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Sample records for somatotropin release inhibiting factor

  1. Somatotropin physiology - a review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the ruminant at lcast" somatotropin may also be involved in satiety control. Other systems ..... metabolism of a number of tissues in such a way as to provide the substrates ..... between energy intake and exogenous porcine growth hormone.

  2. Platelet-released growth factors inhibit proliferation of primary keratinocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Andreas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Berndt, Rouven; Lippross, Sebastian; Behrendt, Peter; Klüter, Tim; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Cremer, Jochen; Rademacher, Franziska; Simanski, Maren; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates as platelet-released growth factors (PRGF) or Vivostat Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF ® ) represent important tools in modern wound therapy, especially in the treatment of chronic, hard-to-heal or infected wounds. Nevertheless, underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of the beneficial clinical effects of a local wound therapy with autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates are poorly understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that PRGF induces antimicrobial peptides in primary keratinocytes and accelerates keratinocytes' differentiation. In the present study we analyzed the influence of PRGF on primary human keratinocytes' proliferation. Using the molecular proliferation marker Ki-67 we observed a concentration- and time dependent inhibition of Ki-67 gene expression in PRGF treated primary keratinocytes. These effects were independent from the EGFR- and the IL-6-R pathway. Inhibition of primary keratinocytes' proliferation by PRGF treatment was confirmed in colorimetric cell proliferation assays. Together, these data indicate that the clinically observed positive effects of autologous thrombocytes concentrates in the treatment of chronic, hard-to-heal wounds are not based on an increased keratinocytes proliferation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenosine inhibits neutrophil vascular endothelial growth factor release and transendothelial migration via A2B receptor activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wakai, A

    2012-02-03

    The effects of adenosine on neutrophil (polymorphonuclear neutrophils; PMN)-directed changes in vascular permeability are poorly characterized. This study investigated whether adenosine modulates activated PMN vascular endothelial growth factor (vascular permeability factor; VEGF) release and transendothelial migration. PMN activated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, 10 ng\\/mL) were incubated with adenosine and its receptor-specific analogues. Culture supernatants were assayed for VEGF. PMN transendothelial migration across human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers was assessed in vitro. Adhesion molecule receptor expression was assessed flow cytometrically. Adenosine and some of its receptor-specific analogues dose-dependently inhibited activated PMN VEGF release. The rank order of potency was consistent with the affinity profile of human A2B receptors. The inhibitory effect of adenosine was reversed by 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, an A2 receptor antagonist. Adenosine (100 microM) or the A2B receptor agonist 5\\'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 100 microM) significantly reduced PMN transendothelial migration. However, expression of activated PMN beta2 integrins and HUVEC ICAM-1 were not significantly altered by adenosine or NECA. Adenosine attenuates human PMN VEGF release and transendothelial migration via the A2B receptor. This provides a novel target for the modulation of PMN-directed vascular hyperpermeability in conditions such as the capillary leak syndrome.

  4. Interleukin 1α inhibits prostaglandin E2 release to suppress pulsatile release of luteinizing hormone but not follicle-stimulating hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettori, V.; McCann, S.M.; Gimeno, M.F.; Karara, A.; Gonzalez, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin 1α (IL-1α), a powerful endogenous pyrogen released from monocytes and macrophages by bacterial endotoxin, stimulates corticotropin, prolactin, and somatotropin release and inhibits thyrotropin release by hypothalamic action. The authors injected recombinant human IL-1α into the third cerebral ventricle, to study its effect on the pulsatile release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in conscious, freely moving, ovariectomized rats. Intraventricular injection of 0.25 pmol of IL-1α caused an almost immediate reduction of plasma LH concentration. To determine the mechanism of the suppression of LH release, mediobasal hypothalamic fragments were incubated in vitro with IL-1α (10 pM) and the release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) and prostaglandin E 2 into the medium was measured by RIA in the presence or absence of nonrepinephrine. 1α reduced basal LHRH release and blocked LHRH release induced by nonrepinephrine. In conclusion, IL-1α suppresses LH but not FSH release by an almost complete cessation of pulsatile release of LH in the castrated rat. The mechanism of this effect appears to be by inhibition of prostaglandin E 2 -mediated release of LHRH

