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Sample records for sorbent residence time

  1. [Part-time residency training in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbain, Dana; Levi, Baruch; Borow, Malke; Ashkenazi, Shai; Lindner, Arie

    2012-08-01

    Full-time work has long been perceived as a cornerstone of medical residency, the consensus being that a resident must apply the bulk of his time and attention to his professional training. Demographic and cultural changes that have taken place over the last several years, specifically the rise in the number of female doctors and the importance of leisure time to the younger generation, have intensified the need to find new and innovative ways to deal with the plight of the resident population. One idea, already in effect in many Western countries, is the institution of part-time residency programs. The possibility of fulfilling residency requirements on a part-time basis is intended to assist medical residents in integrating their professional development with their personal and family life, without compromising the quality of their training. A number of research studies conducted over the last several years in countries that allow part-time residency, among them the United States, England and Switzerland, aimed to examine the quality of part-time training. The various studies evinced a high level of satisfaction from the program both by the residents themselves and their supervisors, and in many aspects those doing residency part-time received higher appraisals than their full-time colleagues. Some of the residents polled noted that they would have totally foregone the practice of medicine had there not been an option to complete residency part-time. In light of the experience throughout the world and the changing landscape in Israel, the Scientific Council of the Israeli Medical Association decided to examine the issue and its various aspects, and weighed all the considerations in favor and against part-time residency. Recently, the Scientific Council approved the launch of a pilot program to allow part-time residency in several fields that were carefully selected according to specific criteria. Once the Ministry of Health completes the LegisLation process, part-time

  2. A Time Study of Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Frank H; Sinha, Indranil; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-05-01

    Resident work hours are under scrutiny and have been subject to multiple restrictions. The studies supporting these changes have not included data on surgical residents. We studied the workday of a team of plastic surgery residents to establish prospective time-study data of plastic surgery (PRS) residents at a single tertiary-care academic medical center. Five trained research assistants observed all residents (n = 8) on a PRS service for 10 weeks and produced minute-by-minute activity logs. Data collection began when the team first met in the morning and continued until the resident being followed completed all non-call activities. We analyzed our data from 3 perspectives: 1) time spent in direct patient care (DPC), indirect patient care, and didactic activities; 2) time spent in high education-value activities (HEAs) versus low education-value activities; and 3) resident efficiency. We defined HEAs as activities that surgeons must master; other activities were LEAs. We quantified resident efficiency in terms of time fragmentation and time spent waiting. A total of 642.4 hours of data across 50 workdays were collected. Excluding call, residents worked an average of 64.2 hours per week. Approximately 50.7% of surgical resident time was allotted to DPC, with surgery accounting for the largest segment of this time (34.8%). Time spent on HEAs demonstrated trended upward with higher resident level (P = 0.086). Time in spent in surgery was significantly associated with higher resident levels (P time study of PRS residents, we found that compared with medicine trainees, surgical residents spent 3.23 times more time on DPC. High education-value activities comprised most of our residents' workdays. Surgery was the leading component of both DPC and HEAs. Our residents were highly efficient and fragmented, with the majority of all activities requiring 4 minutes or less. Residents spent a large portion of their time waiting for other services. In light of these data, we

  3. Aerogel sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begag, Redouane; Rhine, Wendell E.; Dong, Wenting

    2018-04-03

    The current invention describes methods and compositions of various sorbents based on aerogels of various silanes and their use as sorbent for carbon dioxide. Methods further provide for optimizing the compositions to increase the stability of the sorbents for prolonged use as carbon dioxide capture matrices.

  4. Atmospheric Residence Times of Continental Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkanski, Yves Jacques

    The global atmospheric distributions of ^{222}Rn and ^{210 }Pb are simulated with a three-dimensional model of atmospheric transport based on the meteorology of the NASA GISS^1>=neral circulation model. The short-lived radioactive gas ^ {222}Rn (half-life = 3.8d) is emitted almost exclusively from land, at a relatively uniform rate; hence it is an excellent tracer of continental influences. Lead -210 is produced by decay of ^{222} Rn and immediately condenses to preexisting aerosol surfaces. It provides an excellent measure of aerosol residence times in the atmosphere because its source is accurately defined by the ^{222} Rn distribution. Results from the three-dimensional model are compared to measurements of ^ {222}Rn and ^{210 }Pb atmospheric concentrations to evaluate model's long-range transport over oceanic regions and to study the deposition mechanisms of atmospheric aerosols. Model results for ^{222} Rn are used to examine the long-range transport of continental air over two selected oceanic regions, the subantartic Indian Ocean and the North Pacific. It is shown that fast transport of air from southern Africa causes substantial continental pollution at southern mid-latitudes, a region usually regarded as pristine. Air over the North Pacific is heavily impacted by continental influences year round, but the altitude at which the transport occurs varies seasonally. Observations of aerosols at island sites, which are commonly used as diagnostics of continental influences, may be misleading because they do not account for influences at high altitude and because aerosols are efficiently scavenged by deposition during transport. The study of ^{210}Pb focuses on defining the residence times of submicron aerosols in the troposphere. Scavenging in wet convective updrafts is found to provide the dominant sink on a global scale. The globally averaged residence time for ^{210 }Pb-containing aerosols in the troposphere is 7 days. The average increase in residence time

  5. Effects of water vapor pretreatment time and reaction temperature on CO(2) capture characteristics of a sodium-based solid sorbent in a bubbling fluidized-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongwon; Jo, Sung-Ho; Ryu, Chong Kul; Yi, Chang-Keun

    2007-10-01

    CO(2) capture from flue gas using a sodium-based solid sorbent was investigated in a bubbling fluidized-bed reactor. Carbonation and regeneration temperature on CO(2) removal was determined. The extent of the chemical reactivity after carbonation or regeneration was characterized via (13)C NMR. In addition, the physical properties of the sorbent such as pore size, pore volume, and surface area after carbonation or regeneration were measured by gas adsorption method (BET). With water vapor pretreatment, near complete CO(2) removal was initially achieved and maintained for about 1-2min at 50 degrees C with 2s gas residence time, while without proper water vapor pretreatment CO(2) removal abruptly decreased from the beginning. Carbonation was effective at the lower temperature over the 50-70 degrees C temperature range, while regeneration more effective at the higher temperature over the 135-300 degrees C temperature range. To maintain the initial 90% CO(2) removal, it would be necessary to keep the regeneration temperature higher than about 135 degrees C. The results obtained in this study can be used as basic data for designing and operating a large scale CO(2) capture process with two fluidized-bed reactors.

  6. Sorbent suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedder, M.

    1994-01-01

    Sorbents are used to absorb or contain spilled and leaking chemicals, oils, lubricants and other process fluids. They are commonly used around the base of machinery in industrial applications, and in remediating oil spills on land and water. Sorbents are made from biodegradable, inorganic or synthetic materials. Organic materials include corn cobs, wood pulp, paper fiber and cotton. Inorganic materials include clay, perlite, expanded silicates and expanded mica. Synthetic sorbents are made from petroleum- or plastic-based materials such as polyurethane, polyethylene or polypropylene. Sorbents are available in a variety of forms, including pads, rolls, booms, pillows and loose particulate

  7. Residence time and physical processes in lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta SALA

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The residence time of a lake is highly dependent on internal physical processes in the water mass conditioning its hydrodynamics; early attempts to evaluate this physical parameter emphasize the complexity of the problem, which depends on very different natural phenomena with widespread synergies. The aim of this study is to analyse the agents involved in these processes and arrive at a more realistic definition of water residence time which takes account of these agents, and how they influence internal hydrodynamics. With particular reference to temperate lakes, the following characteristics are analysed: 1 the set of the lake's caloric components which, along with summer heating, determine the stabilizing effect of the surface layers, and the consequent thermal stratification, as well as the winter destabilizing effect; 2 the wind force, which transfers part of its momentum to the water mass, generating a complex of movements (turbulence, waves, currents with the production of active kinetic energy; 3 the water flowing into the lake from the tributaries, and flowing out through the outflow, from the standpoint of hydrology and of the kinetic effect generated by the introduction of these water masses into the lake. These factors were studied in the context of the general geographical properties of the lake basin and the watershed (latitude, longitude, morphology, also taking account of the local and regional climatic situation. Also analysed is the impact of ongoing climatic change on the renewal of the lake water, which is currently changing the equilibrium between lake and atmosphere, river and lake, and relationships

  8. Design of engineered sorbent barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.O.; Freeman, H.D.

    1988-08-01

    A sorbent barrier uses sorbent material such as activated carbon or natural zeolites to prevent the migration of radionuclides from a low-level waste site to the aquifer. The sorbent barrier retards the movement of radioactive contaminants, thereby providing time for the radionuclides to decay. Sorbent barriers can be a simple, effective, and inexpensive method for reducing the migration of radionuclides to the environment. Designing a sorbent barrier consists of using soil and sorbent material properties and site conditions as input to a model which will determine the necessary sorbent barrier thickness to meet contaminant limits. The paper will cover the following areas: techniques for measuring sorption properties of barrier materials and underlying soils, use of a radionuclide transport model to determine the required barrier thickness and performance under a variety of site conditions, and cost estimates for applying the barrier. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  9. Design of engineered sorbent barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.O.; Freeman, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    A sorbent barrier uses sorbent material such as activated carbon or natural zeolites to prevent the migration of radionuclides from a low-level waste site to the aquifer. The sorbent barrier retards the movement of radioactive contaminants, thereby providing time for the radionuclides to decay. Sorbent barriers can be a simple, effective, and inexpensive method for reducing the migration of radionuclides to the environment. Designing a sorbent barrier consists of using soil and sorbent material properties and site conditions as input to a model which will determine the necessary sorbent barrier thickness to meet contaminant limits. The paper covers the following areas: techniques for measuring sorption properties of barrier materials and underlying soils, use of a radionuclide transport model to determine the required barrier thickness and performance under a variety of site conditions, and cost estimates for applying the barrier

  10. Atmospheric residence times of continental aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balkanski, Y.J.

    1991-01-01

    The global atmospheric distributions of Rn-222 are simulated with a three-dimensional model of atmospheric transport based on the meteorology of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model. The short-lived radioactive gas Rn-222 (half-life = 3.8d) is emitted almost exclusively from land, at a relatively uniform rate; hence it is an excellent tracer of continental influences. Lead-210 is produced by decay of Rn-222 and immediately condenses to preexisting aerosol surfaces. It provides an excellent measure of aerosol residence times in the atmosphere because its source is accurately defined by the Rn-222 distribution. Results from the three-dimensional model are compared to measurements of Rn-222 and Pb-210 atmospheric concentrations to evaluate model's long-range transport over oceanic regions and to study the deposition mechanisms of atmospheric aerosols. Model results for Rn-222 are used to examine the long-range transport of continental air over two selected oceanic regions, the subantarctic Indian Ocean and the North Pacific. It is shown that the fast transport of air from southern Africa causes substantial continental pollution at southern mid-latitudes, a region usually regarded as pristine. Air over the North Pacific is heavily impacted by continental influences year round, but the altitude at which the transport occurs varies seasonally. Observations of aerosols at island sites, which are commonly used as diagnostics of continental influences, may be misleading because they do not account for influences at high altitude and because aerosols are efficiently scavenged by deposition during transport. The study of Pb-210 focuses on defining the residence times of submicron aerosols in the troposphere. Scavenging in wet convective updrafts is found to provide the dominant sink on a global scale

  11. Protected Time for Research During Orthopaedic Residency Correlates with an Increased Number of Resident Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin R; Agel, Julie A; Van Heest, Ann E

    2017-07-05

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires orthopaedic residency programs to promote scholarship and research, which manifest differently among programs. We assess the impact of protected research time during orthopaedic residency on the number of resident publications. Rotation schedules and resident names were collected from 125 ACGME-accredited U.S. orthopaedic residency programs. Protected research time was classified as 1 of 3 types: (1) block time, (2) longitudinal time, or (3) no dedicated time. In April 2016, we searched residents in postgraduate year (PGY)-3 to PGY-5 on pubmed.gov to generate all orthopaedic publications with a PubMed identifier published during residency. Each publication's 2015 Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports 5-Year Journal Impact Factor and resident first authorship were noted. The number of PubMed identifiers for each program was summed and was divided by the number of residents in PGY-3 to PGY-5, giving a mean number of publications per resident. The relationship between output and program research time was compared using t tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA). A total of 1,690 residents were included, with an overall mean number (and standard deviation) of 1.2 ± 2.4 publications per resident. Eighty-seven programs reported block time, 14 programs reported longitudinal time, and 24 programs reported no time. There was a significant difference (p = 0.02) in the mean number of publications per resident when compared between programs with protected time (1.1 ± 1.2 publications) and programs with no protected time (0.6 ± 0.5 publication). One-way ANOVA demonstrated a significant mean difference across the 3 groups (p publications than block time at 1.0 ± 1.0 publication or no time at 0.6 ± 0.5 publication, a difference that persisted when adjusted to include only impact factors of >0 and exclude case reports (p = 0.0015). Both the presence of and the type of dedicated research time correlate

  12. Characterization of calcium carbonate sorbent particle in furnace environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Soo; Jung, Jae Hee; Keel, Sang In; Yun, Jin Han; Min, Tai Jin; Kim, Sang Soo

    2012-01-01

    The oxy-fuel combustion system is a promising technology to control CO 2 and NO X emissions. Furthermore, sulfation reaction mechanism under CO 2 -rich atmospheric condition in a furnace may lead to in-furnace desulfurization. In the present study, we evaluated characteristics of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) sorbent particles under different atmospheric conditions. To examine the physical/chemical characteristics of CaCO 3 , which is used as a sorbent particle for in-furnace desulfurization in the oxy-fuel combustion system, they were injected into high temperature drop tube furnace (DTF). Experiments were conducted at varying temperatures, residence times, and atmospheric conditions in a reactor. To evaluate the aerosolizing characteristics of the CaCO 3 sorbent particle, changes in the size distribution and total particle concentration between the DTF inlet and outlet were measured. Structural changes (e.g., porosity, grain size, and morphology) of the calcined sorbent particles were estimated by BET/BJH, XRD, and SEM analyses. It was shown that sorbent particles rapidly calcined and sintered in the air atmosphere, whereas calcination was delayed in the CO 2 atmosphere due to the higher CO 2 partial pressure. Instead, the sintering effect was dominant in the CO 2 atmosphere early in the reaction. Based on the SEM images, it was shown that the reactions of sorbent particles could be explained as a grain–subgrain structure model in both the air and CO 2 atmospheres.

  13. Residence time determination for adsorbent beds of different configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otermat, J.E.; Wikoff, W.O.; Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    The residence time calculations of ASME AG-1 Code, Section FC, currently specify a screen surface area method, that is technically incorrect. Test data has been obtained on Type II adsorber trays of different configurations to establish residence time in the adsorber trays. These data indicate that the air volume/carbon volume ratio or the average screen area are more appropriate for the calculation of the residence time calculation than the currently used, smallest screen area basis.

  14. Elective time during dermatology residency: A survey of residents and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Pushpinder; Shantharam, Rohini; Kaufmann, Tara Lynn

    2017-12-15

    Elective time during residency training provides residents with exposure to different subspecialties. This opportunity gives residents the chance tonurture growth in particular areas of interest and broaden their knowledge base in certain topics in dermatology by having the chance to work withexperts in the field. The purpose of this study was to assess the views of residency program directors and dermatology residents on the value of elective time through a cross sectional survey. An eight-questionIRB exempt survey was sent out to 113 residency program directors via email through the American Professors of Dermatology (APD) program director listserv. Program directors were asked to forward a separate set of 9 questions to their residents. The majority of programs that responded allowed for some elective time within their schedule, often duringthe PGY 4 (3rd year of dermatology training), but the amount of time allowed widely varied among many residency programs. Overall, residents and program directors agree that elective is important in residencytraining, but no standardization is established across programs.

  15. Long residence times - bad tracer tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests conducted at geothermal well doublets or triplets in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley [1] all face, with very few exceptions so far, one common issue: lack of conclusive tracer test results, or tracer signals still undetectable for longer than one or two years after tracer injection. While the reasons for this surely differ from site to site (Riehen, Landau, Insheim, Bruchsal, ...), its effects on how the usefulness of tracer tests is perceived by the non-tracer community are pretty much the same. The 'poor-signal' frustration keeps nourishing two major 'alternative' endeavours : (I) design and execute tracer tests in single-well injection-withdrawal (push-pull), 'instead of' inter-well flow-path tracing configurations; (II) use 'novel' tracer substances instead of the 'old' ones which have 'obviously failed'. Frustration experienced with most inter-well tracer tests in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley has also made them be regarded as 'maybe useful for EGS' ('enhanced', or 'engineered' geothermal systems, whose fluid RTD typically include a major share of values below one year), but 'no longer worthwhile a follow-up sampling' in natural, large-scale hydrothermal reservoirs. We illustrate some of these arguments with the ongoing Bruchsal case [2]. The inter-well tracer test conducted at Bruchsal was (and still is!) aimed at assessing inter-well connectivity, fluid residence times, and characterizing the reservoir structure [3]. Fluid samples taken at the geothermal production well after reaching a fluid turnover of about 700,000 m3 showed tracer concentrations in the range of 10-8 Minj per m3, in the liquid phase of each sample (Minj being the total quantity of tracer injected as a short pulse at the geothermal re-injection well). Tracer signals might actually be higher, owing to tracer amounts co-precipitated and/or adsorbed onto the solid phase whose accumulation in the samples was unavoidable (due to pressure relief and degassing during the very sampling

  16. Operative time and cost of resident surgical experience: effect of instituting an otolaryngology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollei, Taylor R; Barrs, David M; Hinni, Michael L; Bansberg, Stephen F; Walter, Logan C

    2013-06-01

    Describe the procedure length difference between surgeries performed by an attending surgeon alone compared with the resident surgeon supervised by the same attending surgeon. Case series with chart review. Tertiary care center and residency program. Six common otolaryngologic procedures performed between August 1994 and May 2012 were divided into 2 cohorts: attending surgeon alone or resident surgeon. This division coincided with our July 2006 initiation of an otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency program. Operative duration was compared between cohorts with confounding factors controlled. In addition, the direct result of increased surgical length on operating room cost was calculated and applied to departmental and published resident case log report data. Five of the 6 procedures evaluated showed a statistically significant increase in surgery length with resident involvement. Operative time increased 6.8 minutes for a cricopharyngeal myotomy (P = .0097), 11.3 minutes for a tonsillectomy (P operative time difference. Cost of increased surgical time was calculated per surgery and ranged from $286 (cricopharyngeal myotomy) to $2142 (mastoidectomy). When applied to reported national case log averages for graduating residents, this resulted in a significant increase of direct training-related costs. Resident participation in the operating room results in increased surgical length and additional system cost. Although residency is a necessary part of surgical training, associated costs need to be acknowledged.

  17. Residence time modeling of hot melt extrusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Elena; Podhaisky, Helmut; Ely, David; Thommes, Markus

    2013-11-01

    The hot melt extrusion process is a widespread technique to mix viscous melts. The residence time of material in the process frequently determines the product properties. An experimental setup and a corresponding mathematical model were developed to evaluate residence time and residence time distribution in twin screw extrusion processes. The extrusion process was modeled as the convolution of a mass transport process described by a Gaussian probability function, and a mixing process represented by an exponential function. The residence time of the extrusion process was determined by introducing a tracer at the extruder inlet and measuring the tracer concentration at the die. These concentrations were fitted to the residence time model, and an adequate correlation was found. Different parameters were derived to characterize the extrusion process including the dead time, the apparent mixing volume, and a transport related axial mixing. A 2(3) design of experiments was performed to evaluate the effect of powder feed rate, screw speed, and melt viscosity of the material on the residence time. All three parameters affect the residence time of material in the extruder. In conclusion, a residence time model was developed to interpret experimental data and to get insights into the hot melt extrusion process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA residence time is a regulatory factor of transcription repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauß, Karen; Popp, Achim P.; Schulze, Lena; Hettich, Johannes; Reisser, Matthias; Escoter Torres, Laura; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Transcription comprises a highly regulated sequence of intrinsically stochastic processes, resulting in bursts of transcription intermitted by quiescence. In transcription activation or repression, a transcription factor binds dynamically to DNA, with a residence time unique to each factor. Whether the DNA residence time is important in the transcription process is unclear. Here, we designed a series of transcription repressors differing in their DNA residence time by utilizing the modular DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and varying the number of nucleotide-recognizing repeat domains. We characterized the DNA residence times of our repressors in living cells using single molecule tracking. The residence times depended non-linearly on the number of repeat domains and differed by more than a factor of six. The factors provoked a residence time-dependent decrease in transcript level of the glucocorticoid receptor-activated gene SGK1. Down regulation of transcription was due to a lower burst frequency in the presence of long binding repressors and is in accordance with a model of competitive inhibition of endogenous activator binding. Our single molecule experiments reveal transcription factor DNA residence time as a regulatory factor controlling transcription repression and establish TALE-DNA binding domains as tools for the temporal dissection of transcription regulation. PMID:28977492

  19. Numerical simulation of onshore separation processes - residence time optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonte, Clarissa Bergman; Oliveira Junior, Joao Americo Aguirre [Engineering Simulation and Scientific Software (ESSS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], E-mails: clarissa@esss.com.br, joao.aguirre@esss.com.br; Dutra, Eduardo Stein Soares [PETROBRAS E e P Engenharia de Producao, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Engenharia de Instalacoes de Superficie e Automacao], E-mail: eduardodutra@petrobras.com.br

    2011-04-15

    Cylindrical tanks are commonly used in onshore facilities to process and treat oil and water streams. These tanks generate a gravitational separation and, when sedimentation velocity is reached, the residence time inside the tank is crucial to guarantee proper separation. The ideal geometry for a tank maximizes the effective residence time by providing the largest possible fluid path, along which sedimentation of the denser phase occurs. Large volume tanks can be used for this purpose. However, internal devices, which increase the effective residence time and decrease undesirable hydrodynamic effects, are a commonly used alternative, allowing a reduction in tank size. This study focuses on the application of computational fluid dynamics as a tool to analyze four geometries found in gravitational separation tanks to identify that which offers the highest residence time values. (author)

  20. Children's postdivorce residence arrangements and parental experienced time pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Franciëlla; Poortman, Anne Rigt; van der Lippe, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Although the rise in postdivorce joint physical custody has fueled scholarly interest in its impact on children, consequences for parents remain understudied. Because children's residence arrangements determine time and coordination demands associated with child care, this study investigated the

  1. Prediction of residence time distributions in food processing machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Torben; Friis, Alan; Szabo, Peter

    1996-01-01

    The velocity field in a co-rotating disc scraped surface heat exchanger (CDHE) is calculated using a finite element method. The residence time distribution for the CDHE is then obtained by tracing particles introduced in the inlet.......The velocity field in a co-rotating disc scraped surface heat exchanger (CDHE) is calculated using a finite element method. The residence time distribution for the CDHE is then obtained by tracing particles introduced in the inlet....

  2. Land processes lead to surprising patterns in atmospheric residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ent, R.; Tuinenburg, O.

    2017-12-01

    Our research using atmospheric moisture tracking methods shows that the global average atmospheric residence time of evaporation is 8-10 days. This residence time appears to be Gamma distributed with a higher probability of shorter than average residence times and a long tail. As a consequence the median of this residence time is around 5 days. In some places in the world the first few hours/days after evaporation there seems to be a little chance for a moisture particle to precipitate again, which is reflected by a Gamma distribution having a shape parameter below 1. In this study we present global maps of this parameter using different datasets (GLDAS and ERA-Interim). The shape parameter is as such also a measure for the land-atmospheric coupling strength along the path of the atmospheric water particle. We also find that different evaporation components: canopy interception, soil evaporation and transpiration appear to have different residence time distributions. We find a daily cycle in the residence time distribution over land, which is not present over the oceans. In this paper we will show which of the evaporation components is mainly responsible for this daily pattern and thus exhibits the largest daily cycle of land-atmosphere coupling strength.

  3. Measurement of the residence time distribution in industrial flotation equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yianatos, Juan; Diaz, F; Rodriguez, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    This work presents a determination of the effective liquid and solid residence time in mechanical cell banks of primary and sweep flotation, and in cleaning flotation columns, at Codelco-Chile's Salvador Division. The determination was carried out using the residence time distribution (RTD) measurement with radioactive tracers. Br-82 was used as the trace element for the liquid. Different kinds of minerals were used to trace the solid: a) activated global tailing (non floatable), b) tailing activated by size classifications (non floatable) and c) activated floatable mineral. The residence time measurement defined effective volumes of 50-80% of the total volume in flotation cell banks, and effective volumes of 77% of the total volume of large-size flotation solids. The effective residence time of the solid (23%+212 microns) in industrial flotation cell banks was 5% below that for the liquid. The residence time of the mineral decreased with increased particle size. Thick mineral (>150 microns) showed a residence time 8% below that for thin mineral (<45 microns). The RTD of industrial mechanical cell banks is adequately represented with a number of perfect mixers in series equivalent to the number of real bank cells. The RTD of the industrial columns equals less than two perfect mixers in series and adjusts better when considering a perfect mixers in series model, but in a different size. Common operating problems could also be observed and analyzed through the RTD measurement, such as embankment of the equipment and the deficient regulation of the outflow, used to control the pulp level (Cw)

  4. Characterization of calcium carbonate sorbent particle in furnace environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Soo [Aerosol and Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae Hee [Environment Sensor System Research Center, KIST 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Keel, Sang In; Yun, Jin Han; Min, Tai Jin [Environmental Systems Research Division, KIMM 104 Sinseongno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Soo, E-mail: sskim@kaist.ac.kr [Aerosol and Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The oxy-fuel combustion system is a promising technology to control CO{sub 2} and NO{sub X} emissions. Furthermore, sulfation reaction mechanism under CO{sub 2}-rich atmospheric condition in a furnace may lead to in-furnace desulfurization. In the present study, we evaluated characteristics of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) sorbent particles under different atmospheric conditions. To examine the physical/chemical characteristics of CaCO{sub 3}, which is used as a sorbent particle for in-furnace desulfurization in the oxy-fuel combustion system, they were injected into high temperature drop tube furnace (DTF). Experiments were conducted at varying temperatures, residence times, and atmospheric conditions in a reactor. To evaluate the aerosolizing characteristics of the CaCO{sub 3} sorbent particle, changes in the size distribution and total particle concentration between the DTF inlet and outlet were measured. Structural changes (e.g., porosity, grain size, and morphology) of the calcined sorbent particles were estimated by BET/BJH, XRD, and SEM analyses. It was shown that sorbent particles rapidly calcined and sintered in the air atmosphere, whereas calcination was delayed in the CO{sub 2} atmosphere due to the higher CO{sub 2} partial pressure. Instead, the sintering effect was dominant in the CO{sub 2} atmosphere early in the reaction. Based on the SEM images, it was shown that the reactions of sorbent particles could be explained as a grain-subgrain structure model in both the air and CO{sub 2} atmospheres.

  5. Relationships between removal processes and residence times for atmospheric pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slinn, W.G.N.

    1978-01-01

    This report is concerned with improving estimates for the residence times of atmospheric trace constituents in various atmospheric reservoirs. Residence times are defined only for steady-state conditions; i.e., when the net growth rate vanishes. The most useful case of vanishing net growth rate is when the total growth rate is equal to the decay rate. It is demonstrated that the most important advance towards improving estimates of pollutant residence times is through proper choices of reservoirs. Chosen reservoirs should possess the following features: steady-state conditions, uniform mixing ratio throughout or throughout specified subreservoirs, and subreservoirs chosen in which removal rates can be treated as approximate constants. An example of a poorly mixed reservoir, the stratosphere, is discussed. In another example, it is suggested that commonly used reservoirs for atmospheric CO 2 have been chosen poorly and that a substantial portion of the anthropogenic CO 2 released during the past 50 years may still be mixing into the stratosphere. In another example, it is suggested that determination of the dry deposition velocity for accumulation-mode aerosol particles may not be so important as previously thought. To improve estimates for the atmospheric residence times of these particles, it is important to increase knowledge of what is called the ascension velocity

  6. Residence Time Distributions in a Cold, Confined Swirl Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lans, Robert Pieter Van Der; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1997-01-01

    Residence time distributions (RTD) in a confined, cold swirling flow have been measured with a fast-response probe and helium as a tracer. The test-rig represented a scaled down version of a burner. The effect of variation of flow velocities and swirl angle on the flow pattern in the near...

  7. Studies on steps affecting tritium residence time in solid blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoru

    1987-01-01

    For the self sustaining of CTR fuel cycle, the effective tritium recovery from blankets is essential. This means that not only tritium breeding ratio must be larger than 1.0, but also high recovering speed is required for the short residence time of tritium in blankets. Short residence time means that the tritium inventory in blankets is small. In this paper, the tritium residence time and tritium inventory in a solid blanket are modeled by considering the steps constituting tritium release. Some of these tritium migration processes were experimentally evaluated. The tritium migration steps in a solid blanket using sintered breeding materials consist of diffusion in grains, desorption at grain edges, diffusion and permeation through grain boundaries, desorption at particle edges, diffusion and percolation through interconnected pores to purging stream, and convective mass transfer to stream. Corresponding to these steps, diffusive, soluble, adsorbed and trapped tritium inventories and the tritium in gas phase are conceivable. The code named TTT was made for calculating these tritium inventories and the residence time of tritium. An example of the results of calculation is shown. The blanket is REPUTER-1, which is the conceptual design of a commercial reversed field pinch fusion reactor studied at the University of Tokyo. The experimental studies on the migration steps of tritium are reported. (Kako, I.)

  8. Financial and Time Burdens for Medical Students Interviewing for Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Paul; Melhado, Trisha; Walling, Anne; Groskurth, Jordan

    2017-02-01

    Interviewing for residency positions is increasingly stressful for students and challenging for programs. Little information is available about the costs and time invested by students in interviewing or about the key factors in decisions to accept interview offers. Our objective was to assess the time and financial costs of residency interviewing for an entire class at a regional campus and explore factors influencing student decisions to accept interviews. We used a 14-item survey administered electronically immediately following National Resident Matching Program results. The response rate was 75% (49 of 65 students). About half interviewed in primary care specialties. Thirty students (63%) applied to 20 or more programs, and 91% were offered multiple interviews out of state. Seventy percent limited interviews by time and cost. Other important factors included personal "fit," program reputation, and the quality of residents. About 50% of the students spent more than 20 days and $1,000-$5,000 interviewing; 29% reported spending over $5,000. Students used multiple funding sources, predominantly loans and savings. Primary care applicants applied to fewer out-of-state programs, reported fewer interview days and lower expenses, but received more financial support from programs. Students invested considerable time and resources in interviewing, and these factors significantly influenced their decisions about accepting interviews. The other major factors in interview decisions concerned personal comfort with the program, especially the residents. The costs and time reported in this study could be greater than other schools due to the regional campus location or lower due to the high proportion of students interviewing in primary care.

  9. Effect of viscosity on tear drainage and ocular residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Heng; Chauhan, Anuj

    2008-08-01

    An increase in residence time of dry eye medications including artificial tears will likely enhance therapeutic benefits. The drainage rates and the residence time of eye drops depend on the viscosity of the instilled fluids. However, a quantitative understanding of the dependence of drainage rates and the residence time on viscosity is lacking. The current study aims to develop a mathematical model for the drainage of Newtonian fluids and also for power-law non-Newtonian fluids of different viscosities. This study is an extension of our previous study on the mathematical model of tear drainage. The tear drainage model is modified to describe the drainage of Newtonian fluids with viscosities higher than the tear viscosity and power-law non-Newtonian fluids with rheological parameters obtained from fitting experimental data in literature. The drainage rate through canaliculi was derived from the modified drainage model and was incorporated into a tear mass balance to calculate the transients of total solute quantity in ocular fluids and the bioavailability of instilled drugs. For Newtonian fluids, increasing the viscosity does not affect the drainage rate unless the viscosity exceeds a critical value of about 4.4 cp. The viscosity has a maximum impact on drainage rate around a value of about 100 cp. The trends are similar for shear thinning power law fluids. The transients of total solute quantity, and the residence time agrees at least qualitatively with experimental studies. A mathematical model has been developed for the drainage of Newtonian fluids and power-law fluids through canaliculi. The model can quantitatively explain different experimental observations on the effect of viscosity on the residence of instilled fluids on the ocular surface. The current study is helpful for understanding the mechanism of fluid drainage from the ocular surface and for improving the design of dry eye treatments.

  10. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts J Mark

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD in a core internal medicine residency program. Methods We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching, comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. Results There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years. Only 42 hours (15% involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18–19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year. Most AHD hours (78% focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response was high throughout (range 3.64 ± 0.21, 3.84 ± 0.14 out of 4, which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. Conclusion We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics.

  11. Mean Residence Time and Emergency Drinking Water Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralik, Martin; Humer, Franko

    2013-04-01

    Immediately after securing an endangered population, the first priority of aid workers following a disaster is the distribution of drinking water. Such emergency situations are reported from many parts of the world following regional chemical or nuclear pollution accidents, floods, droughts, rain-induced landslides, tsunami, and other extreme events. It is often difficult to organise a replacement water supply when regular water systems with short residence times are polluted, infiltrated or even flooded by natural or man-made disasters. They are either unusable or their restoration may take months or even years. Groundwater resources, proven safe and protected by the geological environment, with long residence times and the necessary infrastructure for their exploitation, would provide populations with timeous replacement of vulnerable water supply systems and make rescue activities more rapid and effective. Such resources have to be identified and investigated, as a substitute for affected drinking water supplies thereby eliminating or reducing the impact of their failure following catastrophic events. Even in many areas such water resources with long residence times in years or decades are difficult to find it should be known which water supply facilities in the region are matching these requirements to allow in emergency situation the transport of water in tankers to the affected regions to prevent epidemics, importing large quantities of bottled water. One should know the residence time of the water supply to have sufficient time to plan and install new safe water supply facilities. Development of such policy and strategy for human security - both long term and short term - is therefore needed to decrease the vulnerability of populations threatened by extreme events and water supplies with short residence times. Generally: The longer the residence time of groundwater in the aquifer, the lower its vulnerability. The most common and economic methods to estimate

  12. Sol-gel derived sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, Michael E.; Dindal, Amy B.

    2003-11-11

    Described is a method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles for the production of copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent material. The method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles comprises adding a basic solution to an aqueous metal alkoxide mixture for a pH.ltoreq.8 to hydrolyze the metal alkoxides. Then, allowing the mixture to react at room temperature for a precalculated period of time for the mixture to undergo an increased in viscosity to obtain a desired pore size and surface area. The copolymerized mixture is then added to an immiscible, nonpolar solvent that has been heated to a sufficient temperature wherein the copolymerized mixture forms a solid upon the addition. The solid is recovered from the mixture, and is ready for use in an active sampling trap or activated for use in a passive sampling trap.

  13. Origin and residence time of water in the Lima Aquifer

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya, Modesto; Mamani, Enoc

    2014-01-01

    The 8 million inhabitants of the coastal city Lima are supplied with water from the Rimac and Chillon rivers and water wells in the Lima aquifer. The history of the Rimac River flow and static level of water in its wells have been correlated to calculate the residence time of water in the aquifer it is recharged by the Rimac River until it reaches a well located 12 km away in the Miraflores District near the sea. The relative abundance of H-2 and O-18 are used to identify the origins of the w...

  14. Modelling travel and residence times in the eastern Irish Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, T.; Hartnett, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Irish Sea, which lies between 51 deg. N-56 deg. N and 2 deg. 50'W-7 deg. W, provides a sheltered environment to exploit valuable fisheries resource. Anthropogenic activity is a real threat to its water quality. The majority of freshwater input down rivers flows into the eastern Irish Sea. The structure of the water circulation was not well understood during the planning of Sellafield nuclear plant outfall site in the eastern Irish Sea. A three-dimensional primitive equation numerical model was applied to the Irish Sea to simulate both barotropic and baroclinic circulation within the region. High accuracy was achieved with regard to the prediction of both tidal circulation and surface and nearbed water temperatures across the region. The model properly represented the Western Irish Sea Gyre, induced by thermal stratification and not known during planning Sellafield. Passive tracer simulations based on the developed hydrodynamic model were used to deliver residence times of the eastern Irish Sea region for various times of the year as well as travel times from the Sellafield outfall site to various locations within the Irish Sea. The results indicate a strong seasonal variability of travel times from Sellafield to the examined locations. Travel time to the Clyde Sea is the shortest for the autumnal tracer release (90 days); it takes almost a year for the tracer to arrive at the same location if it is released in January. Travel times from Sellafield to Dublin Bay fall within the range of 180-360 days. The average residence time of the entire eastern Irish Sea is around 7 months. The areas surrounding the Isle of Man are initially flushed due to a predominant northward flow; a backwater is formed in Liverpool Bay. Thus, elevated tracer concentrations are predicted in Liverpool Bay in the case of accidental spills at the Sellafield outfall site

  15. Radiotracer investigation to study residence time distribution in an evaporator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pant, H J; Yelgaonkar, V N; Navada, S V [Isotope Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Determination of mean residence time, residence time distribution and evaluation of flow behavior in industrial process systems is of prime importance in order to control the process and to evaluate the performance of the process systems. This paper describes a case study carried out in an evaporator system in a sugar factory near Pune for determination of the mean residence time and residence time distribution using radiotracer technique. The mean residence time (MRT) was determined to be 4 seconds. The mathematical modelling of residence time distribution (RTD) data indicated the flow behaviour of the system to be a well mixed type. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Origin and residence time of water in the Lima aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, Modesto [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, San Borja, Lima (Peru); Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Rimac, Lima (Peru); Mamani, Enoc [Direccion de Servicios, Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Jose Saco km 12.5, Carabayllo, Lima (Peru)

    2013-07-01

    The 8 million inhabitants of the coastal city Lima are supplied with water from the Rimac and Chillon rivers and water wells in the Lima aquifer. The history of the Rimac River flow and static level of water in its wells have been correlated to calculate the residence time of water in the aquifer it is recharged by the Rimac River until it reaches a well located 12 km away in the Miraflores District near the sea. The relative abundance of {sup 2}H and {sup 18}O are used to identify the origins of the waters from those wells, and the {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C contents are used to estimate the time after they fall as rain. (authors).

  17. Origin and residence time of water in the Lima aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Modesto; Mamani, Enoc

    2013-01-01

    The 8 million inhabitants of the coastal city Lima are supplied with water from the Rimac and Chillon rivers and water wells in the Lima aquifer. The history of the Rimac River flow and static level of water in its wells have been correlated to calculate the residence time of water in the aquifer it is recharged by the Rimac River until it reaches a well located 12 km away in the Miraflores District near the sea. The relative abundance of 2 H and 18 O are used to identify the origins of the waters from those wells, and the 3 H and 14 C contents are used to estimate the time after they fall as rain. (authors).

  18. RTDB: A memory resident real-time object database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogiec, Jerzy M.; Desavouret, Eugene

    2003-01-01

    RTDB is a fast, memory-resident object database with built-in support for distribution. It constitutes an attractive alternative for architecting real-time solutions with multiple, possibly distributed, processes or agents sharing data. RTDB offers both direct and navigational access to stored objects, with local and remote random access by object identifiers, and immediate direct access via object indices. The database supports transparent access to objects stored in multiple collaborating dispersed databases and includes a built-in cache mechanism that allows for keeping local copies of remote objects, with specifiable invalidation deadlines. Additional features of RTDB include a trigger mechanism on objects that allows for issuing events or activating handlers when objects are accessed or modified and a very fast, attribute based search/query mechanism. The overall architecture and application of RTDB in a control and monitoring system is presented

  19. Mean Transit Time and Mean Residence Time for Linear Diffusion–Convection–Reaction Transport System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Waniewski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic times for transport processes in biological systems may be evaluated as mean transit times (MTTs (for transit states or mean residence times (MRT (for steady states. It is shown in a general framework of a (linear reaction–diffusion–convection equation that these two times are related. Analytical formulas are also derived to calculate moments of exit time distribution using solutions for a stationary state of the system.

  20. Residence Times in Central Valley Aquifers Recharged by Dammed Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loustale, M.; Paukert Vankeuren, A. N.; Visser, A.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater is a vital resource for California, providing between 30-60% of the state's water supply. Recent emphasis on groundwater sustainability has induced a push to characterize recharge rates and residence times for high priority aquifers, including most aquifers in California's Central Valley. Flows in almost all rivers from the western Sierra to the Central Valley are controlled by dams, altering natural flow patterns and recharge to local aquifers. In eastern Sacramento, unconfined and confined shallow aquifers (depth recharged by a losing reach of the Lower American River, despite the presence of levees with slurry cut-off walls.1 Flow in the Lower American River is controlled through the operation of the Folsom and Nimbus Dams, with a minimum flow of 500 cfs. Water table elevation in wells in close proximity to the river are compared to river stage to determine the effect of river stage on groundwater recharge rates. Additionally, Tritium-3Helium dates and stable isotopes (∂18O and ∂2H) have been measured in monitoring wells 200- 2400 ft lateral distance from the river, and depths of 25 -225 feet BGS. Variation in groundwater age in the vertical and horizontal directions are used to determine groundwater flow path and velocity. These data are then used to calculate residence time of groundwater in the unconfined and confined aquifer systems for the Central Valley in eastern Sacramento. Applying groundwater age tracers can benefit future compliance metrics of the California Sustainable Groundwater Resources Act (SGMA), by quantifying river seepage rates and impacts of groundwater management on surface water resources. 1Moran et al., UCRL-TR-203258, 2004.

  1. Graduating med-peds residents' interest in part-time employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Amy L; Kaelber, David C; Melgar, Thomas A; Chamberlain, John; Cull, William; Robbins, Brett W

    2011-01-01

    As part-time work is becoming more popular among the primary care specialties, we examined the demographic descriptors of med-peds residents seeking and finding part-time employment upon completion of residency training. As part of the 2006 annual American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Graduating Med-Peds Residents Survey, we surveyed the graduating residents of all med-peds programs about their interest in and plans for part-time employment. A total of 199 (60%) of the residents responded. Of the resident respondents applying for nonfellowship jobs, 19% sought part-time positions and 10% actually accepted a part-time position. Female residents were significantly more likely than male residents to apply for part-time jobs (26% vs. 7%, P = .034). Sixty percent of female residents immediately seeking work and 58% of those going on to fellowship reported an interest in arranging a part-time or reduced-hours position at some point in the next 5 years. Part-time employment among med-peds residents applying for nonfellowship positions after graduation is similar to the current incidence of part-time employment in other fields of primary care. A much higher percentage of med-peds residents are interested in arranging part-time work within 5 years after graduation. This strong interest in part-time work has many implications for the primary care workforce. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Desulfurization sorbent regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

    1982-07-07

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

  3. The role of topography on catchment‐scale water residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, K.J.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Weiler, M.; Kendall, C.; McGlynn, B.L.; Welker, J.M.; Seibert, J.

    2005-01-01

    The age, or residence time, of water is a fundamental descriptor of catchment hydrology, revealing information about the storage, flow pathways, and source of water in a single integrated measure. While there has been tremendous recent interest in residence time estimation to characterize watersheds, there are relatively few studies that have quantified residence time at the watershed scale, and fewer still that have extended those results beyond single catchments to larger landscape scales. We examined topographic controls on residence time for seven catchments (0.085–62.4 km2) that represent diverse geologic and geomorphic conditions in the western Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Our primary objective was to determine the dominant physical controls on catchment‐scale water residence time and specifically test the hypothesis that residence time is related to the size of the basin. Residence times were estimated by simple convolution models that described the transfer of precipitation isotopic composition to the stream network. We found that base flow mean residence times for exponential distributions ranged from 0.8 to 3.3 years. Mean residence time showed no correlation to basin area (r2 organization (i.e., topography) rather than basin area controls catchment‐scale transport. Results from this study may provide a framework for describing scale‐invariant transport across climatic and geologic conditions, whereby the internal form and structure of the basin defines the first‐order control on base flow residence time.

  4. Sorbent Scoping Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chancellor, Christopher John

    2016-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) office was tasked by the DOE CBFO, Office of the Manager to perform a review of the acceptable knowledge (AK) to identify the oxidizers and sorbents in transuranic (TRU) waste streams, to conduct scoping studies on the oxidizers and sorbents identified in AK review to inform the Quality Level 1 (QL1) testing, and to conduct a series of QL1 tests to provide the scientific data to support a basis of knowledge document for determining the criteria for (1) accepting waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without treatment, (2) determining waste that will require treatment, and (3) if treatment is required, how the treatment must be performed. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the AK review of sorbents present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the sorbent list, report the results of the scoping studies for the fastest-burning organic sorbent, and provide the list of organic and inorganic sorbents to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-001, Oxidizer Scoping Studies, has similar information for oxidizers identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  5. Sorbent Scoping Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Carlsbad, NM (United States). Difficult Waste Team

    2016-11-14

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory–Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) office was tasked by the DOE CBFO, Office of the Manager to perform a review of the acceptable knowledge (AK) to identify the oxidizers and sorbents in transuranic (TRU) waste streams, to conduct scoping studies on the oxidizers and sorbents identified in AK review to inform the Quality Level 1 (QL1) testing, and to conduct a series of QL1 tests to provide the scientific data to support a basis of knowledge document for determining the criteria for (1) accepting waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without treatment, (2) determining waste that will require treatment, and (3) if treatment is required, how the treatment must be performed. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the AK review of sorbents present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the sorbent list, report the results of the scoping studies for the fastest-burning organic sorbent, and provide the list of organic and inorganic sorbents to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-001, Oxidizer Scoping Studies, has similar information for oxidizers identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  6. Mercury removal sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  7. Seasonal change of residence time in spring water and groundwater at a mountainous headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Kosuke; Tsujimura, Maki; Onda, Yuichi; Iwagami, Sho; Sakakibara, Koichi; Sato, Yutaro

    2017-04-01

    Determination of water age in headwater is important to consider water pathway, source and storage in the catchment. Previous studies showed that groundwater residence time changes seasonally. These studies reported that mean residence time of water in dry season tends to be longer than that in rainy season, and it becomes shorter as precipitation and discharge amount increases. However, there are few studies to clarify factors causing seasonal change in mean residence time in spring water and groundwater based on observed data. Therefore, this study aims to reveal the relationship between mean residence time and groundwater flow system using SFconcentration in spring and 10 minutes interval hydrological data such as discharge volume, groundwater level and precipitation amount in a headwater catchment in Fukushima, Japan. The SF6 concentration data in spring water observed from April 2015 to November 2016 shows the mean residence time of springs ranged from zero to 14 years. We also observed a clear negative correlation between discharge rate and residence time in the spring. The residence time in shallow groundwater in rainy season was younger as compared with that in low rainfall period. Therefore, the shallow groundwater with young residence time seems to contribute to the spring in rainy season, causing shorter residence time. Additionally, the residence time of groundwater ranged from 3 to 5 years even in low rainfall period. The residence time in high groundwater table level in ridge was older as compared with that in low groundwater table level. These suggest that the contribution of groundwater with older age in the ridge becomes dominant in the low discharge.

  8. Effects of zebra mussels on food webs: Interactions with juvenile bluegill and water residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, W.B.; Bartsch, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated how water residence time mediated the impact of zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha and bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus on experimental food webs established in 1100-1 outdoor mesocosms. Water residence time was manipulated as a surrogate for seston resupply - a critical variable affecting growth and survival of suspension-feeding invertebrates. We used a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial experimental design with eight treatment combinations (3 replicates/treatment) including the presence or absence of Dreissena (2000 per m2), juvenile bluegill (40 per mesocosm), and short (1100 1 per d) or long (220 1 per d) water residence time. Measures of seston concentration (chlorophyll a, turbidity and suspended solids) were greater in the short- compared to long water-residence mesocosms, but intermediate in short water-residence mesocosms containing Dreissena. Abundance of rotifers (Keratella and Polyarthra) was reduced in Dreissena mesocosms and elevated in short residence time mesocosms. Cladocera abundance, in general, was unaffected by the presence of Dreissena; densities were higher in short-residence time mesocosms, and reduced in the presence of Lepomis. The growth of juvenile Lepomis were unaffected by Dreissena because of abundant benthic food. The final total mass of Dreissena was significantly greater in short- than long-residence mesocosms. Impacts of Dreissena on planktonic food webs may not only depend on the density of zebra mussels but also on the residence time of the surrounding water and the resupply of seston. ?? 1997 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  9. Explaining Direct Care Resource Use of Nursing Home Residents: Findings from Time Studies in Four States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L; Mueller, Christine; Lewis, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explain variation in direct care resource use (RU) of nursing home residents based on the Resource Utilization Groups III (RUG-III) classification system and other resident- and unit-level explanatory variables. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data were collected on 5,314 nursing home residents in 156 nursing units in 105 facilities from four states (CO, IN, MN, MS) from 1998 to 2004. Study Design Nurses and other direct care staff recorded resident-specific and other time caring for all residents on sampled nursing units. Care time was linked to resident data from the Minimum Data Set assessment instrument. Major variables were: RUG-III group (34-group), other health and functional conditions, licensed and other professional minutes per day, unlicensed minutes per day, and direct care RU (wage-weighted minutes). Resident- and unit-level relationships were examined through hierarchical linear modeling. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Time study data were recorded with hand-held computers, verified for accuracy by project staff at the data collection sites and then merged into resident and unit-level data sets. Principal Findings Resident care time and RU varied between and within nursing units. RUG-III group was related to RU; variables such as length of stay and unit percentage of high acuity residents also were significantly related. Case-mix indices (CMIs) constructed from study data displayed much less variation across RUG-III groups than CMIs from earlier time studies. Conclusions Results from earlier time studies may not be representative of care patterns of Medicaid and private pay residents. New RUG-III CMIs should be developed to better reflect the relative costs of caring for these residents. PMID:17362220

  10. Defining and measuring the mean residence time of lateral surface transient storage zones in small streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.R. Jackson; R. Haggerty; S.V. Apte; A. Coleman; K.J. Drost

    2012-01-01

    Surface transient storage (STS) has functional significance in stream ecosystems because it increases solute interaction with sediments. After volume, mean residence time is the most important metric of STS, but it is unclear how this can be measured accurately or related to other timescales and field-measureable parameters. We studied mean residence time of lateral...

  11. Simultaneous removal of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn from stormwater using high-efficiency industrial sorbents: Effect of pH, contact time and humic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genc-Fuhrman, Hülya; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Ledin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The effect of contact time, solution pH, and the presence of humic acid (HA) on the combined removal of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn is investigated in batch tests using alumina, granulated activated carbon (GAC), and bauxsol coated sand (BCS) as sorbents. It is found that the equilibrium time for Cd......, Cu, Ni and Zn is about 4 h, while no clear equilibrium is observed for As and Cr. It is also found that increasing the pH until pH ~. 8 enhanced Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn removal, but increasing the pH above this point had no major effect. In the cases of As and Cr, higher pH values (i.e. >. 7) decreased...... that natural organic matter may severely influence the removal efficiency, such that, for most metals the removal was reduced to the half, while for Cr it was increased to the double for alumina and BCS. Consequently, a properly working filter set up may not work properly anymore when receiving high loads...

  12. Space-filling polyhedral sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaland, Peter

    2016-06-21

    Solid sorbents, systems, and methods for pumping, storage, and purification of gases are disclosed. They derive from the dynamics of porous and free convection for specific gas/sorbent combinations and use space filling polyhedral microliths with facial aplanarities to produce sorbent arrays with interpenetrating interstitial manifolds of voids.

  13. Effect of protected research time on ABSITE scores during general surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkin, Bruce A; Poirier, Jennifer; Kowal-Vern, Areta; Chan, Edie; Ohara, Karen; Mendoza, Brian

    2018-02-01

    Objective - To determine whether residents with one or more years of dedicated research time (Research Residents, RR) improved their ABSITE scores compared to those without (Non-Research Residents, N-RR). A retrospective review of general surgery residents' ABSITE scores from 1995 to 2016 was performed. RR were compared to N-RR. Additional analysis of At Risk (AR) v Not At Risk residents (NAR) (35th percentile as PGY1-2) was also performed. Cohort - 147 residents (34 RR and 113 N-RR). There were no differences in initial ABSITE scores (p = 0.47). By definition, the AR group had lower scores than NAR. Overall, post-research RR v PGY-4 N-RR scores did not differ (p = 0.84). Only the AR residents improved their scores (p = 0.0009 v NAR p = 0.42), regardless of research group (p = 0.70). Protected research time did not improve residents' ABSITE scores, regardless of initial scores. At Risk residents improved regardless of research group status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Inter-generational co-residence and women's work and leisure time in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Diamond-Smith

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Labor force participation among women in Egypt remains low, and due to falling fertility and increases life expectancy, women in Egypt in the future may spend more time co-residing with aging in-laws. Past literature has suggested that co-residence in some settings allows women to enter the labor force more, as mother-in-laws help care for their grandchildren, or inhibits labor force participation when mother-in-laws reinforce traditional values. There is little research on co-residence and labor supply, or leisure time, in Egypt. Objective: This paper examines the role of intergenerational co-residence in women's work, work time, and leisure time using data on time allocation in Egypt. Methods: Data were collected from 548 women with a living mother-in-law: 291 co-residing their mother-in-law and 257 not. Survey data included work status, a 24-hour time diary, and a health assessment of the mother-in-law. Multivariate regression models predicted work, work time, and leisure time use using standard models. Results: Co-residing with a disabled mother-in-law was associated with decreased odds of women working and fewer minutes spent working a day. Leisure time was not associated with the co-residence and disability status of a mother-in-law. Factors related to couples' relationships and the woman's views on gender norms were also associated with women working. Conclusions: Co-residence appears to be associated with women's work, depending on the disability status of the co-residing mother-in-law. If increased life expectancy is associated with more time spent in a disabled state for mothers-in-law, this could put downward pressure on women's work in this setting.

  15. Children's Perspectives on Everyday Experiences of Shared Residence: Time, Emotions and Agency Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Gry Mette D.

    2010-01-01

    Shared residence is often presented as an arrangement that is in the best interests of the child following the divorce of its parents. Based on in-depth interviews with Norwegian children who have experienced shared residence, this article seeks to explore some dilemmas concerning time, agency and the children's emotions. Three characteristics of…

  16. Tributyl phosphate removal from reprocessing off-gas streams using a selected sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    Laboratory experiments used small laboratory-scale columns packed with selected sorbent materials to remove tributyl phosphate (TBP) and iodine at conditions approaching those in actual reprocessing off-gas streams. The sorbent materials for TBP removal were placed upstream of iodine sorbent materials to protect the iodine sorbent from the deleterious effects of TBP. Methyl iodide in an airstream containing 30% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons (NPH) and water vapor was metered to two packed columns of sorbents simultaneously (in parallel). One column contained a segment of 8-in. x 14-in. mesh alumina sorbent for TBP removal, the other did not. The measure of the effectiveness of TBP sorbent materials for TBP removal was determined by comparing the iodine retention of the iodine sorbent materials in the two parallel columns. Results from an 18 wt % Ag substituted mordenite iodine sorbent indicated that the iodine retention capacity of the sorbent was reduced 60% by the TBP and that the column containing iodine sorbent material protected by the alumina TBP sorbent retained 30 times more iodine than the column without TBP sorbent. TBP concentration was up to 500 mg/m 3 . Similar experiments using a 7 wt % Ag impregnated silica gel indicated that the TBP vapor had little effect on the iodine retention of the silica gel material. The stoichiometric maximum amount of iodine was retained by the silica gel material. Further experiments were conducted assessing the effects of NO 2 on iodine retention of this 7 wt % Ag sorbent. After the two columns were loaded with iodine in the presence of TBP (in NPH), one column was subjected to 2 vol % NO 2 in air. From visual comparison of the two columns, it appeared that the NO 2 regenerated the silica gel iodine sorbent and that iodine was washed off the silica gel iodine sorbent leaving the sorbent in the original state

  17. Steady And Unsteady Lumped-Parameter Models For Determination of Groundwater Residence Time Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezyurt, N.N.

    2002-01-01

    Groundwater's residence time distribution is an important information to identify the transport mechanism in aquifer systems. In the absence or scarcity of geometric, hydraulic and geohydrologic data needed to describe a flow system, lumped parameter models, that handle the flow system as a whole, exist as an alternative to determine the residence time distribution. Lumped parametre models comprise of idealized models of piston and well-mixed flow and their combinations. Aquifer properties such as, dead volume and by-pass flow can also be included in these models. With the aid of these models, conceptual aquifer models can be tested and residence time distribution of groundwater can be determined

  18. PROCEEDINGS: MULTIPOLLUTANT SORBENT REACTIVITY ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report is a compilation of technical papers and visual aids presented by representatives of industry, academia, and government agencies at a workshop on multipollutant sorbent reactivity that was held at EPA's Environmental Research Center in Research Triangle Park, NC, on July 19-20, 1994. There were 16 technical presentations in three sessions, and a panel discussion between six research experts. The workshop was a forum for the exchange of ideas and information on the use of sorbents to control air emissions of acid gases (sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen chloride); mercury and dioxins; and toxic metals, primarily from fossil fuel combustion. A secondary purpose for conducting the workshop was to help guide EPA's research planning activities. A general theme of the workshop was that a strategy of controlling many pollutants with a single system rather than systems to control individual pollutants should be a research goal. Some research needs cited were: hazardous air pollutant removal by flue gas desulfurization systems, dioxin formation and control, mercury control, waste minimization, impact of ash recycling on metals partitioning, impact of urea and sorbents on other pollutants, high temperature filtration, impact of coal cleaning on metals partitioning, and modeling dispersion of sorbents in flue gas. information

  19. Bench-scale studies on capture of mercury on mineral non-carbon based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion; Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Wendt, Jost O.L. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion

    2013-07-01

    A new high-temperature, mineral non-carbon based dispersed sorbent derived from paper recycling products has been shown to capture mercury at high temperatures in excess of 600 C. The sorbent is consisted of kaolinite/calcite/lime mixtures. Experiments have been conducted on chemi-sorption of elemental mercury in air on a packed bed. The sorption occurs at temperatures between 600 and 1,100 C and requires activation of the minerals contained within the sorbents. Mercury capture is dominated by temperature and capture on sorbents over long time scales. The capture shows a maximum effectiveness at 1,000 C and increases monotonically with temperature. The presence of oxygen is also the required. Freshly activated sorbent is the most effective, and deactivation of sorbents occurs at high temperatures with long pre-exposure times. This activation is suspected to involve a solid-solid reaction between intimately mixed calcium oxide and silica that are both contained within the sorbent. Deactivation occurs at temperatures higher than 1,000 C, and this is due to melting of the substrate and pore closure. The situation in packed beds is complicated because the bed also shrinks, thus allowing channeling and by-passing, and consequent ambiguities in determining sorbent saturation. Sorbent A had significantly greater capacity for mercury sorption than did Sorbent B, for all temperatures and exposure time examined. The effect of SiO{sub 2} on poor Sorbent B is much larger than sorbent A.

  20. Sulphation of calcium-based sorbents in circulating fluidised beds under oxy-fuel combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco Garcia-Labiano; Luis F. de Diego; Alberto Abad; Pilar Gayan; Margarita de las Obras-Loscertales; Aranzazu Rufas; Juan Adanez [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. Energy and Environment

    2009-07-01

    Sulphur Retention (SR) by calcium-based sorbents is a process highly dependent on the temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. In circulating fluidised beds combustors (CFBC's) operating under oxy-fuel conditions, the sulphation process takes place in atmospheres enriched in CO{sub 2} with bed concentrations that can vary from 40 to 95%. Under so high CO{sub 2} concentrations, very different from that in conventional coal combustion atmosphere with air, the calcination and sulphation behaviour of the sorbent must be defined to optimise the SR process in the combustor. The objective of this work was to determine the SO{sub 2} retention capacity of a Spanish limestone at typical oxy-fuel conditions in CFBC's. Long term duration tests of sulphation (up to 24 h), to simulate the residence time of sorbents in CFBC's, were carried out by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Clear behaviour differences were found under calcining and non-calcining conditions. Especially relevant was the result obtained at calcining conditions but close to the thermodynamic temperature given for sorbent calcination. This situation must be avoided in CFBC's because the CO{sub 2} produced inside the particle during calcination can destroy the particles if a non-porous sulphate product layer has been formed around the particle. The effect of the main variables on the sorbent sulphation such as SO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and particle size were analysed in the long term TGA tests. These data were also used to determine the kinetic parameters for the sulphation under oxy-fuel combustion conditions, which were able to adequately predict the sulphation conversion values in a wide range of operating conditions. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. MODELING HOW A HURRICANE BARRIER IN NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS, AFFECTS THE HYDRODYNAMICS AND RESIDENCE TIMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic and transport models were used to simulate tidal and subtidal circulation, residence times, and the longitudinal distributions of conservative constituents in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, before and after a hurricane barrier was constructed. The...

  2. Simultaneous removal of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn from stormwater using high-efficiency industrial sorbents: Effect of pH, contact time and humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç-Fuhrman, Hülya; Mikkelsen, Peter S; Ledin, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The effect of contact time, solution pH, and the presence of humic acid (HA) on the combined removal of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn is investigated in batch tests using alumina, granulated activated carbon (GAC), and bauxsol coated sand (BCS) as sorbents. It is found that the equilibrium time for Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn is about 4h, while no clear equilibrium is observed for As and Cr. It is also found that increasing the pH until pH~8 enhanced Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn removal, but increasing the pH above this point had no major effect. In the cases of As and Cr, higher pH values (i.e. >7) decreased their removal. The presence of both 20 and 100mg/L HA suppressed the heavy metal removal except for Cr, and the suppression was higher at the higher HA concentration. Geochemical simulations suggest that this is due to the formation of dissolved HA-metal complexes preventing effective metal sorption. In the case of Cr, the presence of HA increased the removal when using alumina or BCS, while hindering the removal when using GAC. The findings show that the pH-value of the stormwater to be treated must be in the range of 6-7 in order to achieve removal of the full spectrum of metals. The results also show that natural organic matter may severely influence the removal efficiency, such that, for most metals the removal was reduced to the half, while for Cr it was increased to the double for alumina and BCS. Consequently, a properly working filter set up may not work properly anymore when receiving high loads of natural organic acids during the pollen season in spring or during defoliation in autumn and early winter, and during mixing of runoff with snowmelt having a low pH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mean residence times for tritium in some terrestrial plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogate, S.S.; Krishnamoorthy, T.M.; Soman, S.D.

    1975-01-01

    Uptake of tritiated water from a single or multiple exposure, its fixation and elimination from 3 terrestrial plants, Raphanus sativus L., Amaranthus viridis L. and Phyllanthus fraternus Webster under experimental field conditions are described. Tissue free water tritium (TFWT) attains peak concentration within 4 hr after a single exposure in R. sativus and then decreases with a single component from both leaves and root, with a biological half-time of 36.4 +- 4.2 and 48.5 +- 7.2 hr respectively. TFWT in leaves of A. viridis reaches its peak value within 0.5 hr of exposure and its decay exhibits 2 component fall, one having a very short half-life of 2.4 +- 0.7 hr and the other a long half-time of 86.1 +- 2.0 hr. The two component decay of tritium in TFWT is well represented in P. fraternus. The long-lived components are nearly 8 times of the short-lived ones, both in leaves and stems respectively. Generally, the long -lived component accounts for 15% of the peak TFWT. Tissue bound tritium (TBT) reaches to 4% of TFWT in Phyllanthus sp. TBT elimination time is many times longer than the experimental periods employed in the present study. (author)

  4. Residence time distribution in twin-screw extruders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, T.

    1992-01-01

    For the twin-screw extruders used in the food industry at short time high temperature processes the knowledge of their reactor properties is incomplete for mass- and heat flow. Therefore each process change such as: scale-up or product development requires a great number of measurements

  5. Allocation of Internal Medicine Resident Time in a Swiss Hospital: A Time and Motion Study of Day and Evening Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Nathalie; Méan, Marie; Castioni, Julien; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Waeber, Gérard; Garnier, Antoine

    2017-04-18

    Little current evidence documents how internal medicine residents spend their time at work, particularly with regard to the proportions of time spent in direct patient care versus using computers. To describe how residents allocate their time during day and evening hospital shifts. Time and motion study. Internal medicine residency at a university hospital in Switzerland, May to July 2015. 36 internal medicine residents with an average of 29 months of postgraduate training. Trained observers recorded the residents' activities using a tablet-based application. Twenty-two activities were categorized as directly related to patients, indirectly related to patients, communication, academic, nonmedical tasks, and transition. In addition, the presence of a patient or colleague and use of a computer or telephone during each activity was recorded. Residents were observed for a total of 696.7 hours. Day shifts lasted 11.6 hours (1.6 hours more than scheduled). During these shifts, activities indirectly related to patients accounted for 52.4% of the time, and activities directly related to patients accounted for 28.0%. Residents spent an average of 1.7 hours with patients, 5.2 hours using computers, and 13 minutes doing both. Time spent using a computer was scattered throughout the day, with the heaviest use after 6:00 p.m. The study involved a small sample from 1 institution. At this Swiss teaching hospital, internal medicine residents spent more time at work than scheduled. Activities indirectly related to patients predominated, and about half the workday was spent using a computer. Information Technology Department and Department of Internal Medicine of Lausanne University Hospital.

