injure the facial skin. This potential complication is easily overlooked by medical staff, but it is easily preventable. We herein describe a method of using a rubber tube to avoid causing pressure sores of the facial skin during surgical treatment of mandibular condylar process fractures.

  7. Turbulent flow heat transfer in ET-RR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Mina, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    In nuclear reactors the effect of heat transfer coefficient, which depends on the constant C. Is primordial in calculating the clad surface temperatures. To determine the constant C of ET-RR-1 fuel bundles based on in-pile measurements different well known and recommended values of C are verified. A computer program is written to calculate steady thermal core characteristics at different operating conditions. The total flow rate is distributed considering same pressure drop across the core irrespective of bundle location. The total reactor power is readily distributed as Bessel function. The flow and power per bundle are equally distributed among the fuel rods irrespective of their positions inside the bundle. It is found that the constant C equals 0.047 gives acceptable compatibility between measurements and calculations. The maximum clad surface temperature is shifted from the core center

  8. The Effects of Eccentric Contraction Duration on Muscle Strength, Power Production, Vertical Jump, and Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Jonathan N; Cole, Nathan; Herrera, Chris; VanDusseldorp, Trisha; Kravitz, Len; Kerksick, Chad M

    2017-03-01

    Mike, JN, Cole, N, Herrera, C, VanDusseldorp, T, Kravitz, L, and Kerksick, CM. The effects of eccentric contraction duration on muscle strength, power production, vertical jump, and soreness. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 773-786, 2017-Previous research has investigated the effects of either eccentric-only training or comparing eccentric and concentric exercise on changes related to strength and power expression, but no research to date has investigated the impact of altering the duration of either the concentric or the eccentric component on these parameters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the duration of eccentric (i.e., 2-second, 4-second vs. 6-second) muscle contractions and their effect on muscle strength, power production, vertical jump, and soreness using a plate-loaded barbell Smith squat exercise. Thirty college-aged men (23 ± 3.5 years, 178 ± 6.8 cm, 82 ± 12 kg, and 11.6 ± 5.1% fat) with 3.0 ± 1.0 years of resistance training experience and training frequency of 4.3 ± 0.9 days per week were randomized and assigned to 1 of 3 eccentric training groups that incorporated different patterns of contraction. For every repetition, all 3 groups used 2-second concentric contractions and paused for 1 second between the concentric and eccentric phases. The control group (2S) used 2-second eccentric contractions, whereas the 4S group performed 4-second eccentric contractions and the 6S group performed 6-second eccentric contractions. All repetitions were completed using the barbell Smith squat exercise. All participants completed a 4-week training protocol that required them to complete 2 workouts per week using their prescribed contraction routine for 4 sets of 6 repetitions at an intensity of 80-85% one repetition maximum (1RM). For all performance data, significant group × time (G × T) interaction effects were found for average power production across all 3 sets of a squat jump protocol (p = 0.04) while vertical jump did not reach

  9. The use of throat packs in pediatric cleft lip/palate surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarius, B J A; Guillaume, C H A L; Jonker, G; van der Molen, A B Mink; Breugem, C C

    2018-02-22

    Throat packs are commonly used to prevent ingestion or aspiration of blood and other debris during cleft lip/palate surgery. However, dislodgement or (partial) retainment after extubation could have serious consequences. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of omitting pharyngeal packing during cleft lip/palate surgery on the incidence of early postoperative complications in children. A retrospective study was performed on all children who underwent cleft lip/palate surgery at the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital. This study compared the period January 2010 through December 2012 when pharyngeal packing was applied according to local protocol (group A) with the period January 2013 till December 2015 when pharyngeal packing was no longer applied after removal from the protocol (group B). Data were collected for sex, age at operation, cleft lip/palate type, type of repair, lateral incisions, length of hospital stay, and complications in the first 6 weeks after surgery. Early complications included wound dehiscence, postoperative bleeding, infection, fever, upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), and lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). This study included 489 cleft lip/palate operations (group A n = 246, group B n = 243). A total of 39 (15.9%) early complications were recorded in group A and a total of 40 (16.5%) in group B. There were no significant differences (P = 0.902) in complications between the two groups; however, there was a significant difference (P cleft lip/palate surgery was not associated with an increased early postoperative complication rate. Therefore, the traditional, routine placement of a throat pack during cleft lip/palate surgery can be questioned. The traditional, routine placement of a throat pack during cleft lip/palate surgery can be questioned.

  10. [Heart rate variability study based on a novel RdR RR Intervals Scatter Plot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongwei; Lu, Xiuyun; Wang, Chunfang; Hua, Youyuan; Tian, Jiajia; Liu, Shihai

    2014-08-01

    On the basis of Poincare scatter plot and first order difference scatter plot, a novel heart rate variability (HRV) analysis method based on scatter plots of RR intervals and first order difference of RR intervals (namely, RdR) was proposed. The abscissa of the RdR scatter plot, the x-axis, is RR intervals and the ordinate, y-axis, is the difference between successive RR intervals. The RdR scatter plot includes the information of RR intervals and the difference between successive RR intervals, which captures more HRV information. By RdR scatter plot analysis of some records of MIT-BIH arrhythmias database, we found that the scatter plot of uncoupled premature ventricular contraction (PVC), coupled ventricular bigeminy and ventricular trigeminy PVC had specific graphic characteristics. The RdR scatter plot method has higher detecting performance than the Poincare scatter plot method, and simpler and more intuitive than the first order difference method.

  11. Yolk coelomitis in a white-throated monitor lizard (Varanus albigularis : short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.R. Gardner

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Yolk coelomitis as a result of pre-ovulatory follicular stasis is a common disorder in captive reptiles, especially in captive lizards of various genera. The clinical signs are generally fairly non-specific and diagnosis is based on clinical signs together with most of the common diagnostic modalities. The condition is most likely a husbandry and environment-related reproductive disorder. It has not been reported in wild free-living specimens. This report describes the clinical presentation and post mortem lesions in a white-throated monitor lizard that died during treatment for non-specific clinical signs related to a severe yolk coelomitis.

  12. Lignification of the plant and seed quality of RR soybeans sprayed with herbicide glyphosate

    OpenAIRE

    Gris,Cristiane Fortes; Pinho,Edila Vilela de Resende Von; Carvalho,Maria Laene de Moreira; Diniz,Rafael Parreira; Andrade,Thaís de

    2013-01-01

    Differences in levels of lignin in the plant between conventional and transgenic cultivars RR has been reported by several authors, however, there are few studies evaluating the influence of spraying of glyphosate on the lignin in the plant and RR soybean seeds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physiological quality of RR transgenic soybean seeds and the lignin contents of plants sprayed with the herbicide glyphosate. The assays were conducted both in greenhouse and field in the muni...

  13. Ventricular Cycle Length Characteristics Estimative of Prolonged RR Interval during Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    CIACCIO, EDWARD J.; BIVIANO, ANGELO B.; GAMBHIR, ALOK; EINSTEIN, ANDREW J.; GARAN, HASAN

    2014-01-01

    Background When atrial fibrillation (AF) is incessant, imaging during a prolonged ventricular RR interval may improve image quality. It was hypothesized that long RR intervals could be predicted from preceding RR values. Methods From the PhysioNet database, electrocardiogram RR intervals were obtained from 74 persistent AF patients. An RR interval lengthened by at least 250 ms beyond the immediately preceding RR interval (termed T0 and T1, respectively) was considered prolonged. A two-parameter scatterplot was used to predict the occurrence of a prolonged interval T0. The scatterplot parameters were: (1) RR variability (RRv) estimated as the average second derivative from 10 previous pairs of RR differences, T13–T2, and (2) Tm–T1, the difference between Tm, the mean from T13 to T2, and T1. For each patient, scatterplots were constructed using preliminary data from the first hour. The ranges of parameters 1 and 2 were adjusted to maximize the proportion of prolonged RR intervals within range. These constraints were used for prediction of prolonged RR in test data collected during the second hour. Results The mean prolonged event was 1.0 seconds in duration. Actual prolonged events were identified with a mean positive predictive value (PPV) of 80% in the test set. PPV was >80% in 36 of 74 patients. An average of 10.8 prolonged RR intervals per 60 minutes was correctly identified. Conclusions A method was developed to predict prolonged RR intervals using two parameters and prior statistical sampling for each patient. This or similar methodology may help improve cardiac imaging in many longstanding persistent AF patients. PMID:23998759

  14. RR Tel: Getting Under the Flux Limit: An Observation with FUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenborn, George (Technical Monitor); Kenyon, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this program is to acquire a FUSE spectrum of the symbiotic binary RR Tel. With these data, we plan to derive improved constraints on the hot component, the nebula, and perhaps the red giant wind. Based on results from AG Dra, we should also be able to use some line detections to improve atomic parameters for high ionization emission lines. This results would benefit the general FUSE community. As of this writing, the FUSE observation of RR Tel has not been made. Because RR Tel is a very bright UV source, the FUSE team is assessing the likelihood that RR Tel will have an adverse affect on the instrument.

  15. Blood flow after contraction and cuff occlusion is reduced in subjects with muscle soreness after eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza-Silva, Eduardo; Wittrup Christensen, Steffan; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occur within 1-2 days after eccentric exercise but the mechanism mediating hypersensitivity is unclear. This study hypothesized that eccentric exercise reduces the blood flow response following muscle contractions and cuff occlusion, which may result ...

  16. The posterior thigh flap for defect coverage of ischial pressure sores - a critical single-centre analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djedovic, Gabriel; Morandi, Evi M; Metzler, Julia; Wirthmann, Anna; Matiasek, Johannes; Bauer, Thomas; Rieger, Ulrich M

    2017-12-01

    The development of pressure sores is still not only an enormous economical but also a medical burden. Especially in the ischial region, the local defect coverage remains demanding as it is the main weight-bearing area in wheelchair-mobilised patients and is prone to high mobility. The purpose of our study was to report our long-time experience with the reconstruction of ischial pressure ulcers with the medially based posterior thigh flap. A retrospective analysis of all primary pressure sores grade III-IV in the ischial area, which were covered with a medially based posterior thigh flap between January 2008 and December 2014, at our department was conducted. A total of 28 patients underwent defect coverage of an ischial pressure sore with the aforementioned flap. The subgroup with complications showed a statistically significant longer hospital stay. A statistically significant correlation between age and the coincidence of comorbidities could be seen. Older patients showed significantly higher grades of pressure sores. The medially based posterior thigh flap is a safe and reliable flap design. Complication rates are comparable to other flaps. Nevertheless, in case of complications, a significantly longer duration of hospitalisation has to be taken into account. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. How social media meet patients’ questions: YouTube™ review for mouth sores in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stasio, D; Romano, A; Paparella, R S; Gentile, C; Serpico, R; Minervini, G; Candotto, V; Laino, L

    2018-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common causes of mouth sores in children so the management of this condition is a matter of great importance. YouTube™ is increasingly being used by patients to obtain health-related information. The aim of this work is to examine the quality of information offered by YouTube™ about mouth sores in children (MSC). Searching the term ‘mouth sores in children’, (MSC) displayed 12.300 results. Of the top 60 videos analyzed, 31 were excluded following exclusion criteria. The major source of upload was from healthcare information channels (HC-41,38%), followed by individual users (HP-25.59%), healthcare professionals (IU-17.24%) and generalist information channels (HC-13.78%); 20.69% of them deal with predisposing factors, and related pathologies, the majority of these propose home remedies (60.72%) rather than topical analgesic drugs (21.43%), antimicrobials (7.14%) and topical steroids (3.57). Most of the videos analyzed were slightly useful (68.97%). Information about mouth sores in children on YouTube™ was poor regardless of the upload source. Analyzing health content on social platforms is a starting point for providing greater quality of health-related information.

  18. Randomized clinical study comparing Compeed (R) cold sore patch to acyclovir cream 5% in the treatment of herpes simplex labialis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsmark, T.; Goodman, J.J.; Drouault, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background Hydrocolloid technology has been proven effective in treating dermal wounds. A previous study showed that a newly developed thin hydrocolloid patch [Compeed (R) cold sore patch (CSP)] provided multiple wound-healing benefits across all stages of a herpes simplex labialis (HSL) outbreak...

  19. Breeding biology and natural history of the Slate-throated Whitestart in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggera, R.A.; Martin, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    We provide details on the breeding biology of the Slate-throated Whitestart (Myioborus miniatus) from 126 nests found during seven breeding seasons, 2002-2008, at Yacamb?? National Park, Venezuela. Nesting activity peaked in late April and May. Only the female built the nest and incubated the eggs. Males rarely visited the nest during these stages. Mean clutch size (2.1 ?? 0.04 eggs, n = 93) was the smallest recorded for the Slate-throated Whitestart. Incubation and nestling period lengths were 15.3 ?? 0.31 (n = 21) and 10.8 ?? 0.24 (n = 7) days, respectively. Attentiveness (% of time on the nest) during incubation (59 ?? 1.6%, n = 52) was similar to other tropical warblers and much lower than northern relatives. This caused a relatively low egg temperature (34.40 ?? 0.33u C, n = ?? nests, 20 days) compared with north temperate birds. Both parents fed nestlings and increased their provisioning rates with nestling age. Growth rate based on nestling mass (k = 0.521 ?? 0.015) was faster than for other tropical passerines but slower than northern relatives. Predation was the main cause of nesting failure and rate of predation increased with age of the nest. An estimated 15% of nests were successful based on an overall Mayfield daily predation rate of 0.053 ?? 0.007. This study confirms a strong latitudinal variation in life history traits of warblers. ?? 2010 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  20. Realistic D-brane models on warped throats: Fluxes, hierarchies and moduli stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cascales, J.F.G.; Garcia del Moral, M.P.; Quevedo, F.; Uranga, A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the construction of string theory models with semirealistic spectrum in a sector of (anti) D3-branes located at an orbifold singularity at the bottom of a highly warped throat geometry, which is a generalisation of the Klebanov-Strassler deformed conifold. These models realise the Randall-Sundrum proposal to naturally generate the Planck/electroweak hierarchy in a concrete string theory embedding, and yielding interesting chiral open string spectra. We describe examples with Standard Model gauge group (or left-right symmetric extensions) and three families of SM fermions, with correct quantum numbers including hypercharge. The dilaton and complex structure moduli of the geometry are stabilised by the 3-form fluxes required to build the throat. We describe diverse issues concerning the stabilisation of geometric Kahler moduli, like blow-up modes of the orbifold singularities, via D term potentials and gauge theory non-perturbative effects, like gaugino condensation. This local geometry, once embedded in a full compactification, could give rise to models with all moduli stabilised, and with the potential to lead to de Sitter vacua. Issues of gauge unification, proton stability, supersymmetry breaking and Yukawa couplings are also discussed. (author)

  1. Plasma influence on throat conductance of the TEXTOR pump limiter ALT-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardtke, A.; Finken, K.H.; Reiter, D.; Dippel, K.H.; Goebel, D.M.; McGrath, R.T.; Sagara, A.

    1989-01-01

    On the TEXTOR pump limiter ALT-I conductance measurements for the backstreaming of gas from the pump limiter vessel through the pump limiter entrance have been performed. In these experiments neutral gas has been injected into the pump limiter plenum during a short pulse. The influence of the instreaming plasma results in a reduction of the conductance of the outstreaming gas. For helium the conductance is reduced to about 40% of the molecular conductance when a plasma flux of 0.8 A/cm 2 (T e =T i =11 eV) is streaming into the pump limiter throat. The reduction of the conductance for backstreaming hydrogen and deuterium under the same plasma conditions is smaller; about 70% of the molecular conductance is obtained. This reduction can be explained by an increased recycling of ions which have been produced in the throat back to the neutralizer plate. The experimental results can be reproduced by Monte Carlo neutral transport code calculations if the recycling coefficient is about 0.85 for hydrogen and deuterium and about 0.95 for helium ions. Processes causing these high recycling coefficients are discussed and their influence is estimated. (orig.)

  2. White-throated sparrows alter songs differentially in response to chorusing anurans and other background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenske, Ariel K; La, Van T

    2014-06-01

    Animals can use acoustic signals to attract mates and defend territories. As a consequence, background noise that interferes with signal transmission has the potential to reduce fitness, especially in birds that rely on song. While much research on bird song has investigated vocal flexibility in response to urban noise, weather and other birds, the possibility of inter-class acoustic competition from anurans has not been previously studied. Using sound recordings from central Ontario wetlands, we tested if white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicolis) make short-term changes to their singing behaviour in response to chorusing spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer), as well as to car noise, wind and other bird vocalizations. White-throated sparrow songs that were sung during the spring peeper chorus were shorter with higher minimum frequencies and narrower bandwidths resulting in reduced frequency overlap. Additionally, sparrows were less likely to sing when car noise and the vocalizations of other birds were present. These patterns suggest that birds use multiple adjustment strategies. This is the first report to demonstrate that birds may alter their songs differentially in response to different sources of noise. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Reproductive System of Brown-throated Sloth (Bradypus variegatus, Schinz 1825, Pilosa, Xenarthra): Anatomy and Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favoretto, S M; daSilva, E G; Menezes, J; Guerra, R R; Campos, D B

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, habitat degradation led to the decline of some populations of brown-throated sloth. The aim of this study was to describe morphological features of the female reproductive system of the species. The oval ovaries were partially surrounded by ovarian bursa. An external cortex and an inner medulla were present. Corpora lutea and corpora albicans together with follicles at various stages of development each with a single oocyte were found in the cortex. Uterine tubes were tortuous, tubular, travelled around the perimeter of the ovary and possessed a folded mucosa with ciliated pseudostratified epithelium. Uterus was simplex, with no horns and divided into three parts: a pear-shaped cranial segment and a long caudal uterine segment (both forming the body of the uterus) and two cervices. Uterus presented three layers: mucosa, lined by pseudostratified epithelium, muscular and serosa. The cervices connected the uterus to the urogenital sinus, a distensible cavity with longitudinal mucosal folds lined by transitional epithelium that extended from the external urethral orifice and the external uterine ostia to the vulva, which was lined by a keratinized stratified squamous epithelium. Brown-throated sloth presented a bipartite clitoris with paired crura, bodies and glandes. The presence of a double cervix and a bipartite clitoris was unique features of the species. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Decoupling limit and throat geometry of non-susy D3 brane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayek, Kuntal, E-mail: kuntal.nayek@saha.ac.in; Roy, Shibaji, E-mail: shibaji.roy@saha.ac.in

    2017-03-10

    Recently it has been shown by us that, like BPS Dp branes, bulk gravity gets decoupled from the brane even for the non-susy Dp branes of type II string theories indicating a possible extension of AdS/CFT correspondence for the non-supersymmetric case. In that work, the decoupling of gravity on the non-susy Dp branes has been shown numerically for the general case as well as analytically for some special case. Here we discuss the decoupling limit and the throat geometry of the non-susy D3 brane when the charge associated with the brane is very large. We show that in the decoupling limit the throat geometry of the non-susy D3 brane, under appropriate coordinate change, reduces to the Constable–Myers solution and thus confirming that this solution is indeed the holographic dual of a (non-gravitational) gauge theory discussed there. We also show that when one of the parameters of the solution takes a specific value, it reduces, under another coordinate change, to the five-dimensional solution obtained by Csaki and Reece, again confirming its gauge theory interpretation.