  5. Rupatadine inhibits inflammatory mediator release from human laboratory of allergic diseases 2 cultured mast cells stimulated by platelet-activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alevizos, Michail; Karagkouni, Anna; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Makris, Michael; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2013-12-01

    Mast cells are involved in allergy and inflammation by the secretion of multiple mediators, including histamine, cytokines, and platelet-activating factor (PAF), in response to different triggers, including emotional stress. PAF has been associated with allergic inflammation, but there are no clinically available PAF inhibitors. To investigate whether PAF could stimulate human mast cell mediator release and whether rupatadine (RUP), a dual histamine-1 and PAF receptor antagonist, could inhibit the effect of PAF on human mast cells. Laboratory of allergic diseases 2 cultured mast cells were stimulated with PAF (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 μmol/L) and substance P (1 μmol/L) with or without pretreatment with RUP (2.5 and 25 μmol/L), which was added 10 minutes before stimulation. Release of β-hexosaminidase was measured in supernatant fluid by spectrophotoscopy, and histamine, interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PAF stimulated a statistically significant release of histamine, interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor (0.001-0.1 μmol/L) that was comparable to that stimulated by substance P. Pretreatment with RUP (25 μmol/L) for 10 minutes inhibited this effect. In contrast, pretreatment of laboratory of allergic diseases 2 cells with diphenhydramine (25 μmol/L) did not inhibit mediator release, suggesting that the effect of RUP was not due to its antihistaminic effect. PAF stimulates human mast cell release of proinflammatory mediators that is inhibited by RUP. This action endows RUP with additional properties in treating allergic inflammation. Copyright © 2013 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. KADAR KOLAGEN KULIT DAN TULANG PADA TIKUS BETINA USIA ENAM DAN 12 BULAN YANG DISUPLEMENTASI DENGAN SOMATOTROPIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Wayan Sudatri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of somatotropin supplementation on skin and bone collagen concentration of six-month and one-year old female mice. Forty eight female rats were assigned into a randomized block design with 4 factors. The first factor was age with 2 levels (6 months and 12 months. The second factor was somatotropin dosage with 2 levels (0 and 9 mg/kg body weight. The third factor was duration of injection with 2 levels (3 weeks and 6 weeks, and the fourth factor was sampling period with 2 levels (0 and 14 days after somatotropin termination. The results showed that somatotropin supplementation had significant effects on bone (P<0.05 and skin (P<0.01 collagen concentrations.

  7. Pregnancy, bovine somatotropin, and dietary n-3 fatty acids in lactating dairy cows: I. Ovarian, conceptus, and growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor system responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilby, T R; Sozzi, A; Lopez, M M; Silvestre, F T; Ealy, A D; Staples, C R; Thatcher, W W