  6. Prevalence and cost of full-time research fellowships during general surgery residency: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles M; Klingensmith, Mary E; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-01-01

    To quantify the prevalence, outcomes, and cost of surgical resident research. General surgery is unique among graduate medical education programs because a large percentage of residents interrupt their clinical training to spend 1 to 3 years performing full-time research. No comprehensive data exists on the scope of this practice. Survey sent to all 239 program directors of general surgery residencies participating in the National Resident Matching Program. Response rate was 200 of 239 (84%). A total of 381 of 1052 trainees (36%) interrupt residency to pursue full-time research. The mean research fellowship length is 1.7 years, with 72% of trainees performing basic science research. A significant association was found between fellowship length and postresidency activity, with a 14.7% increase in clinical fellowship training and a 15.2% decrease in private practice positions for each year of full-time research (P < 0.0001). Program directors at 31% of programs reported increased clinical duties for research fellows as a result of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education work hour regulations for clinical residents, whereas a further 10% of programs are currently considering such changes. It costs $41.5 million to pay the 634 trainees who perform research fellowships each year, the majority of which is paid for by departmental funds (40%) and institutional training grants (24%). Interrupting residency to perform a research fellowship is a common and costly practice among general surgery residents. Although performing a research fellowship is associated with clinical fellowship training after residency, it is unclear to what extent this practice leads to the development of surgical investigators after postgraduate training.

  7. Wairarapa Valley groundwater : residence time, flow pattern, and hydrochemistry trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, U.

    2005-01-01

    The Wairarapa groundwater system has a complicated hydrogeological setting as it evolved from sea level changes, tectonic activity, and geomorphic process. Due to increasing groundwater demand a better understanding of the groundwater resources is required to help achieve effective management and sustainable use. In addition to previous 'classical' hydrogeology studies, this report represents the first stage of a comprehensive approach using age dating and chemistry time trends for understanding the Wairarapa groundwater system. The methodology of groundwater age dating and mixing models is described in Appendix 1. Historic tritium data were evaluated, and combined with new tritium and CFC/SF 6 data to allow for robust age dating. (author). 14 refs., 30 figs

  8. Effect of Residence Time of Graphitisation on Thermal Conductivity of Molded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedy Artsanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of residence time of graphitisation on thermal conductivity of molded graphite has been examined. The examination has been conducted by varying residence time of graphitisation of molded carbon with petroleum coke as raw material and coal tar pitch. Graphitisation has been conducted by heating molded graphite at 2500 °C in argon atmosphere with residention time of 10, 30 and 90 minutes. Graphitisation degree, density, shrinking mass and porosity of molded graphite were examined and so was its thermal conductivity. The result showed that the decrease of porosity and the increase of graphitisation degree due to the increasing of residention time of graphitisation will increase the thermal conductivity of graphite. Molded graphite graphitisized with residence time for 90 minutes residention time gave thermal conductivity of 2.134 Watt/mK and graphitization degree 0.718.

  9. Soil Carbon Residence Time in the Arctic - Potential Drivers of Past and Future Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntzinger, D. N.; Fisher, J.; Schwalm, C. R.; Hayes, D. J.; Stofferahn, E.; Hantson, W.; Schaefer, K. M.; Fang, Y.; Michalak, A. M.; Wei, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon residence time is one of the most important factors controlling carbon cycling in ecosystems. Residence time depends on carbon allocation and conversion among various carbon pools and the rate of organic matter decomposition; all of which rely on environmental conditions, primarily temperature and soil moisture. As a result, residence time is an emergent property of models and a strong determinant of terrestrial carbon storage capacity. However, residence time is poorly constrained in process-based models due, in part, to the lack of data with which to benchmark global-scale models in order to guide model improvements and, ultimately, reduce uncertainty in model projections. Here we focus on improving the understanding of the drivers to observed and simulated carbon residence time in the Arctic-Boreal region (ABR). Carbon-cycling in the ABR represents one of the largest sources of uncertainty in historical and future projections of land-atmosphere carbon dynamics. This uncertainty is depicted in the large spread of terrestrial biospheric model (TBM) estimates of carbon flux and ecosystem carbon pool size in this region. Recent efforts, such as the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE), have increased the availability of spatially explicit in-situ and remotely sensed carbon and ecosystem focused data products in the ABR. Together with simulations from Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP), we use these observations to evaluate the ability of models to capture soil carbon stocks and changes in the ABR. Specifically, we compare simulated versus observed soil carbon residence times in order to evaluate the functional response and sensitivity of modeled soil carbon stocks to changes in key environmental drivers. Understanding how simulated carbon residence time compares with observations and what drives these differences is critical for improving projections of changing carbon dynamics in the ABR and globally.

  10. Laboratory study on the high-temperature capture of HCl gas by dry-injection of calcium-based sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemwell, B; Levendis, Y A; Simons, G A

    2001-01-01

    This is a laboratory study on the reduction of combustion-generated hydrochloric acid (HCl) emissions by in-furnace dry-injection of calcium-based sorbents. HCl is a hazardous gaseous pollutant emitted in significant quantities by municipal and hazardous waste incinerators, coal-fired power plants, and other industrial furnaces. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory furnace at gas temperatures of 600-1000 degrees C. HCl gas diluted with N2, and sorbent powders fluidized in a stream of air were introduced into the furnace concurrently. Chlorination of the sorbents occurred in the hot zone of the furnace at gas residence times approximately 1 s. The sorbents chosen for these experiments were calcium formate (CF), calcium magnesium acetate (CMA), calcium propionate (CP), calcium oxide (CX), and calcium carbonate (CC). Upon release of organic volatiles, sorbents calcine to CaO at approximately 700 degrees C, and react with the HCl according to the reaction CaO + 2HCl CaCl2 + H2O. At the lowest temperature case examined herein, 600 degrees C, direct reaction of HCl with CaCO3 may also be expected. The effectiveness of the sorbents to capture HCl was interpreted using the "pore tree" mathematical model for heterogeneous diffusion reactions. Results show that the thin-walled, highly porous cenospheres formed from the pyrolysis and calcination of CF, CMA, and CP exhibited high relative calcium utilization at the upper temperatures of this study. Relative utilizations under these conditions reached 80%. The less costly low-porosity sorbents, calcium carbonate and calcium oxide also performed well. Calcium carbonate reached a relative utilization of 54% in the mid-temperature range, while the calcium oxide reached an 80% relative utilization at the lowest temperature examined. The data matched theoretical predictions of sorbent utilization using the mathematical model, with activation energy and pre-exponential factors for the calcination reaction of 17,000 K and 300

  11. Impact of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on the operative experience of surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmans, Cornelis J; den Hoed, Pieter T; van der Laan, Lijckle; van der Harst, Erwin; van der Elst, Maarten; Mannaerts, Guido H H; Dawson, Imro; Timman, Reinier; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; IJzermans, Jan N M

    2015-04-01

    In Europe and the United States, work hour restrictions are considered to be particularly burdensome for residents in surgery specialties. The aim of this study was to examine whether reduction of the work week to 48 hours resulting from the implementation of the European Working Time Directive has affected the operative experience of surgery residents. This study was conducted in a general surgery training region in the Netherlands, consisting of 1 university hospital and 6 district training hospitals. Operating records summarizing the surgical procedures performed as "primary surgeon" in the operating theater for different grades of surgeons were retrospectively analyzed for the period 2005-2012 by the use of linear regression models. Operative procedures performed by residents were considered the main outcome measure. In total, 235,357 operative procedures were performed, including 47,458 (20.2%) in the university hospital and 187,899 (79.8%) in the district training hospitals (n = 5). For residents in the university hospital, the mean number of operative procedures performed per 1.0 full-time equivalent increased from 128 operations in 2005 to 204 operations in 2012 (P = .001), whereas for residents in district training hospitals, no substantial differences were found over time. The mean (±SD) operative caseload of 64 residents who completed the 6-year training program between 2005 and 2012 was 1,391 ± 226 (range, 768-1856). A comparison of the operative caseload according to year of board-certification showed no difference. Implementation of the European Working Time Directive has not affected adversely the number of surgical procedures performed by residents within a general surgical training region in the Netherlands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granite, Evan J.; Hargis, Richard A.; Pennline, Henry W.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the various promoters and sorbents examined for the removal of mercury from flue gas is presented. Commercial sorbent processes are described along with the chemistry of the various sorbent-mercury interactions. Novel sorbents for removing mercury from flue gas are suggested. Since activated carbons are expensive, alternate sorbents and/or improved activated carbons are needed. Because of their lower cost, sorbent development work can focus on base metal oxides and halides. Additionally, the long-term sequestration of the mercury on the sorbent needs to be addressed. Contacting methods between the flue gas and the sorbent also merit investigation.

  13. Lean principles optimize on-time vascular surgery operating room starts and decrease resident work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Courtney J; Walsh, Daniel B; Horvath, Alexander J; Walsh, Teri R; Herrick, Daniel P; Prentiss, Steven J; Powell, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Lean process improvement techniques are used in industry to improve efficiency and quality while controlling costs. These techniques are less commonly applied in health care. This study assessed the effectiveness of Lean principles on first case on-time operating room starts and quantified effects on resident work hours. Standard process improvement techniques (DMAIC methodology: define, measure, analyze, improve, control) were used to identify causes of delayed vascular surgery first case starts. Value stream maps and process flow diagrams were created. Process data were analyzed with Pareto and control charts. High-yield changes were identified and simulated in computer and live settings prior to implementation. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of on-time first case starts; secondary outcomes included hospital costs, resident rounding time, and work hours. Data were compared with existing benchmarks. Prior to implementation, 39% of first cases started on time. Process mapping identified late resident arrival in preoperative holding as a cause of delayed first case starts. Resident rounding process inefficiencies were identified and changed through the use of checklists, standardization, and elimination of nonvalue-added activity. Following implementation of process improvements, first case on-time starts improved to 71% at 6 weeks (P = .002). Improvement was sustained with an 86% on-time rate at 1 year (P < .001). Resident rounding time was reduced by 33% (from 70 to 47 minutes). At 9 weeks following implementation, these changes generated an opportunity cost potential of $12,582. Use of Lean principles allowed rapid identification and implementation of perioperative process changes that improved efficiency and resulted in significant cost savings. This improvement was sustained at 1 year. Downstream effects included improved resident efficiency with decreased work hours. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  14. Conceptual framework for model-based analysis of residence time distribution in twin-screw granulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Vanhoorne, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising continuous alternative for traditional batchwise wet granulation processes. The twin-screw granulator (TSG) screws consist of transport and kneading element modules. Therefore, the granulation to a large extent is governed by the residence time distribution...... within each module where different granulation rate processes dominate over others. Currently, experimental data is used to determine the residence time distributions. In this study, a conceptual model based on classical chemical engineering methods is proposed to better understand and simulate...... the residence time distribution in a TSG. The experimental data were compared with the proposed most suitable conceptual model to estimate the parameters of the model and to analyse and predict the effects of changes in number of kneading discs and their stagger angle, screw speed and powder feed rate...

  15. Working time of neurosurgical residents in Europe--results of a multinational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienen, Martin N; Netuka, David; Demetriades, Andreas K; Ringel, Florian; Gautschi, Oliver P; Gempt, Jens; Kuhlen, Dominique; Schaller, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the European Working Time directive 2003/88/EC has led to a reduction of the working hours with distinct impact on the clinical and surgical activity of neurosurgical residents in training. A survey was performed among European neurosurgical residents between 06/2014 and 03/2015. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between responder-specific variables (e.g., age, gender, country, postgraduate year (PGY)) and outcome (e.g., working time). A total of 652 responses were collected, of which n = 532 responses were taken into consideration. In total, 17.5, 22.1, 29.5, 19.5, 5.9, and 5.5 % of European residents indicated to work 80 h/week, respectively. Residents from France and Turkey (OR 4.72, 95 % CI 1.29-17.17, p = 0.019) and Germany (OR 2.06, 95 % CI 1.15-3.67, p = 0.014) were more likely to work >60 h/week than residents from other European countries. In total, 29 % of European residents were satisfied with their current working time, 11.3 % indicated to prefer reduced working time. More than half (55 %) would prefer to work more hours/week if this would improve their clinical education. Residents that rated their operative exposure as insufficient were 2.3 times as likely as others to be willing to work more hours (OR 2.32, 95 % CI 1.47-3.70, p 50 % of his/her working time in the operating room. By contrast, 77.4 % indicate to devote >25 % of their daily working time to administrative work. For every advanced PGY, the likelihood to spend >50 % of the working time in the OR increases by 19 % (OR 1.19, 95 % CI 1.02-1.40, p = 0.024) and the likelihood to spend >50 % of the working time with administrative work decreases by 18 % (OR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.76-0.94, p = 0.002). The results of this survey on >500 European neurosurgical residents clearly prove that less than 40 % conform with the 48-h week as claimed by the WTD2003/88/EC. Still, more than half of them would chose to work

  16. On the joint residence time of N independent two-dimensional Brownian motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benichou, O; Coppey, M; Klafter, J; Moreau, M; Oshanin, G

    2003-01-01

    We study the behaviour of several joint residence times of N independent Brownian particles in a disc of radius R in two dimensions. We consider: (i) the time T N (t) spent by all N particles simultaneously in the disc within the time interval [0, t], (ii) the time T (m) N (t) which at least m out of N particles spend together in the disc within the time interval [0, t], and (iii) the time T-tilde (m) N (t) which exactly m out of N particles spend together in the disc within the time interval [0, t]. We obtain very simple exact expressions for the expectations of these three residence times in the limit t → ∞

  17. Single molecule diffusion and the solution of the spherically symmetric residence time equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon, Noam

    2011-06-16

    The residence time of a single dye molecule diffusing within a laser spot is propotional to the total number of photons emitted by it. With this application in mind, we solve the spherically symmetric "residence time equation" (RTE) to obtain the solution for the Laplace transform of the mean residence time (MRT) within a d-dimensional ball, as a function of the initial location of the particle and the observation time. The solutions for initial conditions of potential experimental interest, starting in the center, on the surface or uniformly within the ball, are explicitly presented. Special cases for dimensions 1, 2, and 3 are obtained, which can be Laplace inverted analytically for d = 1 and 3. In addition, the analytic short- and long-time asymptotic behaviors of the MRT are derived and compared with the exact solutions for d = 1, 2, and 3. As a demonstration of the simplification afforded by the RTE, the Appendix obtains the residence time distribution by solving the Feynman-Kac equation, from which the MRT is obtained by differentiation. Single-molecule diffusion experiments could be devised to test the results for the MRT presented in this work. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Particle residence times in waters of the Yangtze and Amazon continental shelves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, B.A.; Nittrouer, C.A.; DeMaster, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Water column and seabed samples were analyzed for naturally occurring Th-234 to determine particle residence times in Yangtze and Amazon continental-shelf waters. On the Yangtze shelf, the water column was vertically well-mixed and suspended-sediment concentrations decreased offshore (from 230 mg/l near the river mouth to 2 mg/l in mid-shelf waters). Particle residence times increased offshore and ranged from 3.2 hours (12 m water depth) to 7.3 days (60 m water depth). Particle residence times ranged from 3 to 30 times shorter than values predicted by settling of discrete (4-8 micron) particles, suggesting that particles were settling in aggregate form. On the Amazon shelf, a two-layer estuarine flow dominated shelf circulation. Suspended-sediment concentrations on the inner shelf (10-12 m water depth) were much greater in bottom waters (range: 100-880 mg/l) than in surface waters (range 5-60 mg/l) as a result of resuspension. Particle residence times ranged from 1.1 days in surface waters to 2.5 days in bottom waters. Particles probably underwent several cycles of resuspension before permanent removal from the water column

  19. Conformational Network and Residence Time Estimation of Trypsin-Benzamidine Unbinding Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, Alex; Lotz, Samuel D.

    2016-01-01

    In this poster we present results from molecular dynamics sampling of benzamidine unbinding from trypsin. We give background on the weighted ensemble technique used (WExplore) and the Markovian state model construction. Our network shows three unique unbinding pathways including a never before observed unbinding pathway. We also estimate residence time to within one order of magnitude to the experimental value.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Kinetic Measurements to Estimate and Predict Protein-Ligand Residence Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Luca; Theret, Isabelle; Antoine, Mathias; Perron-Sierra, Françoise; Charton, Yves; Fourquez, Jean-Marie; Wierzbicki, Michel; Boutin, Jean A; Ferry, Gilles; Decherchi, Sergio; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Ducrot, Pierre; Cavalli, Andrea

    2016-08-11

    Ligand-target residence time is emerging as a key drug discovery parameter because it can reliably predict drug efficacy in vivo. Experimental approaches to binding and unbinding kinetics are nowadays available, but we still lack reliable computational tools for predicting kinetics and residence time. Most attempts have been based on brute-force molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which are CPU-demanding and not yet particularly accurate. We recently reported a new scaled-MD-based protocol, which showed potential for residence time prediction in drug discovery. Here, we further challenged our procedure's predictive ability by applying our methodology to a series of glucokinase activators that could be useful for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined scaled MD with experimental kinetics measurements and X-ray crystallography, promptly checking the protocol's reliability by directly comparing computational predictions and experimental measures. The good agreement highlights the potential of our scaled-MD-based approach as an innovative method for computationally estimating and predicting drug residence times.

  1. Dynamics of nitrate production and removal as a function of residence time in the hyporheic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay P. Zarnetske; Roy Haggerty; Steven M. Wondzell; Michelle A. Baker

    2011-01-01

    Biogeochemical reactions associated with stream nitrogen cycling, such as nitrification and denitrification, can be strongly controlled by water and solute residence times in the hyporheic zone (HZ). We used a whole-stream steady state 15N-Iabeled nitrate and conservative tracer addition to investigate the spatial and temporal physiochemical...

  2. Residence time of pollutants discharged in the Gulf of Kachchh, northwestern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patgaonkar, R.S.; Vethamony, P.; Lokesh, K.S.; Babu, M.T.

    A 2D Hydrodynamic-Particle Analysis model was applied to the Gulf of Kachchh (GoK) to estimate the residence time of pollutants. The tidal currents in the Gulf have a strong E-W component, which prevents the material in the north being transported...

  3. Fertilizer residence time affects nitrogen uptake efficiency and growth of sweet corn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zotarelli, L.; Scholberg, J.M.S.; Dukes, M.D.; Munoz-Carpena, R.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding plant N uptake dynamics is critical for increasing fertilizer N uptake efficiency (FUE) and minimize the risk of N leaching. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of residence time of N fertilizer on N uptake and FUE of sweet corn. Plants were grown in 25 L columns

  4. Factors influencing the residence time of catchment waters : A virtual experiment approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunn, S.M.; McDonnell, J.J.; Vaché, K.B.

    Estimates of mean residence time (MRT) are increasingly used as simple summary descriptors of the hydrological processes involving storage and mixing of water within catchment systems. Current understanding of the physical controls on MRT remains limited, and various hypotheses have been proposed to

  5. Effect of Residence Time on Hydrothermal Carbonization of Corn Cob Residual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal carbonization is a promising technique for conversion of industrial waste into valuable products. Producing hydrochar from corn cob residual (CCR in a cost-effective way is key, from an economic standpoint. For this purpose, the effect of residence time in the range of 0.5 to 6 h was studied under the optimal temperature of 250 °C. Results showed that the higher heating value (HHV of hydrochar increased approximately 40% in comparison to that of the raw material; however, prolonging the residence time beyond 0.5 h had a negligible effect on the HHV increase. Chemical compositions and H/C and O/C ratios of hydrochars revealed a minimal effect of longer residence time. Furthermore, thermogravimetric and derivative thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis of hydrochars also verified that the pyrolysis behavior and chemical structure of hydrochars with various residence times were similar.

  6. Timed Up And Go Risk Predictor Of Falls In Elderly People Residing In The Community?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Muniz Peixoto Rodrigues

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: evaluate the risk of falls of elderly people residing in a community in northeastern Brazil using the “Timed up and go”. Method: descriptive study, with a quantitative approach, performed with elderly people residing in a community. The collected data related to the sociodemographic and economic characteristics of episodes of falls in the last two years, regular practice of physical exercise and complaint of pain at the time of the interview; and, at last, the application of the “Timed Up and Go” test. Result: Most of the elderly were classified as free and independent and independent. There is a direct relationship between advanced age and increased time to perform the test. Conclusion: the "Timed Up and Go" test was not effective in predicting risk of falls alone and should associate with other indicators. Descriptors: Elderly people; Accidents by fall; Walking; Postural balance.

  7. Burnout syndrome during residency in internal medicine and pediatrics in a country without working time directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Duygu Yazgan; Durusu Tanriover, Mine; Unal, Sule; Dizdar, Omer; Kalyoncu, Umut; Karakaya, Jale; Unal, Serhat; Kale, Gulsev

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate burnout syndrome among internal medicine and pediatrics residents in a country that does not have the working time directive (WTD) and also to determine the risk factors and consequent impact on efficient functioning in clinical areas. A 57-item questionnaire was given to internal medicine and pediatrics residents. Responses from 22 pediatrics and 33 internal medicine residents were evaluated. Demographic findings, burnout scores, having hobbies, social activities and reading books unrelated to medicine were similar between the two groups. Six pediatrics residents (27.3 per cent) and 11 (33.3 per cent) internal medicine residents met the criteria for clinically significant burnout. Personal accomplishment scores and reading books unrelated to medicine were found to be related to burnout. Burnout is a syndrome characterized by depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and a low sense of personal accomplishment. It is important to document burnout in countries where WTDs are not implemented. Further studies might demonstrate burnout's effect on patient safety, service quality and physician's performance.

  8. Life events during surgical residency have different effects on women and men over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michelle M; Yeo, Heather L; Roman, Sanziana A; Bell, Richard H; Sosa, Julie A

    2013-08-01

    Women represent half of medical school graduates in the United States. Our aim was to characterize the effects of marriage and childbirth on the experiences of surgery residents. This was a prospective, longitudinal study of categorical general surgery residents between 2008 and 2010. Outcomes included changes in faculty and peer relationships, work-life balance, financial security, and career goals over time. We included 4,028 residents. Compared with men, women in postgraduate years (PGYs) 1 through 5 were less likely to be married (28.2% to 47.3% vs 49.6% to 67.6%) or have children (4.6% to 18.0% vs 19.0% to 45.8%) (P < .001). Women who married during PGY1 to PGY3 became worried about performing in front of senior residents (P = .005); men who married were more likely to be happy at work (P = .005). Women who had a first child during PGY1 to PGY3 were more likely to feel overwhelmed (P = .008) and worry about financial security (P = .03) than other women. Men who had a child were more likely to feel supported by faculty (P = .004), but they experienced more family strain (P = .008) compared to childless men. Marriage and childbirth are associated with divergent changes in career experiences for women and men. Women lag behind their male peers in these life events from start to finish of residency. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of temperature on patch residence time in parasitoids: physiological and behavioural mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiroux, Joffrey; Abram, Paul K.; Louâpre, Philippe; Barrette, Maryse; Brodeur, Jacques; Boivin, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Patch time allocation has received much attention in the context of optimal foraging theory, including the effect of environmental variables. We investigated the direct role of temperature on patch time allocation by parasitoids through physiological and behavioural mechanisms and its indirect role via changes in sex allocation and behavioural defences of the hosts. We compared the influence of foraging temperature on patch residence time between an egg parasitoid, Trichogramma euproctidis, and an aphid parasitoid, Aphidius ervi. The latter attacks hosts that are able to actively defend themselves, and may thus indirectly influence patch time allocation of the parasitoid. Patch residence time decreased with an increase in temperature in both species. The increased activity levels with warming, as evidenced by the increase in walking speed, partially explained these variations, but other mechanisms were involved. In T. euproctidis, the ability to externally discriminate parasitised hosts decreased at low temperature, resulting in a longer patch residence time. Changes in sex allocation with temperature did not explain changes in patch time allocation in this species. For A. ervi, we observed that aphids frequently escaped at intermediate temperature and defended themselves aggressively at high temperature, but displayed few defence mechanisms at low temperature. These defensive behaviours resulted in a decreased patch residence time for the parasitoid and partly explained the fact that A. ervi remained for a shorter time at the intermediate and high temperatures than at the lowest temperature. Our results suggest that global warming may affect host-parasitoid interactions through complex mechanisms including both direct and indirect effects on parasitoid patch time allocation.

  10. How Entrustment Is Informed by Holistic Judgments Across Time in a Family Medicine Residency Program: An Ethnographic Nonparticipant Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagasser, Margaretha H; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; van Weel, Chris; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Kramer, Anneke W M

    2017-06-01

    Entrustment has mainly been conceptualized as delegating discrete professional tasks. Because residents provide most of their patient care independently, not all resident performance is visible to supervisors; the entrustment process involves more than granting discrete tasks. This study explored how supervisors made entrustment decisions based on residents' performance in a long-term family medicine training program. A qualitative nonparticipant observational study was conducted in 2014-2015 at competency-based family medicine residency programs in the Netherlands. Seven supervisor-resident pairs participated. During two days, one researcher observed first-year residents' patient encounters, debriefing sessions, and supervisor-resident educational meetings and interviewed them separately afterwards. Data were collected and analyzed using iterative, phenomenological inductive research methodology. The entrustment process developed over three phases. Supervisors based their initial entrustment on prior knowledge about the resident. In the ensuing two weeks, entrustment decisions regarding independent patient care were derived from residents' observed general competencies necessary for a range of health problems (clinical reasoning, decision making, relating to patients); medical knowledge and skills; and supervisors' intuition. Supervisors provided supervision during and after encounters. Once residents performed independently, supervisors kept reevaluating their decisions, informed by residents' overall growth in competencies rather than by adhering to a predefined set of tasks. Supervisors in family medicine residency training took a holistic approach to trust, based on general competencies, knowledge, skills, and intuition. Entrustment started before training and developed over time. Building trust is a mutual process between supervisor and resident, requiring a good working relationship.

  11. Effect of Resident Involvement on Operative Time and Operating Room Staffing Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert William; Pruitt, Mark; Taaffe, Kevin M

    The operating room (OR) is a major driver of hospital costs; therefore, operative time is an expensive resource. The training of surgical residents must include time spent in the OR, but that experience comes with a cost to the surgeon and hospital. The objective of this article is to determine the effect of surgical resident involvement in the OR on operative time and subsequent hospital labor costs. The Kruskal-Wallis statistical test is used to determine whether or not there is a difference in operative times between 2 groups of cases (with residents and without residents). This difference leads to an increased cost in associated hospital labor costs for the group with the longer operative time. Cases were performed at Greenville Memorial Hospital. Greenville Memorial Hospital is part of the larger healthcare system, Greenville Health System, located in Greenville, SC and is a level 1 trauma center with up to 33 staffed ORs. A total of 84,997 cases were performed at the partnering hospital between January 1st, 2011 and July 31st, 2015. Cases were only chosen for analysis if there was only one CPT code associated with the case and there were more than 5 observations for each group being studied. This article presents a comprehensive retrospective analysis of 29,134 cases covering 246 procedures. The analysis shows that 45 procedures took significantly longer with a resident present in the room. The average increase in operative time was 4.8 minutes and the cost per minute of extra operative time was determined to be $9.57 per minute. OR labor costs at the partnering hospital was found to be $2,257,433, or $492,889 per year. Knowing the affect on operative time and OR costs allows managers to make smart decisions when considering alternative educational and training techniques. In addition, knowing the connection between residents in the room and surgical duration could help provide better estimates of surgical time in the future and increase the predictability of

  12. Mean residence times of atmospheric aerosols in the boundary layer as determined from 210Bi/210Pb activity ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papastefanou, C.; Bondietti, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Concentrations of radioactive 210 Pb and 210 Bi were measured in surface air after chemical separation and radiochemical analysis in an annual cycle and were used to determine aerosol residence times in the lower atmosphere. It was concluded that residence times of 8 days would apply to aerosols of 0.3 μm activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD). Cascade impactor data are also presented in relating the residence times and the AMAD of atmospheric aerosols. (author)

  13. Dedicated Shift Wrap-up Time Does Not Improve Resident Sign-out Volume or Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanmonod, Rebecca K; Brook, Christopher; Winther, Mark; Pathak, Soma; Boyd, Molly

    2010-02-01

    Sign-out (SO) is a challenge to the emergency physician. Some training programs have instituted overlapping 9-hour shifts. The residents see patients for eight hours, and have one hour of wrap-up time. This hour helps them complete patient care, leaving fewer patients to sign-out. We examined whether this strategy impacts SO burden. This is a retrospective review of patients evaluated by emergency medicine (EM) residents working 9-hour (eight hours of patient care, one hour wrap-up time) and 12-hour shifts (12 hours patient care, no reserved time for wrap-up). Data were collected by reviewing the clinical tracker. A patient was assigned to the resident who initiated care and dictated the chart. SO was defined as any patient in the ED without disposition at change of shift. Patient turn-around-time (TAT) was also recorded. One-hundred sixty-one postgraduate-year-one resident (PGY1), 264 postgraduate-year-two resident (PGY2), and 193 postgraduate-year-three resident (PGY3) shifts were included. PGY1s signed out 1.9 patients per 12-hour shift. PGY2s signed out 2.3 patients on 12-hour shifts and 1.8 patients on 9-hour shifts. PGY3s signed out 2.1 patients on 12-hour shifts and 2.0 patients on 9-hour shifts. When we controlled for patients seen per hour, SO burden was constant by class regardless of shift length, with PGY2s signing out 18% of patients seen compared to 15% for PGY3s. PGY1s signed out 18% of patients seen. TAT for patients seen by PGY1s and PGY2s was similar, at 189 and 187 minutes, respectively. TAT for patients seen by PGY3s was significantly less at 175 minutes. The additional hour devoted to wrapping up patients in the ED had no affect on SO burden. The SO burden represented a fixed percentage of the total number of patients seen by the residents. PGY3s sign-out a smaller percentage of patients seen compared to other classes, and have faster TATs.

  14. Dedicated Shift Wrap-up Time Does Not Improve Resident Sign-out Volume or Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanmonod, Rebecca K

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sign-out (SO is a challenge to the emergency physician. Some training programs have instituted overlapping 9-hour shifts. The residents see patients for eight hours, and have one hour of wrap-up time. This hour helps them complete patient care, leaving fewer patients to sign-out. We examined whether this strategy impacts SO burden.Methods: This is a retrospective review of patients evaluated by emergency medicine (EM residents working 9-hour (eight hours of patient care, one hour wrap-up time and 12-hour shifts (12 hours patient care, no reserved time for wrap-up. Data were collected by reviewing the clinical tracker. A patient was assigned to the resident who initiated care and dictated the chart. SO was defined as any patient in the ED without disposition at change of shift. Patient turn-around-time (TAT was also recorded.Results: One-hundred sixty-one postgraduate-year-one resident (PGY1, 264 postgraduate-year-two resident (PGY2, and 193 postgraduate-year-three resident (PGY3 shifts were included. PGY1s signed out 1.9 patients per 12-hour shift. PGY2s signed out 2.3 patients on 12-hour shifts and 1.8 patients on 9-hour shifts. PGY3s signed out 2.1 patients on 12-hour shifts and 2.0 patients on 9-hour shifts. When we controlled for patients seen per hour, SO burden was constant by class regardless of shift length, with PGY2s signing out 18% of patients seen compared to 15% for PGY3s. PGY1s signed out 18% of patients seen. TAT for patients seen by PGY1s and PGY2s was similar, at 189 and 187 minutes, respectively. TAT for patients seen by PGY3s was significantly less at 175 minutes.Conclusion: The additional hour devoted to wrapping up patients in the ED had no affect on SO burden. The SO burden represented a fixed percentage of the total number of patients seen by the residents. PGY3s sign-out a smaller percentage of patients seen compared to other classes, and have faster TATs. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(1:35-39].

  15. Tracer concentration curves and residence time analysis in technological flow systems. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pippel, W.

    1976-01-01

    Tracer concentration curves measured in flow systems by means of radioactive isotopes are treated as a two dimensional random process. Comparing them with the family distribution functions described in part I, it follows that only in case of ergodic behaviour of the system tracer curves can be considered as age distribution functions. The conception of ergodicity in residence time systems has been explained with the aid of a time function measurable by a special method of radioactive tracer technique and by the mean value of the residence time obtainable from this function. Furthermore, technological consequences in evaluating tracer concentration curves of real flow systems are discussed with respect to supposed ergodic or nonergodic behaviour. These considerations are of special importance for flow systems with temporary fluctuations in structure. (author)

  16. Residence-time framework for modeling multicomponent reactive transport in stream hyporheic zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, S. L.; Coon, E. T.; Brooks, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    Process-based models for transport and transformation of nutrients and contaminants in streams require tractable representations of solute exchange between the stream channel and biogeochemically active hyporheic zones. Residence-time based formulations provide an alternative to detailed three-dimensional simulations and have had good success in representing hyporheic exchange of non-reacting solutes. We extend the residence-time formulation for hyporheic transport to accommodate general multicomponent reactive transport. To that end, the integro-differential form of previous residence time models is replaced by an equivalent formulation based on a one-dimensional advection dispersion equation along the channel coupled at each channel location to a one-dimensional transport model in Lagrangian travel-time form. With the channel discretized for numerical solution, the associated Lagrangian model becomes a subgrid model representing an ensemble of streamlines that are diverted into the hyporheic zone before returning to the channel. In contrast to the previous integro-differential forms of the residence-time based models, the hyporheic flowpaths have semi-explicit spatial representation (parameterized by travel time), thus allowing coupling to general biogeochemical models. The approach has been implemented as a stream-corridor subgrid model in the open-source integrated surface/subsurface modeling software ATS. We use bedform-driven flow coupled to a biogeochemical model with explicit microbial biomass dynamics as an example to show that the subgrid representation is able to represent redox zonation in sediments and resulting effects on metal biogeochemical dynamics in a tractable manner that can be scaled to reach scales.

  17. Development of Electronic Medical Record-Based "Rounds Report" Results in Improved Resident Efficiency, More Time for Direct Patient Care and Education, and Less Resident Duty Hour Violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Phillip B; Anderton, Toby; Gallaher, Ryan; Hyrman, Mike; Simmerman, Erika; Ramanathan, Annamalai; Fallaw, David; Holsten, Steven; Howell, Charles Gordon

    2016-09-01

    Surgeons frequently report frustration and loss of efficiency with electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Together, surgery residents and a programmer at Augusta University created a rounds report (RR) summarizing 24 hours of vitals, intake/output, labs, and other values for each inpatient that were previously transcribed by hand. The objective of this study was to evaluate the RR's effect on surgery residents. Surgery residents were queried to assess the RR's impact. Outcome measures were time spent preparing for rounds, direct patient care time, educational activity time, rates of incorrect/incomplete data on rounds, and rate of duty hour violations. Hospital wide, 17,200 RRs were generated in the 1-month study. Twenty-three surgery residents participated. Time spent preparing for rounds decreased per floor patient (15.6 ± 3.0 vs 6.0 ± 1.2, P care unit patient (19.9 ± 2.9 vs 7.5 ± 1.2 P care increased from 45.1 ± 5.6 to 54.0 ± 5.7 per cent (P = 0.0044). Educational activity time increased from 35.2 ± 5.4 to 54.7 ± 7.1 minutes per resident per day (P = 0.0004). Reported duty hour violations decreased 58 per cent (P care at academic medical centers.

  18. Using continuous underway isotope measurements to map water residence time in hydrodynamically complex tidal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian; Kendall, Carol; Kraus, Tamara; Dennis, Kate J.; Carter, Jeffery A.; von Dessonneck, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotopes present in water (δ2H, δ18O) have been used extensively to evaluate hydrological processes on the basis of parameters such as evaporation, precipitation, mixing, and residence time. In estuarine aquatic habitats, residence time (τ) is a major driver of biogeochemical processes, affecting trophic subsidies and conditions in fish-spawning habitats. But τ is highly variable in estuaries, owing to constant changes in river inflows, tides, wind, and water height, all of which combine to affect τ in unpredictable ways. It recently became feasible to measure δ2H and δ18O continuously, at a high sampling frequency (1 Hz), using diffusion sample introduction into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. To better understand the relationship of τ to biogeochemical processes in a dynamic estuarine system, we continuously measured δ2H and δ18O, nitrate and water quality parameters, on board a small, high-speed boat (5 to >10 m s–1) fitted with a hull-mounted underwater intake. We then calculated τ as is classically done using the isotopic signals of evaporation. The result was high-resolution (∼10 m) maps of residence time, nitrate, and other parameters that showed strong spatial gradients corresponding to geomorphic attributes of the different channels in the area. The mean measured value of τ was 30.5 d, with a range of 0–50 d. We used the measured spatial gradients in both τ and nitrate to calculate whole-ecosystem uptake rates, and the values ranged from 0.006 to 0.039 d–1. The capability to measure residence time over single tidal cycles in estuaries will be useful for evaluating and further understanding drivers of phytoplankton abundance, resolving differences attributable to mixing and water sources, explicitly calculating biogeochemical rates, and exploring the complex linkages among time-dependent biogeochemical processes in hydrodynamically complex environments such as estuaries.

  19. Does residence time affect responses of alien species richness to environmental and spatial processes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Dainese

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most robust emerging generalisations in invasion biology is that the probability of invasion increases with the time since introduction (residence time. We analysed the spatial distribution of alien vascular plant species in a region of north-eastern Italy to understand the influence of residence time on patterns of alien species richness. Neophytes were grouped according to three periods of arrival in the study region (1500–1800, 1800–1900, and > 1900. We applied multiple regression (spatial and non-spatial with hierarchical partitioning to determine the influence of climate and human pressure on species richness within the groups. We also applied variation partitioning to evaluate the relative importance of environmental and spatial processes. Temperature mainly influenced groups with speciesa longer residence time, while human pressure influenced the more recently introduced species, although its influence remained significant in all groups. Partial regression analyses showed that most of the variation explained by the models is attributable to spatially structured environmental variation, while environment and space had small independent effects. However, effects independent of environment decreased, and spatially independent effects increased, from older to the more recent neophytes. Our data illustrate that the distribution of alien species richness for species that arrived recently is related to propagule pressure, availability of novel niches created by human activity, and neutral-based (dispersal limitation processes, while climate filtering plays a key role in the distribution of species that arrived earlier. This study highlights the importance of residence time, spatial structure, and environmental conditions in the patterns of alien species richness and for a better understanding of its geographical variation.

  20. Water purification from radionuclides with using fibroid sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaydarov, R. A.; Gapurova, O.U.; Khaydarov, R.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Purification waste water and drinking water from radionuclides, heavy metal ions, organic contamination is one of the important problems today. For solving this problem we have created three types of fibroid sorbents on the base of Polyester: cationic and anionic exchange and carbonic. Main properties of these sorbents are described in this article. For example characteristics of the sorbents for removing radionuclides Co-60,57, Zn-65, Sr-89,90, Cs-134,137, etc., radionuclides containing organic molecules M-P-32, M-I-131, M-Mo-99+Tc-99m, M-C-14, etc., heavy metal ions Zn, Ni, Cu, Sb, Pb, Cd, Cr, U, etc., organic molecules (pesticides, phenols, dioxin, benzene, toluene, etc.) were investigated. Influence of pH on percent removal, influence of K, Na and another ions concentrations in the liquid on the percent removal, decreasing of the saturation capacity from number of regeneration and another characteristics are described. Static exchange capacity of the cationic sorbents is 1-2 mg-equ/g and anionic - 0.5-1 mg-equ/g. Capacity of the carbonic sorbents for benzene is 100 mg/g. Time of chemical balance setting is 1-2 s. The sorbents are effective in removing the low concentrations of contamination from the water (lower than 100-200 mg/l) and the air (lower than 100 mg/m 3 ). The use of sorbents in drinking water filters and mini-systems is described. The industrial water purification system consists of coagulating unit, sorbent unit and disinfectant unit. The systems are used in atomic power stations, electroplating plants, matches plants, leather and skin treating plants, car-washing stations, etc

  1. REMOVAL OF ANIONIC SURFACTANTS FROM WASTEWATER BY MAGNETIC MINERAL SORBENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Vladimirova Makarchuk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The simplest and most effective method of removing low concentrations of anionic surfactants such as sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS is adsorption. Among adsorbents the natural clays are cheap and promising for these purposes. However, there are significant difficulties in removal of spent sorbent after the adsorption process. So, the creation of magnetic sorbents that can be effectively removed from water after sorption by magnetic separation will be a successful decision. The aim of this investigation is the creation of cheap and efficient magnetic sorbents based on natural clays and magnetite for anionic surfactant removal from wastewater. We have synthesized a series of magnetic sorbents from different natural clays with a content of magnetite from 2 to 10 wt%. The ability of magnetic sorbents to remove SDBS and SLS from aqueous solutions has been studied for different adsorbate concentrations by varying the amount of adsorbent, temperature and shaking time. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated from the slope and intercept of the linear plots of ln K against 1/T. Analysis of adsorption results obtained at different temperatures showed that the adsorption pattern on magnetic sorbents correspond to the Langmuir isotherm. It is shown that with increasing the content of magnetite in the magnetic sorbents improves not only their separation from water by magnetic separation, but adsorption capacity to SDBS and SLS. Thus, we obtained of cheap magnetic sorbents based on natural clays and magnetite by the easy way, which not only quickly separated from the solution by magnetic separation, but effectively remove anionic surfactants.

  2. Classification of Animal Movement Behavior through Residence in Space and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Leigh G; Orben, Rachael A; Tolkova, Irina; Thompson, David R

    2017-01-01

    Identification and classification of behavior states in animal movement data can be complex, temporally biased, time-intensive, scale-dependent, and unstandardized across studies and taxa. Large movement datasets are increasingly common and there is a need for efficient methods of data exploration that adjust to the individual variability of each track. We present the Residence in Space and Time (RST) method to classify behavior patterns in movement data based on the concept that behavior states can be partitioned by the amount of space and time occupied in an area of constant scale. Using normalized values of Residence Time and Residence Distance within a constant search radius, RST is able to differentiate behavior patterns that are time-intensive (e.g., rest), time & distance-intensive (e.g., area restricted search), and transit (short time and distance). We use grey-headed albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma) GPS tracks to demonstrate RST's ability to classify behavior patterns and adjust to the inherent scale and individuality of each track. Next, we evaluate RST's ability to discriminate between behavior states relative to other classical movement metrics. We then temporally sub-sample albatross track data to illustrate RST's response to less resolved data. Finally, we evaluate RST's performance using datasets from four taxa with diverse ecology, functional scales, ecosystems, and data-types. We conclude that RST is a robust, rapid, and flexible method for detailed exploratory analysis and meta-analyses of behavioral states in animal movement data based on its ability to integrate distance and time measurements into one descriptive metric of behavior groupings. Given the increasing amount of animal movement data collected, it is timely and useful to implement a consistent metric of behavior classification to enable efficient and comparative analyses. Overall, the application of RST to objectively explore and compare behavior patterns in movement data can

  3. Extra-regional residence time as a correlate of plant invasiveness: European archaeophytes in North America

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    La Sorte, F. A.; Pyšek, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 9 (2009), s. 2589-2597 ISSN 0012-9658 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Grant - others:Evropská komise(XE) GOCE-CT-2003-506675 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : residence time * archaeophyte * North America Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.411, year: 2009

  4. New residence times of the Holocene reworked shells on the west coast of Bohai Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zhiwen; Wang, Fu; Li, Jianfen; Marshall, William A.; Chen, Yongsheng; Jiang, Xingyu; Tian, Lizhu; Wang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Shelly cheniers and shell-rich beds found intercalated in near-shore marine muds and sandy sediments can be used to indicate the location of ancient shorelines, and help to estimate the height of sea level. However, dating the deposition of material within cheniers and shell-rich beds is not straightforward because much of this material is transported and re-worked, creating an unknown temporal off-set, i.e., the residence time, between the death of a shell and its subsequent entombment. To quantify the residence time during the Holocene on a section of the northern Chinese coastline a total 47 shelly subsamples were taken from 17 discrete layers identified on the west coast of Bohai Bay. This material was AMS 14C dated and the calibrated ages were systematically compared. The subsamples were categorized by type as articulated and disarticulated bivalves, gastropod shells, and undifferentiated shell-hash. It was found that within most individual layers the calibrated ages of the subsamples got younger relative to the amount of apparent post-mortem re-working the material had been subject to. For examples, the 14C ages of the bivalve samples trended younger in this order: shell-hash → split shells → articulated shells. We propose that the younger subsample age determined within an individual layer will be the closest to the actual depositional age of the material dated. Using this approach at four Holocene sites we find residence times which range from 100 to 1260 cal yrs, with two average values of 600 cal yrs for the original 14C dates older than 1 ka cal BP and 100 cal yrs for the original 14C dates younger than 1 ka cal BP, respectively. Using this semi-empirical estimation of the shell residence times we have refined the existing chronology of the Holocene chenier ridges on the west coast of Bohai Bay.

  5. The use of 41Ar to investigate residence time distribution (RTD) in petrochemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirelkhatim, D. A.; Hassan, B. A.; ElTayeb, M. A. H.; Hills, A. E.

    2004-01-01

    Residence time measurements were carried out on a wax slurry bed reactor (SBR) and on a pilot FTDU reactor by means of radioisotope tracer technology using Ar-41 as tracer gas. Representative results were obtained as the behaviour of the gas in the SBR showed channeling downstream and in the FTDU, possible different mixing zones in the upper portion and the occurrence of air pockets was evident. ( Authors)

  6. Residence Time Distribution (RTD) Prediction in Mixing Vessel via CFD Simulation Using Fluent: An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Rizal Mamat; Azraf Azman; Noraishah Othman

    2011-01-01

    A prototype mixing vessel has been developed by Industrial Technology Division and installed at a multiphase testing facility in MINT Tech Park. A task to investigate the mixing vessel performance using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been undertaken using the available FLUENT software in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This paper discusses the modeling and simulation done in obtaining the Residence Time Distribution (RTD) for the mixing vessel using FLUENT. (author)

  7. Spatial distribution of residence time, microbe and storage volume of groundwater in headwater catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Maki; Ogawa, Mahiro; Yamamoto, Chisato; Sakakibara, Koichi; Sugiyama, Ayumi; Kato, Kenji; Nagaosa, Kazuyo; Yano, Shinjiro

    2017-04-01

    Headwater catchments in mountainous region are the most important recharge area for surface and subsurface waters, and time and stock information of the water is principal to understand hydrological processes in the catchments. Also, a variety of microbes are included in the groundwater and spring water, and those varies in time and space, suggesting that information of microbe could be used as tracer for groundwater flow system. However, there have been few researches to evaluate the relationship among the residence time, microbe and storage volume of the groundwater in headwater catchments. We performed an investigation on age dating using SF6 and CFCs, microbe counting in the spring water, and evaluation of groundwater storage volume based on water budget analysis in 8 regions underlain by different lithology, those are granite, dacite, sedimentary rocks, serpentinite, basalt and volcanic lava all over Japan. We conducted hydrometric measurements and sampling of spring water in base flow conditions during the rainless periods 2015 and 2016 in those regions, and SF6, CFCs, stable isotopic ratios of oxygen-18 and deuterium, inorganic solute concentrations and total number of prokaryotes were determined on all water samples. Residence time of spring water ranged from 0 to 16 years in all regions, and storage volume of the groundwater within topographical watershed was estimated to be 0.1 m to 222 m in water height. The spring with the longer residence time tends to have larger storage volume in the watershed, and the spring underlain by dacite tends to have larger storage volume as compared with that underlain by sand stone and chert. Also, total number of prokaryotes in the spring water ranged from 103 to 105 cells/mL, and the spring tends to show clear increasing of total number of prokaryotes with decreasing of residence time. Thus, we observed a certain relationship among residence time, storage volume and total number of prokaryotes in the spring water, and

  8. Determination of the hydraulic residence time of two subsurface-flow constructed wetlands using radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debien, Bruno R.

    2013-01-01

    The adoption of constructed wetland systems (CW's) with subsuperficial drainage for sewage treatment is increasingly growing in places with low technological resources and available land. The efficient removal of pollutants depends on the internal flow characteristics in the CW and on its hydraulic residence time (HRT). In the present work 82 Br - a gamma radiation emitter, produced from soluble potassium bromide irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at the Centre for the Development of Nuclear Energy (CDTN) - was used as a pseudo-conservative tracer for the comparative study of aqueous phase flow dynamics in two CW's: one in which plants were grown (WP) whereas the other had no plants (WNP). Experimental hydraulic residence time values were found to be very close to the theoretical one, while dispersion numbers obtained for both CW's were quite small. Besides these measured hydrodynamic parameters, the residence time distribution (RTD) curves of the tracer test and the results of modeling of experimental data also demonstrate the tendency of the units to display a plug flow-like effluent hydraulic transport within their systems, as expected from their designs, considering the large length/width ratio (L/W=8). (author)

  9. The relative importance of water temperature and residence time in predicting cyanobacteria abundance in regulated rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, YoonKyung; Cho, Kyung Hwa; Lee, Hyuk; Kang, Taegu; Kim, Joon Ha

    2017-11-01

    Despite a growing awareness of the problems associated with cyanobacterial blooms in rivers, and particularly in regulated rivers, the drivers of bloom formation and abundance in rivers are not well understood. We developed a Bayesian hierarchical model to assess the relative importance of predictors of summer cyanobacteria abundance, and to test whether the relative importance of each predictor varies by site, using monitoring data from 16 sites in the four major rivers of South Korea. The results suggested that temperature and residence time, but not nutrient levels, are important predictors of summer cyanobacteria abundance in rivers. Although the two predictors were of similar significance across the sites, the residence time was marginally better in accounting for the variation in cyanobacteria abundance. The model with spatial hierarchy demonstrated that temperature played a consistently significant role at all sites, and showed no effect from site-specific factors. In contrast, the importance of residence time varied significantly from site to site. This variation was shown to depend on the trophic state, indicated by the chlorophyll-a and total phosphorus levels. Our results also suggested that the magnitude of weir inflow is a key factor determining the cyanobacteria abundance under baseline conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of the hydraulic residence time of two subsurface-flow constructed wetlands using radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debien, Bruno R., E-mail: brunordebien@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept de Geografia. Lab. de Geomorfologia; Barreto, Alberto A.; Pinto, Amenonia M.F.; Moreira, Rubens M., E-mail: aab@cdtn.br, E-mail: amfp@cdtn.br, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The adoption of constructed wetland systems (CW's) with subsuperficial drainage for sewage treatment is increasingly growing in places with low technological resources and available land. The efficient removal of pollutants depends on the internal flow characteristics in the CW and on its hydraulic residence time (HRT). In the present work {sup 82}Br - a gamma radiation emitter, produced from soluble potassium bromide irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at the Centre for the Development of Nuclear Energy (CDTN) - was used as a pseudo-conservative tracer for the comparative study of aqueous phase flow dynamics in two CW's: one in which plants were grown (WP) whereas the other had no plants (WNP). Experimental hydraulic residence time values were found to be very close to the theoretical one, while dispersion numbers obtained for both CW's were quite small. Besides these measured hydrodynamic parameters, the residence time distribution (RTD) curves of the tracer test and the results of modeling of experimental data also demonstrate the tendency of the units to display a plug flow-like effluent hydraulic transport within their systems, as expected from their designs, considering the large length/width ratio (L/W=8). (author)

  11. Academic time at a level 1 trauma center: no resident, no problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Dickinson, Rebecca M; Schaefer, Eric W; Armen, Scott B; Frankel, Heidi L

    2012-01-01

    Globally, the compliance of resident work-hour restrictions has no impact on trauma outcome. However, the effect of protected education time (PET), during which residents are unavailable to respond to trauma patients, has not been studied. We hypothesized that PET has no impact on the outcome of trauma patients. We conducted a retrospective review of relevant patients at an academic level I trauma center. During PET, a trauma attending and advanced practice providers (APPs) responded to trauma activations. PGY1, 3, and 4 residents were also available at all other times. The outcome of new trauma patient activations during Thursday morning 3-hours resident PET was compared with same time period on other weekdays (non-PET) using a univariate and multivariate analysis. From January 2005 to April 2010, a total of 5968 trauma patients were entered in the registry. Of these, 178 patients (2.98%) were included for study (37 PET and 141 non-PET). The mean injury severity score (ISS) was 16.2. Although no significant difference were identified in mortality, complications, or length of stay (LOS), we do see that length of emergency department stay (ED-LOS) tends to be longer during PET, although not significantly (314 vs 381 minutes, p = 0.74). On the multiple logistic regression model, PET was not a significant factor of complications, LOS, or ED-LOS. Few trauma activations occur during PET. New trauma activations can be staffed safely by trauma activations and APPs. However, there could be some delays in transferring patients to appropriate disposition. Additional study is required to determine the effect of PET on existing trauma inpatients. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A new time-space accounting scheme to predict stream water residence time and hydrograph source components at the watershed scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahiro Sayama; Jeffrey J. McDonnell

    2009-01-01

    Hydrograph source components and stream water residence time are fundamental behavioral descriptors of watersheds but, as yet, are poorly represented in most rainfall-runoff models. We present a new time-space accounting scheme (T-SAS) to simulate the pre-event and event water fractions, mean residence time, and spatial source of streamflow at the watershed scale. We...

  13. Novel sorbents for environmental remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Werner, David

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, one of the major environmental problems is the pollution of aquatic systems and soil by persistent pollutants. Persistent pollutants have been found widespread in sediments, surface waters, and drinking water supplies. The removal of pollutants can be accomplished prior to their discharge to receiving bodies or by immobilizing them onto soil. Sorption is the most commonly applied process, and activated carbons have been widely used. Rapid progress in nanotechnology and a new focus on biomass-based instead of non-renewable starting materials have produced a wide range of novel engineered sorbents including biosorbents, biochars, carbon-based nanoparticles, bio-nano hybrid materials, and iron-impregnated activated carbons. Sorbent materials have been used in environmental remediation processes and especially in agricultural soil, sediments and contaminated soil, water treatment, and industrial wastewater treatment. Furthermore, sorbents may enhance the synergistic action of other processes, such as volatilization and biodegradation. Novel sorbents have been employed for the removal or immobilization of persistent pollutants such as and include heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Pb, Cd, and Hg), halogenated organic compounds, endocrine disrupting chemicals, metalloids and non-metallic elements, and other organic pollutants. The development and evaluation of novel sorbents requires a multidisciplinary approach encompassing environmental, nanotechnology, physical, analytical, and surface chemistry. The necessary evaluations encompass not only the efficiency of these materials to remove pollutants from surface waters and groundwater, industrial wastewater, polluted soils and sediments, etc., but also the potential side-effects of their environmental applications. The aim of this work is to present the results of the use of biochar and impregnated carbon sorbents for the removal of organic pollutants and metals. Furthermore, the new findings from the forthcoming session

  14. Residence times in a hypersaline lagoon: Using salinity as a tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudge, Stephen M.; Icely, John D.; Newton, Alice

    2008-04-01

    Generally the waters of the Ria Formosa Lagoon, Portugal have a short residence time, in the order of 0.5 days (Tett, P., Gilpin, L., Svendsen, H., Erlandsson, C.P., Larsson, U., Kratzer, S., Fouilland, E., Janzen, C., Lee, J., Grenz, C., Newton, A., Ferreira, J.G., Fernandes, T., Scory, S., 2003. Eutrophication and some European waters of restricted exchange. Continental Shelf Research 23, 1635-1671). This estimation is based on the measurements of currents and the modelling of water exchange at the outlets to the ocean. However, observations of the temperature and salinity in the inner channels imply that residence time is greater in these regions of the lagoon. To resolve this apparent contradiction, spatial measurements of the temperature and salinity were made with a meter for conductivity, temperature and depth along the principal channels of the western portion of the lagoon, with a sampling frequency of two per second. Evaporation rates of 5.4 mm day -1 were measured in a salt extraction pond adjacent to the lagoon and used to determine the residence time through salinity differences with the incoming seawater. In June 2004, the water flooding in from the ocean had an average salinity of 36.07 which contrasted with a maximum of 37.82 at mid ebb on a spring tide, corresponding to a residence time of >7 days; the mean residence time was 2.4 days. As the tide flooded into the channels, the existing water was advected back into the lagoon. Although there was a small amount of mixing with water from another inlet, the water body from the inner lagoon essentially remained distinct with respect to temperature and salinity characteristics. The residence time of the water was further prolonged at the junction between the main channels, where distinct boundaries were observed between the different water masses. As the water ebbed out, the shallow Western Channel was essentially isolated from the rest of the outer lagoon, and the water from this channel was forced

  15. Mineralogical Controls over Carbon Storage and Residence Times in Grassland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D.; Riley, W. J.; Torn, M. S.; Spycher, N.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains approximately three times more carbon than the atmosphere and terrestrial vegetation contain combined. However, it is not well understood why some SOM persists for a long time while other SOM decomposes quickly. For future climate predictions, representing soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics accurately in Earth system models is essential. Soil minerals stabilize organic carbon in soil; however, there are gaps in our understanding of how soil mineralogy controls the quantity and turnover of long-residence-time organic carbon. To investigate the impact of soil mineralogy on SOM dynamics, we used a new model (Biotic and Abiotic Model of SOM—BAMS1 [Riley et al., 2014]) integrated with a three-dimensional, multiphase reactive transport solver (TOUGHREACT). The model represents bacterial and fungal activity, archetypal polymer and monomer carbon substrate groups, aqueous chemistry, gaseous diffusion, aqueous advection and diffusion, and adsorption and desorption processes. BAMS1 can predict bulk SOM and radiocarbon signatures without resorting to an arbitrary depth-dependent decline in SOM turnover rates. Results show a reasonable match between observed and simulated depth-resolved SOM and Δ14C in grassland ecosystems (soils formed on terraces south of Eureka, California, and the Central Chernozem Region of Russia) and were consistent with expectations of depth-resolved profiles of lignin content and fungi:aerobic bacteria ratios. Results also suggest that clay-mineral surface area and soil sorption coefficients constitute dominant controls over organic carbon stocks and residence times, respectively. Bibliography: Riley, W.J., F.M. Maggi, M. Kleber, M.S. Torn, J.Y. Tang, D. Dwivedi, and N. Guerry (2014), Long residence times of rapidly decomposable soil organic matter: application of a multi-phase, multi-component, and vertically resolved model (BAMS1) to soil carbon dynamics, Geoscientific Model Development, vol. 7, 1335

  16. Taste, choice and timing: Investigating resident and carer preferences for meals in aged care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milte, Rachel; Ratcliffe, Julie; Chen, Gang; Miller, Michelle; Crotty, Maria

    2018-03-01

    There has been little empirical investigation of the preferences of people living in aged care homes for food services. The aim of the present study was to elicit consumer preferences and their willingness to pay for food service in aged care homes. Current residents or their family members were invited to take part in the discrete choice experiment questionnaire administered via interview. Of the 109 eligible residents and 175 eligible family members approached for consent 121 (43%) participated, including 43 residents. Participant preferences were influenced by food taste, choice in relation to serving size, timing of meal selection, visual appeal, and additional cost. Participants indicated they would be willing to pay an additional $24 (US$18.42) per week for food which tasted excellent and $8 (US$6.14) per week to have choice in serving sizes. The study found that respondents were willing to pay a premium to receive food that met their expectations of taste, and for a high level of control over serving sizes, which has implications for the funding and provision of food and dining in long-term care in the future. © 2018 The Authors Nursing & Health Sciences Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Geometrical effects on the electron residence time in semiconductor nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koochi, Hakimeh; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh

    2014-09-07

    We have used random walk (RW) numerical simulations to investigate the influence of the geometry on the statistics of the electron residence time τ(r) in a trap-limited diffusion process through semiconductor nano-particles. This is an important parameter in coarse-grained modeling of charge carrier transport in nano-structured semiconductor films. The traps have been distributed randomly on the surface (r(2) model) or through the whole particle (r(3) model) with a specified density. The trap energies have been taken from an exponential distribution and the traps release time is assumed to be a stochastic variable. We have carried out (RW) simulations to study the effect of coordination number, the spatial arrangement of the neighbors and the size of nano-particles on the statistics of τ(r). It has been observed that by increasing the coordination number n, the average value of electron residence time, τ̅(r) rapidly decreases to an asymptotic value. For a fixed coordination number n, the electron's mean residence time does not depend on the neighbors' spatial arrangement. In other words, τ̅(r) is a porosity-dependence, local parameter which generally varies remarkably from site to site, unless we are dealing with highly ordered structures. We have also examined the effect of nano-particle size d on the statistical behavior of τ̅(r). Our simulations indicate that for volume distribution of traps, τ̅(r) scales as d(2). For a surface distribution of traps τ(r) increases almost linearly with d. This leads to the prediction of a linear dependence of the diffusion coefficient D on the particle size d in ordered structures or random structures above the critical concentration which is in accordance with experimental observations.

  18. 32-Week Holding-Time Study of SUMMA Polished Canisters and Triple Sorbent Traps Used To Sample Organic Constituents in Radioactive Waste Tank Vapor Headspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, John C.; Huckaby, James L.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Julya, Janet L.; Hayes, James C.; Edwards, Jeffrey A.; Sasaki, Leela M.

    1997-01-01

    Two sampling methods[SUMMA polished canisters and triple sorbent traps (TSTs)] were compared for long-term storage of trace organic vapor samples collected from the headspaces of high-level radioactive waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. Because safety, quality assurance, radiological controls, the long-term stability of the sampling media during storage needed to be addressed. Samples were analyzed with a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) using cryogenic reconcentration or thermal desorption sample introduction techniques. SUMMA canister samples were also analyzed for total non-methane organic compounds (TNMOC) by GC/flame ionization detector (FID) using EPA Compendium Method TO-12 . To verify the long-term stability of the sampling media, multiple samples were collected in parallel from a typical passively ventilated radioactive waste tank known to contain moderately high concentrations of both polar and nonpolar organic compounds. Analyses for organic analytes and TNMOC were conducted at increasing intervals over a 32-week period to determine whether any systematic degradation of sample integrity occurred. Analytes collected in the SUMMA polished canisters generally showed good stability over the full 32 weeks with recoveries at the 80% level or better for all compounds studied. The TST data showed some loss (50-80% recovery) for a few high-volatility compounds even in the refrigerated samples; losses for unrefrigerated samples were far more pronounced with recoveries as low as 20% observed in a few cases

  19. Cheap carbon sorbents produced from lignite by catalytic pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Schchipko, M.L. [Inst. of Chemistry of Natural Organic Materials, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    Some data are presented describing the new technology of carbon sorbent production from powdered lignite in the installation with fluidized bed of catalyst. It was shown the different types of char products with extended pore structure and high sorption ability can be produced from cheap and accessible lignite of Kansk-Achinsk coal pit in pilot installation with fluidized bed of Al-Cu-Cr oxide catalyst or catalytically active slag materials. In comparison with the conventional technologies of pyrolysis the catalytic pyrolysis allows to increase by 3-5 times the process productivity and to decrease significantly the formation of harmful compounds. The latter is accomplished by complete oxidation of gaseous pyrolysis products in the presence of catalysts and by avoiding the formation of pyrolysis tars - the source of cancerogenic compounds. The technology of cheap powdered sorbent production from lignites makes possible to obtain from lignite during the time of pyrolysis only a few seconds char products with porosity up to 0.6 cm{sup 3} /g, and specific surface area more than 400 m{sup 3} /g. Some methods of powdered chars molding into carbon materials with the different shape were proved for producing of firmness sorbents. Cheap carbon sorbents obtained by thermocatalytic pyrolysis can be successfully used in purification of different industrial pollutants as one-time sorbent or as adsorbents of long-term application with periodic regeneration.

  20. Flow and Residence Times of Dynamic River Bank Storage and Sinuosity-Driven Hyporheic Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Velez, J. D.; Wilson, J. L.; Cardenas, M. B.; Harvey, J. W.

    2017-10-01

    Hydrologic exchange fluxes (HEFs) vary significantly along river corridors due to spatiotemporal changes in discharge and geomorphology. This variability results in the emergence of biogeochemical hot-spots and hot-moments that ultimately control solute and energy transport and ecosystem services from the local to the watershed scales. In this work, we use a reduced-order model to gain mechanistic understanding of river bank storage and sinuosity-driven hyporheic exchange induced by transient river discharge. This is the first time that a systematic analysis of both processes is presented and serves as an initial step to propose parsimonious, physics-based models for better predictions of water quality at the large watershed scale. The effects of channel sinuosity, alluvial valley slope, hydraulic conductivity, and river stage forcing intensity and duration are encapsulated in dimensionless variables that can be easily estimated or constrained. We find that the importance of perturbations in the hyporheic zone's flux, residence times, and geometry is mainly explained by two-dimensionless variables representing the ratio of the hydraulic time constant of the aquifer and the duration of the event (Γd) and the importance of the ambient groundwater flow (Δh∗). Our model additionally shows that even systems with small sensitivity, resulting in small changes in the hyporheic zone extent, are characterized by highly variable exchange fluxes and residence times. These findings highlight the importance of including dynamic changes in hyporheic zones for typical HEF models such as the transient storage model.