  5. Urban sores. On the interaction between segregation, urban decay and deprived neighbourhoods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Skifter

    Most European countries have experienced special problems that have emerged in certain more or less well-defined parts of cities called de-prived or depressed urban neighbourhoods. These problems were initially found in the oldest urban areas with the lowest quality housing. Since the beginning...... of the 1980s, however, in Europe they have also emerged in newer social housing estates outside city centres. These neighbourhoods display visible physical and social problems that can disfigure the perhaps otherwise attractive urban landscape. They could in severe cases even be termed sores on the face...... of the city. They are often perceived by the public as places that are not inhabited or frequented by decent people – they are seen as ‘places of exclusion’. The purpose of this book is to contribute to a deeper understanding of why such neighbourhoods come to exist and the impacts they have on cities. Urban...

  6. Computed tomography of pressure sores, pelvic abscess, and osteomyelitis in patients with spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Golimbu, C.; Lam, S.; Sokolow, J.; Kung, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    Nine patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and large pressure ulcers and other possible complications, were evaluated by computed tomography (CT), conventional radiography, tomography, bone scanning, gallium scanning, and sonography. CT revealed the depth, extent, and relationship of the ulcer-bed to the underlying structures in all 9 patients. CT also positively identified unsuspected intra- and extra-pelvic abscess and pelvic osteomyelitis in 4 patients each. Other modalities identified only 2 of these complications. We believe CT is the modality of choice for evaluation of these complications in SCI patients, because of its superior ability in evaluation of pressure sores and detection of pathologic changes in soft tissue and bone in the pelvic region

  7. Development of Marjolin's ulcer following successful surgical treatment of chronic sacral pressure sore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, M.A.; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2008-01-01

    of surgical excision and successful closure of the wound, the patient developed Marjolin's ulcer 2.5 years later. Yet it illustrates the primary importance of preventing the development pressure sores, of aggressive (surgical) therapy with healing when they do arise and of taking frequent biopsies......STUDY DESIGN: Case report. OBJECTIVE: Report of an unusual case, where a Marjolin's ulcer that developed 2.5 years after surgical excision and successful closure. SETTING: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Burn Unit and the Clinic for Spinal Cord Injuries, Copenhagen University...... Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. METHODS AND RESULTS: A 22-year-old man sustained a fracture with luxation of the 5th and 6th cervical vertebrae and loss of sensory and motor function after a diving accident (complete C8 lesion). During initial hospitalization, he developed a sacral ulcer...

  8. The Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Planning a Pedicled Perforator Flap for Pressure Sores in the Gluteal Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-June; Lee, Kyeong-Tae; Jeon, Byung-Joon; Woo, Kyong-Je

    2018-04-01

    Pedicled perforator flaps (PPFs) have been widely used to treat pressure sores in the gluteal region. Selection of a reliable perforator is crucial for successful surgical treatment of pressure sores using PPFs. In this study, we evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in planning PPF reconstruction of pressure sores in the gluteal region. A retrospective chart review was performed in patients who had undergone these PPF reconstructions and who had received preoperative MRI. Preoperatively, the extent of infection and necrotic tissue was evaluated using MRI, and a reliable perforator was identified, considering the perforator location in relation to the defect, perforator size, and perforator courses. Intraoperatively, the targeted perforator was marked on the skin at the locations measured on the MRI images, and the marked location was confirmed using intraoperative handheld Doppler. Superior gluteal artery, inferior gluteal artery, or parasacral perforators were used for the PPFs. Surgical outcomes were evaluated. A total of 12 PPFs were performed in 12 patients. Superior gluteal artery perforator flaps were performed in 7 patients, inferior gluteal artery perforator flaps were performed in 3 patients, and parasacral perforator flaps were performed in 2 patients. We could identify a reliable perforator on MRI, and it was found at the predicted locations in all cases. There was only one case of partial flap necrosis. There was no recurrence of the pressure sores during the mean follow-up period of 6.7 months (range = 3-15 months). In selected patients with gluteal pressure sores, MRI is a suitable means for not only providing information about disease extent and comorbidities but also for evaluating perforators for PPF reconstructions.

  9. Foam Rolling for Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Recovery of Dynamic Performance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcey, Gregory E. P.; Bradbury-Squires, David J.; Kawamoto, Jon-Erik; Drinkwater, Eric J.; Behm, David G.; Button, Duane C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: After an intense bout of exercise, foam rolling is thought to alleviate muscle fatigue and soreness (ie, delayed-onset muscle soreness [DOMS]) and improve muscular performance. Potentially, foam rolling may be an effective therapeutic modality to reduce DOMS while enhancing the recovery of muscular performance. Objective: To examine the effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense exercise protocol through assessment of pressure-pain threshold, sprint time, change-of-direction speed, power, and dynamic strength-endurance. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 8 healthy, physically active males (age = 22.1 ± 2.5 years, height = 177.0 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 88.4 ± 11.4 kg) participated. Intervention(s): Participants performed 2 conditions, separated by 4 weeks, involving 10 sets of 10 repetitions of back squats at 60% of their 1-repetition maximum, followed by either no foam rolling or 20 minutes of foam rolling immediately, 24, and 48 hours postexercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): Pressure-pain threshold, sprint speed (30-m sprint time), power (broad-jump distance), change-of-direction speed (T-test), and dynamic strength-endurance. Results: Foam rolling substantially improved quadriceps muscle tenderness by a moderate to large amount in the days after fatigue (Cohen d range, 0.59 to 0.84). Substantial effects ranged from small to large in sprint time (Cohen d range, 0.68 to 0.77), power (Cohen d range, 0.48 to 0.87), and dynamic strength-endurance (Cohen d = 0.54). Conclusions: Foam rolling effectively reduced DOMS and associated decrements in most dynamic performance measures. PMID:25415413

  10. Effects of acupuncture on symptoms and muscle function in delayed-onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübscher, Markus; Vogt, Lutz; Bernhörster, Marcus; Rosenhagen, Andreas; Banzer, Winfried

    2008-10-01

    This study was done to investigate the effects of a standardized acupuncture treatment on symptoms and muscle function in exercise-induced delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). A prospective, randomized, controlled, observer and subject-blinded trial was undertaken. Twenty-two (22) healthy subjects (22-30 years; 10 males and 12 females) were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: real acupuncture (deep needling at classic acupuncture points and tender points; n = 7), sham-acupuncture (superficial needling at nonacupuncture points; n = 8), and control (no needling; n = 7). DOMS of the nondominant elbow-flexors was experimentally induced through eccentric contractions until exhaustion. The outcome measures were pain perception (visual analogue scale; VAS; range: 0-10 cm), mechanical pain threshold (MPT; pressure algometer), and maximum isometric voluntary force (MIVF; force transducer). Treatment was applied immediately, 24 and 48 hours after DOMS induction. Measurements of MPT and MIVF were made prior to DOMS induction as well as before and after every treatment session. VAS data were acquired after DOMS induction as well as pre- and post-treatment. Final pain, MPT, and MIVF measurements were performed 72 hours after DOMS induction. Following nonparametric testing, there were no significant differences between groups in outcome measures at baseline. After 72 hours, pain perception (VAS) was significantly lower in the acupuncture group compared to the sham acupuncture and control subjects. However, the mean MPT and MIVF scores were not significantly different between groups. Although acupuncture seemed to have no effects on mechanical pain threshold and muscle function, it proved to reduce perceived pain arising from exercise-induced muscle soreness.

  11. Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, Christopher John; Whitaker, Mark Thomas; Williams, Steve John

    2017-01-04

    Non-isothermal conditions during flight cycles have long led to the requirement for thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) evaluation of aerospace materials. However, the increased temperatures within the gas turbine engine have meant that the requirements for TMF testing now extend to disc alloys along with blade materials. As such, fatigue crack growth rates are required to be evaluated under non-isothermal conditions along with the development of a detailed understanding of related failure mechanisms. In the current work, a TMF crack growth testing method has been developed utilising induction heating and direct current potential drop techniques for polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys, such as RR1000. Results have shown that in-phase (IP) testing produces accelerated crack growth rates compared with out-of-phase (OOP) due to increased temperature at peak stress and therefore increased time dependent crack growth. The ordering of the crack growth rates is supported by detailed fractographic analysis which shows intergranular crack growth in IP test specimens, and transgranular crack growth in 90° OOP and 180° OOP tests. Isothermal tests have also been carried out for comparison of crack growth rates at the point of peak stress in the TMF cycles.

  12. Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher John Pretty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-isothermal conditions during flight cycles have long led to the requirement for thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF evaluation of aerospace materials. However, the increased temperatures within the gas turbine engine have meant that the requirements for TMF testing now extend to disc alloys along with blade materials. As such, fatigue crack growth rates are required to be evaluated under non-isothermal conditions along with the development of a detailed understanding of related failure mechanisms. In the current work, a TMF crack growth testing method has been developed utilising induction heating and direct current potential drop techniques for polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys, such as RR1000. Results have shown that in-phase (IP testing produces accelerated crack growth rates compared with out-of-phase (OOP due to increased temperature at peak stress and therefore increased time dependent crack growth. The ordering of the crack growth rates is supported by detailed fractographic analysis which shows intergranular crack growth in IP test specimens, and transgranular crack growth in 90° OOP and 180° OOP tests. Isothermal tests have also been carried out for comparison of crack growth rates at the point of peak stress in the TMF cycles.

  13. RR Tel: Determination of Dust Properties During Minimum Obscuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurkić T.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available the ISO infrared spectra and the SAAO long-term JHKL photometry of RR Tel in the epochs during minimum obscuration are studied in order to construct a circumstellar dust model. the spectral energy distribution in the near- and the mid-IR spectral range (1–15 μm was obtained for an epoch without the pronounced dust obscuration. the DUSTY code was used to solve the radiative transfer through the dust and to determine the circumstellar dust properties of the inner dust regions around the Mira component. Dust temperature, maximum grain size, dust density distribution, mass-loss rate, terminal wind velocity and optical depth are determined. the spectral energy distribution and the long-term JHKL photometry during an epoch of minimum obscuration show almost unattenuated stellar source and strong dust emission which cannot be explained by a single dust shell model. We propose a two-component model consisting of an optically thin circmustellar dust shell and optically thick dust outside the line of sight in some kind of a flattened geometry, which is responsible for most of the observed dust thermal emission.

  14. Computer control of ET-RR-1 hot cell manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effat, A.M.; Rahman, F.A.

    1990-01-01

    The hot cell designed for remote handling of radioactive materials are, in effect, integral systems of safety devices for attaining adequate radiological protection for the operating personnel. Their operation involve potential hazards that are sometimes of great magnitude. The effect of an incident or accident could thus be fatal. some of these incident are due to the collision of the manipulator slave side with the radioactive objectives. Therefore in order to minimize the probability of such type of incidents, the movement of the manipulators is suggested (in the present investigation) to be kept under computer control. A model have been developed to control the movement of the hot cell manipulators in the slave side for Egypt first research reactor ET-RR-1, specially in the hidden sectors. The model is based on the use of a microprocessor and some accessories fixed to the manipulators slave side in a special manner such that it prevents the manipulator from colliding with radioactive objects. This is achieved by a signal transmitted to a specially designed brake which controls the movement of the upper arm of the manipulator master side. The hardware design of the model as well as the software are presented in details

  15. La Silla quest RR Lyrae star survey: Region I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinn, R.; Miller, L.; Horowitz, B.; Baltay, C.; Ellman, N.; Hadjiyska, E.; Rabinowitz, D.; Vivas, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    A search for RR Lyrae stars (RRLSs) in ∼840 deg 2 of the sky in right ascension 150°-210° and declination –10° to + 10° yielded 1013 type ab and 359 type c RRLS. This sample is used to study the density profile of the Galactic halo, halo substructures, and the Oosterhoff type of the halo over distances (d ☉ ) from ∼5 to ∼80 kpc. The halo is flattened toward the Galactic plane, and its density profile steepens in slope at galactocentric distances greater than ∼25 kpc. The RRLS in the stellar stream from the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy match well the model of Law and Majewski for the stars that were stripped 1.3-3.2 Gyr ago, but not for the ones stripped 3.2-5.0 Gyr ago. Over densities are found at the locations of the Virgo Overdensity and the Virgo Stellar Stream. Within 1° of 1220-1, which Jerjen et al. identify as a halo substructure at d ☉ ∼ 24 kpc, there are four RRLS that are possibly members. Away from substructures, the RRLS are a mixture of Oosterhoff types I and II, but mostly OoI (∼73%). The accretion of galaxies resembling in RRLS content the most massive Milky Way satellites (LMC, SMC, For, Sgr) may explain this preponderance of OoI. Six new RRLS and three new anomalous Cepheids were found in the Sextans dSph galaxy.

  16. AIREKMOD-RR, Reactivity Transients in Nuclear Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggoura, B.; Mazrou, H.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: AIREMOD-RR is a point kinetics code which can simulate fast transients in nuclear research reactor cores. It can also be used for theoretical reactor dynamics studies. It is used for research reactor kinetic analysis and provides a point neutron kinetic capability. The thermal hydraulic behavior is governed by a one-dimensional heat balance equation. The calculations are restricted to a single equivalent unit cell which consists of fuel, clad and coolant. 2 - Method of solution: For transient reactor kinetic calculations a modified Runge Kutta numerical method is used. The external reactivity insertion, specified as a function of time, is converted in dollar ($) unit. The neutron density, energy release and feedback variables are given at each time step. The two types of reactivity feedback considered are: Doppler effect and moderator effect. A new expression for the reactivity dependence on the feedback variables has been introduced in the present version of the code. The feedback reactivities are fitted in power series expression. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The number of delayed neutron groups and the total number of equations are limited only by computer storage capabilities. - Coolant is always in liquid phase. - Void reactivity feedback is not considered

  17. Improvement on Main/backup Controller Switching Device of the Nozzle Throat Area Control System for a Turbofan Aero Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Duan, Minghu; Yan, Maode; Li, Gang; Li, Xiaohui

    2014-06-01

    A full authority digital electronic controller (FADEC) equipped with a full authority hydro-mechanical backup controller (FAHMBC) is adopted as the nozzle throat area control system (NTACS) of a turbofan aero engine. In order to ensure the switching reliability of the main/backup controller, the nozzle throat area control switching valve was improved from three-way convex desktop slide valve to six-way convex desktop slide valve. Simulation results show that, if malfunctions of FAEDC occur and abnormal signals are outputted from FADEC, NTACS will be seriously influenced by the main/backup controller switching in several working states, while NTACS will not be influenced by using the improved nozzle throat area control switching valve, thus the controller switching process will become safer and smoother and the working reliability of this turbofan aero engine is improved by the controller switching device improvement.

  18. A NOVEL APPROACH TO ARRHYTHMIA CLASSIFICATION USING RR INTERVAL AND TEAGER ENERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHANDRAKAR KAMATH

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is hypothesized that a key characteristic of electrocardiogram (ECG signal is its nonlinear dynamic behaviour and that the nonlinear component changes more significantly between normal and arrhythmia conditions than the linear component. The usual statistical descriptors used in RR (R to R interval analysis do not capture the nonlinear disposition of RR interval variability. In this paper we explore a novel approach to extract the features from nonlinear component of the RR interval signal using Teager energy operator (TEO. The key feature of Teager energy is that it models the energy of the source that generated the signal rather than the energy of the signal itself. Hence any deviations in regular rhythmic activity of the heart get reflected in the Teager energy function. The classification evaluated on MIT-BIH database, with RR interval and mean of Teager energy computed over RR interval as features, exhibits an average accuracy that exceeds 99.79%.

  19. IDAS-RR: an incident data base system for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Kohsaka, Atsuo; Kaminaga, Masanori; Murayama, Youji; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Maniwa, Masaki.

    1990-03-01

    An Incident Data Base System for Research Reactors, IDAS-RR, has been developed. IDAS-RR has information about abnormal incidents (failures, transients, accidents, etc.) of research reactors in the world. Data reference, input, editing and other functions of IDAS-RR are menu driven. The routine processing and data base management functions are performed by the system software and hardware. PC-9801 equipment was selected as the hardware because of its portability and popularity. IDAS-RR provides effective reference information for the following activities. 1) Analysis of abnormal incident of research reactors, 2) Detail analysis of research reactor behavior in the abnormal incident for building the knowledge base of the reactor emergency diagnostic system for research reactor, 3) Planning counter-measure for emergency situation in the research reactor. This report is a user's manual of IDAS-RR. (author)

  20. La Silla quest RR Lyrae star survey: Region I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn, R.; Miller, L. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Horowitz, B.; Baltay, C.; Ellman, N.; Hadjiyska, E.; Rabinowitz, D. [Department of Physics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06511-8499 (United States); Vivas, A. K. [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía, Apartado Postal 264, Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2014-01-20

    A search for RR Lyrae stars (RRLSs) in ∼840 deg{sup 2} of the sky in right ascension 150°-210° and declination –10° to + 10° yielded 1013 type ab and 359 type c RRLS. This sample is used to study the density profile of the Galactic halo, halo substructures, and the Oosterhoff type of the halo over distances (d {sub ☉}) from ∼5 to ∼80 kpc. The halo is flattened toward the Galactic plane, and its density profile steepens in slope at galactocentric distances greater than ∼25 kpc. The RRLS in the stellar stream from the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy match well the model of Law and Majewski for the stars that were stripped 1.3-3.2 Gyr ago, but not for the ones stripped 3.2-5.0 Gyr ago. Over densities are found at the locations of the Virgo Overdensity and the Virgo Stellar Stream. Within 1° of 1220-1, which Jerjen et al. identify as a halo substructure at d {sub ☉} ∼ 24 kpc, there are four RRLS that are possibly members. Away from substructures, the RRLS are a mixture of Oosterhoff types I and II, but mostly OoI (∼73%). The accretion of galaxies resembling in RRLS content the most massive Milky Way satellites (LMC, SMC, For, Sgr) may explain this preponderance of OoI. Six new RRLS and three new anomalous Cepheids were found in the Sextans dSph galaxy.