    2006-09-01

    The objective was to examine effects of bovine somatotropin (bST), pregnancy, and dietary fatty acids on reproductive responses in lactating dairy cows. Beginning at approximately 17 d in milk (DIM), a comparison was made of isoenergetic diets comprising supplementary lipids of whole cottonseed vs. calcium salts of fish oil enriched lipid (FO). Ovulation was synchronized in cows with a presynchronization plus Ovsynch protocol, and cows were inseminated artificially by appointment or not inseminated (d 0 = time of synchronized ovulation; 77 +/- 12 DIM). On d 0 and 11, cows received bST (500 mg) or no bST. All cows were slaughtered on d 17. Number of cows in each group was as follows: control diet had 5 bST-treated cyclic (bST-C), 5 non-bST-treated cyclic (no bST-C), 4 bST-treated pregnant (bST-P), and 5 non-bST-treated pregnant (no bST-P) cows; and cyclic cows fed FO diet had 4 bST-treated (bST-FO) and 5 non-bST-treated cyclic (no bST-FO-C) cows. Feeding FO increased milk production, number of class 1 follicles (2 to 5 mm), and decreased insulin during the period before d 0 compared with control-fed cows. The bST increased milk production, pregnancy rate [83% (5/6) vs. 40% (4/10)], conceptus length (45 vs. 34 cm), and interferon-tau in the uterine luminal flushings (9.4 vs. 5.3 microg) with no effect on interferon-tau mRNA concentration in the conceptus. Treatment with bST increased plasma growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I. Among control-fed cows (cyclic and pregnant), bST decreased progesterone concentration in plasma. Cows fed FO had less plasma insulin than control-fed cyclic cows, and FO altered the plasma GH (bST-FO > bST-C) and IGF-I (bST-C > bST-FO-C) responses to bST injections. Endometrial IGF-I mRNA was reduced in pregnant cows and tended to decrease in those fed FO. The IGF-II mRNA was increased in the endometrium of pregnant and bST-treated cows fed the control diet. Cows fed FO had increased concentrations of IGF-II mRNA, when b

  8. Inhibition of sup 125 I organification and thyroid hormone release by interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in human thyrocytes in suspension culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Satoh, T.; Shizume, K.; Ozawa, M.; Han, D.C.; Imamura, H.; Tsushima, T.; Demura, H.; Kanaji, Y.; Ito, Y. (Institute of Clinical Endocrinology, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in patients with subacute thyroiditis and painless thyroiditis, human thyroid follicles were cultured with interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), and/or interferon-gamma (IFN gamma), and the effects of these cytokines on thyroid function were studied in vitro. When human thyrocytes were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 0.5% fetal calf serum and TSH for 5-8 days, the cells incorporated 125I, synthesized de novo (125I)iodotyrosines and (125I)iodothyronines, and secreted (125I)T4 and (125I)T3 into the medium. IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta inhibited 125I incorporation and (125I)iodothyronine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The minimal inhibitory effect was detected at 10 pg/ml. Electron microscopic examination revealed a marked decrease in lysosome formation in IL-1-treated thyrocytes. TNF alpha and IFN gamma also inhibited thyroid function in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, when thyrocytes were cultured with IL-1, TNF alpha and IFN gamma, these cytokines more than additively inhibited thyroid function. Although the main mechanism of 131I uptake suppression in the thyroid gland in subacute thyroiditis is due to cellular damage and suppression of TSH release, our present findings suggest that IL-1, TNF alpha, and IFN gamma produced in the inflammatory process within the thyroid gland further inhibit iodine incorporation and at least partly account for the decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in destruction-induced hyperthyroidism.

  9. Inhibition of 125I organification and thyroid hormone release by interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in human thyrocytes in suspension culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Satoh, T.; Shizume, K.; Ozawa, M.; Han, D.C.; Imamura, H.; Tsushima, T.; Demura, H.; Kanaji, Y.; Ito, Y.

    1990-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in patients with subacute thyroiditis and painless thyroiditis, human thyroid follicles were cultured with interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), and/or interferon-gamma (IFN gamma), and the effects of these cytokines on thyroid function were studied in vitro. When human thyrocytes were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 0.5% fetal calf serum and TSH for 5-8 days, the cells incorporated 125I, synthesized de novo [125I]iodotyrosines and [125I]iodothyronines, and secreted [125I]T4 and [125I]T3 into the medium. IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta inhibited 125I incorporation and [125I]iodothyronine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The minimal inhibitory effect was detected at 10 pg/ml. Electron microscopic examination revealed a marked decrease in lysosome formation in IL-1-treated thyrocytes. TNF alpha and IFN gamma also inhibited thyroid function in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, when thyrocytes were cultured with IL-1, TNF alpha and IFN gamma, these cytokines more than additively inhibited thyroid function. Although the main mechanism of 131I uptake suppression in the thyroid gland in subacute thyroiditis is due to cellular damage and suppression of TSH release, our present findings suggest that IL-1, TNF alpha, and IFN gamma produced in the inflammatory process within the thyroid gland further inhibit iodine incorporation and at least partly account for the decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in destruction-induced hyperthyroidism