  1. Spatial distribution of triazine residues in a shallow alluvial aquifer linked to groundwater residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassine, Lara; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Khaska, Mahmoud; Verdoux, Patrick; Meffre, Patrick; Benfodda, Zohra; Roig, Benoît

    2017-03-01

    At present, some triazine herbicides occurrence in European groundwater, 13 years after their use ban in the European Union, remains of great concern and raises the question of their persistence in groundwater systems due to several factors such as storage and remobilization from soil and unsaturated zone, limited or absence of degradation, sorption in saturated zones, or to continuing illegal applications. In order to address this problem and to determine triazine distribution in the saturated zone, their occurrence is investigated in the light of the aquifer hydrodynamic on the basis of a geochemical approach using groundwater dating tracers ( 3 H/ 3 He). In this study, atrazine, simazine, terbuthylazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and deethylterbuthylazine are measured in 66 samples collected between 2011 and 2013 from 21 sampling points, on the Vistrenque shallow alluvial aquifer (southern France), covered by a major agricultural land use. The frequencies of quantification range from 100 to 56 % for simazine and atrazine, respectively (LQ = 1 ng L -1 ). Total triazine concentrations vary between 15 and 350 ng L -1 and show three different patterns with depth below the water table: (1) low concentrations independent of depth but related to water origin, (2) an increase in concentrations with depth in the aquifer related to groundwater residence time and triazine use prior to their ban, and (3) relatively high concentrations at low depths in the saturated zone more likely related to a slow desorption of these compounds from the soil and unsaturated zone. The triazine attenuation rate varies between 0.3 for waters influenced by surface water infiltration and 4.8 for water showing longer residence times in the aquifer, suggesting an increase in these rates with water residence time in the saturated zone. Increasing triazine concentrations with depth is consistent with a significant decrease in the use of these pesticides for the last 10 years on

  2. Numerical and machine learning simulation of parametric distributions of groundwater residence time in streams and wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starn, J. J.; Belitz, K.; Carlson, C.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater residence-time distributions (RTDs) are critical for assessing susceptibility of water resources to contamination. This novel approach for estimating regional RTDs was to first simulate groundwater flow using existing regional digital data sets in 13 intermediate size watersheds (each an average of 7,000 square kilometers) that are representative of a wide range of glacial systems. RTDs were simulated with particle tracking. We refer to these models as "general models" because they are based on regional, as opposed to site-specific, digital data. Parametric RTDs were created from particle RTDs by fitting 1- and 2-component Weibull, gamma, and inverse Gaussian distributions, thus reducing a large number of particle travel times to 3 to 7 parameters (shape, location, and scale for each component plus a mixing fraction) for each modeled area. The scale parameter of these distributions is related to the mean exponential age; the shape parameter controls departure from the ideal exponential distribution and is partly a function of interaction with bedrock and with drainage density. Given the flexible shape and mathematical similarity of these distributions, any of them are potentially a good fit to particle RTDs. The 1-component gamma distribution provided a good fit to basin-wide particle RTDs. RTDs at monitoring wells and streams often have more complicated shapes than basin-wide RTDs, caused in part by heterogeneity in the model, and generally require 2-component distributions. A machine learning model was trained on the RTD parameters using features derived from regionally available watershed characteristics such as recharge rate, material thickness, and stream density. RTDs appeared to vary systematically across the landscape in relation to watershed features. This relation was used to produce maps of useful metrics with respect to risk-based thresholds, such as the time to first exceedance, time to maximum concentration, time above the threshold

  3. Devolatilization kinetics of woody biomass at short residence times and high heating rates and peak temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Joakim M.; Gadsbøll, Rasmus; Thomsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This work combines experimental and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results to derive global kinetics for biomass (pine wood) devolatilization during heating rates on the order of 105Ks-1, bulk flow peak temperatures between 1405 and 1667K, and particle residence times below 0.1s. Experiments......Jmol-1. The accuracy of the derived global kinetics was supported by comparing predictions to experimental results from a 15kW furnace. The work emphasizes the importance of characterizing the temperature history of the biomass particles when deriving pyrolysis kinetics. The present results indicate...

  4. A residence-time-based transport approach for the groundwater pathway in performance assessment models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Chu, Shaoping

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the theoretical development and numerical implementation of a new modeling approach for representing the groundwater pathway in risk assessment or performance assessment model of a contaminant transport system. The model developed in the present study, called the Residence Time Distribution (RTD) Mixing Model (RTDMM), allows for an arbitrary distribution of fluid travel times to be represented, to capture the effects on the breakthrough curve of flow processes such as channelized flow and fast pathways and complex three-dimensional dispersion. Mathematical methods for constructing the model for a given RTD are derived directly from the theory of residence time distributions in flowing systems. A simple mixing model is presented, along with the basic equations required to enable an arbitrary RTD to be reproduced using the model. The practical advantages of the RTDMM include easy incorporation into a multi-realization probabilistic simulation; computational burden no more onerous than a one-dimensional model with the same number of grid cells; and straightforward implementation into available flow and transport modeling codes, enabling one to then utilize advanced transport features of that code. For example, in this study we incorporated diffusion into the stagnant fluid in the rock matrix away from the flowing fractures, using a generalized dual porosity model formulation. A suite of example calculations presented herein showed the utility of the RTDMM for the case of a radioactive decay chain, dual porosity transport and sorption.

  5. Using just-in-time teaching and peer instruction in a residency program's core curriculum: enhancing satisfaction, engagement, and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Mary C; DaRosa, Debra A; Crandall, Marie L

    2015-03-01

    To assess use of the combined just-in-time teaching (JiTT) and peer instruction (PI) instructional strategy in a residency program's core curriculum. In 2010-2011, JiTT/PI was piloted in 31 core curriculum sessions taught by 22 faculty in the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine's general surgery residency program. JiTT/PI required preliminary and categorical residents (n=31) to complete Web-based study questions before weekly specialty topic sessions. Responses were examined by faculty members "just in time" to tailor session content to residents' learning needs. In the sessions, residents answered multiple-choice questions (MCQs) using clickers and engaged in PI. Participants completed surveys assessing their perceptions of JiTT/PI. Videos were coded to assess resident engagement time in JiTT/PI sessions versus prior lecture-based sessions. Responses to topic session MCQs repeated in review sessions were evaluated to study retention. More than 70% of resident survey respondents indicated that JiTT/PI aided in the learning of key points. At least 90% of faculty survey respondents reported positive perceptions of aspects of the JiTT/PI strategy. Resident engagement time for JiTT/PI sessions was significantly greater than for prior lecture-based sessions (z=-2.4, P=.016). Significantly more review session MCQ responses were correct for residents who had attended corresponding JiTT/PI sessions than for residents who had not (chi-square=13.7; df=1; P<.001). JiTT/PI increased learner participation, learner retention, and the amount of learner-centered time. JiTT/PI represents an effective approach for meaningful and active learning in core curriculum sessions.

  6. Keeping up with the times: revising the dermatology residency curriculum in the era of molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChance, Avery; Murphy, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The clinical use of molecular diagnostics, genomics, and personalized medicine is increasing and improving rapidly over time. However, medical education incorporating the practical application of these techniques is lagging behind. Although instruction in these areas should be expanded upon and improved at all levels of training, residency provides a concentrated period of time in which to hone in on skills that are practically applicable to a trainee's specialty of choice. Although residencies in some fields, such as pathology, have begun to incorporate practical molecular diagnostics training, this area remains a relative gap in dermatology residency programs. Herein, we advocate for the incorporation of training in molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine into dermatology residency programs and propose a basic curriculum template for how to begin approaching these topics. By incorporating molecular diagnostics into dermatology residency training, dermatologists have the opportunity to lead the way and actively shape the specialty's transition into the era of personalized medicine. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. Determination of flow patterns in industrial gold leaching tank by radiotracer residence time distribution measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegowski, Z.; Furman, L.; Dagadu, Ch.P.K.; Akaho, E.H.K.; Danso, K.A.; Mumuni, I.I.; Adu, P.S; Amoah, Ch.

    2010-01-01

    The carbon-in-leach (CIL) process is one the most efficient methods of gold recovery from gold bearing ores. The efficiency of the leaching process greatly depends on the flow structure created by mechanical agitation (in some cases air agitation) in the leaching tanks. Residence time distribution (RTD) measurement was conducted in the CIL section of a gold processing plant in order to determine the flow structure in the first tank using the 131 I radioactive tracer. The shape of the experimental data revealed that the flow behaviour in the tank was close to an ideal mixer. Modelling of the experimental data, however, revealed that the tank was not behaving as a single perfect mixer, but consisted of two mixing zones. The flow structure in the tank was best described by the '' perfect mixers with exchange '' model consisting of two mixing zones. The model allowed the determination of flow parameters including the mean residence time, flow rate and volumes of the mixing zones. (authors)

  8. A non-discrete method for computation of residence time in fluid mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Marsden, Alison L

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular simulations provide a promising means to predict risk of thrombosis in grafts, devices, and surgical anatomies in adult and pediatric patients. Although the pathways for platelet activation and clot formation are not yet fully understood, recent findings suggest that thrombosis risk is increased in regions of flow recirculation and high residence time (RT). Current approaches for calculating RT are typically based on releasing a finite number of Lagrangian particles into the flow field and calculating RT by tracking their positions. However, special care must be taken to achieve temporal and spatial convergence, often requiring repeated simulations. In this work, we introduce a non-discrete method in which RT is calculated in an Eulerian framework using the advection-diffusion equation. We first present the formulation for calculating residence time in a given region of interest using two alternate definitions. The physical significance and sensitivity of the two measures of RT are discussed and their mathematical relation is established. An extension to a point-wise value is also presented. The methods presented here are then applied in a 2D cavity and two representative clinical scenarios, involving shunt placement for single ventricle heart defects and Kawasaki disease. In the second case study, we explored the relationship between RT and wall shear stress, a parameter of particular importance in cardiovascular disease.

  9. Determination of the hydraulic residence time of trickling filters using radiotracer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debien, Bruno R.; Ferreira, Ladislau M.; Barreto, Alberto A.; Pinto, Amenonia M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Trickling filters (TF) are bioreactors fulfilled with inert materials working as support for biofilm development, and have been used in a large scale in wastewater treatment for organic matter, ammonia nitrogen and nitrate removal. TF's can be widely used in Brazil, especially because of its simplicity and operational low cost. The efficiency of pollutants removal processes depends on the water flow dynamics inside the reactor. For this reason, in the present work the mean residence time of two TF's containing different support materials were determined by means of tracer testes. The radioisotope 82Br - a gamma radiation emitter, produced from soluble potassium bromide irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at the Centre for the Development of Nuclear Energy (CDTN) - was used as a pseudo-conservative tracer for the comparative study of aqueous phase flow dynamics in both TF's. Mean residence time for the first TF (containing a single support material) was 0,3 hours, much smaller than the value obtained for the second TF (containing two alternated support materials), around 2 hours. These results were already expected, once the alternated material is denser than the single one, and are very important for numerical modeling studies aiming to determine the kinetic constant for removal of the pollutants cited above. (author)

  10. Tritium activity concentrations and residence times of groundwater collected in Rokkasho, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Hidenao; Ueda, Shinji; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Akata, Naofumi

    2015-01-01

    Tritium ( 3 H) concentrations were measured in groundwater samples from four surface wells (4-10 m deep), four shallow wells (24-26.5 m deep) and a 150-m-deep well in the Futamata River catchment area, which is adjacent to the large-scale commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan. The 3 H concentrations in most of the surface- and shallow-well samples (<0.03-0.57 Bq l -1 ) were similar to those in precipitation (annual mean: 0.31-0.79 Bq l -1 ), suggesting that the residence time of the water in those wells was 0-15 y. The 3 H concentrations in the samples from a 26-m-deep well and the 150-m-deep well were lower than those in the other wells, indicating that groundwater with a long residence time exists in deep aquifers and the estuary area of the catchment. It is not clear whether 3 H released during test operation of the plant with actual spent nuclear fuel affected the 3 H concentrations observed in this study. (authors)

  11. Determination of the hydraulic residence time of trickling filters using radiotracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debien, Bruno R.; Ferreira, Ladislau M.; Barreto, Alberto A.; Pinto, Amenonia M.F., E-mail: brunordebien@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Geografia. Lab. de Geomorfologia; Moreira, Rubens M., E-mail: aab@cdtn.br, E-mail: amfp@cdtn.br, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Trickling filters (TF) are bioreactors fulfilled with inert materials working as support for biofilm development, and have been used in a large scale in wastewater treatment for organic matter, ammonia nitrogen and nitrate removal. TF's can be widely used in Brazil, especially because of its simplicity and operational low cost. The efficiency of pollutants removal processes depends on the water flow dynamics inside the reactor. For this reason, in the present work the mean residence time of two TF's containing different support materials were determined by means of tracer testes. The radioisotope 82Br - a gamma radiation emitter, produced from soluble potassium bromide irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at the Centre for the Development of Nuclear Energy (CDTN) - was used as a pseudo-conservative tracer for the comparative study of aqueous phase flow dynamics in both TF's. Mean residence time for the first TF (containing a single support material) was 0,3 hours, much smaller than the value obtained for the second TF (containing two alternated support materials), around 2 hours. These results were already expected, once the alternated material is denser than the single one, and are very important for numerical modeling studies aiming to determine the kinetic constant for removal of the pollutants cited above. (author)

  12. A study of residence time distribution using radiotracer technique in the large scale plant facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetchagarun, S.; Tippayakul, C.; Petchrak, A.; Sukrod, K.; Khoonkamjorn, P.

    2017-06-01

    As the demand for troubleshooting of large industrial plants increases, radiotracer techniques, which have capability to provide fast, online and effective detections to plant problems, have been continually developed. One of the good potential applications of the radiotracer for troubleshooting in a process plant is the analysis of Residence Time Distribution (RTD). In this paper, the study of RTD in a large scale plant facility using radiotracer technique was presented. The objective of this work is to gain experience on the RTD analysis using radiotracer technique in a “larger than laboratory” scale plant setup which can be comparable to the real industrial application. The experiment was carried out at the sedimentation tank in the water treatment facility of Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (Public Organization). Br-82 was selected to use in this work due to its chemical property, its suitable half-life and its on-site availability. NH4Br in the form of aqueous solution was injected into the system as the radiotracer. Six NaI detectors were placed along the pipelines and at the tank in order to determine the RTD of the system. The RTD and the Mean Residence Time (MRT) of the tank was analysed and calculated from the measured data. The experience and knowledge attained from this study is important for extending this technique to be applied to industrial facilities in the future.

  13. Investigation of liquid phase axial dispersion in Taylor bubble flow by radiotracer residence time distribution analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin J.H.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A gas-liquid Taylor bubble flow occurs in small diameter channels in which gas bubbles are separated by slugs of pure liquid. This type of flow regime is well suited for solid catalyzed gas-liquid reactors in which the reaction efficiency is a strong function of axial dispersion in the regions of pure liquid. This paper presents an experimental study of liquid phase axial dispersion in a Taylor bubble flow developed in a horizontal tube using high speed photography and radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD analysis. A parametric dependence of axial dispersion on average volume fraction of gas phase was also investigated by varying the relative volumetric flow rates of the two phases. 137mBa produced from a 137Cs/137mBa radionuclide generator was used as radiotracer and measurements were made using the NaI(Tl scintillation detectors. Validation of 137mBa in the form of barium chloride as aqueous phase radiotracer was also carried out. Axial Dispersion Model (ADM was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the system and the results of the experiment are presented. It was observed that the system is characterized by very high values of Peclet Number (Pe∼102 which reveals an approaching plug type flow. The experimental and model estimated values of mean residence times were observed in agreement with each other.

  14. Optimizing residence time, temperature and speed to improve TMP pulp properties and reduce energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabourin, M.; Xu, E.; Cort, B.; Boileau, I.; Waller, A.

    1997-04-01

    The concept of reducing energy consumption in pulp mills by increasing the disc speed of refining has been established using single disc and double disc refiners in both pilot plant and mill applications. The RTS study evaluated in this paper reviews the effect of high-speed single disc refining coupled with shortdwell-high pressure retention conditions. Coupling these variables permitted evaluation of an optimum residence time, temperature and speed (RTS) operational window. The objective of the RTS conditions to sufficiently soften the wood chips through high temperature such that the fibre is more receptive to initial defiberization at high intensity. The improved pulp from the primary refiner at high intensity could potentially demonstrate improvements in physical pulp properties at a reduced specific energy requirement. The spruce/fir RTS-TMP described here required significantly less specific energy and produced TMP with slightly improved strength properties and equivalent optical properties compared to conventional TMP pulp. Studies on the radiate pine furnish indicated that the physical pulp property/specific energy relationships could be adjusted by manipulating the residence time. 4 refs., 10 tabs., 10 figs.

  15. Tritium activity concentrations and residence times of groundwater collected in Rokkasho, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hidenao; Ueda, Shinji; Akata, Naofumi; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2015-11-01

    Tritium ((3)H) concentrations were measured in groundwater samples from four surface wells (4-10 m deep), four shallow wells (24-26.5 m deep) and a 150-m-deep well in the Futamata River catchment area, which is adjacent to the large-scale commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan. The (3)H concentrations in most of the surface- and shallow-well samples (<0.03-0.57 Bq l(-1)) were similar to those in precipitation (annual mean: 0.31-0.79 Bq l(-1)), suggesting that the residence time of the water in those wells was 0-15 y. The (3)H concentrations in the samples from a 26-m-deep well and the 150-m-deep well were lower than those in the other wells, indicating that groundwater with a long residence time exists in deep aquifers and the estuary area of the catchment. It is not clear whether (3)H released during test operation of the plant with actual spent nuclear fuel affected the (3)H concentrations observed in this study. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Residence times and nitrate transport in ground water discharging to streams in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Phillips, Scott; Donnelly, Colleen A.; Speiran, Gary K.; Plummer, Niel; Bohlke, John Karl; Focazio, Michael J.; Burton, William C.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2003-01-01

    One of the major water-quality problems in the Chesapeake Bay is an overabundance of nutrients from the streams and rivers that discharge to the Bay. Some of these nutrients are from nonpoint sources such as atmospheric deposition, agricultural manure and fertilizer, and septic systems. The effects of efforts to control nonpoint sources, however, can be difficult to quantify because of the lag time between changes at the land surface and the response in the base-flow (ground water) component of streams. To help resource managers understand the lag time between implementation of management practices and subsequent response in the nutrient concentrations in the base-flow component of streamflow, a study of ground-water discharge, residence time, and nitrate transport in springs throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed and in four smaller watersheds in selected hydrogeomorphic regions (HGMRs) was conducted. The four watersheds were in the Coastal Plain Uplands, Piedmont crystalline, Valley and Ridge carbonate, and Valley and Ridge siliciclastic HGMRs.A study of springs to estimate an apparent age of the ground water was based on analyses for concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons in water samples collected from 48 springs in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Results of the analysis indicate that median age for all the samples was 10 years, with the 25th percentile having an age of 7 years and the 75th percentile having an age of 13 years. Although the number of samples collected in each HGMR was limited, there did not appear to be distinct differences in the ages between the HGMRs. The ranges were similar between the major HGMRs above the Fall Line (modern to about 50 years), with only two HGMRs of small geographic extent (Piedmont carbonate and Mesozoic Lowland) having ranges of modern to about 10 years. The median values of all the HGMRs ranged from 7 to 11 years. Not enough samples were collected in the Coastal Plain for comparison. Spring samples showed slightly younger

  17. TRUEX process solvent cleanup with solid sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tse, Pui-Kwan; Reichley-Yinger, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    Solid sorbents, alumina, silica gel, and Amberlyst A-26 have been tested for the cleanup of degraded TRUEX-NPH solvent. A sodium carbonate scrub alone does not completely remove acidic degradation products from highly degraded solvent and cannot restore the stripping performance of the solvent. By following the carbonate scrub with either neutral alumina or Amberlyst A-26 anion exchange resin, the performance of the TRUEX-NPH is substantially restored. The degraded TRUEX-NPH was characterized before and after treatment by supercritical fluid chromatography. Its performance was evaluated by americium distribution ratios, phase-separation times, and lauric acid distribution coefficients. 17 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  18. The significance of oxygen as oxides and hydroxides in controlling the abundance and residence times of elements in seawater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.

    A model is presented which signifies the role of oxygen (as oxides and hydroxides) in controlling the composition of seawater. respective concentration and residence times for the unknown elements can be estimated. Geometric and statistical indices...

  19. Prevalence and Cost of Full-Time Research Fellowships During General Surgery Residency – A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles M.; Klingensmith, Mary E.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective To quantify the prevalence, outcomes, and cost of surgical resident research. Summary Background Data General surgery is unique among graduate medical education programs because a large percentage of residents interrupt their clinical training to spend 1-3 years performing full-time research. No comprehensive data exists on the scope of this practice. Methods Survey sent to all 239 program directors of general surgery residencies participating in the National Resident Matching Program. Results Response rate was 200/239 (84%). A total of 381 out of 1052 trainees (36%) interrupt residency to pursue full-time research. The mean research fellowship length is 1.7 years, with 72% of trainees performing basic science research. A significant association was found between fellowship length and post-residency activity, with a 14.7% increase in clinical fellowship training and a 15.2% decrease in private practice positions for each year of full-time research (p<0.0001). Program directors at 31% of programs reported increased clinical duties for research fellows as a result of ACGME work hour regulations for clinical residents, while a further 10% of programs are currently considering such changes. It costs $41.5 million to pay the 634 trainees who perform research fellowships each year, the majority of which is paid for by departmental funds (40%) and institutional training grants (24%). Conclusions Interrupting residency to perform a research fellowship is a common and costly practice among general surgery residents. While performing a research fellowship is associated with clinical fellowship training after residency, it is unclear to what extent this practice leads to the development of surgical investigators after post-graduate training. PMID:19106692

  20. Associations of psychosocial working conditions and working time characteristics with somatic complaints in German resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nina; Degen, Christiane; Li, Jian; Loerbroks, Adrian; Müller, Andreas; Angerer, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Somatic complaints (SC) are highly prevalent in working populations and cause suffering and extensive health-care utilization. Adverse psychosocial working conditions as conceptualized in the Job Demand-Control-Support Model (JDC-S) and adverse working time characteristics (WTC) are potential risk factors. This combination is particularly common in hospital physicians. This study examines associations of JDC-S and WTC with SC in resident physicians from Germany. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 405 physicians at the end of residency training. SC were measured using the Giessen Subjective Complaints List (GBB-24) containing the sub-categories exhaustion, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and cardiovascular complaints. Data on working conditions were collected by a self-report method for work analysis in hospitals (TAA-KH-S) and by questions on WTC (i.e., working hours). Multivariable stepwise regression analyses were applied. Workload showed the most pronounced relationship with all sub-categories of SC except gastrointestinal complaints. Job autonomy was not significantly related to any SC sub-category. Social support at work was inversely associated with all SC sub-categories except for cardiovascular complaints. Free weekends were associated with reduced SC except for exhaustion. Shift work was related to an increased SC total score and musculoskeletal complaints. Working hours showed no association with SC. In resident physicians, high workload and shift work are associated with increased SC, while social support at work and free weekends are associated with decreased SC. These insights may inform the development of preventive measures to improve the health of this professional group. Prospective studies are needed though to corroborate our findings.

  1. Variability in benthic exchange rate, depth, and residence time beneath a shallow coastal estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russoniello, C. J.; Michael, H. A.; Heiss, J.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrodynamically-driven exchange of water between the water column and shallow seabed aquifer, benthic exchange, is a significant and dynamic component of coastal and estuarine fluid budgets, but wave-induced benthic exchange has not been measured in the field. Mixing between surface water and groundwater solutes promotes ecologically important chemical reactions, so quantifying benthic exchange rates, depths, and residence times, constrains estimates of coastal chemical cycling. In this study, we present the first field-based direct measurements of wave-induced exchange and compare it to exchange induced by the other primary drivers of exchange - tides, and currents. We deployed instruments in a shallow estuary to measure benthic exchange and temporal variability over an 11-day period. Differential pressure sensors recorded pressure gradients across the seabed, and up-and down-looking ADCPs recorded currents and pressures from which wave parameters, surface-water currents, and water depth were determined. Wave-induced exchange was calculated directly from 1) differential pressure measurements, and indirectly with an analytical solution based on wave parameters from 2) ADCP and 3) weather station data. Groundwater flow models were used to assess the effects of aquifer properties on benthic exchange depth and residence time. Benthic exchange driven by tidal pumping or current-bedform interaction was calculated from tidal stage variation and from ADCP-measured currents at the bed, respectively. Waves were the primary benthic exchange driver (average = 20.0 cm/d, maximum = 92.3 cm/d) during the measurement period. Benthic exchange due to tides (average = 3.7 cm/d) and current-bedform interaction (average = 6.5x10-2 cm/d) was much lower. Wave-induced exchange calculated from pressure measurements and ADCP-measured wave parameters matched well, but wind-based rates underestimated wave energy and exchange. Groundwater models showed that residence time and depth increased

  2. Trait differences between naturalized and invasive plant species independent of residence time and phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, R V; Randall, R P; Leishman, M R

    2015-04-01

    The ability to predict which alien plants will transition from naturalized to invasive prior to their introduction to novel regions is a key goal for conservation and has the potential to increase the efficacy of weed risk assessment (WRA). However, multiple factors contribute to plant invasion success (e.g., functional traits, range characteristics, residence time, phylogeny), and they all must be taken into account simultaneously in order to identify meaningful correlates of invasion success. We compiled 146 pairs of phylogenetically paired (congeneric) naturalized and invasive plant species in Australia with similar minimum residence times (i.e., time since introduction in years). These pairs were used to test for differences in 5 functional traits (flowering duration, leaf size, maximum height, specific leaf area [SLA], seed mass) and 3 characteristics of species' native ranges (biome occupancy, mean annual temperature, and rainfall breadth) between naturalized and invasive species. Invasive species, on average, had larger SLA, longer flowering periods, and were taller than their congeneric naturalized relatives. Invaders also exhibited greater tolerance for different environmental conditions in the native range, where they occupied more biomes and a wider breadth of rainfall and temperature conditions than naturalized congeners. However, neither seed mass nor leaf size differed between pairs of naturalized and invasive species. A key finding was the role of SLA in distinguishing between naturalized and invasive pairs. Species with high SLA values were typically associated with faster growth rates, more rapid turnover of leaf material, and shorter lifespans than those species with low SLA. This suite of characteristics may contribute to the ability of a species to transition from naturalized to invasive across a wide range of environmental contexts and disturbance regimes. Our findings will help in the refinement of WRA protocols, and we advocate the inclusion

  3. Calculation of residence times and radiation doses using the standard PC software Excel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, H.; Zilken, H.; Niederbremer, A.; Friedrich, W.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    We developed a program which aims to facilitate the calculation of radiation doses to single organs and the whole body. IMEDOSE uses Excel to include calculations, graphical displays, and interactions with the user in a single general-purpose PC software tool. To start the procedure the input data are copied into a spreadsheet. They must represent percentage uptake values of several organs derived from measurements in animals or humans. To extrapolate these data up to seven half-lives of the radionuclide, fitting to one or two exponentional functions is included and can be checked by the user. By means of the approximate time-activity information the cumulated activity or residence times are calculated. Finally these data are combined with the absorbed fraction doses (S-values) given by MIRD pamphlet No. 11 to yield radiation doses, the effective dose equivalent and the effective dose. These results are presented in a final table. Interactions are realized with push-buttons and drop-down menus. Calculations use the Visual Basic tool of Excel. In order to test our program, biodistribution data of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose were taken from the literature (Meija et al., J Nucl Med 1991; 32:699-706). For a 70-kg adult the resulting radiation doses of all target organs listed in MIRD 11 were different from the ICRP 53 values by 1%±18% on the average. When the residence times were introduced into MIRDOSE3 (Stabin, J Nucl Med 1996; 37:538-546) the mean difference between our results and those of MIRDOSE3 was -3%±6%. Both outcomes indicate the validity of the present approach. (orig.)

  4. Calculation of residence times and radiation doses using the standard PC software Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, H; Zilken, H; Niederbremer, A; Friedrich, W; Müller-Gärtner, H W

    1997-12-01

    We developed a program which aims to facilitate the calculation of radiation doses to single organs and the whole body. IMEDOSE uses Excel to include calculations, graphical displays, and interactions with the user in a single general-purpose PC software tool. To start the procedure the input data are copied into a spreadsheet. They must represent percentage uptake values of several organs derived from measurements in animals or humans. To extrapolate these data up to seven half-lives of the radionuclide, fitting to one or two exponentional functions is included and can be checked by the user. By means of the approximate time-activity information the cumulated activity or residence times are calculated. Finally these data are combined with the absorbed fraction doses (S-values) given by MIRD pamphlet No. 11 to yield radiation doses, the effective dose equivalent and the effective dose. These results are presented in a final table. Interactions are realized with push-buttons and drop-down menus. Calculations use the Visual Basic tool of Excel. In order to test our program, biodistribution data of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose were taken from the literature (Meija et al., J Nucl Med 1991; 32:699-706). For a 70-kg adult the resulting radiation doses of all target organs listed in MIRD 11 were different from the ICRP 53 values by 1%+/-18% on the average. When the residence times were introduced into MIRDOSE3 (Stabin, J Nucl Med 1996; 37:538-546) the mean difference between our results and those of MIRDOSE3 was -3%+/-6%. Both outcomes indicate the validity of the present approach.

  5. Calculation of residence times and radiation doses using the standard PC software Excel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, H.; Zilken, H.; Niederbremer, A.; Friedrich, W. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Mueller-Gaertner, H.W. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany)]|[Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heinrich-Heine University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    We developed a program which aims to facilitate the calculation of radiation doses to single organs and the whole body. IMEDOSE uses Excel to include calculations, graphical displays, and interactions with the user in a single general-purpose PC software tool. To start the procedure the input data are copied into a spreadsheet. They must represent percentage uptake values of several organs derived from measurements in animals or humans. To extrapolate these data up to seven half-lives of the radionuclide, fitting to one or two exponentional functions is included and can be checked by the user. By means of the approximate time-activity information the cumulated activity or residence times are calculated. Finally these data are combined with the absorbed fraction doses (S-values) given by MIRD pamphlet No. 11 to yield radiation doses, the effective dose equivalent and the effective dose. These results are presented in a final table. Interactions are realized with push-buttons and drop-down menus. Calculations use the Visual Basic tool of Excel. In order to test our program, biodistribution data of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose were taken from the literature (Meija et al., J Nucl Med 1991; 32:699-706). For a 70-kg adult the resulting radiation doses of all target organs listed in MIRD 11 were different from the ICRP 53 values by 1%{+-}18% on the average. When the residence times were introduced into MIRDOSE3 (Stabin, J Nucl Med 1996; 37:538-546) the mean difference between our results and those of MIRDOSE3 was -3%{+-}6%. Both outcomes indicate the validity of the present approach. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 18 refs.

  6. Residence time distribution measurements in a pilot-scale poison tank using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, H J; Goswami, Sunil; Samantray, J S; Sharma, V K; Maheshwari, N K

    2015-09-01

    Various types of systems are used to control the reactivity and shutting down of a nuclear reactor during emergency and routine shutdown operations. Injection of boron solution (borated water) into the core of a reactor is one of the commonly used methods during emergency operation. A pilot-scale poison tank was designed and fabricated to simulate injection of boron poison into the core of a reactor along with coolant water. In order to design a full-scale poison tank, it was desired to characterize flow of liquid from the tank. Residence time distribution (RTD) measurement and analysis was adopted to characterize the flow dynamics. Radiotracer technique was applied to measure RTD of aqueous phase in the tank using Bromine-82 as a radiotracer. RTD measurements were carried out with two different modes of operation of the tank and at different flow rates. In Mode-1, the radiotracer was instantaneously injected at the inlet and monitored at the outlet, whereas in Mode-2, the tank was filled with radiotracer and its concentration was measured at the outlet. From the measured RTD curves, mean residence times (MRTs), dead volume and fraction of liquid pumped in with time were determined. The treated RTD curves were modeled using suitable mathematical models. An axial dispersion model with high degree of backmixing was found suitable to describe flow when operated in Mode-1, whereas a tanks-in-series model with backmixing was found suitable to describe flow of the poison in the tank when operated in Mode-2. The results were utilized to scale-up and design a full-scale poison tank for a nuclear reactor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of the resident time distribution (RTD) in copper concentrate drying plants using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz V, Francisco J.; Duran P, Oscar U.; Hernandez A, Fernando A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a study on the drying process of copper concentrate, on two fluidized bed dryers at Fundicion Caletones, Division El Teniente, Codelco-Chile. The problem was investigated by experimental determination of the resident Time Distribution (RTD) for the material to be dry and by an analysis of the influence of the grain size in the drying process. The stimulus-response technique was used in the experiments, where the stimulation was a pulse of an adequate radioactive tracer injected at the dryer's input. Under these conditions, the response obtained at the dryer's outputs, i.e., the concentration variation curve as a function of time, represents directly the RTD of the system between the injection and measuring points. The tracer used was the same material to be dried, and it was irradiated with neutrons in the nuclear reactor at La Reina Nuclear Centre, thus producing a solid gamma radiation emitter tracer of identical behaviour as the material under study. The approximate activity of each sample was equivalent to 8 mCi of Cu-64 at the time of the injection and the measurement of the tracer was made on-line using NaI(Tl) gamma radiation detectors. The results obtained showed average times less than the estimated and would indicate a fast drying using minimum volume in the dryer. The drying of the fine particles was three times faster than the coarse ones. (author)

  8. Spectrum analysis of radiotracer residence time distribution for industrial and environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasban, H.; Ashraf Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Radiotracer signal analysis and recognition still represents challenges in industrial and environmental applications specially in residence time distribution (RTD) measurement. This paper presents a development for the RTD signal recognition method that is based on power density spectrum (PDS). In this development, the features are extracted from the signals and/or from their higher-orders statistics (HOS) (Bispectrum and Trispectrum) instead of PDS. The HOS are estimated using direct, indirect and parametric estimations. The recognition results are analyzed and compared for different HOS estimation in order to select the best HOS estimation method for the purpose of RTD signal recognition. The artificial neural networks are used for training and testing of the proposed method. The proposed method is tested using RTD signals obtained from the measurements carried out using radiotracer technique. The simulation results show that the parametric estimation of the Trispectrum gives the higher recognition rate and is the most reliable for the RTD signal recognition. (author)

  9. Residence time of contaminants released in surface coal mines -- a wind-tunnel study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, R.S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Surface coal mining operations (blasting, shoveling, loading, trucking, etc.) are sources of airborne particles. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments direct the EPA to analyze the accuracy of the Industrial Source Complex model and the AP-42 emission factors, and to make revisions as may be necessary to eliminate any significant over-prediction of air concentration of fugitive particles from surface coal mines. A wind-tunnel study was performed at the US EPA`s Fluid Modeling Facility to investigate dispersion from surface coal mines in support of the dispersion modeling activities. Described here is the portion of the study directed at determining the residence time that material released near the floor of a mine will stay within the mine.

  10. Cross-linked poly(tetrahydrofuran) as promising sorbent for organic solvent/oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yati, Ilker; Ozan Aydin, Gulsah; Bulbul Sonmez, Hayal, E-mail: hayalsonmez@gtu.edu.tr

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Poly(tetrahydrofuran) based sorbents were prepared. • PTHF sorbents demonstrate reusability at least for ten times. • PTHF based sorbents show fast and quick absorption-desorption process. • 19 g of oil can be absorbed by 1 g of PTHF based sorbent. - Abstract: In this study, a series of different molecular weights of poly(tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), which is one of the most important commercial polymers around the world, was condensed with tris[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]isocyanurate (ICS) to generate a cross-linked 3-dimensional network in order to obtain organic solvent/oil sorbents having high swelling capacity. The prepared sorbents show high and fast swelling capacity in oils such as dichloromethane (DCM), tetrahydrofuran (THF), acetone, t-butyl methyl ether (MTBE), gasoline, euro diesel, and crude oil. The recovery of the absorbed oils from contaminated surfaces, especially from water, and the regeneration of the sorbents after several applications are effective. The characterization and thermal properties of the sorbents are identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), solid-state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analyses (TGA), respectively. The new usage area of PTHF is emerged by the preparation of PTHF-based network structure with high oil absorption capacity and having excellent reusability as an oil absorbent for the removal of organic liquids from the spill site.

  11. Variability in Benthic Exchange Rate, Depth, and Residence Time Beneath a Shallow Coastal Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russoniello, Christopher J.; Heiss, James W.; Michael, Holly A.

    2018-03-01

    Hydrodynamically driven benthic exchange of water between the water column and shallow seabed aquifer is a significant and dynamic component of coastal and estuarine fluid budgets. Associated exchange of solutes promotes ecologically important chemical reactions, so quantifying benthic exchange rates, depths, and residence times constrains coastal chemical cycling estimates. We present the first combined field, numerical, and analytical modeling investigation of wave-induced exchange. Temporal variability of exchange was calculated with data collected by instruments deployed in a shallow estuary for 11 days. Differential pressure sensors recorded pressure gradients across the seabed, and up- and down-looking ADCPs recorded currents and pressures to determine wave parameters, surface-water currents, and water depth. Wave-induced exchange was calculated (1) directly from differential pressure measurements, and indirectly with an analytical model based on wave parameters from (2) ADCP and (3) wind data. Wave-induced exchange from pressure measurements and ADCP-measured wave parameters matched well, but both exceeded wind-based values. Exchange induced by tidal pumping and current-bed form interaction—the other primary drivers in shallow coastal waters were calculated from tidal stage variation and ADCP-measured currents. Exchange from waves (mean = 20.0 cm/d; range = 1.75-92.3 cm/d) greatly exceeded exchange due to tides (mean = 3.7 cm/d) and current-bed form interaction (mean = 6.5 × 10-2 cm/d). Groundwater flow models showed aquifer properties affect wave-driven benthic exchange: residence time and depth increased and exchange rates decreased with increasing hydraulic diffusivity (ratio of aquifer permeability to compressibility). This new understanding of benthic exchange will help managers assess its control over chemical fluxes to marine systems.

  12. Spinning Disc Technology – Residence Time Distribution and Efficiency in Textile Wastewater Treatment Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob Tudose, E. T.; Zaharia, C.

    2018-06-01

    The spinning disc (SD) technology has received increased attention in the last years due to its enhanced fluid flow features resulting in improved property transfers. The actual study focuses on characterization of the flow within a spinning disc system based on experimental data used to establish the residence time distribution (RTD) and its dependence on the feeding liquid flowrate and the disc rotational speed. To obtain these data, an inert tracer (sodium chloride) was injected as a pulse input in the liquid stream entering the disc and the salt concentration of the liquid leaving the disc was continuously recorded. The obtained data indicate that an increase in the liquid flowrate from 10 L/h to 30 L/h determines a narrower RTD function. Also, at rotational speed of 200 rpm, the residence time distribution is broader than that for 500 rpm and 800 rpm. The RTD data suggest that depending on the needed flow characteristics, one can choose a certain flowrate and rotational speed domain for its application. Also, the SD technology was used to process textile wastewater treated with bentonite (as both coagulation and discoloration agent) in order to investigate whether the quality indicators such as the total suspended solid content, turbidity and discoloration, can be improved. The experimental results are promising since the discoloration and the removals of suspended solids attained values of over 40%, and respectively, 50 %, depending on the effluent flowrate (10 l/h and 30 L/h), and the disc rotational speed (200 rpm, 550 rpm and 850 rpm) without any other addition of chemicals, or initiation of other simultaneous treatment processes (e.g., advanced oxidative, or reductive, or biochemical processes). This recommends spinning disc technology as a suitable and promising tool to improve different wastewater characteristics.

  13. Hydrochemistry, origin and residence time of deep groundwater in the Yuseong area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Yong Kwon; Kim, Geon Young; Bae, Dae Seok; Park, Kyung Woo

    2005-01-01

    As a part of the radioactive waste disposal research program in Korea, the geological, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical investigations have been carried out in the Yuseong area (KAERI). The temperature or groundwater is measured up to 24 .deg. C and thermal gradient is obtained, to 0.26 .deg. C/100m. pH of groundwater at upper section shows about 7 and the pH of groundwater of 200m below surface reaches almost constant value as 9.9∼10.3. The redox potential of groundwater varied with depth and more negative values were recognized in deep groundwater. The redox potential of deep groundwater, main factor of U solubility, was measured up to -150 mV. These high pH and reduced conditions indicates that the maximum U concentration in groundwater would be limited by the equilibrium solubility of U minerals. The chemistry of shallow groundwater shows Ca-HCO 3 or Ca-Na-HCO 3 type, whereas the deep groundwater belongs to typical Na-HCO 3 type. The chemistry of groundwater below 250m from the surface is constant with depth, indicating that the extent of water-rock reaction is almost unique, which is controlled by the residence time of groundwater. The carbon isotope data (δ 13 C) of groundwater show the contribution of carbon from either that microbial oxidation of organic matter or carbon dioxide from plant respiration. The measurement and interpretation of C-14 indicate that the residence time of borehole deep groundwater ranges from about 2,000 to 6,000 yr BP. The high δ 34 S so4 value of groundwater indicate that the sulfate reduction might be occurred in the deep environment

  14. Sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Smotraiev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The actual problem of water supply in the world and in Ukraine, in particular, is a high level of pollution in water resources and an insufficient level of drinking water purification. With industrial wastewater, a significant amount of pollutants falls into water bodies, including suspended particles, sulfates, iron compounds, heavy metals, etc. Aim: The aim of this work is to determine the impact of aluminum and manganese ions additives on surface and sorption properties of zirconium oxyhydroxide based sorbents during their production process. Materials and Methods: The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were prepared by sol-gel method during the hydrolysis of metal chlorides (zirconium oxychloride ZrOCl2, aluminum chloride AlCl3 and manganese chloride MnCl2 with carbamide. Results: The surface and sorption properties of sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were investigated. X-ray amorphous structure and evolved hydroxyl-hydrate cover mainly characterize the obtained xerogels. The composite sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide doped with aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 537 m2/g and manganese oxyhydroxide (aS = 356 m2/g have more developed specific surface area than single-component xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide (aS = 236 m2/g and aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 327 m2/g. The sorbent based on the xerogel of zirconium and manganese oxyhydroxides have the maximum SO42--ions sorption capacity. It absorbs 1.5 times more SO42–-ions than the industrial anion exchanger AN-221. The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide has the sorption capacity of Fe3+-ions that is 1.5…2 times greater than the capacity of the industrial cation exchanger KU-2-8. The Na+-ions absorption capacity is 1.47…1.56 mmol/g for each sorbent. Conclusions: Based on these data it can be concluded that the proposed method is effective for sorbents production based on

  15. Deep Bed Iodine Sorbent Testing FY 2011 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products that increasingly interfere with the fission process as their concentrations increase. Some of these fission and activation products tend to evolve in gaseous species during used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Analyses have shown that I129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Deep-bed iodine sorption testing has been done to evaluate the performance of solid sorbents for capturing iodine in off-gas streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The objectives of the FY 2011 deep bed iodine sorbent testing are: (1) Evaluate sorbents for iodine capture under various conditions of gas compositions and operating temperature (determine sorption efficiencies, capacities, and mass transfer zone depths); and (2) Generate data for dynamic iodine sorption modeling. Three tests performed this fiscal year on silver zeolite light phase (AgZ-LP) sorbent are reported here. Additional tests are still in progress and can be reported in a revision of this report or a future report. Testing was somewhat delayed and limited this year due to initial activities to address some questions of prior testing, and due to a period of maintenance for the on-line GC. Each test consisted of (a) flowing a synthetic blend of gases designed to be similar to an aqueous dissolver off-gas stream over the sorbent contained in three separate bed segments in series, (b) measuring each bed inlet and outlet gas concentrations of iodine and methyl iodide (the two surrogates of iodine gas species considered most representative of iodine species expected in dissolver off-gas), (c) operating for a long enough time to achieve breakthrough of the iodine species from at least one (preferably the first two) bed segments, and (d) post-test purging

  16. "It's Not Just Time Off": A Framework for Understanding Factors Promoting Recovery From Burnout Among Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, Nauzley C; Stack, Shobha W; Goodman, Jessie L; Steinberg, Kenneth P

    2018-02-01

    Burnout rates for internal medicine residents are among the highest of all specialties, yet little is known about how residents recover from burnout. We identified factors promoting recovery from burnout and factors that assist with the subsequent avoidance of burnout among internal medicine residents. A purposive sample of postgraduate year 2 (PGY-2), PGY-3, and recent graduates who experienced and recovered from burnout during residency participated in semistructured, 60-minute interviews from June to August 2016. Using qualitative methods derived from grounded theory, saturation of themes occurred after 25 interviews. Coding was performed in an iterative fashion and consensus was reached on major themes. Coding revealed 2 different categories of resident burnout- circumstantial and existential -with differing recovery and avoidance methods. Circumstantial burnout stemmed from self-limited circumstances and environmental triggers. Recovery from, and subsequent avoidance of, circumstantial burnout arose from (1) resolving workplace challenges; (2) nurturing personal lives; and (3) taking time off. In contrast, existential burnout stemmed from a loss of meaning in medicine and an uncertain professional role. These themes were identified around recovery: (1) recognizing burnout and feeling validated; (2) connecting with patients and colleagues; (3) finding meaning in medicine; and (4) redefining a professional identity and role. Our study suggests that residents experience different types of burnout and have variable methods by which they recover from and avoid further burnout. Categorizing residents' burnout into circumstantial versus existential experiences may serve as a helpful framework for formulating interventions.

  17. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  18. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  19. U Isotope Systematics on Groundwaters from Southwestern France : Mixing Processes and Residence Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocent, C.; Malcuit, E.; Négrel, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Eocene Sands Aquifer of the Aquitanian Basin (Southwestern France) has been extensively studied for its hydrology, hydrogeochemistry and also for stable isotopes (André, 2002; André et al., 2005). 14C dates were also obtained in the southern part of the aquifer (André, 2002). Recently, in the framework of the CARISMEAU research project (Négrel et al., 2007), groundwaters have been analyzed for their U activity ratio in order to put some constraints on their residence time in the aquifer. A excellent correlation has been found between 234U/238U ratios (which can be as high as 13.5) and 14C dates, which allowed to propose residence times for the analyzed groundwaters at the scale of the whole aquifer (including the city of Bordeaux and its suburb) (Innocent and Négrel, 2008; submitted). The second step of the CARISMEAU research project (CARISMEAU 2) now focusses on the restricted "Entre-Deux-Mers" area. New groundwaters have been recovered and analyzed for their U isotopic composition. As for previous data, U activity ratios are typically very high, ranging from 2.9 to 8.6. Owing to additional 14C ages from the northern part of the aquifer, it is shown that most of the measured uranium activity ratios correlate with these 14C dates and fall on or close to the straight line defined previously (see above). As a consequence, residence times derived from U isotopic compositions fairly agree with 14C data, with only one exception from a groundwater which plots apart from the correlation line. Pumping tests have been done at a selected site (EMZM 7), involving pumping times of 1 hour, 8 hours and 16 hours. For each pumping time, waters have been recovered at different, increasing pumping rates of 80 m3 per hour, 120 m3 per hour, 160 m3 per hour, and 120 m3 per hour. The chemical composition of these twelve waters has not been found to vary significantly. Uranium activities are constant for ten of the twelve groundwaters (around 6.5, with a U concentration around

  20. Measuring gas-residence times in large municipal incinerators, by means of a pseudo-random binary signal tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasserzadeh, V.; Swithenbank, J.; Jones, B.

    1995-01-01

    The problem of measuring gas-residence time in large incinerators was studied by the pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) stimulus tracer response technique at the Sheffield municipal solid-waste incinerator (35 MW plant). The steady-state system was disturbed by the superimposition of small fluctuations in the form of a pseudo-random binary sequence of methane pulses, and the response of the incinerator was determined from the CO 2 concentration in flue gases at the boiler exit, measured with a specially developed optical gas analyser with a high-frequency response. For data acquisition, an on-line PC computer was used together with the LAB Windows software system; the output response was then cross-correlated with the perturbation signal to give the impulse response of the incinerator. There was very good agreement between the gas-residence time for the Sheffield MSW incinerator as calculated by computational fluid dynamics (FLUENT Model) and gas-residence time at the plant as measured by the PRBS tracer technique. The results obtained from this research programme clearly demonstrate that the PRBS stimulus tracer response technique can be successfully and economically used to measure gas-residence times in large incinerator plants. It also suggests that the common commercial practice of characterising the incinerator operation by a single-residence-time parameter may lead to a misrepresentation of the complexities involved in describing the operation of the incineration system. (author)

  1. Exposure in emergency general surgery in a time-based residency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This paper aimed to characterize the resident exposure to acute general surgical conditions during a three-months rotation in a general surgical unit. Setting: The Department of Surgery, University of Nairobi and Kenyatta National Referral and Teaching Hospital in Nairobi. MethodS: Four residents (in their first to ...

  2. Organizational and Individual Conditions Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Nursing Home Residents over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassie, Kimberly M.; Cassie, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of organizational culture and climate on depressive symptoms among nursing home residents. Design and Methods: Using a pooled cross-sectional design, this study examines a sample of 23 nursing homes, 1,114 employees, and 5,497 residents. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Minimum Data Set, Depression Rating…

  3. Residence times and alluvial architecture of a sediment superslug in response to different flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, John A.

    2017-01-01

    A superslug was deposited in a basin in the Colorado Front Range Mountains as a consequence of an extreme flood following a wildfire disturbance in 1996. The subsequent evolution of this superslug was measured by repeat topographic surveys (31 surveys from 1996 through 2014) of 18 cross sections approximately uniformly spaced over 1500 m immediately above the basin outlet. These surveys allowed the identification within the superslug of chronostratigraphic units deposited and eroded by different geomorphic processes in response to different flow regimes.Over the time period of the study, the superslug went through aggradation, incision, and stabilization phases that were controlled by a shift in geomorphic processes from generally short-duration, episodic, large-magnitude floods that deposited new chronostratigraphic units to long-duration processes that eroded units. These phases were not contemporaneous at each channel cross section, which resulted in a complex response that preserved different chronostratigraphic units at each channel cross section having, in general, two dominant types of alluvial architecture—laminar and fragmented. Age and transit-time distributions for these two alluvial architectures evolved with time since the extreme flood. Because of the complex shape of the distributions they were best modeled by two-parameter Weibull functions. The Weibull scale parameter approximated the median age of the distributions, and the Weibull shape parameter generally had a linear relation that increased with time since the extreme flood. Additional results indicated that deposition of new chronostratigraphic units can be represented by a power-law frequency distribution, and that the erosion of units decreases with depth of burial to a limiting depth. These relations can be used to model other situations with different flow regimes where vertical aggradation and incision are dominant processes, to predict the residence time of possible contaminated

  4. Residence times and alluvial architecture of a sediment superslug in response to different flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, John A.

    2017-10-01

    A superslug was deposited in a basin in the Colorado Front Range Mountains as a consequence of an extreme flood following a wildfire disturbance in 1996. The subsequent evolution of this superslug was measured by repeat topographic surveys (31 surveys from 1996 through 2014) of 18 cross sections approximately uniformly spaced over 1500 m immediately above the basin outlet. These surveys allowed the identification within the superslug of chronostratigraphic units deposited and eroded by different geomorphic processes in response to different flow regimes. Over the time period of the study, the superslug went through aggradation, incision, and stabilization phases that were controlled by a shift in geomorphic processes from generally short-duration, episodic, large-magnitude floods that deposited new chronostratigraphic units to long-duration processes that eroded units. These phases were not contemporaneous at each channel cross section, which resulted in a complex response that preserved different chronostratigraphic units at each channel cross section having, in general, two dominant types of alluvial architecture-laminar and fragmented. Age and transit-time distributions for these two alluvial architectures evolved with time since the extreme flood. Because of the complex shape of the distributions they were best modeled by two-parameter Weibull functions. The Weibull scale parameter approximated the median age of the distributions, and the Weibull shape parameter generally had a linear relation that increased with time since the extreme flood. Additional results indicated that deposition of new chronostratigraphic units can be represented by a power-law frequency distribution, and that the erosion of units decreases with depth of burial to a limiting depth. These relations can be used to model other situations with different flow regimes where vertical aggradation and incision are dominant processes, to predict the residence time of possible contaminated

  5. Assessment of the vaginal residence time of biomarkers of semen exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Andrea; Jacot, Terry; Melendez, Johan; Kimble, Thomas; Snead, Margaret; Jamshidi, Roxanne; Wheeless, Angie; Archer, David F; Doncel, Gustavo F; Mauck, Christine

    2016-11-01

    The primary objective of this pilot study is to determine and compare the residence time in the vagina of biomarkers of semen exposure for up to 15 days post exposure. The biomarkers are prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Y chromosome DNA, the sex determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY) and testis-specific protein Y-encoded 4 (TSPY4). The secondary objectives are to determine if biomarker concentrations differed between intercourse and inoculation groups, to establish whether the sampling frequency post exposure affected biomarker concentrations and decay profile and to determine if biomarker concentrations in vaginal swabs obtained by the participant at home were similar to swabs obtained by the nurse in the clinic. We randomized healthy women to unprotected intercourse (n=17) versus vaginal inoculation with the male partner's semen in the clinic (n=16). Women were then further randomized to have vaginal swabs obtained at either 7 or 4 time points after semen exposure, up to 15 days post exposure, either obtained at home by the participant or in the clinic by the research nurse. PSA and SRY were markers of recent semen exposure. TSPY4 was detectable in approximately 50% of participants at 15 days post exposure. Unprotected intercourse resulted in significantly higher concentrations of select biomarkers. Sampling frequency and home versus clinic sampling had no significant effect on biomarker concentrations. Objective biomarkers of recent or distant semen exposure may have great utility for verifying protocol compliance in a variety of clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Plan for radionuclide tracer studies of the residence time distribution in the Wilsonville dissolver and preheater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, R.L.; Begovich, J.M.; Brashear, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Stimulus-response measurements using radiotracers to measure residence time distribution (RTD) and hydrodynamic parameters for the preheaters and dissolvers at the Ft. Lewis Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) and the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal conversion pilot plants are reviewed. A plan is also presented for a series of radioactive tracer studies proposed for the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama, to measure the RTD for the preheater and dissolvers in the SRC-I mode. The tracer for the gas phase will be 133 Xe, and 198 Au (on carbonized resin or as an aqueous colloidal suspension) will be used as the slurry tracer. Four experimental phases are recommended for the RTD tracer studies: (1) preheater; (2) dissolver with 100% takeoff; (3) dissolver with 100% takeoff and solids withdrawal; and (4) dissolver with 50% takeoff. Eighteen gas-tracer and 22 liquid-tracer injections are projected to accomplish the four experimental phases. Two to four tracer injections are projected for preliminary tests to ensure the capability of safe injection of the radiotracers and the collection of statistically significant data. A complete projected cost and time schedule is provided, including procurement of necessary components, preparation of the radiotracers, assembly and testing of tracer injection apparatus and detection systems, onsite work and tracer injections, laboratory experimentation, data analysis, and report writing

  7. Accessing doctors at times of need-measuring the distance tolerance of rural residents for health-related travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Matthew Richard; Humphreys, John Stirling; Ward, Bernadette

    2015-05-29

    Poor access to doctors at times of need remains a significant impediment to achieving good health for many rural residents. The two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method has emerged as a key tool for measuring healthcare access in rural areas. However, the choice of catchment size, a key component of the 2SFCA method, is problematic because little is known about the distance tolerance of rural residents for health-related travel. Our study sought new evidence to test the hypothesis that residents of sparsely settled rural areas are prepared to travel further than residents of closely settled rural areas when accessing primary health care at times of need. A questionnaire survey of residents in five small rural communities of Victoria and New South Wales in Australia was used. The two outcome measures were current travel time to visit their usual doctor and maximum time prepared to travel to visit a doctor, both for non-emergency care. Kaplan-Meier charts were used to compare the association between increased distance and decreased travel propensity for closely-settled and sparsely-settled areas, and ordinal multivariate regression models tested significance after controlling for health-related travel moderating factors and town clustering. A total of 1079 questionnaires were completed with 363 from residents in closely-settled locations and 716 from residents in sparsely-settled areas. Residents of sparsely-settled communities travel, on average, 10 min further than residents of closely-settled communities (26.3 vs 16.9 min, p time prepared to travel (54.1 vs 31.9 min, p time remained significant after controlling for demographic and other constraints to access, such as transport availability or difficulties getting doctor appointments, as well as after controlling for town clustering and current travel times. Improved geographical access remains a key issue underpinning health policies designed to improve the provision of rural primary health care

  8. Investigations to the reduction of the drying time of temperature sensitive goods with assistance of sorbents. Final report; Untersuchungen zur Verkuerzung der Trocknungszeit temperaturempfindlicher Gueter unter Verwendung von Sorptionsmitteln. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutelle, R.

    1998-07-31

    It was the aim of the project to improve the solar drying process with assistance of solar regenerated sorbents. Fruits, vegetables, herbs and mushrooms were dried in hurdles and calcium chloride solutions were concentrated in black plastic basins with solar energy during the day. At night or at bad meteorological conditions the hurdles with the drying goods were set into the basins and capped in order to continue the drying process. By this means a microbial decay was prohibited and the drying time was shortened roughly by half. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel des Vorhabens war es, den Prozess der solaren Trocknung mit Hilfe von solar regenerierten Sorptionsmitteln zu verbessern. Tagsueber wurden mit Solarenergie Fruechte, Gemuese, Kraeuter und Pilze in Horden getrocknet, und Calciumchloridloesungen wurden in schwarzen Kunststoffwannen regeneriert. Zur Fortsetzung der Trocknung waehrend der Nacht und bei unguenstigen Witterungsverhaeltnissen wurden die Horden mit den Trocknungsguetern in die Wannen gesetzt und abgedeckt. Durch dieses Verfahren konnte ein mikrobieller Verderb vermieden und die Trocknungszeit auf ca. die Haelfte verkuerzt werden. (orig.)

  9. Residence times of groundwater and nitrate transport in coastal aquifer systems: Daweijia area, northeastern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dongmei; Cao, Guoliang; McCallum, James; Song, Xianfang

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater within the coastal aquifer systems of the Daweijia area in northeastern China is characterized by a large of variations (33–521 mg/L) in NO_3"− concentrations. Elevated nitrate concentrations, in addition to seawater intrusion in the Daweijia well field, both attributable to anthropogenic activities, may impact future water-management practices. Chemical and stable isotopic (δ"1"8O, δ"2H) analysis, "3H and CFCs methods were applied to provide a better understanding of the relationship between the distribution of groundwater mean residence time (MRT) and nitrate transport, and to identify sources of nitrate concentrations in the complex coastal aquifer systems. There is a relatively narrow range of isotopic composition (ranging from − 8.5 to − 7.0‰) in most groundwater. Generally higher tritium contents observed in the wet season relative to the dry season may result from rapid groundwater circulation in response to the rainfall through the preferential flow paths. In the well field, the relatively increased nitrate concentrations of groundwater, accompanied by the higher tritium contents in the wet season, indicate the nitrate pollution can be attributed to domestic wastes. The binary exponential and piston-flow mixing model (BEP) yielded feasible age distributions based on the conceptual model. The good inverse relationship between groundwater MRTs (92–467 years) and the NO_3"− concentrations in the shallow Quaternary aquifers indicates that elevated nitrate concentrations are attributable to more recent recharge for shallow groundwater. However, there is no significant relationship between the MRTs (8–411 years) and the NO_3"− concentrations existing in the carbonate aquifer system, due to the complex hydrogeological conditions, groundwater age distributions and the range of contaminant source areas. Nitrate in the groundwater system without denitrification effects could accumulate and be transported for tens of years, through the

  10. Residence times of groundwater and nitrate transport in coastal aquifer systems: Daweijia area, northeastern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dongmei [Key Laboratory of Water Cycle & Related Land Surface Processes, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Cao, Guoliang [National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Center for Water Research, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); McCallum, James [National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); School of the Environment, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Song, Xianfang [Key Laboratory of Water Cycle & Related Land Surface Processes, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Groundwater within the coastal aquifer systems of the Daweijia area in northeastern China is characterized by a large of variations (33–521 mg/L) in NO{sub 3}{sup −} concentrations. Elevated nitrate concentrations, in addition to seawater intrusion in the Daweijia well field, both attributable to anthropogenic activities, may impact future water-management practices. Chemical and stable isotopic (δ{sup 18}O, δ{sup 2}H) analysis, {sup 3}H and CFCs methods were applied to provide a better understanding of the relationship between the distribution of groundwater mean residence time (MRT) and nitrate transport, and to identify sources of nitrate concentrations in the complex coastal aquifer systems. There is a relatively narrow range of isotopic composition (ranging from − 8.5 to − 7.0‰) in most groundwater. Generally higher tritium contents observed in the wet season relative to the dry season may result from rapid groundwater circulation in response to the rainfall through the preferential flow paths. In the well field, the relatively increased nitrate concentrations of groundwater, accompanied by the higher tritium contents in the wet season, indicate the nitrate pollution can be attributed to domestic wastes. The binary exponential and piston-flow mixing model (BEP) yielded feasible age distributions based on the conceptual model. The good inverse relationship between groundwater MRTs (92–467 years) and the NO{sub 3}{sup −} concentrations in the shallow Quaternary aquifers indicates that elevated nitrate concentrations are attributable to more recent recharge for shallow groundwater. However, there is no significant relationship between the MRTs (8–411 years) and the NO{sub 3}{sup −} concentrations existing in the carbonate aquifer system, due to the complex hydrogeological conditions, groundwater age distributions and the range of contaminant source areas. Nitrate in the groundwater system without denitrification effects could accumulate and be

  11. Watershed Influences on Residence Time and Oxygen Reduction Rates in an Agricultural Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, C. L.; Tesoriero, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural use of synthetic fertilizers and animal manure has led to increased crop production, but also elevated nitrogen concentrations in groundwater, resulting in impaired water quality. Groundwater oxygen concentrations are a key indicator of potential biogeochemical processes, which control water/aquifer interactions and contaminant transport. The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program has a long-history of studying nutrient transport and processing across the United States and the Glacial Aquifer system in particular. A series of groundwater well networks in Eastern Wisconsin is being used to evaluate the distribution of redox reaction rates over a range of scales with a focus on dissolved O2 reduction rates. An analysis of these multi-scale networks elucidates the influence of explanatory variables (i.e.: soil type, land use classification) on reduction rates and redox reactions throughout the Fox-Wolf-Peshtigo watersheds. Multiple tracers including dissolved gasses, tritium, helium, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and carbon-14 were used to estimate groundwater ages (0.8 to 61.2 yr) at over 300 locations. Our results indicate O2 reduction rates along a flowpath study area (1.2 km2) of 0.15 mg O2 L-1 yr-1 (0.12 to 0.18 mg O2 L-1 yr-1) up to 0.41 mg O2 L-1 yr-1 (0.23 to 0.89 mg O2 L-1 yr-1) for a larger scale land use study area (3,300 km2). Preliminary explanatory variables that can be used to describe the variability in reduction rates include soil type (hydrologic group, bulk density) and chemical concentrations (nitrite plus nitrate, silica). The median residence time expected to reach suboxic conditions (≤ 0.4 mg O2 L-1) for the flowpath and the land use study areas was 66 and 25 yr, respectively. These results can be used to elucidate and differentiate the impact of residence time on groundwater quality vulnerability and sustainability in agricultural regions without complex flow models.

  12. Seasonal variation of residence time in spring and groundwater evaluated by CFCs and numerical simulation in mountainous headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Maki; Watanabe, Yasuto; Ikeda, Koichi; Yano, Shinjiro; Abe, Yutaka

    2016-04-01

    Headwater catchments in mountainous region are the most important recharge area for surface and subsurface waters, additionally time information of the water is principal to understand hydrological processes in the catchments. However, there have been few researches to evaluate variation of residence time of subsurface water in time and space at the mountainous headwaters especially with steep slope. We investigated the temporal variation of the residence time of the spring and groundwater with tracing of hydrological flow processes in mountainous catchments underlain by granite, Yamanashi Prefecture, central Japan. We conducted intensive hydrological monitoring and water sampling of spring, stream and ground waters in high-flow and low-flow seasons from 2008 through 2013 in River Jingu Watershed underlain by granite, with an area of approximately 15 km2 and elevation ranging from 950 m to 2000 m. The CFCs, stable isotopic ratios of oxygen-18 and deuterium, inorganic solute constituent concentrations were determined on all water samples. Also, a numerical simulation was conducted to reproduce of the average residence times of the spring and groundwater. The residence time of the spring water estimated by the CFCs concentration ranged from 10 years to 60 years in space within the watershed, and it was higher (older) during the low flow season and lower (younger) during the high flow season. We tried to reproduce the seasonal change of the residence time in the spring water by numerical simulation, and the calculated residence time of the spring water and discharge of the stream agreed well with the observed values. The groundwater level was higher during the high flow season and the groundwater dominantly flowed through the weathered granite with higher permeability, whereas that was lower during the low flow season and that flowed dominantly through the fresh granite with lower permeability. This caused the seasonal variation of the residence time of the spring

  13. Investigation of Residence and Travel Times in a Large Floodplain Lake with Complex Lake-River Interactions: Poyang Lake (China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunliang Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Most biochemical processes and associated water quality in lakes depends on their flushing abilities. The main objective of this study was to investigate the transport time scale in a large floodplain lake, Poyang Lake (China. A 2D hydrodynamic model (MIKE 21 was combined with dye tracer simulations to determine residence and travel times of the lake for various water level variation periods. The results indicate that Poyang Lake exhibits strong but spatially heterogeneous residence times that vary with its highly seasonal water level dynamics. Generally, the average residence times are less than 10 days along the lake’s main flow channels due to the prevailing northward flow pattern; whereas approximately 30 days were estimated during high water level conditions in the summer. The local topographically controlled flow patterns substantially increase the residence time in some bays with high spatial values of six months to one year during all water level variation periods. Depending on changes in the water level regime, the travel times from the pollution sources to the lake outlet during the high and falling water level periods (up to 32 days are four times greater than those under the rising and low water level periods (approximately seven days.