  1. Cold-water immersion (cryotherapy for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bleakley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many strategies are in use with the intention of preventing or minimizing delayed onset muscle soreness and fatigue after exercise. Cold-water immersion, in water temperatures of less than 15 °C, is currently one of the most popular interventional strategies used after exercise. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of cold-water immersion in the management of muscle soreness after exercise. SEARCH METHODS: In February 2010, we searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library (2010, Issue 1, Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL, British Nursing Index and archive (BNI, and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro. We also searched the reference lists of articles, handsearched journals and conference proceedings and contacted experts. In November 2011, we updated the searches of Central (2011, Issue 4, Medline (up to November Week 3 2011, Embase (to 2011 Week 46 and CINAHL (to 28 November 2011 to check for more recent publications. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized and quasi-randomized trials comparing the effect of using cold-water immersion after exercise with: passive intervention (rest/no intervention, contrast immersion, warm-water immersion, active recovery, compression, or a different duration/dosage of cold-water immersion. Primary outcomes were pain (muscle soreness or tenderness (pain on palpation, and subjective recovery (return to previous activities without signs or symptoms. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three authors independently evaluated study quality and extracted data. Some of the data were obtained following author correspondence or extracted from graphs in the trial reports. Where possible, data were pooled using the fixed-effect model. MAIN RESULTS: Seventeen small trials were included, involving a total of 366 participants. Study quality was low. The temperature, duration and

  2. Throat quantization of the Schwarzschild–Tangherlini(-AdS) black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunstatter, Gabor; Maeda, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Adopting the throat quantization pioneered by Louko and Mäkelä, we derive the mass and area spectra for the Schwarzschild–Tangherlini black hole and its anti-de Sitter (AdS) generalization in arbitrary dimensions. We find that the system can be quantized exactly in three special cases: the three-dimensional BTZ black hole, toroidal black holes in any dimension, and five-dimensional Schwarzshild–Tangherlini(-AdS) black holes. For the remaining cases the spectra are obtained for large mass using the WKB approximation. For asymptotically flat black holes, the area/entropy has an equally spaced spectrum, as expected from previous work. In the asymptotically AdS case on the other hand, it is the mass spectrum that is equally spaced. Our exact results for the BTZ black hole mass with Dirichlet boundary conditions are consistent with the spectra of the corresponding operators in the dual CFT. (paper)

  3. An overview of the microbiology of acute ear, nose and throat infections requiring hospitalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusan, Maria; Klug, Tejs Ehlers; Ovesen, Therese

    2009-01-01

    This study is the first to provide an extensive overview of the microbiology of acute ear, nose and throat infections requiring hospitalisation. All 2,028 cases of acute infections admitted between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2006 were reviewed to assess the use of pre-admission antibiotics......, microbiological results, antibiotic and surgical management and length of hospitalisation. Infections of the oropharynx accounted for the vast majority of admissions, followed by ear infections, and cutaneous neck abscesses. Peritonsillar abscess was the most frequent diagnosis, accounting for over one third...... of admissions (39.8%, 808 out of 2,028). Complete microbiological data were available for 1,430 cultures, and were analysed for trends with respect to diagnosis, age, gender and use of pre-admission antibiotics. Forty-six percent (657 out of 1,430) of cultures yielded no growth or normal flora. This value...

  4. Mumps vaccine virus genome is present in throat swabs obtained from uncomplicated healthy recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T; Nakayama, T

    2001-01-08

    Seven children were followed for up to 42 days post-vaccination with live mumps vaccine and 37 throat swabs were obtained serially. Viral genomic RNA was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the phosphoprotein (P) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) regions. Virus isolation was also attempted. Genomic differentiation of detected mumps virus genome was performed by sequence analysis and/or restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). No adverse reaction was observed in these children. Although mumps virus was not isolated from any of the samples, viral RNA was detected in four samples from three vaccine recipients, 18, 18 and 26, and 7 days after vaccination, respectively. Detected viral RNA was identified as the vaccine strain. Our data suggests that vaccine virus inoculated replicates in the parotid glands but the incidence of virus transmission from recipients to other susceptible subjects should be low.

  5. Review of ear, nose and throat foreign bodies in Sarawak General Hospital. A five year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiun, Kian Chai; Tang, Ing Ping; Tan, Tee Yong; Jong, Doris Evelyn Yah Hui

    2012-02-01

    Ear, nose and throat foreign bodies are common in ENT clinical practice. This study was designed to establish the local data of otorhinolaryngeal foreign bodies in term of prevalence among paediatric and adult groups, the clinical features, types of foreign body at different sites, and laterality of foreign bodies. This study was carried out at ENT department, Sarawak General Hospital, Malaysia, from 1st January 2005 to 31st December 2009. A total of 1084 cases were included and statistically analyzed. Ear foreign bodies showed the highest incidence which was consisted of 480 (44.3%) cases, followed by nose in 270 (24.9%) cases, pharynx in 251 (23.2%) cases, esophagus in 57 (5.3%) cases and laryngo-tracheobronchial tree in 26 (2.4%) cases. Otorhinolaryngeal foreign bodies occurred more frequently in 0-10 year old age group which constituted 651 (60.1%) cases. The descending order of frequency for foreign body sites in adult was pharynx (17.2%), ear (12.8%), esophagus (3.1%), nose (1.7%) and laryngo-tracheobronchial tree (1.1%). The type of foreign bodies varies with age group and site of foreign body lodgement. In general, common foreign bodies in both adult and children were food related, with the additional of small objects such as plastic toy in paediatric group. Otorhinolaryngeal foreign bodies were found more frequently in children. The types of foreign body were different from age group and sites of foreign body lodgement. The local food constituted the highest incidence of ear, nose, and throat foreign bodies with additional of plastic toys in paediatric group.

  6. Genes located in a chromosomal inversion are correlated with territorial song in white-throated sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinzow-Kramer, W M; Horton, B M; McKee, C D; Michaud, J M; Tharp, G K; Thomas, J W; Tuttle, E M; Yi, S; Maney, D L

    2015-11-01

    The genome of the white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) contains an inversion polymorphism on chromosome 2 that is linked to predictable variation in a suite of phenotypic traits including plumage color, aggression and parental behavior. Differences in gene expression between the two color morphs, which represent the two common inversion genotypes (ZAL2/ZAL2 and ZAL2/ZAL2(m) ), may therefore advance our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of these phenotypes. To identify genes that are differentially expressed between the two morphs and correlated with behavior, we quantified gene expression and terrirorial aggression, including song, in a population of free-living white-throated sparrows. We analyzed gene expression in two brain regions, the medial amygdala (MeA) and hypothalamus. Both regions are part of a 'social behavior network', which is rich in steroid hormone receptors and previously linked with territorial behavior. Using weighted gene co-expression network analyses, we identified modules of genes that were correlated with both morph and singing behavior. The majority of these genes were located within the inversion, showing the profound effect of the inversion on the expression of genes captured by the rearrangement. These modules were enriched with genes related to retinoic acid signaling and basic cellular functioning. In the MeA, the most prominent pathways were those related to steroid hormone receptor activity. Within these pathways, the only gene encoding such a receptor was ESR1 (estrogen receptor 1), a gene previously shown to predict song rate in this species. The set of candidate genes we identified may mediate the effects of a chromosomal inversion on territorial behavior. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  7. From the Generation Memory to the Group Identity: The Film "A Throat Full of Strawberries"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Delač

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the work entitled “From the generation memory to the group identity: the film "A Throat Full of Strawberries", the influence of personal and collective memory on generation identity is analyzed. The work is based on Jan Assmann and Aleida Assmann’s theory of memory, with a special review of the books “Cultural Memory” (Jan Assmann, and “Work on the National Memory” and “The Long Shadow of the Past” (Aleida Assmann. Firstly, the analysis includes the mapping, then the explanation of the memory figures which appear in the movie. Also, the thesis which I covered in the work refers to the difference between Halbwachs’s  term “the images of memory”, and “the figure of memory” introduced by Assmann: the figures of memory are complementary to the first term “because they include not only pictorial, but narrative forms as well.” (Assmann. In this paper, the relation between personal and collective memory is examined, as well as how individual memory influences the establishment of one’s group memory, and how memory and remembrance affect what we call generation identity. The Film “A Throat Full of Strawberries” (by Srdjan Karanovic, 1985 was chosen as my case study. This movie is a sequel to the series “The Unpicked Strawberries” (Srdjan Karanovic, 1976. It tells about a reunion of the group of people of the particular generation, who evoke the memories about the events during the 60’s (the time of their youth, so the topic this film is focused on represents the starting point for the study of the generation memory and its function. The aim of this paper is to prove that generation memory has the crucial role when it comes to the creation of one’s group identity

  8. Coinfection with Hepatozoon sp. and Canine Distemper Virus in a Yellow-throated Marten ( Martes flavigula koreana) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Surim; Choi, Ul Soo; Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, Jong Hyun; Lee, Hae Beom; Cho, Ho Seong; Kim, Wonil; Lim, Chae Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2016-04-28

    We describe coinfection with Hepatozoon sp. and canine distemper virus (CDV) in a yellow-throated marten ( Martes flavigula koreana). We found Hepatozoon cysts in muscular tissue and viral inclusion bodies in the brain. Hepatozoon sp., and CDV was confirmed in blood and brain, respectively, by PCR.

  9. Female preference for sympatric vs. allopatric male throat color morphs in the mesquite lizard (Sceloporus grammicus species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Bastiaans

    Full Text Available Color polymorphic sexual signals are often associated with alternative reproductive behaviors within populations, and the number, frequency, or type of morphs present often vary among populations. When these differences lead to assortative mating by population, the study of such polymorphic taxa may shed light on speciation mechanisms. We studied two populations of a lizard with polymorphic throat color, an important sexual signal. Males in one population exhibit orange, yellow, or blue throats; whereas males in the other exhibit orange, yellow, or white throats. We assessed female behavior when choosing between allopatric and sympatric males. We asked whether females discriminated more when the allopatric male was of an unfamiliar morph than when the allopatric male was similar in coloration to the sympatric male. We found that female rejection of allopatric males relative to sympatric males was more pronounced when males in a pair were more different in throat color. Our findings may help illuminate how behavioral responses to color morph differences between populations with polymorphic sexual signals contribute to reproductive isolation.

  10. Using Evaluability Assessment to Improve Program Evaluation for the Blue-Throated Macaw Environmental Education Project in Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatierra da Silva, Daniela; Jacobson, Susan K.; Monroe, Martha C.; Israel, Glenn D.

    2016-01-01

    An evaluability assessment of a program to save a critically endangered bird helped prepare the Blue-throated Macaw Environmental Education Project for evaluation and program improvement. The evaluability assessment facilitated agreement among key stakeholders on evaluation criteria and intended uses of evaluation information in order to maximize…

  11. Female preference for sympatric vs. allopatric male throat color morphs in the mesquite lizard (Sceloporus grammicus) species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaans, Elizabeth; Bastiaans, Mary Jane; Morinaga, Gen; Castañeda Gaytán, José Gamaliel; Marshall, Jonathon C; Bane, Brendan; de la Cruz, Fausto Méndez; Sinervo, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Color polymorphic sexual signals are often associated with alternative reproductive behaviors within populations, and the number, frequency, or type of morphs present often vary among populations. When these differences lead to assortative mating by population, the study of such polymorphic taxa may shed light on speciation mechanisms. We studied two populations of a lizard with polymorphic throat color, an important sexual signal. Males in one population exhibit orange, yellow, or blue throats; whereas males in the other exhibit orange, yellow, or white throats. We assessed female behavior when choosing between allopatric and sympatric males. We asked whether females discriminated more when the allopatric male was of an unfamiliar morph than when the allopatric male was similar in coloration to the sympatric male. We found that female rejection of allopatric males relative to sympatric males was more pronounced when males in a pair were more different in throat color. Our findings may help illuminate how behavioral responses to color morph differences between populations with polymorphic sexual signals contribute to reproductive isolation.

  12. Chronic plaque psoriasis: streptococcus pyogenes throat carriage rate and therapeutic response to oral antibiotics in comparison with oral methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, N.; Usman, M.; Hameed, A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the throat carriage rate of Streptococcus pyogenes in patients having chronic plaque psoriasis and the effect of antibiotics as compared with that of oral methotrexate. Forty patients and 40 age and gender-matched controls were selected. Throat swab for culture of Streptococcus pyogenes was taken from each patient and control. All patients were treated with oral Penicillin V 250 mg, 6 hourly, and oral Rifampicin, 600 mg daily, for 10 days. Pre- and post therapy 'Psoriasis Area and Severity Index' (PASI) were compared. Thirty of these 40 patients were later given oral methotrexate, 5-10 mg weekly, for 04 weeks and pre- and post-therapy PASI were compared. Chi-square and paired-samples t-test were used for data analysis. Throat swab cultures were positive for Streptococcus pyogenes in 05 (12.5%) patients and none (0%) of the controls (p=0.02). Mean pre- and postantibiotic therapy PASI were 15.92 + 05.94 and 15.19 + 06.17 respectively (p=0.078). Mean pre- and postmethotrexate PASI were 15.81+ 5.55 and 8.79 + 4.19 respectively (p <0.01). Throat carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes is common in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis. Short-term antibiotic treatment has no role in routine treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis. However, it would be worthwhile to consider the effects of long term antibiotics on chronic plaque psoriasis. (author)

  13. Eye, nose, hair, and throat: external anatomy of the head of a neonate gray whale (Cetacea, Mysticeti, Eschrichtiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Annalisa; Ekdale, Eric G; Zellmer, Nicholas T; Deméré, Thomas A; Kienle, Sarah S; Smallcomb, Meghan

    2015-04-01

    Information is scarce on gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) anatomy and that of mysticetes in general. Dissection of the head of a neonatal gray whale revealed novel anatomical details of the eye, blowhole, incisive papilla with associated nasopalatine ducts, sensory hairs, and throat grooves. Compared to a similar sized right whale calf, the gray whale eyeball is nearly twice as long. The nasal cartilages of the gray whale, located between the blowholes, differ from the bowhead in having accessory cartilages. A small, fleshy incisive papilla bordered by two blind nasopalatine pits near the palate's rostral tip, previously undescribed in gray whales, may be associated with the vomeronasal organ, although histological evidence is needed for definitive identification. Less well known among mysticetes are the numerous elongated, stiff sensory hairs (vibrissae) observed on the gray whale rostrum from the ventral tip to the blowhole and on the mandible. These hairs are concentrated on the chin, and those on the lower jaw are arranged in a V-shaped pattern. We confirm the presence of two primary, anteriorly converging throat grooves, confined to the throat region similar to those of ziphiid and physeteroid odontocetes. A third, shorter groove occurs lateral to the left primary groove. The throat grooves in the gray whale have been implicated in gular expansion during suction feeding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Reproductive parameters in the critically endangered Blue-throated Macaw: limits to the recovery of a parrot under intensive management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Berkunsky

    Full Text Available Rediscovered in the wild twenty years ago, the breeding biology of wild Blue-throated Macaws remains largely unexplored, yet is essential to its effective conservation and recovery. Here, we analyse reproductive parameters in an intensively managed wild population of Blue-throated Macaws, providing the first data on the breeding biology of this critically endangered species. During the six-year study period, 2007-2012, the number of active breeding pairs either remained constant or decreased, depending on the site, and no new breeding pairs were discovered despite extensive searching. We documented nesting attempts in natural cavities in dead palms or live hardwoods, and artificial nest boxes. Egg-laying was concentrated during the end of dry season and the beginning of the wet season, August through December. Hatching failure was the greatest cause of egg losses. Half of the breeding attempts of Blue-throated Macaws produced at least one fledging, on average two, after a 85 days nestling period. An average of 4.3 nestlings per year fledged from all known wild nests combined. Each pair lost roughly 65% of its initial reproductive investment at each nesting attempt. In most successful nesting attempts of individualized pairs, a new nesting attempt was not detected the following year. All monitored breeding pairs showed high nest site fidelity, reusing hardwood-tree cavities and nest boxes. Our findings will aid conservation efforts by refining current actions and prompting new approaches towards the conservation and recovery of the Blue-throated Macaw.

  15. Exceeding Parents' Expectations in Ear-Nose-Throat Outpatient Facilities: The Development and Analysis of a Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritis, Eleftherios; Katharaki, Maria; Katharakis, George

    2012-01-01

    The study attempts to develop an outpatient service quality scale by investigating the key dimensions which assess parental satisfaction and provides a recommendation on an improved health service delivery system. The survey was conducted in an Ear-Nose-Throat outpatient clinic of a Greek public pediatric hospital. A total of 127 parents in…

  16. Marine oil dietary supplementation reduces delayed onset muscle soreness after a 30 km run

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baum K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Klaus Baum,1 Richard D Telford,2 Ross B Cunningham,3 1Trainingsinstitut Prof Baum, Köln, Germany; 2College of Medicine, Biology, and Environment, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 3The Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia Objective: Runners are prone to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS during long distance training. This especially holds for unaccustomed training volumes at moderate to high intensities. We investigated the effects of a marine oil complex, PCSO-524®, derived from the New Zealand green-lipped mussel (formulated as Lyprinol® and Omega XL® on DOMS after a 30 km training run. Methods: Initially, peak oxygen uptake of 32 distance runners (4 female, 28 male; median age 45 years, range 28–53 was measured on a treadmill with a 1.5 km hour-1 increase every 4 minutes starting from 8.5 km hour-1. At least 1-week after this initial test, they participated in a 30 km road run at a speed corresponding to about 70% of their individual peak oxygen uptake on a flat terrain. Before and after (0, 24, and 48 hours the run, blood concentration of creatine kinase (CK were measured and pain sensation was determined (pain scale from 0 = no pain to 10 = extremely painful. Runners were then matched in pairs based on maximal CK and peak oxygen uptake, and allocated randomly into two different groups. One group was supplemented with 400 mg per day of PCSO-524® for 11 weeks, the other group with an olive oil placebo. After that period, CK and pain sensations were remeasured following a second 30 km run at the same speed and on the same terrain. Results: The general pattern of soreness in the PCSO-524® supplemented group was reduced by 1.1 units (standard error 0.41 compared to the placebo (P < 0.05, the effects being greater in lesser trained runners (P < 0.05. CK levels were positively associated with pain sensation (P < 0.05, but trends toward lower CK in the

  17. Blood flow after contraction and cuff occlusion is reduced in subjects with muscle soreness after eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza-Silva, Eduardo; Wittrup Christensen, Steffan; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occur within 1-2 days after eccentric exercise but the mechanism mediating hypersensitivity is unclear. This study hypothesized that eccentric exercise reduces the blood flow response following muscle contractions and cuff occlusion, which may result...... anterior muscle. All measures were done bilaterally at day-0 (pre-exercise), day-2 and day-6 (post-exercise). Subjects scored the muscle soreness on a Likert scale for 6 days. Results: Eccentric exercise increased Likert scores at day-1 and day-2 compared with day-0 (P... in accumulated algesic substances being a part of the sensitization in DOMS. Methods: Twelve healthy subjects (5 women) performed dorsiflexion exercise (5 sets of 10 repeated eccentric contractions) in one leg, while the contralateral leg was the control. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the tibialis...