  10. Lactoferrin release and interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor production by human polymorphonuclear cells stimulated by various lipopolysaccharides: relationship to growth inhibition of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, C; Cassone, A; Serbousek, D; Pearson, C A; Djeu, J Y

    1992-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Salmonella typhimurium, at doses from 1 to 100 ng/ml, strongly enhanced growth inhibition of Candida albicans by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that LPS markedly augmented phagocytosis of Candida cells by increasing the number of yeasts ingested per neutrophil as well as the number of neutrophils capable of ingesting fungal cells. LPS activation caused augmented release of lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein which itself could inhibit the growth of C. albicans in vitro. Antibodies against lactoferrin effectively and specifically reduced the anti-C. albicans activity of both LPS-stimulated and unstimulated PMN. Northern (RNA blot) analysis showed enhanced production of mRNAs for interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6 and in neutrophils within 1 h of stimulation with LPS. The cytokines were also detected in the supernatant of the activated PMN, and their synthesis was prevented by pretreatment of LPS-stimulated PMN with protein synthesis inhibitors, such as emetine and cycloheximide. These inhibitors, however, did not block either lactoferrin release or the anti-Candida activity of LPS-stimulated PMN. These results demonstrate the ability of various bacterial LPSs to augment neutrophil function against C. albicans and suggest that the release of a candidastatic, iron-binding protein, lactoferrin, may contribute to the antifungal effect of PMN. Moreover, the ability to produce cytokines upon stimulation by ubiquitous microbial products such as the endotoxins points to an extraphagocytic, immunomodulatory role of PMN during infection.

  11. Combination of interferon-alpha and 5-fluorouracil inhibits endothelial cell growth directly and by regulation of angiogenic factors released by tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Hiroshi; Tanemura, Masahiro; Umeshita, Koji; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Nagano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Noda, Takehiro; Murakami, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Shogo; Marubashi, Shigeru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Takeda, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    The combination therapy of interferon (IFN)-alpha and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) improved the prognosis of the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To determine the molecular mechanisms of the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic effects, we examined the direct anti-proliferative effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and indirect effects by regulating secretion of angiogenic factors from HCC cells. The direct effects on HUVEC were examined by TUNEL, Annexin-V assays and cell cycles analysis. For analysis of the indirect effects, the apoptosis induced by the conditioned medium from HCC cell treated by IFN-alpha/5-FU and expression of angiogenic factors was examined. IFN-alpha and 5-FU alone had anti-proliferative properties on HUVEC and their combination significantly inhibited the growth (compared with control, 5-FU or IFN alone). TUNEL and Annexin-V assays showed no apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that IFN-alpha and 5-FU delayed cell cycle progression in HUVEC with S-phase accumulation. The conditioned medium from HuH-7 cells after treatment with IFN/5-FU significantly inhibited HUVEC growth and induced apoptosis, and contained high levels of angiopoietin (Ang)-1 and low levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Ang-2. Knockdown of Ang-1 in HuH-7 cells abrogated the anti-proliferative effects on HUVEC while knockdown of Ang-2 partially rescue the cells. These results suggested that IFN-alpha and 5-FU had direct growth inhibitory effects on endothelial cells, as well as anti-angiogenic effects through regulation of angiogenic factors released from HCC cells. Modulation of VEGF and Angs secretion by IFN-alpha and 5-FU may contribute to their anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects on HCC

  12. Chitosan inhibits platelet-mediated clot retraction, increases platelet-derived growth factor release, and increases residence time and bioactivity of platelet-rich plasma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprés-Tremblay, Gabrielle; Chevrier, Anik; Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Nelea, Monica; Buschmann, Michael D