  14. [The European Working Time Directive and surgical residents' expertise: no effect on the number of operations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicherit, Onno R

    2015-01-01

    Residents' working hours in the Netherlands were first capped in the early 1990 s. In 2003, European legislation consolidated restrictions to a 48-hour week. No adverse effects were seen on the number of surgical operations performed either in the first or the second decade following these measures. Either the effect on surgical training is minimal, or the number of operations carried out during a residency is not a meaningful indicator of its quality. Personalized modular rotations in both university and teaching hospitals are needed for residents with sub-specializations. Training activities, in combination with more supervision, have to focus on a broader set of competencies beyond simply mastering surgical procedures.

  15. Groundwater residence time : tell me who you are and I will tell which information you may provide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, Luc; Labasque, Thierry; Kolbe, Tamara; Marçais, Jean; Leray, Sarah; Abbott, Ben; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater residence-time or ages have been widely used in hydrogeology during the last decades. Following tritium measurements, anthropogenic gases (CFC, SF6, 35Kr) have been developed. They provide information at the aquifer scale on long residence times. They complement the more localized data obtained from sparse boreholes with hydraulic and geophysical methods. Anthropogenic tracer concentrations are most generally considered as "Groundwater ages" using a piston flow model providing an order of magnitude for the residence time. More advanced information can however be derived from the combined analysis of the tracer concentrations. For example, the residence time distribution over the last 50 years can be well approached by the concentration of two sufficient different anthropogenic tracers in the group (CFC, SF6, 35Kr), i.e. tracers whose anthropogenic chronicles are sufficiently different. And, with additional constrains on geological and hydraulic properties, groundwater ages contribute to characterize the aquifer structures and the groundwater resources. Complex geological environments also include old groundwater bodies in extremely confined aquifer sections. In such cases, various tracers are related to highly different processes. CFCs can be taken as a marker of modern contamination to track exchanges between shallower and deeper aquifers, leakage processes, and modification of circulations linked to recent anthropogenic changes. 14C or 36Cl can be used to evidence much older processes but have to be related to the history of the chemical element itself. Numerous field studies in fact demonstrate the broad-range extent of the residence time distribution spanning in some cases several orders of magnitude. Flow and transport models in heterogeneous structures confirm such wide residence times and help to characterize their distribution. Residence times also serve as a privileged interface to the fate of some contaminants in aquifers or to trace

  16. Evaluation of silk-floss fiber and dog fur as sorbent materials for the petroleum sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Lucas P. dos [Universidade Federal do Parana (PGMec/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Dubiella, Juliana [Universidade Federal do Parana (DEMEC/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Programa Institucional de Bolsas de Iniciacao Cientifica; Perotta, Larissa [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa Interdisciplinar em Engenharia de Petroleo e Gas Natural; Satyanarayana, Kestur G. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Flores-Sahagun, Thais Sydenstricker [Universidade Federal do Parana (DEMEC/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2009-07-01

    In this study silk-floss and dog fur were tested as sorbent materials for oils and the results were compared with peat, a commercial sorbent. Sorption tests were carried out in dry and aqueous systems, with and without stirring for different periods of time (5-1440 min). Density, hydrophobicity, buoyancy and water uptake by the fibers of the impregnated sorbents have been determined. The use of silk-floss and dog fur was also tested in columns to purify water containing toluene, benzene, motor oil or sunflower oil. Breakthrough curves during 120 min were drawn for each material with the samples (oily water or water containing benzene or toluene) and were analyzed by ultraviolet spectroscopy. It was concluded that the silk-floss is the best sorbent material (65.3 g oil/g sorbent) followed by the dog fur (34.6 g oil/g sorbent) and peat (19.5 g oil/g sorbent), for sorption time of 1 h in dynamic condition. The efficiency of the pollutant removal from water with the use of adsorption columns was high for both materials although the use of dog fur was preferable because of the slight superiority in efficiency compared to silk-floss and also, due to the easier packing of the dog fur in the column. (author)

  17. RESIDENCE TIMES OF PARTICLES IN DIFFUSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISK ENVIRONMENTS. I. VERTICAL MOTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciesla, F. J.

    2010-01-01

    The chemical and physical evolution of primitive materials in protoplanetary disks are determined by the types of environments they are exposed to and their residence times within each environment. Here, a method for calculating representative paths of materials in diffusive protoplanetary disks is developed and applied to understanding how the vertical trajectories that particles take impact their overall evolution. The methods are general enough to be applied to disks with uniform diffusivity, the so-called constant-α cases, and disks with a spatially varying diffusivity, such as expected in 'layered-disks'. The average long-term dynamical evolution of small particles and gaseous molecules is independent of the specific form of the diffusivity in that they spend comparable fractions of their lifetimes at different heights in the disk. However, the paths that individual particles and molecules take depend strongly on the form of the diffusivity leading to a different range of behavior of particles in terms of deviations from the mean. As temperatures, gas densities, chemical abundances, and photon fluxes will vary with height in protoplanetary disks, the different paths taken by primitive materials will lead to differences in their chemical and physical evolution. Examples of differences in gas phase chemistry and photochemistry are explored here. The methods outlined here provide a powerful tool that can be integrated with chemical models to understand the formation and evolution of primitive materials in protoplanetary disks on timescales of 10 5 -10 6 years.

  18. Fluid flow profile in a packed bead column using residence time curves and radiotracer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ana Paula F. de; Gonçalves, Eduardo Ramos; Brandão, Luis Eduardo B.; Salgado, Cesar M., E-mail: anacamiqui@gmail.com, E-mail: egoncalves@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Filling columns are extremely important in the chemical industry and are used for purification, separation and treatment processes of gas or liquid mixtures. The objective of this work is to study the hydrodynamics of the fluid for a characterization of aqueous phase flow patterns in the filling column, associating with the methodology of the Curves of Residence Time Distribution (RTD) to analyze and associate theoretical models that put as conditions column operating. RTD can be obtained by using the pulse-stimulus response technique which is characterized by the instantaneous injection of a radiotracer into the system input. In this work, 68Ga was used as radiotracer. Five shielded and collimated NaI (Tl) 1 x 1″ scintillator detectors were suitably positioned to record the movement of the radiotracer's path in the conveying line and filling column. Making possible the analysis of the RTD curve in the regions of interest. With the data generated by the NaI (Tl) detectors with the passage of the radiotracer in the transport line and inside the column, it was possible to evaluate the flow profile of the aqueous phase and to identify operational failures, such as internal conduit and the existence of a retention zone in the inside the column. Theoretical models were used for different flow flows: the piston flow and perfect mixing. (author)

  19. Subunit Stabilization and Polyethylene Glycolation of Cocaine Esterase Improves In Vivo Residence Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Collins, Gregory T.; Nance, Mark R.; Nichols, Joseph; Edwald, Elin; Chan, Jimmy; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Woods, James H.; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K. (Michigan)

    2012-03-15

    No small-molecule therapeutic is available to treat cocaine addiction, but enzyme-based therapy to accelerate cocaine hydrolysis in serum has gained momentum. Bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) is the fastest known native enzyme that hydrolyzes cocaine. However, its lability at 37 C has limited its therapeutic potential. Cross-linking subunits through disulfide bridging is commonly used to stabilize multimeric enzymes. Herein we use structural methods to guide the introduction of two cysteine residues within dimer interface of CocE to facilitate intermolecular disulfide bond formation. The disulfide-crosslinked enzyme displays improved thermostability, particularly when combined with previously described mutations that enhance stability (T172R-G173Q). The newly modified enzyme yielded an extremely stable form of CocE (CCRQ-CocE) that retained greater than 90% of its activity after 41 days at 37 C, representing an improvement of more than 4700-fold over the wild-type enzyme. CCRQ-CocE could also be modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, which improved its in vivo residence time from 24 to 72 h, as measured by a cocaine lethality assay, by self-administration in rodents, and by measurement of inhibition of cocaine-induced cardiovascular effects in rhesus monkeys. PEG-CCRQ elicited negligible immune response in rodents. Subunit stabilization and PEGylation has thus produced a potential protein therapeutic with markedly higher stability both in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Fluid flow profile in a packed bead column using residence time curves and radiotracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Ana Paula F. de; Gonçalves, Eduardo Ramos; Brandão, Luis Eduardo B.; Salgado, Cesar M.

    2017-01-01

    Filling columns are extremely important in the chemical industry and are used for purification, separation and treatment processes of gas or liquid mixtures. The objective of this work is to study the hydrodynamics of the fluid for a characterization of aqueous phase flow patterns in the filling column, associating with the methodology of the Curves of Residence Time Distribution (RTD) to analyze and associate theoretical models that put as conditions column operating. RTD can be obtained by using the pulse-stimulus response technique which is characterized by the instantaneous injection of a radiotracer into the system input. In this work, 68Ga was used as radiotracer. Five shielded and collimated NaI (Tl) 1 x 1″ scintillator detectors were suitably positioned to record the movement of the radiotracer's path in the conveying line and filling column. Making possible the analysis of the RTD curve in the regions of interest. With the data generated by the NaI (Tl) detectors with the passage of the radiotracer in the transport line and inside the column, it was possible to evaluate the flow profile of the aqueous phase and to identify operational failures, such as internal conduit and the existence of a retention zone in the inside the column. Theoretical models were used for different flow flows: the piston flow and perfect mixing. (author)

  1. Impacts of Streambed Heterogeneity and Anisotropy on Residence Time of Hyporheic Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suning; Chui, Ting Fong May

    2018-05-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ), which is the region beneath or alongside a streambed, plays an important role in the stream's ecology. The duration that a water molecule or a solute remains within the HZ, or residence time (RT), is one of the most common metrics used to evaluate the function of the HZ. The RT is greatly influenced by the streambed's hydraulic conductivity (K), which is intrinsically difficult to characterize due to its heterogeneity and anisotropy. Many laboratory and numerical studies of the HZ have simplified the streambed K to a constant, thus producing RT values that may differ from those gathered from the field. Some studies have considered the heterogeneity of the HZ, but very few have accounted for anisotropy or the natural K distributions typically found in real streambeds. This study developed numerical models in MODFLOW to examine the influence of heterogeneity and anisotropy, and that of the natural K distribution in a streambed, on the RT of the HZ. Heterogeneity and anisotropy were both found to shorten the mean and median RTs while increasing the range of the RTs. Moreover, heterogeneous K fields arranged in a more orderly pattern had longer RTs than those with random K distributions. These results could facilitate the design of streambed K values and distributions to achieve the desired RT during river restoration. They could also assist the translation of results from the more commonly considered homogeneous and/or isotropic conditions into heterogeneous and anisotropic field situations. © 2017, National Ground Water Association.

  2. Relationship between fiber degradation and residence time distribution in the processing of long fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT were processed by in-line compounding equipment with a modified single screw extruder. A pulse stimulus response technique using PET spheres as the tracer was adopted to obtain residence time distribution (RTD of extrusion compounding. RTD curves were fitted by the model based on the supposition that extrusion compounding was the combination of plug flow and mixed flow. Characteristic parameters of RTD model including P the fraction of plug flow reactor (PFR and d the fraction of dead volume of continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR were used to associate with fiber degradation presented by fiber length and dispersion. The effects of screw speed, mixing length and channel depth on RTD curves, and characteristic parameters of RTD models as well as their effects on the fiber degradation were investigated. The influence of shear force with different screw speeds and variable channel depth on fiber degradation was studied and the main impetus of fiber degradation was also presented. The optimal process for obtaining the balance of fiber length and dispersion was presented.

  3. Impact of repository depth on residence times for leaking radionuclides in land-based surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, Anders; Marklund, Lars; Xu, Shulan; Dverstorp, Björn

    2007-03-01

    The multiple scales of landscape topography produce a wide distribution of groundwater circulation cells that control the hydro-geological environments surrounding geological repositories for nuclear waste. The largest circulation cells tend to discharge water into major river reaches, large freshwater systems or the nearby Baltic Sea. We investigated numerically the release of radionuclides from repositories placed in bedrock with depths between 100 to 2000 meters in a Swedish coastal area and found that leakage from the deeper positions emerges primarily in the major aquatic systems. In effect, radionuclides from the deeper repositories are more rapidly transported towards the Sea by the stream system compared to leakage from more shallow repositories. The release from the shallower repositories is significantly retained in the initial stage of the transport in the (superficial) landscape because the discharge occurs in or near low-order streams with high retention characteristics. This retention and residence time for radioactivity in the landscape control radiological doses to biota and can, thus, be expected to constitute an essential part of an associated risk evaluation.

  4. Investigation of residence time and groundwater flux in Venice Lagoon: comparing radium isotope and hydrodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaglia, John; Ferrarin, Christian; Zaggia, Luca; Moore, Willard S; Umgiesser, Georg; Garcia-Solsona, Ester; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi; Masqué, Pere

    2010-07-01

    The four naturally-occurring isotopes of radium were coupled with a previously evaluated hydrodynamic model to determine the apparent age of surface waters and to quantify submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into the Venice Lagoon, Italy. Mean apparent age of water in the Venice Lagoon was calculated using the ratio of 224Ra to 228Ra determined from 30 monitoring stations and a mean pore water end member. Average apparent age was calculated to be 6.0 d using Ra ratios. This calculated age was very similar to average residence time calculated for the same period using a hydrodynamic model (5.8 d). A mass balance of Ra was accomplished by quantifying each of the sources and sinks of Ra in the lagoon, with the unknown variable being attributed to SGD. Total SGD were calculated to be 4.1 +/- 1.5, 3.8 +/- 0.7, 3.0 +/- 1.3, and 3.5 +/- 1.0 x 10(10) L d(-1) for (223,224,226, 228)Ra, respectively, which are an order of magnitude larger than total mean fluvial discharge into the Venice Lagoon (3.1 x 10(9) L d(-1)). The SGD as a source of nutrients in the Venice Lagoon is also discussed and, though significant to the nutrient budget, is likely to be less important as the dominant control on SGD is recirculated seawater rather than freshwater. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation of residence time and groundwater flux in Venice Lagoon: comparing radium isotope and hydrodynamical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapaglia, John; Ferrarin, Christian; Zaggia, Luca; Moore, Willard S.; Umgiesser, Georg; Garcia-Solsona, Ester; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi; Masque, Pere

    2010-01-01

    The four naturally-occurring isotopes of radium were coupled with a previously evaluated hydrodynamic model to determine the apparent age of surface waters and to quantify submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into the Venice Lagoon, Italy. Mean apparent age of water in the Venice Lagoon was calculated using the ratio of 224 Ra to 228 Ra determined from 30 monitoring stations and a mean pore water endmember. Average apparent age was calculated to be 6.0 d using Ra ratios. This calculated age was very similar to average residence time calculated for the same period using a hydrodynamic model (5.8 d). A mass balance of Ra was accomplished by quantifying each of the sources and sinks of Ra in the lagoon, with the unknown variable being attributed to SGD. Total SGD were calculated to be 4.1 ± 1.5, 3.8 ± 0.7, 3.0 ± 1.3, and 3.5 ± 1.0 x 10 10 L d -1 for 223,224,226,228 Ra, respectively, which are an order of magnitude larger than total mean fluvial discharge into the Venice Lagoon (3.1 x 10 9 L d -1 ). The SGD as a source of nutrients in the Venice Lagoon is also discussed and, though significant to the nutrient budget, is likely to be less important as the dominant control on SGD is recirculated seawater rather than freshwater.

  6. Relating hyporheic fluxes, residence times, and redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes upstream of beaver dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lautz, Laura; Hare, Danielle K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Small dams enhance the development of patchy microenvironments along stream corridors by trapping sediment and creating complex streambed morphologies. This patchiness drives intricate hyporheic flux patterns that govern the exchange of O2 and redox-sensitive solutes between the water column and the stream bed. We used multiple tracer techniques, naturally occurring and injected, to evaluate hyporheic flow dynamics and associated biogeochemical cycling and microbial reactivity around 2 beaver dams in Wyoming (USA). High-resolution fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing was used to collect temperature data over 9 vertical streambed profiles and to generate comprehensive vertical flux maps using 1-dimensional (1-D) heat-transport modeling. Coincident with these locations, vertical profiles of hyporheic water were collected every week and analyzed for dissolved O2, pH, dissolved organic C, and several conservative and redox-sensitive solutes. In addition, hyporheic and net stream aerobic microbial reactivity were analyzed with a constant-rate injection of the biologically sensitive resazurin (Raz) smart tracer. The combined results revealed a heterogeneous system with rates of downwelling hyporheic flow organized by morphologic unit and tightly coupled to the redox conditions of the subsurface. Principal component analysis was used to summarize the variability of all redox-sensitive species, and results indicated that hyporheic water varied from oxic-stream-like to anoxic-reduced in direct response to the hydrodynamic conditions and associated residence times. The anaerobic transition threshold predicted by the mean O2 Damko

  7. Drug-target residence time--a case for G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dong; Hillger, Julia M; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2014-07-01

    A vast number of marketed drugs act on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the most successful category of drug targets to date. These drugs usually possess high target affinity and selectivity, and such combined features have been the driving force in the early phases of drug discovery. However, attrition has also been high. Many investigational new drugs eventually fail in clinical trials due to a demonstrated lack of efficacy. A retrospective assessment of successfully launched drugs revealed that their beneficial effects in patients may be attributed to their long drug-target residence times (RTs). Likewise, for some other GPCR drugs short RT could be beneficial to reduce the potential for on-target side effects. Hence, the compounds' kinetics behavior might in fact be the guiding principle to obtain a desired and durable effect in vivo. We therefore propose that drug-target RT should be taken into account as an additional parameter in the lead selection and optimization process. This should ultimately lead to an increased number of candidate drugs moving to the preclinical development phase and on to the market. This review contains examples of the kinetics behavior of GPCR ligands with improved in vivo efficacy and summarizes methods for assessing drug-target RT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Alongshore Variation in the Depth of Activation: Implications of Oil Residence Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, P.; Houser, C.

    2016-12-01

    In 2010 the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill released approximately 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico just as the nearshore and beach profile were recovering from winter storms. As a consequence, oil mats and tar balls were trapped at depth within the beach and nearshore profile. Excavation of this buried oil during subsequent storms creates the potential for the contamination of adjacent beaches and the degradation of marine ecosystems, which can in turn negatively impact local economies that depend on fisheries and tourism. The potential for oil burial and persistence is dependent on four things: the physio-chemical nature of the oil as it reaches the nearshore environment, the pre-existing morphology of the beach and nearshore, and the evolution of that morphology after the oil is deposited. The depth at which the oil is buried is also dependent on the beach profile during the time of the spill. The purpose of this study is to characterize the alongshore variation in depth of activation on a Deepwater Horizon impacted section of Pensacola Beach, Florida with regards to the implications of oil residence time. Ground- Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys were conducted along two parallel 1-km transects adjacent to the swash zone and the dune. Additional cross- shore transects were completed every 150 m from the base of the dune to the top of the swash zone. Sediments cores were taken at the crossing points of the alongshore and cross-shore transects, to calibrate the GPR surveys and complete an elemental analysis for the identification of storm layers. The cores were also analyzed for the presence of buried oil.

  9. Sorbent Nanotechnologies for Water Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Snober

    Despite decades of regulatory efforts to mitigate water pollution, many chemicals, particularly heavy metals, still present risks to human health. In addition to direct exposure, certain metals such as mercury threaten public health due to its persistence, bioaccumulation and bioamplification throughout the food chain. A number of U.S. Federal and State regulations have been established to reduce the levels of mercury in water. Activated carbon (AC) has been widely explored for the removal of mercury. However, AC suffers from many limitations inherent to its chemical properties, and it becomes increasingly challenging to meet current and future regulations by simply modifying AC to enhance its performance. Recently, the performance of nanosorbents have been studied in order to removal pollutants. Nanosorbents utilize the ultra-high reactive surface of nanoparticles for rapid, effective and even permanent sequestration of heavy metals from water and air, thus showed promising results as compared to AC. The goal of this thesis research is to develop nanomaterial-based sorbents for the removal of mercury from water. It describes the development of a new solid-support assisted growth of selenium nanoparticles, their use for water remediation, and the development of a new nanoselenium-based sorbent sponge for fast and efficient mercury removal. The nanoselenium sorbent not only shows irreversible interaction with mercury but also exhibits remarkable properties by overcoming the limitations of AC. The nanoselenium sponge was shown to remove mercury to undetectable levels within one minute. This new sponge technology would have an impact on inspiring new stringent regulations and lowering costs to help industries meet regulatory requirements, which will ultimately help improve air and water quality, aquatic life and public health.

  10. Reflections in a time of transition: orthopaedic faculty and resident understanding of accreditation schemes and opinions on surgical skills feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Gundle

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orthopaedic surgery is one of the first seven specialties that began collecting Milestone data as part of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System (NAS rollout. This transition from process-based advancement to outcome-based education is an opportunity to assess resident and faculty understanding of changing paradigms, and opinions about technical skill evaluation. Methods: In a large academic orthopaedic surgery residency program, residents and faculty were anonymously surveyed. A total of 31/32 (97% residents and 29/53 (55% faculty responded to Likert scale assessments and provided open-ended responses. An internal end-of-rotation audit was conducted to assess timeliness of evaluations. A mixed-method analysis was utilized, with nonparametric statistical testing and a constant-comparative qualitative method. Results: There was greater familiarity with the six core competencies than with Milestones or the NAS (p<0.05. A majority of faculty and residents felt that end-of-rotation evaluations were not adequate for surgical skills feedback. Fifty-eight per cent of residents reported that end-of-rotation evaluations were rarely or never filled out in a timely fashion. An internal audit demonstrated that more than 30% of evaluations were completed over a month after rotation end. Qualitative analysis included themes of resident desire for more face-to-face feedback on technical skills after operative cases, and several barriers to more frequent feedback. Discussion: The NAS and outcome-based education have arrived. Residents and faculty need to be educated on this changing paradigm. This transition period is also a window of opportunity to address methods of evaluation and feedback. In our orthopaedic residency, trainees were significantly less satisfied than faculty with the amount of technical and surgical skills feedback being provided to trainees. The quantitative and qualitative analyses

  11. Using reactor network for global identification based on residence time distribution theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocine, S.; Pibouleau, L.; Azzaro-Pantel, C.; Domenech, S. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique - UMR 5503 CNRS/ INPT ENSIACET, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2006-07-01

    In the ventilation systems, the control of transfer contaminants is one of the principal problems during the design and control phases. The installation of a suitable ventilation system for the control of contaminant transfer is essential in industry, because it makes it possible to detect and to prevent chemical and radiological risks. Research on air distribution in ventilated rooms traditionally involves full-scale experiments, scale -model experiments and application of the computational fluid dynamics (C.F.D.) tools. Most of the time, particularly in our case of large and cluttered enclosures, the predictive approach based on C.F.D. codes can not be used. The solution retained here is the establishment of a model based on the well known residence time distribution. This model is widely used in chemical engineering to treat non-ideal flows. The proposed method is based on the experimental determination of the residence time distribution curve, generally obtained through the response of the system to tracer release. A superstructure involving the set of all the possible solutions corresponding to the physical reactor is then defined, and the model will be selected from this superstructure according to its simulated response. The superstructure is identified as a combination of elementary systems, representing ideal flow patterns, as perfect mixed flows, plug flows, continuous stirred tank reactors, etc. The selected model is derived from the comparison between the simulated response to a stimulus, and the experimental response. The structure and parameters of the model are simultaneously optimized in order to fit the experimental curve with a minimal number of elementary units, constituting a key point for future control purposes of the process. This problem is a dynamic M.I.N.L.P. (Mixed Integer Non Linear Programming) problem with bilinear equality constraints. Generally, these constraints lead to numerical difficulties for reaching an optimum solution (even a

  12. Sorbent Structural Impacts Due to Humidity on Carbon Dioxide Removal Sorbents for Advanced Exploration Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, David; Knox, James C.; West, Phillip; Stanley, Christine M.; Bush, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Life Support Systems Project (LSSP) under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program builds upon the work performed under the AES Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project focusing on the numerous technology development areas. The CO2 removal and associated air drying development efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art system on the International Space Station (ISS) utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, evaluating structured sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. A component of the CO2 removal effort encompasses structural stability testing of existing and emerging sorbents. Testing will be performed on dry sorbents and sorbents that have been conditioned to three humidity levels. This paper describes the sorbent structural stability screening efforts in support of the LSS Project within the AES Program.

  13. Leveraging time and learning style, iPod vs. realtime attendance at a series of medicine residents conferences: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Tempelhof

    2009-06-01

    Conclusions Residency training programmes can optimise time management strategies with the integration of innovative learning resources into educational curricula. This study suggests that iPod capture of conferences is a reasonable resource to help meet the educational goals of residents and residency programs.

  14. Groundwater residence time and movement in the Maltese islands - A geochemical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, M.E., E-mail: mest@bgs.ac.uk [British Geological Survey, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Maurice, L. [British Geological Survey, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Heaton, T.H.E. [British Geological Survey, NERC Isotope Geoscience Laboratory, Keyworth, Nottinghamshire NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Sapiano, M.; Micallef Sultana, M. [Malta Resources Authority, Marsa MRS 9065 (Malta); Gooddy, D.C.; Chilton, P.J. [British Geological Survey, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    The Maltese islands are composed of two limestone aquifers, the Upper and Lower Coralline Limestone separated by an aquitard, the 'Blue Clay'. The Lower Coralline Limestone is overlain in part by the poorly permeable Globigerina Limestone. The upper perched aquifers are discontinuous and have very limited saturated thickness and a short water level response time to rainfall. Frequent detections of coliforms suggest a rapid route to groundwater. However, the unsaturated zone has a considerable thickness in places and the primary porosity of the Upper Coralline Limestone is high, so there is likely to be older recharge by slow matrix flow as well as rapid recharge from fractures. Measurement of SF{sub 6} from a pumping station in a deep part of one of the perched aquifers indicated a mean saturated zone age of about 15 a. The Main Sea Level aquifers (MSL) on both Malta and Gozo have a large unsaturated thickness as water levels are close to sea level. On Malta, parts of the aquifer are capped by the perched aquifers and more extensively by the Globigerina Limestone. The limited detection of coliform bacteria suggests only some rapid recharge from the surface via fractures or karst features. Transmissivity is low and {sup 3}H and CFC/SF{sub 6} data indicate that saturated zone travel times are in the range 15-40 a. On Gozo the aquifer is similar but is more-extensively capped by impermeable Blue Clay. CFC data show the saturated zone travel time is from 25 a to possibly more than 60 a. Groundwater age is clearly related to the extent of low-permeability cover. The {delta}{sup 13}C signature of groundwater is related to the geochemical processes which occur along the flowpath and is consistent with residence time ages in the sequence; perched aquifers < Malta MSL < Gozo MSL. The {sup 18}O and {sup 2}H enriched isotopic signature of post 1983 desalinated water can be seen in more-modern groundwater, particularly the urbanized areas of the perched and Malta MSL

  15. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle : Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, A Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle

  16. Implementation and evaluation of a simulation curriculum for paediatric residency programs including just-in-time in situ mock codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Jonathan; Pierse, Michael; Al-Qahtani, Abdullah; Cheng, Adam

    2012-02-01

    To develop, implement and evaluate a simulation-based acute care curriculum in a paediatric residency program using an integrated and longitudinal approach. Curriculum framework consisting of three modular, year-specific courses and longitudinal just-in-time, in situ mock codes. Paediatric residency program at BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia. The three year-specific courses focused on the critical first 5 min, complex medical management and crisis resource management, respectively. The just-in-time in situ mock codes simulated the acute deterioration of an existing ward patient, prepared the actual multidisciplinary code team, and primed the surrounding crisis support systems. Each curriculum component was evaluated with surveys using a five-point Likert scale. A total of 40 resident surveys were completed after each of the modular courses, and an additional 28 surveys were completed for the overall simulation curriculum. The highest Likert scores were for hands-on skill stations, immersive simulation environment and crisis resource management teaching. Survey results also suggested that just-in-time mock codes were realistic, reinforced learning, and prepared ward teams for patient deterioration. A simulation-based acute care curriculum was successfully integrated into a paediatric residency program. It provides a model for integrating simulation-based learning into other training programs, as well as a model for any hospital that wishes to improve paediatric resuscitation outcomes using just-in-time in situ mock codes.

  17. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising wet granulation technique for the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. A twin screw granulator displays a short residence time. Thus, the solid-liquid mixing must be achieved quickly by appropriate arrangement of transport and kneading...

  18. Comparison of the tritium residence times of various ceramic breeder materials irradiated in EXOTIC experiments 4 and 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwast, H.; Elen, J.D.; Conrad, R.; Casadio, S.; Werle, H.; Verstappen, G.

    1990-09-01

    Tritium residence times have been determined for various ceramic tritium breeding materials from in-situ release measurements. The irradiations, codenamed EXOTIC (EXtraction Of Tritium In Ceramics), were carried out in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) Petten. During the irradiation more than 450 transients were performed and the corresponding tritium release measured. Materials supplied by SCK/CEN (Li 2 ZrO 3 ), CEA (Li 2 ZrO 3 and LiAlO 2 ), ENEA (LiAlO 2 ), KfK (Li 4 SiO 4 ), NRL (Li 6 Zr 2 O 7 ) and ECN (Li 8 ZrO 6 ) were irradiated in EXOTIC-5 to compare the tritium residence times obtained under equal conditions. Apart from differences in density, grain size, pore size and OPV it appeared that the tritium residence times of the lithium zirconates (pellets) were shorter than those of the Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles. The tritium residence times of the Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles were shorter than those of the LiAlO 2 pellets. (author). 7 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  19. Measurement and modeling of polychlorinated biphenyl bioaccumulation from sediment for the marine polychaete neanthes arenaceodentata and response to sorbent amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, E.M.-L.; Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Luthy, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    Bioaccumulation rates of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) for the marine polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata were characterized, including PCB uptake rates from water and sediment, and the effect of sorbent amendment to the sediment on PCB bioavailability, organism growth, and lipid content. Physiological parameters were incorporated into a biodynamic model to predict contaminant uptake. The results indicate rapid PCB uptake from contaminated sediment and significant organism growth dilution during time-series exposure studies. PCB uptake from the aqueous phase accounted for less than 3% of the total uptake for this deposit-feeder. Proportional increase of gut residence time and assimilation efficiency as a consequence of the organism's growth was assessed by PCB uptake and a reactor theory model of gut architecture. Pulse-chase feeding and multilabeled stable isotope tracing techniques proved high sediment ingestion rates (i.e., 6?10 times of dry body weight per day) indicating that such deposit-feeders are promising biological indicators for sediment risk assessment. Activated carbon amendment reduced PCB uptake by 95% in laboratory experiments with no observed adverse growth effects on the marine polychaete. Biodynamic modeling explained the observed PCB body burdens for N. arenaceodentata, with and without sorbent amendment. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  20. Hydraulic residence time and iron removal in a wetland receiving ferruginous mine water over a 4 year period from commissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusin, F M; Jarvis, A P; Gandy, C J

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) has been conducted for the UK Coal Authority's mine water treatment wetland at Lambley, Northumberland, to determine the hydraulic performance of the wetland over a period of approximately 4 years since site commissioning. The wetland RTD was evaluated in accordance with moment analysis and modelled based on a tanks-in-series (TIS) model to yield the hydraulic characteristics of system performance. Greater hydraulic performance was seen during the second site monitoring after 21 months of site operation i.e. longer hydraulic residence time to reflect overall system hydraulic efficiency, compared to wetland performance during its early operation. Further monitoring of residence time during the third year of wetland operation indicated a slight reduction in hydraulic residence time, thus a lower system hydraulic efficiency. In contrast, performance during the fourth year of wetland operation exhibited an improved overall system hydraulic efficiency, suggesting the influence of reed growth over the lifetime of such systems on hydraulic performance. Interestingly, the same pattern was found for iron (which is the primary pollutant of concern in ferruginous mine waters) removal efficiency of the wetland system from the second to fourth year of wetland operation. This may therefore, reflect the maturity of reeds for maintaining efficient flow distribution across the wetland to retain a longer residence time and significant fractions of water involved to enhance the extent of treatment received for iron attenuation. Further monitoring will be conducted to establish whether such performance is maintained, or whether efficiency decreases over time due to accumulation of dead plant material within the wetland cells.

  1. Improving residents' handovers through just-in-time training for structured communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Liam; Amin, Aditi; Boyington, Curtiss; Ao, Peter; Frolova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent quality assurance project we learned that nearly half of the handovers we examined were characterized as unsatisfactory by our residents, who provided examples in which their anxiety had been piqued and patient care had been affected. These reports substantiated a growing body of literature on the relationship between the quality of handover and the quality of patient care, so we sought to improve the quality and consistency of the in-hosptial handovers undertaken by our internal medicine residents. Senior residents attended morning report for three consecutive month long blocks and evaluated the quality of the handovers using an observational protocol comprised of 16 aspects of effective handover. During the first block, the resident observed a median of eight of the 16 practices occurring across the 46 handovers, and a large amount of variability. At the beginning of the subsequent block we presented a concise introduction to a structured handover procedure (SBARR). The median quality of the subsequent 33 handovers rose to 11, and the variability decreased considerably. In the next block we refined the SBARR orientation to focus on the errors observed in the previous blocks, and the improvement in the quality and variability was sustained. The minor change, which requires few resources to sustain, had a favourable impact on the quality of our residents' in-hospital handovers.

  2. Radiotracer method for residence time distribution study in multiphase flow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiharto, S.; Su'ud, Z.; Kurniadi, R.; Wibisono, W.; Abidin, Z.

    2009-01-01

    [ 131 I] isotope in different chemical compounds have been injected into 24 in hydrocarbon transmission pipeline containing approximately 95% water, 3% crude oil, 2% gas and negligible solid material, respectively. The system is operated at the temperature around 70 deg. C enabling fluids flow is easier in the pipeline. The segment of measurement was chosen far from the junction point of the pipeline, therefore, it was reasonably to assume that the fluids in such multiphase system were separated distinctively. Expandable tubing of injector was used to ensure that the isotopes were injected at the proper place in the sense that [ 131 I]Na isotope was injected into water layer and iodo-benzene, [131] IC 6 H 5, was injected into crude oil regime. The radiotracer selection was based on the compatibility of radiotracer with each of fluids under investigation. [ 131 I]Na was used for measuring flow of water while iodo-benzene, [131] IC 6 H 5, was used for measuring flow of crude oil. Two scintillation detectors were used and they are put at the distances 80 and 100 m, respectively, from injection point. The residence time distribution data were utilized for calculation water and crude oil flows. Several injections were conducted in the experiments. Although the crude oil density is lighter than the density of water, the result of measurement shows that the water flow is faster than the crude oil flow. As the system is water-dominated, water may act as carrier and the movement of crude oil is slowed due to friction between crude oil with water and crude oil with gas at top layer. Above of all, this result was able to give answer on the question why crude oil always arrives behind water as it is checked at gathering station. In addition, the flow patterns of the water in the pipeline calculated by Reynolds number and predicted by simple tank-in-series model is turbulence in character.

  3. Firing technology in practice - temperature, residence time, corrosion; Feuerungstechnik in der Praxis - Temperatur, Verweilzeit, Korrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freimann, P.; Holl, D. [Muellheizkraftwerk Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, Burgkirchen/Alz (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    In a circular dated 1st Sept. 1994, i.e., after the issue of the pertinent planning decision, the Federal Environmental Ministry, BMU, laid down uniform standards on measurements and the parameterisation of the evaluation system for different operation states and loads. Subsequently, TUeV, the German Technical Control Board, prepared the parameterisation curves on the basis of these specifications. The implementation of the BMU paper of 1st Sept. 1994 did not result in any advantage, nor did it lead to a reduction of plant emissions, nor to advantages in the operation of the waste-fuelled cogeneration plant. On the contrary, elevated gas consumption and operating trouble due to frequent feed stops worsened the operating state of the plant. Elevated crude gas temperature in the boiler reduced the lifetime of the two boilers to a critical degree. An operating temperature of 850 C and a residence time of approx. 1 sec. in Burgkirchen waste-fuelled cogeneration plant have not worsened emission values while rendering the plant operable again. [Deutsch] Durch Rundschreiben d. BMU vom 01.09.1994 - also nach Erlass des Planfeststellungsbeschlusses - wurden einheitliche Vorgaben ueber Messungen und Parametrierung des Auswertesystems fuer die verschiedenen Betriebs- bzw. Lastzustaende erlassen. Unter Beruecksichtigung dieser Vorgaben wurden vom TUeV die Parametrierungskurven erstellt. Die Umsetzung des BMU-Papieres vom 01.09.1994 ergab keinerlei Vorteile, weder gab es eine Verringerung der anlagenbedingten Emissionen noch Vorteile fuer den Betrieb des MHKW`s. Im Gegenteil, erhoehte Gasverbraeuche und Betriebsstoerungen durch oftmalige Beschickungsstops verschlechterten den Betriebszustand. Erhoehte Rohgastemperatur im Kessel reduzierten die Lebensdauer der beiden Kessel kritisch. Der Betrieb mit 850 C und mit einer Verweilzeit von ca. 1 sec. fuehrt im MHKW Burgkirchen zu keiner Verschlechterung der Emissionswerte, macht aber die Anlagen wieder betreibbar. (orig./SR)

  4. Seasonal variations of aerosol residence time in the lower atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.A.; Mohamed, A.; Ali, A.E.; Barakat, A.; Abd El-Hady, M.; El-Hussein, A.

    2004-01-01

    During a one year period, from Jan. 2002 up to Dec. 2002, approximately 130 air samples were analyzed to determine the atmospheric air activity concentrations of short- and long-lived ( 222 Rn) decay products 214 Pb and 210 Pb. The samples were taken by using a single-filter technique and γ-spectrometry was applied to determine the activity concentrations. A seasonal fluctuation in the concentration of 214 Pb and 210 Pb in surface air was observed. The activity concentrations of both radionuclides were observed to be relatively higher during the winter/autumn season than in spring/summer season. The mean activity concentration of 214 Pb and 210 Pb within the whole year was found to be 1.4±0.27 Bq m -3 and 1.2±0.15 mBq m -3 , respectively. Different 210 Pb: 214 Pb activity ratios during the year varied between 1.78x10 -4 and 1.6x10 -3 with a mean value of 8.9x10 -4 ±7.6x10 -5 . From the ratio between the activity concentrations of the radon decay products 214 Pb and 210 Pb a mean residence time (MRT) of aerosol particles in the atmosphere of about 10.5±0.91 d could be estimated. The seasonal variation pattern shows relatively higher values of MRT in spring/summer season than in winter/autumn season. The MRT data together with relative humidity (RH), air temperature (T) and wind speed (WS), were used for a comprehensive regression analysis of its seasonal variation in the atmospheric air

  5. Residence time distributions of artificially infiltrated groundwater used for drinking water production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, A. L.; Marçais, J.; Moeck, C.; Brennwald, M. S.; Kipfer, R.

    2017-12-01

    Public drinking water supply in urban areas is often challenging due to exposure to potential contamination and high water demands. At our study site, a drinking water supply field in Switzerland, managed aquifer recharge (MAR) was implemented to overcome an increasing water demand and decreasing water quality. Water from the river Rhine is put on a system of channels and ponds to artificially infiltrate and hence, increase the natural groundwater availability. The groundwater system consists of two overlying aquifers, with hydraulic connections related to fractures and faults. The deeper aquifer contains contaminants, which possibly originate from nearby landfills and industrial areas. The operating water works aims to pump recently infiltrated water only. However, we suspect that the pumped water contains a fraction of old water due to the fractured zones which serve as hydraulic connection between the two aquifers. With this study, we aim to better understand the mixing patterns between recently infiltrated water and old groundwater to evaluate the risk for contamination of the system. To reach our objective, we used a set of gas tracers (222Rn, 3H/3He, 4He) from fifteen wells distributed throughout the area to estimate the residence time distribution (RTD) of each well. We calibrated the RTD with a Binary Mixing Model, where the fraction of young groundwater is assumed to follow a Piston Flow Model. The older groundwater fraction is calibrated with a Dispersion Model. Our results reflect the heterogeneity of the system with some abstraction wells containing young water only and others showing an admixture of old water which can only be explained by a connection to the deeper aquifer. We also show that our results on calibrated RTDs are in accordance with other geochemical data such as electrical conductivity, major ions and pH. Our results will contribute to a sound conceptual flow and transport understanding and will help to optimize the water supply system.

  6. Residence times of groundwater and nitrate transport in coastal aquifer systems: Daweijia area, northeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongmei; Cao, Guoliang; McCallum, James; Song, Xianfang

    2015-12-15

    Groundwater within the coastal aquifer systems of the Daweijia area in northeastern China is characterized by a large of variations (33-521mg/L) in NO3(-) concentrations. Elevated nitrate concentrations, in addition to seawater intrusion in the Daweijia well field, both attributable to anthropogenic activities, may impact future water-management practices. Chemical and stable isotopic (δ(18)O, δ(2)H) analysis, (3)H and CFCs methods were applied to provide a better understanding of the relationship between the distribution of groundwater mean residence time (MRT) and nitrate transport, and to identify sources of nitrate concentrations in the complex coastal aquifer systems. There is a relatively narrow range of isotopic composition (ranging from -8.5 to -7.0‰) in most groundwater. Generally higher tritium contents observed in the wet season relative to the dry season may result from rapid groundwater circulation in response to the rainfall through the preferential flow paths. In the well field, the relatively increased nitrate concentrations of groundwater, accompanied by the higher tritium contents in the wet season, indicate the nitrate pollution can be attributed to domestic wastes. The binary exponential and piston-flow mixing model (BEP) yielded feasible age distributions based on the conceptual model. The good inverse relationship between groundwater MRTs (92-467years) and the NO3(-) concentrations in the shallow Quaternary aquifers indicates that elevated nitrate concentrations are attributable to more recent recharge for shallow groundwater. However, there is no significant relationship between the MRTs (8-411years) and the NO3(-) concentrations existing in the carbonate aquifer system, due to the complex hydrogeological conditions, groundwater age distributions and the range of contaminant source areas. Nitrate in the groundwater system without denitrification effects could accumulate and be transported for tens of years, through the complex carbonate

  7. Residence-Time Distributions in Laminar Flows and During the Passage of Granular Solids Through Rotary Kilns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, W. J.; De Ridder, H. J. [Technische Hogeschool, Delft (Netherlands); Houtman, J. P.W.; Kuiper, D. [Reactor Instituut, Delft (Netherlands)

    1967-06-15

    Data on residence-time distributions are important in the design of apparatus for the chemical industry. Radioactive tracers can be useful in many cases, e.g. where a pulse technique is desired. Two examples are given in which a pulse of radioactive tracer is used. The first example deals with the residence-time distribution of a laminar, Newtonian flow in an annulus. This problem arises especially in the extrusion and injection moulding of polymers and in the coating of wires with plastics. In these cases the fractions of polymer with long residence times may have other properties than the polymer that flows fastest, because the polymerization reaction or the degradation reactions go on during the process. Two difficulties are to be considered: (a) the tracer pulse (a radioactive Au-sol suspended in the liquid used) cannot be distributed over the cross-section in proportion to the local flow velocity, and (b) the outflowing liquid must be sampled discontinuously. Both effects have been studied and corrections are indicated. When these corrections are applied to the measured distribution curve, the result is in fair agreement with the calculated residence-time distribution. The second example considers the residence-time distribution in a granular solid (sand) passing through a rotary kiln. The response was measured at the outlet to a pulse at the inlet of radioactive material (sand impregnated with a solution of radioactive AuCl{sub 3}). When calculating the residence-time distribution from the experimental data, difficulties were encountered because the duration of the pulse was of the same order of magnitude as the average residence time. Considering this, it was found that the axial dispersion of the flow of sand could be described by an effective dispersion coefficient. This dispersion coefficient proved to be very low (order of magnitude 10{sup -5} m{sup 2}/s); hence, in practical situations, the flow of granular material through a rotary kiln may often be

  8. TG-FTIR measurement of CO2-H2O co-adsorption for CO2 air capture sorbent screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smal, I.M.; Yu, Qian; Veneman, Rens; Fränzel-Luiten, B.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Capturing atmospheric CO2 using solid sorbents is gaining interest. As ambient air normally contains much more (up to 100 times) water than CO2, a selective sorbent is desirable as co-adsorption will most likely occur. In this study, a convenient method based on an TG-FTIR analysis system is

  9. Using stable isotope tracers to assess hydrological flow paths, residence times and landscape influences in a nested mesoscale catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rodgers

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available δ18O measurements in precipitation and stream waters were used to investigate hydrological flow paths and residence times at nested spatial scales in the mesoscale (233 km2 River Feugh catchment in the northeast of Scotland over the 2001-2002 hydrological year. Precipitation δ18O exhibited strong seasonal variation, which although significantly damped within the catchment, was reflected in stream water at six sampling sites. This allowed δ18O variations to be used to infer the relative influence of soil-derived storm flows with a seasonally variable isotopic signature, and groundwater of apparently more constant isotopic composition. Periodic regression analysis was then used to examine the sub-catchment difference using an exponential flow model to provide indicative estimates of mean stream water residence times, which varied between approximately 3 and 14 months. This showed that the effects of increasing scale on estimated mean stream water residence time was minimal beyond that of the smallest (ca. 1 km2 headwater catchment scale. Instead, the interaction of catchment soil cover and topography appeared to be the dominant controlling influence. Where sub-catchments had extensive peat coverage, responsive hydrological pathways produced seasonally variable δ18O signatures in runoff with short mean residence times (ca. 3 months. In contrast, areas dominated by steeper slopes, more freely draining soils and larger groundwater storage in shallow valley-bottom aquifers, deeper flow paths allow for more effective mixing and damping of δ18O indicating longer residence times (>12 months. These insights from δ18O measurements extend the hydrological understanding of the Feugh catchment gained from previous geochemical tracer studies, and demonstrate the utility of isotope tracers in investigating the interaction of hydrological processes and catchment characteristics at larger spatial scales.

  10. Silver-Loaded Aluminosilicate Aerogels As Iodine Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Kroll, Jared O. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Peterson, Jacob A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Matyáš, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Olszta, Matthew J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Li, Xiaohong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States

    2017-09-14

    This paper discusses the development of aluminosilicates aerogels as scaffolds for Ag0 nanoparticles used for chemisorption of I2(g). The starting materials for these scaffolds included both Na-Al-Si-O and Al-Si-O aerogels, both synthesized from metal alkoxides. The Ag0 particles are added by soaking the aerogels in AgNO3 followed by drying and flowing under H2/Ar to reduce Ag+ → Ag0. In some cases, samples were soaked in 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane under supercritical CO2 to add –SH tethers to the aerogel surfaces for more effective binding of Ag+. During the Ag+-impregnation steps, for the Na-Al-Si-O aerogels, Na was replaced with Ag, and for the Al-Si-O aerogel, Si was replaced with Ag. The Ag-loading of thiolated versus non-thiolated Na-Al-Si-O aerogels was comparable at ~35 at% whereas the Ag-loading in unthiolated Al-Si-O aerogels was significantly lower at ~ 7 at% after identical treatment. Iodine loadings in both thiolated and unthiolated Ag0-functionalized Na-Al-Si-O aerogels were > 0.5 g g-1 showing almost complete utilization of the Ag through chemisorption to form AgI. Iodine loading in the thiolated Al-Si-O aerogel was 0.31 g g-1. The control of Ag uptake over solution residence time and [AgNO3] demonstrates the ability to customize the Ag-loading in the base sorbent to regulate the capacity of iodine chemisorption. Consolidation experimental results are also presented.

  11. Impact of solids residence time on biological nutrient removal performance of membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersu, Cagatayhan Bekir; Ong, Say Kee; Arslankaya, Ertan; Lee, Yong-Woo

    2010-05-01

    Impact of long solids residence times (SRTs) on nutrient removal was investigated using a submerged plate-frame membrane bioreactor with anaerobic and anoxic tanks. The system was operated at 10, 25, 50 and 75 days SRTs with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 2 h each for the anaerobic and anoxic tanks and 8 h for the oxic tank. Recirculation of oxic tank mixed liquor into the anaerobic tank and permeate into the anoxic tank were fixed at 100% each of the influent flow. For all SRTs, percent removals of soluble chemical oxygen demand were more than 93% and nitrification was more than 98.5% but total nitrogen percent removal seemed to peak at 81% at 50 days SRT while total phosphorus (TP) percent removal showed a deterioration from approximately 80% at 50 days SRT to 60% at 75 days SRT. Before calibrating the Biowin((R)) model to the experimental data, a sensitivity analysis of the model was conducted which indicated that heterotrophic anoxic yield, anaerobic hydrolysis factors of heterotrophs, heterotrophic hydrolysis, oxic endogenous decay rate for heterotrophs and oxic endogenous decay rate of PAOs had the most impact on predicted effluent TP concentration. The final values of kinetic parameters obtained in the calibration seemed to imply that nitrogen and phosphorus removal increased with SRT due to an increase in anoxic and anaerobic hydrolysis factors up to 50 days SRT but beyond that removal of phosphorus deteriorated due to high oxic endogenous decay rates. This indirectly imply that the decrease in phosphorus removal at 75 days SRT may be due to an increase in lysis of microbial cells at high SRTs along with the low food/microorganisms ratio as a result of high suspended solids in the oxic tank. Several polynomial correlations relating the various calibrated kinetic parameters with SRTs were derived. The Biowin((R)) model and the kinetic parameters predicted by the polynomial correlations were verified and found to predict well the effluent water quality

  12. Estimation of gastric residence time of the Heidelberg capsule in humans: effect of varying food composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mojaverian, P.; Ferguson, R.K.; Vlasses, P.H.; Rocci, M.L. Jr.; Oren, A.; Fix, J.A.; Caldwell, L.J.; Gardner, C.

    1985-01-01

    In animal and human studies, the gastric emptying of large (greater than 1 mm) indigestible solids is due to the activity of the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex. The gastric residence time (GRT) of an orally administered, nondigestible, pH-sensitive, radiotelemetric device (Heidelberg capsule) was evaluated in three studies in healthy volunteers. In 6 subjects, the GRT of the Heidelberg capsule was compared with the half-emptying time (t1/2) of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with technetium 99m after a 4-ml/kg liquid fatty meal. The mean (+/-SD) GRT (4.3 +/- 1.4 h) was significantly (p less than 0.001) longer than the mean t1/2 (1.1 +/- 0.3 h); the GRT was prolonged compared with the t1/2 in each subject. In a randomized, crossover trial in 10 subjects, frequent feeding caused a dramatic prolongation in mean GRT of the capsule compared with the fasting state (greater than 14.5 vs. 0.5 h, p less than 0.005). In another crossover study in 6 subjects, the GRT of the capsule was evaluated after an overnight fast, a standard breakfast including solid food, and a liquid meal (i.e., 200 ml of diluted light cream). The mean GRT was 2.6 +/- 0.9 h after the liquid meal vs. 1.2 +/- 0.8 h after fasting (p less than 0.025). The mean GRT after the breakfast was 4.8 +/- 1.5 h, which was significantly greater than that after fasting (p less than 0.001) and after the liquid meal (p less than 0.01). These data suggest that the GRT of the Heidelberg capsule is a marker of the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex in humans, the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex can be markedly delayed by frequent feedings with solids, and the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex is delayed by both liquid and solid meals

  13. Estimation of gastric residence time of the Heidelberg capsule in humans: effect of varying food composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojaverian, P.; Ferguson, R.K.; Vlasses, P.H.; Rocci, M.L. Jr.; Oren, A.; Fix, J.A.; Caldwell, L.J.; Gardner, C.

    1985-08-01

    In animal and human studies, the gastric emptying of large (greater than 1 mm) indigestible solids is due to the activity of the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex. The gastric residence time (GRT) of an orally administered, nondigestible, pH-sensitive, radiotelemetric device (Heidelberg capsule) was evaluated in three studies in healthy volunteers. In 6 subjects, the GRT of the Heidelberg capsule was compared with the half-emptying time (t1/2) of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with technetium 99m after a 4-ml/kg liquid fatty meal. The mean (+/-SD) GRT (4.3 +/- 1.4 h) was significantly (p less than 0.001) longer than the mean t1/2 (1.1 +/- 0.3 h); the GRT was prolonged compared with the t1/2 in each subject. In a randomized, crossover trial in 10 subjects, frequent feeding caused a dramatic prolongation in mean GRT of the capsule compared with the fasting state (greater than 14.5 vs. 0.5 h, p less than 0.005). In another crossover study in 6 subjects, the GRT of the capsule was evaluated after an overnight fast, a standard breakfast including solid food, and a liquid meal (i.e., 200 ml of diluted light cream). The mean GRT was 2.6 +/- 0.9 h after the liquid meal vs. 1.2 +/- 0.8 h after fasting (p less than 0.025). The mean GRT after the breakfast was 4.8 +/- 1.5 h, which was significantly greater than that after fasting (p less than 0.001) and after the liquid meal (p less than 0.01). These data suggest that the GRT of the Heidelberg capsule is a marker of the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex in humans, the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex can be markedly delayed by frequent feedings with solids, and the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex is delayed by both liquid and solid meals.

  14. [Work satisfaction, quality of life and leisure time of residents at the Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheba, Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Asaf; Perry, Zvi; Reuveni, Haim; Toker, Asaf

    2009-02-01

    Work dissatisfaction among physicians worldwide continues to rise over the last few decades, mainly due to declining professional prestige, tack of self fulfillment, time pressure and tack of leisure time. Physicians' burnout is a major result of dissatisfaction, causing doctors to leave the medical profession, and to provide lower quality of care. To examine the work satisfaction, quality of life and leisure time of residents in the Soroka University Medical Center. A validated questionnaire was delivered during the second half of 2004 to 252 residents in the Soroka University Medical Center The data was analyzed using the SPSS 12 for windows program. Descriptive analysis, parametric Students' T Test [where pleisure time. Further attention must be given to these matters--a step which will eventually improve patient care, and delay, to some extent, the burnout of physicians.

  15. Assessment of resident operative performance using a real-time mobile Web system: preparing for the milestone age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Justin P; Chen, David C; Donahue, Timothy R; Quach, Chi; Hines, O Joe; Hiatt, Jonathan R; Tillou, Areti

    2014-01-01

    To satisfy trainees' operative competency requirements while improving feedback validity and timeliness using a mobile Web-based platform. The Southern Illinois University Operative Performance Rating Scale (OPRS) was embedded into a website formatted for mobile devices. From March 2013 to February 2014, faculty members were instructed to complete the OPRS form while providing verbal feedback to the operating resident at the conclusion of each procedure. Submitted data were compiled automatically within a secure Web-based spreadsheet. Conventional end-of-rotation performance (CERP) evaluations filed 2006 to 2013 and OPRS performance scores were compared by year of training using serial and independent-samples t tests. The mean CERP scores and OPRS overall resident operative performance scores were directly compared using a linear regression model. OPRS mobile site analytics were reviewed using a Web-based reporting program. Large university-based general surgery residency program. General Surgery faculty used the mobile Web OPRS system to rate resident performance. Residents and the program director reviewed evaluations semiannually. Over the study period, 18 faculty members and 37 residents logged 176 operations using the mobile OPRS system. There were 334 total OPRS website visits. Median time to complete an evaluation was 45 minutes from the end of the operation, and faculty spent an average of 134 seconds on the site to enter 1 assessment. In the 38,506 CERP evaluations reviewed, mean performance scores showed a positive linear trend of 2% change per year of training (p = 0.001). OPRS overall resident operative performance scores showed a significant linear (p = 0.001), quadratic (p = 0.001), and cubic (p = 0.003) trend of change per year of clinical training, reflecting the resident operative experience in our training program. Differences between postgraduate year-1 and postgraduate year-5 overall performance scores were greater with the OPRS (mean = 0.96, CI

  16. Sediment residence times constrained by uranium-series isotopes: A critical appraisal of the comminution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Heather K.; Turner, Simon; Afonso, Juan C.; Dosseto, Anthony; Cohen, Tim

    2013-02-01

    Quantifying the rates of landscape evolution in response to climate change is inhibited by the difficulty of dating the formation of continental detrital sediments. We present uranium isotope data for Cooper Creek palaeochannel sediments from the Lake Eyre Basin in semi-arid South Australia in order to attempt to determine the formation ages and hence residence times of the sediments. To calculate the amount of recoil loss of 234U, a key input parameter used in the comminution approach, we use two suggested methods (weighted geometric and surface area measurement with an incorporated fractal correction) and typical assumed input parameter values found in the literature. The calculated recoil loss factors and comminution ages are highly dependent on the method of recoil loss factor determination used and the chosen assumptions. To appraise the ramifications of the assumptions inherent in the comminution age approach and determine individual and combined comminution age uncertainties associated to each variable, Monte Carlo simulations were conducted for a synthetic sediment sample. Using a reasonable associated uncertainty for each input factor and including variations in the source rock and measured (234U/238U) ratios, the total combined uncertainty on comminution age in our simulation (for both methods of recoil loss factor estimation) can amount to ±220-280 ka. The modelling shows that small changes in assumed input values translate into large effects on absolute comminution age. To improve the accuracy of the technique and provide meaningful absolute comminution ages, much tighter constraints are required on the assumptions for input factors such as the fraction of α-recoil lost 234Th and the initial (234U/238U) ratio of the source material. In order to be able to directly compare calculated comminution ages produced by different research groups, the standardisation of pre-treatment procedures, recoil loss factor estimation and assumed input parameter values

  17. Performance of a novel synthetic Ca-based solid sorbent suitable for desulfurizing flue gases in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacciani, R.; Muller, C.R.; Davidson, J.F.; Dennis, J.S.; Hayhurst, A.N. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering & Biotechnology

    2009-08-05

    The extent and mechanism of sulfation and carbonation of limestone, dolomite, and chalk, were compared with a novel, synthetic sorbent (85 wt % CaO and 15 wt % Ca{sub 12}A{sub l14}O{sub 33}), by means of experiments undertaken in a small, electrically heated fluidized bed. The sorbent particles were used either (I) untreated, sieved to two particle sizes and reacted with two different concentrations of SO{sub 2}, or (ii) after being cycled 20 times between carbonation, in 15 vol % CO{sub 2} in N2, and calcination, in pure N2, at 750 degrees C. The uptake of untreated limestone and dolomite was generally low (<0.2 g(SO{sub 2})/g(sorbent)), confirming previous results, However, the untreated chalk and the synthetic sorbent were found to be substantially more reactive with SO{sub 2}, and their final uptake was significantly higher (>0.5 g(SO{sub 2})/g(sorbent)) and essentially independent of the particle size. Here, comparisons are made on the basis of the sorbents in the calcined state. The capacities for the uptake of SO{sub 2}, on a basis of unit mass of calcined sorbent, were comparable for the chalk and the synthetic sorbent. However, previous work has demonstrated the ability of the synthetic sorbent to retain its capacity for CO{sub 2} over many cycles of carbonation and calcination: much more so than natural sorbents such as chalk and limestone. Accordingly, the advantage of the synthetic sorbent is that it could be used to remove CO{sub 2} from flue gases and, at the end of its life, to remove SO{sub 2} on a once-through basis.

  18. Trait differences between naturalized and invasive plant species independent of residence time and phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, R V; Randall, R P; Leishman, M R

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict which alien plants will transition from naturalized to invasive prior to their introduction to novel regions is a key goal for conservation and has the potential to increase the efficacy of weed risk assessment (WRA). However, multiple factors contribute to plant invasion success (e.g., functional traits, range characteristics, residence time, phylogeny), and they all must be taken into account simultaneously in order to identify meaningful correlates of invasion success. We compiled 146 pairs of phylogenetically paired (congeneric) naturalized and invasive plant species in Australia with similar minimum residence times (i.e., time since introduction in years). These pairs were used to test for differences in 5 functional traits (flowering duration, leaf size, maximum height, specific leaf area [SLA], seed mass) and 3 characteristics of species’ native ranges (biome occupancy, mean annual temperature, and rainfall breadth) between naturalized and invasive species. Invasive species, on average, had larger SLA, longer flowering periods, and were taller than their congeneric naturalized relatives. Invaders also exhibited greater tolerance for different environmental conditions in the native range, where they occupied more biomes and a wider breadth of rainfall and temperature conditions than naturalized congeners. However, neither seed mass nor leaf size differed between pairs of naturalized and invasive species. A key finding was the role of SLA in distinguishing between naturalized and invasive pairs. Species with high SLA values were typically associated with faster growth rates, more rapid turnover of leaf material, and shorter lifespans than those species with low SLA. This suite of characteristics may contribute to the ability of a species to transition from naturalized to invasive across a wide range of environmental contexts and disturbance regimes. Our findings will help in the refinement of WRA protocols, and we advocate the

  19. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John Henry

    2017-09-12

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  20. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Edwin S [Grand Forks, ND; Holmes, Michael J [Thompson, ND; Pavlish, John H [East Grand Forks, MN

    2008-10-14

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  1. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Edwin S [Grand Forks, ND; Holmes, Michael J [Thompson, ND; Pavlish, John H [East Grand Forks, MN

    2012-05-01

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  2. Chitosan-ferrocyanide sorbent for Cs-137 removal from mineralized alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorin, Andrei [Far Eastern Federal Univ., Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Ozyorsk Technical Institute MEPHI, Ozersk (Russian Federation); Tokar, Eduard [Far Eastern Federal Univ., Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Zemskova, Larisa [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-01

    An organomineral sorbent based on mixed nickel-potassium ferrocyanide and chitosan to be used in removal of Cs-137 radionuclide from highly mineralized media with high pH has been fabricated. The synthesized sorbent was applied to remove Cs-137 from model solutions under static and dynamic conditions. The effects of contact time, pH, and presence of sodium ions and complexing agents in the process of Cs-137 removal have been investigated. The sorbent is distinguished by increased stability to the impact of alkaline media containing complexing agents, whereas the sorbent capacity in solutions with pH 11 exceeds 1000 bed volumes with the Cs-137 removal efficiency higher than 95%.

  3. Sorption of methylxanthines by different sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, S. G.; Andreeva, E. Yu.; Tolmacheva, V. V.; Terent'eva, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    Sorption of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine, diprophylline, and pentoxyphylline on different sorbents (supercross-linked polystyrene, surface-modified copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene Strata-X, and carbon nanomaterials Taunit and Diasorb-100-C16T) was studied in a static mode in an effort to find new sorbents suitable for sorption isolation and concentration of methylxanthines. The peculiarities of sorption of methylxanthines were explained in relation to the solution acidity, the nature of the sorbates and their concentration, the nature of the solvent, and the structural characteristics of the sorbents.

  4. Meteorologic, oceanographic, and geomorphic controls on circulation and residence time in a coral reef-lined embayment: Faga'alu Bay, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C. D.; Cheriton, O. M.; Messina, A. M.; Biggs, T. W.

    2018-06-01

    Water circulation over coral reefs can determine the degree to which reef organisms are exposed to the overlying waters, so understanding circulation is necessary to interpret spatial patterns in coral health. Because coral reefs often have high geomorphic complexity, circulation patterns and the duration of exposure, or "local residence time" of a water parcel, can vary substantially over small distances. Different meteorologic and oceanographic forcings can further alter residence time patterns over reefs. Here, spatially dense Lagrangian surface current drifters and Eulerian current meters were used to characterize circulation patterns and resulting residence times over different regions of the reefs in Faga'alu Bay, American Samoa, during three distinct forcing periods: calm, strong winds, and large waves. Residence times varied among different geomorphic zones of the reef and were reflected in the spatially varying health of the corals across the embayment. The relatively healthy, seaward fringing reef consistently had the shortest residence times, as it was continually flushed by wave breaking at the reef crest, whereas the degraded, sheltered, leeward fringing reef consistently had the longest residence times, suggesting this area is more exposed to land-based sources of pollution. Strong wind forcing resulted in the longest residence times by pinning the water in the bay, whereas large wave forcing flushed the bay and resulted in the shortest residence times. The effect of these different forcings on residence times was fairly consistent across all reef geomorphic zones, with the shift from wind to wave forcing shortening mean residence times by approximately 50%. Although ecologically significant to the coral organisms in the nearshore reef zones, these shortened residence times were still 2-3 times longer than those associated with the seaward fringing reef across all forcing conditions, demonstrating how the geomorphology of a reef environment sets a

  5. A Comparison Study of Communication Skills between General Surgery and General Practice Residents on First-time Patient Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al Ansari

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is little published research about differences in doctor-patient communication of different specialties. Accordingly, we compared doctor-patient communication skills in two different specialties, general surgery (GS and general practice (GP. Methods: Twenty residents training at the Bahrain Defence Force Hospital (10 men and 10 women; mean age 28 years; 10 GS and 10 GP participated in 200 patient first visit consultations. The consultations were video-recorded and analysed by four trained observers using the MAAS Global scale. Results: 1 Internal consistency reliability of the MAAS Global (> 0.91 and Ep2 = 0.84 for raters was high, 2 GP residents spent more time (12 minutes than GS residents (7 minutes, in the visits, 3 There were several differences on the MAAS Global items between GP and GS residents (GS > GP, p GS, p < 0.05 on information giving, and 4 The present participants performed well compared to normative samples as well as to criterion-referenced cut-off scores. The general level of communication skills in both specialties, however, was ‘unsatisfactory’ and ‘doubtful’, as it is for normative samples. Conclusion: Excellent doctor-patient communication is essential but does not appear to receive the amount of attention that it deserves in practice settings. There are some differences between specialties as well as unsatisfactory communication skills for both specialties, since residents from both programs spent less time than recommended on each consultation. Our findings emphasize the need to improve the communication skills of physicians in general and for surgeons in particular.