  18. Intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescent angiography-assisted modified superior gluteal artery perforator flap for reconstruction of sacral pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Kai; Wu, Chien-Ju; Chen, Chun-Yu; Wang, Chi-Yu; Chu, Tzi-Shiang; Hsu, Kuo-Feng; Chiu, Han-Ting; Liu, Hung-Hui; Chou, Chang-Yi; Wang, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Chin-Ta; Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng

    2017-12-01

    Pressure sores are often observed in patients who are bedridden. They can be a severe problem not only for patients and their caregivers but also for plastic surgeons. Here, we describe a new method of superior gluteal artery perforator flap harvesting and anchoring with the assistance of intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescent angiography. In this report, we describe the procedure and outcomes for 19 patients with grades III and IV sacral pressure sores who underwent the operation between September 2015 and November 2016. All flaps survived, and two experienced wound-edge partial dehiscence. With the assistance of this imaging device, we were able to acquire a reliable superior gluteal artery perforator flap and perform modified operations with it that are safe, easy to learn and associated with fewer complications than are traditional. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A longitudinal study of the incidence of pressure sores and the associated risks and strategies adopted in Italian operating theatres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulfone, Giampiera; Marzoli, Ilaria; Quattrin, Rosanna; Fabbro, Carmen; Palese, Alvisa

    2012-02-01

    To explore the incidence of intraoperative pressure sores, the associated risk factors and the preventive strategies adopted by nurses, we adopted a longitudinal study in a 900-bed teaching hospital with multiple operating theatres, located in the North of Italy. Patients who underwent major surgery were evaluated four times: at the moment of operating theatre admission, at operating theatre discharge, and on their third and sixth postoperative day. Of the patients included (n = 102) who had an average age of 62.3 years (range 20-87), 12.7% (13/102) developed a pressure ulcer in the operating theatre; 46.1% (6/13) of these ulcers were still present on the third postoperative day. Some health conditions (diabetes mellitus, cardiac diseases) and intra-operative factors (lying on the operating table for more than 6.15 hours, intraoperative hypothermia) are associated with the occurrence of pressure sores.

  20. Effects of winter military training on energy balance, whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Lee M; Murphy, Nancy E; Martini, Svein; Spitz, Marissa G; Thrane, Ingjerd; McGraw, Susan M; Blatny, Janet-Martha; Castellani, John W; Rood, Jennifer C; Young, Andrew J; Montain, Scott J; Gundersen, Yngvar; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2014-12-01

    Physiological consequences of winter military operations are not well described. This study examined Norwegian soldiers (n = 21 males) participating in a physically demanding winter training program to evaluate whether short-term military training alters energy and whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and performance. Energy expenditure (D2(18)O) and intake were measured daily, and postabsorptive whole-body protein turnover ([(15)N]-glycine), muscle damage, soreness, and performance (vertical jump) were assessed at baseline, following a 4-day, military task training phase (MTT) and after a 3-day, 54-km ski march (SKI). Energy intake (kcal·day(-1)) increased (P balance was lower (P military training provide the basis for future studies to evaluate nutritional strategies that attenuate protein loss and sustain performance during severe energy deficits.

  1. EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT DOSAGE OF BCAA SUPPLEMENTATION ON SERUM INDICES OF MUSCLE DAMAGE AND SORENESS IN SOCCER PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Mohamad-Panahi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigation of the effects of two different dose of BCAA supplementation on serum indices of muscle damage and soreness in soccer players. 30 male soccer players (age: 20.2+-0.6 yr participated as subjects in this study. Subjects were randomly divided into three groups (double-blind design. All subjects performed lower- body resistance exercise (6 sets, 10 repetitions, 70% 1RM. The BCAA was given at doses of 200 and 450 mg.kg -1 BW for supplemental groups 1 and 2, respectively, 30 minutes before and after to exercise tests and carbohydrate was given at dose of 200 mg.kg -1 BW for placebo group. To identify enzymes activity (IU/L, venous blood samples were collected 30 min prior to exercise and at 24 and 48 hrs post exercise. Data were statistically analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and Bonfferoni test. Baseline CK, CK-MB and muscle soreness were determined 30 minutes before the exercise test. Baseline serum values for CK, CK-MB and baseline muscle soreness were not different between groups in the 30 minutes before the exercise test (p>0/05. However, there were significant increases between the pre-exercise and post-exercise values for CK, CK-MB and muscle soreness from 24 hrs to 48 hrs post-test (p<0/05, but there were no significant differences between two groups (p< 0.05(. These results suggested that two different dosages of BCAA supplementation did not affect muscle damage and muscle sureness during resistance exercise bout in soccer players.

  2. The Pacman Perforator-Based V-Y Advancement Flap for Reconstruction of Pressure Sores at Different Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Stefano; Salval, André; Brenta, Federica; Rapisarda, Vincenzo; Settembrini, Fernanda

    2016-09-01

    Many procedures have been proposed for the treatment of pressure sores, and V-Y advancement flaps are widely used to repair a defect. Unfortunately, the degree of mobility of a V-Y advancement flap is dependent on the laxity of the underlying subcutaneous tissue. This is an important disadvantage of traditional V-Y advancement flap and limits its use.We used V-Y advancement flaps as perforator-based to overcome mobility restriction problem, with a further modification (Pacman-like shape) to improve the covering surface area of the flap. Between January 2012 and December 2014, the authors used 37 V-Y Pacman perforator-based flaps in 33 consecutive patients for coverage of defects located at sacral (n = 21), ischial (n = 13), trochanter (n = 1) regions. There were 27 male and 6 female patients with a mean age of 49.9 years (range, 15-74 years). All flaps survived completely (92.3%) except 3 in which one of them had undergone total necrosis due to hematoma and the other 2 had partial necrosis. No venous congestion was observed. The mean follow-up period was 14.9 months (range, 2-38 months). No flap surgery-related mortality or recurrence of pressure sores was noted. The V-Y Pacman perforator-based advancement flaps are safe and very effective for reconstruction of pressure sores at various regions. The advantage of our modification procedure include shorter operative time, lesser pedicle dissection, low donor site morbidity, good preservation of muscle, and offers remarkable excursion to the V-Y flap, which make the V-Y Pacman perforator-based flaps an excellent choice for large pressure sore coverage.

  3. The coefficient of rolling resistance (CoRR) of some pharmaceutical tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterhagen, William R; Bharadwaj, Rahul; Hancock, Bruno C

    2010-06-15

    Experiments have been conducted to measure the coefficient of rolling resistance (CoRR) of some pharmaceutical tablets and several common materials, such as glass beads and steel ball bearings. CoRR values are required as inputs for discrete element method (DEM) models which can be used to model particulate flows and solid dosage form manufacturing processes. Until now there have been no CoRR data reported for pharmaceutical materials, and thus these new data will help to facilitate more accurate modeling of pharmaceutical systems. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Thigh and leg musculo-cutaneous island flap for giant bilateral trochanteric and perineal pressure sores coverage: Extreme treatment in spinal cord injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, A; Crouzet, C; De Boissezon, X; Grolleau, J-L

    2015-06-01

    Surgical treatment of perineal pressure sores could be done with various fascio-cutaneous or musculo-cutaneous flaps, which provide cover and filling of most of pressure sores after spinal cord injuries. In rare cases, classical solutions are overtaken, then it is necessary to use more complex techniques. We report a case of a made-to-measure lower limb flap for coverage of confluent perineal pressure sores. A 49-year-old paraplegic patient developed multiple pressure sores on left and right ischial tuberosity, inferior pubic bone and bilateral trochanters with hips dislocation. Surgical treatment involved a whole right thigh flap to cover and fill right side lesions, associated to a posterior right leg musculo-cutaneous island flap to cover and fill the left trochanteric pressure sore. The surgical procedure lasted 6.5 hours and required massive blood transfusion. Antibiotics were adapted to bacteriological samples. There were no postoperative complications; complete wound healing occurred after three weeks. A lower limb sacrifice for coverage of a giant perineal pressure sores is an extreme surgical solution, reserved to patients understanding the issues of this last chance procedure. A good knowledge of vascular anatomy is an essential prerequisite, and allows to shape made-to-measure flaps. The success of such a procedure is closely linked to the collaboration with the rehabilitation team (appropriate therapeutic education concerning transfers and positioning). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The influence of an artificial playing surface on injury risk and perceptions of muscle soreness in elite Rugby Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S; Trewartha, G; Kemp, S P T; Michell, R; Stokes, K A

    2016-01-01

    This prospective cohort study investigated the influence of an artificial playing surface on injury risk and perceptions of muscle soreness in elite English Premiership Rugby Union players. Time loss (from 39.5 matches) and abrasion (from 27 matches) injury risk was compared between matches played on artificial turf and natural grass. Muscle soreness was reported over the 4 days following one match played on each surface by 95 visiting players (i.e., normally play on natural grass surfaces). There was a likely trivial difference in the overall injury burden relating to time-loss injuries between playing surfaces [rate ratio = 1.01, 90% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-1.38]. Abrasions were substantially more common on artificial turf (rate ratio = 7.92, 90% CI: 4.39-14.28), although the majority of these were minor and only two resulted in any reported time loss. Muscle soreness was consistently higher over the 4 days following a match on artificial turf in comparison with natural grass, although the magnitude of this effect was small (effect sizes ranging from 0.26 to 0.40). These results suggest that overall injury risk is similar for the two playing surfaces, but further surveillance is required before inferences regarding specific injury diagnoses and smaller differences in overall injury risk can be made. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Influence of fatigue, stress, muscle soreness and sleep on perceived exertion during submaximal effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Monoem; Chaouachi, Anis; Wong, Del P; Castagna, Carlo; Hambli, Mourad; Hue, Olivier; Chamari, Karim

    2013-07-02

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the Hooper's Index variations (i.e., self-ratings of fatigue, stress, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and sleep) on rating of perceived exertion during a 10 min submaximal exercise training session (RPE-10 min) and then check the stability and the internal consistency of RPE-10 min. Seventeen junior soccer players took part in this study. The individual Hooper's indices taken before each training session were correlated with RPE-10 min during a constant intensity and duration effort (10 min) using Pearson product moment correlation. Intraclass correlation (ICC) was used to assess the internal consistency of the RPE-10 min. All individual correlations between RPE-10 min and quality of sleep and quantity of fatigue, stress, and DOMS were non-significant (p>0.05). No significant correlations were resulted between RPE-10 min and Hooper's Index in all athletes. The ICC of RPE-10 min was 0.77 thus demonstrating internal consistency. The results of the present study demonstrated the objectivity and utility of RPE as a psychological tool for monitoring training during traditional soccer training. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that fatigue, stress, DOMS and sleep are not major contributors of perceived exertion during traditional soccer training without excessive training loads. It seems that psychobiological factors other than fatigue, stress, DOMS and sleep may have mediated the 10 min exercise perceptual intensity. © 2013.

  7. Design of a Novel Two-Component Hybrid Dermal Scaffold for the Treatment of Pressure Sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vaibhav; Kohli, Nupur; Moulding, Dale; Afolabi, Halimat; Hook, Lilian; Mason, Chris; García-Gareta, Elena

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study is to design a novel two-component hybrid scaffold using the fibrin/alginate porous hydrogel Smart Matrix combined to a backing layer of plasma polymerized polydimethylsiloxane (Sil) membrane to make the fibrin-based dermal scaffold more robust for the treatment of the clinically challenging pressure sores. A design criteria are established, according to which the Sil membranes are punched to avoid collection of fluid underneath. Manual peel test shows that native silicone does not attach to the fibrin/alginate component while the plasma polymerized silicone membranes are firmly bound to fibrin/alginate. Structural characterization shows that the fibrin/alginate matrix is intact after the addition of the Sil membrane. By adding a Sil membrane to the original fibrin/alginate scaffold, the resulting two-component scaffolds have a significantly higher shear or storage modulus G'. In vitro cell studies show that dermal fibroblasts remain viable, proliferate, and infiltrate the two-component hybrid scaffolds during the culture period. These results show that the design of a novel two-component hybrid dermal scaffold is successful according to the proposed design criteria. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study that reports the combination of a fibrin-based scaffold with a plasma-polymerized silicone membrane. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Herbs and natural supplements in the prevention and treatment of delayed-onset muscle soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Meamarbashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:  Unaccustomed and intense eccentric exercise is a common cause of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS. There are multiple remedies for the treatment of DOMS, but its clinical and laboratory pieces of evidence are scarce. Currently, the treatments proposed for DOMS are numerous and include pharmaceuticals, herbal remedies, stretching, massage, nutritional supplements, and other alternatives. To find a holistic treatment with effective pain relief and minimum side effects, complementary and alternative medicine, including herbal therapies, plays a main role.Methods: In this review, the existing published studies investigating the efficacy of herbal and natural supplementation therapies for the prevention or treatment of side effects, symptoms, and signs of DOMS are summarized.Results: Previous studies have documented the efficacy of herbal therapies to treat pain, inflammation, as well as laboratory and clinical side effects of DOMS.Conclusion: The use of herbs in DOMS seems safer and has lower side effects than pharmacotherapy. However, the potential for side effects and drug interactions should be considered.

  9. The Effects of Pre-Exercise Ginger Supplementation on Muscle Damage and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Melissa D; Zavorsky, Gerald S; Smoliga, James M

    2015-06-01

    Ginger possesses analgesic and pharmacological properties mimicking non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We aimed to determine if ginger supplementation is efficacious for attenuating muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) following high-intensity resistance exercise. Following a 5-day supplementation period of placebo or 4 g ginger (randomized groups), 20 non-weight trained participants performed a high-intensity elbow flexor eccentric exercise protocol to induce muscle damage. Markers associated with muscle damage and DOMS were repeatedly measured before supplementation and for 4 days following the exercise protocol. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed one repetition maximum lift decreased significantly 24 h post-exercise in both groups (p ginger group (p = 0.002), and improved at 72 (p = 0.021) and 96 h (p = 0.044) only in the placebo group. Blood creatine kinase significantly increased for both groups (p = 0.015) but continued to increase only in the ginger group 72 (p = 0.006) and 96 h (p = 0.027) post-exercise. Visual analog scale of pain was significantly elevated following eccentric exercise (p ginger. In conclusion, 4 g of ginger supplementation may be used to accelerate recovery of muscle strength following intense exercise but does not influence indicators of muscle damage or DOMS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Rodent Research-1 (RR1) NASA Validation Flight: Mouse liver transcriptomic proteomic and epigenomic data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — RR-1 is a validation flight to evaluate the hardware operational and science capabilities of the Rodent Research Project on the ISS. RNA DNA and protein were...

  11. Rodent Research-1 (RR1) NASA Validation Flight: Mouse soleus muscle transcriptomic and epigenomic data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA s Rodent Research (RR) project is playing a critical role in advancing biomedical research on the physiological effects of space environments. Due to the...

  12. Rodent Research-1 (RR1) NASA Validation Flight: Mouse kidney transcriptomic proteomic and epigenomic data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA s Rodent Research (RR) project is playing a critical role in advancing biomedical research on the physiological effects of space environments. Due to the...

  13. Rodent Research-1 (RR1) NASA Validation Flight: Mouse quadriceps muscle transcriptomic proteomic and epigenomic data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA s Rodent Research (RR) project is playing a critical role in advancing biomedical research on the physiological effects of space environments. Due to the...

  14. Rodent Research-1 (RR1) NASA Validation Flight: Mouse gastrocnemius muscle transcriptomic proteomic and epigenomic data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA s Rodent Research (RR) project is playing a critical role in advancing biomedical research on the physiological effects of space environments. Due to the...

  15. Rodent Research-1 (RR1) NASA Validation Flight: Mouse eye transcriptomic and epigenomic data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA s Rodent Research (RR) project is playing a critical role in advancing biomedical research on the physiological effects of space environments. Due to the...

  16. Rodent Research-1 (RR1) NASA Validation Flight: Mouse adrenal gland transcriptomic proteomic and epigenomic data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA s Rodent Research (RR) project is playing a critical role in advancing biomedical research on the physiological effects of space environments. Due to the...

  17. VBLUM photometry of RR Lyrae stars in ω Cen and M4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBruijn, J.W.; Lub, J.

    1987-01-01

    Multicolour VBLUW photometry of RR Lyrae stars in the globular clusters M4 and ω Cen is used to derive information on reddening, blanketing, effective temperatures and gravity of these stars. The methods employed in the literature to determine the reddening of globular clusters from the UBV colours of the RR Lyrae stars are in complete agreement with the results from VBLUW photometry. The most important conclusions of the present work are: the close similarity between the RR Lyrae variables in the field and in globular clusters, and the agreement between the reddenings derived for RR Lyrae in the field and in globular clusters. This means that at least one parameter which normally is taken as a free parameter in studying globular cluster colour magnitude diagrams can be constrained very precisely

  18. Mechanism of blood pressure and R-R variability: insights from ganglion blockade in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Iwasaki, Kenichi; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Behbehani, Khosrow; Crandall, Craig G.; Levine, Benjamin D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Spontaneous blood pressure (BP) and R-R variability are used frequently as 'windows' into cardiovascular control mechanisms. However, the origin of these rhythmic fluctuations is not completely understood. In this study, with ganglion blockade, we evaluated the role of autonomic neural activity versus other 'non-neural' factors in the origin of BP and R-R variability in humans. Beat-to-beat BP, R-R interval and respiratory excursions were recorded in ten healthy subjects (aged 30 +/- 6 years) before and after ganglion blockade with trimethaphan. The spectral power of these variables was calculated in the very low (0.0078-0.05 Hz), low (0.05-0.15 Hz) and high (0.15-0.35 Hz) frequency ranges. The relationship between systolic BP and R-R variability was examined by cross-spectral analysis. After blockade, R-R variability was virtually abolished at all frequencies; however, respiration and high frequency BP variability remained unchanged. Very low and low frequency BP variability was reduced substantially by 84 and 69 %, respectively, but still persisted. Transfer function gain between systolic BP and R-R interval variability decreased by 92 and 88 % at low and high frequencies, respectively, while the phase changed from negative to positive values at the high frequencies. These data suggest that under supine resting conditions with spontaneous breathing: (1) R-R variability at all measured frequencies is predominantly controlled by autonomic neural activity; (2) BP variability at high frequencies (> 0.15 Hz) is mediated largely, if not exclusively, by mechanical effects of respiration on intrathoracic pressure and/or cardiac filling; (3) BP variability at very low and low frequencies (rhythmicity; and (4) the dynamic relationship between BP and R-R variability as quantified by transfer function analysis is determined predominantly by autonomic neural activity rather than other, non-neural factors.