    2017-11-10

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used to treat different orthopedic conditions, however, the clinical benefits of using PRP remain uncertain. Chitosan (CS)-PRP implants have been shown to improve meniscus, rotator cuff and cartilage repair in pre-clinical models. The purpose of this current study was to investigate in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of action of CS-PRP implants. Freeze-dried formulations containing 1% (w/v) CS (80% degree of deacetylation and number average molar mass 38 kDa), 1% (w/v) trehalose as a lyoprotectant and 42.2 mM calcium chloride as a clot activator were solubilized in PRP. Gravimetric measurements and molecular/cellular imaging studies revealed that clot retraction is inhibited in CS-PRP hybrid clots through physical coating of platelets, blood cells and fibrin strands by chitosan, which interferes with platelet aggregation and platelet-mediated clot retraction. Flow cytometry and ELISA assays revealed that platelets are activated and granules secreted in CS-PRP hybrid clots and that cumulative release of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AB) and epidermal growth factor is higher from CS-PRP hybrid clots compared to PRP clots in vitro. Finally, CS-PRP implants resided for up to 6 weeks in a subcutaneous implantation model and induced cell recruitment and granulation tissue synthesis, confirming greater residency and bioactivity compared to PRP in vivo.

  13. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-03-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -4/M), naloxone inhibited (p < .001) the release of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O/sub 2//sup -/ released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of /sup 3/H FMLP to HN. Using /sup 3/H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10/sup -5/) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED/sub 50/ for naloxone inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ (1 x 10/sup -5/M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D/sub 2/ or E/sub 2/. Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O/sub 2/ but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN.

  14. Epidermal growth factor inhibits rat pancreatic cell proliferation, causes acinar cell hypertrophy, and prevents caerulein-induced desensitization of amylase release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, J; Larose, L; Korc, M

    1989-06-01

    The in vivo effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on pancreatic growth and digestive enzyme concentrations were compared with the actions of the pancreatic secretagogue caerulein in the adult rat. EGF (10 micrograms/kg BW) did not alter pancreatic weight or protein content. However, this concentration of EGF inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA by 44%, decreased DNA content by 20%, and increased the concentrations of amylase, chymotrypsinogen, and protein by 106%, 232%, and 42%, respectively. Pancreatic acini prepared from EGF-treated rats exhibited a characteristic secretory response to caerulein that was superimposable to that obtained in acini from saline-treated rats. In both groups of acini half-maximal and maximal stimulation of amylase release occurred at approximately 5 pM and 50 pM caerulein, respectively. In contrast to EGF, caerulein (1 microgram/kg BW) increased pancreatic weight by 29% and protein content by 59%, and enhanced [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA by 70%. Although caerulein increased the concentrations of pancreatic amylase and chymotrypsinogen by 38% and 297%, respectively, pancreatic acini prepared from caerulein-treated rats were less sensitive to the actions of caerulein in vitro when compared with acini from control rats. Indeed, the EC50 was shift from 4.8 pM to 9.8 pM after 4 days of treatment. EGF potentiated the actions of caerulein on pancreatic weight, protein content, and chymotrypsinogen concentration, and prevented the caerulein-induced alteration in the secretory responsiveness of the acinar cell. Conversely, caerulein reversed the inhibitory effect of EGF on thymidine incorporation. These findings suggest that EGF may modulate the trophic effects of certain gastrointestinal hormones, and may participate in the regulation of pancreatic exocrine function in vivo.