  6. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Kivetty site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-12-01

    groundwater are due to carbonate reactions: oxidising of organic carbon, and dissolution and precipitation of calcite. The carbonate reactions and slight hydrolysis of silicates stabilise the pH value at 8-9. In addition to aerobic oxidation of organic matter, oxidative dissolution of biotite seems to be an important oxygen consumer at shallow depth during recharge. The most important process controlling the redox state deeper in the bedrock was interpreted to be the microbially mediated sulphate reduction with simultaneous anaerobic respiration of organic carbon. This process buffers the redox level of about -200 - -300 mV depending on the pH. Even though the salinities of the groundwater samples and mass-transfer along flow paths remain low, the geochemical evolution was fully developed and has reached quite a stable thermodynamic state. The residence times of the groundwater samples cover the time span back to glaciation. Young ages seem to be limited to the upper part of bedrock, and any really dynamic natural flowpath with deep observed recently recharged water cannot be demonstrated. Deglacial or subglacial ages (over 9,700 years old at Kivetty) are typical below the 150-300m level in the bedrock. Subglacial waters are interpreted to derive from mixing of preglacial water and meltwater, the input of which is estimated to be about 20% at the most. Indications of elevated oxygen intrusion cannot be observed in groundwater having glacial signals. (orig.) 122 refs.

  7. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Kivetty site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U.

    1998-12-01

    groundwater are due to carbonate reactions: oxidising of organic carbon, and dissolution and precipitation of calcite. The carbonate reactions and slight hydrolysis of silicates stabilise the pH value at 8-9. In addition to aerobic oxidation of organic matter, oxidative dissolution of biotite seems to be an important oxygen consumer at shallow depth during recharge. The most important process controlling the redox state deeper in the bedrock was interpreted to be the microbially mediated sulphate reduction with simultaneous anaerobic respiration of organic carbon. This process buffers the redox level of about -200 - -300 mV depending on the pH. Even though the salinities of the groundwater samples and mass-transfer along flow paths remain low, the geochemical evolution was fully developed and has reached quite a stable thermodynamic state. The residence times of the groundwater samples cover the time span back to glaciation. Young ages seem to be limited to the upper part of bedrock, and any really dynamic natural flowpath with deep observed recently recharged water cannot be demonstrated. Deglacial or subglacial ages (over 9,700 years old at Kivetty) are typical below the 150-300m level in the bedrock. Subglacial waters are interpreted to derive from mixing of preglacial water and meltwater, the input of which is estimated to be about 20% at the most. Indications of elevated oxygen intrusion cannot be observed in groundwater having glacial signals. (orig.)

  8. Durable zinc ferrite sorbent pellets for hot coal gas desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Mahesh C.; Blandon, Antonio E.; Hepworth, Malcolm T.

    1988-01-01

    Durable, porous sulfur sorbents useful in removing hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gas are prepared by water pelletizing a mixture of fine zinc oxide and fine iron oxide with inorganic and organic binders and small amounts of activators such as sodium carbonate and molybdenite; the pellets are dried and then indurated at a high temperature, e.g., 1800.degree. C., for a time sufficient to produce crush-resistant pellets.

  9. Highly efficient indoor air purification using adsorption-enhanced-photocatalysis-based microporous TiO2 at short residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jinze; Zhu, Lizhong

    2013-01-01

    A short residence time is a key design parameter for the removal of organic pollutants in catalyst-based indoor air purification systems. In this study, we synthesized a series of TiO2 with different micropore volumes and studied their removal efficiency of indoor carbonyl pollutants at a short residence time. Our results indicated that the superior adsorption capability of TiO2 with micropores improved its performance in the photocatalytic degradation of cyclohexanone, while the photocatalytic removal of the pollutant successfully kept porous TiO2 from becoming saturated. When treated with 1 mg m(-3) cyclohexanone at a relatively humidity of 18%, the adsorption amount on microporous TiO2 was 5.4-7.9 times higher than that on P25. Removal efficiency via photocatalysis followed'the same order as the adsorption amount: TiO2-5 > TiO2-20 > TiO2-60 > TiO2-180 > P25. The advantage of microporous TiO2 over P25 became more pronounced when the residence time declined from 0.072 to 0.036 s. Moreover, as the concentration of cyclohexanone deceased from 1000 ppb to 500 ppb, removal efficiency by microporous TiO2 increased more rapidly than P25.

  10. Sorption of short-lived radionuclides in a layer of sorbent with spherical granules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlin, Yu.V.

    1993-01-01

    Sorption methods have found wide application in the purification of liquid radioactive wastes. The working element in sorption methods for this purpose is usually a sorption column with a fixed layer of sorbent. Continuous-action equipment with a moving layer of sorbent is very seldom used. When a fixed layer of sorbent is used its wear and prolonged mixing in the sorption column are reduced to a minimum, and maximum purification is achieved due to the advantages of the dynamic method of sorption over the static method. The time of protective action of the sorbent layer is determined by the time taken for the radionuclide to pass through the sorption column, and for the majority of radionuclides is determined by numerous parameters, including the type of sorbent and radionuclide, the rate of flow through the sorbent, the size of the sorbent granules, etc. The physical and chemical aspects of this process have been investigated in detail, and numerous methods for modeling it mathematically have been developed and have been used to develop methods of designing sorption column apparatus. The specific nature of the radionuclides as unstable materials enables the hypothetical case of a open-quotes perpetualclose quotes sorption filter to be represented. In fact, to achieve this it is only necessary to assume that the half-life of the radionuclide is so small that the rate of decay of the radionuclide in the sorption column (both in the sorbed state and in the aqueous phase of the sorption layer) is equal to the rate that it is fed into the column in the flow of liquid radioactive waste. In this case the sorption front of the radionuclide in the column wall remains fixed after a certain initial period. In this paper, a mathematical model of such a hypothetical filter for the case of spherical sorbent granules is considered

  11. Isotopic and geochemical tracers in the evaluation of groundwater residence time and salinization problems at Santiago Island, Cape Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreira, Paula M.; Nunes, Dina; Marques, Jose M.; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Goncalves, Rui; Pina, Antonio; Mota Gomes, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotopes (δ 18 O, δ 2 H) and tritium ( 3 H), together with geochemistry and geophysical data, were used for evaluating groundwater recharge sources, flow paths, and residence times in a watershed on Santiago Island, Cape Verde, West Africa. Stable isotopes indicate the predominance of high-elevation precipitation that undergoes little evaporation prior to groundwater recharge. Low tritium concentrations at seven sampling sites indicate groundwater residence times greater than 50 years. Higher tritium values at other locations suggest more recent recharge. Young ages indicate local recharge and potential groundwater vulnerability to surface contamination and/or salt-water intrusion. Geochemical results indicate that water-rock interaction mechanisms are the major processes responsible for the groundwater quality (mainly calcium-bicarbonate type), reflecting the lithological composition of subsurface soil. (authors)

  12. Measurement of residence time distribution of liquid phase in an industrial-scale continuous pulp digester using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheoran, Meenakshi; Goswami, Sunil; Pant, Harish J; Biswal, Jayashree; Sharma, Vijay K; Chandra, Avinash; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K; Rao, S Madhukar; Dash, A

    2016-05-01

    A series of radiotracer experiments was carried out to measure residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase (alkali) in an industrial-scale continuous pulp digester in a paper industry in India. Bromine-82 as ammonium bromide was used as a radiotracer. Experiments were carried out at different biomass and white liquor flow rates. The measured RTD data were treated and mean residence times in individual digester tubes as well in the whole digester were determined. The RTD was also analyzed to identify flow abnormalities and investigate flow dynamics of the liquid phase in the pulp digester. Flow channeling was observed in the first section (tube 1) of the digester. Both axial dispersion and tanks-in-series with backmixing models preceded with a plug flow component were used to simulate the measured RTD and quantify the degree of axial mixing. Based on the study, optimum conditions for operating the digester were proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Isotopic and geochemical tracers in the evaluation of groundwater residence time and salinization problems at Santiago Island, Cape Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreira, Paula M.; Nunes, Dina [Quimica Analitica e Ambiental, IST/ITN, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional no. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Marques, Jose M. [Centro de Petrologia e Geoquimica. Instituto Superior Tecnico, UTL, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Monteiro Santos, Fernando A. [Universidade de Lisboa-IDL, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Goncalves, Rui [Inst. Politecnico de Tomar, Quinta do Contador, Estrada da Serra, 2300 Tomar (Portugal); Pina, Antonio; Mota Gomes, Antonio [Instituto Superior de Educacao, Praia, Santiago (Cape Verde)

    2013-07-01

    Stable isotopes (δ{sup 18}O, δ{sup 2}H) and tritium ({sup 3}H), together with geochemistry and geophysical data, were used for evaluating groundwater recharge sources, flow paths, and residence times in a watershed on Santiago Island, Cape Verde, West Africa. Stable isotopes indicate the predominance of high-elevation precipitation that undergoes little evaporation prior to groundwater recharge. Low tritium concentrations at seven sampling sites indicate groundwater residence times greater than 50 years. Higher tritium values at other locations suggest more recent recharge. Young ages indicate local recharge and potential groundwater vulnerability to surface contamination and/or salt-water intrusion. Geochemical results indicate that water-rock interaction mechanisms are the major processes responsible for the groundwater quality (mainly calcium-bicarbonate type), reflecting the lithological composition of subsurface soil. (authors)

  14. Design report for the residence time extension of KNK II/2 from 455 to 720 equivalent full-power days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schade, H.-J.; Steinmetz, B.; Wehmann, U.

    1985-05-01

    The report describes the performance of the whole reactor and of its assemblies and their components during the residence time extension of the second core of KNK II from the foreseen value of 455 equivalent full-power days (efpd) to 720 efpd. By this extension existing reactivity and design reserves can be utilized, and the burnup of the test zone assemblies can be increased towards the level aimed at for future sodium breeder reactors. The investigations about the static and the dynamic behavior of the core with its components and of the heat transfer systems under nominal and accidental conditions show, that the plant can be safely operated during the residence time extension [de

  15. Using 50 years of soil radiocarbon data to identify optimal approaches for estimating soil carbon residence times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisden, W. T.; Canessa, S.

    2013-01-01

    In 1959, Athol Rafter began a substantial programme of systematically monitoring the flow of 14C produced by atmospheric thermonuclear tests through organic matter in New Zealand soils under stable land use. A database of ∼500 soil radiocarbon measurements spanning 50 years has now been compiled, and is used here to identify optimal approaches for soil C-cycle studies. Our results confirm the potential of 14C to determine residence times, by estimating the amount of ‘bomb 14C’ incorporated. High-resolution time series confirm this approach is appropriate, and emphasise that residence times can be calculated routinely with two or more time points as little as 10 years apart. This approach is generally robust to the key assumptions that can create large errors when single time-point 14C measurements are modelled. The three most critical assumptions relate to: (1) the distribution of turnover times, and particularly the proportion of old C (‘passive fraction’), (2) the lag time between photosynthesis and C entering the modelled pool, (3) changes in the rates of C input. When carrying out approaches using robust assumptions on time-series samples, multiple soil layers can be aggregated using a mixing equation. Where good archived samples are available, AMS measurements can develop useful understanding for calibrating models of the soil C cycle at regional to continental scales with sample numbers on the order of hundreds rather than thousands. Sample preparation laboratories and AMS facilities can play an important role in coordinating the efficient delivery of robust calculated residence times for soil carbon.

  16. Using 50 years of soil radiocarbon data to identify optimal approaches for estimating soil carbon residence times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baisden, W.T.; Canessa, S.

    2013-01-01

    In 1959, Athol Rafter began a substantial programme of systematically monitoring the flow of 14 C produced by atmospheric thermonuclear tests through organic matter in New Zealand soils under stable land use. A database of ∼500 soil radiocarbon measurements spanning 50 years has now been compiled, and is used here to identify optimal approaches for soil C-cycle studies. Our results confirm the potential of 14 C to determine residence times, by estimating the amount of ‘bomb 14 C’ incorporated. High-resolution time series confirm this approach is appropriate, and emphasise that residence times can be calculated routinely with two or more time points as little as 10 years apart. This approach is generally robust to the key assumptions that can create large errors when single time-point 14 C measurements are modelled. The three most critical assumptions relate to: (1) the distribution of turnover times, and particularly the proportion of old C (‘passive fraction’), (2) the lag time between photosynthesis and C entering the modelled pool, (3) changes in the rates of C input. When carrying out approaches using robust assumptions on time-series samples, multiple soil layers can be aggregated using a mixing equation. Where good archived samples are available, AMS measurements can develop useful understanding for calibrating models of the soil C cycle at regional to continental scales with sample numbers on the order of hundreds rather than thousands. Sample preparation laboratories and AMS facilities can play an important role in coordinating the efficient delivery of robust calculated residence times for soil carbon.

  17. Using 50 years of soil radiocarbon data to identify optimal approaches for estimating soil carbon residence times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baisden, W.T., E-mail: t.baisden@gns.cri.nz [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, P.O. Box 31312, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Canessa, S. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, P.O. Box 31312, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2013-01-15

    In 1959, Athol Rafter began a substantial programme of systematically monitoring the flow of {sup 14}C produced by atmospheric thermonuclear tests through organic matter in New Zealand soils under stable land use. A database of {approx}500 soil radiocarbon measurements spanning 50 years has now been compiled, and is used here to identify optimal approaches for soil C-cycle studies. Our results confirm the potential of {sup 14}C to determine residence times, by estimating the amount of 'bomb {sup 14}C' incorporated. High-resolution time series confirm this approach is appropriate, and emphasise that residence times can be calculated routinely with two or more time points as little as 10 years apart. This approach is generally robust to the key assumptions that can create large errors when single time-point {sup 14}C measurements are modelled. The three most critical assumptions relate to: (1) the distribution of turnover times, and particularly the proportion of old C ('passive fraction'), (2) the lag time between photosynthesis and C entering the modelled pool, (3) changes in the rates of C input. When carrying out approaches using robust assumptions on time-series samples, multiple soil layers can be aggregated using a mixing equation. Where good archived samples are available, AMS measurements can develop useful understanding for calibrating models of the soil C cycle at regional to continental scales with sample numbers on the order of hundreds rather than thousands. Sample preparation laboratories and AMS facilities can play an important role in coordinating the efficient delivery of robust calculated residence times for soil carbon.

  18. Comparison of Residence Time Distributions of Liquid for Different Types of Input Signal Using a Stimulus-Response Technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermáková, Jiřina; Siyakatshana, N.; Šilar, F.; Kudrna, V.; Jahoda, M.; Machoň, V.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 6 (2003), s. 427-431 ISSN 0366-6352. [International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering /30./. Tatranské Matliare, 26.05.2003-30.05.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : stirred tank * stimulus-response technique * residence time distribution Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.226, year: 2003

  19. Successful invaders co-opt pollinators of native flora and accumulate insect pollinators with increasing residence time

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pyšek, Petr; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Chytrý, M.; Danihelka, Jiří; Kuhn, D.; Pergl, Jan; Tichý, L.; Biesmeijer, J. C.; Ellis, W. N.; Kunin, W. E.; Settele, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 2 (2011), s. 277-293 ISSN 0012-9615 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073; GA ČR GA206/09/0563 Grant - others:European Comission(XE) GOCE-CT-2003-506675 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : pollination * residence time * plant invasion Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 7.433, year: 2011

  20. Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjostrom, Sharon [Ada-Es, Inc., Highlands Ranch, CO (United States)

    2016-06-02

    ADA completed a DOE-sponsored program titled Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture under program DE-FE0004343. During this program, sorbents were analyzed for use in a post-combustion CO2 capture process. A supported amine sorbent was selected based upon superior performance to adsorb a greater amount of CO2 than the activated carbon sorbents tested. When the most ideal sorbent at the time was selected, it was characterized and used to create a preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA). A preliminary 550 MW coal-fired power plant using Illinois #6 bituminous coal was designed with a solid sorbent CO2 capture system using the selected supported amine sorbent to both facilitate the TEA and to create the necessary framework to scale down the design to a 1 MWe equivalent slipstream pilot facility. The preliminary techno-economic analysis showed promising results and potential for improved performance for CO2 capture compared to conventional MEA systems. As a result, a 1 MWe equivalent solid sorbent system was designed, constructed, and then installed at a coal-fired power plant in Alabama. The pilot was designed to capture 90% of the CO2 from the incoming flue gas at 1 MWe net electrical generating equivalent. Testing was not possible at the design conditions due to changes in sorbent handling characteristics at post-regenerator temperatures that were not properly incorporated into the pilot design. Thus, severe pluggage occurred at nominally 60% of the design sorbent circulation rate with heated sorbent, although no handling issues were noted when the system was operated prior to bringing the regenerator to operating temperature. Testing within the constraints of the pilot plant resulted in 90% capture of the incoming CO2 at a flow rate equivalent of 0.2 to 0.25 MWe net electrical generating equivalent. The reduction in equivalent flow rate at 90% capture was

  1. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Olkiluoto site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U.

    1999-05-01

    external conditions such as glaciation, palaeo Baltic stages, land uplift and ancient hydrothermal events, have had a significant effect on local palaeohydrogeological conditions. They have caused great variability, which is observable in the chemical data notably in salinity (up to 70 g/l), water type and contents of conservative parameters, such as Cl, Br and stable isotopes of water. However, their influence is also significant on the water-rock interaction that principally controls the pH and redox conditions - varying 7.5 to 8 and -200 to -300 mV, respectively - in the groundwater, although the calculated mass transfer in the reactions is minor compared with conservative mixing at the site. Calcite in fractures is interpreted to principally control pH level in groundwater. Sulphidic redox conditions dominate in the upper 500 m in brackish and slightly saline groundwater. Deeper sulphur species are absent and methanic processes are obtained. The water types can be connected to certain palaeo stages. This enables to estimate mean residence time of groundwaters. Current meteoric recharge stage (< 2500 a) mainly dominates in the upper 150 m. Groundwater from Litorina stage (7500-2500 a ago) forms the bulk at 100 - 250 m. Glacial melt water (about 10 000 a old) is an important component of groundwater between 100 - 500 m. However, any remarks of oxygen intrusion cannot be interpreted neither from mineralogy nor from groundwater. Deeper, subglacial and older saline groundwater predominates. Despite the current locations of different groundwater bodies it seems according to hydrogeochemical interpretation that dynamic flow conditions has been limited to upper 150 - 200 m. (orig.)

  2. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Olkiluoto site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy (Finland); Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-05-01

    external conditions such as glaciation, palaeo Baltic stages, land uplift and ancient hydrothermal events, have had a significant effect on local palaeohydrogeological conditions. They have caused great variability, which is observable in the chemical data notably in salinity (up to 70 g/l), water type and contents of conservative parameters, such as Cl, Br and stable isotopes of water. However, their influence is also significant on the water-rock interaction that principally controls the pH and redox conditions - varying 7.5 to 8 and -200 to -300 mV, respectively - in the groundwater, although the calculated mass transfer in the reactions is minor compared with conservative mixing at the site. Calcite in fractures is interpreted to principally control pH level in groundwater. Sulphidic redox conditions dominate in the upper 500 m in brackish and slightly saline groundwater. Deeper sulphur species are absent and methanic processes are obtained. The water types can be connected to certain palaeo stages. This enables to estimate mean residence time of groundwaters. Current meteoric recharge stage (< 2500 a) mainly dominates in the upper 150 m. Groundwater from Litorina stage (7500-2500 a ago) forms the bulk at 100 - 250 m. Glacial melt water (about 10 000 a old) is an important component of groundwater between 100 - 500 m. However, any remarks of oxygen intrusion cannot be interpreted neither from mineralogy nor from groundwater. Deeper, subglacial and older saline groundwater predominates. Despite the current locations of different groundwater bodies it seems according to hydrogeochemical interpretation that dynamic flow conditions has been limited to upper 150 - 200 m. (orig.) 82 refs.

  3. Survey of some natural decay-series isotopes in the Wairakei geothermal area and possible residence-time applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.; Burnett, W.C.; Whitehead, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of selected isotopes in the uranium decay series were determined for samples collected from the Wairakei, Broadlands/Ohaaki and Waiotapu areas. /sup 226/Ra concentrations were found to be low (0.05-0.22 dpm/l), similar to values reported in neutral hot springs at Tatun geothermal area, Taiwan, but lower than other geothermal systems (Yellowstone, USA, and Latera, Central Italy) (up to 25 dpm/l). The potential of /sup 226/Ra//sup 228/Ra ratios for indicating water residence times could not be explored because /sup 228/Ra data was not available. /sup 222/Rn concentrations are higher and related to steam fractions and CO/sub 2/ concentrations. The short half-life (3.8 days) makes /sup 222/Rn suitable for estimating residence times of radon in steam, and therefore the distance of travel of steam from its source (e.g., wells WK9 and 52). /sup 210/Pb and /sup 210/Po concentrations were very low and less than detection limits in many of the Wairakei waters; no residence time applications are apparent for these isotopes. (author). 11 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  4. Measurement of residence time distribution of liquid phase in an industrial-scale continuous pulp digester using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheoran, Meenakshi; Goswami, Sunil; Pant, Harish J.; Biswal, Jayashree; Sharma, Vijay K.; Chandra, Avinash; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K.; Rao, S. Madhukar; Dash, A.

    2016-01-01

    A series of radiotracer experiments was carried out to measure residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase (alkali) in an industrial-scale continuous pulp digester in a paper industry in India. Bromine-82 as ammonium bromide was used as a radiotracer. Experiments were carried out at different biomass and white liquor flow rates. The measured RTD data were treated and mean residence times in individual digester tubes as well in the whole digester were determined. The RTD was also analyzed to identify flow abnormalities and investigate flow dynamics of the liquid phase in the pulp digester. Flow channeling was observed in the first section (tube 1) of the digester. Both axial dispersion and tanks-in-series with backmixing models preceded with a plug flow component were used to simulate the measured RTD and quantify the degree of axial mixing. Based on the study, optimum conditions for operating the digester were proposed. - Highlights: • Radiotracer experiments were conducted to measure RTD of liquid phase in a pulp digester • Mean residence times of white liquor were measured • Axial dispersion and tanks-in-series models were used to investigate flow patterns • Parallel flow paths were observed in first section of the digester • Optimized flow rates of biomass and liquor were obtained

  5. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-04-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1-3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents.

  6. Residence half-time of {sup 137}Cs in the top-soils of Japanese paddy and upland fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komamura, Misako [National Inst. of Agro-Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsumura, Akito; Kodaira, Kiyoshi

    1999-03-01

    A series of top-soil samples of 14 paddy fields and 10 upland fields in Japan, were annually collected during more than 30 years, to be examined in the contents of {sup 137}Cs. The data, which were obtained by the use of a gamma spectrometric system, received some statistical treatments to distinguish the annual decline of {sup 137}Cs contents from deviations. Then the authors calculated `residence half-time of {sup 137}Cs` within top-soil, and `eluviation rate of {sup 137}Cs` from top to the sub-layer of the soil. The following nationwide results were obtained irrespective of paddy or upland field: (1) The `apparent residence half-time` was estimated as 16 - 17 years. This consists of both effects of eluviation and nuclear disintegration. (2) The true residence half-time` was reported as 41 - 42 years. This depends on the eluviation speed of {sup 137}Cs exclusively, because the influence of nuclear disintegration has been compensated. (3) The eluviation rate of {sup 137}Cs from top-soil down to the sub-soil was 1.6 - 1.7% per year. (4) The ratio of distribution of {sup 137}Cs between top-soil and the sub-soil was estimated to be 6:4 as average at the date of 1996. (author)

  7. Low-Cost Sorbents: A Literature Summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailey, Susan

    1997-01-01

    The capital and regeneration costs of activated carbon and ion exchange media suggest that better process economics may be achieved with disposable sorbents for the treatment of metals-contaminated...

  8. Pathology resident and fellow education in a time of disruptive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziai, James M; Smith, Brian R

    2012-12-01

    The development of disruptive technologies is changing the practice of pathology. Their implementation challenges traditional educational paradigms. Training programs must adapt to these heuristic needs. The dual explosion of new medical knowledge and innovative methodologies adds new practice aspects to the pathologist's areas of expertise. This transformation potentially challenges the traditional core model of training. It raises questions as to how pathology should incorporate future expanding subspecialty needs into educational and practice models. This article examines the impact of these disruptive technologies on resident and fellow education and explores alternative educational and practice models that may better accommodate pathology's future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. SO{sub 2} Retention by CaO-Based Sorbent Spent in CO{sub 2} Looping Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.; Loncarevic, D.

    2009-07-15

    CaO-based looping cycles are promising processes for CO{sub 2} Capture from both syngas and flue gas. The technology is based on cyclical carbonation of CaO and regeneration of CaCO{sub 3} in a dual fluidized-bed reactor to produce a pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration. Use of spent sorbent from CO{sub 2} looping cycles for SO{sub 2} capture is investigated. Three limestones were investigated: Kelly Rock (Canada), La Blanca (Spain), and Katowice (Poland, Upper Silesia). Carbonation/calcination cycles were performed in a tube furnace with both the original limestones and samples thermally pretreated for different times (i.e., sintered). The spent sorbent samples were sulfated in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The changes in the resulting sorbent pore structure were then investigated using mercury porosimetry. It has been shown that the sulfation rates of both thermally pretreated and spent sorbent samples are lower in comparison with those of the original samples. However, final conversions of both spent and pretreated sorbents after longer sulfation time were comparable or higher than those observed for the original sorbents under comparable conditions. Maximum sulfation levels strongly depend on sorbent porosity and pore surface area. The results showed that spent sorbent samples from CO{sub 2} looping cycles can be used as sorbents for SO{sub 2} retention in cases where significant porosity loss does not occur during CO{sub 2} reaction cycles. In the case of spent Kelly Rock and Katowice samples, sorbent particles are practically uniformly sulfated, achieving final conversions that are determined by the total pore volume available for the bulky CaSO{sub 4} product.

  10. Release of iodine radionuclides from gas media in a system of selective block sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, L.N.; Miroshnikov, V.S.; Mel'nikov, V.A.; Chetverikov, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    A scheme of extracting iodine radionuclides from gas flows in a system of selective sorbents has been developed. The method provides separation of three forms of iodine: the aerosol component, the elementary iodine and organic-iodine compounds. Aerosols are trapped by a mechanical filter made of porous polytetrafluoroethylene with pores of no more than 1 μm. Silver-based sorbents for the elementary iodine are made by sintering the granular polytetrafluoroethylene (the size of granules is 0.1-0.5 mm) with of finely dispersed solver (5% mass). Organic iodine compounds are extracted by a silica sorbent impregnated with silver nitrate. The efficiency of sorbents was tested in gas flows with a known content of 131 I in the form of elementary iodine and methyl iodide. The results of experiments show that the efficiency of sorption of elementary iodine by a metallic-silver sorbent and of methyl iodide by a SiO 2 /AgNO 3 sorbent constitutes no less than 99% at a flow rate of up to 200 l/h. The iodine has been extracted at a flow rate of 100 l/h during 100 hours and for that time the efficiency of the iodine sorbtion has not changed. The suggested variant of extracting iodine radionuclides from gaseous media can be used both for fast control of iodine content in gas blowoffs and for researches aimed at studying the distribution of iodine forms in steam-and-gas media depending on nuclear plant operating conditions

  11. Latitude of residence and position in time zone are predictors of cancer incidence, cancer mortality, and life expectancy at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisenkov, Mikhail F

    2011-03-01

    According to the hypothesis of circadian disruption, external factors that disturb the function of the circadian system can raise the risk of malignant neoplasm and reduce life span. Recent work has shown that the functionality of the circadian system is dependent not only on latitude of residence but also on the region's position in the time zone. The purpose of the present research was to examine the influence of latitude and time zone on cancer incidence, cancer mortality, and life expectancy at birth. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was carried out on residents of 59 regions of the European part of the Russian Federation (EPRF) using age-standardized parameters (per 100,000) of cancer incidence (CI), cancer mortality (CM), and life expectancy at birth (LE, yrs) as dependent variables. The geographical coordinates (latitude and position in the time zone) of the regions were used as independent variables, controlling for the level of economic development in the regions. The same analysis was carried out for LE in 31 regions in China. Latitude was the strongest predictor of LE in the EPRF population; it explained 48% and 45% of the variability in LE of women and men, respectively. Position within the time zone accounted for an additional 4% and 3% variability of LE in women and men, respectively. The highest values for LE were observed in the southeast of the EPRF. In China, latitude was not a predictor of LE, whereas position in the time zone explained 15% and 18% of the LE variability in women and men, respectively. The highest values of LE were observed in the eastern regions of China. Both latitude and position within the time zone were predictors for CI and CM of the EPRF population. Latitude was the best predictor of stomach CI and CM; this predictor explained 46% and 50% of the variability, respectively. Position within the time zone was the best predictor of female breast CM; it explained 15% of the variability. In most cases, CI and CM increased

  12. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-07-01

    Sodium based sorbents including sodium carbonate may be used to capture carbon dioxide from flue gas. A relatively concentrated carbon dioxide stream may be recoverable for sequestration when the sorbent is regenerated. Electrobalance tests indicated that sodium carbonate monohydrate was formed in a mixture of helium and water vapor at temperatures below 65 C. Additional compounds may also form, but this could not be confirmed. In the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor, both the initial reaction rate of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water and the sorbent capacity decreased with increasing temperature, consistent with the results from the previous quarter. Increasing the carbon dioxide concentration at constant temperature and water vapor concentration produced a measurable increase in rate, as did increasing the water vapor concentration at constant carbon dioxide concentration and temperature. Runs conducted with a flatter TGA pan resulted in a higher initial reaction rate, presumably due to improved gas-solid contact, but after a short time, there was no significant difference in the rates measured with the different pans. Analyses of kinetic data suggest that the surface of the sodium carbonate particles may be much hotter than the bulk gas due to the highly exothermic reaction with carbon dioxide and water, and that the rate of heat removal from the particle may control the reaction rate. A material and energy balance was developed for a cyclic carbonation/calcination process which captures about 26 percent of the carbon dioxide present in flue gas available at 250 C.

  13. Maintaining social cohesion is a more important determinant of patch residence time than maximizing food intake rate in a group-living primate, Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazahari, Nobuko

    2014-04-01

    Animals have been assumed to employ an optimal foraging strategy (e.g., rate-maximizing strategy). In patchy food environments, intake rate within patches is positively correlated with patch quality, and declines as patches are depleted through consumption. This causes patch-leaving and determines patch residence time. In group-foraging situations, patch residence times are also affected by patch sharing. Optimal patch models for groups predict that patch residence times decrease as the number of co-feeding animals increases because of accelerated patch depletion. However, group members often depart patches without patch depletion, and their patch residence time deviates from patch models. It has been pointed out that patch residence time is also influenced by maintaining social proximity with others among group-living animals. In this study, the effects of maintaining social cohesion and that of rate-maximizing strategy on patch residence time were examined in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). I hypothesized that foragers give up patches to remain in the proximity of their troop members. On the other hand, foragers may stay for a relatively long period when they do not have to abandon patches to follow the troop. In this study, intake rate and foraging effort (i.e., movement) did not change during patch residency. Macaques maintained their intake rate with only a little foraging effort. Therefore, the patches were assumed to be undepleted during patch residency. Further, patch residence time was affected by patch-leaving to maintain social proximity, but not by the intake rate. Macaques tended to stay in patches for short periods when they needed to give up patches for social proximity, and remained for long periods when they did not need to leave to keep social proximity. Patch-leaving and patch residence time that prioritize the maintenance of social cohesion may be a behavioral pattern in group-living primates.

  14. Creating a Residency Application Personal Statement Writers Workshop: Fostering Narrative, Teamwork, and Insight at a Time of Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce H; Havas, Nancy; Derse, Arthur R; Holloway, Richard L

    2016-03-01

    Every graduating medical student must write a personal statement for the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS), yet there are no widely available resources designed to aid the writing process, causing stress among applicants. The authors offered every Medical College of Wisconsin senior student in the Classes of 2014 and 2015 a voluntary self-contained two-hour Residency Application Personal Statement Writers Workshop. The session included the selection of writing prompts, speedwriting, and a peer-edit critique. Data were gathered before and after each workshop and at the time of ERAS submission. One hundred nine students elected to participate. Of the 96 participants completing a preworkshop questionnaire, only 28 (29%) were comfortable with creative and reflective writing. Fifty-four students completed a follow-up survey after submitting their ERAS application. Fifty-one (94%) found the session effective in getting their personal statement started, and 65 (70%) were surprised by the quality of their writing. Almost all could trace some of their final statement to the workshop. Forty-six (85%) found working with other students helpful, and 49 (91%) would recommend the session to future students; 47 (87%) agreed that the workshop was "fun." The full workshop will be repeated yearly. Workshops will also be offered to residents preparing fellowship applications. A shorter version (without the peer-edit critique) was used successfully with the entire Class of 2016 to help them reflect on their initial clinical encounters. The authors will seek further opportunities to enhance reflection for students, residents, and faculty with these techniques.

  15. Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Capture From Existing Coal Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Steven [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Srinivasachar, Srivats [Envergex LLC, Sturbridge, MA (United States); Laudal, Daniel [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Browers, Bruce [Barr Engineering, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-12-31

    A novel hybrid solid sorbent technology for CO₂ capture and separation from coal combustion-derived flue gas was evaluated. The technology – Capture of CO₂ by Hybrid Sorption (CACHYS™) – is a solid sorbent technology based on the following ideas: 1) reduction of energy for sorbent regeneration, 2) utilization of novel process chemistry, 3) contactor conditions that minimize sorbent-CO₂ heat of reaction and promote fast CO₂ capture, and 4) low-cost method of heat management. This report provides key information developed during the course of the project that includes sorbent performance, energy for sorbent regeneration, physical properties of the sorbent, the integration of process components, sizing of equipment, and overall capital and operational cost of the integrated CACHYS™ system. Seven sorbent formulations were prepared and evaluated at the lab-scale for energy requirements and CO₂ capture performance. Sorbent heat of regeneration ranged from 30-80 kJ/mol CO₂ and was found to be dependent on process conditions. Two sorbent formulations (designated HCK-4 & HCK-7) were down-selected for additional fixed-bed testing. Additional testing involved subjecting the sorbents to 100 continuous cycles in the fixed-bed reactor to determine performance as a function of time. The working capacity achieved for HCK-4 sorbent ranged from 5.5-8.0 g CO₂/100 g sorbent, while the HCK-7 typically ranged from 8.0-10.0 g CO₂/100 g sorbent. Overall, there was no deterioration in capacity with continuous cycling for either sorbent. The CACHYS™ bench-scale testing system designed and fabricated under this award consists of a dual circulating fluidized-bed adsorber and a moving-bed regenerator. The system takes a flue gas slipstream from the University of North Dakota’s coal-fired steam plant. Prior to being sent to the adsorber, the flue gas is scrubbed to remove SO₂ and particulate. During parametric testing of the adsorber, CO₂ capture achieved using

  16. Groundwater residence time in basement aquifers of the Ochi-Narkwa Basin in the Central Region of Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganyaglo, Samuel Y.; Osae, Shiloh; Akiti, Tetteh; Armah, Thomas; Gourcy, Laurence; Vitvar, Tomas; Ito, Mari; Otoo, Isaac

    2017-10-01

    Groundwaters from basement aquifers in the Ochi-Narkwa basin of the Central Region together with rain and surface waters have been analysed for stable isotopes (δ18O, δ2H and δ13C) and radioisotopes (3H and 14C) to determine sources of recharge, groundwater residence time and flow path. The mechanism of recharge to the groundwaters is by direct infiltration of past local rainfall of mean isotopic composition δ18O = -3.8‰ V-SMOW and δ2H = -18‰ V-SMOW. Tritium in the groundwaters ranged from 0.05 ± 0.07 to 4.75 ± 0.16 TU. Tritium data revealed that 85% of the groundwater samples were of modern recharge or young waters. The 14C content of the groundwaters ranged between 9.50 pMC in borehole CR2-50 at Ekumfi Asokwa to 113.56 pMC in borehole CR3-26 at Onyaadze. Evaluation of 3H and 14C data distinguished three groups of water namely (1) waters characterised by high 3H and high 14C depicting modern recharge, (2) waters showing a mixture of young and old water due to fractures and (3) waters showing low 3H and low 14C contents referred to as very old waters and include borehole CR2-50 at Ekumfi Asokwa. The estimated age or residence time of this older water is 19,459 years BP based on uncorrected age. The major flow direction is northwest-southeast. The dominant months contributing to recharge in the study area were February, March, April, May, June, August, September and October. Groundwater residence times in the basement aquifers of the Ochi-Narkwa basin showed that groundwater abstraction is sustainable and requires that the recharge areas are protected from contamination.

  17. Measurements of liquid phase residence time distributions in a pilot-scale continuous leaching reactor using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.J.; Sharma, V.K.; Shenoy, K.T.; Sreenivas, T.

    2015-01-01

    An alkaline based continuous leaching process is commonly used for extraction of uranium from uranium ore. The reactor in which the leaching process is carried out is called a continuous leaching reactor (CLR) and is expected to behave as a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for the liquid phase. A pilot-scale CLR used in a Technology Demonstration Pilot Plant (TDPP) was designed, installed and operated; and thus needed to be tested for its hydrodynamic behavior. A radiotracer investigation was carried out in the CLR for measurement of residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase with specific objectives to characterize the flow behavior of the reactor and validate its design. Bromine-82 as ammonium bromide was used as a radiotracer and about 40–60 MBq activity was used in each run. The measured RTD curves were treated and mean residence times were determined and simulated using a tanks-in-series model. The result of simulation indicated no flow abnormality and the reactor behaved as an ideal CSTR for the range of the operating conditions used in the investigation. - Highlights: • Radiotracer technique was applied for evaluation of design of a pilot-scale continuous leaching reactor. • Mean residence time and dead volume were estimated. Dead volume was found to be ranging from 4% to 15% at different operating conditions. • Tank-in-series model was used to simulate the measured RTD data and was found suitable to describe the flow in the reactor. • No flow abnormality was found and the reactor behaved as a well-mixed system. The design of the reactor was validated

  18. Fly Ash Formation during Suspension-Firing of Biomass. Effects of Residence Time and Fuel-Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damø, Anne Juul; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    particles were subjected to various analyses, including char burnout level, particle size distribution, elemental composition, and particle morphology and composition. Furthermore, the transient release, i.e. the vaporization of the flame-volatile inorganic elements K, Cl and S, from the burning fuel...... particles to the gas phase, has been quantified by using two different calculation methods. The ash formation mechanisms were found to be quite similar for straw and wood. The degree of conversion (char burn-out level) was generally good at residence times ≥ 1s. The size distribution of the residual fly ash...

  19. Disinfection of drinking water by ultraviolet light. Minimum dose and shortest time of residence are central criteria when choosing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-23

    It is no longer mandatory that a given residue of chlorine is present in drinking water and this has led to interest in the use of ultraviolet radiation for disinfection of water in large public waterworks. After a brief discussion of the effect of ultraviolet radiation related to wavelength, the most usual type of irradiation equipment is briefly described. Practioal considerations regarding the installation, such as attenuation of the radiation due to water quality and deposits are presented. The requirements as to dose and residence time are also discussed and finally it is pointed out that hydraulic imperfections can reduce the effectiveness drastically.

  20. Determination of the residence time of rain water in some hydrographic basins by means of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, A.R.L.

    1979-10-01

    Samples of rain-and river water, monthly collected during one year from ten stations of the Amazon basin analysed in their 18 O and D content. The residence time of rain water for each station was determined using the values of Δ 18 O(%o) and ΔD(%). The values of Δ 18 O(%o) were correlated with the precipitation ones (mm) in order to determine the occurence of 'amount effect' in the stations. An analysis of samples was done along the Amazon River for simple observation of the 'isotopic fractionation' phenomenon the values of Δ 18 O(%o). (Author) [pt

  1. Impact of meander geometry and stream flow events on residence times and solute transport in the intra-meander flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir Mahmood, Muhammad; Schmidt, Christian; Trauth, Nico

    2017-04-01

    Stream morphological features, in combination with hydrological variability play a key role in water and solute exchange across surface and subsurface waters. Meanders are prominent morphological features within stream systems which exhibit unique hydrodynamics. The water surface elevation difference across the inner bank of a meander induces lateral hyporheic exchange within the intra-meander region. This hyporheic flow is characterized by considerably prolonged flow paths and residence times (RT) compared to smaller scales of hyporheic exchange. In this study we examine the impact of different meander geometries on the intra-meander hyporheic flow field and solute mobilization under both steady state and transient flow conditions. We developed a number of artificial meander shape scenarios, representing various meander evolution stages, ranging from a typical initial to advanced stage (near cut off ) meander. Three dimensional steady state numerical groundwater flow simulations including the unsaturated zone were performed for the intra-meander region. The meandering stream was implemented in the model by adjusting the top layers of the modelling domain to the streambed elevation and assigning linearly decreasing head boundary conditions to the streambed cells. Residence times for the intra-meander region were computed by advective particle tracking across the inner bank of meander. Selected steady state cases were extended to transient flow simulations to evaluate the impact of stream discharge events on the temporal behavior of the water exchange and solute transport in the intra-meander region. The transient stream discharge was simulated for a number of discharge events of variable duration and peak height using the surface water model HEC-RAS. Transient hydraulic heads obtained from the surface water model were applied as transient head boundary conditions to the streambed cells of the groundwater model. A solute concentration source was added in the

  2. Test determination with tritium as a radioactive tracer of the residence time distribution in the stability pool for Cabrero sewage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Francisco; Duran, Oscar; Henriquez, Pedro; Vega, Pedro; Padilla, Liliana; Gonzalez, David; Garcia Agudo, Edmundo

    2000-01-01

    This work was prepared by the Chilean and International Atomic Energy Agencies and covers the hydrodynamic functioning of sewage stability pools using tracers. The plant selected in the city of Cabrero, 500 km. south of Santiago, and is a rectangular facultative pool with a surface area of 7100 m 2 and a maximum volume of 12,327 m2 that receives an average flow of 20 l/s, serving a population of 7000 individuals. The work aims to characterize the runoff from the flow that enters the pool, using a radioactive tracer test, where the incoming water is marked, and its out-coming passage is determined, to establish the residence time distribution. Tritium was selected in the form of tritiated water as a tracer that is precisely emptied into the water flow from the distribution ravine at the lake entrance. Samples are taken at the outflow to determine the concentration of tritium after distillation, simultaneously measuring the flow, to be analyzed in a liquid flicker counter. An average test time of 5.3 days was obtained and an analysis of the residence time distribution for the tracer shows that it leaves quickly and indicates bad flow distribution in the lake with a major short circuit and probable dead zones

  3. Estimation of groundwater residence time and evaluation of geomorphological processes using cosmogenic and terrigenic radionuclides and isotopes of noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahara, Yasunori; Ohta, Tomoko; Igarashi, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the estimation of groundwater residence time and geomorphological changing processes are discussed by focusing on isotopes of noble gases and radionuclides with a long half-life as an environmental tracer. Noble gases and radionuclides are produced in the atmospheric air and terrestrial rocks by spallation and various muon reactions during cosmic rays irradiation. Groundwater dating and geomorphological changing are estimated from changes in the number of atoms of cosmogenic and terrigenic nuclides in groundwater and terrestrial rock. The main tools of groundwater dating are combination of the dissolved helium and tritium (half-life T 1/2 =12.3 y) for younger groundwater less than 60 years of residence time, and of the dissolved helium and 36 Cl (T 1/2 =3.01 x 10 5 y) for older groundwater over million years. On the other hand, the main tools on the geomorphological changes are the estimation of exposure time using cosmogenic radionuclides ( 10 Be(half-life T 1/2 =1.6 x 10 6 y), 14 C (T 1/2 =5730 y), 26 Al (T 1/2 =7.16 x 10 5 y) and 36 Cl) and cosmogenic stable noble gases ( 3 He and 21 Ne) produced in rock. (author)

  4. A model of environmental behaviour of contaminated dust and its application to determining dust fluxes and residence times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allott, R.W.; Kelly, M.; Hewitt, C.N.

    1994-01-01

    A model has been developed to describe the temporal behaviour of the concentrations of a pollutant tracer within the urban environment of Barrow-in-Furness, NW England. The tracer used was 137 Cs derived primarily from wet deposition of the radioactive cloud from the Chernobyl reactor accident. The 137 Cs activity deposited during this primary event was supplemented by a small secondary atmospheric deposition input of resuspended activity. The model was validated against the measured temporal behaviour of 137 Cs in urban dust for two outdoor reservoirs in which the only observed input of dust and activity was by atmospheric deposition. Further modelling studies on other reservoirs (both outdoors and indoors) confirmed the existence of additional input influxes of dust and activity. The model enabled estimates of the magnitudes of these additional fluxes to be made and mean dust mass residence times to be calculated. These residence times correspond to environment half-lives of 170 ± 70 d outdoors and 20 ± 1 d indoors, for reservoirs which only receive a single primary input of a contaminant. Where secondary inputs of pollutants occur, the mean environmental half-lives of the pollutants increase by 50% for outdoor dust reservoirs and over 18-times for indoor reservoirs. This re-contamination of indoor dusts has implications in that attention should be paid to reducing outdoor contamination levels to ensure that attempts to reduce the levels of a pollutant indoors by cleaning are effective. (Author)

  5. Application of inorganic sorbents for sewage purification from copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yelizarova, I.A.; Tomchuk, T.K.; Kalinin, N.F.; Vol'khin, V.V.; Levichek, M.S.; Gulyaeva, E.I.

    1986-01-01

    Article presents the results of elaboration of synthesis methods of sorbent on the base of phosphate and magnesium hydroxide. As a result of study the technology of sorbent production with optimal properties was elaborated.

  6. Long Life Moving-Bed Zinc Titanate Sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, Robert J.; Cesario, Mike; Feinberg, Daniel A.; Sibold, Jack; Windecker, Brian; Yang, Jing

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and test long-life sorbents for hot gas cleanup. Specifically, we measured the sulfur loading at space velocities typically used for absorption of H 2 S and regenerated the sorbent with diluted air for multiple cycles. Based on the experimental results, we prepared a conceptual design of the sorbent-fabrication system, and estimated the cost of sorbent production and of sulfur removal

  7. Residence times and mixing of water in river banks: implications for recharge and groundwater - surface water exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unland, N. P.; Cartwright, I.; Cendón, D. I.; Chisari, R.

    2014-02-01

    The residence time of groundwater within 50 m of the Tambo River, South East Australia, has been estimated through the combined use of 3H and 14C. Groundwater residence times increase towards the Tambo River which implies a gaining river system and not increasing bank storage with proximity to the Tambo River. Major ion concentrations and δ2H and δ18O values of bank water also indicate that bank infiltration does not significantly impact groundwater chemistry under baseflow and post-flood conditions, suggesting that the gaining nature of the river may be driving the return of bank storage water back into the Tambo River within days of peak flood conditions. The covariance between 3H and 14C indicates the leakage and mixing between old (~17 200 yr) groundwater from a semi-confined aquifer and younger groundwater (bank storage, as rapid pressure propagation into the semi-confined aquifer during flooding will minimise bank infiltration. This study illustrates the complex nature of river groundwater interactions and the potential downfall in assuming simple or idealised conditions when conducting hydrogeological studies.

  8. Measurements of liquid phase residence time distributions in a pilot-scale continuous leaching reactor using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, H J; Sharma, V K; Shenoy, K T; Sreenivas, T

    2015-03-01

    An alkaline based continuous leaching process is commonly used for extraction of uranium from uranium ore. The reactor in which the leaching process is carried out is called a continuous leaching reactor (CLR) and is expected to behave as a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for the liquid phase. A pilot-scale CLR used in a Technology Demonstration Pilot Plant (TDPP) was designed, installed and operated; and thus needed to be tested for its hydrodynamic behavior. A radiotracer investigation was carried out in the CLR for measurement of residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase with specific objectives to characterize the flow behavior of the reactor and validate its design. Bromine-82 as ammonium bromide was used as a radiotracer and about 40-60MBq activity was used in each run. The measured RTD curves were treated and mean residence times were determined and simulated using a tanks-in-series model. The result of simulation indicated no flow abnormality and the reactor behaved as an ideal CSTR for the range of the operating conditions used in the investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Flow Characterization of Vapor Phase of Geothermal Fluid in Pipe Using Isotope 85Kr and Residence Time Distribution Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sugiharto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of vapor flow in geothermal pipe faces great challenges due to fast fluids flow in high-temperature and high-pressure environment. In present study the flow rate measurement has been performed to characterization the geothermal vapor flow in a pipe. The experiment was carried out in a pipe which is connected to a geothermal production well, KMJ-14. The pipe has a 10” outside diameter and contains dry vapor at a pressure of 8 kg/cm2 and a temperature of 170 oC. Krypton-85 gas isotope (85Kr has been injected into the pipe. Three collimated radiation detectors positioned respectively at 127, 177 and 227m from injection point were used to obtain experimental data which represent radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD in the pipe. The last detector at the position of 227 m did not respond, which might be due to problems in cable connections. Flow properties calculated using mean residence time (MRT shows that the flow rate of the vapor in pipe is 10.98 m/s, much faster than fluid flow commonly found in various industrial process plants. Best fitting evaluated using dedicated software developed by IAEA expert obtained the Péclet number Pe as 223. This means that the flow of vapor of geothermal fluids in pipe is plug flow in character. The molecular diffusion coefficient is 0.45 m2/s, calculated from the axial dispersion model.

  10. The role of residence time in diagnostic models of global carbon storage capacity: model decomposition based on a traceable scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhao, Chen; Jianyang, Xia; Zhengguo, Sun; Jianlong, Li; Yiqi, Luo; Chengcheng, Gang; Zhaoqi, Wang

    2015-11-06

    As a key factor that determines carbon storage capacity, residence time (τE) is not well constrained in terrestrial biosphere models. This factor is recognized as an important source of model uncertainty. In this study, to understand how τE influences terrestrial carbon storage prediction in diagnostic models, we introduced a model decomposition scheme in the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) and then compared it with a prognostic model. The result showed that τE ranged from 32.7 to 158.2 years. The baseline residence time (τ'E) was stable for each biome, ranging from 12 to 53.7 years for forest biomes and 4.2 to 5.3 years for non-forest biomes. The spatiotemporal variations in τE were mainly determined by the environmental scalar (ξ). By comparing models, we found that the BEPS uses a more detailed pool construction but rougher parameterization for carbon allocation and decomposition. With respect to ξ comparison, the global difference in the temperature scalar (ξt) averaged 0.045, whereas the moisture scalar (ξw) had a much larger variation, with an average of 0.312. We propose that further evaluations and improvements in τ'E and ξw predictions are essential to reduce the uncertainties in predicting carbon storage by the BEPS and similar diagnostic models.

  11. Removal of mercury from coal-combustion flue gas using regenerable sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, C S; Albiston, J; Broderick, T E; Stewart, R M

    1999-07-01

    The US EPA estimates that coal-fired power plants constitute the largest anthropogenic source of mercury emissions in the US. The Agency has contemplated emission regulations for power plants, but the large gas-flow rates and low mercury concentrations involved have made current treatment options prohibitively expensive. ADA Technologies, Inc. (Englewood, Colorado), in conjunction with the US DOE, is developing regenerable sorbents for the removal and recovery of mercury from flue gas. These sorbents are based on the ability of noble metals to amalgamate mercury at typical flue-gas temperatures and release mercury at higher temperatures. The process allows for recovery of mercury with minimal volumes of secondary wastes and no impact on fly ash quality. In 1997 and 1998, ADA tested a 20-cfm sorbent unit at CONSOL Inc.'s coal-combustion test facility in Library, PA. Results from the 1997 tests indicated that the sorbent can remove elemental and oxidized mercury and can be regenerated without loss of capacity. Design changes were implemented in 1998 to enhance the thermal efficiency of the process and to recover the mercury in a stable form. Testing during autumn, 1998 demonstrated 60% to 90% removal efficiency of mercury from a variety of different coals. However, contradictory removal results were obtained at the end of the test period. Subsequent laboratory analyses indicated that the sorbent had lost over half its capacity for mercury due to a decrease in available sites for mercury sorption. The presence of sulfur compounds on the sorbent suggests that thermal cycling may have condensed acid gases on the sorbent leading to deterioration of the active sorption sites. The regeneration time/temperature profile has been altered to minimize this potential in the upcoming power plant tests.

  12. How Entrustment Is Informed by Holistic Judgments Across Time in a Family Medicine Residency Program: An Ethnographic Nonparticipant Observational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagasser, M.H.; Fluit, C.R.M.G.; Weel, C. van; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Kramer, A.W.M.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Entrustment has mainly been conceptualized as delegating discrete professional tasks. Because residents provide most of their patient care independently, not all resident performance is visible to supervisors; the entrustment process involves more than granting discrete tasks. This study

  13. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  14. Topical Report 5: Sorbent Performance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutka, Holly; Sjostrom, Sharon

    2011-05-31

    ADA-ES has completed an extensive sorbent screening program funded primarily through DOE NETL cooperative agreement DE-NT0005649 with support from EPRI and industry cost-share participants. Tests were completed on simulated and actual flue gas. The overall project objective is to address the viability and accelerate development of a solid-based postcombustion CO2 capture technology that can be retrofit to the existing fleet of coal-fired power plants. An important component of the viability assessment was to evaluate the state of development of sorbents and measure key performance characteristics under realistic operating conditions.

  15. Desulfurization Sorbents for Transport-Bed Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.; Vierheilig, Albert A.

    1997-01-01

    This project extends the prior work on the development of fluidizable zinc titanate particles using a spray-drying technique to impart high reactivity and attrition resistance. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop highly reactive and attrition-resistant zinc titanate sorbents in 40- to 150-(micro)m particle size range for transport reactor applications; (2) To transfer sorbent production technology to private sector; and (3) To provide technical support to Sierra Pacific Clean Coal Technology Demonstration plant and FETC's Hot-Gas Desulfurization Process Development Unit (PDU), both employing a transport reactor system

  16. Influence of lignin on properties of wood-inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remez, V.P.; Charina, M.V.; Klass, S.M.; Shubin, A.S.; Tkachev, K.V.; Isaeva, O.F.

    1986-01-01

    Present article is devoted to influence of lignin on properties of wood-inorganic sorbents. The influence of component composition of matrix on sorption properties of sorbents and their stability in different mediums is studied. The dependence of sorption capacity of sorbent on component matrix composition and its porous structure is defined.

  17. Matrix diffusion: heavy-tailed residence time distributions and their influence on radionuclide retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, R.

    2002-01-01

    Matrix diffusion in rocks is frequently assumed to be both Fickian and effectively homogeneous over space- and time-scales relevant to radionuclide retention. This paper discusses some cases of rocks where one or both of these assumptions may be invalid and what the consequences may be for modeling and performance assessment: a single pore diffusivity and matrix block size which is not representative of the diffusion process at all time- or space-scales, a scale-dependent diffusion rate coefficient which decreases with time- and space-scales, a retention capacity of host rocks that may be smaller than apparent in laboratory and field tests because all of the pore space is not accessible via diffusion over the performance assessment-scale transport time. (J.S.)

  18. Anesthesia preparation time is not affected by the experience level of the resident involved during his/her first month of adult cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, David M; Couch, Michael C

    2011-10-01

    This study was designed to answer the question of whether the experience level of the resident on his/her first month of adult cardiothoracic anesthesiology has an impact on operating room efficiency in a large academic medical center. Traditionally, the resident's 1st month of cardiac anesthesia had been reserved for the clinical anesthesia (CA)-2 year of training. This study analyzed the impact on operating room efficiency of moving the 1st month of cardiac anesthesia into the CA-1 year. The authors hypothesized that there would be no difference in anesthesia preparation times (defined as the interval between "in-room" and "anesthesia-ready" times) between CA-1 and CA-2 residents on their 1st month of cardiac anesthesia. This study was retrospective and used an electronic anesthesia information management system database. This study was conducted on care provided at a single 450-bed academic medical center. This study included 12 residents in their 1st month of cardiac anesthesia. The anesthesia preparation time (defined as the interval between "in-room" and "anesthesia-ready" times) was measured for cases involving residents on their first month of cardiac anesthesia. Anesthesia preparation times for 6 CA-1 resident months and 6 CA-2 resident months (100 adult cardiac procedures in total) were analyzed (49 for the CA-1 residents and 51 for the CA-2s). There were no differences in preparation time between CA-1 and CA-2 residents as a group (p = 0.8169). The CA-1 residents had an unadjusted mean (±standard error) of 51.1 ± 3.18 minutes, whereas the CA-2 residents' unadjusted mean was 50.2 ± 2.41 minutes. Adjusting for case mix (valves v coronary artery bypass graft surgery), the CA-1 mean was 49.1 ± 5.22 minutes, whereas the CA-2 mean was 49.1 ± 4.54 minutes. These findings suggest that operating room efficiency as measured by the anesthesia preparation time may not be affected by the level of the resident on his/her 1st month of adult cardiac anesthesia

  19. Mean residence time of kaolinite and smectite-bound organic matter in mozambiquan soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattel-Koekkoek, E.J.W.; Buurman, P.

    2004-01-01

    To gain understanding about the process of global warming, it is essential to study the global C cycle. In the global C cycle, soil organic matter (SOM) is a major source and sink of atmospheric C. Turnover times of C in these soil organic compounds vary from hours to thousands of years. Clay

  20. Residence Time Distribution of Solid Particles in High-Aspect Ratio Multiple-Impeller Stirred Vessel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Scargiali, F.; Grisafi, F.; Čermáková, Jiřina; Machoň, V.; Brucato, A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 17 (2004), s. 3601-3618 ISSN 0009-2509 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : retention time distribution * twin systems approach * particle tracing Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.655, year: 2004

  1. Groundwater residence times in Shenandoah National Park, Blue Ridge Mountains, Virginia, USA: A multi-tracer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Niel; Busenberg, E.; Böhlke, J.K.; Nelms, D.L.; Michel, R.L.; Schlosser, P.

    2001-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic properties of water discharging from springs and wells in Shenandoah National Park (SNP), near the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains, VA, USA were monitored to obtain information on groundwater residence times. Investigated time scales included seasonal (wet season, April, 1996; dry season, August–September, 1997), monthly (March through September, 1999) and hourly (30-min interval recording of specific conductance and temperature, March, 1999 through February, 2000). Multiple environmental tracers, including tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), sulfur-35 (35S), and stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) of water, were used to estimate the residence times of shallow groundwater discharging from 34 springs and 15 wells. The most reliable ages of water from springs appear to be based on SF6 and 3H/3He, with most ages in the range of 0–3 years. This range is consistent with apparent ages estimated from concentrations of CFCs; however, CFC-based ages have large uncertainties owing to the post-1995 leveling-off of the CFC atmospheric growth curves. Somewhat higher apparent ages are indicated by 35S (>1.5 years) and seasonal variation of δ18O (mean residence time of 5 years) for spring discharge. The higher ages indicated by the 35S and δ18O data reflect travel times through the unsaturated zone and, in the case of 35S, possible sorption and exchange of S with soils or biomass. In springs sampled in April, 1996, apparent ages derived from the 3H/3He data (median age of 0.2 years) are lower than those obtained from SF6 (median age of 4.3 years), and in contrast to median ages from 3H/3He (0.3 years) and SF6 (0.7 years) obtained during the late summer dry season of 1997. Monthly samples from 1999 at four springs in SNP had SF6apparent ages of only 1.2 to 2.5±0.8 years, and were consistent with the 1997 SF6 data. Water from springs has low excess air (0–1 cm3 kg−1) and N2–Ar temperatures that vary

  2. Batch leachate treatment using stirred electrocoagulation reactor with variation of residence time and stirring rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitorus, I. S.; Astono, W.; Iswanto, B.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to reduce pollutant levels of the leachate by electrocoagulation method using a stirred electrocoagulation reactor as the electrochemical water treatment. The release of active coagulants as metallic ions took place in the anode, while in the cathode, the electrolysis reaction in the form of hydrogen gas dischargeoccurred. The source of wastewater is Waste Water Treatment Plant inlet III of Bantar Gebang, Bekasi. Some parameters were analyzed in this research, i.e., Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), NH3, NO3 -, NO2 -, N-total, and organic substances as well as the microorganism growth before and after electrocoagulation, with variations of detention time (seconds) of 10, 20, 120, 600 and rapid mixing conditions (rpm) of 60, 100 and 200. The results show that the greater the rapid mixing speed and the detention time of electrolysis, the higher the removal of contaminants in liquid waste. The optimum condition of electrocoagulation was encountered at 200 rpm rapid mixing with 600 seconds of processing time. The removal efficiencies of electrocoagulation method for each parameter are TSS of 46.80%, BOD5 of 71.33%, COD of 73.77%, Pb of 62.5%,and NH3-N of 57.92%,whereas the pH value has been increased from 8.03 to 8.95. The electrocoagulation method can reduce levels of pollutants, complying with the environmental standards.

  3. Use of multiple age tracers to estimate groundwater residence times and long-term recharge rates in arid southern Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Th.; Osenbrück, K.; Strauch, G.; Pavetich, S.; Al-Mashaikhi, K.-S.; Herb, C.; Merchel, S.; Rugel, G.; Aeschbach, W.; Sanford, W.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple age tracers were measured to estimate groundwater residence times in the regional aquifer system underlying southwestern Oman. This area, known as the Najd, is one of the most arid areas in the world and is planned to be the main agricultural center of the Sultanate of Oman in the near future. The three isotopic age tracers "4He, "1"4C and "3"6Cl were measured in waters collected from wells along a line that extended roughly from the Dhofar Mountains near the Arabian Sea northward 400 km into the Empty Quarter of the Arabian Peninsula. The wells sampled were mostly open to the Umm Er Radhuma confined aquifer, although, some were completed in the mostly unconfined Rus aquifer. The combined results from the three tracers indicate the age of the confined groundwater is  100 ka in the central section north of the mountains, and up to and > one Ma in the Empty Quarter. The "1"4C data were used to help calibrate the "4He and "3"6Cl data. Mixing models suggest that long open boreholes north of the mountains compromise "1"4C-only interpretations there, in contrast to "4He and "3"6Cl calculations that are less sensitive to borehole mixing. Thus, only the latter two tracers from these more distant wells were considered reliable. In addition to the age tracers, δ"2H and δ"1"8O data suggest that seasonal monsoon and infrequent tropical cyclones are both substantial contributors to the recharge. The study highlights the advantages of using multiple chemical and isotopic data when estimating groundwater travel times and recharge rates, and differentiating recharge mechanisms. - Highlights: • Multiple age tracers are required for the interpretation of the groundwater system. • Different tracers are applicable along different sections of the flowpath. • Groundwater residence times >1 Ma have been determined for the northern Najd area.

  4. Application of engineered sorbent barriers Summary of Laboratory Data for FY 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, H.D.; Jones, E.O.

    1989-09-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted in FY 1988 Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine the effect of contact time, pH, solution to solid ratio, and particle size on the performance of a number of materials in adsorbing radioactive cobalt, strontium, and cesium. The laboratory studies were conducted to provide background information useful in designing an engineered sorbent barrier, which restricts the migration of radionuclides from low-level waste sites. Understanding how the variables affect the adsorption of ions on the sorbent materials is the key to estimating the performance of sorbent barriers under a variety of conditions. The scope of the studies was limited to three radionuclides and four sorbent materials, but the general approach can be used to evaluate other radionuclides and conditions. The sorbent materials evaluated in this study included clinoptilolite, activated carbon, bentonite clay, and Savannah River soil. The clinoptilolite and activated carbon were identified in previous studies as the most cost-effective materials for sorption of the three radionuclides under consideration. The bentonite clay was evaluated as a component of the barrier that could be used to modify the permeability of the barrier system. The Savannah River soil was used to represent soil from a humid site. 3 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Non-carbon sorbents for mercury removal from flue gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, G.O.; Dubovik, M.; Cesario, M. [TDA Research Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States)

    2005-07-01

    TDA Research Inc. is developing a new sorbent that can effectively remove mercury from flue gases. It is made of non-carbon based materials and will therefore not alter the properties of the fly ash. The sorbent can be produced as an injectable powder. The paper summarises the initial testing results of the new sorbent. The sorbent exhibited 7.5 to 11.0 mg/g mercury absorption capacity under representative flue gas streams depending on the operating temperature and gas hourly space velocity. The sorbent also showed resistance to sulfur poisoning by sulfur dioxide. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Radon adsorption in fibrous carbon sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anshakov, O.M.; Kish, A.O.; Chudakov, V.A.; Matvejchuk, S.V.; Sokolovskij, A.S.; Ugolev, I.I.