  19. Carbon and oxygen abundances of field RR Lyrae stars. I. Carbon abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, D.; Manduca, A.; Deming, D.; Bell, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    From an analysis of KPNO 4-m echelle plates and simultaneous uvbyβ photometry, we have determined carbon abundances and carbon-to-iron ratios for a large number of field RR Lyrae stars having [Fe/H]> or approx. =-1.2. It is found that these field RR Lyrae stars: stars which are known to be in an advanced evolutionary state: have carbon-to-iron ratios which are similar to those of unevolved stars

  20. DNA aptamer selection and aptamer-based fluorometric displacement assay for the hepatotoxin microcystin-RR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Shijia; Li, Qi; Duan, Nuo; Wang, Zhouping; Ma, Haile

    2016-01-01

    Microcystin-RR (MC-RR) is a highly acute hepatotoxin produced by cyanobacteria. It is harmful to both humans and the environment. A novel aptamer was identified by the systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method as a recognition element for determination of MC-RR in aquatic products. The graphene oxide (GO) SELEX strategy was adopted to generate aptamers with high affinity and specificity. Of the 50 aptamer candidates tested, sequence RR-33 was found to display high affinity and selectivity, with a dissociation constant of 45.7 ± 6.8 nM. Aptamer RR-33 therefore was used as the recognition element in a fluorometric assay that proceeds as follows: (1) Biotinylated aptamer RR-33 is immobilized on the streptavidinylated wells of a microtiterplate, and carboxyfluorescein (FAM) labelled complementary DNA is then allowed to hybridize. (2) After removal of excess (unbound) cDNA, sample containing MC-RR is added and incubated at 37 °C for 2 h. (3) Displaced free cDNA is washed away and fluorescence intensity measured at excitation/emission wavelengths of 490/515 nm. The calibration plot is linear in the 0.20 to 2.5 ng·mL −1 concentration range, and the limit of detection is 80 pg·mL −1 . The results indicate that the GO-SELEX technology is appropriate for the screening of aptamers against small-molecule toxins. The detection scheme was applied to the determination of MC-RR in (spiked) water, mussel and fish and gave recoveries between 91 and 98 %. The method compares favorably to a known ELISA. Conceivably, this kind of assay is applicable to other toxins for which appropriate aptamers are available. (author)

  1. [Reduction of pressure sores during prone positioning of ventilated intensive care patients by the prone-head support system: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebio, Michael; Katz-Papatheophilou, Elfriede; Heindl, Werner; Gelbmann, Herbert; Burghuber, Otto C

    2005-02-01

    Prone positioning in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome is a well-known method to improve oxygenation. The aim of our study was to evaluate a new device for prone positioning, the prone-head support system (PHS system), with regard to reduction of cutaneous pressure sores. In a pilot study we randomized 8 patients with ARDS in two groups: 180 degrees standard prone positioning (group without mask) and prone positioning with the PHS system (group with mask). The PHS system consists of a facemask support, which is connected to an adapted air suspension bed. The patients of both groups were intermittently proned for several days. We evaluated the pressure sores on head and neck before turning the patients prone for the first time and after each period of prone positioning. We documented the quantity, the size, the type and the localization of the pressure sores. There was no significant difference in the mean duration of prone positioning (27.1+/-14.7 hours in the group with mask versus 24.5+/-18.7 h in the group without mask). In the group with mask there were 1.5+/-0.8 new pressure sores by each proning, whereas in the group without mask there were 2.37+/-1.6 new pressure sores, which was lower, but not significantly. The overall area of pressure sores (798 mm2 versus 3184 mm2, p=0.004), the area of pressure sores per patient (199.5+/-104.7 mm2 versus 796+/-478 mm2, p=0.03) and the increase of the area of pressure sores per proning (79.8+/-52.0 mm2 versus 398.0+/-214.3 mm2, p=0.004) were significantly lower in the group with mask in comparison to the group without mask. The lips were the most effected localization in both groups. The pressure sores in the group with mask were less severe and showed a homogenous distribution in comparison to the group without mask. Blisters dominated in the group with mask in comparison to erosions, necrosis and ulcers in the group without mask. The PHS system with its face mask is able to reduce the extent and the

  2. The VMC survey - XXVI. Structure of the Small Magellanic Cloud from RR Lyrae stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraveva, T.; Subramanian, S.; Clementini, G.; Cioni, M.-R. L.; Palmer, M.; van Loon, J. Th.; Moretti, M. I.; de Grijs, R.; Molinaro, R.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Emerson, J.; Ivanov, V. D.

    2018-01-01

    We present results from the analysis of 2997 fundamental mode RR Lyrae variables located in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). For these objects, near-infrared time series photometry from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds system (VMC) and visual light curves from the OGLE IV (Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment IV) survey are available. In this study, the multi-epoch Ks-band VMC photometry was used for the first time to derive intensity-averaged magnitudes of the SMC RR Lyrae stars. We determined individual distances to the RR Lyrae stars from the near-infrared period-absolute magnitude-metallicity (PM_{K_s}Z) relation, which has some advantages in comparison with the visual absolute magnitude-metallicity (MV-[Fe/H]) relation, such as a smaller dependence of the luminosity on interstellar extinction, evolutionary effects and metallicity. The distances we have obtained were used to study the three-dimensional structure of the SMC. The distribution of the SMC RR Lyrae stars is found to be ellipsoidal. The actual line-of-sight depth of the SMC is in the range 1-10 kpc, with an average depth of 4.3 ± 1.0 kpc. We found that RR Lyrae stars in the eastern part of the SMC are affected by interactions of the Magellanic Clouds. However, we do not see a clear bimodality observed for red clump stars, in the distribution of RR Lyrae stars.

  3. INCIDENCE OF POLIOMYELITIS—The Effect of Tonsillectomy and Other Operations on the Nose and Throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alden H.

    1952-01-01

    A statistical survey was made of all the cases of poliomyelitis occurring in all of Los Angeles County during the three years of 1949, 1950 and 1951 in an attempt to determine the effect of operations on the nose and throat on the incidence of poliomyelitis. Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy were the only operations noted with any degree of frequency. Yet, in the total of 3,601 cases of poliomyelitis that occurred in this three-year period there were only 20 (0.55 per cent) in which the patient had had recent tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. The incidence of this disease in patients who had had tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy was compared with the “expected” incidence as determined from the incidence in other patients, in the same age group. There was no significant difference between actual and expected incidence even during the summer months when most cases of poliomyelitis occurred. The same was true with regard to recently tonsillectomized patients in the epidemic months of July through October. In a separate survey of 675 patients with poliomyelitis, it was noted that only 30 per cent ever had had tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy. Inasmuch as it is estimated that one of every three persons in the general young population nowadays has had tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy, this figure is no more or less than could be expected. PMID:12978882

  4. Differential regulation of adipokines may influence migratory behavior in the white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Erica F; Verpeut, Jessica; Horvat-Gordon, Maria; Ramachandran, Ramesh; Bartell, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    White-throated sparrows increase fat deposits during pre-migratory periods and rely on these fat stores to fuel migration. Adipose tissue produces hormones and signaling factors in a rhythmic fashion and may be controlled by a clock in adipose tissue or driven by a master clock in the brain. The master clock may convey photoperiodic information from the environment to adipose tissue to facilitate pre-migratory fattening, and adipose tissue may, in turn, release adipokines to indicate the extent of fat energy stores. Here, we present evidence that a change in signal from the adipokines adiponectin and visfatin may act to indicate body condition, thereby influencing an individual's decision to commence migratory flight, or to delay until adequate fat stores are acquired. We quantified plasma adiponectin and visfatin levels across the day in captive birds held under constant photoperiod. The circadian profiles of plasma adiponectin in non-migrating birds were approximately inverse the profiles from migrating birds. Adiponectin levels were positively correlated to body fat, and body fat was inversely related to the appearance of nocturnal migratory restlessness. Visfatin levels were constant across the day and did not correlate with fat deposits; however, a reduction in plasma visfatin concentration occurred during the migratory period. The data suggest that a significant change in the biological control of adipokine expression exists between the two migratory conditions and we propose a role for adiponectin, visfatin and adipose clocks in the regulation of migratory behaviors.

  5. Differential regulation of adipokines may influence migratory behavior in the white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica F Stuber

    Full Text Available White-throated sparrows increase fat deposits during pre-migratory periods and rely on these fat stores to fuel migration. Adipose tissue produces hormones and signaling factors in a rhythmic fashion and may be controlled by a clock in adipose tissue or driven by a master clock in the brain. The master clock may convey photoperiodic information from the environment to adipose tissue to facilitate pre-migratory fattening, and adipose tissue may, in turn, release adipokines to indicate the extent of fat energy stores. Here, we present evidence that a change in signal from the adipokines adiponectin and visfatin may act to indicate body condition, thereby influencing an individual's decision to commence migratory flight, or to delay until adequate fat stores are acquired. We quantified plasma adiponectin and visfatin levels across the day in captive birds held under constant photoperiod. The circadian profiles of plasma adiponectin in non-migrating birds were approximately inverse the profiles from migrating birds. Adiponectin levels were positively correlated to body fat, and body fat was inversely related to the appearance of nocturnal migratory restlessness. Visfatin levels were constant across the day and did not correlate with fat deposits; however, a reduction in plasma visfatin concentration occurred during the migratory period. The data suggest that a significant change in the biological control of adipokine expression exists between the two migratory conditions and we propose a role for adiponectin, visfatin and adipose clocks in the regulation of migratory behaviors.

  6. Early reproductive success of western bluebirds and ash-throated flycatchers: a landscape-contaminant perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Jeanne M; Myers, Orrin B

    2002-01-01

    Eggshell quality, clutch size, sex ratio, and hatching success of western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana) and ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens) were studied on a landscape-soil contaminant gradient at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico from 1997 to 1999. A variety of contaminants (heavy metals, chemicals, insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorines, and radioactive isotopes) range across different spatial scales and concentrations on LANL land. This study is an example of a monitoring program over a large area with varying degree of contamination that is used to highlight locations of concern for future research. There were two locations where the flycatcher had a lower hatching success. The bluebirds at Sandia wetland, a location of concern for PCBs. had a thinner eggshell thickness index (RATCLIFFE) and the eggs were smaller than at other locations. The flycatcher had thinner eggshells than bluebirds, which could add to sensitivity to exposure to contaminants. There was no variation in clutch size or sex ratio between locations or areas closer to contaminant release sites for both species. Percent females in the clutch ranged from 0 to 100% in the WEBL and from 33 to 67% for ATFL.

  7. Otolaryngology fantastica: the ear, nose, and throat manifestations of Munchausen's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Moretti, Valentina; Ruberto, Marco; Monzani, Daniele; Chiarini, Luigi; Presutti, Livio

    2012-01-01

    Munchausen's syndrome (MS) is a form of severe, chronic, factitious disorder with physical symptoms. Some essential features define MS, such as recurrent, feigned, or simulated illness; peregrination (traveling or wandering); pseudologia fantastica; and drug abuse. Munchausen's syndrome by proxy (MSBP) classically involves a parent or other caregiver who inflicts injury or induces illness in a child. The aim of the present study was to summarize and study the main ear, nose, and throat (ENT) manifestations of MS and MSBP. A systematic literature review carried out in a tertiary university referral center. An appropriate string was run on PubMed to retrieve articles dealing with ENT manifestations of MS and MSBP. A double cross-check was performed on citations and full-text articles found using selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. In total, 24 articles were finally included in the study, describing 30 cases of MS or MSBP involving the ENT region; 15/30 (50%) cases involved the face, most often presenting as facial pain or facial swelling; and 7/30 (23.3%) cases presented with symptoms involving the ear. Six cases out of 30 (20%) were MSBP. MS and MSBP may present with symptoms involving the head and neck area, particularly the face and external ear canal. The ENT specialist should suspect MS in patients with strange and long-lasting symptoms, so as to avoid misdiagnosis and unnecessary treatments that waste time and money in the healthcare sector. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Reproduction of the Atlantic Forest endemic star-throated antwren, Rhopias gularis (Aves: Thamnophilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. Perrella

    Full Text Available Abstract The Thamnophilidae are one of the most speciose Neotropical bird families, yet aspects of their natural history remain poorly documented. Here we provide information on breeding phenology, the length of incubation and nestling periods, parental care, and nesting success of the Star-throated Antwren, Rhopias gularis, an Atlantic Forest endemic. The data are discussed in light of life history theories. We found 27 active nests during two breeding seasons (2013/2014 and 2014/2015 at Carlos Botelho State Park in southeastern Brazil. Nesting activities were observed from September to January. Incubation and nestling periods lasted 16.8 ± 0.6 and 11.0 ± 0.86 days, respectively, as with most other antbirds. Males and females shared equally in incubation and nestling provisioning. The small clutch size of two eggs is that most commonly found in tropical birds and is hypothesized to have evolved due to increased nest predation rates. However, our data was not consistent with this hypothesis as the nest survival probability was high (57%. This is one of only a handful of studies that provide comprehensive information on the breeding biology of a Thamnophilid species in undisturbed habitat.

  9. Unexpected strong polygyny in the brown-throated three-toed sloth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan N Pauli

    Full Text Available Promiscuous mating strategies are much more common than previously appreciated. So much so, that several authors have proposed that promiscuity is the "rule" rather than the exception in vertebrate mating systems. Decreasing species mobility and increasing habitat fragmentation have both been suggested to reduce the "polygyny potential" of the environment and promote other mating strategies like promiscuity in females. We explored the social and genetic mating system for one of the most sedentary extant mammals, the brown-throated three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus, within a highly fragmented Neotropical habitat. Surprisingly, we found that three-toed sloths were strongly polygynous, with males excluding male competitors from their core ranges, and exhibiting strong reproductive skew. Indeed, only 25% of all resident adult males sired offspring and one individual sired half of all sampled juveniles. Paradoxically, a sedentary life-history strategy seems to facilitate polygyny in fragmented landscapes because multiple females can persist within small patches of habitat, and be monopolized by a single male. Our work demonstrates that strong polygyny can arise in systems in which the polygyny potential should be extremely low, and other strategies, including promiscuity, would be favoured. Mating systems can be influenced by a multitude of factor and are dynamic, varying among taxa, over time, and across habitats; consequently, mating systems remain difficult to predict based on general ecological principles.

  10. [Ear, nose and throat disease profile in children with Down syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul D, María A; Bravo V, Alejandra; Beltrán M, Constanza; Cerda L, Jaime; Angulo M, Daniela; Lizama C, Macarena

    2015-01-01

    The children with Down syndrome (DS) are at increased risk of ear-nose-throat (ENT) disorders. International recommendations suggest early hearing screening and periodic specialist evaluation. Our goal was to characterize ENT disorders in children with DS, and propose recommendations for the Chilean population. Cross-sectional, descriptive study, of children with DS, between 6 months and 15 years of age. The data was obtained by a health interview to the parents and review of medical records. We analyzed 134 patients with an average age of 44.5 months. The 78.8% had ENT disorders, the most frequent ENT disorders was allergic rhinitis and otitis media with effusion. Hearing screening was abnormal in a quarter of the patients, 50% of children over 3 years of age had obstructive sleep apnea diagnosed by polysomnogram. Older children had a statistically higher frequency of ENT disorders. This series shows a high rate of ENT disorders in children with DS, which supports recommendations for hearing screening, high suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea and routine referral to an ENT specialist for prevention and aggressive therapy in order to reduce hearing loss and improve development of the child with DS. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of hydrotherapy on the signs and symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaile, Joanna; Halson, Shona; Gill, Nicholas; Dawson, Brian

    2008-03-01

    This study independently examined the effects of three hydrotherapy interventions on the physiological and functional symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Strength trained males (n = 38) completed two experimental trials separated by 8 months in a randomised crossover design; one trial involved passive recovery (PAS, control), the other a specific hydrotherapy protocol for 72 h post-exercise; either: (1) cold water immersion (CWI: n = 12), (2) hot water immersion (HWI: n = 11) or (3) contrast water therapy (CWT: n = 15). For each trial, subjects performed a DOMS-inducing leg press protocol followed by PAS or one of the hydrotherapy interventions for 14 min. Weighted squat jump, isometric squat, perceived pain, thigh girths and blood variables were measured prior to, immediately after, and at 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise. Squat jump performance and isometric force recovery were significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) at 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise following CWT and at 48 and 72 h post-exercise following CWI when compared to PAS. Isometric force recovery was also greater (P < 0.05) at 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise following HWI when compared to PAS. Perceived pain improved (P < 0.01) following CWT at 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise. Overall, CWI and CWT were found to be effective in reducing the physiological and functional deficits associated with DOMS, including improved recovery of isometric force and dynamic power and a reduction in localised oedema. While HWI was effective in the recovery of isometric force, it was ineffective for recovery of all other markers compared to PAS.

  12. Female Preference for Sympatric vs. Allopatric Male Throat Color Morphs in the Mesquite Lizard (Sceloporus grammicus) Species Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Bastiaans, Elizabeth; Bastiaans, Mary Jane; Morinaga, Gen; Castañeda Gaytán, José Gamaliel; Marshall, Jonathon C.; Bane, Brendan; de la Cruz, Fausto Méndez; Sinervo, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Color polymorphic sexual signals are often associated with alternative reproductive behaviors within populations, and the number, frequency, or type of morphs present often vary among populations. When these differences lead to assortative mating by population, the study of such polymorphic taxa may shed light on speciation mechanisms. We studied two populations of a lizard with polymorphic throat color, an important sexual signal. Males in one population exhibit orange, yellow, or blue throa...