  15. Inhibition of the release of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors in experimental endotoxemia by an anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; van der Poll, T.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; ten Cate, H.; Gallati, H.; ten Cate, J. W.; van Deventer, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the shedding of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors in endotoxemia was investigated. The appearance of the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors was assessed in four healthy volunteers following an intravenous injection of tumor necrosis factor-alpha

  16. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-01-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10 -7 to 10 -4 M), naloxone inhibited (p 2 - ) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O 2 - released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of 3 H FMLP to HN. Using 3 H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10 -5 ) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED 50 for naloxone inhibition of O 2 - (1 x 10 -5 M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D 2 or E 2 . Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O 2 but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN

  17. Gliclazide directly inhibits arginine-induced glucagon release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvan, Kenan; Coy, David H; Holst, Jens Juul

    2002-01-01

    Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect of glicl......Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect....... In islet perifusions with DC-41-33, arginine-induced glucagon release was inhibited by 66%. We therefore concluded that gliclazide inhibits glucagon release by a direct action on the pancreatic A cell....

  18. Evidence that the primary effect of phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2(alpha) in rabbit reticulocyte lysate is inhibition of the release of eukaryotic initiation factor-2.GDP from 60 S ribosomal subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, M.; Redman, R.; Kaplansky, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    The phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2 alpha that occurs when rabbit reticulocyte lysate is incubated in the absence of hemin or with poly(I.C) causes inhibition of polypeptide chain initiation by preventing a separate factor (termed RF) from promoting the exchange of GTP for GDP on eIF-2. When lysate was incubated in the presence of hemin and [ 14 C] eIF-2 or [alpha- 32 P]GTP, the authors observed binding of eIF-2 and GDP or GTP to 60 S ribosomal subunits that was slightly greater than that bound to 40 S subunits and little binding to 80 S ribosomes. When incubation was in the absence of hemin or in the presence of hemin plus 0.1 microgram/ml poly(I.C), eIF-2 and GDP binding to 60 S subunits was increased 1.5- to 2-fold, that bound to 80 S ribosomes was almost as great as that bound to 60 S subunits, and that bound to 40 S subunits was unchanged. The data indicate that about 40% of the eIF-2 that becomes bound to 60 S subunits and 80 S ribosomes in the absence of hemin or with poly(I.C) is eIF-2(alpha-P) and suggest that the eIF-2 and GDP bound is probably in the form of a binary complex. The rate of turnover of GDP (presumably eIF-2.GDP) on 60 S subunits and 80 S ribosomes in the absence of hemin is reduced to less than 10% the control rate, because the dissociation of eIF-2.GDP is inhibited. Our findings suggest that eIF-2.GTP binding to and eIF-2.GDP release from 60 S subunits may normally occur and serve to promote subunit joining

  19. Expression of somatotropin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in bovine tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucy, M.C.; Boyd, C.K.; Koenigsfeld, A.T.; Okamura, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    The somatotropin receptor mRNA is controlled by at least two different gene promoters that generate 2 two variants with different exon 1 sequences (1A and 1B). The location of 1A and 1B somatotropin receptor mRNA within cattle tissues and, hence, the tissue specificity of the 1A and 1B promoters are unknown. In addition, the cDNA sequence of the 1B somatotropin receptor has not been determined. Our objective, therefore, was to sequence a cDNA for the 1B somatotropin receptor and to analyze bovine tissues for expression of 1A and 1B somatotropin receptor mRNA. Twenty adult tissues and six fetal tissues were collected at slaughter from each of four cows and two fetuses. Messenger RNA was analyzed using ribonuclease protection assays. The adult liver expressed both 1A and 1B mRNA. All other adult tissues expressed 1B mRNA but not 1A mRNA. The greatest amount of 1B mRNA was detected in liver and adipose (abdominal and subcutaneous) tissues. Other tissues had approximately one-half to one-tenth of the amount of 1B mRNA in the liver or adipose tissue. Fetal tissues (including fetal liver) expressed 1B mRNA and not 1A mRNA. Based on cDNA sequencing, the protein encoded by the 1A and 1B mRNA was nearly identical. We concluded that 1A somatotropin receptor mRNA is specific to adult bovine liver. Other adult and fetal bovine tissues expressed 1B somatotropin receptor mRNA with a predicted protein sequence that was similar to the 1A somatotropin receptor