    2006-01-01

    Radon sorption in woven fibrous sorbents 'AUT-M' and 'Busofit' and nonwoven fiber in the temperature range 0-50 degrees centigrade was studied. Adsorption heat of radon from the ambient air in different types of carbon fiber was determined. (authors)

  7. Analysis of Ethane and Diethylbenzene Bridged Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-13

    Textiles modified in this manner have been shown to reduce or eliminate transport of chemical warfare agents and simulants across the fabric barrier...B.J. Johnson; B.J. Melde; M.H. Moore; A.P. Malanoski; J.R. Taft, "Improving sorbents for glycerol capture in biodiesel refinement," Materials 10

  8. Recovery of Sleep or Recovery of Self? A Grounded Theory Study of Residents' Decision Making Regarding How to Spend Their Nonclinical Postcall Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Taryn S; Nisker, Jeff; Teunissen, Pim W; Dornan, Tim; Lingard, Lorelei

    2016-03-01

    As resident work hours policies evolve, residents' off-duty time remains poorly understood. Despite assumptions about how residents should be using their postcall, off-duty time, there is little research on how residents actually use this time and the reasoning underpinning their activities. This study sought to understand residents' nonclinical postcall activities when they leave the hospital, their decision-making processes, and their perspectives on the relationship between these activities and their well-being or recovery. The study took place at a Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited Canadian medical school from 2012 to 2014. The authors recruited a purposive and convenience sample of postgraduate year 1-5 residents from six surgical and nonsurgical specialties at three hospitals affiliated with the medical school. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, semistructured interviews were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed, anonymized, and combined with field notes. The authors analyzed interview transcripts using constant comparative analysis and performed post hoc member checking. Twenty-four residents participated. Residents characterized their predominant approach to postcall decision making as one of making trade-offs between multiple, competing, seemingly incompatible, but equally valuable, activities. Participants exhibited two different trade-off orientations: being oriented toward maintaining a normal life or toward mitigating fatigue. The authors' findings on residents' trade-off orientations suggest a dual recovery model with postcall trade-offs motivated by the recovery of sleep or of self. This model challenges the dominant viewpoint in the current duty hours literature and suggests that the duty hours discussion must be broadened to include other recovery processes.

  9. The antimicrobial efficiency of silver activated sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Đolić, Maja B.; Rajaković-Ognjanović, Vladana N.; Štrbac, Svetlana B.; Rakočević, Zlatko Lj.; Veljović, Đorđe N.; Dimitrijević, Suzana I.; Rajaković, Ljubinka V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Different sorbents were activated by Ag + -ions and modified sorbents were determined by sorption capacities, in range of values: 42.06–3.28 mg/g. • Granulated activated carbon (GAC), natural zeolit (Z) and titanium dioxide (T) activated by Ag + -ions were tested against E. coli, S. aureus and C. albicans. • The most successful bacteria removal was obtained using Ag/Z against S. aureus and E. coli, while the yeast cell reduction reached unsatisfactory effect for all three activated sorbents. • XRD, XPS and FE-SEM analysis showed that the chemical state of the silver activating agent affects the antimicrobial activity, as well as the structural properties of the material. • An overall microbial cell reduction, which is performed by separated antimicrobial tests on the Ag + -activated surface and Ag + -ions in aquatic solutions, is a consequence of both mechanisms. - Abstract: This study is focused on the surface modifications of the materials that are used for antimicrobial water treatment. Sorbents of different origin were activated by Ag + -ions. The selection of the most appropriate materials and the most effective activation agents was done according to the results of the sorption and desorption kinetic studies. Sorption capacities of selected sorbents: granulated activated carbon (GAC), zeolite (Z), and titanium dioxide (T), activated by Ag + -ions were following: 42.06, 13.51 and 17.53 mg/g, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of Ag/Z, Ag/GAC and Ag/T sorbents were tested against Gram-negative bacteria E. coli, Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and yeast C. albicans. After 15 min of exposure period, the highest cell removal was obtained using Ag/Z against S. aureus and E. coli, 98.8 and 93.5%, respectively. Yeast cell inactivation was unsatisfactory for all three activated sorbents. The antimicrobial pathway of the activated sorbents has been examined by two separate tests – Ag + -ions desorbed from the activated surface to the

  10. Comparison of groundwater residence time using isotope techniques and numerical groundwater flow model in Gneissic Terrain, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, D.S.; Kim, C.S.; Koh, Y.K.; Kim, K.S.; Song, M.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The prediction of groundwater flow affecting the migration of radionuclides is an important component of the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. Groundwater flow in fractured rock mass is controlled by fracture networks, transmissivity and hydraulic gradient. Furthermore the scale-dependent and anisotropic properties of hydraulic parameters are resulted mainly from irregular patterns of fracture system, which are very complex to evaluate properly with the current techniques available. For the purpose of characterizing a groundwater flow in fractured rock mass, the discrete fracture network (DFN) concept is available on the basis of assumptions of groundwater flowing only along fractures and flowpaths in rock mass formed by interconnected fractures. To increase the reliability of assessment in groundwater flow phenomena, numerical groundwater flow model and isotopic techniques were applied. Fracture mapping, borehole acoustic scanning were performed to identify conductive fractures in gneissic terrane. Tracer techniques, using deuterium, oxygen-18 and tritium were applied to evaluate the recharge area and groundwater residence time

  11. Foraging strategy of a Neotropical primate: how intrinsic and extrinsic factors influence destination and residence time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plante, Sabrina; Colchero, Fernando; Calmé, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    accounting for intrinsic and extrinsic factors, which are often overlooked when modelling foraging behaviour. 2.We identified the decision rules for foraging in black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), according to food preferences, locations of high quality patches and previously eaten trees, phenology...... of food resources and hunger state. We depicted foraging in two stages: 1) the choice of the immediate next tree and 2) the time spent on this tree. We used a recently developed model for inference of movement processes, incorporating resource selection functions into a Markov Chain framework. 3.We found...... that monkeys tend to move to preferred tree species at each step. However, we did not find conclusively that, at each step, monkeys direct their movements to reach high-quality patches. In fact, they were using these patches intensively, thus limiting the possibility to move toward other high quality patches...

  12. How does warming affect carbon allocation, respiration and residence time in trees? An isotope tracer approach in a eucalypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendall, E.; Drake, J. E.; Furze, M.; Barton, C. V.; Carillo, Y.; Richter, A.; Tjoelker, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    Climate warming has the potential to alter the balance between photosynthetic carbon assimilation and respiratory losses in forest trees, leading to uncertainty in predicting their future physiological functioning. In a previous experiment, warming decreased canopy CO2 assimilation (A) rates of Eucalyptus tereticornis trees, but respiration (R) rates were usually not significantly affected, due to physiological acclimation to temperature. This led to a slight increase in (R/A) and thus decrease in plant carbon use efficiency with climate warming. In contrast to carbon fluxes, the effect of warming on carbon allocation and residence time in trees has received less attention. We conducted a study to test the hypothesis that warming would decrease the allocation of C belowground owing to reduced cost of nutrient uptake. E. parramattensis trees were grown in the field in unique whole-tree chambers operated at ambient and ambient +3 °C temperature treatments (n=3 per treatment). We applied a 13CO2 pulse and followed the label in CO2 respired from leaves, roots, canopy and soil, in plant sugars, and in rhizosphere microbes over a 3-week period in conjunction with measurements of tree growth. The 9-m tall, 57 m3 whole-tree chambers were monitored for CO2 concentrations in independent canopy and below ground (root and soil) compartments; periodic monitoring of δ13C values in air in the compartments allowed us to quantify the amount of 13CO2 assimilated and respired by each tree. Warmed trees grew faster and assimilated more of the label than control trees, but the 13C allocation to canopy, root and soil respiration was not altered. However, warming appeared to reduce the residence time of carbon respired from leaves, and especially from roots and soil, indicating that autotrophic respiration has the potential to feedback to climate change. This experiment provides insights into how warming may affect the fate of assimilated carbon from the leaf to the ecosystem scale.

  13. Preparation of diatomite/Ca(OH){sub 2} sorbents and modelling their sulphation reaction Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilgun Karatepe; Nilufer Erdoan; Aysegul Ersoy-Mericboyu; Sadriye Kucukbayrak

    2004-09-01

    Mixtures of Ca(OH){sub 2} and diatomite were hydrated at different conditions to produce reactive SO{sub 2} sorbents. Two different hydration techniques were used; namely, atmospheric and pressure hydration. The effect of the hydration temperature, time and diatomite/Ca(OH){sub 2} weight ratio on the physical properties of the activated sorbents were investigated. In atmospheric hydration, it was found that increasing the temperature and hydration time caused an increase in the total surface area of the sorbents. However, surface area values of the sorbents prepared from mixtures which have different diatomite/Ca(OH){sub 2} weight ratio were generally not changed significantly. In pressure hydration, the surface area of the activated sorbents was positively affected from the hydration temperature and pressure. Finally, Ca(OH){sub 2} and two diatomite/Ca(OH){sub 2} sorbents were sulphated at constant temperature (338 K) using a synthetic gaseous mixture consisting of 5% O{sub 2}, 10% CO{sub 2}, 5000 ppm SO{sub 2} and the balance of nitrogen with a 55% relative humidity. The sulphation reaction of these sorbents were investigated and modelled. The unreacted shrinking core model was chosen to describe this non-catalytic solid/gas (hydrated sorbent/SO{sub 2}) reaction mechanism. The experimental results were found to be correlated successfully by this model.

  14. Estimation of residence times of coastal basins in the Laxemar- Simpevarp area between 3000 BC and 9000 AD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engqvist, Anders (AandI Engqvist Konsult HB, Vaxholm (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    The assignment has consisted of computation of the morpho- and bathymetry of the coastal area of Laxemar-Simpevarp for the time period 3000 BC through 9000 AD, in order to estimate the residence times as yearly means of volume-averaged specific age (Average Age, AvA) for water in coastal basins. These basins have been selected as belonging to earlier defined biosphere objects, containing anticipated exit points from possible radionuclides leaking from a hypothetical underground repository for spent nuclear fuel. This endeavor starts with partitioning of the coast into appropriate sub-basins interconnected by straits in an as objective manner as possible. This has been performed in cooperation with Umeaa Univ. followed by the transformation of these hypsographical data to a form that can serve as input data to the employed numerical CouBa-model. This model has been developed to simulate the water exchange of straits between densimetrically stably stratified basins with a free sea level including advection and mixing of water-borne conservative scalar properties, e.g. salinity, heat and specific age. The forcing of the model consists of run-off, wind-induced stress, thermal surface dynamics (heating/cooling) and density fluctuations at the open boundary toward the coastal zone, relative by which the specific water age is calculated For these ambient forcing factors there do not exist sufficiently precise climate data other than for contemporary times. For all other time periods the measured and/or model-computed forcing data regarding 2004 have been used. Estimated AvA-values for the different time periods are thus an expression of sub-basin configuration and hypsographical differences. An overriding directive has been to rather overestimate than underestimate the residence times, as to avoid underestimation of the subsequent dose calculations. The results of these AvA computations, presented as volume averages of yearly means of the sixteen biosphere object

  15. Estimation of residence times of coastal basins in the Laxemar-Simpevarp area between 3000 BC and 9000 AD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engqvist, Anders

    2010-09-01

    The assignment has consisted of computation of the morpho- and bathymetry of the coastal area of Laxemar-Simpevarp for the time period 3000 BC through 9000 AD, in order to estimate the residence times as yearly means of volume-averaged specific age (Average Age, AvA) for water in coastal basins. These basins have been selected as belonging to earlier defined biosphere objects, containing anticipated exit points from possible radionuclides leaking from a hypothetical underground repository for spent nuclear fuel. This endeavor starts with partitioning of the coast into appropriate sub-basins interconnected by straits in an as objective manner as possible. This has been performed in cooperation with Umeaa Univ. followed by the transformation of these hypsographical data to a form that can serve as input data to the employed numerical CouBa-model. This model has been developed to simulate the water exchange of straits between densimetrically stably stratified basins with a free sea level including advection and mixing of water-borne conservative scalar properties, e.g. salinity, heat and specific age. The forcing of the model consists of run-off, wind-induced stress, thermal surface dynamics (heating/cooling) and density fluctuations at the open boundary toward the coastal zone, relative by which the specific water age is calculated For these ambient forcing factors there do not exist sufficiently precise climate data other than for contemporary times. For all other time periods the measured and/or model-computed forcing data regarding 2004 have been used. Estimated AvA-values for the different time periods are thus an expression of sub-basin configuration and hypsographical differences. An overriding directive has been to rather overestimate than underestimate the residence times, as to avoid underestimation of the subsequent dose calculations. The results of these AvA computations, presented as volume averages of yearly means of the sixteen biosphere object

  16. Time series linear regression of half-hourly radon levels in a residence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper uses time series linear regression modelling to assess the impact of temperature and pressure differences on the radon measured in the basement and in the basement drain of a research house in the Princeton area of New Jersey. The models examine half-hour averages of several climate and house parameters for several periods of up to 11 days. The drain radon concentrations follow a strong diurnal pattern that shifts 12 hours in phase between the summer and the fall seasons. This shift can be linked both to the change in temperature differences between seasons and to an experiment which involved sealing the connection between the drain and the basement. We have found that both the basement and the drain radon concentrations are correlated to basement-outdoor and soil-outdoor temperature differences (the coefficient of determination varies between 0.6 and 0.8). The statistical models for the summer periods clearly describe a physical system where the basement drain pumps radon in during the night and sucks radon out during the day

  17. Water Residence Time estimation by 1D deconvolution in the form of a l2 -regularized inverse problem with smoothness, positivity and causality constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meresescu, Alina G.; Kowalski, Matthieu; Schmidt, Frédéric; Landais, François

    2018-06-01

    The Water Residence Time distribution is the equivalent of the impulse response of a linear system allowing the propagation of water through a medium, e.g. the propagation of rain water from the top of the mountain towards the aquifers. We consider the output aquifer levels as the convolution between the input rain levels and the Water Residence Time, starting with an initial aquifer base level. The estimation of Water Residence Time is important for a better understanding of hydro-bio-geochemical processes and mixing properties of wetlands used as filters in ecological applications, as well as protecting fresh water sources for wells from pollutants. Common methods of estimating the Water Residence Time focus on cross-correlation, parameter fitting and non-parametric deconvolution methods. Here we propose a 1D full-deconvolution, regularized, non-parametric inverse problem algorithm that enforces smoothness and uses constraints of causality and positivity to estimate the Water Residence Time curve. Compared to Bayesian non-parametric deconvolution approaches, it has a fast runtime per test case; compared to the popular and fast cross-correlation method, it produces a more precise Water Residence Time curve even in the case of noisy measurements. The algorithm needs only one regularization parameter to balance between smoothness of the Water Residence Time and accuracy of the reconstruction. We propose an approach on how to automatically find a suitable value of the regularization parameter from the input data only. Tests on real data illustrate the potential of this method to analyze hydrological datasets.

  18. Uncertainties in carbon residence time and NPP-driven carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems of the conterminous USA: a Bayesian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhui Zhou

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon (C residence time is one of the key factors that determine the capacity of ecosystem C storage. However, its uncertainties have not been well quantified, especially at regional scales. Assessing uncertainties of C residence time is thus crucial for an improved understanding of terrestrial C sequestration. In this study, the Bayesian inversion and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC technique were applied to a regional terrestrial ecosystem (TECO-R model to quantify C residence times and net primary productivity (NPP-driven ecosystem C uptake and assess their uncertainties in the conterminous USA. The uncertainty was represented by coefficient of variation (CV. The 13 spatially distributed data sets of C pools and fluxes have been used to constrain TECO-R model for each biome (totally eight biomes. Our results showed that estimated ecosystem C residence times ranged from 16.6±1.8 (cropland to 85.9±15.3 yr (evergreen needleleaf forest with an average of 56.8±8.8 yr in the conterminous USA. The ecosystem C residence times and their CV were spatially heterogeneous and varied with vegetation types and climate conditions. Large uncertainties appeared in the southern and eastern USA. Driven by NPP changes from 1982 to 1998, terrestrial ecosystems in the conterminous USA would absorb 0.20±0.06 Pg C yr−1. Their spatial pattern was closely related to the greenness map in the summer with larger uptake in central and southeast regions. The lack of data or timescale mismatching between the available data and the estimated parameters lead to uncertainties in the estimated C residence times, which together with initial NPP resulted in the uncertainties in the estimated NPP-driven C uptake. The Bayesian approach with MCMC inversion provides an effective tool to estimate spatially distributed C residence time and assess their uncertainties in the conterminous USA.

  19. Family involvement in timely detection of changes in health of nursing homes residents: A qualitative exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Catherine; Blighe, Alan; Froggatt, Katherine; McCormack, Brendan; Woodward-Carlton, Barbara; Young, John; Robinson, Louise; Downs, Murna

    2018-01-01

    To explore family perspectives on their involvement in the timely detection of changes in their relatives' health in UK nursing homes. Increasingly, policy attention is being paid to the need to reduce hospitalisations for conditions that, if detected and treated in time, could be managed in the community. We know that family continue to be involved in the care of their family members once they have moved into a nursing home. Little is known, however, about family involvement in the timely detection of changes in health in nursing home residents. Qualitative exploratory study with thematic analysis. A purposive sampling strategy was applied. Fourteen semi-structured one-to-one interviews with family members of people living in 13 different UK nursing homes. Data were collected from November 2015-March 2016. Families were involved in the timely detection of changes in health in three key ways: noticing signs of changes in health, informing care staff about what they noticed and educating care staff about their family members' changes in health. Families suggested they could be supported to detect timely changes in health by developing effective working practices with care staff. Families can provide a special contribution to the process of timely detection in nursing homes. Their involvement needs to be negotiated, better supported, as well as given more legitimacy and structure within the nursing home. Families could provide much needed support to nursing home nurses, care assistants and managers in timely detection of changes in health. This may be achieved through communication about their preferred involvement on a case-by-case basis as well as providing appropriate support or services. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Improving Timely Resident Follow-Up and Communication of Results in Ambulatory Clinics Utilizing a Web-Based Audit and Feedback Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggan, Joel C; Swaminathan, Aparna; Thomas, Samantha; Simel, David L; Zaas, Aimee K; Bae, Jonathan G

    2017-04-01

    Failure to follow up and communicate test results to patients in outpatient settings may lead to diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Residents are less likely than attending physicians to report results to patients, and may face additional barriers to reporting, given competing clinical responsibilities. This study aimed to improve the rates of communicating test results to patients in resident ambulatory clinics. We performed an internal medicine, residency-wide, pre- and postintervention, quality improvement project using audit and feedback. Residents performed audits of ambulatory patients requiring laboratory or radiologic testing by means of a shared online interface. The intervention consisted of an educational module viewed with initial audits, development of a personalized improvement plan after Phase 1, and repeated real-time feedback of individual relative performance compared at clinic and program levels. Outcomes included results communicated within 14 days and prespecified "significant" results communicated within 72 hours. A total of 76 of 86 eligible residents (88%) reviewed 1713 individual ambulatory patients' charts in Phase 1, and 73 residents (85%) reviewed 1509 charts in Phase 2. Follow-up rates were higher in Phase 2 than Phase 1 for communicating results within 14 days and significant results within 72 hours (85% versus 78%, P  Communication of "significant" results was more likely to occur via telephone, compared with communication of nonsignificant results. Participation in a shared audit and feedback quality improvement project can improve rates of resident follow-up and communication of results, although communication gaps remained.

  1. More Learning in Less Time: Optimizing the Resident Educational Experience with Limited Clinical and Educational Work Hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedney, Cara L; Spirou, Eleni; Voelker, Joseph L; Rosen, Charles L

    2017-11-01

    Resident education in the United States and elsewhere has undergone significant changes in recent years owing to work hour restrictions, requiring didactics to fit within a limited schedule, while being increasingly effective at accomplishing educational goals. A single small program experience in improving the didactic experience of residents is described. Focused mentorship, curricula for intangibles, asynchronous education, and independent curricula all are useful tools in resident education. Residents can be exposed to both clinical material and specialty-specific mores using focused and intentional educational techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The use of lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) as sorbent for PAHs removal from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nkansah, Marian Asantewah; Christy, Alfred A.; Barth, Tanja; Francis, George William

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effect of contact time on sorption PAH by LECA. ► Effect of mass of sorbent (LECA) on sorption of PAH. ► Sorption Isotherms for PAH-LECA interaction. - Abstract: Lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) has been explored as a sorbent for the removal of PAHs (phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene) from water. The efficacy of LECA as a sorbent for PAHs was assessed using contact time, mass of sorbent and sorption isotherms in a series of batch experiments. Maximum (optimum) sorption was reached at 21 h after which the amount of PAHs sorbed remained almost constant. Batch experiments were conducted by shaking a 100 ml solution mixture of individual PAHs (containing 0.02 mg/L) with LECA. The maximum sorption was 70.70, 70.82 and 72.12%, respectively for phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene when a mass of 0.2 g of sorbent was used. There was an increase in sorption as a result of an increase in mass of sorbent until a maximum was reached at a mass of 4.0 g LECA with 92.61, 93.91 and 94.15% sorption of phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene respectively. Sorption data were fitted to the linearised forms of the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models to determine the water-LECA partitioning coefficient. Physical sorption caused by the aromatic nature of the compounds was the main mechanism that governed the removal process while the hydrophobicity of the PAHs also influenced the sorption capacity. LECA can be used as an alternative method for aqueous PAHs removal.

  3. Redfield Ratios in Inland Waters: Higher Biological Control of C:N:P Ratios in Tropical Semi-arid High Water Residence Time Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng H. They

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The canonical Redfield C:N:P ratio for algal biomass is often not achieved in inland waters due to higher C and N content and more variability when compared to the oceans. This has been attributed to much lower residence times and higher contributions of the watershed to the total organic matter pool of continental ecosystems. In this study we examined the effect of water residence times in low latitude lakes (in a gradient from humid to a semi-arid region on seston elemental ratios in different size fractions. We used lake water specific conductivity as a proxy for residence time in a region of Eastern Brazil where there is a strong precipitation gradient. The C:P ratios decreased in the seston and bacterial size-fractions and increased in the dissolved fraction with increasing water retention time, suggesting uptake of N and P from the dissolved pool. Bacterial abundance, production and respiration increased in response to increased residence time and intracellular nutrient availability in agreement with the growth rate hypothesis. Our results reinforce the role of microorganisms in shaping the chemical environment in aquatic systems particularly at long water residence times and highlights the importance of this factor in influencing ecological stoichiometry in all aquatic ecosystems.

  4. RESIDENCE TIMES OF PARTICLES IN DIFFUSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISK ENVIRONMENTS. II. RADIAL MOTIONS AND APPLICATIONS TO DUST ANNEALING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciesla, F. J.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of crystalline grains in comets and the outer regions of protoplanetary disks remains a mystery. It has been suggested that such grains form via annealing of amorphous precursors in the hot, inner region of a protoplanetary disk, where the temperatures needed for such transformations were found, and were then transported outward by some dynamical means. Here we develop a means of tracking the paths that dust grains would have taken through a diffusive protoplanetary disk and examine the types and ranges of environments that particles would have seen over a 10 6 yr time period in the dynamic disk. We then combine this model with three annealing laws to examine how the dynamic evolution of amorphous grains would have led to their physical restructuring and their delivery to various regions of the disk. It is found that 'sibling particles' - those particles that reside at the same location at a given period of time-take a wide range of unique and independent paths through the disk to arrive there. While high temperatures can persist in the disk for very long time periods, we find that those grains that are delivered to the cold outer regions of the disk are largely annealed in the first few x10 5 yr of disk history. This suggests that the crystallinity of grains in the outer disk would be determined early and remain unchanged for much of disk history, in agreement with recent astronomical observations.

  5. Determination of residence times of ions in a resistive glass selected ion flow-drift tube using the Hadamard transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-09-15

    Selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, used for trace gas analyses has certain fundamental limitations that could be alleviated by adding a facility that allows reaction times and ion interaction energies to be varied. Thus, a selected ion flow-drift tube, SIFDT, has been created to explore the influence of an embedded electric field on these parameters and on reaction processes. The new SIFTD instrument was constructed using a miniature resistive glass drift tube. Arrival times of ions, t, analysed by a downstream quadrupole mass spectrometer over the m/z range 10-100 were studied by modulating the injected ion current using a gate lens. Single pulse modulation was compared with pseudorandom time multiplexing exploiting the Hadamard transformation. A simple model involving analysis of ethanol and water vapour mixture in air was used to explore the advantages of the SIFDT concept to SIFT-MS analysis. It is shown that the resistive glass drift tube is suitable for SIFDT experiments. The Hadamard transformation can be used to routinely determine reagent ion residence time in the flow-drift tube and also to observe differences in arrival times for different product ions. Two-dimensional data combining arrival time and mass spectra can be obtained rapidly. The calculated ion drift velocities vary with the reduced field strength, E/N, and the calculated ion mobilities agree with theoretical and previous literature values. This study has provided evidence that the SIFDT-MS technique can be implemented in a miniature and low-cost instrument and two- or three-dimensional data can be obtained (product ion count rates as functions of m/z, t and E/N) using the Hadamard transformation thus providing exciting possibilities for further analytical additions and extensions of the SIFT-MS technique. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Groundwater flowpaths and residence times inferred by 14C, 36Cl and 4He isotopes in the Continental Intercalaire aquifer (North-Western Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, J. O.; Deschamps, P.; Hamelin, B.; Fourré, E.; Gonçalvès, J.; Zouari, K.; Guendouz, A.; Michelot, J.-L.; Massault, M.; Dapoigny, A.; ASTER Team

    2018-05-01

    In a semi-arid to arid climate context, dependency on groundwater resources may lead to overexploitation and deterioration of water quality. The Continental Intercalaire (CI) aquifer is one such continental-scale aquifer (more than a million of km2), which is mainly confined, poorly recharged but intensely abstracted. To date, the management of this resource relies on hydrogeological modelling and key parameters such as recharge/discharge rate and groundwater dynamics. We use a combination of residence time indicators (14C, 36Cl, 4He) and stable isotopes of water (2H and 18O) to give greater constraint on the groundwater residence time in the CI. In previous studies, 14C measurements and steady state modelling indicate a residence time of less than 100 ka whereas in others, 36Cl measurements and transient scenarios modelling suggest a longer residence time (>500 ka). In this study, most of the 14C measurements are below the limit of detection, establishing residence times greater than 40 ka and confirming the necessity of strict sampling protocols to exclude all air and AMS measurements when low 14C concentrations are expected. In the Tunisian recharge area, detectable 14C indicate sporadic recharge episodes (3-7 ka and 29-43 ka), whereas 4He and 36Cl concentrations in central areas suggest very old (water quality in the whole system.

  7. Flow pattern and residence time of groundwater within the south-eastern Taoudeni sedimentary basin (Burkina Faso, Mali)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneau, F.; Dakoure, D.; Celle-Jeanton, H.; Vitvar, T.; Ito, M.; Traore, S.; Compaore, N. F.; Jirakova, H.; Le Coustumer, P.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryThe knowledge about groundwater flow conditions within the Southeastern Taoudeni Basin Aquifer shared by Burkina Faso and Mali is relatively limited with very little information on potentiometric heads, recharge processes, residence time and water quality. A better evaluation of groundwater resources in this area is a strategic point for water resources management in the entire Soudano-Sahelian region which endures since the beginning of the twentieth century a continuous decrease in precipitation amount. This paper provides a transboundary synthesis using water ( 18O, 2H and 3H) and carbon isotopes ( 13C and 14C) in conjunction with hydrogeological and hydrochemical data. The objectives are to improve the conceptual model of groundwater recharge and flow within this sandstone reservoir, and to assess the changes in the aquifer due to water abstraction and recent climate changes including an insight into Sahelian aquifers palaeorecharge processes. The local meteoric water line for the Bobo-Dioulasso station is proposed: δ 2H = 8.0 (±0.5)δ 18O + 10.2 (±2.1). Two main tendencies can be derived from groundwater chemistry. First, a slight evolution from the Ca-Mg-HCO 3 type towards a Na-K-HCO 3 type that indicates developed interactions between groundwater and clay minerals related to the residence time of groundwater. A second tendency towards Cl-NO 3-SO 4-HCO 3 water types indicates the anthropogenic influence on groundwater related to the poor sanitary conditions observed around wells. The carbon-14 activity measured on the TDIC varies between 0.3 and 122 pmC, so our record contains samples covering a wide period from Actual to Pleistocene suggesting a continuous recharge of the system through time even if the Sahel region has endured many different climate phases which have influenced the infiltration and recharge processes. All groundwater samples have stable isotope compositions in the range of the present day regional and global meteoric water line

  8. Comment on "Scrutinizing the carbon cycle and CO2residence time in the atmosphere" by H. Harde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Peter; Hauck, Judith; Völker, Christoph; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.; Butzin, Martin; Halpern, Joshua B.; Rice, Ken; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2018-05-01

    Harde (2017) proposes an alternative accounting scheme for the modern carbon cycle and concludes that only 4.3% of today's atmospheric CO2 is a result of anthropogenic emissions. As we will show, this alternative scheme is too simple, is based on invalid assumptions, and does not address many of the key processes involved in the global carbon cycle that are important on the timescale of interest. Harde (2017) therefore reaches an incorrect conclusion about the role of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Harde (2017) tries to explain changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration with a single equation, while the most simple model of the carbon cycle must at minimum contain equations of at least two reservoirs (the atmosphere and the surface ocean), which are solved simultaneously. A single equation is fundamentally at odds with basic theory and observations. In the following we will (i) clarify the difference between CO2 atmospheric residence time and adjustment time, (ii) present recently published information about anthropogenic carbon, (iii) present details about the processes that are missing in Harde (2017), (iv) briefly discuss shortcoming in Harde's generalization to paleo timescales, (v) and comment on deficiencies in some of the literature cited in Harde (2017).

  9. INFLUENCE OF RESIDENCE-TIME DISTRIBUTION ON A SURFACE-RENEWAL MODEL OF CONSTANT-PRESSURE CROSS-FLOW MICROFILTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This work examines the influence of the residence-time distribution (RTD of surface elements on a model of cross-flow microfiltration that has been proposed recently (Hasan et al., 2013. Along with the RTD from the previous work (Case 1, two other RTD functions (Cases 2 and 3 are used to develop theoretical expressions for the permeate-flux decline and cake buildup in the filter as a function of process time. The three different RTDs correspond to three different startup conditions of the filtration process. The analytical expressions for the permeate flux, each of which contains three basic parameters (membrane resistance, specific cake resistance and rate of surface renewal, are fitted to experimental permeate flow rate data in the microfiltration of fermentation broths in laboratory- and pilot-scale units. All three expressions for the permeate flux fit the experimental data fairly well with average root-mean-square errors of 4.6% for Cases 1 and 2, and 4.2% for Case 3, respectively, which points towards the constructive nature of the model - a common feature of theoretical models used in science and engineering.

  10. Budget and residence time of {sup 210}Pb along the Gulf of Lion`s continental slope (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abassi, A.; Radakovitch, O.; Heussner, S.; Monaco, A. [Perpignan Univ., 66 (France). Lab. de Sedimentologie et Geochimie Marines

    1997-12-31

    Concentration of {sup 210}Pb has been measured in water and sediment trap samples collected on 7 experimental sites representative of the Gulf of Lion`s continental margin. This marine system is characterised by a major continental input through the Rhone river and a powerful along-slope cyclonic current (Northern Current). From the distribution of bulk {sup 210}Pb activities, it was intended to gain some information on the processes controlling the transport of trace metals at the ocean/continent boundary. Residence times of {sup 210}Pb relative to scavenging in surface waters (0-100 m) showed a constant along-slope (i.e., downstream) decrease that can be related to increasing concentrations in suspended particles. Annual time-series of {sup 210}Pb activities in settling particles were determined on samples collected by traps at 500 and 1000 m depth. From this data set, a budget for {sup 210}Pb on this margin was established which permitted to determine the flux of {sup 210}Pb theoretically adsorbed onto particles. This theoretical flux was compared, at each site, with fluxes effectively measured by traps and revealed that exchange processes - mainly in the form of large inputs of this nuclide (import of 47 to 93% of measured flux) - largely affect the {sup 210}Pb distribution on this continental margin. (author) 12 refs.

  11. Budget and residence time of 210Pb along the Gulf of Lion's continental slope (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abassi, A.; Radakovitch, O.; Heussner, S.; Monaco, A.

    1997-01-01

    Concentration of 210 Pb has been measured in water and sediment trap samples collected on 7 experimental sites representative of the Gulf of Lion's continental margin. This marine system is characterised by a major continental input through the Rhone river and a powerful along-slope cyclonic current (Northern Current). From the distribution of bulk 210 Pb activities, it was intended to gain some information on the processes controlling the transport of trace metals at the ocean/continent boundary. Residence times of 210 Pb relative to scavenging in surface waters (0-100 m) showed a constant along-slope (i.e., downstream) decrease that can be related to increasing concentrations in suspended particles. Annual time-series of 210 Pb activities in settling particles were determined on samples collected by traps at 500 and 1000 m depth. From this data set, a budget for 210 Pb on this margin was established which permitted to determine the flux of 210 Pb theoretically adsorbed onto particles. This theoretical flux was compared, at each site, with fluxes effectively measured by traps and revealed that exchange processes - mainly in the form of large inputs of this nuclide (import of 47 to 93% of measured flux) - largely affect the 210 Pb distribution on this continental margin. (author)

  12. New polymer bounces into sorbent market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Spectacular spills like the Exxon Valdez capture headlines and dominate conversation, but most releases involve quantities too small to attract media attention. For these spills, companies often rely on sorbents to collect the oil and dispose it. These devices come in a variety of shapes, sizes and absorbent materials, including a new generation of products that offers solid results-literally. This paper reports on the Solidifier which absorbs oil, as well as chlorinated solvents, hydrocarbons and PCBs, and, as the name implies, solidifies into a rubber-like material. A polymer used extensively in the rubber industry is the key to the sorbent's success. Oil and other contaminants, act like catalysts. They dissolve into the polymer, causing its molecules to bond together and form a rubber-like mass. No. 2 diesel fuel oil can be bounced on the floor after it solidifies

  13. Effect of cerium oxide doping on the performance of CaO-based sorbents during calcium looping cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengping; Fan, Shasha; Fan, Lijing; Zhao, Yujun; Ma, Xinbin

    2015-04-21

    A series of CaO-based sorbents were synthesized through a sol-gel method and doped with different amounts of CeO2. The sorbent with a Ca/Ce molar ratio of 15:1 showed an excellent absorption capacity (0.59 gCO2/g sorbent) and a remarkable cycle durability (up to 18 cycles). The admirable capture performance of CaCe-15 was ascribed to its special morphology formed by the doping of CeO2 and the well-distributed CeO2 particles. The sorbents doped with CeO2 possessed a loose shell-connected cross-linking structure, which was beneficial for the contact between CaO and CO2. CaO and CeO2 were dispersed homogeneously, and the existence of CeO2 also decreased the grain size of CaO. The well-dispersed CeO2, which could act as a barrier, effectively prevented the CaO crystallite from growing and sintering, thus the sorbent exhibited outstanding stability. The doping of CeO2 also improved the carbonation rate of the sorbent, resulting in a high capacity in a short period of time.

  14. Adsorption of Ammonia on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Jesph E.; Serio, Michael A..; Wilburn, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide, moisture, and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Data on sorption and desorption of ammonia, which is a major TC of concern, are presented in this paper. The current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. In this study, several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested for ammonia sorption. Ammonia-sorption capacity was related to carbon pore structure characteristics, and the temperature of oxidative carbon-surface treatment was optimized for enhanced ammonia-sorption performance.

  15. Sorbents based on carbonized rice peel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansurova, R. M.; Taipova, R. A.; Zhylybaeva, N. K.; Mansurov, Z. A.; Bijsenbaev, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    The process receiving of sorbents based on carbonized rice peel (RP) was received and their sorption properties were investigated. Processing carbonization of samples leading on station, this was developed in laboratory of hybrid technology. Carbonization of samples was realized in nitric atmosphere on 400-8000 deg. C. On raising temperature of carbonization content of carbon in samples is rice, hydrogen and oxygen is reduce as a result isolation of volatility products is discover. The samples carbonized on 650 deg. C (910 m 2 /g) owners with maximum removed surface is discover. On carbonization temperature 600-800 deh. C the sorption of ions, which carbonized by sorbents based on rice peel is run to 95-100 %. Electron-microscopic investigation of samples leaded on EM-125 mechanism by accelerating pressure 100 kV. From electron-microscopic print of original samples of RP it is evident, that sample consists of carbonic fractions of different species: carbonic fiber of rounded fractions, fractions of ellipsoid form and of more thickly carbonic structure. Increasing sizes of pores and modification structure of synthesized sorbent is occur during carbonization process. The RP-samples, which carbonized by 650 deg. C has the higher specific surface. Samples consist of thin carbonic scum and reducing specific surface, by higher temperature

  16. A time-efficient web-based teaching tool to improve medical knowledge and decrease ABIM failure rate in select residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Sean M; Qureshi, Waqas; Morse, William; Baker-Genaw, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    The American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) exam's pass rate is considered a quality measure of a residency program, yet few interventions have shown benefit in reducing the failure rate. We developed a web-based Directed Reading (DR) program with an aim to increase medical knowledge and reduce ABIM exam failure rate. Internal medicine residents at our academic medical center with In-Training Examination (ITE) scores ≤ 35 th percentile from 2007 to 2013 were enrolled in DR. The program matches residents to reading assignments based on their own ITE-failed educational objectives and provides direct electronic feedback from their teaching physicians. ABIM exam pass rates were analyzed across various groups between 2002 and 2013 to examine the effect of the DR program on residents with ITE scores ≤ 35 percentile pre- (2002-2006) and post-intervention (2007-2013). A time commitment survey was also given to physicians and DR residents at the end of the study. Residents who never scored ≤ 35 percentile on ITE were the most likely to pass the ABIM exam on first attempt regardless of time period. For those who ever scored ≤ 35 percentile on ITE, 91.9% of residents who participated in DR passed the ABIM exam on first attempt vs 85.2% of their counterparts pre-intervention (p ITE were more likely to fail ABIM exam on first attempt, those who participated in the DR program were less likely to fail than the historical control counterparts. The web-based teaching method required little time commitment by faculty.

  17. Rational optimization of drug-target residence time: Insights from inhibitor binding to the S. aureus FabI enzyme-product complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Andrew; Schiebel, Johannes; Yu, Weixuan; Bommineni, Gopal R.; Pan, Pan; Baxter, Michael V.; Khanna, Avinash; Sotriffer, Christoph A.; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-target kinetics has recently emerged as an especially important facet of the drug discovery process. In particular, prolonged drug-target residence times may confer enhanced efficacy and selectivity in the open in vivo system. However, the lack of accurate kinetic and structural data for series of congeneric compounds hinders the rational design of inhibitors with decreased off-rates. Therefore, we chose the Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-ACP reductase (saFabI) - an important target for the development of new anti-staphylococcal drugs - as a model system to rationalize and optimize the drug-target residence time on a structural basis. Using our new, efficient and widely applicable mechanistically informed kinetic approach, we obtained a full characterization of saFabI inhibition by a series of 20 diphenyl ethers complemented by a collection of 9 saFabI-inhibitor crystal structures. We identified a strong correlation between the affinities of the investigated saFabI diphenyl ether inhibitors and their corresponding residence times, which can be rationalized on a structural basis. Due to its favorable interactions with the enzyme, the residence time of our most potent compound exceeds 10 hours. In addition, we found that affinity and residence time in this system can be significantly enhanced by modifications predictable by a careful consideration of catalysis. Our study provides a blueprint for investigating and prolonging drug-target kinetics and may aid in the rational design of long-residence-time inhibitors targeting the essential saFabI enzyme. PMID:23697754

  18. CO2 Capacity Sorbent Analysis Using Volumetric Measurement Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Roger; Richardson, Tra-My Justine; Belancik, Grace; Jan, Darrell; Knox, Jim

    2017-01-01

    In support of air revitalization system sorbent selection for future space missions, Ames Research Center (ARC) has performed CO2 capacity tests on various solid sorbents to complement structural strength tests conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The materials of interest are: Grace Davison Grade 544 13X, Honeywell UOP APG III, LiLSX VSA-10, BASF 13X, and Grace Davison Grade 522 5A. CO2 capacity was for all sorbent materials using a Micromeritics ASAP 2020 Physisorption Volumetric Analysis machine to produce 0C, 10C, 25C, 50C, and 75C isotherms. These data are to be used for modeling data and to provide a basis for continued sorbent research. The volumetric analysis method proved to be effective in generating consistent and repeatable data for the 13X sorbents, but the method needs to be refined to tailor to different sorbents.

  19. Teaching leadership in trauma resuscitation: Immediate feedback from a real-time, competency-based evaluation tool shows long-term improvement in resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Shea C; Heffernan, Daithi S; Connolly, Michael D; Stephen, Andrew H; Leuckel, Stephanie N; Harrington, David T; Machan, Jason T; Adams, Charles A; Cioffi, William G

    2016-10-01

    Limited data exist on how to develop resident leadership and communication skills during actual trauma resuscitations. An evaluation tool was developed to grade senior resident performance as the team leader during full-trauma-team activations. Thirty actions that demonstrated the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies were graded on a Likert scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (exceptional). These actions were grouped by their respective core competencies on 5 × 7-inch index cards. In Phase 1, baseline performance scores were obtained. In Phase 2, trauma-focused communication in-services were conducted early in the academic year, and immediate, personalized feedback sessions were performed after resuscitations based on the evaluation tool. In Phase 3, residents received only evaluation-based feedback following resuscitations. In Phase 1 (October 2009 to April 2010), 27 evaluations were performed on 10 residents. In Phase 2 (April 2010 to October 2010), 28 evaluations were performed on nine residents. In Phase 3 (October 2010 to January 2012), 44 evaluations were performed on 13 residents. Total scores improved significantly between Phases 1 and 2 (p = 0.003) and remained elevated throughout Phase 3. When analyzing performance by competency, significant improvement between Phases 1 and 2 (p competencies (patient care, knowledge, system-based practice, practice-based learning) with the exception of "communication and professionalism" (p = 0.56). Statistically similar scores were observed between Phases 2 and 3 in all competencies with the exception of "medical knowledge," which showed ongoing significant improvement (p = 0.003). Directed resident feedback sessions utilizing data from a real-time, competency-based evaluation tool have allowed us to improve our residents' abilities to lead trauma resuscitations over a 30-month period. Given pressures to maximize clinical educational opportunities among work-hour constraints, such a model may help

  20. Advanced sorbent development progam; development of sorbents for moving-bed and fluidized-bed applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, R.E.; Venkataramani, V.S.

    1998-01-01

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 C (900-1000F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 C (650-1000 F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a cost assessment and

  1. Some Examples of Residence-Time Distribution Studies in Large-Scale Chemical Processes by Using Radiotracer Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullock, R. M.; Johnson, P.; Whiston, J. [Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd., Billingham, Co., Durham (United Kingdom)

    1967-06-15

    The application of radiotracers to determine flow patterns in chemical processes is discussed with particular reference to the derivation of design data from model reactors for translation to large-scale units, the study of operating efficiency and design attainment in established plant and the rapid identification of various types of process malfunction. The requirements governing the selection of tracers for various types of media are considered and an example is given of the testing of the behaviour of a typical tracer before use in a particular large-scale process operating at 250 atm and 200 Degree-Sign C. Information which may be derived from flow patterns is discussed including the determination of mixing parameters, gas hold-up in gas/liquid reactions and the detection of channelling and stagnant regions. Practical results and their interpretation are given in relation to an define hydroformylation reaction system, a process for the conversion of propylene to isopropanol, a moving bed catalyst system for the isomerization of xylenes and a three-stage gas-liquid reaction system. The use of mean residence-time data for the detection of leakage between reaction vessels and a heat interchanger system is given as an example of the identification of process malfunction. (author)

  2. Residence times and mixing of water in river banks: implications for recharge and groundwater-surface water exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unland, N. P.; Cartwright, I.; Cendón, D. I.; Chisari, R.

    2014-12-01

    Bank exchange processes within 50 m of the Tambo River, southeast Australia, have been investigated through the combined use of 3H and 14C. Groundwater residence times increase towards the Tambo River, which suggests the absence of significant bank storage. Major ion concentrations and δ2H and δ18O values of bank water also indicate that bank infiltration does not significantly impact groundwater chemistry under baseflow and post-flood conditions, suggesting that the gaining nature of the river may be driving the return of bank storage water back into the Tambo River within days of peak flood conditions. The covariance between 3H and 14C indicates the leakage and mixing between old (~17 200 years) groundwater from a semi-confined aquifer and younger groundwater (bank infiltration. Furthermore, the more saline deeper groundwater likely controls the geochemistry of water in the river bank, minimising the chemical impact that bank infiltration has in this setting. These processes, coupled with the strongly gaining nature of the Tambo River are likely to be the factors reducing the chemical impact of bank storage in this setting. This study illustrates the complex nature of river groundwater interactions and the potential downfall in assuming simple or idealised conditions when conducting hydrogeological studies.

  3. Charge and energy dependence of the residence time of cosmic ray nuclei below 15 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soutoul, A.; Engelmann, J.J.; Ferrando, P.; Koch-Miramond, L.; Masse, P.; Webber, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The relative abundance of nuclear species measured in cosmic rays at Earth has often been interpreted with the simple leaky box model. For this model to be consistent an essential requirement is that the escape length does not depend on the nuclear species. The discrepancy between escape length values derived from iron secondaries and from the B/C ratio was identified by Garcia-Munoz and his co-workers using a large amount of experimental data. Ormes and Protheroe found a similar trend in the HEAO data although they questioned its significance against uncertainties. They also showed that the change in the B/C ratio values implies a decrease of the residence time of cosmic rays at low energies in conflict with the diffusive convective picture. These conclusions crucially depend on the partial cross section values and their uncertainties. Recently new accurate cross sections of key importance for propagation calculations have been measured. Their statistical uncertainties are often better than 4% and their values significantly different from those previously accepted. Here, these new cross sections are used to compare the observed B/C+O and (Sc to Cr)/Fe ratio to those predicted with the simple leaky box model

  4. Evaluating Residence Time for Cesium Removal from Simulated Hanford Tank Wastes Using SuperLig(R) 644 Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.M.

    2003-01-01

    Batch contact and column experiments were performed to evaluate the effect of residence time on cesium (Cs) removal from two simulated Hanford tank wastes using SuperLig(R) 644 resin. The two waste simulants mimic the compositions of tanks 241-AZ-102 and 241-AN-107 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. A single column made of glass tube (2.7-cm i.d.), which contained approximately 100 mL of H-form SuperLig(R) 644 resin was used in the column experiments. The experiments each consisted of loading, elution, and regeneration steps were performed at flow rates ranging from 0.64 to 8.2 BV/h for AZ-102 and from 1.5 to 18 BV/h for AN-107 simulant. The lowest flow rates of 0.64 and 1.5 BV/h were selected to evaluate less than optimal flow conditions in the plant. The range of the flow rates is consistent with the River Protection Project design for the waste treatment plant (WTP) columns, which will operate at a flow rate between 1.5 to 3 BV/h. Batch contact experiments were also performed for two batches of SuperLig(R) 644 to determine the equilibrium distribution coefficients (Kds) as a function of Cs concentration

  5. Contrasting residence times and fluxes of water and sulfate in two small forested watersheds in Virginia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, John Karl; Michel, Robert L

    2009-07-01

    Watershed mass balances for solutes of atmospheric origin may be complicated by the residence times of water and solutes at various time scales. In two small forested headwater catchments in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, USA, mean annual export rates of SO(4)(=) differ by a factor of 2, and seasonal variations in SO(4)(=) concentrations in atmospheric deposition and stream water are out of phase. These features were investigated by comparing (3)H, (35)S, delta(34)S, delta(2)H, delta(18)O, delta(3)He, CFC-12, SF(6), and chemical analyses of open deposition, throughfall, stream water, and spring water. The concentrations of SO(4)(=) and radioactive (35)S were about twice as high in throughfall as in open deposition, but the weighted composite values of (35)S/S (11.1 and 12.1x10(-15)) and delta(34)S (+3.8 and +4.1 per thousand) were similar. In both streams (Shelter Run, Mill Run), (3)H concentrations and delta(34)S values during high flow were similar to those of modern deposition, delta(2)H and delta(18)O values exhibited damped seasonal variations, and (35)S/S ratios (0-3x10(-15)) were low throughout the year, indicating inter-seasonal to inter-annual storage and release of atmospheric SO(4)(=) in both watersheds. In the Mill Run watershed, (3)H concentrations in stream base flow (10-13 TU) were consistent with relatively young groundwater discharge, most delta(34)S values were approximately the same as the modern atmospheric deposition values, and the annual export rate of SO(4)(=) was equal to or slightly greater than the modern deposition rate. In the Shelter Run watershed, (3)H concentrations in stream base flow (1-3 TU) indicate that much of the discharging ground water had been deposited prior to the onset of atmospheric nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s, base flow delta(34)S values (+1.6 per thousand) were significantly lower than the modern deposition values, and the annual export rate of SO(4)(=) was less than the modern deposition rate

  6. Hydraulic paths and estimation of the real residence time of the water in Lago Maggiore (N. Italy: application of massless markers transported in 3D motion fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Sala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study, conducted using the TRIM_LM model, is a continuation of work on the movement of the water mass at different depths in Lago Maggiore, and thus on the estimation of the real residence time of the water in the lake. Three-dimensional CFD numerical simulations were extended to a 4-year period, focusing on the movements of 202 (two hundred and two massless markers inserted at different points in Lago Maggiore and at the mouths of 11 of its tributaries, enabling us to establish more realistic water renewal times for Lago Maggiore. By crossing the data of the horizontal trajectories of the environmental markers with those of their vertical variations, we reconstructed their movements over the four years of the simulation programme. An analysis of the results shows that the water mass in the layers of the upper 100 m has residence times between a minimum of 1 y and a maximum of 4-5 y. The water from the tributaries has residence times between 250 and 1000 days, depending on the distance of the tributaries from the closing section of the lake. The water in the layers below 100 m has residence times that still cannot be quantified with precision, but that can certainly be estimated at a number of years in two figures. These times are strongly conditioned by the depth of the late winter mixing, which in the last 40 y has not exceeded 200 m.

  7. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  8. Properties and reactivity of reactivated calcium-based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davini, P. [Pisa University, Pisa (Italy). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2002-04-01

    Calcium-based sorbents used in the process of high temperature desulfurisation of flue gases are partly regenerable by hydration with steam; the best results are obtained for treatment temperatures of approximately 300{degree}C. The regeneration process, and the consequent increase in the sorbent consumption can be correlated to the surface characteristics (BET surface area, porosity and pore size distribution) of the sorbents themselves. In particular, the presence of suitable pore structure, also having pores large enough to let molecules easily penetrate the inner part of the sorbent particles, is very important. 27 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Simple test guidelines for screening oilspill sorbents for toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blenkinsopp, S.A.; Sergy, G.; Doe, K.; Jackman, P.; Huybers, A.

    1998-01-01

    Environment Canada's Emergencies Science Division has established a program to develop a standard test method suitable for evaluating the toxicity of common sorbent materials. Sorbents are used to absorb or adsorb spilled oil and other hazardous materials. They vary widely in composition and packaging. They are often treated with oleophilic and hydrophobic compounds to improve performance and have been used in large quantities during oil spills. Until now, their potential toxicity has never been considered. Three tests have been evaluated to determine how appropriate they are in screening the toxicity of sorbents. Seven toxicity test recommendations for sorbents were presented. 7 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  10. Sorbent selection and design considerations for uranium trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, R.M.; Hobbs, W.E.; Norton, J.L.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1981-07-01

    The efficient removal of UF 6 from effluent streams can be accomplished through the selection of the best solid sorbent and the implementation of good design principles. Pressure losses, sorbent capacity, reaction kinetics, sorbent regeneration/uranium recovery requirements and the effects of other system components are the performance factors which are summarized. The commonly used uranium trapping materials highlighted are sodium fluoride, H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, and F-1 alumina. Sorbent selection and trap design have to be made on a case-by-case basis but the theoretical modeling studies and the evaluation of the performance factors presented can be used as a guide for other chemical trap applications

  11. Characterization of the Gacka River basin karst aquifer (Croatia): Hydrochemistry, stable isotopes and tritium-based mean residence times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozyurt, Nur N. [Department of Geological Engineering, Hacettepe University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Lutz, Hans O. [Stable Isotope Laboratory, Medical Faculty, Rijeka University, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Hunjak, Tamara; Mance, Diana [Stable Isotope Laboratory, Medical Faculty, Rijeka University, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Roller-Lutz, Zvjezdana, E-mail: roller@medri.uniri.hr [Stable Isotope Laboratory, Medical Faculty, Rijeka University, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia)

    2014-07-01

    The Gacka River basin aquifer is a highly-developed karst system, located in the Croatian Dinarides. It is mostly composed of permeable Jurassic and Cretaceous carbonate rocks, and clastic sedimentary rocks of Paleogene age. Gacka River provides high quality water for the town of Otočac and several villages; together with the neighboring Lika River, the water is used for the Hydroelectric Power Plant at Senj on the coast. About 10 perennial and over 20 seasonal springs are located at 450 to 460 m a.s.l. (above sea level). Three major springs (Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića) provide 57% of the mean annual river flow. Similarities between the average groundwater temperatures as well as between the average specific electrical conductivity values (9.0 °C-328 μS/cm, 9.6 °C-350 μS/cm and 8.9 °C-312 μS/cm) of the springs imply that they are fed from aquifers with similar mean residence times (MRTs). The mean δ{sup 18}O contents of Majerovo, Tonkovića, and Pećina are around − 10.1‰, − 9.2‰ and − 8.9‰, respectively, revealing differences in the mean recharge area elevations. Compared to the temporal amplitude of the{sup 18}O signal of precipitation, the {sup 18}O signal variations of the springs are substantially attenuated because the recharges occurring at different times are well mixed within the aquifers. This indicates MRTs of more than just a few years. The average tritium contents of Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića are 5.48 TU, 6.13 TU and 6.17 TU, respectively. Serially connected exponential-plug type unsteady lumped-parameter models run on an annual time scale resulted in rather satisfactory matches between the observed and calculated tritium contents for all studied springs. The models revealed similar MRTs (and corresponding reservoir volumes) for Pećina, Tonkovića and Majerovo of 12 years (470 Mm{sup 3}), 12 years (1190 Mm{sup 3}), and 12.2 years (1210 Mm{sup 3}), respectively. Plug flow conditions dominate in about 90% of the total

  12. EVALUATION OF SOLID SORBENTS AS A RETROFIT TECHNOLOGY FOR CO2 CAPTURE FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holly Krutka; Sharon Sjostrom

    2011-07-31

    diffusion limitations related to the CO{sub 2} uptake rate. Three additional supported amine materials, sorbents AX, F, and BN, were selected for evaluation using the 1 kW pilot at Sherco. Sorbent AX was operated in batch mode and performed similarly to sorbent R (i.e. could achieve up to 90% removal when given adequate regeneration time). Sorbent BN was not expected to be subject to the same mass diffusion limitations as experienced with sorbent R. When sorbent BN was used in continuous mode the steady state CO{sub 2} removal was approximately double that of sorbent R, which highlighted the importance of sorbents without kinetic limitations.

  13. Use of multiple age tracers to estimate groundwater residence times and long-term recharge rates in arid southern Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Th.; Osenbrück, K.; Strauch, G.; Pavetich, S.; Al-Mashaikhi, K.-S.; Herb, C.; Merchel, S.; Rugel, G.; Aeschbach, W.; Sanford, Ward E.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple age tracers were measured to estimate groundwater residence times in the regional aquifer system underlying southwestern Oman. This area, known as the Najd, is one of the most arid areas in the world and is planned to be the main agricultural center of the Sultanate of Oman in the near future. The three isotopic age tracers 4He, 14C and 36Cl were measured in waters collected from wells along a line that extended roughly from the Dhofar Mountains near the Arabian Sea northward 400 km into the Empty Quarter of the Arabian Peninsula. The wells sampled were mostly open to the Umm Er Radhuma confined aquifer, although, some were completed in the mostly unconfined Rus aquifer. The combined results from the three tracers indicate the age of the confined groundwater is  100 ka in the central section north of the mountains, and up to and > one Ma in the Empty Quarter. The 14C data were used to help calibrate the 4He and 36Cl data. Mixing models suggest that long open boreholes north of the mountains compromise 14C-only interpretations there, in contrast to 4He and 36Cl calculations that are less sensitive to borehole mixing. Thus, only the latter two tracers from these more distant wells were considered reliable. In addition to the age tracers, δ2H and δ18O data suggest that seasonal monsoon and infrequent tropical cyclones are both substantial contributors to the recharge. The study highlights the advantages of using multiple chemical and isotopic data when estimating groundwater travel times and recharge rates, and differentiating recharge mechanisms.

  14. Using stable isotopes to estimate and compare mean residence times in contrasting geologic catchments (Attert River, NW Luxembourg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Carreras, N.; Fenicia, F.; Frentress, J.; Wrede, S.; Pfister, L.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, stable isotopes have been increasingly used to characterize important aspects of catchment hydrological functioning, such as water storage dynamics, flow pathways and water sources. These characteristics are often synthesized by the Mean Residence Time (MRT), which is a simple catchment descriptor that employ the relation of distinct stable isotopic signatures in the rainfall input and streamflow output of a catchment that are significantly dampened through sub-surface propagation. In this preliminary study, MRT was estimated in the Attert River catchment (NW Luxembourg), where previous studies have shown that lithology exerts a major control on runoff generation. The Attert catchment lies at the transition zone of contrasting bedrock lithology: the Northern part is characterized by Devonian schist of the Ardennes massif, while sedimentary deposits of sandstone and marls dominate in the south of the catchment. As a consequence of differing lithologic characteristics, hydrological processes change across scales. The schistose catchments exhibit a delayed shallow groundwater component, sandstone catchments have slow-responding year-round groundwater component, whereas flashy runoff regimes prevails in the marly catchments. Under these circumstances, the MRTs are expected to vary significantly according to lithology, and provide additional understanding in internal catchment processes and their scale dependencies. In order to test this, bi-weekly monitoring of rainfall and discharge stable water isotope composition (oxygen-18 and deuterium) has been carried out since 2007 in 10 nested sub-catchments ranging in size from 0.4 to 247 km2 in the Attert catchment. MRT was estimated using different lumped convolution integral models and sine wave functions with varying transit times distributions (TTDs). TTDs were evaluated through calibration. Further research efforts will deal with the application of conceptual models to simulate and compare TTD, using

  15. A passive heat tracer experiment to determine the seasonal variation in residence times in a managed aquifer recharge system with DTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    des Tombe, B.F.; Bakker, M.; Schaars, F; van der Made, KJ; Calje, R; Borst, L.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted provisional session N°8.01 The seasonal variation in residence times is determined in a managed aquifer recharge system using a passive heat tracer test. The managed aquifer recharge system consists of a sequence of alternating elongated recharge basins and rows of recovery wells. The

  16. Radium isotopes in Port Phillip Bay: estimation of the rate of bio irrigation of sediments, and water residence time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, G.J.; Webster, I.T.

    1998-01-01

    Recent work has shown that estuarine sediments are a source of radium (Ra) to coastal waters (Bollinger and Moore, 1982, Webster et al., 1994; Hancock et al., 1997). Ra is soluble in saline water (Moore, 1992, Webster et al., 1995) and is rapidly desorbed into porewater from deposited fluvial sediments where it is continuously generated by insoluble Th parents. The rate at which Ra effuses into surface water has been used to determine the rate of surface-water pore water exchange (Hancock and Murray, 1996). Once in the water column, the behaviour of Ra is essentially conservative, enabling the determination of water residence time in a semi-enclosed estuary (Turekian et al., 1996). Here we use measurements of Ra in an estuary to estimate two water mixing processes. Port Phillip Bay (PPB) is a semi-enclosed estuary adjacent to the city of Melbourne, one of the highest density population centres in Australia. The Bay is approximately 50 km in diameter, and has an average depth of 14 m. A recent study found that the potential for eutrophication and algal blooms in the Bay was intricately linked to the fate of nutrients, particularly nitrogen, discharged into the Bay from rivers, drains, and sewage treatment plants (Harris et al. 1996). Two of the most important processes controlling the levels of inorganic N in the water column were identified as bio irrigation of bottom sediments, and the rate of exchange of Bay water with ocean water via Bass Strait. In this paper we describe how Ra isotopes can be used to estimate the rates of these processes, and we compare these rates with estimates made using conventional techniques. Water and sediment samples were collected from five sites in February 1996. Sediment cores were collected by divers, frozen, and sectioned in the laboratory. Surface, mid depth and bottom water samples were collected using a Niskin bottle. Radionuclide activities were determined by alpha spectrometry (Martin and Hancock, 1992) and gamma spectrometry

  17. Systematic Analysis of the Effect of Small Scale Permeability Heterogeneity on Hyporheic Exchange Flux and Residence Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, G.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) contributes significantly to whole stream biogeochemical cycling. Biogeochemical reactions within the HZ are often transport limited, thus, understanding these reactions requires knowledge about the magnitude of hyporheic fluxes (HF) and the residence time (RT) of these fluxes within the HZ. While the hydraulics of HF are relatively well understood, studies addressing the influence of permeability heterogeneity lack systematic analysis and have even produced contradictory results (e.g. [1] vs. [2]). In order to close this gap, this study uses a statistical numerical approach to elucidate the influence of permeability heterogeneity on HF and RT. We simulated and evaluated 3750 2D-scenarios of sediment heterogeneity by means of Gaussian random fields with focus on total HF and RT distribution. The scenarios were based on ten realizations of each of all possible combinations of 15 different correlation lengths, 5 dipping angles and 5 permeability variances. Roughly 500 hyporheic stream traces were analyzed per simulation, for a total of almost two million stream traces analyzed for correlations between permeability heterogeneity, HF, and RT. Total HF and the RT variance positively correlated with permeability variance while the mean RT negatively correlated with permeability variance. In contrast, changes in correlation lengths and dipping angles had little effect on the examined properties RT and HF. These results provide a possible explanation of the seemingly contradictory conclusions of recent studies, given that the permeability variances in these studies differ by several orders of magnitude. [1] Bardini, L., Boano, F., Cardenas, M.B, Sawyer, A.H, Revelli, R. and Ridolfi, L. "Small-Scale Permeability Heterogeneity Has Negligible Effects on Nutrient Cycling in Streambeds." Geophysical Research Letters, 2013. doi:10.1002/grl.50224. [2] Zhou, Y., Ritzi, R. W., Soltanian, M. R. and Dominic, D. F. "The Influence of Streambed Heterogeneity on

  18. Effect of temperature, hydraulic residence time and elevated PCO2 on acid neutralization within a pulsed limestone bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watten, B.J.; Lee, P.C.; Sibrell, P.L.; Timmons, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Limestone has potential for reducing reagent costs and sludge volume associated with treatment of acid mine drainage, but its use is restricted by slow dissolution rates and the deposition of Fe, Al and Mn-based hydrolysis products on reactive surfaces. We evaluated a pulsed limestone bed (PLB) reactor (15 L/min capacity) that uses a CO2 pretreatment step to accelerate dissolution and hydraulic shearing forces provided by intermittent fluidization to abrade and carry away surface scales. We established the effects of hydraulic residence time (HRT, 5.1-15.9 min), temperature (T, 12-22 ??C) and CO2 tension (PCO2, 34.5-206.8 kPa) on effluent quality when inlet acidity (Acy) was fixed at 440 mg/L (pH=2.48) with H2SO4. The PLB reactor neutralized all H+ acidity (N=80) while concurrently providing unusually high levels of effluent alkalinity (247-1028 mg/L as CaCO3) that allow for side-stream treatment with blending. Alkalinity (Alk) yields rose with increases in PCO2, HRT and settled bed height (BH, cm) and decreased with T following the relationship (R2=0.926; p<0.001): (Alk)non-filtered=-548.726+33.571??(PCO2)0.5+33.671??(HRT)+7.734??(BH)-5.197??(T). Numerical modeling showed CO2 feed requirements for a target Alk yield decrease with increases in HRT, T and the efficiency of off-gas (CO2) recycling. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Super-Hydrophobic High Throughput Electrospun Cellulose Acetate (CA) Nanofibrous Mats as Oil Selective Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao

    The threat of oil pollution increases with the expansion of oil exploration and production activities, as well as the industrial growth around the world. Use of sorbents is a common method to deal with the oil spills. In this work, an advanced sorbent technology is described. A series of non-woven Cellulose Acetate (CA) nanofibrous mats with a 3D fibrous structure were synthesized by a novel high-throughput electrospinning technique. The precursor was solutions of CA/ acetic acid-acetone in various concentrations. Among them, 15.0% CA exhibits a superhydrophobic surface property, with a water contact angle of 128.95°. Its oil sorption capacity is many times higher the oil sorption capacity of the best commercial sorbent available in the market. Also, it showed good buoyancy properties on the water both as dry-mat and oil-saturated mat. In addition, it is biodegradable, easily available, easily manufactured, so the CA nanofibrous mat is an excellent candidate as oil sorbent for oil spill in water treatment.