  13. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in simulated and true clinical throat swab specimens by nanorod array-surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne L Hennigan

    Full Text Available The prokaryote Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a major cause of respiratory disease in humans, accounting for 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia and the leading cause of pneumonia in older children and young adults. The limitations of existing options for mycoplasma diagnosis highlight a critical need for a new detection platform with high sensitivity, specificity, and expediency. Here we evaluated silver nanorod arrays (NA as a biosensing platform for detection and differentiation of M. pneumoniae in culture and in spiked and true clinical throat swab samples by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS. Three M. pneumoniae strains were reproducibly differentiated by NA-SERS with 95%-100% specificity and 94-100% sensitivity, and with a lower detection limit exceeding standard PCR. Analysis of throat swab samples spiked with M. pneumoniae yielded detection in a complex, clinically relevant background with >90% accuracy and high sensitivity. In addition, NA-SERS correctly classified with >97% accuracy, ten true clinical throat swab samples previously established by real-time PCR and culture to be positive or negative for M. pneumoniae. Our findings suggest that the unique biochemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy, combined with reproducible spectral enhancement by silver NA, holds great promise as a superior platform for rapid and sensitive detection and identification of M. pneumoniae, with potential for point-of-care application.

  14. Effects of protein supplements on muscle damage, soreness and recovery of muscle function and physical performance: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; Lieberman, Harris R; McLellan, Tom M

    2014-05-01

    Protein supplements are frequently consumed by athletes and recreationally-active individuals, although the decision to purchase and consume protein supplements is often based on marketing claims rather than evidence-based research. To provide a systematic and comprehensive analysis of literature examining the hypothesis that protein supplements enhance recovery of muscle function and physical performance by attenuating muscle damage and soreness following a previous bout of exercise. English language articles were searched with PubMed and Google Scholar using protein and supplements together with performance, exercise, competition and muscle, alone or in combination as keywords. Inclusion criteria required studies to recruit healthy adults less than 50 years of age and to evaluate the effects of protein supplements alone or in combination with carbohydrate on performance metrics including time-to-exhaustion, time-trial or isometric or isokinetic muscle strength and markers of muscle damage and soreness. Twenty-seven articles were identified of which 18 dealt exclusively with ingestion of protein supplements to reduce muscle damage and soreness and improve recovery of muscle function following exercise, whereas the remaining 9 articles assessed muscle damage as well as performance metrics during single or repeat bouts of exercise. Papers were evaluated based on experimental design and examined for confounders that explain discrepancies between studies such as dietary control, training state of participants, sample size, direct or surrogate measures of muscle damage, and sensitivity of the performance metric. High quality and consistent data demonstrated there is no apparent relationship between recovery of muscle function and ratings of muscle soreness and surrogate markers of muscle damage when protein supplements are consumed prior to, during or after a bout of endurance or resistance exercise. There also appears to be insufficient experimental data

  15. Use of inferior gluteal artery and posterior thigh perforators in management of ischial pressure sores with limited donor sites for flap coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Cigdem; Ozdemir, Jale; Yirmibesoglu, Oktay; Yucel, Ergin; Agir, Hakan

    2012-07-01

    Reconstructive surgery for ischial pressure sore defects presents a challenge because of high rates of recurrence. The aim of this study was to describe the use of inferior gluteal artery (IGA) and posterior thigh perforators in management of ischial pressure sores with limited donor sites. Between September 2005 and 2009, 11 patients (9 male, 2 female) with ischial sores were operated by using IGA and posterior thigh perforator flaps. The data of patients included age, sex, cause of paraplegia, flap size, perforator of flap, previous surgeries, recurrences, complications, and postoperative follow-up. Nine IGA and 5 posterior thigh perforator flaps were used. Six patients presented with recurrent lesions, 5 patients were operated for sacral and contralateral ischial pressure sores previously. In 2 patients, IGA and posterior thigh perforator flaps were used in combination. Patients were followed for an average of 34.3 months. In 2 recurrent cases, readvancement of IGA perforator flap and gluteus maximus myocutaneous flap were treatment of choice. Treatment of patients with recurrent lesions or multiple pressure sores is challenging because of limited available flap donor sites. In this study, posterior thigh perforator flaps were preferred in patients in whom the previous donor site was the gluteal region. IGA perforator flaps were the treatment of choice in patients for whom posterior thigh region was previously used. Alternately, preserved perforators of previous conventional myocutaneous flaps enabled us to use these perforators in recurrences.

  16. [Cohort study of the incidence of heel pressure sores in patients with leg casts at the Rizzoli Orthopedic Hospital and of the associated risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, Cristiana; Zoli, Marina; Loro, Loretta; Tremosini, Morena; Mini, Sandra; Pirini, Valter; Turrini, Roberta; Durante, Stefano; Nicolini, Annamaria; Riccioni, Francesca; Girolami, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Pressure sores, especially at the heel, are a side effect of the cast. To assess the incidence of late skin complications (heel pressure sores) of a cast and determine risk factors. All consecutive patients treated with a leg cast over a 16 months observation time were recruited. Risk factors were identified by the nurse that placed the cast and skin lesions classified with the NPUAP scale when the cast was removed. In the 216 enrolled patients 17.6% (38) developed a pressure sore: 16/124 in orthopedic wards; 22/92 in oncology wards. The multivariate analysis identified the following risk factors: administration of cytotoxic drugs (p = 0.033; OR = 2.61; having a cancer did not increase the risk); skin redness before cast application (p = 0.001; OR = 4.44) and having reported symptoms after the application (p = 0.000; OR = 7.86). Pressure sores were mainly stage 1 and only 6/216 (2.4%) > or = stage II. The type of plaster cast, the material, the number of days it was worn and having had a surgery are not significant risk factors. Pressure sores related to leg plaster casts are a frequent complication in at risk sub-groups. The acknowledgement and identification of specific risk factors may allow to identify and evaluate preventive interventions to improve the care of these patients.

  17. Ridge Regression and Other Kernels for Genomic Selection with R Package rrBLUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B. Endelman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Many important traits in plant breeding are polygenic and therefore recalcitrant to traditional marker-assisted selection. Genomic selection addresses this complexity by including all markers in the prediction model. A key method for the genomic prediction of breeding values is ridge regression (RR, which is equivalent to best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP when the genetic covariance between lines is proportional to their similarity in genotype space. This additive model can be broadened to include epistatic effects by using other kernels, such as the Gaussian, which represent inner products in a complex feature space. To facilitate the use of RR and nonadditive kernels in plant breeding, a new software package for R called rrBLUP has been developed. At its core is a fast maximum-likelihood algorithm for mixed models with a single variance component besides the residual error, which allows for efficient prediction with unreplicated training data. Use of the rrBLUP software is demonstrated through several examples, including the identification of optimal crosses based on superior progeny value. In cross-validation tests, the prediction accuracy with nonadditive kernels was significantly higher than RR for wheat ( L. grain yield but equivalent for several maize ( L. traits.

  18. Mitochondrial electron transport chain is involved in microcystin-RR induced tobacco BY-2 cells apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenmin; Li, Dunhai; Liu, Yongding

    2014-09-01

    Microcystin-RR (MC-RR) has been suggested to induce apoptosis in tobacco BY-2 cells through mitochondrial dysfunction including the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). To further elucidate the mechanisms involved in MC-RR induced apoptosis in tobacco BY-2 cells, we have investigated the role of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) as a potential source for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Tobacco BY-2 cells after exposure to MC-RR (60mg/L) displayed apoptotic changes in association with an increased production of ROS and loss of ΔΨm. All of these adverse effects were significantly attenuated by ETC inhibitors including Rotenone (2μmol/L, complex I inhibitor) and antimycin A (0.01μmol/L, complex III inhibitor), but not by thenoyltrifluoroacetone (5μmol/L, complex II inhibitor). These results suggest that mitochondrial ETC plays a key role in mediating MC-RR induced apoptosis in tobacco BY-2 cells through an increased mitochondrial production of ROS. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The effect of Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolutionary masses of RR Lyrae stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sukyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Demarque, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the new Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars. This work was motivated by the recent stellar pulsation calculations using the new Livermore opacities, which suggest that the masses of double-mode RR Lyrae stars are 0.1-0.2 solar mass larger than those based on earlier opacities. Unlike the pulsation calculations, we find that the effect of opacity change on the evolution of HB stars is not significant. In particular, the effect of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars is very small, showing a decrease of only 0.01-0.02 solar mass compared to the models based on old Cox-Stewart opacities. Consequently, with the new Livermore OPAL opacities, both the stellar pulsation and evolution models now predict approximately the same masses for the RR Lyrae stars. Our evolutionary models suggest that the mean masses of the RR Lyrae stars are about 0.76 and about 0.71 solar mass for M15 (Oosterhoff group II) and M3 (group I), respectively. If (alpha/Fe) = 0.4, these values are decreased by about 0.03 solar mass. Variations of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars with HB morphology and metallicity are also presented.

  20. Analysis of a selected sample of RR Lyrae stars in the LMC from OGLE-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bing-Qiu; Jiang Bi-Wei; Yang Ming

    2013-01-01

    A systematic study of RR Lyrae stars is performed using a selected sample of 655 objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with long-term observations and numerous measurements from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment III project. The phase dispersion method and linear superposition of the harmonic oscillations are used to derive the pulsation frequency and properties of light variation. It is found that a dichotomy exists in Oosterhoff Type I and Oosterhoff Type II for RR Lyrae stars in the LMC. Due to our strict criteria for identifying a frequency, a lower limit for the incidence rate of Blazhko modulation in the LMC is estimated in various subclasses of RR Lyrae stars. For fundamental-mode RR Lyrae stars, the rate of 7.5% is smaller than the previous result. In the case of the first-overtone RR Lyrae variables, the rate of 9.1% is relatively high. In addition to the Blazhko variables, 15 objects are identified to pulsate in the fundamental/first-overtone double mode. Furthermore, four objects show a period ratio around 0.6, which makes them very likely to be rare pulsators in the fundamental/second-overtone double mode. (research papers)

  1. Characterization and Persistence of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from the Anterior Nares and Throats of Healthy Carriers in a Mexican Community▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan-Partida, Aída; Sainz-Espuñes, Teresita; Bustos-Martínez, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Healthy carriers of Staphylococcus aureus strains have an important role in the dissemination of this bacterium. To investigate the presence of S. aureus in the throat and anterior nares, samples from 1,243 healthy volunteers in a Mexican community were examined. The percentage of healthy carriers was 59.8%. Results showed that colonization of the throat occurred more frequently than that of the nares (46.5% versus 37.1%, P < 0.0001). Of the S. aureus carriers, 22.2% were exclusive nasal carriers and 38% were exclusive throat carriers. A total of 1,039 strains were isolated; 12.6% were shown to be methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Of MRSA strains, 32.1% were isolated from exclusive throat carriers. Most of the strains isolated from the anterior nares and throat of the same carriers were the same or related; however, some were different. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern analysis of the MRSA strains isolated from the exclusive nasal carriers or exclusive throat carriers showed that they belong to different clusters. A 6-year prospective study was performed to investigate the persistence of S. aureus in the throat. Results showed that 13% of subjects were persistent carriers. Most of them were colonized with the same clone of S. aureus throughout the time of the study, and just three had different clones. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that 91.1% of the strains were penicillin resistant. The presence of mecA and nucA genes (in order to confirm methicillin resistance) and of thermostable nuclease of S. aureus was examined. This study showed that some strains of S. aureus regularly colonized the throats of healthy people and could persist for years. PMID:20335416

  2. Glucose transporter expression in an avian nectarivore: the ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Welch

    Full Text Available Glucose transporter (GLUT proteins play a key role in the transport of monosaccharides across cellular membranes, and thus, blood sugar regulation and tissue metabolism. Patterns of GLUT expression, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4, have been well characterized in mammals. However, relatively little is known about patterns of GLUT expression in birds with existing data limited to the granivorous or herbivorous chicken, duck and sparrow. The smallest avian taxa, hummingbirds, exhibit some of the highest fasted and fed blood glucose levels and display an unusual ability to switch rapidly and completely between endogenous fat and exogenous sugar to fuel energetically expensive hovering flight. Despite this, nothing is known about the GLUT transporters that enable observed rapid rates of carbohydrate flux. We examined GLUT (GLUT1, 2, 3, & 4 expression in pectoralis, leg muscle, heart, liver, kidney, intestine and brain from both zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata and ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris. mRNA expression of all four transporters was probed using reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR. In addition, GLUT1 and 4 protein expression were assayed by western blot and immunostaining. Patterns of RNA and protein expression of GLUT1-3 in both species agree closely with published reports from other birds and mammals. As in other birds, and unlike in mammals, we did not detect GLUT4. A lack of GLUT4 correlates with hyperglycemia and an uncoupling of exercise intensity and relative oxidation of carbohydrates in hummingbirds. The function of GLUTs present in hummingbird muscle tissue (e.g. GLUT1 and 3 remain undescribed. Thus, further work is necessary to determine if high capillary density, and thus surface area across which cellular-mediated transport of sugars into active tissues (e.g. muscle occurs, rather than taxon-specific differences in GLUT density or kinetics, can account for observed rapid rates of sugar flux into these

  3. Resource defense and monopolization in a marked population of ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseu, François; Charette, Yanick; Bélisle, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Resource defense behavior is often explained by the spatial and temporal distribution of resources. However, factors such as competition, habitat complexity, and individual space use may also affect the capacity of individuals to defend and monopolize resources. Yet, studies frequently focus on one or two factors, overlooking the complexity found in natural settings. Here, we addressed defense and monopolization of nectar feeders in a population of free-ranging ruby-throated hummingbirds marked with passive integrated transponder (PIT tags). Our study system consisted of a 44 ha systematic grid of 45 feeders equipped with PIT tag detectors recording every visit made at feeders. We modeled the number of visits by competitors (NVC) at feeders in response to space use by a focal individual potentially defending a feeder, number of competitors, nectar sucrose concentration, and habitat visibility. Individuals who were more concentrated at certain feeders on a given day and who were more stable in their use of the grid throughout the season gained higher exclusivity in the use of those feeders on that day, especially for males competing against males. The level of spatial concentration at feeders and its negative effect on NVC was, however, highly variable among individuals, suggesting a continuum in resource defense strategies. Although the apparent capacity to defend feeders was not affected by competition or nectar sucrose concentration, the level of monopolization decreased with increasing number of competitors and higher nectar quality. Defense was enhanced by visibility near feeders, but only in forested habitats. The reverse effect of visibility in open habitats was more difficult to interpret as it was probably confounded by perch availability, from which a bird can defend its feeder. Our study is among the first to quantify the joint use of food resource by overlapping individuals unconstrained in their use of space. Our results show the importance of

  4. The Controls of Pore-Throat Structure on Fluid Performance in Tight Clastic Rock Reservoir: A Case from the Upper Triassic of Chang 7 Member, Ordos Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of porosity and permeability in tight clastic rock reservoir have significant difference from those in conventional reservoir. The increased exploitation of tight gas and oil requests further understanding of fluid performance in the nanoscale pore-throat network of the tight reservoir. Typical tight sandstone and siltstone samples from Ordos Basin were investigated, and rate-controlled mercury injection capillary pressure (RMICP and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR were employed in this paper, combined with helium porosity and air permeability data, to analyze the impact of pore-throat structure on the storage and seepage capacity of these tight oil reservoirs, revealing the control factors of economic petroleum production. The researches indicate that, in the tight clastic rock reservoir, largest throat is the key control on the permeability and potentially dominates the movable water saturation in the reservoir. The storage capacity of the reservoir consists of effective throat and pore space. Although it has a relatively steady and significant proportion that resulted from the throats, its variation is still dominated by the effective pores. A combination parameter (ε that was established to be as an integrated characteristic of pore-throat structure shows effectively prediction of physical capability for hydrocarbon resource of the tight clastic rock reservoir.

  5. Optimization of Tape Winding Process Parameters to Enhance the Performance of Solid Rocket Nozzle Throat Back Up Liners using Taguchi's Robust Design Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Nayani Kishore

    2017-08-01

    The throat back up liners is used to protect the nozzle structural members from the severe thermal environment in solid rocket nozzles. The throat back up liners is made with E-glass phenolic prepregs by tape winding process. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the optimization of process parameters of tape winding process to achieve better insulative resistance using Taguchi's robust design methodology. In this method four control factors machine speed, roller pressure, tape tension, tape temperature that were investigated for the tape winding process. The presented work was to study the cogency and acceptability of Taguchi's methodology in manufacturing of throat back up liners. The quality characteristic identified was Back wall temperature. Experiments carried out using L 9 ' (34) orthogonal array with three levels of four different control factors. The test results were analyzed using smaller the better criteria for Signal to Noise ratio in order to optimize the process. The experimental results were analyzed conformed and successfully used to achieve the minimum back wall temperature of the throat back up liners. The enhancement in performance of the throat back up liners was observed by carrying out the oxy-acetylene tests. The influence of back wall temperature on the performance of throat back up liners was verified by ground firing test.

  6. Myocellular enzyme leakage, polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisier, J L; Camus, G; Deby-Dupont, G; Bertrand, F; Lhermerout, C; Crielaard, J M; Juchmès-Ferir, A; Deby, C; Albert, A; Lamy, M

    1996-01-01

    To address the question of whether delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of the arachidonic acid derived product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). 10 healthy male subjects were submitted to eccentric and concentric isokinetic exercises on a Kin Trex device at 60 degrees/s angular velocity. Exercise consisted of 8 stages of 5 maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases. There was an interval of at least 30 days between eccentric and concentric testing, and the order of the two exercise sessions was randomly assigned. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS was evaluated using a visual analogue scale, immediately, following 24 h and 48 h after each test. Five blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein: at rest before exercise, immediately after, after 30 min recovery, 24 h and 48 h after the tests. The magnitude of the acute inflammatory response to exercise was assessed by measuring plasma levels of polymorphonuclear elastase ([EL]), myeloperoxidase ([MPO]) and PGE2 ([PGE2]). Using two way analysis of variance, it appeared that only eccentric exercise significantly increased [EL] and DOMS, especially of the hamstring muscles. Furthermore, a significant decrease in eccentric peak torque of this muscle group only was observed on day 2 after eccentric work (- 21%; P < 0.002). Serum activity of creatine kinase and serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly 24 and 48 h after both exercise tests. However, these variables reached significantly higher values following eccentric contractions 48 h after exercise. Mean [PGE2] in the two exercise modes remained unchanged over time and were practically equal at each time point. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the magnitude of polymorphonuclear (PMN) activation, muscle damage, and DOMS are greater after eccentric than after concentric muscle

  7. RR Lyrae star distance scale and kinematics from inner bulge to 50 kpc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dambis Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We use the currently most complete sample of ∼ 3500 type ab RR Lyraes in our Galaxy with available radial-velocity and [Fe/H] measurements to perform a statisticalparallax analysis for a subsample of ∼ 600 type ab RR Lyraes located within 5 kpc from the Sun to refine the parameters of optical and WISE W1-band period-metallicityluminosity relations and adjust our preliminary distances. The new zero point implies the rescaled estimates for the solar Galactocentric distance (RG = 7.99 ± 0.37 kpc and the LMC distance modulus (DMLMC = 18.39 ±0.09. We use the kinematic data for the entire sample to explore the dependence of the halo and thick-disk RR Lyrae velocity ellipsoids on Galactocentric distance from the inner bulge out to R ∼ 50 kpc.