  20. Palmitoylethanolamide Inhibits Glutamate Release in Rat Cerebrocortical Nerve Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Yu Lin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA, an endogenous fatty acid amide displaying neuroprotective actions, on glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals (synaptosomes was investigated. PEA inhibited the Ca2+-dependent release of glutamate, which was triggered by exposing synaptosomes to the potassium channel blocker 4-aminopyridine. This release inhibition was concentration dependent, associated with a reduction in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, and not due to a change in synaptosomal membrane potential. The glutamate release-inhibiting effect of PEA was prevented by the Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVA or the protein kinase A inhibitor H89, not affected by the intracellular Ca2+ release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157, and partially antagonized by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM281. Based on these results, we suggest that PEA exerts its presynaptic inhibition, likely through a reduction in the Ca2+ influx mediated by Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channels, thereby inhibiting the release of glutamate from rat cortical nerve terminals. This release inhibition might be linked to the activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the suppression of the protein kinase A pathway.

  1. Delayed release formulation of the somatostatin analog RC-160 inhibits the growth hormone (GH) response to GH-releasing factor-(1-29)NH2 and decreases elevated prolactin levels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokser, L; Schally, A V

    1988-10-01

    Recently, we have developed a long-acting delivery system for our somatostatin (SS) analog RC-160 based on injectable microcapsules in poly-(D,L-lactide-coglycolide). We studied the capacity of this formulation to repeatedly block the GH secretion induced by administration of GRF-(1-29)NH2 (GRF) on different days. Male rats anesthetized with pentobarbital were injected iv with 2.5 micrograms/kg BW GRF-(1-29)NH2 or saline. Five minutes later, blood samples were taken for GH measurement, and the animals were injected im with RC-160 microcapsules at a dose calculated to release 25 micrograms/day of the analog for 7 days or with the vehicle. The GRF stimuli were repeated 48 h, 96 h, and 8 days after administration of SS analog in microcapsules. GRF administration increased GH levels at the four times tested (P less than 0.01) in the control group injected with vehicle, while RC-160 microcapsules inhibited the GH response for more than 96 h (P less than 0.01). The GH levels augmented by pentobarbital were also decreased by the RC-160 microcapsules (P less than 0.01). Animals treated with microcapsules showed smaller increases in their body weight than untreated rats (P less than 0.05). We also investigated the effect of RC-160 microcapsules on hyperprolactinemic female rats implanted with pituitary glands under the kidney capsules. High PRL levels in rats bearing pituitary grafts showed a significant decrease when measured 4 days after the administration of RC-160 microcapsules. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the long-acting delivery system of the SS analog RC-160 and suggest the possible clinical usefulness of this formulation for lowering GH and PRL levels.

  2. Leptin inhibits and ghrelin augments hypothalamic noradrenaline release after stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Akio; Okada, Nobukazu; Rokkaku, Kumiko; Honda, Kazufumi; Ishibashi, Shun; Onaka, Tatsushi

    2008-09-01

    Metabolic conditions affect hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal responses to stressful stimuli. Here we examined effects of food deprivation, leptin and ghrelin upon noradrenaline release in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentrations after stressful stimuli. Food deprivation augmented both noradrenaline release in the PVN and the increase in plasma ACTH concentration following electrical footshocks (FSs). An intracerebroventricular injection of leptin attenuated the increases in hypothalamic noradrenaline release and plasma ACTH concentrations after FSs, while ghrelin augmented these responses. These data suggest that leptin inhibits and ghrelin facilitates neuroendocrine stress responses via noradrenaline release and indicate that a decrease in leptin and an increase in ghrelin release after food deprivation might contribute to augmentation of stress-induced ACTH release in a fasting state.

  3. Lactoferrin release and interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor production by human polymorphonuclear cells stimulated by various lipopolysaccharides: relationship to growth inhibition of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, C; Cassone, A; Serbousek, D; Pearson, C A; Djeu, J Y

    1992-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Salmonella typhimurium, at doses from 1 to 100 ng/ml, strongly enhanced growth inhibition of Candida albicans by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that LPS markedly augmented phagocytosis of Candida cells by increasing the number of yeasts ingested per neutrophil as well as the number of neutrophils capable of ingesting fungal cells. LPS activation caused augmented ...