  20. Thermally moderated hollow fiber sorbent modules in rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption mode for hydrogen purification

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.; Bessho, Naoki; Bhandari, Dhaval A.; Kawajiri, Yoshiaki; Koros, William J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe thermally moderated multi-layered pseudo-monolithic hollow fiber sorbents entities, which can be packed into compact modules to provide small-footprint, efficient H2 purification/CO2 removal systems for use in on-site steam methane reformer product gas separations. Dual-layer hollow fibers are created via dry-jet, wet-quench spinning with an inner "active" core of cellulose acetate (porous binder) and zeolite NaY (69 wt% zeolite NaY) and an external sheath layer of pure cellulose acetate. The co-spun sheath layer reduces the surface porosity of the fiber and was used as a smooth coating surface for a poly(vinyl-alcohol) post-treatment, which reduced the gas permeance through the fiber sorbent by at least 7 orders of magnitude, essentially creating an impermeable sheath layer. The interstitial volume between the individual fibers was filled with a thermally-moderating paraffin wax. CO2 breakthrough experiments on the hollow fiber sorbent modules with and without paraffin wax revealed that the "passively" cooled paraffin wax module had 12.5% longer breakthrough times than the "non-isothermal" module. The latent heat of fusion/melting of the wax offsets the released latent heat of sorption/desorption of the zeolites. One-hundred rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption cycles were performed on the "passively" cooled hollow fiber sorbents using 25 vol% CO2/75 vol% He (H2 surrogate) at 60 °C and 113 psia, resulting in a product purity of 99.2% and a product recovery of 88.1% thus achieving process conditions and product quality comparable to conventional pellet processes. Isothermal and non-isothermal dynamic modeling of the hollow fiber sorbent module and a traditional packed bed using gPROMS® indicated that the fiber sorbents have sharper fronts (232% sharper) and longer adsorbate breakthrough times (66% longer), further confirming the applicability of the new fiber sorbent approach for H2 purification. © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC

  1. Thermally moderated hollow fiber sorbent modules in rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption mode for hydrogen purification

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.

    2012-10-01

    We describe thermally moderated multi-layered pseudo-monolithic hollow fiber sorbents entities, which can be packed into compact modules to provide small-footprint, efficient H2 purification/CO2 removal systems for use in on-site steam methane reformer product gas separations. Dual-layer hollow fibers are created via dry-jet, wet-quench spinning with an inner "active" core of cellulose acetate (porous binder) and zeolite NaY (69 wt% zeolite NaY) and an external sheath layer of pure cellulose acetate. The co-spun sheath layer reduces the surface porosity of the fiber and was used as a smooth coating surface for a poly(vinyl-alcohol) post-treatment, which reduced the gas permeance through the fiber sorbent by at least 7 orders of magnitude, essentially creating an impermeable sheath layer. The interstitial volume between the individual fibers was filled with a thermally-moderating paraffin wax. CO2 breakthrough experiments on the hollow fiber sorbent modules with and without paraffin wax revealed that the "passively" cooled paraffin wax module had 12.5% longer breakthrough times than the "non-isothermal" module. The latent heat of fusion/melting of the wax offsets the released latent heat of sorption/desorption of the zeolites. One-hundred rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption cycles were performed on the "passively" cooled hollow fiber sorbents using 25 vol% CO2/75 vol% He (H2 surrogate) at 60 °C and 113 psia, resulting in a product purity of 99.2% and a product recovery of 88.1% thus achieving process conditions and product quality comparable to conventional pellet processes. Isothermal and non-isothermal dynamic modeling of the hollow fiber sorbent module and a traditional packed bed using gPROMS® indicated that the fiber sorbents have sharper fronts (232% sharper) and longer adsorbate breakthrough times (66% longer), further confirming the applicability of the new fiber sorbent approach for H2 purification. © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC

  2. Anionic sorbents for arsenic and technetium species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero, Daniel A.; Moore, Robert Charles; Bontchev, Ranko Panayotov; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Zhao, Hongting; Salas, Fred Manuel; Holt, Kathleen Caroline

    2003-01-01

    Two sorbents, zirconium coated zeolite and magnesium hydroxide, were tested for their effectiveness in removing arsenic from Albuquerque municipal water. Results for the zirconium coated zeolite indicate that phosphate present in the water interfered with the sorption of arsenic. Additionally, there was a large quantity of iron and copper present in the water, corrosion products from the piping system, which may have interfered with the uptake of arsenic by the sorbent. Magnesium hydroxide has also been proven to be a strong sorbent for arsenic as well as other metals. Carbonate, present in water, has been shown to interfere with the sorption of arsenic by reacting with the magnesium hydroxide to form magnesium carbonate. The reaction mechanism was investigated by FT-IR and shows that hydrogen bonding between an oxygen on the arsenic species and a hydrogen on the Mg(OH)2 is most likely the mechanism of sorption. This was also confirmed by RAMAN spectroscopy and XRD. Technetium exists in multiple oxidation states (IV and VII) and is easily oxidized from the relatively insoluble Tc(IV) form to the highly water soluble and mobile Tc(VII) form. The two oxidation states exhibit different sorption characteristics. Tc(VII) does not sorb to most materials whereas Tc(IV) will strongly sorb to many materials. Therefore, it was determined that it is necessary to first reduce the Tc (using SnCl2) before sorption to stabilize Tc in the environment. Additionally, the effect of carbonate and phosphate on the sorption of technetium by hydroxyapatite was studied and indicated that both have a significant effect on reducing Tc sorption

  3. Time to reach tacrolimus maximum blood concentration,mean residence time, and acute renal allograft rejection: an open-label, prospective, pharmacokinetic study in adult recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuypers, Dirk R J; Vanrenterghem, Yves

    2004-11-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether disposition-related pharmacokinetic parameters such as T(max) and mean residence time (MRT) could be used as predictors of clinical efficacy of tacrolimus in renal transplant recipients, and to what extent these parameters would be influenced by clinical variables. We previously demonstrated, in a prospective pharmacokinetic study in de novo renal allograft recipients, that patients who experienced early acute rejection did not differ from patients free from rejection in terms of tacrolimus pharmacokinetic exposure parameters (dose interval AUC, preadministration trough blood concentration, C(max), dose). However, recipients with acute rejection reached mean (SD) tacrolimus T(max) significantly faster than those who were free from rejection (0.96 [0.56] hour vs 1.77 [1.06] hours; P clearance nor T(1/2) could explain this unusual finding, we used data from the previous study to calculate MRT from the concentration-time curves. As part of the previous study, 100 patients (59 male, 41 female; mean [SD] age, 51.4 [13.8] years;age range, 20-75 years) were enrolled in the study The calculated MRT was significantly shorter in recipients with acute allograft rejection (11.32 [031] hours vs 11.52 [028] hours; P = 0.02), just like T(max) was an independent risk factor for acute rejection in a multivariate logistic regression model (odds ratio, 0.092 [95% CI, 0.014-0.629]; P = 0.01). Analyzing the impact of demographic, transplantation-related, and biochemical variables on MRT, we found that increasing serum albumin and hematocrit concentrations were associated with a prolonged MRT (P calculated MRT were associated with a higher incidence of early acute graft rejection. These findings suggest that a shorter transit time of tacrolimus in certain tissue compartments, rather than failure to obtain a maximum absolute tacrolimus blood concentration, might lead to inadequate immunosuppression early after transplantation.

  4. Assessment of spent mushroom substrate as sorbent of fungicides: influence of sorbent and sorbate properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Benito, Jesús M; Rodríguez-Cruz, M Sonia; Andrades, M Soledad; Sánchez-Martín, María J

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) as a sorbent of fungicides was evaluated for its possible use in regulating pesticide mobility in the environment. The sorption studies involved four different SMS types in terms of nature and treatment and eight fungicides selected as representative compounds from different chemical groups. Nonlinear sorption isotherms were observed for all SMS-fungicide combinations. The highest sorption was obtained by composted SMS from Agaricus bisporus cultivation. A significant negative and positive correlation was obtained between the K(OC) sorption constants and the polarity index values of sorbents and the K(OW) of fungicides, respectively. The statistic revealed that more than 77% of the variability in the K(OW) could be explained considering these properties jointly. The other properties of both the sorbent (total carbon, dissolved organic carbon, or pH) and the sorbate (water solubility) were nonsignificant. The hysteresis values for cyprodinil (log K(OW)= 4) were for all the sorbents much higher (>3) than for other fungicides. This was consistent with the remaining sorption after desorption considered as an indicator of the sorption efficiency of SMS for fungicides. Changes in the absorption bands of fungicides sorbed by SMS observed by FTIR permitted establishing the interaction mechanism of fungicides with SMS. The findings of this work provide evidence for the potential capacity of SMS as a sorbent of fungicides and the low desorption observed especially for some fungicides, although they suggest that more stabilized or humified organic substrates should be produced to enhance their efficiency in environmental applications. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. SU-E-T-45: Antibody Mean Residence Time in Blood and Its Correlation with Protein Molecular Weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, C; Williams, L [Retired from City of Hope Medical Center, Arcadia, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Animal biodistribution data are required prior to introducing a new radiopharmaceutical into clinical trials. Protein engineering, using recombinant DNA techniques can produce a large number of related (cognate) antibodies to a given molecular target. Thus, it is important that these constructs be numerically related to one another via a single criterion. In the following, we use the mean residence time (MRT) in murine blood as this criterion. Methods: Five cognate anti-CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) antibodies were compared with regard to their MRT in whole blood of CEA-positive tumor-bearing (LS174T) mice. MRT was defined by blood AUC (area under the curve) divided by the initial blood uptake value; all in units of percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g). Cognates included single chain scFv (25 kDa), diabody (50 kDa), minibody (80 kDa), F(ab')2 (120 kDa), and intact (155 kDa) forms of the murine cT84.66 antibody against CEA. All were labeled with radioactive iodine. Results: The agents, in the sequence listed, exhibited MRT values of 1.16 +/- 0.01 h, 0.99 h, 5.06 +/- 0.70 h, 6.61 +/- 0.36 h, and 59.3 +/- 2.4 h respectively. Because of the monotonic nature of the sequence, a linear correlation analysis was performed between molecular weight (MW) and MRT or ln(MRT) of the 5 proteins. Probability of random correlation was 0.10 for MRT and 0.01 for ln(MRT). Conclusion: MRT values of cognate anti-CEA antibodies were found to be a monotonically increasing sequence with respect to MW. Cognate MW values correlated best to ln(MRT) of the protein species. Thus MRT was proportional to an exponential function of molecular weight. The extended intact antibody circulation time presumably reflected its relatively maximal MW. Presence of an intact FC segment on this native antibody may also have influenced these results.

  6. Tracer test modeling for characterizing heterogeneity and local scale residence time distribution in an artificial recharge site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valhondo, Cristina; Martinez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesús; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Ayora, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Artificial recharge of aquifers (AR) is a standard technique to replenish and enhance groundwater resources, that have widely been used due to the increasing demand of quality water. AR through infiltration basins consists on infiltrate surface water, that might be affected in more or less degree by treatment plant effluents, runoff and others undesirables water sources, into an aquifer. The water quality enhances during the passage through the soil and organic matter, nutrients, organic contaminants, and bacteria are reduced mainly due to biodegradation and adsorption. Therefore, one of the goals of AR is to ensure a good quality status of the aquifer even if lesser quality water is used for recharge. Understand the behavior and transport of the potential contaminants is essential for an appropriate management of the artificial recharge system. The knowledge of the flux distribution around the recharge system and the relationship between the recharge system and the aquifer (area affected by the recharge, mixing ratios of recharged and native groundwater, travel times) is essential to achieve this goal. Evaluate the flux distribution is not always simple because the complexity and heterogeneity of natural systems. Indeed, it is not so much regulate by hydraulic conductivity of the different geological units as by their continuity and inter-connectivity particularly in the vertical direction. In summary for an appropriate management of an artificial recharge system it is needed to acknowledge the heterogeneity of the media. Aiming at characterizing the residence time distribution (RTDs) of a pilot artificial recharge system and the extent to which heterogeneity affects RTDs, we performed and evaluated a pulse injection tracer test. The artificial recharge system was simulated as a multilayer model which was used to evaluate the measured breakthrough curves at six monitoring points. Flow and transport parameters were calibrated under two hypotheses. The first

  7. SU-E-T-45: Antibody Mean Residence Time in Blood and Its Correlation with Protein Molecular Weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, C; Williams, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Animal biodistribution data are required prior to introducing a new radiopharmaceutical into clinical trials. Protein engineering, using recombinant DNA techniques can produce a large number of related (cognate) antibodies to a given molecular target. Thus, it is important that these constructs be numerically related to one another via a single criterion. In the following, we use the mean residence time (MRT) in murine blood as this criterion. Methods: Five cognate anti-CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) antibodies were compared with regard to their MRT in whole blood of CEA-positive tumor-bearing (LS174T) mice. MRT was defined by blood AUC (area under the curve) divided by the initial blood uptake value; all in units of percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g). Cognates included single chain scFv (25 kDa), diabody (50 kDa), minibody (80 kDa), F(ab')2 (120 kDa), and intact (155 kDa) forms of the murine cT84.66 antibody against CEA. All were labeled with radioactive iodine. Results: The agents, in the sequence listed, exhibited MRT values of 1.16 +/- 0.01 h, 0.99 h, 5.06 +/- 0.70 h, 6.61 +/- 0.36 h, and 59.3 +/- 2.4 h respectively. Because of the monotonic nature of the sequence, a linear correlation analysis was performed between molecular weight (MW) and MRT or ln(MRT) of the 5 proteins. Probability of random correlation was 0.10 for MRT and 0.01 for ln(MRT). Conclusion: MRT values of cognate anti-CEA antibodies were found to be a monotonically increasing sequence with respect to MW. Cognate MW values correlated best to ln(MRT) of the protein species. Thus MRT was proportional to an exponential function of molecular weight. The extended intact antibody circulation time presumably reflected its relatively maximal MW. Presence of an intact FC segment on this native antibody may also have influenced these results

  8. Use of tritium for estimation of groundwater mean residence time, a case study of the Ain Al-Samak Karst springs (Central Syria)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattan, Z.

    2003-01-01

    This work is an attempt to estimate the mean residence time of groundwater in the Ain Al-Tanour and Ain-Samak, which are the major karst springs in the Upper Orontes Basin (Central Syria). This estimate, which consists on the application of a mathematical modeling approach, was based on the use of tritium, as a natural radioisotope tracer and a tool for ground water age dating. By adopting a completely mixed reservoir model, linked with exponential time distribution function, the mean residence time (turnover time) of these two springs was evaluated to be about 50 years. This result is in good agreement with previous estimation obtained for the Figeh main spring, which belongs to the same aquifer (Cenomanian-Turonian complex) in the Damascus Basin. On the basis of this evaluation, a value of about 800 million m 3 was obtained for the maximum groundwater reservoir size

  9. Post-combustion carbon capture - solid sorbents and membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, R.M.

    2009-01-15

    This report follows on from that on solvent scrubbing for post-combustion carbon capture from coal-fired power plants by considering the use of solid sorbents and membranes instead of solvents. First, mesoporous and microporous adsorbents are discussed: carbon-based adsorbents, zeolites, hydrotalcites and porous crystals. Attempts have been made to improve the performance of the porous adsorbent by functionalising them with nitrogen groups and specifically, amine groups to react with CO{sub 2} and thus enhance the physical adsorption properties. Dry, regenerable solid sorbents have attracted a good deal of research. Most of the work has been on the carbonation/calcination cycle of natural limestone but there have also been studies of other calcium-based sorbents and alkali metal-based sorbents. Membranes have also been studied as potential post-combustion capture devices. Finally, techno-economic studies predicting the economic performance of solid sorbents and membranes are discussed. 340 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Detoxication and recycling of radioactive waters using selective mineral sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berak, L.

    1980-01-01

    Activated BaSO 4 (designated AB 70) was proposed for use in decontaminating concentrated calcium salt solutions containing a small amount of 226 Ra. The AB 70 concentration factor amounts to 2x1a 3 . A sorption contactor for applying the powder sorbent was proposed and will be tested. The AB 70 sorbent liberates small amounts of sulphates into the decontaminated solution, and thus another suitable mineral sorbent was sought. A new sorbent could be synthetized and tested, called RAS-1 whose Ra/Ca selectivity is comparable to that of AB 70 while its Ra/Ba selectivity is considerably higher. The RAS-1 sorbent is also suitable for radiochemical separation in the analysis and concentration of Ra. (Ha)

  11. Rubber Fruit Shell (Hevea brasiliensis) as bio sorbent to remove FFA (Free Fatty Acid) content in CPO (Crude Palm Oil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandia, S.; Sinaga, M. S.; Masyithah, Z.; Husin, A.; Nurfadilla, S.; Fitriani; Sipahutar, B. K. S.

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to discover the effectiveness of the shell of rubber fruit as bio sorbent for removing FFA (Free Fatty Acid) content in CPO (Crude Palm Oil). Methods used in this study were pretreatment, activation (carbonating and chemically) and adsorption process at room temperature. In the beginning, the shell of rubber fruit was cleaned and dried under the sun. Then the shell was cut for about 0.5 cm of length and carbonated in a furnace for 1h at 600°C. After that, they were crushed to pass through 140 meshes and activated using three variations of chemical such as 6 of HNO3, 6N of KOH and 6N of H3PO4 at certain ratio as 1:3, 1:4, and 1:5 (b/v). The adsorption process was carried out using bio sorbent with the highest iodine number in varying bio sorbent dosage and contact time. The highest iodine number was 913.680 mg/g and obtained at the ratio of bio sorbent to 6N of KOH as 1:5. The best removal of FFA content was 91.94% and at 1% bio sorbent dose and 30 min of contact time.

  12. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-01-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period October 1, 2001 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO(sub X) selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. This is the fifth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During the previous (fourth) period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (at both Gavin and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO(sub 3) formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO(sub X) control than at removing SO(sub 3) formed in the furnace. The SO(sub 3) removal results were presented in the

  13. Removal of metals from industrial wastewater and urban runoff by mineral and bio-based sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Harshita; Leiviskä, Tiina; Heiderscheidt, Elisangela; Postila, Heini; Tanskanen, Juha

    2018-03-01

    The study was performed to evaluate chemically modified biosorbents, hydrochloric acid treated peat (HCl-P) and citric acid treated sawdust (Citric acid-SD) for their metal removal capacity from dilute industrial wastewater and urban runoff and compare their efficiency with that of commercially available mineral sorbents (AQM PalPower M10 and AQM PalPower T5M5 magnetite). Batch and column experiments were conducted using real water samples to assess the sorbents' metal sorption capacity. AQM PalPower M10 (consisting mainly of magnesium, iron and silicon oxides) exhibited excellent Zn removal from both industrial wastewater and spiked runoff water samples even at low dosages (0.1 g/L and 0.05 g/L, respectively). The high degree of Zn removal was associated with the release of hydroxyl ions from the sorbent and subsequent precipitation of zinc hydroxide. The biosorbents removed Ni and Cr better than AQM PalPower M10 from industrial wastewater and performed well in removing Cr and Cu from spiked runoff water, although at higher dosages (0.3-0.75 g/L). The main mechanism of sorption by biosorbents was ion exchange. The sorbents required a short contact time to reach equilibrium (15-30 min) in both tested water samples. AQM PalPower T5M5 magnetite was the worst performing sorbent, leaching Zn into both industrial and runoff water and Ni into runoff water. Column tests revealed that both HCl-P and AQM PalPower M10 were able to remove metals, although some leaching was witnessed, especially As from AQM PalPower M10. The low hydraulic conductivity observed for HCl-P may restrict the possibilities of using such small particle size peat material in a filter-type passive system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Preliminary estimates of residence times and apparent ages of ground water in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and water-quality data from a survey of springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focazio, Michael J.; Plummer, Niel; Bohlke, John K.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Bachman, L. Joseph; Powars, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the residence times of the ground-water systems in Chesapeake Bay watershed helps resource managers anticipate potential delays between implementation of land-management practices and any improve-ments in river and estuary water quality. This report presents preliminary estimates of ground-water residence times and apparent ages of water in the shallow aquifers of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. A simple reservoir model, published data, and analyses of spring water were used to estimate residence times and apparent ages of ground-water discharge. Ranges of aquifer hydraulic characteristics throughout the Bay watershed were derived from published literature and were used to estimate ground-water residence times on the basis of a simple reservoir model. Simple combinations of rock type and physiographic province were used to delineate hydrogeomorphic regions (HGMR?s) for the study area. The HGMR?s are used to facilitate organization and display of the data and analyses. Illustrations depicting the relation of aquifer characteristics and associated residence times as a continuum for each HGMR were developed. In this way, the natural variation of aquifer characteristics can be seen graphically by use of data from selected representative studies. Water samples collected in September and November 1996, from 46 springs throughout the watershed were analyzed for chlorofluorocarbons (CFC?s) to estimate the apparent age of ground water. For comparison purposes, apparent ages of water from springs were calculated assuming piston flow. Additi-onal data are given to estimate apparent ages assuming an exponential distribution of ages in spring discharge. Additionally, results from previous studies of CFC-dating of ground water from other springs and wells in the watershed were compiled. The CFC data, and the data on major ions, nutrients, and nitrogen isotopes in the water collected from the 46 springs are included in this report. The apparent ages of water

  15. Groundwater residence time downgradient of Trench No. 22 at the Chernobyl Pilot Site: Constraints on hydrogeological aquifer functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gal La Salle, C.; Aquilina, L.; Fourre, E.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Michelot, J.-L.; Roux, C.; Bugai, D.; Labasque, T.; Simonucci, C.; Van Meir, N.; Noret, A.; Bassot, S.; Dapoigny, A.; Baumier, D.

    2012-01-01

    Following the explosion of reactor 4 at the Chernobyl power plant in northern Ukraine in 1986, contaminated soil and vegetation were buried in shallow trenches dug directly on-site in an Aeolian sand deposit. These trenches are sources of radionuclide (RN) pollution. The objective of the present study is to provide constraints for the Chernobyl flow and RN transport models by characterising groundwater residence time. A radiochronometer 3 H/ 3 He method (t 1/2 = 12.3 a) and anthropogenic tracers including CFC and SF 6 are investigated along with the water mass natural tracers Na, Cl, 18 O and 2 H. The groundwater is stratified, as evidenced by Na and Cl concentrations and stable isotopes ( 18 O, 2 H). In the upper aeolian layer, the Na–Cl relationship corresponds to evapotranspiration of precipitation, while in the underlying alluvial layer, an increase in Na and Cl with depth suggests both water–rock interactions and mixing processes. The 3 H/ 3 He and CFC apparent groundwater ages increase with depth, ranging from ‘recent’ (1–3 a) at a 2 m depth below the groundwater table to much higher apparent ages of 50–60 a at 27 m depth below the groundwater table. Discrepancies in 3 H/ 3 He and CFC apparent ages (20–25 a and 3–10 a, respectively) were observed during the 2008 campaign at an intermediate depth immediately below the aeolian/alluvial sand limit, which were attributed to the complex water transfer processes. Extremely high SF 6 concentrations, well above equilibrium with the atmosphere and up to 1112 pptv, are attributed to significant contamination of the soils following the nuclear reactor explosion in 1986. The SF 6 concentration vs. the apparent groundwater ages agrees with this interpretation, as the high SF 6 concentrations are all more recent than 1985. The persistence of the SF 6 concentration suggests that SF 6 was introduced in the soil atmosphere and slowly integrated in the groundwater moving along the hydraulic gradient. The

  16. Carbon-Based Regenerable Sorbents for the Combined Carbon Dioxide and Ammonia Removal for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Manthina, Venkata; Singh, Prabhakar; Chullen, Cinda

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Since ammonia is the most important TC to be captured, data on TC sorption presented in this paper are limited to ammonia, with results relevant to other TCs to be reported at a later time. The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Furthermore, the current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using carbon sorbents for the reversible, concurrent sorption of carbon dioxide and ammonia. Several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested, and multiple adsorption/vacuum-regeneration cycles were demonstrated at room temperature, and also a carbon surface conditioning technique that enhances the combined carbon dioxide and ammonia sorption without impairing sorbent regeneration.

  17. Using heat as a tracer to estimate spatially distributed mean residence times in the hyporheic zone of a riffle-pool sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Ramon C.

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical reactions that occur in the hyporheic zone are highly dependent on the time solutes that are in contact with sediments of the riverbed. In this investigation, we developed a 2-D longitudinal flow and solute-transport model to estimate the spatial distribution of mean residence time in the hyporheic zone. The flow model was calibrated using observations of temperature and pressure, and the mean residence times were simulated using the age-mass approach for steady-state flow conditions. The approach used in this investigation includes the mixing of different ages and flow paths of water through advection and dispersion. Uncertainty of flow and transport parameters was evaluated using standard Monte Carlo and the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation method. Results of parameter estimation support the presence of a low-permeable zone in the riffle area that induced horizontal flow at a shallow depth within the riffle area. This establishes shallow and localized flow paths and limits deep vertical exchange. For the optimal model, mean residence times were found to be relatively long (9–40.0 days). The uncertainty of hydraulic conductivity resulted in a mean interquartile range (IQR) of 13 days across all piezometers and was reduced by 24% with the inclusion of temperature and pressure observations. To a lesser extent, uncertainty in streambed porosity and dispersivity resulted in a mean IQR of 2.2 and 4.7 days, respectively. Alternative conceptual models demonstrate the importance of accounting for the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity in simulating mean residence times in a riffle-pool sequence.

  18. (18)O(2) label mechanism of sulfur generation and characterization in properties over mesoporous Sm-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B S; Wan, Z Y; Wang, F; Zhan, Y P; Tian, M; Cheung, A S C

    2014-02-28

    Using a sol-gel method, SmMeOx/MCM-41 or SBA-15 (Me=Fe, Co and Zn) and corresponding unsupported sorbents were prepared. The desulfurization performance of these sorbents was evaluated over a fixed-bed reactor and the effects of reaction temperature, feed and sorbent composition on desulfurization performance were studied. Samarium-based sorbents used to remove H2S from hot coal gas were reported for the first time. The results of successive sulfidation/regeneration cycles revealed that SmFeO3/SBA-15 sorbent was suitable for desulfurization of hot coal gas in the chemical industry. The formation of elemental sulfur during both sulfidation and regeneration processes depended strongly on the catalytic action of Sm2O2S species, which was confirmed for the first time via high sensitive time of flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) using 6%vol(18)O2/Ar regeneration gas and can reduce markedly procedural complexity. The sorbents were characterized using N2-adsorption, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction of H2 (H2-TPR), thermogravimetry (TG) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sorbent-based Oxygen Production for Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Vijay [Western Research Inst. (WRI), Laramie, WY (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Project DE-FE0024075 deals with the development of a moderate-temperature sorbent-based oxygen production technology. Sorbent-based oxygen production process utilizes oxygen-storage properties of Perovskites to (1) adsorb oxygen from air in a solid sorbent, and (2) release the adsorbed oxygen into a sweep gas such as CO2 and/or steam for gasification systems or recycled flue gas for oxy-combustion systems. Pure oxygen can be produced by the use of vacuum instead of a sweep gas to affect the pressure swing. By developing more efficient and stable, higher sorption capacity, newer class of materials operating at moderate temperatures this process represents a major advancement in air separation technology. Newly developed perovskite ceramic sorbent materials with order-disorder transition have a higher O2 adsorption capacity, potentially 200 °C lower operating temperatures, and up to two orders of magnitude faster desorption rates than those used in earlier development efforts. The performance advancements afforded by the new materials lead to substantial savings in capital investment and operational costs. Cost of producing oxygen using sorbents could be as much as 26% lower than VPSA and about 13% lower than a large cryogenic air separation unit. Cost advantage against large cryogenic separation is limited because sorbent-based separation numbers up sorbent modules for achieving the larger capacity.

  20. The cleaning of the soils polluted by oil and radionuclides by natural sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farajov, M.F.; Shamilov, E.N.; Abdullayev, A.S.; Huseynov, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    Full text : Problem of environmental pollution in oil extracting areas of Absheron peninsula became the very important discussion object lately. It this areas for many years oil and well waters were flowed to environmental areas caused a lot of pools in that areas and at the result the soil and plants were polluted with oil and radionuclides. By last years researches it was revealed that amount of radium 226 oil well water contains 10 - 500 Bq/l. Sometimes amount of radium 226 in polluted soils is increasing to 2000--5000 Bq/l and at the result it is raising probability of entering radionuclides by the way of migration from ground to plants into the nutrition chain cycle. Thus the polluted areas with oil and radionuclides and also when oil spills from oil-pipes by an accident the deactivation of soils is one of the main and most actual problems. In researches for cleaning of polluted soils with radionuclides for the first time were used the phyto sorbent modified breccias forms taken from Chaildag, Gobu, and Lokbatan mud volcano areas. The mineral contain of volcano mud generally consists of clay rocks -(kaolinit, montmorillonit, zeolite, chlorite, biotit) pyrite, and i.e.[2]. The polluted soil samples were taken in Surakhani region from area with the 150 mikroroentgen per hour radiation background. The contain and amount of radionuclides were determined with the radio spectrometer P rogress - Beta - Gamma . Polluted soil samples firstly are washed by hot water and HCl solution by mixing for 3-5 hours. At the next level by adding pieced sorbent into the solution is intensively mixing by mixer and putting for sedimentation for 24 hours. After sedimentation the stiring process is repeated by adding HCl on the sediment again. The soil is stirred by water for last time. Decomposed solutions from soil are adhering and are maked with sorbent again. Thus the soil is quite cleaned from oil and radionuclides by the sorbents we offer. At the same time this sorbents may be

  1. Effects of Temperature and Residence Time on the Emissions of PIC and Fine Particles during Fixed Bed Combustion of Conifer Stemwood Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boman, Christoffer; Lindmark, Fredrik; Oehman, Marcus; Nordin, Anders [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry; Pettersson, Esbjoern [Energy Technology Centre, Piteaa (Sweden); Westerholm, Roger [Stockholm Univ., Arrhenius Laboratory (Sweden). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2006-07-15

    The use of wood fuel Pellets has proved to be well suited for the small-scale market enabling controlled and efficient combustion with low emission of products of incomplete combustion (PIC). Still a potential for further emission reduction exists and a thorough understanding of the influence of combustion conditions on the emission characteristics of air pollutants like PAH and particulate matter (PM) is important. The objective was to determine the effects of temperature and residence time on the emission performance and characteristics with focus on hydrocarbons and PM during combustion of conifer stemwood Pellets in a laboratory fixed bed reactor (<5 kW). Temperature and residence time after the bed section were varied according to statistical experimental designs (650-970 deg C and 0.5-3.5 s) with the emission responses; CO, organic gaseous carbon, NO, 20 VOC compounds, 43 PAH compounds, PM{sub tot}, fine particle mass/count median diameter (MMD and CMD) and number concentration. Temperature was negatively correlated with the emissions of all studied PIC with limited effects of residence time. The PM{sub tot} emissions of 15-20 mg/MJ was in all cases dominated by fine (<1 {mu}m) particles of K, Na, S, Cl, C, O and Zn. Increased residence time resulted in increased fine particle sizes (i.e. MMD and CMD) and decreased number concentrations. The importance of high temperature (>850 deg C) in the bed zone with intensive, air rich and well mixed isothermal conditions for 0.5-1.0 s in the post combustion zone was illustrated for wood Pellets combustion with almost a total depletion of all studied PIC. The results emphasize the need for further verification studies and technology development work.

  2. Optimizing the Costs of Solid Sorbent-Based CO2 Capture Process Through Heat Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjostrom, Sharon [Ada-Es, Inc., Highlands Ranch, CO (United States)

    2016-03-18

    The focus of this project was the ADAsorb™ CO2 Capture Process, a temperature-swing adsorption process that incorporates a three-stage fluidized bed as the adsorber and a single-stage fluidized bed as the regenerator. ADAsorb™ system was designed, fabricated, and tested under DOE award DEFE0004343. Two amine-based sorbents were evaluated in conjunction with the ADAsorb™ process: “BN”, an ion-exchange resin; and “OJ”, a metal organic framework (MOF) sorbent. Two cross heat exchanger designs were evaluated for use between the adsorber and regenerator: moving bed and fluidized bed. The fluidized bed approach was rejected fairly early in the project because the additional electrical load to power blowers or fans to overcome the pressure drop required for fluidization was estimated to be nominally three times the electrical power that could be generated from the steam saved through the use of the cross heat exchanger. The Energy Research Center at Lehigh University built and utilized a process model of the ADAsorb™ capture process and integrated this model into an existing model of a supercritical PC power plant. The Lehigh models verified that, for the ADAsorb™ system, the largest contributor to parasitic power was lost electrical generation, which was primarily electric power which the host plant could not generate due to the extraction of low pressure (LP) steam for sorbent heating, followed by power for the CO2 compressor and the blower or fan power required to fluidize the adsorber and regenerator. Sorbent characteristics such as the impacts of moisture uptake, optimized adsorption and regeneration temperature, and sensitivity to changes in pressure were also included in the modeling study. Results indicate that sorbents which adsorb more than 1-2% moisture by weight are unlikely to be cost competitive unless they have an extremely high CO2 working capacity that well exceeds 15% by weight. Modeling also revealed

  3. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

    1989-10-01

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) investigated methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbents. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For this program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation. Two base case sorbents, a spherical pellet and a cylindrical extrude used in related METC-sponsored projects, were used to provide a basis for the aimed enhancement in durability and reactivity. Sorbent performance was judged on the basis of physical properties, single particle kinetic studies based on thermogravimetric (TGA) techniques, and multicycle bench-scale testing of sorbents. A sorbent grading system was utilized to quantify the characteristics of the new sorbents prepared during the program. Significant enhancements in both reactivity and durability were achieved for the spherical pellet shape over the base case formulation. Overall improvements to reactivity and durability were also made to the cylindrical extrude shape. The primary variables which were investigated during the program included iron oxide type, zinc oxide:iron oxide ratio, inorganic binder concentration, organic binder concentration, and induration conditions. The effects of some variables were small or inconclusive. Based on TGA studies and bench-scale tests, induration conditions were found to be very significant.

  4. NIFSIL - a composite sorbent for caesium - properties and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajec, P.; Orechovska, J.

    1998-01-01

    Samples of the potassium-nickel ferrocyanides K 2 NiFe(CN) 6 , KNi 1,5 Fe(CN) 6 and Ni 2 Fe(CN) 6 were prepared and their properties studied with respect to their use as sorbents for caesium. Caesium is fixed on mixed alkaline-nickel ferrocyanide without structural change. The capacity of Cs retention never reached the theoretic value corresponding to a total release of the monovalent ions of the solid. High distribution coefficients (K D in the order of 10 4 cm 3 /g) determined in batch experiments show that these sorbents have a very high affinity for caesium ions, even in the presence of competing K + , Na + and Ca 2+ ions. The sorbents have a good chemical stability in a wide pH-range (2-12). The irradiation of some sorbent samples with high energy gamma-rays ( 60 Co) of a total dose of 1.10 5 Gy caused no remarkable changes in the sorbent properties (K D , sorption capacity and kinetics, mechanical stability). The sorbents were also tested for 85 Sr and 239 Pu and the results carried out under dynamic and batch experiments have shown that sorbents are not suitable for removal of these radionuclides. Potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate incorporated in silica-gel matrix could compete with others sorbents based on insoluble hexacyanoferrates, has the advantage of good radiation stability and suitable granulometry. The sorbent was prepared on a pilot scale with a capacity about 1000 kg per year with the prospect that it could be easily upgraded to an industrial scale

  5. Estimation of Transport Trajectory and Residence Time in Large River–Lake Systems: Application to Poyang Lake (China Using a Combined Model Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunliang Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical processes and associated water quality in many lakes mainly depend on their transport behaviors. Most existing methodologies for investigating transport behaviors are based on physically based numerical models. The pollutant transport trajectory and residence time of Poyang Lake are thought to have important implications for the steadily deteriorating water quality and the associated rapid environmental changes during the flood period. This study used a hydrodynamic model (MIKE 21 in conjunction with transport and particle-tracking sub-models to provide comprehensive investigation of transport behaviors in Poyang Lake. Model simulations reveal that the lake’s prevailing water flow patterns cause a unique transport trajectory that primarily develops from the catchment river mouths to the downstream area along the lake’s main flow channels, similar to a river-transport behavior. Particle tracking results show that the mean residence time of the lake is 89 days during July–September. The effect of the Yangtze River (the effluent of the lake on the residence time is stronger than that of the catchment river inflows. The current study represents a first attempt to use a combined model approach to provide insights into the transport behaviors for a large river–lake system, given proposals to manage the pollutant inputs both directly to the lake and catchment rivers.

  6. Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

    2010-04-20

    Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts are disclosed, including silver hollandite and cryptomelane. These materials can be used, for example, to catalyze the oxidation of CO.sub.x (e.g., CO), NO.sub.x (e.g., NO), hydrocarbons (e.g., C.sub.3H.sub.6) and/or sulfur-containing compounds. The disclosed materials also may be used to catalyze other reactions, such as the reduction of NO.sub.2. In some cases, the disclosed materials are capable of sorbing certain products from the reactions they catalyze. Silver hollandite, in particular, can be used to remove a substantial portion of certain sulfur-containing compounds from a gas or liquid by catalysis and/or sorption. The gas or liquid can be, for example, natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon.

  7. Potential of Cogon Grass as an Oil Sorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Wiloso, Edi Iswanto; Barlianti, Vera; Anggraini, Irni Fitria; Hendarsyah, Hendris

    2012-01-01

    Experiments on the potential of Cogon grass (lmperata cylindrica), a weed harmful to other plants, for use as a low-cost and biodegradable oil sorbent were carried out under various spill conditions. Flowers of Cogon grass adsorbed much larger amount of high-viscosity lubricating oil (57.9 g-oil/g-sorbent) than that adsorbed by Peat Sorb (7.7 g-oil/g-sorbent), a commercial oilsorbent based on peat. However, the flowers adsorbed only 27.9 g of low-viscosity crude oillgsorbent. In an oil-water ...

  8. Point-of-care ultrasonography as a training milestone for internal medicine residents: the time is now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabath, Bruce F; Singh, Gurkeerat

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography is considered fundamental in emergency medicine training and recently has become a milestone in critical care fellowship programs as well. Currently, there is no such standard requirement for internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We present a new case and briefly review another case at our institution - a community hospital - in which internal medicine house staff trained in ultrasonography were able to uncover unexpected and critical diagnoses that significantly changed patient care and outcomes. We also review the growing evidence of the application of ultrasound in the diagnosis of a myriad of conditions encountered in general internal medicine as well as the mounting data on the ability of internal medicine residents to apply this technology accurately at the bedside. We advocate that the literature has sufficiently established the role of POC ultrasonography in general internal medicine that there should no longer be any delay in giving this an official place in the development of internal medicine trainees. This may be particularly useful in the community hospital setting where 24-h echocardiography or other sonography may not be readily available.

  9. The Effect of Beaver Activity on the Ammonium Uptake and Water Residence Time Characteristics of a Third-Order Stream Reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, M.; Gooseff, M. N.; Wollheim, W. M.; Peterson, B. J.; Morkeski, K.

    2009-12-01

    Increasing beaver populations within low gradient basins in the northeastern United States are fundamentally changing the way water and dissolved nutrients are exported through these stream networks to the coast. Beaver dams can increase water residence time and contact with organic material, promote anoxic conditions and enhance both surface and hyporheic transient storage; all of these may have an impact on biogeochemical reactivity and nutrient retention. To quantitatively assess some of these effects we co-injected NaCl and NH4+ into the same 3rd-order stream reach in Massachusetts, USA under pre- and post-dam conditions. These experiments were done at similar discharge rates to isolate the impacts of a large natural beaver dam (7 m X 1.3 m) on the low-gradient (0.002) system where variable discharge also imparts a strong control on residence time. During the post-dam experiment there was an estimated 2300 m3 of water impounded behind the structure, which influenced more than 300 m of the 650 m stream reach. Our results showed that median transport time through the reach increased by 160% after dam construction. Additionally the tracer tailing time normalized to the corresponding median transport time increased from 1.08 to 1.51, indicating a pronounced tailing of the tracer signal in the post-dam condition. Data collected within the beaver pond just upstream of the dam indicated poor mixing and the presence of preferential flow paths through the generally stagnant zone. The uptake length (Sw) for NH4+ was 1250 m under the pre-dam condition, and may have changed for the post-dam reach in part because of the observed changes in residence time. As beaver population growth continues within these basins the consequences may be a smoothing of the outlet hydrograph and increased nutrient and organic matter removal and storage along the stream network.

  10. Crosslinked polymeric ionic liquids as solid-phase microextraction sorbent coatings for high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Honglian; Merib, Josias; Anderson, Jared L

    2016-03-18

    Neat crosslinked polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) sorbent coatings for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) compatible with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are reported for the first time. Six structurally different PILs were crosslinked to nitinol supports and applied for the determination of select pharmaceutical drugs, phenolics, and insecticides. Sampling conditions including sample solution pH, extraction time, desorption solvent, desorption time, and desorption solvent volume were optimized using design of experiment (DOE). The developed PIL sorbent coatings were stable when performing extractions under acidic pH and remained intact in various organic desorption solvents (i.e., methanol, acetonitrile, acetone). The PIL-based sorbent coating polymerized from the IL monomer 1-vinyl-3-(10-hydroxydecyl) imidazolium chloride [VC10OHIM][Cl] and IL crosslinker 1,12-di(3-vinylbenzylimidazolium) dodecane dichloride [(VBIM)2C12] 2[Cl] exhibited superior extraction performance compared to the other studied PILs. The extraction efficiency of pharmaceutical drugs and phenolics increased when the film thickness of the PIL-based sorbent coating was increased while many insecticides were largely unaffected. Satisfactory analytical performance was obtained with limits of detection (LODs) ranging from 0.2 to 2 μg L(-1) for the target analytes. The accuracy of the analytical method was examined by studying the relative recovery of analytes in real water samples, including tap water and lake water, with recoveries varying from 50.2% to 115.9% and from 48.8% to 116.6%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of 137Cs sorbents for fixation in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    As part of the long-term waste management program at the Savannah River Laboratory, several 137 Cs sorbents were evaluated for incorporation into concrete. The sorbents studied were: Linde AW-300, AW-500, 13-X, and SK-40; Norton Zeolon 200, 500, and 900; clinoptilolite; and vermiculite. The parameters studied were sorption kinetics, leachability, and compressive strength of the concrete. The best sorbents identified were Linde AW-500 and Norton Zeolon 900. In all tests, these two sorbents performed almost identically; sorption kinetics were acceptable; both strengthened the concrete, and both gave relatively leach-resistant concrete. Vermiculite that had been heated to collapse its lattice around 137 Cs gave the most leach-resistant concrete. However, it sorbed cesium slowly, and the resulting concrete was very weak. When silica gel was added to concrete to react with free calcium, the addition had no effect on cesium leachability

  12. Novel Sorbent to Clean Up Biogas for CHPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gökhan O. [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Jayataman, Ambalavanan [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Schaefer, Matthew [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Ware, Michael [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Hunt, Jennifer [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States); Dobek, Frank [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    2015-05-30

    In this project, TDA Research Inc. (TDA) has developed low-cost (on a per unit volume of gas processed basis), high-capacity expendable sorbents that can remove both the H2S and organic sulfur species in biogas to the ppb levels. The proposed sorbents will operate downstream of a bulk desulfurization system as a polishing bed to provide an essentially sulfur-free gas to a fuel cell (or any other application that needs a completely sulfur-free feed). Our sorbents use a highly dispersed mixed metal oxides active phase with desired modifiers prepared over on a mesoporous support. The support structure allows the large organic sulfur compounds (such as the diethyl sulfide and dipropyl sulfide phases with a large kinetic diameter) to enter the sorbent pores so that they can be adsorbed and removed from the gas stream.

  13. Dual layer hollow fiber sorbents: Concept, fabrication and characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Bhandari, Dhaval; Olanrewaju, Kayode O.; Bessho, Naoki; Breedveld, Victor; Koros, William J.

    2013-01-01

    and to ensure consistent sorption capacity over repeated cycles, a dense, thin polymer barrier layer on the fiber sorbents is needed to allow only thermal interactions between the sorbate loaded layer and the thermal regeneration fluid. This paper considers

  14. Oil sorbents from plastic wastes and polymers: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Junaid; Adil Riaz, Muhammad; Gordon, McKay

    2018-01-05

    A large volume of the waste produced across the world is composed of polymers from plastic wastes such as polyethylene (HDPE or LDPE), polypropylene (PP), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) amongst others. For years, environmentalists have been looking for various ways to overcome the problems of such large quantities of plastic wastes being disposed of into landfill sites. On the other hand, the usage of synthetic polymers as oil sorbents in particular, polyolefins, including polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) have been reported. In recent years, the idea of using plastic wastes as the feed for the production of oil sorbents has gained momentum. However, the studies undertaking such feasibility are rather scattered. This review paper is the first of its kind reporting, compiling and reviewing these various processes. The production of an oil sorbent from plastic wastes is being seen to be satisfactorily achievable through a variety of methods Nevertheless, much work needs to be done regarding further investigation of the numerous parameters influencing production yields and sorbent qualities. For example, differences in results are seen due to varying operating conditions, experimental setups, and virgin or waste plastics being used as feeds. The field of producing oil sorbents from plastic wastes is still very open for further research, and seems to be a promising route for both waste reduction, and the synthesis of value-added products such as oil sorbents. In this review, the research related to the production of various oil sorbents based on plastics (plastic waste and virgin polymer) has been discussed. Further oil sorbent efficiency in terms of oil sorption capacity has been described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effectiveness of liquid radioactive waste purification by inorganic granulated sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarevskij, V.M.; Stepanets, O.V.; Sharygin, L.M.; Matveev, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Study results on purification of simulative and real liquid radioactive wastes from fission products radionuclides and by inorganic corrosion-nature sorbents 'Thermoxide' are presented. Properties by sorption of cesium, strontium and cobalt are studied; results of experiments on purification of weakly-salted water solutions (waste waters, ships drainage tanks, showers and laundries) of the Beloyarsk NPP are presented. Sorbents source characteristics are determined. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Quaternary ammonium-functionalized silica sorbents for the solid-phase extraction of aromatic amines under normal phase conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Lorena; Robin, Orlane; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2013-04-12

    Quaternary ammonium-functionalized silica materials were synthesized and applied for solid-phase extraction (SPE) of aromatic amines, which are classified as priority pollutants by US Environmental Protection Agency. Hexamethylenetetramine used for silica surface modification for the first time was employed as SPE sorbent under normal phase conditions. Hexaminium-functionalized silica demonstrated excellent extraction efficiencies for o-toluidine, 4-ethylaniline and quinoline (recoveries 101-107%), while for N,N-dimethylaniline and N-isopropylaniline recoveries were from low to moderate (14-46%). In addition, the suitability of 1-alkyl-3-(propyl-3-sulfonate) imidazolium-functionalized silica as SPE sorbent was tested under normal phase conditions. The recoveries achieved for the five aromatic amines ranged from 89 to 99%. The stability of the sorbent was evaluated during and after 150 extractions. Coefficients of variation between 4.5 and 10.2% proved a high stability of the synthesized sorbent. Elution was carried out using acetonitrile in the case of hexaminium-functionalized silica and water for 1-alkyl-3-(propyl-3-sulfonate) imidazolium-functionalized silica sorbent. After the extraction the analytes were separated and detected by liquid chromatography ultraviolet detection (LC-UV). The retention mechanism of the materials was primarily based on polar hydrogen bonding and π-π interactions. Comparison made with activated silica proved the quaternary ammonium-functionalized materials to offer different selectivity and better extraction efficiencies for aromatic amines. Finally, 1-alkyl-3-(propyl-3-sulfonate) imidazolium-functionalized silica sorbent was successfully tested for the extraction of wastewater and soil samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Co-Adsorption of Ammonia and Formaldehyde on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Wilburn, Monique S.

    2016-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of a reversible carbon sorbent for trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is deemed non-regenerable, while the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. Data on concurrent sorption and desorption of ammonia and formaldehyde, which are major TCs of concern, are presented in this paper. A carbon sorbent was fabricated by dry impregnation of a reticulated carbon-foam support with polyvinylidene chloride, followed by carbonization and thermal oxidation in air. Sorbent performance was tested for ammonia and formaldehyde sorption and vacuum regeneration, with and without water present in the gas stream. It was found that humidity in the gas phase enhanced ammonia-sorption capacity by a factor larger than two. Co-adsorption of ammonia and formaldehyde in the presence of water resulted in strong formaldehyde sorption (to the point that it was difficult to saturate the sorbent on the time scales used in this study). In the absence of humidity, adsorption of formaldehyde on the carbon surface was found to impair ammonia sorption in subsequent runs; in the presence of water, however, both ammonia and formaldehyde could be efficiently removed from the gas phase by the sorbent. The efficiency of vacuum regeneration could be enhanced by gentle heating to temperatures below 60 deg.

  18. Evaluating the impact of land use changes on the behaviour of shallow aquifers, by quantifying the groundwater mean residence times distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Aude; Gillon, Marina; Marc, Vincent; Cognard-Plancq, Anne-Laure; Baillieux, Antoine; Babic, Milanka; Simler, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Residence time is one of the key factors of the groundwater resource management. The Crau aquifer (Mediterranean area, south of France) is a major resource for drinking water supply, threatened by climate change, changes in irrigation patterns, and urban expansion. Water residence time in the aquifer is expected to be highly dependent on these changes. We propose to determinate it using an isotopic approach, associated to numerical modelling. The Crau aquifer is a palaeo-alluvial fan of the Durance river, made of alluviums lying on a Miocene substratum, and recharged by rainwater and gravity irrigation water, diverted from the Durance river. The irrigation water being more depleted in 18O than the rain water, the contribution of irrigation to the aquifer recharge can be quantified (up to 80 to 85% of the total recharge), but is variable in space and time. The modelling approach uses two models, a lumped one and a discretised one. They are based on daily recharge data (rainfall, drainage rates under irrigated crops calculated from the STICS crop model, Olioso et al., 2013), and on monthly water sampling conducted from February 2012 to November 2016 for δ18O content in rainwater, surface water and groundwater. The lumped approach was carried out at a monthly time step, using a binary mixing model, including two exponentially draining reservoirs in parallel. It leads to a satisfying simulation of the δ18O variations in the monitored wells, and gives mean residence times between 3 and 20 months depending on the wells locations. The discretised model is a combination of MODFLOW and MODPATH, through the free user interface MODELMUSE, on a daily time-step. The permeability map used is the one calibrated by Baillieux et al. (2015). Recharge is applied with an increasing spatial complexity, in three successive steps: - a homogeneous recharge, provided by the intermediate output of the lumped model, in order to compare the two models results; - a recharge discretised in

  19. Residence time as a key for comprehensive assessment of the relationship between changing land use and nitrates in regional groundwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yingjie; Tang, Changyuan; Song, Xianfang; Liu, Changming; Zhang, Yinghua

    2013-04-01

    In this study, an approach is put forward to study the relationship between changing land use and groundwater nitrate contamination in the Sanjiang Plain. This approach emphasizes the importance of groundwater residence time when relating the nitrates to the changing land use. The principles underlying the approach involve the assessment of groundwater residence time by CFCs and the Vogel age model and the reconstruction of the land use at the groundwater recharge time by interpolation. Nitrate trend analysis shows that nitrates have begun to leach into the aquifers since agricultural activities boomed after the 1950s. Hydrochemical analysis implies that the possible process relating to the nitrate reduction in the groundwater is the oxidation of Fe(ii)-silicates. However, the chemical kinetics of the oxidation of Fe(ii)-silicates is slow, so this denitrification process contributes little to the nitrate variations. Stepwise regression shows that the nitrate concentrations of samples had no direct relationship with the land use at the groundwater sampling time, but had a relatively strong relationship with the land use at the groundwater recharge time. Dry land is recognized as the dominant factor contributing to the elevated concentration of nitrates. The nitrogen isotope for nitrate (δ(15)N-NO3) gives a more direct result of the identification of nitrate sources: the use of manure in agricultural activities. Principle component (PC) regression shows that the process of the dry land exploitation is the major process that controls the nitrate contamination in the Sanjiang Plain.

  20. Application of Chemically Modified and Unmodified Waste Biological Sorbents in Treatment of Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kanayochukwu Nduka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein wastes (feathers, goat hair and cellulosic wastes (corn cob, coconut husks were collected and washed with detergent solution, thoroughly rinsed and sun dried for 2 days before drying in an oven, and then ground. One-half of ground material was carbonized at a maximum temperature of 500°C after mixing with H2SO4. The carbonized parts were pulverized; both carbonized and uncarbonized sorbents were sieved into two particle sizes of 325 and 625 μm using mechanical sieve. Sorbents of a given particle size were packed into glass column.Then, textile wastewater that had its physicochemical parameters previously determined was eluted into each glass column and a contact time of 60 and 120 mins was allowed before analysis. Results showed 48.15–99.98 percentage reduction of NO3−, EC, Cl−, BOD, COD, DO, TSS, and TDS, 34.67–99.93 percentage reduction of NO3−, EC, Cl−, BOD, COD, DO, TSS, and TDS, 52.83–97.95 percentage reduction of Pb2+, Ni2+, Cr3+ and Mn2+ and 34.59–94.87 percentage reduction of Pb2+, Ni2+, Cr3+ and Mn2+. Carbonization, small particle, size and longer contact time enhanced the sorption capabilities of the sorbents. These show that protein and cellulosic wastes can be used to detoxify wastewater.

  1. Engineered sorbent barriers for low-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, S.J.; Freeman, H.D.; Buelt, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Engineered Sorbent Barriers Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing sorbent materials to prevent the migration of radionuclides from low-level waste sites. These materials would allow water to pass, preventing the bathtub effect at humid sites. Screening studies identified promising sorbent materials for three key radionuclides: for cesium, greensand; for cobalt, activated charcoal; and for strontium, synthetic zeolite of clinoptilolite. Mixtures of these sorbent materials were tested in 0.6-m-diameter columns using radioactive leachates. To simulate expected worst-case conditions, the leachate solution contained the radionuclides, competing cations, and a chelating agent, adjusted to a pH of 5. A sorbent barrier comprised of greensand (1 wt%), activated charcoal (6 wt%), synthetic zeolite (20 wt%), and soil (73 wt%) achieved the decontamination factors necessary to meet the regulatory performance requirements established for this study. Sorbent barriers can be applied to shallow land burial, as backfill around the waste or engineered structures, or as backup to other liner systems. 2 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  2. Engineered sorbent barriers for low-level waste disposal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, H.D.; Mitchell, S.J.; Buelt, J.L.

    1986-12-01

    The Engineered Sorbent Barriers Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating sorbent materials to prevent the migration of soluble radio nuclides from low-level waste sites. These materials would allow water to pass, preventing the bathtub effect at humid sites. Laboratory studies identifield promising sorbent materials for three key radionuclides: for cesium, greensand; for cobalt, activated charcoal; and for strontium, synthetic zeolite or clinoptilolite. Mixtures of these sorbent materials were tested in 0.6-m-diameter columns using radioactive leachates. To simulate expected worst-case conditions, the leachate solution contained the radionuclides, competing cations, and a chelating agent and was adjusted to a pH of 5. A sorbent barrier comprised of greensand (1 wt%), activated charcoal (6 wt%), synthetic zeolite (20 wt%), and local soil (73 wt%) achieved the decontamination factors necessary to meet the regulatory performance requirements established for this study. Sorbent barriers can be applied to shallow-land burial, as backfill around the waste or engineered structures, or as backup to other liner systems. 7 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Engineered sorbent barriers for low-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, H.D.; Mitchell, S.J.; Buelt, J.L.

    1986-12-01

    The Engineered Sorbent Barriers Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating sorbent materials to prevent the migration of soluble radio nuclides from low-level waste sites. These materials would allow water to pass, preventing the bathtub effect at humid sites. Laboratory studies identifield promising sorbent materials for three key radionuclides: for cesium, greensand; for cobalt, activated charcoal; and for strontium, synthetic zeolite or clinoptilolite. Mixtures of these sorbent materials were tested in 0.6-m-diameter columns using radioactive leachates. To simulate expected worst-case conditions, the leachate solution contained the radionuclides, competing cations, and a chelating agent and was adjusted to a pH of 5. A sorbent barrier comprised of greensand (1 wt%), activated charcoal (6 wt%), synthetic zeolite (20 wt%), and local soil (73 wt%) achieved the decontamination factors necessary to meet the regulatory performance requirements established for this study. Sorbent barriers can be applied to shallow-land burial, as backfill around the waste or engineered structures, or as backup to other liner systems. 7 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs

  4. New Sorbents for Removing Arsenic From Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConchie, D. M.; Genc-Fuhrman, H.; Clark, M. W.; Caldicott, W.; Davies-McConchie, F. G.

    2004-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic in the drinking water used in many countries, including some of the poorest developing countries, and recognition that consuming this water can have serious consequences for human health, have led to increased investigations of ways to obtain safe water supplies. Finding new groundwater resources is a possible solution but this is a costly strategy that has no guarantee of success, particularly in areas where water is already a scarce commodity. The alternative is to treat water that is already available, but existing technologies are usually too expensive, too difficult to operate and maintain, or not completely effective when used in less developed countries or remote areas. There is therefore, an urgent need to find a simple and effective but inexpensive sorbent for arsenic that can be used to treat large volumes of water under less than ideal conditions. In this paper we present the results of field and laboratory trials that used a new, highly cost-effective, sorbent to remove arsenic from contaminated water. BauxsolT is the name given to the cocktail of minerals prepared by treating caustic bauxite refinery residues with Mg and Ca to produce a substance with a reaction pH of about 8.5, a high acid neutralizing capacity and an excellent ability to trap trace metals, metalloids and some other ionic species. The trapped ions are tightly bound by processes that include; precipitation of low solubility neoformational minerals, isomorphous substitution, solid-state diffusion, and adsorption; it is also an excellent flocculant. Although ordinary BauxsolT has an excellent ability to bind arsenate, and to a lesser extent arsenite, this ability can be further increased for particular water types by using activated BauxsolT or BauxsolT combined with small amounts of other reagents. Field trials conducted at the Gilt Edge Mine, South Dakota, showed that the addition of BauxsolT to highly sulfidic waste rock reduced the arsenic

  5. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  6. Post-irradiation examinations on the KNK II/1 fuel element NY-203 with 400 equivalent full-power days residence time and 10 % burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzer, G.; Geier, F.

    1984-09-01

    The fuel assembly NY-203 has been irradiated in the first core of KNK II up to a burnup of about 10 % and a residence time of 400 equivalent full-power days. The assembly contained 211 fuel pins with 6.0 mm outer diameter and fuel pellets with the composition (U 0 .7Pu 0 .3)O 2 .00. The cladding material was the austenitic steel 1.4988 lg. Some selected pins were examined in the hot cells of the KfK Karlsruhe. The post-irradiation examinations did not reveal any critical design aspects [de

  7. Evaluation of quantitative imaging methods for organ activity and residence time estimation using a population of phantoms having realistic variations in anatomy and uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Bin; Du Yong; Segars, W. Paul; Wahl, Richard L.; Sgouros, George; Jacene, Heather; Frey, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Estimating organ residence times is an essential part of patient-specific dosimetry for radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Quantitative imaging methods for RIT are often evaluated using a single physical or simulated phantom but are intended to be applied clinically where there is variability in patient anatomy, biodistribution, and biokinetics. To provide a more relevant evaluation, the authors have thus developed a population of phantoms with realistic variations in these factors and applied it to the evaluation of quantitative imaging methods both to find the best method and to demonstrate the effects of these variations. Using whole body scans and SPECT/CT images, organ shapes and time-activity curves of 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan were measured in dosimetrically important organs in seven patients undergoing a high dose therapy regimen. Based on these measurements, we created a 3D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT)-based phantom population. SPECT and planar data at realistic count levels were then simulated using previously validated Monte Carlo simulation tools. The projections from the population were used to evaluate the accuracy and variation in accuracy of residence time estimation methods that used a time series of SPECT and planar scans. Quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) reconstruction methods were used that compensated for attenuation, scatter, and the collimator-detector response. Planar images were processed with a conventional (CPlanar) method that used geometric mean attenuation and triple-energy window scatter compensation and a quantitative planar (QPlanar) processing method that used model-based compensation for image degrading effects. Residence times were estimated from activity estimates made at each of five time points. The authors also evaluated hybrid methods that used CPlanar or QPlanar time-activity curves rescaled to the activity estimated from a single QSPECT image. The methods were evaluated in terms of mean relative error and standard deviation of the

  8. Sorption-enhanced steam reforming of ethanol: thermodynamic comparison of CO{sub 2} sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.J.; Santos, J.C.; Cunha, A.F.; Rodrigues, A.E. [University of Porto, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Associated Laboratory LSRE/LCM, Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Porto (Portugal); Diaz Alvarado, F.; Gracia, F. [Universidad de Chile, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Biotecnologia, Laboratorio de Catalisis, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-05-15

    A thermodynamic analysis is performed with a Gibbs free energy minimization method to compare the conventional steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) process and sorption-enhanced SRE (SE-SRE) with three different sorbents, namely, CaO, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, and hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc). As a result, the use of a CO{sub 2} adsorbent can enhance the hydrogen yield and provide a lower CO content in the product gas at the same time. The best performance of SE-SRE is found to be at 500 C with an HTlc sorbent. Nearly 6 moles hydrogen per mole ethanol can be produced, when the CO content in the vent stream is less than 10 ppm, so that the hydrogen produced via SE-SRE with HTlc sorbents can be directly used for fuel cells. Higher pressures do not favor the overall SE-SRE process due to lower yielding of hydrogen, although CO{sub 2} adsorption is enhanced. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Polymeric supported sorbents for decreasing hazardous metal ions content in wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zahhar, A.A.; El-Naggar, H.A.; Ahmed, M.