  8. Build-up of actinides in irradiated fuel rods of the ET-RR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M.; Naguib, K.; Morcos, H.N

    2001-09-01

    The content concentrations of actinides are calculated as a function of operating reactor regime and cooling time at different percentage of fuel burn-up. The build-up transmutation equations of actinides content in an irradiated fuel are solved numerically .A computer code BAC was written to operate on a PC computer to provide the required calculations. The fuel element of 10% {sup 235}U enrichment of ET-RR-1 reactor was taken as an example for calculations using the BAC code. The results are compared with other calculations for the ET-RR-1 fuel rod. An estimation of fissile build-up content of a proposed new fuel of 20% {sup 235}U enrichment for ET-RR-1 reactor is given. The sensitivity coefficients of build-up plutonium concentrations as a function of cross-section data uncertainties are also calculated.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Mid-infrared study of RR Lyrae stars (Gavrilchenko+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilchenko, T.; Klein, C. R.; Bloom, J. S.; Richards, J. W.

    2015-02-01

    The first goal was to find a large sample of WISE-observed RR Lyrae stars. A data base of previously identified RR Lyrae stars was created, combining information from General Catalogue of Variable Stars (GCVS), All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS), SIMBAD, VizieR, and individual papers. For many of the sources in this data base the only available data were the coordinates and RR Lyrae classification. When provided, information about the period, distance, subclass, and magnitude for several different wavebands was also stored. If a single source appeared in multiple surveys or papers, information from all relevant surveys was included, with markers indicating contradicting measurements between surveys. The resulting data base contains about 17000 sources, of which about 5000 sources have documented V-band periods. (3 data files).

  10. Entropy Analysis of RR and QT Interval Variability during Orthostatic and Mental Stress in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Baumert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic activity affects beat-to-beat variability of heart rate and QT interval. The aim of this study was to explore whether entropy measures are suitable to detect changes in neural outflow to the heart elicited by two different stress paradigms. We recorded short-term ECG in 11 normal subjects during an experimental protocol that involved head-up tilt and mental arithmetic stress and computed sample entropy, cross-sample entropy and causal interactions based on conditional entropy from RR and QT interval time series. Head-up tilt resulted in a significant reduction in sample entropy of RR intervals and cross-sample entropy, while mental arithmetic stress resulted in a significant reduction in coupling directed from RR to QT. In conclusion, measures of entropy are suitable to detect changes in neural outflow to the heart and decoupling of repolarisation variability from heart rate variability elicited by orthostatic or mental arithmetic stress.

  11. Degradation of microcystin-RR using boron-doped diamond electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunyong; Fu Degang; Gu Zhongze

    2009-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs), produced by blue-green algae, are one of the most common naturally occurring toxins found in natural environment. The presence of MCs in drinking water sources poses a great threat to people's health. In this study, the degradation behavior of microcystin-RR on boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode was investigated under galvanostatic conditions. Such parameters as reaction time, supporting electrolyte and applied current density were varied in order to determine their effects on this oxidation process. The experimental results revealed the suitability of electrochemical processes employing BDD electrode for removing MC-RR from the solution. However, the efficient removal of MC-RR only occurred in the presence of sodium chloride that acted as redox mediators and the reaction was mainly affected by the chloride concentration (c NaCl ) and applied current density (I appl ). Full and quick removal of 0.50 μg/ml MC-RR in solution was achieved when the operating conditions of c NaCl and I appl were 20 mM and 46.3 mA/cm 2 , or 35 mM and 18.2 mA/cm 2 respectively. The kinetics for MC-RR degradation followed a pesudo-first order reaction in most cases, indicating the process was under mass transfer control. As a result of its excellent performance, the BDD technology could be considered as a promising alternative to promote the degradation of MC-RR than chlorination in drinking water supplies.

  12. Adipose tissue (P)RR regulates insulin sensitivity, fat mass and body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamansurova, Zulaykho; Tan, Paul; Ahmed, Basma; Pepin, Emilie; Seda, Ondrej; Lavoie, Julie L

    2016-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that the handle-region peptide, a prorenin/renin receptor [(P)RR] blocker, reduces body weight and fat mass and may improve insulin sensitivity in high-fat fed mice. We hypothesized that knocking out the adipose tissue (P)RR gene would prevent weight gain and insulin resistance. An adipose tissue-specific (P)RR knockout (KO) mouse was created by Cre-loxP technology using AP2-Cre recombinase mice. Because the (P)RR gene is located on the X chromosome, hemizygous males were complete KO and had a more pronounced phenotype on a normal diet (ND) diet compared to heterozygous KO females. Therefore, we challenged the female mice with a high-fat diet (HFD) to uncover certain phenotypes. Mice were maintained on either diet for 9 weeks. KO mice had lower body weights compared to wild-types (WT). Only hemizygous male KO mice presented with lower total fat mass, higher total lean mass as well as smaller adipocytes compared to WT mice. Although food intake was similar between genotypes, locomotor activity during the active period was increased in both male and female KO mice. Interestingly, only male KO mice had increased O2 consumption and CO2 production during the entire 24-hour period, suggesting an increased basal metabolic rate. Although glycemia during a glucose tolerance test was similar, KO males as well as HFD-fed females had lower plasma insulin and C-peptide levels compared to WT mice, suggesting improved insulin sensitivity. Remarkably, all KO animals exhibited higher circulating adiponectin levels, suggesting that this phenotype can occur even in the absence of a significant reduction in adipose tissue weight, as observed in females and, thus, may be a specific effect related to the (P)RR. (P)RR may be an important therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and its associated complications such as type 2 diabetes.

  13. Nahid Sırrı Örik’in Romanlarında Aile

    OpenAIRE

    Sayar, Feyza

    2013-01-01

    In this study, The six novels of Nahid Sırrı Örik Kıskanmak, Yıldız Olmak Kolay mı?, Tersine Giden Yol, Gece Olmadan, Sultan Hamid Düşerken, Kozmopolitler were examined in terms of family approach. In the first section of the study, Nahid Sırrı Örik's life, art and works were mentioned. In the second section, generally novels in Turkish Literature which are on the subject of family were mentioned. In the third section, the plot is studied. In the fourth section family and in the fifth sect...

  14. Probabilistic safety analysis for control rod drive system of ET-RR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasr, M.; Nasser, O.

    1988-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) co-ordinated a Research programme on Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) for research reactors; with the participation of several countries. In the framework of this project (Project Int. 9/063) the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority decided to perform a PSA study on the ET-RR-1 (Egypt Thermal Research Reactor). The study is conducted in collaboration between the nuclear regulatory and safety centre (NRSC) and the reactor department of the nuclear research centre at Inchass. The present work is a part of the PSA study on ET-RR- it is concerning a probabilistic safety analysis of the control rod drive mechanism

  15. EPIC 201585823, a rare triple-mode RR Lyrae star discovered in K2 mission data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtz, Donald W.; Bowman, Dominic M.; Ebo, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    We have discovered a new, rare triple-mode RR Lyr star, EPIC 201585823, in the Kepler K2 mission Campaign 1 data. This star pulsates primarily in the fundamental and first-overtone radial modes, and, in addition, a third non-radial mode. The ratio of the period of the non-radial mode...... pixels with significant signal for the star, but without correction for pointing changes, is best for frequency analysis of this star, and, by implication, other RR Lyr stars observed by the K2 mission. We compare several pipeline reductions of the K2 mission data for this star....

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Type II Cepheid and RR Lyrae variables (Feast+, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feast, M. W.; Laney, C. D.; Kinman, T. D.; van Leeuwen, F.; Whitelock, P. A.

    2008-10-01

    Infrared and optical absolute magnitudes are derived for the type II Cepheids kappa Pav and VY Pyx using revised Hipparcos parallaxes and for kappa Pav, V553 Cen and SW Tau from pulsational parallaxes. Revised Hipparcos and HST parallaxes for RR Lyrae agree satisfactorily and are combined in deriving absolute magnitudes. Phase-corrected J, H and Ks mags are given for 142 Hipparcos RR Lyraes based on Two-Micron All-Sky Survey observations. Pulsation and trigonometrical parallaxes for classical Cepheids are compared to establish the best value for the projection factor (p) used in pulsational analyses. (3 data files).

  17. Impact of thermal loading and other water quality parameters on the epizootiology of red-sore disease in centrarchids. Progress report, December 1, 1977--November 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, G.W.; Hazen, T.C.

    1978-07-01

    The implications from these studies are varied, sometimes clear and sometimes less so, for many of the results have raised new and even more critical questions. Thus, our data clearly show that Aeromonas hydrophila is the etiological agent for red-sore disease. Furthermore, they suggest that the effects of temperature are twofold, first in increasing the density of the pathogen in the water column and then in affecting the physiology of the host organism to such an extent as to increase the probability of acquiring the pathogen. On the other hand, organic loading, suggested by other investigators as being important in red-sore disease, was not identified as being significant in the present study. However, if organic loading, or any of its consequences, can be shown to induce stress, then it may be as important in other systems as temperature is in Par Pond. Thus it is quite conceivable that it (organic loading), or some other water quality parameter, may create conditions conducive to increasing densities of A. hydrophila while simultaneously producing water quality characteristics which would lead to stress in fish, and then to increasing the probability of fish acquiring red-sore disease. An enigmatic observation (see Hazen, 1978, for details) is that A. hydrophila has been recovered from a variety of habitats throughout the U.S., yet red-sore disease is known to occur only in the southeast. This peculiar distribution pattern raises several important questions regarding the epizootiology of red-sore, not the least of which is the possibility of there existing differentially virulent strains of A. hydrophila and/or more or less susceptible populations of potential hosts in various parts of the country. Other significant questions are related to the variability in amplitude of red-sore disease from one year to the next among bass in Par Pond, the mode of entry of the pathogen into largemouth bass, and the basic, cellular mechanisms of stress in largemouth bass.

  18. [Topic efficacy of ialuronic acid associated with argentic sulphadiazine (Connettivina Plus) in the treatment of pressure sores: a prospective observational cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paghetti, Angela; Bellingeri, Andrea; Pomponio, Giovanni; Sansoni, Julita; Paladino, Dario

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this observational study was to evaluate the efficacy, tolerability and methods of application of ialuronic acid associated with argentic sulphadiazine (Connettivina Plus) in routine clinical activity, on a target of "complex" patients with pressure sores, for the most realistic assessment possible. The study comprised 127 patients hospitalized between January 2006 and December 2007, who received ialuronic acid associated with argentic sulphadiazine in addition to the standard treatment. Inclusion criteria were th presence of at least one stage 2 or 3 pressure sore (NPUAP '89 classification), pressure sore that the researcher had already decided to treat using ialuronic acid associated with argentic sulphadiazine , according to hospital protocol, area of the lesion less than 25cm2, patient age 18 years or more, informed patient consensus. Patients with these characteristics were , however, excluded if they did not provide written consent or if they had one of the following: presence of pressure sores with escara, concomitant neoplastic disease, concomitant insulin-dependent diabetes or other pathologies that interfere with skin regeneration, allergic diasthesis (acclaimed or presumed) to ialuronic acid - argentic sulphadiazine, inability / refusal to undergo all the subsequent controls required by the study. Improvement or complete healing of the pressure sores was observed in 67% of patients at early follow-up (10 days), increasing to 76% and 87% at 20 and 35 day controls respectively. The Push tool further improved in patients who carried on treatment. Use of ialuronic acid associated with argentic sulphadiazine was effective for treating grade 2-3 pressure sores in patients with chronic lesions and its efficacy was confirmed in association with both advanced and traditional types of medication.

  19. Impact of thermal loading and other water quality parameters on the epizootiology of red-sore disease in centrarchids. Progress report, December 1, 1977--November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, G.W.; Hazen, T.C.

    1978-07-01

    The implications from these studies are varied, sometimes clear and sometimes less so, for many of the results have raised new and even more critical questions. Thus, our data clearly show that Aeromonas hydrophila is the etiological agent for red-sore disease. Furthermore, they suggest that the effects of temperature are twofold, first in increasing the density of the pathogen in the water column and then in affecting the physiology of the host organism to such an extent as to increase the probability of acquiring the pathogen. On the other hand, organic loading, suggested by other investigators as being important in red-sore disease, was not identified as being significant in the present study. However, if organic loading, or any of its consequences, can be shown to induce stress, then it may be as important in other systems as temperature is in Par Pond. Thus it is quite conceivable that it (organic loading), or some other water quality parameter, may create conditions conducive to increasing densities of A. hydrophila while simultaneously producing water quality characteristics which would lead to stress in fish, and then to increasing the probability of fish acquiring red-sore disease. An enigmatic observation (see Hazen, 1978, for details) is that A. hydrophila has been recovered from a variety of habitats throughout the U.S., yet red-sore disease is known to occur only in the southeast. This peculiar distribution pattern raises several important questions regarding the epizootiology of red-sore, not the least of which is the possibility of there existing differentially virulent strains of A. hydrophila and/or more or less susceptible populations of potential hosts in various parts of the country. Other significant questions are related to the variability in amplitude of red-sore disease from one year to the next among bass in Par Pond, the mode of entry of the pathogen into largemouth bass, and the basic, cellular mechanisms of stress in largemouth bass

  20. Lignification of the plant and seed quality of RR soybeans sprayed with herbicide glyphosate Lignificação da planta e qualidade de sementes de soja RR pulverizadas com herbicida glifosato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Fortes Gris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Differences in levels of lignin in the plant between conventional and transgenic cultivars RR has been reported by several authors, however, there are few studies evaluating the influence of spraying of glyphosate on the lignin in the plant and RR soybean seeds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physiological quality of RR transgenic soybean seeds and the lignin contents of plants sprayed with the herbicide glyphosate. The assays were conducted both in greenhouse and field in the municipality of Lavras, MG, in the agricultural year 2007/08. The experiment was arranged in a splitplot design with four replicates, considering the treatments hand weeding and herbicide glyphosate as plots, and five RR soybean cultivars (BRS 245 RR, BRS 247 RR, Valiosa RR, Silvânia RR and Baliza RR as splitplots. In the greenhouse, the cultivars tested were BRS 245 RR and Valiosa RR in a randomized block design with four replicates. The sprayings were carried out at stages V3, V7 and early R5 (3L/ha. The 1000 seed weight, mechanical injury, germination and germination velocity index, emergence velocity index, accelerated aging, electrical conductivity and water soaking seed test, lignin content in the seed coat, in the stem and legumes were determined. The spraying of glyphosate herbicide, in greenhouse and field, did not alter the physiological quality of seeds and the lignin contents in the plant.Diferenças nos teores de lignina na planta entre cultivares transgênicos RR e convencionais, tem sido relatadas, por vários autores, no entanto, são escassos os trabalhos avaliando a influência da aplicação do glifosato sobre os teores de lignina na planta e em sementes de soja RR. Neste sentido, objetivou-se, com este trabalho, avaliar a qualidade fisiológica de sementes de soja transgênica RR e os teores de lignina de plantas submetidas à pulverização com o herbicida glifosato. Os ensaios foram conduzidos em casa de vegetação e em campo, no munic

  1. The accordion gracilis muscle flap: a new design for coverage of recurrent and complicated ischeal pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sabbagh, Ahmed H

    2011-10-01

    Management of patients with large or recurrent pressure ulcerations can be complicated by the lack of available local flap, whether already used or because adjacent lesions make such flap insufficient for complete coverage. In this article, the gracilis muscle was modified to cover large defects without help from its cutaneous territory. Twelve ischeal pressure sores were treated between August 2007 and 2009 with the modified gracilis muscle flap in a single-staged procedure. Five ulcers were recurrent and seven patients have associated pressure ulcers. All reconstructions were successful. Mean patient age was 35 years and nearly all patients had multiple significant comorbidities, including associated ulcers, diabetes and urethrocutaneous fistula. All flaps and donor sites healed uneventfully. There was one complication presented as cellulites at the donor site. Follow-up in some cases extend up to 1·5 years. No recurrence was observed. The accordion gracilis muscle flap is a handy, safe and fast flap for reconstruction of recurrent, difficult ischeal pressure sores. © 2011 The Author. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  2. Pressure sores significantly increase the risk of developing a Fournier's gangrene in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, M; Citak, M; Tilkorn, D-J; Meindl, R; Schildhauer, T A; Fehmer, T

    2011-11-01

    Retrospective chart review. The aim of our study was to evaluate the mortality rate and further specific risk factors for Fournier's gangrene in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Division of Spinal Cord Injury, BG-University Hospital Bergmannsheil Bochum, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. All patients with a SCI and a Fournier's gangrene treated in our hospital were enrolled in this study. Following parameters were taken form patients medical records: age, type of SCI, cause of Fournier's gangrene, number of surgical debridements, length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, co morbidity factors and mortality rate. In addition, laboratory parameter including the laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis (LRINEC) score and microbiological findings were analyzed. Clinical diagnosis was made via histological examination. A total of 16 male patients (15 paraplegic and one tetraplegic) were included in the study. In 81% of all cases, the origin of Fournier's gangrene was a pressure sore. The median LRINEC score on admission was 6.5. In the vast majority of cases, a polybacterial infection was found. No patient died during the hospital stay. The mean number of surgical debridements before soft tissue closure was 1.9 and after a mean time interval of 39.1 days wound closure was performed in all patients. Pressure sores significantly increase the risk of developing Fournier's gangrene in patients with SCI. We reported the results of our patients to increase awareness among physicians and training staff working with patients with a SCI in order to expedite the diagnosis.