    2005-01-01

    Procedure for preparation of polymeric supported silica, and their usage for decreasing hazardous metal ion content in wet process phosphoric acid was developed. The procedure is based firstly on extraction silica from rice straw by alkaline treatment , secondly supporting the produced silica on binding polyacrylonitrile (PAN). The produced polymer based sorbent was used for decreasing hazardous metal ions (especially iron) present as inorganic impurities in crud Egyptian phosphoric acid (green acid). Different factors affecting the sorption equilibrium ( contact time, temperature , sorbent mass and batch factor ) were studied. Studying the sorption isotherm revealed that the adsorption data could favorably fit the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. In the dynamic study , the sorption capacity at (Cξ/Cο = 50%) was found to be 28.5 mg/g and the loaded column could be regenerated using 50ml of 0.15 M HNO 3 . The regenerated column could undergo sorption regeneration cycles up to four cycles without significant decrease in the sorption capacity , weight loss or change in the physical properties of the sorbent

  10. Real-Time Observation of Apathy in Long-Term Care Residents With Dementia: Reliability of the Person-Environment Apathy Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Ying-Ling; Mogle, Jacqueline; Williams, Kristine; McDermott, Caroline; Behrens, Liza

    2018-04-01

    Apathy is prevalent in individuals with dementia. Lack of responsiveness to environmental stimulation is a key characteristic of apathy. The Person-Environment Apathy Rating (PEAR) scale consists of environment and apathy subscales, which allow for examination of environmental impact on apathy. The interrater reliability of the PEAR scale was examined via real-time observation. The current study included 45 observations of 15 long-term care residents with dementia. Each participant was observed at three time points for 10 minutes each. Two raters observed the participant and surrounding environment and independently rated the participant's apathy and environmental stimulation using the PEAR scale. Weighted Kappa was 0.5 to 0.82 for the PEAR-Environment subscale and 0.5 to 0.8 for the PEAR-Apathy subscale. Overall, with the exception of three items with relatively weak reliability (0.50 to 0.56), the PEAR scale showed moderate to strong interrater reliability (0.63 to 0.82). The results support the use of the PEAR scale to measure environmental stimulation and apathy via real-time observation in long-term care residents with dementia. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(4), 23-28.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Tunable polymeric sorbent materials for fractionation of model naphthenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamed H; Wilson, Lee D; Headley, John V

    2013-04-04

    The sorption properties are reported for several examples of single-component carboxylic acids representing naphthenic acids (NAs) with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) based polyurethane sorbents. Seven single-component examples of NAs were chosen with variable z values, carbon number, and chemical structure as follows: 2-hexyldecanoic acid (z = 0 and C = 16; S1), n-caprylic acid (z = 0 and C = 8; S2), trans-4-pentylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid (z = -2 and C = 12; S3), 4-methylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid (z = -2 and C = 8; S4), dicyclohexylacetic acid (z = -4; C = 14; S5), 4-pentylbicyclo[2.2.2]octane-1-carboxylic acid (z = -4; C = 14; S6), and lithocholic acid (z = -6; C = 24; S7). The copolymer sorbents were synthesized at three relative β-CD:diisocyanate mole ratios (i.e., 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3) using 4,4'-dicyclohexylmethane diisocyanate (CDI) and 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI). The sorption properties of the copolymer sorbents were characterized using equilibrium sorption isotherms in aqueous solution at pH 9.00 with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The equilibrium fraction of the unbound carboxylate anions was monitored in the aqueous phase. The sorption properties of the copolymer sorbents (i.e., Qm) were obtained from the Sips isotherm model. The Qm values generally decrease as the number of accessible β-CD inclusion sites in the copolymer framework decreases. The chemical structure of the adsorbates played an important role in their relative uptake, as evidenced by the adsorbate lipophilic surface area (LSA) and the involvement of hydrophobic effects. The copolymers exhibit molecular selective sorption of the single-component carboxylates in mixtures which suggests their application as sorbents for fractionation of mixtures of NAs. By comparison, granular activated carbon (GAC) and chitosan sorbents did not exhibit any significant molecular selective sorption relative to the copolymer materials; however, evidence of variable sorption capacity was

  12. Evaluation of Solid Sorbents As A Retrofit Technology for CO{sub 2} Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutka, Holly; Sjostrom, Sharon

    2011-07-31

    limitations related to the CO{sub 2} uptake rate. Three additional supported amine materials, sorbents AX, F, and BN, were selected for evaluation using the 1 kW pilot at Sherco. Sorbent AX was operated in batch mode and performed similarly to sorbent R (i.e. could achieve up to 90% removal when given adequate regeneration time). Sorbent BN was not expected to be subject to the same mass diffusion limitations as experienced with sorbent R. When sorbent BN was used in continuous mode the steady state CO{sub 2} removal was approximately double that of sorbent R, which highlighted the importance of sorbents without kinetic limitations. Many different processes and equipment designs exist that may be applicable for postcombustion CO{sub 2} capture using solids in a temperature-swing system. A thorough technology survey was completed to identify the most promising options, which were grouped and evaluated based on the four main unit operations involved with sorbent based capture: Adsorption; Heating and cooling, or heat transfer; Conveying; Desorption. The review included collecting information from a wide variety of sources, including technology databases, published papers, advertisements, web searches, and vendor interviews. Working with power producers, scoring sheets were prepared and used to compare the different technology options. Although several technologies were interesting and promising, those that were selected for the final conceptual design were commercially available and performed multiple steps simultaneously. For the adsorption step, adsorption and conveying were both accomplished in a circulating fluidized bed. A rotary kiln was selected for desorption and cooling because it can simultaneously accomplish conveying and effective heat transfer. The final technology selection was used to complete preliminary costs assessments for a conceptual 500 MW CO{sub 2} capture process. The high level cost analysis was completed to determine the key cost drivers. The

  13. Development of Novel Sorbents for Uranium Extraction from Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wenbin [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-08

    As the uranium resource in terrestrial ores is limited, it is difficult to ensure a long-term sustainable nuclear energy technology. The oceans contain approximately 4.5 billion tons of uranium, which is one thousand times the amount of uranium in terrestrial ores. Development of technologies to recover the uranium from seawater would greatly improve the uranium resource availability, sustaining the fuel supply for nuclear energy. Several methods have been previously evaluated including solvent extraction, ion exchange, flotation, biomass collection, and adsorption; however, none have been found to be suitable for reasons such as cost effectiveness, long term stability, and selectivity. Recent research has focused on the amidoxime functional group as a promising candidate for uranium sorption. Polymer beads and fibers have been functionalized with amidoxime functional groups, and uranium adsorption capacities as high as 1.5 g U/kg adsorbent have recently been reported with these types of materials. As uranium concentration in seawater is only ~3 ppb, great improvements to uranium collection systems must be made in order to make uranium extraction from seawater economically feasible. This proposed research intends to develop transformative technologies for economic uranium extraction from seawater. The Lin group will design advanced porous supports by taking advantage of recent breakthroughs in nanoscience and nanotechnology and incorporate high densities of well-designed chelators into such nanoporous supports to allow selective and efficient binding of uranyl ions from seawater. Several classes of nanoporous materials, including mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs), meta-organic frameworks (MOFs), and covalent-organic frameworks (COFs), will be synthesized. Selective uranium-binding liagnds such as amidoxime will be incorporated into the nanoporous materials to afford a new generation of sorbent materials that will be

  14. Development of Novel Sorbents for Uranium Extraction from Seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenbin; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    As the uranium resource in terrestrial ores is limited, it is difficult to ensure a long-term sustainable nuclear energy technology. The oceans contain approximately 4.5 billion tons of uranium, which is one thousand times the amount of uranium in terrestrial ores. Development of technologies to recover the uranium from seawater would greatly improve the uranium resource availability, sustaining the fuel supply for nuclear energy. Several methods have been previously evaluated including solvent extraction, ion exchange, flotation, biomass collection, and adsorption; however, none have been found to be suitable for reasons such as cost effectiveness, long term stability, and selectivity. Recent research has focused on the amidoxime functional group as a promising candidate for uranium sorption. Polymer beads and fibers have been functionalized with amidoxime functional groups, and uranium adsorption capacities as high as 1.5 g U/kg adsorbent have recently been reported with these types of materials. As uranium concentration in seawater is only ~3 ppb, great improvements to uranium collection systems must be made in order to make uranium extraction from seawater economically feasible. This proposed research intends to develop transformative technologies for economic uranium extraction from seawater. The Lin group will design advanced porous supports by taking advantage of recent breakthroughs in nanoscience and nanotechnology and incorporate high densities of well-designed chelators into such nanoporous supports to allow selective and efficient binding of uranyl ions from seawater. Several classes of nanoporous materials, including mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs), meta-organic frameworks (MOFs), and covalent-organic frameworks (COFs), will be synthesized. Selective uranium-binding liagnds such as amidoxime will be incorporated into the nanoporous materials to afford a new generation of sorbent materials that will be

  15. Prolonged naproxen joint residence time after intra-articular injection of lipophilic solutions comprising a naproxen glycolamide ester prodrug in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thing, Mette; Lu, Yi; Agårdh, Li

    2013-01-01

    time. Two oils, medium-chain triglycerides and castor oil, differing with respect to viscosity were tested. After intra-articular administration of oil prodrug solutions, a significant increase in the time to maximum naproxen serum concentration from around 40 to 245min, an increase in the MRTj from......Intra-articular injection of oil solutions of lipophilic prodrugs that rapidly degrade to their parent compound in synovial fluid may constitute a feasible approach to increase the joint residence time of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In this in vivo study, oil solutions of the N......,N-diethyl glycolamide ester prodrug of naproxen (16mg/ml) were injected into the rat knee joint by dosing 6μl formulation per 100g body weight. The sustained release properties were compared to those of intra-articularly injected aqueous and oil solutions of naproxen by monitoring the naproxen serum concentrations over...

  16. Spatial and temporal variation of residence time and storage volume of subsurface water evaluated by multi-tracers approach in mountainous headwater catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Maki; Yano, Shinjiro; Abe, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Takehiro; Yoshizawa, Ayumi; Watanabe, Ysuhito; Ikeda, Koichi

    2015-04-01

    Headwater catchments in mountainous region are the most important recharge area for surface and subsurface waters, additionally time and stock information of the water is principal to understand hydrological processes in the catchments. However, there have been few researches to evaluate variation of residence time and storage volume of subsurface water in time and space at the mountainous headwaters especially with steep slope. We performed an investigation on age dating and estimation of storage volume using simple water budget model in subsurface water with tracing of hydrological flow processes in mountainous catchments underlain by granite, Paleozoic and Tertiary, Yamanashi and Tsukuba, central Japan. We conducted hydrometric measurements and sampling of spring, stream and ground waters in high-flow and low-flow seasons from 2008 through 2012 in the catchments, and CFCs, stable isotopic ratios of oxygen-18 and deuterium, inorganic solute constituent concentrations were determined on all water samples. Residence time of subsurface water ranged from 11 to 60 years in the granite catchments, from 17 to 32 years in the Paleozoic catchments, from 13 to 26 years in the Tertiary catchments, and showed a younger age during the high-flow season, whereas it showed an older age in the low-flow season. Storage volume of subsurface water was estimated to be ranging from 10 ^ 4 to 10 ^ 6 m3 in the granite catchments, from 10 ^ 5 to 10 ^ 7 m3 in the Paleozoic catchments, from 10 ^ 4 to 10 ^ 6 m3 in the Tertiary catchments. In addition, seasonal change of storage volume in the granite catchments was the highest as compared with those of the Paleozoic and the Tertiary catchments. The results suggest that dynamic change of hydrological process seems to cause a larger variation of the residence time and storage volume of subsurface water in time and space in the granite catchments, whereas higher groundwater recharge rate due to frequent fissures or cracks seems to cause larger

  17. Effects of Hydrologic Restoration on the Residence Times and Water Quality of a Coastal Wetland in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, E.; Price, R. M.; Melesse, A. M.; Whitman, D.

    2013-05-01

    The Everglades, located in southern Florida, is a dominantly freshwater coastal wetland ecosystem that has experienced many alterations and changes led by urbanization and water management practices with most cases resulting in decreased water flow across the system. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, passed in 2000, has the final goal of restoring natural flow and clean water to the Everglades while also balancing flood control and water supply needs of the south Florida population with approximately 60 projects to be constructed and completed in the following 30 years. One way to assess the success of restoration projects is to observe long-term hydrological and geochemical changes as the projects undergo completion. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of restoration on the water balance, flushing time, and water chemistry of Taylor Slough; one of the main natural waterways located within the coastal Everglades. A water balance equation was used to solve for groundwater-surface water exchange. The major parameters for the water balance equation (precipitation, evapotranspiration (ET), surface water storage, inflow and outflow) were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey and Everglades National Park databases via the Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN). Watershed flushing times were estimated as the surface water volume divided by the total outputs from the watershed. Both the water balance equation and water flushing time were calculated on a monthly time step from 2001 - 2011. Water chemistry of major ions and Total Nitrogen (TN) and Total Phosphorus (TP) was analyzed on water samples, 3-day composites collected every 18 hours from 2008 - 2012, and correlated with water flushing times. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen of water samples were obtained to support the dominant inputs of water into Taylor Slough as identified by the water budget equation. Results for flushing times varied between 3 and 78 days, with

  18. Method of making ionic liquid mediated sol-gel sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Abdul; Shearrow, Anne M.

    2017-01-31

    Ionic liquid (IL)-mediated sol-gel hybrid organic-inorganic materials present enormous potential for effective use in analytical microextraction. One obstacle to materializing this prospect arises from high viscosity of ILs significantly slowing down sol-gel reactions. A method was developed which provides phosphonium-based, pyridinium-based, and imidazolium-based IL-mediated advanced sol-gel organic-inorganic hybrid materials for capillary microextraction. Scanning electron microscopy results demonstrate that ILs can serve as porogenic agents in sol-gel reactions. IL-mediated sol-gel coatings prepared with silanol-terminated polymers provided up to 28 times higher extractions compared to analogous sol-gel coatings prepared without any IL in the sol solution. This study shows that IL-generated porous morphology alone is not enough to provide effective extraction media: careful choice of the organic polymer and the precursor with close sol-gel reactivity must be made to ensure effective chemical bonding of the organic polymer to the created sol-gel material to be able to provide the desired sorbent characteristics.

  19. Post combustion carbon capture - solid sorbents and membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, R.M. [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    This report follows on from that on solvent scrubbing for post-combustion carbon capture from coal-fired power plants by considering the use of solid sorbents and membranes instead of solvents. First, mesoporous and microporous adsorbents are discussed: carbon-based adsorbents, zeolites, hydrotalcites and porous crystals. Attempts have been made to improve the performance of the porous adsorbent by functionalising them with nitrogen groups and specifically, amine groups to react with CO{sub 2} and thus enhance the physical adsorption properties. Dry, regenerable solid sorbents have attracted a good deal of research. Most of the work has been on the carbonation/calcination cycle of natural limestone but there have also been studies of other calcium-based sorbents and alkali metal-based sorbents. Membranes have also been studied as potential post-combustion capture devices. Finally, techno-economic studies predicting the economic performance of solid sorbents and membranes are discussed. The report is available from IEA Clean Coal Centre as report no. CCC/144. See Coal Abstracts entry April 2009 00406. 340 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Oil spill sorbents: Testing protocol and certification listing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, D.; Gausemel, I.

    1993-01-01

    Environment Canada's Emergencies Engineering Division is spearheading a program in conjunction with the Canadian General Standards Board that would see the development of a certification and listing program in addition to a national standard for the testing of sorbent materials. Funding for this program is provided by Environment Canada (EC), Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC), US Coast Guard (USCG), and US Minerals Management Service (MMS). The test methods are based upon those defined by the American Society for Testing and Materials and previous test methods developed by Environment Canada for our series of reports entitled Selection Criteria and Laboratory Evaluation of Oil Spill Sorbents. This series, which was started in 1975, encompasses a number of commercially available oil spill sorbents tested with different petroleum products and hydrocarbon solvents. The testing program will categorize the sorbents according to their operating characteristics. The main categories are oil spills on water, oil spills on land, and industrial use. The characteristics to be evaluated with the new test protocols include initial and maximum sorption capacities, water pickup, buoyancy, reuse potential, retention profile, disintegration (material integrity), and ease of application and retrieval. In the near future are plans to incorporate changes to the test that would involve increasing the list of test liquids to encompass spills in an industrial setting, in addition to testing sorbent booms and addressing the disposal problem

  1. Engineered sorbent barriers for low-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, S.J.; Freeman, H.D.; Buelt, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing sorbent materials to prevent the migration of radionuclides from low-level waste sites. These materials would allow water to pass, preventing the bathtub effect at humid sites. Screening studies identified promising sorbent materials for three key radionuclides: for cesium, greensand; for cobalt, activated charcoal; and for strontium, synthetic zeolite or clinoptilolite. Mixtures of these sorbent materials were tested in 0.6-m-diameter columns using radioactive leachates. To simulate expected worst-case conditions, the leachate solution contained the radionuclides, competing cations, and a chelating agent, adjusted to a pH of 5. A sorbent barrier comprised of greensand (1 wt %), activated charcoal (6 wt %), synthetic zeolite (20 wt %), and soil (73 wt %) achieved the decontamination factors necessary to meet the regulatory performance requirements established for this study. Sorbent barriers can be applied to shallow land burial, as backfill around the waste or engineered structures, or as backup to other liner systems. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Ecologically pure sorbents for power system of Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, I. S.; Moryganova, Y. A.; Maung, Ko Ko; Arefeva, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, one of the most important problems of the thermal power plant, and many industrial enterprises in different countries is a wastewater treatment for oil products. When choosing the good sorbents is necessary to consider not only the properties and efficiency of the recommended materials, but also the cost, the possibility of environmentally friendly disposal of used sorbents and the possibility of using secondary resources. The purpose of this paper is to study the possibility of using agricultural waste in Myanmar as the sorbents in wastewater treatment containing oil products. The results of experiments have confirmed that rice hulls, and coconut fiber can be effectively used as the sorbents in wastewater treatment containing oil products at concentrations up to 10 mg/l. According to comparative analysis with the conventional sorbent-activated birch carbon (BAC-A) in the Russian power industry has shown that coconut fiber has very good sorption capacity and it is available to use as the raw materials for industries, which does not require to regenerate after using it and can be directly recycled in the factory.

  3. Dual layer hollow fiber sorbents: Concept, fabrication and characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Bhandari, Dhaval

    2013-02-01

    Hollow fiber sorbents are pseudo-monolithic separations materials created with fiber spinning technology using a polymer \\'binder\\', impregnated with high loadings of sorbent \\'fillers\\' [1]. To increase purified gas recovery during the sorption step and to ensure consistent sorption capacity over repeated cycles, a dense, thin polymer barrier layer on the fiber sorbents is needed to allow only thermal interactions between the sorbate loaded layer and the thermal regeneration fluid. This paper considers materials and methods to create delamination-free dual layer fiber sorbents, with a porous core and a barrier sheath layer formed using a simultaneous co-extrusion process. Low permeability polymers were screened for sheath layer creation, with the core layer comprising cellulose acetate polymer as binder and zeolite NaY as sorbent fillers. Appropriate core and sheath layer dope compositions were determined by the cloud-point method and rheology measurements. The morphology of the as-spun fibers was characterized in detail by SEM, EDX and gas permeation analysis. A simplified qualitative model is described to explain the observed fiber morphology. The effects of core, sheath spin dope and bore fluid compositions, spinning process parameters such as air-gap height, spin dope and coagulation bath temperatures, and elongation draw ratio are examined in detail. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sorbent application on the base of chitosan for radionuclides separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivarciova, L.

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive waste contains enormous amounts of radionuclides, which pollute the environment and can cause serious chemical and radiological toxicity threats to lower and higher living organism. Alternative process for the removal of heavy metal ions and radionuclides is sorption, which utilizes various certain natural materials of biological origin. Amino-polysaccharide-based sorbents e.g. chitosan represent suitable materials for binding of metal oxo-anion species because of numerous functional groups -OH and -NH_2 because of their suitable H-bond donor and acceptor sites. The sorbents on the base chitosan prepared through chemical modification were used for removal and separation certain radionuclides from aqueous media. The aim of this work was the study of physicochemical properties of prepared sorbents. The specific surface of sorbents was characterized with BET methods. Point of zero charge was identified with potentiometric titration. The size of particles and shape of sorbents were determined by scanning electron microscope. The sorption experiments for selected radionuclides were conducted under static and dynamic conditions. The effect of various parameters on the sorption "9"9"mTc, "6"0Co and the effect of pH on the separation of radionuclide mixture in the solution were studied. (author)

  5. High-speed mapping of water isotopes and residence time in Cache Slough Complex, San Francisco Bay Delta, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Real-time, high frequency (1-second sample interval) GPS location, water quality, and water isotope (δ2H, δ18O) data was collected in the Cache Slough Complex (CSC),...

  6. The ADESORB Process for Economical Production of Sorbents for Mercury Removal from Coal Fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin Stewart

    2008-03-12

    The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) currently manages the largest research program in the country for controlling coal-based mercury emissions. NETL has shown through various field test programs that the determination of cost-effective mercury control strategies is complex and highly coal- and plant-specific. However, one particular technology has the potential for widespread application: the injection of activated carbon upstream of either an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or a fabric filter baghouse. This technology has potential application to the control of mercury emissions on all coal-fired power plants, even those with wet and dry scrubbers. This is a low capital cost technology in which the largest cost element is the cost of sorbents. Therefore, the obvious solutions for reducing the costs of mercury control must focus on either reducing the amount of sorbent needed or decreasing the cost of sorbent production. NETL has researched the economics and performance of novel sorbents and determined that there are alternatives to the commercial standard (NORIT DARCO{reg_sign} Hg) and that this is an area where significant technical improvements can still be made. In addition, a key barrier to the application of sorbent injection technology to the power industry is the availability of activated carbon production. Currently, about 450 million pounds ($250 million per year) of activated carbon is produced and used in the U.S. each year - primarily for purification of drinking water, food, and beverages. If activated carbon technology were to be applied to all 1,100 power plants, EPA and DOE estimate that it would require an additional $1-$2 billion per year, which would require increasing current capacity by a factor of two to eight. A new facility to produce activated carbon would cost approximately $250 million, would increase current U.S. production by nearly 25%, and could take four to five years to build. This means that there could be

  7. Impact of Residency Training Redesign on Residents' Clinical Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Elaine; Eiff, M Patrice; Dexter, Eve; Rinaldo, Jason C B; Marino, Miguel; Garvin, Roger; Douglass, Alan B; Phillips, Robert; Green, Larry A; Carney, Patricia A

    2017-10-01

    The In-training Examination (ITE) is a frequently used method to evaluate family medicine residents' clinical knowledge. We compared family medicine ITE scores among residents who trained in the 14 programs that participated in the Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4) Project to national averages over time, and according to educational innovations. The ITE scores of 802 consenting P4 residents who trained in 2007 through 2011 were obtained from the American Board of Family Medicine. The primary analysis involved comparing scores within each academic year (2007 through 2011), according to program year (PGY) for P4 residents to all residents nationally. A secondary analysis compared ITE scores among residents in programs that experimented with length of training and compared scores among residents in programs that offered individualized education options with those that did not. Release of ITE scores was consented to by 95.5% of residents for this study. Scores of P4 residents were higher compared to national scores in each year. For example, in 2011, the mean P4 score for PGY1 was 401.2, compared to the national average of 386. For PGY2, the mean P4 score was 443.1, compared to the national average of 427, and for PGY3, the mean P4 score was 477.0, compared to the national PGY3 score of 456. Scores of residents in programs that experimented with length of training were similar to those in programs that did not. Scores were also similar between residents in programs with and without individualized education options. Family medicine residency programs undergoing substantial educational changes, including experiments in length of training and individualized education, did not appear to experience a negative effect on resident's clinical knowledge, as measured by ITE scores. Further research is needed to study the effect of a wide range of residency training innovations on ITE scores over time.

  8. Itaconic acid based potential sorbent for uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyan, Y.; Naidu, G.R.K.; Das, Sadananda; Pandey, A.K.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-linked hydrogels and adsorptive membranes containing Itaconic acid, Acrylamide, Penta erythritol tetra acrylate and α, α-dimethyl- α-phenyl aceto phenone were prepared by UV-initiated bulk polymerization. These hydrogels and adsorptive membranes were characterized for pH uptake, sorption and desorption kinetics and selectivity towards uranium. The sorption ability of the sorbents towards uranyl ion was thoroughly examined. The developed itaconic acid based sorbents were evaluated for the recovery of uranium from lean sources like sea water. (author)

  9. Effect of rice husk ash addition on CO2 capture behavior of calcium-based sorbent during calcium looping cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yingjie; Zhao, Changsui; Ren, Qiangqiang; Duan, Lunbo; Chen, Huichao; Chen, Xiaoping

    2009-01-01

    Rice husk ash/CaO was proposed as a CO 2 sorbent which was prepared by rice husk ash and CaO hydration together. The CO 2 capture behavior of rice husk ash/CaO sorbent was investigated in a twin fixed bed reactor system, and its apparent morphology, pore structure characteristics and phase variation during cyclic carbonation/calcination reactions were examined by SEM-EDX, N 2 adsorption and XRD, respectively. The optimum preparation conditions for rice husk ash/CaO sorbent are hydration temperature of 75 C, hydration time of 8 h, and mole ratio of SiO 2 in rice husk ash to CaO of 1.0. The cyclic carbonation performances of rice husk ash/CaO at these preparation conditions were compared with those of hydrated CaO and original CaO. The temperature at 660 C-710 C is beneficial to CO 2 absorption of rice husk ash/CaO, and it exhibits higher carbonation conversions than hydrated CaO and original CaO during multiple cycles at the same reaction conditions. Rice husk ash/CaO possesses better anti-sintering behavior than the other sorbents. Rice husk ash exhibits better effect on improving cyclic carbonation conversion of CaO than pure SiO 2 and diatomite. Rice husk ash/CaO maintains higher surface area and more abundant pores after calcination during the multiple cycles; however, the other sorbents show a sharp decay at the same reaction conditions. Ca 2 SiO 4 found by XRD detection after calcination of rice husk ash/CaO is possibly a key factor in determining the cyclic CO 2 capture behavior of rice husk ash/CaO. (author)

  10. How registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and resident aides spend time in nursing homes: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Rose; Donovan, Cindy; Stewart, Connie; Donovan, Alicia

    2015-09-01

    Calls for improved conditions in nursing homes have pointed to the importance of optimizing the levels and skills of care providers. Understanding the work of care providers will help to determine if staff are being used to their full potential and if opportunities exist for improved efficiencies. To explore the activities of care providers in different nursing homes and to identify if variations exist within and across homes and shifts. A multi-centre cross-sectional observational work flow study was conducted in seven different nursing homes sites in one Canadian province. Data were collected by a research assistant who conducted 368 h of observation. The research assistant collected data by following an identical route in each site and recording observations on staff activities. Findings indicate staff activities vary across roles, sites and shifts. Licensed practical nurses (nursing assistants) have the greatest variation in their role while registered nurses have the least amount of variability. In some sites both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses perform activities that may be safely delegated to others. Care providers spend as much as 53.7% of their time engaged in non-value added activities. There may be opportunities for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to delegate some of their activities to non-regulated workers. The time care providers spend in non-value activities suggest there may be opportunities to improve efficiencies within the nursing home setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Axial dispersion, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column by radiotracer residence time distribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Ghiyas Ud; Chughtai, Imran Rafiq; Inayat, Mansoor Hameed; Khan, Iqbal Hussain

    2008-12-01

    Axial dispersion, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase have been investigated for a range of dispersed and continuous phase superficial velocities in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD) analysis. Axial dispersion model (ADM) was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the system. It has been observed that increase in dispersed phase superficial velocity results in a decrease in its axial dispersion and increase in its slip velocity while its holdup increases till a maximum asymptotic value is achieved. An increase in superficial velocity of continuous phase increases the axial dispersion and holdup of dispersed phase until a maximum value is obtained, while slip velocity of dispersed phase is found to decrease in the beginning and then it increases with increase in superficial velocity of continuous phase.

  12. Comparative X-ray studies on the behaviour of amalgam and gold fillings at the margins in the approximal space as a function of time of residence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, R.

    1982-01-01

    Within the framework of this thesis, X-ray pictures have been made of 430 gold or amalgam fillings in order to measure the gap between approximal cavity margin and filling margin. With amalgam fillings, the gap width measured after a residence time of half a year was 9.3 μm and widened to 136.9 μm after 8 years, which represents an increase to the 14-fold. The gap widths measured with gold inlays only doubled within this period, increasing from 38.8 μm after half a year to 77.4 μm after 8 years. The number of retention spots found in the approximal-cervical space with amalgam fillings was at least twice that found for gold fillings. From this it is concluded that gold inlays are by far the better solution for dental restorations. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Investigating the Role of Hydrologic Residence Time in Nitrogen Transformations at the Sediment-Water Interface using Controlled Variable Head Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, T. B.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Briggs, M. A.; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2017-12-01

    Many important biogeochemical processes governing both carbon and nitrogen dynamics in streams take place at the sediment-water interface (SWI). This interface is highly variable in biogeochemical function, with stream stage often influencing the magnitude and direction of water and solute exchange through the SWI. It is well known that the SWI can be an important location for carbon and nitrogen transformations, including denitrification and greenhouse gas production. The degree of mixing of carbon and nitrate, along with oxygen from surface waters, is strongly influenced by hydrologic exchange at the SWI. We hypothesize that hydrologic residence time, which is also determined by the magnitude of exchange, is a key control on the fate of nitrate at the SWI and on the end products of denitrification. Previous studies in the headwaters of the Ipswich River in MA as part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiments (LINX II) and other long-term monitoring suggest that the Ipswich River SWI represents an important source of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas. Using a novel constant-head infiltrometer ring embedded in the stream sediments, we created four unique controlled down-welling (i.e., recharge) conditions, and tested how varying this hydrologic flux and thus the residence time distribution influenced biogeochemical function of the Ipswich River SWI. Specifically, we added isotopically-labelled 15N-nitrate to stream water during each controlled hydrologic flux experiment to quantify nitrate transformation rates, including denitrification end products, under the different hydrologic conditions. We also measured a suite of carbon and nitrogen solutes, along with dissolved oxygen conditions throughout each experiment to characterize the broader residence timescale and biogeochemical responses to the hydrologic manipulations. Initial results show that the oxic conditions of the SWI were strongly responsive to changes in hydrologic flux rates, thereby changing the

  14. Residence time, chemical and isotopic analysis of nitrate in the groundwater and surface water of a small agricultural watershed in the Coastal Plain, Bucks Branch, Sussex County, Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, John W.; Denver, Judith M.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate is a common contaminant in groundwater and surface water throughout the Nation, and water-resource managers need more detailed small-scale watershed research to guide conservation efforts aimed at improving water quality. Concentrations of nitrate in Bucks Branch are among the highest in the state of Delaware and a scientific investigation was performed to provide water-quality information to assist with the management of agriculture and water resources. A combination of major-ion chemistry, nitrogen isotopic composition and age-dating techniques was used to estimate the residence time and provide a chemical and isotopic analysis of nitrate in the groundwater in the surficial aquifer of the Bucks Branch watershed in Sussex County, Delaware. The land use was more than 90 percent agricultural and most nitrogen inputs were from manure and fertilizer. The apparent median age of sampled groundwater is 18 years and the estimated residence time of groundwater contributing to the streamflow for the entire Bucks Branch watershed at the outlet is approximately 19 years. Concentrations of nitrate exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standard of 10 milligrams per liter (as nitrogen) in 60 percent of groundwater samples and 42 percent of surface-water samples. The overall geochemistry in the Bucks Branch watershed indicates that agriculture is the predominant source of nitrate contamination and the observed patterns in major-ion chemistry are similar to those observed in other studies on the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. The pattern of enrichment in nitrogen and oxygen isotopes (δ15N and δ18O) of nitrate in groundwater and surface water indicates there is some loss of nitrate through denitrification, but this process is not sufficient to remove all of the nitrate from groundwater discharging to streams, and concentrations of nitrate in streams remain elevated.

  15. Recharge sources and residence times of groundwater as determined by geochemical tracers in the Mayfield Area, southwestern Idaho, 2011–12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Candice B.

    2013-01-01

    Parties proposing residential development in the area of Mayfield, Idaho are seeking a sustainable groundwater supply. During 2011–12, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, used geochemical tracers in the Mayfield area to evaluate sources of aquifer recharge and differences in groundwater residence time. Fourteen groundwater wells and one surface-water site were sampled for major ion chemistry, metals, stable isotopes, and age tracers; data collected from this study were used to evaluate the sources of groundwater recharge and groundwater residence times in the area. Major ion chemistry varied along a flow path between deeper wells, suggesting an upgradient source of dilute water, and a downgradient source of more concentrated water with the geochemical signature of the Idaho Batholith. Samples from shallow wells had elevated nutrient concentrations, a more positive oxygen-18 signature, and younger carbon-14 dates than deep wells, suggesting that recharge comes from young precipitation and surface-water infiltration. Samples from deep wells generally had higher concentrations of metals typical of geothermal waters, a more negative oxygen-18 signature, and older carbon-14 values than samples from shallow wells, suggesting that recharge comes from both infiltration of meteoric water and another source. The chemistry of groundwater sampled from deep wells is somewhat similar to the chemistry in geothermal waters, suggesting that geothermal water may be a source of recharge to this aquifer. Results of NETPATH mixing models suggest that geothermal water composes 1–23 percent of water in deep wells. Chlorofluorocarbons were detected in every sample, which indicates that all groundwater samples contain at least a component of young recharge, and that groundwater is derived from multiple recharge sources. Conclusions from this study can be used to further refine conceptual hydrological models of the area.

  16. Reduced variability and execution time to reach a target with a needle GPS system: Comparison between physicians, residents and nurse anaesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fevre, Marie-Cécile; Vincent, Caroline; Picard, Julien; Vighetti, Arnaud; Chapuis, Claire; Detavernier, Maxime; Allenet, Benoît; Payen, Jean-François; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Albaladejo, Pierre

    2018-02-01

    Ultrasound (US) guided needle positioning is safer than anatomical landmark techniques for central venous access. Hand-eye coordination and execution time depend on the professional's ability, previous training and personal skills. Needle guidance positioning systems (GPS) may theoretically reduce execution time and facilitate needle positioning in specific targets, thus improving patient comfort and safety. Three groups of healthcare professionals (41 anaesthesiologists and intensivists, 41 residents in anaesthesiology and intensive care, 39 nurse anaesthetists) were included and required to perform 3 tasks (positioning the tip of a needle in three different targets in a silicon phantom) by using successively a conventional US-guided needle positioning and a needle GPS. We measured execution times to perform the tasks, hand-eye coordination and the number of repositioning occurrences or errors in handling the needle or the probe. Without the GPS system, we observed a significant inter-individual difference for execution time (Pgaming were found to be independent factors associated with a shorter execution time. Use of GPS attenuated the inter-individual and group variability. We observed a reduced execution time and improved hand-eye coordination in all groups as compared to US without GPS. Neither US training, video gaming nor demographic personal or professional factors were found to be significantly associated with reduced execution time when GPS was used. US associated with GPS systems may improve safety and decrease execution time by reducing inter-individual variability between professionals for needle-handling procedures. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Removal of Zn(II) and Hg(II) from aqueous solution on a carbonaceous sorbent chemically prepared from rice husk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shafey, E.I.

    2010-01-01

    A carbonaceous sorbent was prepared from rice husk via sulfuric acid treatment. Sorption of Zn(II) and Hg(II) from aqueous solution was studied varying time, pH, metal concentration, temperature and sorbent status (wet and dry). Zn(II) sorption was found fast reaching equilibrium within ∼2 h while Hg(II) sorption was slow reaching equilibrium within ∼120 h with better performance for the wet sorbent than for the dry. Kinetics data for both metals were found to follow pseudo-second order model. Sorption rate of both metals was enhanced with temperature rise. Activation energy, E a , for Zn(II) sorption, was ∼13.0 kJ/mol indicating a diffusion-controlled process ion exchange process, however, for Hg(II) sorption, E a was ∼54 kJ/mol indicating a chemically controlled process. Sorption of both metals was low at low pH and increased with pH increase. Sorption was much higher for Hg(II) than for Zn(II) with higher uptake for both metals by rising the temperature. Hg(II) was reduced to Hg(I) on the sorbent surface. This was confirmed from the identification of Hg 2 Cl 2 deposits on the sorbent surface by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. However, no redox processes were observed in Zn(II) sorption. Sorption mechanism is discussed.

  18. Effect of additives on eremomycin sorbent selectivity in separation of salbutamol enantiomers using supercritical fluid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovskiy, O. I.; Kayda, A. S.; Usovich, O. I.; Parenago, O. O.; Lunin, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    A regime is found in which chiral stationary phase based on macrocyclic glycopeptide eremomycin allows separation of salbutamol sulfate enantiomers in supercritical fluid chromatography. Enantioseparation occurs only when two dynamic modifiers are used simultaneously: isopropylamin + trifluoroacetic acid or isopropylamin + ammonium acetate. Amine molar concentration in mobile phase has to be higher than acid molar concentration, otherwise enantiomers coelute. We suppose that with amine excess a mechanism of enantiorecognition is realized which involves ionic sorbent-sorbate interactions. Such mechanism is well-known for glycopeptide chiral selectors in liquid chromatography, but for supercritical fluid chromatography it is reported for the first time.

  19. Uranium separation and concentration from ground waters on TIO-PAN sorbent and determination by TRLFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raindl, Jakub; Spendlikova, Irena; Nemec, Mojmir; Sebesta, Ferdinand; Zavadilova, Alena; John, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A new sorbent, viz. hydrated titanium dioxide embedded on a polyacrylonitrile solid support, was tested for the title purpose. Uranium so separated was eluted with 0.1M HCl. Uranium concentrations before and after sorption/elution were determined by time resolved laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS ). The study is aimed at the development of a method suitable for sample preparation for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurements and at determining the 236 U/U ratio (in cooperation with the VERA facility at the University of Vienna, Austria)

  20. Sorption of europium (3) by polymer sorbents with grafted heterocyclic nitrogen-containing groupings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'tyukova, S.V.; Kravchenko, T.B.; Balamtsarashvili, G.M.; Roska, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    On polymer sorbents (copolymer of styrene-divinylbenzene) with grafted heterocyclic nitrogen-containing functional groupings of tetrazole, triazole and imidazole (sorbents 1,2,3, respectively). It is stated that europium sorption takes place from neutral solutions in presence of organic solvents. Luminescent properties of europium on sorbent are used to develope methods of its determination in high purity lanthanide and yttrium oxides. Europium determination limits consist 7.5·10 -5 μg/ml on 1 and 3 sorbents and 1.5·10 -4 μg/ml on sorbent 2, S p value is 0.089 and 0.075, respectivaly

  1. Novel composite sorbent AAm/MA hydrogels containing starch and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A novel polymer/clay composite sorbent based on acrylamide/maleic acid, starch and clay such as kaolin was synthesized with free radical solution polymerization by using ammonium persulfate/,,','-tetramethylethylenediamine as redox initiating pair in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate as a crosslinker.

  2. New Composite Sorbents for Caesium and Strontium Ions Sorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Kartel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Composite lignocellulose-inorganic sorbents derived from plant residues of agriculture and food industry, modified with ferrocyanides of d-metals and hydrated antimony pentoxide were prepared. Caesium and strontium ions removal from water was tested by radiotracer method. Sorption of heavy metal ions, methylene blue, gelatin, vitamin B12 was also studied.

  3. Evaluation of inorganic sorbent treatment for LWR coolant process streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roddy, J.W.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents results of a survey of the literature and of experience at selected nuclear installations to provide information on the feasibility of replacing organic ion exchangers with inorganic sorbents at light-water-cooled nuclear power plants. Radioactive contents of the various streams in boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors were examined. In addition, the methods and performances of current methods used for controlling water quality at these plants were evaluated. The study also includes a brief review of the physical and chemical properties of selected inorganic sorbents. Some attributes of inorganic sorbents would be useful in processing light water reactor (LWR) streams. The inorganic resins are highly resistant to damage from ionizing radiation, and their exchange capacities are generally equivalent to those of organic ion exchangers. However, they are more limited in application, and there are problems with physical integrity, especially in acidic solutions. Research is also needed in the areas of selectivity and anion removal before inorganic sorbents can be considered as replacements for the synthetic organic resins presently used in LWRs. 11 figures, 14 tables

  4. Comments on "Ceria-Zirconia High-Temperature Desulfurization Sorbents".

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Trnka, Otakar

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2006), s. 1548-1549 ISSN 0888-5885 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : hydrogen sulfide * desulfurization * cerium sorbent Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.518, year: 2006

  5. Natural sorbents for decontamination of objects of urban territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movchan, N.; Fedorenko, Yu.; Zlobenko, B.; Spigoun, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives an information about the use of film coverings, based on natural sorbents, in decontamination of buildings, contaminated after the Chernobyl accident. This method has incontrovertible advantages in the beginning period after the accident and can be used for cleaning considerable areas of urban territories

  6. Core-in-shell sorbent for hot coal gas desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Thomas D.; Akiti, Jr., Tetteh T.

    2004-02-10

    A core-in-shell sorbent is described herein. The core is reactive to the compounds of interest, and is preferably calcium-based, such as limestone for hot gas desulfurization. The shell is a porous protective layer, preferably inert, which allows the reactive core to remove the desired compounds while maintaining the desired physical characteristics to withstand the conditions of use.

  7. MERCURY CONTROL WITH CALCIUM-BASED SORBENTS AND OXIDIZING AGENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2002-06-01

    The initial tasks of this DOE funded project to investigate mercury removal by calcium-based sorbents have been completed, and initial testing results have been obtained. Mercury monitoring capabilities have been obtained and validated. An approximately 1MW (3.4 Mbtu/hr) Combustion Research Facility at Southern Research Institute was used to perform pilot-scale investigations of mercury sorbents, under conditions representative of full-scale boilers. The initial results of ARCADIS G&M proprietary sorbents, showed ineffective removal of either elemental or oxidized mercury. Benchscale tests are currently underway to ascertain the importance of differences between benchscale and pilot-scale experiments. An investigation of mercury-capture temperature dependence using common sorbents has also begun. Ordinary hydrated lime removed 80 to 90% of the mercury from the flue gas, regardless of the temperature of injection. High temperature injection of hydrated lime simultaneously captured SO{sub 2} at high temperatures and Hg at low temperatures, without any deleterious effects on mercury speciation. Future work will explore alternative methods of oxidizing elemental mercury.

  8. Cadmium adsorption by coal combustion ashes-based sorbents-Relationship between sorbent properties and adsorption capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsamo, Marco; Di Natale, Francesco; Erto, Alessandro; Lancia, Amedeo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale Vincenzo Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Montagnaro, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.montagnaro@unina.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Santoro, Luciano [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    A very interesting possibility of coal combustion ashes reutilization is their use as adsorbent materials, that can also take advantage from proper beneficiation techniques. In this work, adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solutions was taken into consideration, with the emphasis on the intertwining among waste properties, beneficiation treatments, properties of the beneficiated materials and adsorption capacity. The characterization of three solid materials used as cadmium sorbents (as-received ash, ash sieved through a 25 {mu}m-size sieve and demineralized ash) was carried out by chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy, laser granulometry and mercury porosimetry. Cadmium adsorption thermodynamic and kinetic tests were conducted at room temperature, and test solutions were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Maximum specific adsorption capacities resulted in the range 0.5-4.3 mg g{sup -1}. Different existing models were critically considered to find out an interpretation of the controlling mechanism for adsorption kinetics. In particular, it was observed that for lower surface coverage the adsorption rate is governed by a linear driving force while, once surface coverage becomes significant, mechanisms such as the intraparticle micropore diffusion may come into play. Moreover, it was shown that both external fluid-to-particle mass transfer and macropore diffusion hardly affect the adsorption process, which was instead regulated by intraparticle micropore diffusion: characteristic times for this process ranged from 4.1 to 6.1 d, and were fully consistent with the experimentally observed equilibrium times. Results were discussed in terms of the relationship among properties of beneficiated materials and cadmium adsorption capacity. Results shed light on interesting correlations among solid properties, cadmium capture rate and maximum cadmium uptake.

  9. Changes in medicine: residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The most important time in a physician’s educational development is residency, especially the first year. However, residency work and responsibility have come under the scrutiny of a host of agencies and bureaucracies, and therefore, is rapidly changing. Most important in the alphabet soup of regulatory agencies is the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME which accredits residencies and ultimately makes the governing rules.Resident work hours have received much attention and are clearly decreasing. However, the decline in work hours began in the 1970’s before the present political push to decrease work hours. The residency I entered in 1976 had every third night call during the first year resident’s 6-9 months on general medicine or wards. It had changed from every other night the year before. On wards, we normally were in the hospital for our 24 hours of call and followed this with a 10-12 hour day before …

  10. [Fire behavior of Mongolian oak leaves fuel bed under no-wind and zero-slope conditions. II. Analysis of the factors affecting flame length and residence time and related prediction models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Li; Liu, Bo-Fei; Di, Xue-Ying; Chu, Teng-Fei; Jin, Sen

    2012-11-01

    Taking fuel moisture content, fuel loading, and fuel bed depth as controlling factors, the fuel beds of Mongolian oak leaves in Maoershan region of Northeast China in field were simulated, and a total of one hundred experimental burnings under no-wind and zero-slope conditions were conducted in laboratory, with the effects of the fuel moisture content, fuel loading, and fuel bed depth on the flame length and its residence time analyzed and the multivariate linear prediction models constructed. The results indicated that fuel moisture content had a significant negative liner correlation with flame length, but less correlation with flame residence time. Both the fuel loading and the fuel bed depth were significantly positively correlated with flame length and its residence time. The interactions of fuel bed depth with fuel moisture content and fuel loading had significant effects on the flame length, while the interactions of fuel moisture content with fuel loading and fuel bed depth affected the flame residence time significantly. The prediction model of flame length had better prediction effect, which could explain 83.3% of variance, with a mean absolute error of 7.8 cm and a mean relative error of 16.2%, while the prediction model of flame residence time was not good enough, which could only explain 54% of variance, with a mean absolute error of 9.2 s and a mean relative error of 18.6%.

  11. Lime-Based Sorbents for High-Temperature CO2 Capture—A Review of Sorbent Modification Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the research on CO2 capture by lime-based looping cycles undertaken at CanmetENERGY’s (Ottawa, Canada) research laboratories. This is a new and very promising technology that may help in mitigation of global warming and climate change caused primarily by the use of fossil fuels. The intensity of the anticipated changes urgently requires solutions such as more cost-effective technologies for CO2 capture. This new technology is based on the use of lime-based sorbents in a dual fluidized bed combustion (FBC) reactor which contains a carbonator—a unit for CO2 capture, and a calciner—a unit for CaO regeneration. However, even though natural materials are cheap and abundant and very good candidates as solid CO2 carriers, their performance in a practical system still shows significant limitations. These limitations include rapid loss of activity during the capture cycles, which is a result of sintering, attrition, and consequent elutriation from FBC reactors. Therefore, research on sorbent performance is critical and this paper reviews some of the promising ways to overcome these shortcomings. It is shown that reactivation by steam/water, thermal pre-treatment, and doping simultaneously with sorbent reforming and pelletization are promising potential solutions to reduce the loss of activity of these sorbents over multiple cycles of use. PMID:20948952

  12. Lime-Based Sorbents for High-Temperature CO2 Capture—A Review of Sorbent Modification Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Anthony

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of the research on CO2 capture by lime-based looping cycles undertaken at CanmetENERGY’s (Ottawa, Canada research laboratories. This is a new and very promising technology that may help in mitigation of global warming and climate change caused primarily by the use of fossil fuels. The intensity of the anticipated changes urgently requires solutions such as more cost-effective technologies for CO2 capture. This new technology is based on the use of lime-based sorbents in a dual fluidized bed combustion (FBC reactor which contains a carbonator—a unit for CO2 capture, and a calciner—a unit for CaO regeneration. However, even though natural materials are cheap and abundant and very good candidates as solid CO2 carriers, their performance in a practical system still shows significant limitations. These limitations include rapid loss of activity during the capture cycles, which is a result of sintering, attrition, and consequent elutriation from FBC reactors. Therefore, research on sorbent performance is critical and this paper reviews some of the promising ways to overcome these shortcomings. It is shown that reactivation by steam/water, thermal pre-treatment, and doping simultaneously with sorbent reforming and pelletization are promising potential solutions to reduce the loss of activity of these sorbents over multiple cycles of use.

  13. A Preliminary Study of Biodegradable Waste as Sorbent Material for Oil-Spill Cleanup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, J.; Eyu, G. D.; Mansor, A. M.; Ahmad, Z.; Chukwuekezie, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Oil spill constitutes a major source of fresh and seawater pollution as a result of accidental discharge from tankers, marine engines, and underwater pipes. Therefore, the need for cost-effective and environmental friendly sorbent materials for oil spill cleanup cannot be overemphasized. The present work focuses on the preliminary study of empty palm fruit bunch fibre as a promising sorbent material. The morphology of the unmodified empty palm fruit bunch, EPFB fibre, was examined using an optical microcopy, scanning electron microcopy coupled with EDX and X-ray diffraction. The effects of oil volume, fibre weight, and time on oil absorption of EPFB fibre were evaluated with new engine oil from the model oil. The results show that EPFB fibre consists of numerous micro pores, hydrophobic, and partially crystalline and amorphous with approximately 13.5% carbon. The oil absorbency of the fibre increased with the increase in oil volume, immersion time, and fibre weight. However, sorption capacity decreased beyond 3 g in 100 mL. Additionally unmodified EPFB fibre showed optimum oil sorption efficiency of approximately 2.8 g/g within three days of immersion time. PMID:24693241

  14. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that

  15. Separating Direct and Indirect Turbofan Engine Combustion Noise While Estimating Post-Combustion (Post-Flame) Residence Time Using the Correlation Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2011-01-01

    A previous investigation on the presence of direct and indirect combustion noise for a full-scale turbofan engine using a far-field microphone at 130 is extended by also examining signals obtained at two additional downstream directions using far-field microphones at 110 deg and 160 deg. A generalized cross-correlation function technique is used to study the change in propagation time to the far field of the combined direct and indirect combustion noise signal as a sequence of low-pass filters are applied. The filtering procedure used produces no phase distortion. As the low-pass filter frequency is decreased, the travel time increases because the relative amount of direct combustion noise is reduced. The indirect combustion noise signal travels more slowly because in the combustor entropy fluctuations move with the flow velocity, which is slow compared to the local speed of sound. The indirect combustion noise signal travels at acoustic velocities after reaching the turbine and being converted into an acoustic signal. The direct combustion noise is always propagating at acoustic velocities. The results show that the estimated indirect combustion noise time delay values (post-combustion residence times) measured at each angle are fairly consistent with one another for a relevant range of operating conditions and demonstrate source separation of a mixture of direct and indirect combustion noise. The results may lead to a better idea about the acoustics in the combustor and may help develop and validate improved reduced-order physics-based methods for predicting turbofan engine core noise.

  16. The pregnant female surgical resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifflette V

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Vanessa Shifflette,1 Susannah Hambright,2 Joseph Darryl Amos,1 Ernest Dunn,3 Maria Allo4 1Associates in Surgical Acute Care, Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 2Methodist Surgical Associates, Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 3Graduate Medical Education - General Surgery, Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 4Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, CA, USA Background: Surgery continues to be an intense, time-consuming residency. Many medical students decide against surgery as a profession due to the long work hours and family strain. The pregnant female surgical resident has an added stress factor compared to her male counterpart. Methods: We distributed an electronic, online 26-question survey to 32 general surgery programs in the southwestern region of the United States. Each program distributed our survey to the female surgical residents who had been pregnant during residency in the last 5 years. Each program was re-contacted 6 weeks after the initial contact. Most questions were in a 5-point Likert scale format. The responses were collected and analyzed using the Survey Monkey website. Results: An unvalidated survey was sent to 32 general surgery programs and 26 programs responded (81%. Each program was asked for the total number of possible responses from female residents that met our criteria (60 female residents. Seven of the programs (27% stated that they have had zero residents pregnant. We had 22 residents respond (37%. Over half of the residents (55% were pregnant during their 2nd or 3rd year of residency, with only 18% pregnant during a research year. Thirty-one percent had a lower American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam (ABSITE score. Ninety percent of the residents were able to take 4 weeks or more for maternity leave. Most of the residents (95% stated that they would do this again during residency given the opportunity, but many of the residents felt that returning back to work

  17. Adsorption of iron by using hybrid Akar Putra and commercialized chicken eggshells as bio-sorbents from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Nasir

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal contamination in the environment could cause harmful effects both to human health and aquatic life. Numerous remediation methods had been developed to encounter with the contamination problem prior to degrade, decrease and to purify the contaminated water at minimal concentration as low as possible. Therefore, in current study, commercialized chicken eggshells and hybrid Akar Putra chicken eggshells were conducted in batch experiment to testify the capabilities of bio-sorbent materials in iron (II ion removal from aqueous solution at optimized level of dosage and equilibrium contact time. The optimum condition for iron (II removal for commercialized chicken eggshells and hybrid Akar Putra chicken eggshells bio-sorbents reached at 0.30 g with optimum contact time of 50 minutes and 91.83% and 91.07% of removal percentage with 0.60 g at 40 minutes. The final concentration from both bio-sorbents is achieved below than drinking water guideline (0.30 mg/L, 0.1635 mg/L and 0.1785 mg/L, respectively. The isotherm adsorption results showed it fitted better in Langmuir Isotherm Model than in Freundlich Isotherm Model, however with weak bonding, which could not held onto the heavy metal ions in long time period. In brief, commercialized chicken eggshells and hybrid Akar Putra chicken eggshells have considerable potential in removing heavy metal in aqueous solution. The selection of the bio-sorbent materials is more favorable as it reduces dependency towards chemical usage in water treatment which could have complied with drinking water guideline that can be obtained easily, abundance in amount, cheap and biodegradable.

  18. Methyl iodide retention on charcoal sorbents at parts-per-million concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, G.O.; Vogt, G.J.; Kasunic, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    Breakthrough curves for charcoal beds challenged by air containing parts-per-million methyl iodide ( 127 I) vapor concentrations were obtained and analyzed. A goal of this research is to determine if sorbent tests at relatively high vapor concentrations give data that can be extrapolated many orders of magnitude to the region of interest for radioiodine retention and removal. Another objective is to identify and characterize parameters that are critical to the performance of a charcoal bed in a respirator cartridge application. Towards these ends, a sorbent test system was built that allows experimental variations of the parameters of challenge vapor concentration, volumetric flow rate, bed depth, bed diameter, and relative humidity. Methyl iodide breakthrough was measured at a limit of 0.002 ppM using a gas chromatograph equipped with a linearized electron capture detector. Several models that have been proposed to describe breakthrough curves were tested against experimental data. A variety of charcoals used or proposed for use in radioiodine air filtration systems have been tested against 25.7 ppM methyl iodide to obtain these parameters and protection (decomtamination) factors. Effects of challenge concentration, relative humidity, and bed diameter were also investigated. Significant challenge concentration dependence was measured (more efficiency at lower concentration) for two types of charcoals. Increased relative humidity greatly decreased breakthrough times for a given protection factor. Increased bed diameter greatly increased breakthrough times for a given protection factor. Implications of these effects for a test method are discussed

  19. Frozen section evaluation via dynamic real-time non-robotic Telepathology system in a university Cancer center by resident / faculty cooperation team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosoughi, Aram; Smith, Paul Taylor; Zeitouni, Joseph A; Sodeman, Gregori M; Jorda, Merce; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Garcia-Buitrago, Monica; Petito, Carol K; Chapman, Jennifer R; Campuzano-Zuluaga, German; Rosenberg, Andrew E; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N

    2018-04-30

    Frozen section telepathology interpretation experience has been largely limited to practices with locations significantly distant from one another with sporadic need for frozen section diagnosis. In 2010 we established a real-time non-robotic telepathology system in a very active cancer center for daily frozen section service. Herein, we evaluate its accuracy compared to direct microscopic interpretation performed in the main hospital by the same faculty and its cost-efficiency over a 1-year period. From 643 (1416 parts) cases requiring intraoperative consultation, 333 cases (690 parts) were examined by telepathology and 310 cases (726 parts) by direct microscopy. Corresponding discrepancy rates were 2.6% (18 cases: 6 (0.9%) sampling and 12 (1.7%) diagnostic errors) and 3.2% (23 cases: 8 (1.1%) sampling and 15 (2.1%) diagnostic errors), P=.63. The sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative frozen diagnosis were 0.92 and 0.99, respectively, in telepathology, and 0.90 and 0.99, respectively, in direct microscopy. There was no correlation of error incidence with post graduate year level of residents involved in the telepathology service. Cost analysis indicated that the time saved by telepathology was $19691 over one year of the study period while the capital cost for establishing the system was $8924. Thus, real-time non-robotic telepathology is a reliable and easy to use tool for frozen section evaluation in busy clinical settings, especially when frozen section service involves more than one hospital, and it is cost efficient when travel is a component of the service. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Caracterización de la biomasa inactiva de Aspergillus niger O-5 como sorbente de Pb (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusleydi Enamorado Horrutiner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The inactive biomass of fungus Aspergillus niger O-5 obtained in Cuba was characterized as sorbent of Pb2+ by several structural analysis and others techniques. In addition, the biomass was studied for the separation / preconcentration of Pb2+ from aqueous solution. The maximum biosorption capacity was obtained for the contact time of 30 min and pH 5. The kinetic of sorption process occurred according to the model of Ho. The Freundlich or Langmuir models suitably described the experimental adsorption isotherms. The biomass can be used as sorbent for Pb2+ with a maximum capacity of 4.7 - 6.2 mg g-1. The pretreatment with NaOH solution improved its sorption capacity.

  1. Application of groundwater residence time tracers and broad screening for micro-organic contaminants in the Indo-Gangetic aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapworth, Dan; Das, Prerona; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Petersen, Jade; Gooddy, Daren; Krishan, Gopal

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater abstracted from aquifers underlying urban centres across India provide a vital source of domestic water. Abstraction from municipal and private supplies is considerable and growing rapidly with ever increasing demand for water from expanding urban populations. This trend is set to continue. The vulnerability of deeper aquifers (typically >100 m below ground) used for domestic water to contamination migration from often heavily contaminated shallow aquifer systems has not been studies in detail in India. This paper focusses on the occurrence of micro-organic contaminants within sedimentary aquifers beneath urban centres which are intensively pumped for drinking water and domestic use. New preliminary results from a detailed case study undertaken across Varanasi, a city with an estimated population of ca. 1.5 million in Uttar Pradesh. Micro -organic groundwater quality status and evolution with depth is investigated through selection of paired shallow and deep sites across the city. These results are considered within the context of paired groundwater residence time tracers within the top 150m within the sedimentary aquifer system. Groundwater emerging contaminant results are compared with surface water quality from the Ganges which is also used for drinking water supply. Broad screening for >800 micro-organic compounds was undertaken. Age dating tools were employed to constrain and inform a conceptual model of groundwater recharge and contaminant evolution within the sedimentary aquifer system.

  2. Local and distant residence times of contaminants in multi-compartment models. Part II: Application to assessing environmental mobility and long-range atmospheric transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Liisa; Mackay, Don

    2008-01-01

    In Part I, the concepts of inherent, local and distant residence times (DRTs) were reviewed as metrics of the extent to which chemical discharges or emissions in one region or box are transported to distant regions. In this second part, the concepts are applied to geographically relevant systems to illustrate their applicability to the assessment of chemicals for long-range transport potential (LRTP). It is shown that the relative ranking of chemicals as characterized by the DRT method is similar to that of the characteristic travel distance concept. A DRT source-receptor matrix is developed that can express the chemical-specific potential of source regions to contaminate a specific receptor region of concern such as the Arctic. The matrix can be modified to identify for a specific source region the likely destinations of emissions as well as to assess the relative vulnerability of regions in the global environment to contaminants of concern. - The DRT concept is applied to multi-box and geographically explicit models to assess the long-range transport potential of 10 chemicals

  3. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz

    2001-01-01

    Four grades of sodium bicarbonate and two grades of trona were characterized in terms of particle size distribution, surface area, pore size distribution, and attrition. Surface area and pore size distribution determinations were conducted after calcination of the materials. The sorbent materials were subjected to thermogravimetric testing to determine comparative rates and extent of calcination (in inert gas) and sorption (in a simulated coal combustion flue gas mixture). Selected materials were exposed to five calcination/sorption cycles and showed no decrease in either sorption capacity or sorption rate. Process simulations were conducted involving different heat recovery schemes. The process is thermodynamically feasible. The sodium-based materials appear to have suitable physical properties for use as regenerable sorbents and, based on thermogravimetric testing, are likely to have sorption and calcination rates that are rapid enough to be of interest in full-scale carbon sequestration processes.

  4. Literature survey: methods for the removal of iodine species from off-gases and liquid waste streams of nuclear power and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, with emphasis on solid sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holladay, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    Emphasis was focused on the operating parameters that most strongly affected the optimization of the processes used to treat actual process or feed streams which simulated actual compositions occurring at nuclear facilities. These parameters included gas superficial velocity, temperature, types of organic and inorganic contaminants, relative humidity, iodine feed-gas concentration, iodine species, column design (for both acid-scrub and solid sorbent-based processes), sorbent particle size, run time, intense radiation (solid sorbents only), and scrub-acid concentration. The most promising acid-scrub process for removal of iodine species from off-gases appears to be Iodox. The most promising solid sorbent for removal of iodine species from off-gases is the West German Ag-KTB--AgNO 3 -impregnated amorphous silicic acid. The tandem silver mordenite--lead mordenite sorbent system is also quite attractive. Only a limited number of processes have thus far been studied for removal of iodine species from low-level liquid waste streams. The most extensive successful operating experience has been obtained with anion exchange resins utilized at nuclear power reactors. Bench-scale engineering tests have indicated that the best process for removal of all types of iodine species from liquid waste streams may be treatment on a packed bed containing a mixture of sorbents with affinity for both elemental and anionic species of iodine. 154 references, 7 figures, 21 tables

  5. Sorbents for effective removal of radioactive antimony during chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishad, Padala Abdul; Bhaskarapillai, Anupkumar; Velmurugan, Sankaralingam

    2014-01-01

    Removal of radioactive antimony is a challenging problem. Often, during decontamination, they get mobilized around the system and redeposit in different areas thus offsetting the reduction in the radiation field obtained by removing other activities such as 60 Co. Thus, there is a clear need for better antimony removing materials/strategies for effective reactor decontamination. In this regard, six commercially available sorbents namely, Tulsion A33 (strong base anion (-OH) resin), Amberlite IRC-718 (chelating resin), Radex ® Sb-1000, nano TiO 2 -special grade (Inorganic type IX), Chitosan (biosorbent) and Aeroxide p25 (nano TiO 2 , Inorganic type IX) were evaluated for their antimony sorption properties. Radex ® and TiO 2 based materials were found to be more effective in removing both Sb(V) and Sb(III). Solution pH was seen to significantly influence the antimony sorption and the effect was more prominent in anion resin, when tested under column conditions. Apart from the commercial sorbents, we have synthesised a robust high performing sorbent (TA-Chitosan beads) in the form of stable beads, using nano-TiO 2 and chitosan. The beads were found to retain the antimony sorption properties of the nano-TiO 2 , while adapting a physical format suitable for large scale operations. The sorbent exhibited almost complete sorption of antimony both in low (ppb level) as well as high concentrations of antimony. The suitability of the beads for use in column mode has been established and its radiation stability was probed in detail. The beads were found to be stable to irradiations as ascertained from the TOC values and unchanged sorption properties. The sorption properties of the CHITA beads in typical decontamination formulation containing mixture of complexing agents have been investigated in detail. (author)

  6. The effect of preparation of biogenic sorbent on zinc sorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Jenčárová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to prepare biogenic sulphides by using bacteria for the removal of zinc cations from their solutions. Theproduction was realized in a bioreactor under anaerobic conditions at 30 °C. Sorbents were prepared by sulphate-reducing bacteria indifferent nutrient medium modifications, under two modes of bacteria cultivation. Created precipitates of iron sulphides were removedfrom the liquid phase of the cultivation medium by filtration, dried and used for the sorption experiments.

  7. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO(sub 2) as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates, through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO(sub 2) stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests conducted at LSU indicated that exposure of sorbent to water vapor prior to contact with carbonation gas does not significantly increase the reaction rate. Calcined fine mesh trona has a greater initial carbonation rate than calcined sodium bicarbonate, but appears to be more susceptible to loss of reactivity under severe calcination conditions. The Davison attrition indices for Grade 5 sodium bicarbonate, commercial grade sodium carbonate and extra fine granular potassium carbonate were, as tested, outside of the range suitable for entrained bed reactor testing. Fluidized bed testing at RTI indicated that in the initial stages of reaction potassium carbonate removed 35% of the carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas, and is reactive at higher temperatures than sodium carbonate. Removals declined to 6% when 54% of the capacity of the sorbent was exhausted. Carbonation data from electrobalance testing was correlated using a shrinking core reaction model. The activation energy of the reaction of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water vapor was determined from nonisothermal thermogravimetry

  8. Part-time employment of gynecologists and obstetricians: a sub-group analysis of a Germany-wide survey of residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Sarah; Lermann, Johannes; Eismann, Sabine; Neimann, Johannes; Knabl, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Combining family and career is increasingly taken for granted in many fields. However, the medical profession in Germany has inadequately developed structures. Little is known regarding the satisfaction of physicians working part-time (PT). This Germany-wide on-line survey collected information on the working situation of PT employees (PTE) in gynecology. An anonymous questionnaire with 95 items, nine of which concerned PT work, was sent to 2770 residents and physicians undergoing further specialist training. Of the 481 participants, 104 (96 % female, 4 % male) stated they worked PT, which is greater than the national average. 94 % of all women and 60 % of all men would work PT for better compatibility between work and family life. The PTE regularly work night shifts (NS) (96 %) and weekends (98 %). The number of monthly NS (median 5-9) was not different between the full-time (FT) employees and the PTE who work >75 %. Only when the working hours are reduced by 25 % or more, there are fewer NS (median 1-4) PTE that have a desire for fewer NS. The classic PT model is seldom realized; over 70 % of PTE work whole days, while other working models do not play a major role in Germany. On-call models were subjectively declared to have the best family friendly work-life balance. The results obtained indicated that structures must be developed that to address the problem of childcare and the long working hours to ensure comprehensive medical care from specialists.

  9. Behavior of plutonium and other long-lived radionuclides in Lake Michigan. I. Biological transport, seasonal cycling, and residence times in the water column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlgren, M.A.; Marshall, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    Eight operating nuclear reactors are situated on the shores of Lake Michigan, but their releases of radioactivity have been much less than that entering the lake from stratospheric fallout. Measurements of 239 , 240 Pu, 241 Am, and 137 Cs from the latter source have been made in order to study biological transport, seasonal cycling, and residence times of long-lived radionuclides in the lake. The apparent turnover times for the residual fallout 239 , 240 Pu and 137 Cs, which are present as nonfilterable, ionic forms, are about 3 to 4 y. Resuspension may be occurring at a low rate, probably through the feeding activities of benthic organisms. Transport by settling of phytodetritus and zooplankton fecal pellets is postulated to be the cause of the rapid decline of the concentration of 239 , 240 Pu in surface waters observed during summer thermal stratification of the lake, while the concentration of 137 Cs remained almost constant. Concentration factors for fallout 239 , 240 Pu, 137 Cs, and 90 Sr at various trophic levels in the food chain in Lake Michigan have been measured. Analyses of biological samples taken at various distances from the Big Rock Point Nuclear Power Plant and of plant waste discharge show that any plutonium possibly released from the recycle plutonium test fue