  3. Whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Joseph T; Baker, Philip R A; Minett, Geoffrey M; Bieuzen, Francois; Stewart, Ian B; Bleakley, Chris

    2015-09-18

    Recovery strategies are often used with the intention of preventing or minimising muscle soreness after exercise. Whole-body cryotherapy, which involves a single or repeated exposure(s) to extremely cold dry air (below -100 °C) in a specialised chamber or cabin for two to four minutes per exposure, is currently being advocated as an effective intervention to reduce muscle soreness after exercise. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the British Nursing Index and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database. We also searched the reference lists of articles, trial registers and conference proceedings, handsearched journals and contacted experts.The searches were run in August 2015. We aimed to include randomised and quasi-randomised trials that compared the use of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) versus a passive or control intervention (rest, no treatment or placebo treatment) or active interventions including cold or contrast water immersion, active recovery and infrared therapy for preventing or treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults. We also aimed to include randomised trials that compared different durations or dosages of WBC. Our prespecified primary outcomes were muscle soreness, subjective recovery (e.g. tiredness, well-being) and adverse effects. Two review authors independently screened search results, selected studies, assessed risk of bias and extracted and cross-checked data. Where appropriate, we pooled results of comparable trials. The random-effects model was used for pooling where there was substantial heterogeneity. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE. Four laboratory-based randomised controlled trials were included. These reported results for 64

  4. Histopathology of red-sore disease (aeromonas hydrophila) in naturally and experimentally infected largemouth bass micropterus salmoides(lacepede)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizinga, H W [Illinois State Univ., Normal; Esch, G W; Hazen, T C

    1979-01-01

    The histopathology of red-sore disease, caused by the gram-negative bacterium, Aeromonas hydrophila, is described for largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides. Externally, lesions range from those affecting a few scales (pin-point), to those associated with extensive chronic ulcerations; there is focal hemorrhage, oedema and dermal necrosis which exposes underlying muscles producing infiltration of mononuclear and granulocytic inflammatory cells. Internally, the liver and kidneys are foci for toxic products produced by A. hydrophila with, in the most severe cases, complete destruction of the structural integrity of both organs. Pathological changes were not serious in either the spleen or heart, even in cases with massive damage in the liver and kidney. Internal and external lesions were similar in both natural and experimentally induced infections. The pathobiology of red-sore disease in bass was postulated to be linked to elevated water temperature stimulating increased metabolism, decreased body condition and stress, leading to the increased production of corticosteroids and the concommitant rise in susceptibility to infection.

  5. Soreness during non-music activities is associated with playing-related musculoskeletal problems: an observational study of 731 child and adolescent instrumentalists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Ranelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Question: Is exposure to non-music-related activities associated with playing-related musculoskeletal problems in young instrumentalists? Is non-music-activity-related soreness associated with playing-related musculoskeletal problems in this group of instrumentalists? Design: Observational study using a questionnaire and physical measures. Participants: 859 instrumentalists aged 7 to 17 years from the School of Instrumental Music program. Results: Of the 731 respondents who completed the questionnaire adequately, 412 (56% experienced instrument-playing problems; 219 (30% had symptoms severe enough to interfere with normal playing. Children commonly reported moderate exposure to non-music-related activities, such as watching television (61%, vigorous physical activity (57%, writing (51% and computer use (45%. Greater exposure to any non-music activity was not associated with playing problems, with odds ratios ranging from 1.01 (95% CI 0.7 to 1.5 for watching television to 2.08 (95% CI 0.5 to 3.3 for intensive hand activities. Four hundred and seventy eight (65% children reported soreness related to non-music activities, such as vigorous physical activity (52%, writing (40%, computer use (28%, intensive hand activities (22%, electronic game use (17% and watching television (15%. Non-music-activity-related soreness was significantly associated with instrument playing problems, adjusting for gender and age, with odds ratios ranging from 2.6 (95% CI 1.7 to 3.9 for soreness whilst watching television, to 4.3 (95% CI 2.6 to 7.1 for soreness during intensive hand activities. Conclusion: Non-music-activity-related soreness co-occurs significantly with playing problems in young instrumentalists. The finding of significant co-occurrence of music and non-music-related soreness in respondents in this study suggests that intervention targets for young instrumentalists could include risk factors previously identified in the general child and adolescent

  6. Temporal migration patterns between natal locations of ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris) and their Gulf Coast stopover site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenzal, Theodore J; Contina, Andrea J; Kelly, Jeffrey F; Moore, Frank R

    2018-01-01

    Autumn latitudinal migrations generally exhibit one of two different temporal migration patterns: type 1 where southern populations migrate south before northern populations, or type 2 where northern populations overtake southern populations en route . The ruby-throated hummingbird ( Archilochus colubris ) is a species with an expansive breeding range, which allows opportunities to examine variation in the timing of migration. Our objective was to determine a relationship between natal origin of ruby-throated hummingbirds and arrival at a Gulf coast stopover site; and if so, what factors, such as differences in body size across the range as well as the cost of migration, might drive such a pattern. To carry out our objectives, we captured hummingbirds at a coastal stopover site during autumn migration, at which time we collected feathers from juveniles for analysis of hydrogen stable isotopes. Using the hydrogen stable isotope gradient of precipitation across North America and published hydrogen isotope values of feathers from populations of breeding ruby-throated hummingbirds, we assigned migrants to probable natal latitudes. Our results confirm that individuals from across the range (30-50° N) stopover along the Gulf of Mexico and there is a positive relationship between arrival day and latitude, suggesting a type 1 migration pattern. We also found no relationship between fuel load (proxy for migration cost) or fat-free body mass (proxy for body size) and natal latitude. Our results, coupled with previous work on the spatial migration patterns of hummingbirds, show a type 1 chain migration pattern. While the mechanisms we tested do not seem to influence the evolution of migratory patterns, other factors such as resource availability may play a prominent role in the evolution of this migration system.

  7. Estimating density of a rare and cryptic high-mountain Galliform species, the Buff-throated Partridge Tetraophasis szechenyii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of abundance or density are essential for wildlife management and conservation. There are few effective density estimates for the Buff-throated Partridge Tetraophasis szechenyii, a rare and elusive high-mountain Galliform species endemic to western China. In this study, we used the temporary emigration N-mixture model to estimate density of this species, with data acquired from playback point count surveys around a sacred area based on indigenous Tibetan culture of protection of wildlife, in Yajiang County, Sichuan, China, during April-June 2009. Within 84 125-m radius points, we recorded 53 partridge groups during three repeats. The best model indicated that detection probability was described by covariates of vegetation cover type, week of visit, time of day, and weather with weak effects, and a partridge group was present during a sampling period with a constant probability. The abundance component was accounted for by vegetation association. Abundance was substantially higher in rhododendron shrubs, fir-larch forests, mixed spruce-larch-birch forests, and especially oak thickets than in pine forests. The model predicted a density of 5.14 groups/km², which is similar to an estimate of 4.7 - 5.3 groups/km² quantified via an intensive spot-mapping effort. The post-hoc estimate of individual density was 14.44 individuals/km², based on the estimated mean group size of 2.81. We suggest that the method we employed is applicable to estimate densities of Buff-throated Partridges in large areas. Given importance of a mosaic habitat for this species, local logging should be regulated. Despite no effect of the conservation area (sacred on the abundance of Buff-throated Partridges, we suggest regulations linking the sacred mountain conservation area with the official conservation system because of strong local participation facilitated by sacred mountains in land conservation.

  8. Stability of UV exposed RR-P3BT films by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diware, Mangesh S.; Byun, J. S.; Hwang, S. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, Y. D.

    2013-01-01

    Stability of regioregular poly(3-butylthiophene) (RR-P3BT) films under irradiation of ultra-violet (UV) light has been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature. Consistent decrease in dielectric function with UV exposure time showed the degree of degradation of polymer. This work suggests that, protective methods are mandatory to use this kind of material in optical devices.

  9. 78 FR 54149 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... service information identified in this AD, contact Rolls-Royce plc, Corporate Communications, P.O. Box 31... per hour. Replacement parts are estimated to cost about $2,271 per engine. Based on these figures, we...

  10. 76 FR 65136 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... information identified in this AD, contact Rolls-Royce plc, Corporate Communications, P.O. Box 31, Derby... 8, 2011, to perform the inspection. Costs of Compliance Based on the service information, we...

  11. 76 FR 52288 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ...-0836; Directorate Identifier 2010-NE-38-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR... plc, P.O. Box 31, Derby, DE24 8BJ, United Kingdom: telephone 44 (0) 1332 242424; fax 44 (0) 1332... based on those comments. We will post all comments we receive, without change, to http://www.regulations...

  12. A HIGH-VELOCITY BULGE RR LYRAE VARIABLE ON A HALO-LIKE ORBIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunder, Andrea; Storm, J.; Rich, R. M.; Hawkins, K.; Poleski, R.; Johnson, C. I.; Shen, J.; Li, Z.-Y.; Cordero, M. J.; Nataf, D. M.; Bono, G.; Walker, A. R.; Koch, A.; De Propris, R.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the RR Lyrae variable star, MACHO 176.18833.411, located toward the Galactic bulge and observed within the data from the ongoing Bulge RR Lyrae Radial Velocity Assay, which has the unusual radial velocity of −372 ± 8 km s −1 and true space velocity of −482 ± 22 km s −1 relative to the Galactic rest frame. Located less than 1 kpc from the Galactic center and toward a field at (l, b) = (3, −2.5), this pulsating star has properties suggesting it belongs to the bulge RR Lyrae star population, yet a velocity indicating it is abnormal, at least with respect to bulge giants and red clump stars. We show that this star is most likely a halo interloper and therefore suggest that halo contamination is not insignificant when studying metal-poor stars found within the bulge area, even for stars within 1 kpc of the Galactic center. We discuss the possibility that MACHO 176.18833.411 is on the extreme edge of the bulge RR Lyrae radial velocity distribution, and also consider a more exotic scenario in which it is a runaway star moving through the Galaxy

  13. Analysis of R-R intervals in patients with atrial fibrillation at rest and during exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bootsma, B.K.; Hoelen, A.J.; Strackee, J.; Meijler, F.L.

    Serial autocorrelation functions and histograms of R-R intervals in patients with atrial fibrillation, with and without digitalis, at rest and during exercise, were produced by a computer. At rest with and without digitalis the first and higher order coefficients did not differ from zero. During

  14. Characterization of the VVV Survey RR Lyrae Population across the Southern Galactic Plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minniti, Dante; Palma, Tali; Pullen, Joyce; Tissera, Patricia; Dékány, Istvan; Majaess, Daniel; Rejkuba, Marina; Valenti, Elena; Alonso-García, Javier; Catelan, Marcio; Contreras Ramos, Rodrigo; Zoccali, Manuela; Gonzalez, Oscar A.; Hempel, Maren; Irwin, Mike; Lucas, Philip W.; Saito, Roberto K.

    2017-01-01

    Deep near-IR images from the VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey were used to search for RR Lyrae stars in the Southern Galactic plane. A sizable sample of 404 RR Lyrae of type ab stars was identified across a thin slice of the fourth Galactic quadrant (295° < ℓ < 350°, −2.°24 < b < −1.°05). The sample’s distance distribution exhibits a maximum density that occurs at the bulge tangent point, which implies that this primarily Oosterhoff type I population of RRab stars does not trace the bar delineated by their red clump counterparts. The bulge RR Lyrae population does not extend beyond ℓ  ∼ 340°, and the sample’s spatial distribution presents evidence of density enhancements and substructure that warrants further investigation. Indeed, the sample may be employed to evaluate Galactic evolution models, and is particularly lucrative since half of the discovered RR Lyrae are within reach of Gaia astrometric observations.

  15. Characterization of the VVV Survey RR Lyrae Population across the Southern Galactic Plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, Dante; Palma, Tali; Pullen, Joyce; Tissera, Patricia [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Av. Fernández Concha 700, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Dékány, Istvan [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Majaess, Daniel [Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Rejkuba, Marina; Valenti, Elena [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarszchild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Alonso-García, Javier; Catelan, Marcio; Contreras Ramos, Rodrigo; Zoccali, Manuela [Instituto Milenio de Astrofísica, Santiago (Chile); Gonzalez, Oscar A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Hempel, Maren [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Instituto de Astrofisica, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Irwin, Mike [Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Lucas, Philip W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Hertfordshire, Hertfordshire (United Kingdom); Saito, Roberto K. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Trindade 88040-900, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2017-04-01

    Deep near-IR images from the VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey were used to search for RR Lyrae stars in the Southern Galactic plane. A sizable sample of 404 RR Lyrae of type ab stars was identified across a thin slice of the fourth Galactic quadrant (295° < ℓ < 350°, −2.°24 < b < −1.°05). The sample’s distance distribution exhibits a maximum density that occurs at the bulge tangent point, which implies that this primarily Oosterhoff type I population of RRab stars does not trace the bar delineated by their red clump counterparts. The bulge RR Lyrae population does not extend beyond ℓ  ∼ 340°, and the sample’s spatial distribution presents evidence of density enhancements and substructure that warrants further investigation. Indeed, the sample may be employed to evaluate Galactic evolution models, and is particularly lucrative since half of the discovered RR Lyrae are within reach of Gaia astrometric observations.

  16. Measure of the QT-RR Dynamic Coupling in Patients with the Long QT Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halámek, Josef; Couderc, J. P.; Jurák, Pavel; Vondra, Vlastimil; Zareba, W.; Viščor, Ivo; Leinveber, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 4 (2012), s. 323-330 ISSN 1082-720X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09050 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Long QT syndrome * Dynamic QT-RR coupling * Holter recording * QT adaptation * QT parameters Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.084, year: 2012

  17. A HIGH-VELOCITY BULGE RR LYRAE VARIABLE ON A HALO-LIKE ORBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunder, Andrea; Storm, J. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Rich, R. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States); Hawkins, K. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Poleski, R. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Johnson, C. I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Shen, J.; Li, Z.-Y. [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Cordero, M. J. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut: Zentrum für Astronomie, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Nataf, D. M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bono, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Walker, A. R. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Koch, A. [Landessternwarte, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Königstuhl 12, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); De Propris, R. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2015-07-20

    We report on the RR Lyrae variable star, MACHO 176.18833.411, located toward the Galactic bulge and observed within the data from the ongoing Bulge RR Lyrae Radial Velocity Assay, which has the unusual radial velocity of −372 ± 8 km s{sup −1} and true space velocity of −482 ± 22 km s{sup −1} relative to the Galactic rest frame. Located less than 1 kpc from the Galactic center and toward a field at (l, b) = (3, −2.5), this pulsating star has properties suggesting it belongs to the bulge RR Lyrae star population, yet a velocity indicating it is abnormal, at least with respect to bulge giants and red clump stars. We show that this star is most likely a halo interloper and therefore suggest that halo contamination is not insignificant when studying metal-poor stars found within the bulge area, even for stars within 1 kpc of the Galactic center. We discuss the possibility that MACHO 176.18833.411 is on the extreme edge of the bulge RR Lyrae radial velocity distribution, and also consider a more exotic scenario in which it is a runaway star moving through the Galaxy.

  18. Gaia Data Release 1. Testing parallaxes with local Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaia Collaboration, [Unknown; Clementini, G.; Eyer, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Muraveva, T.; Garofalo, A.; Sarro, L. M.; Palmer, M.; Luri, X.; Molinaro, R.; Rimoldini, L.; Szabados, L.; Musella, I.; Anderson, R. I.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J.-L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J.-M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Abreu Aramburu, A.; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Andrei, A. H.; Anglada Varela, E.; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Barrado y Navascués, D.; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; Bello García, A.; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Dos Anjos, S.; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Eynard Bontemps, G.; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Falcão, A. J.; Farràs Casas, M.; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; Jevardat de Fombelle, G.; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J.-B.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Magalhães Fernandes, T.; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F.-X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sagristà Sellés, T.; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I.-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Soria Nieto, S.; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Allende Prieto, C.; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H.-H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P.-M.; Bunclark†, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Delle Luche, C.; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Isasi Parache, Y.; Janotto, A.-M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D.-W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A.-T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Olias Sanz, A.; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels†, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Serraller Vizcaino, I.; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J.-M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Parallaxes for 331 classical Cepheids, 31 Type II Cepheids, and 364 RR Lyrae stars in common between Gaia and the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1) as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). Aims: In order to test these first parallax

  19. Influence of Age and Aerobic Fitness on the Multifractal Characteristics of Electrocardiographic RR Time-Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Lewis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Multifractal properties of electrocardiographic inter-beat (RR time-series offer insight into its long-term correlation structure, independently of RR variability. Here we quantify multifractal characteristics of RR data during 24-hour diurnal-nocturnal activity in healthy participants. We tested the hypotheses that (1 age, gender and aerobic fitness influence RR multifractal properties, and that (2 these are influenced by circadian variation.Seventy adults (39 males aged 19-58 years and of various fitness levels were monitored using 24-hour ECG. Participants were dichotomised by median age and fitness for sub-group analysis. Gender and fitness were independent of age (p=0.1, p>0.5. Younger/older group ages were substantially different (p<0.0005 and were independent of gender and fitness. Multifractality was quantified using the probability spectrum of Hölder exponents (h, from which modal h (h* and the full-width and half-widths at half-maximum measures (FWHM, HWHM+ and HWHM- were derived. FWHM decreased (p=0.004 and h* increased (p=0.011 in older people, indicating diminished long-range RR correlations and weaker anti-persistent behavior. Anti-persistent correlation (h* was strongest in the youngest/fittest individuals and weakest in the oldest/least fit individuals (p=0.015. Long-range correlation (HWHM+/FWHM was strongest in the fittest males and weakest in the least fit females (p=0.007-0.033.Multifractal RR characteristics in our healthy participants showed strong age-dependence with diminished long-range anti-persistent correlation in older people. Circadian variation of these characteristics was influenced by fitness and gender: fitter males and females of all ages had the greatest degree of multifractality or long-range order. Multifractal characterisation appears to be a useful method for exploring the physiological basis of long-term correlation structure in RR time-series as well as the benefits thereon of physical fitness training.

  20. 2D and 3D imaging resolution trade-offs in quantifying pore throats for prediction of permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckingham, Lauren E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

    2013-09-03

    Although the impact of subsurface geochemical reactions on porosity is relatively well understood, changes in permeability remain difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling was used to predict permeability based on pore- and pore-throat size distributions determined from analysis of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections and 3D X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data. The analyzed specimens were a Viking sandstone sample from the Alberta sedimentary basin and an experimental column of reacted Hanford sediments. For the column, a decrease in permeability due to mineral precipitation was estimated, but the permeability estimates were dependent on imaging technique and resolution. X-ray CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network while 2D SEM imaging can easily analyze sub-grain and intragranular variations in mineralogy. Pore network models informed by analyses of 2D and 3D images at comparable resolutions produced permeability esti- mates with relatively good agreement. Large discrepancies in predicted permeabilities resulted from small variations in image resolution. Images with resolutions 0.4 to 4 lm predicted permeabilities differ- ing by orders of magnitude. While lower-resolution scans can analyze larger specimens, small pore throats may be missed due to resolution limitations, which in turn overestimates permeability in a pore-network model in which pore-to-pore conductances are statistically assigned. Conversely, high-res- olution scans are capable of capturing small pore throats, but if they are not actually flow-conducting predicted permeabilities will be below expected values. In addition, permeability is underestimated due to misinterpreting surface-roughness features as small pore throats. Comparison of permeability pre- dictions with expected and measured permeability values showed that the largest discrepancies resulted from the highest resolution images and the best predictions of