  4. Effect of recombinant bovine somatotropin application intervals on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    productivity gains in dairy herds is recombinant bovine somatotropin ... intervals of 14 days can increase milk production from 3 to 5 kg/day, on ... blood flow and improving the efficiency in the use of .... The total increase in liters of milk produced within 30 days .... maintenance on production throughout the experimental.

  5. Effect of recombinant bovine somatotropin application intervals on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST) application intervals on chemical composition of milk from Girolando cows with productivity below 20 L/milk/day and animals with productivity above 20.1 liters/milk/day. The study included 30 Girolando cows with production ranging ...

  6. Somatotropin physiology - a review | van der Walt | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 24, No 1 (1994) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Somatotropin physiology - a review. JG van der ...

  7. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by somatotropin in pigs is independent of the somatotropin-induced increase in circulating insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Fiona A; Orellana, Renán A; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Jeyapalan, Asumthia S; Frank, Jason; Davis, Teresa A

    2008-07-01

    Chronic treatment of growing pigs with porcine somatotropin (pST) promotes protein synthesis and doubles postprandial levels of insulin, a hormone that stimulates translation initiation. This study aimed to determine whether the pST-induced increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis was mediated through an insulin-induced stimulation of translation initiation. After 7-10 days of pST (150 microg x kg(-1) x day(-1)) or control saline treatment, pancreatic glucose-amino acid clamps were performed in overnight-fasted pigs to reproduce 1) fasted (5 microU/ml), 2) fed control (25 microU/ml), and 3) fed pST-treated (50 microU/ml) insulin levels while glucose and amino acids were maintained at baseline fasting levels. Fractional protein synthesis rates and indexes of translation initiation were examined in skeletal muscle. Effectiveness of pST treatment was confirmed by reduced urea nitrogen and elevated insulin-like growth factor I levels in plasma. Skeletal muscle protein synthesis was independently increased by both insulin and pST. Insulin increased the phosphorylation of protein kinase B and the downstream effectors of the mammalian target of rapamycin, ribosomal protein S6 kinase, and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1). Furthermore, insulin reduced inactive 4E-BP1.eIF4E complex association and increased active eIF4E.eIF4G complex formation, indicating enhanced eIF4F complex assembly. However, pST treatment did not alter translation initiation factor activation. We conclude that the pST-induced stimulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in growing pigs is independent of the insulin-associated activation of translation initiation.

  8. Fluoxetine-induced inhibition of synaptosomal [3H]5-HT release: Possible Ca2+-channel inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauderman, K.A.; Gandhi, V.C.; Jones, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective 5-Ht uptake inhibitor, inhibited 15 mM K + -induced [ 3 H]5-HT release from rat spinal cord and cortical synaptosomes at concentrations > 0.5 uM. This effect reflected a property shared by another selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor paroxetine but not by less selective uptake inhibitors such as amitriptyline, desipramine, imipramine or nortriptyline. Inhibition of release by fluoxetine was inversely related to both the concentration of K + used to depolarize the synaptosomes and the concentration of external Ca 2+ . Experiments aimed at determining a mechanism of action revealed that fluoxetine did not inhibit voltage-independent release of [ 3 H]5-HT release induced by the Ca 2+ -ionophore A 23187 or Ca 2+ -independent release induced by fenfluramine. Moreover the 5-HT autoreceptor antagonist methiothepin did not reverse the inhibitory actions of fluoxetine on K + -induced release. Further studies examined the effects of fluoxetine on voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channels and Ca 2+ entry

  9. Acute serotonin depletion releases motivated inhibition of response vigour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Swart, Jennifer C; Schmidt, Kristin; Fekkes, Durk; Geurts, Dirk E M; Cools, Roshan

    2015-04-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin has long been implicated in the motivational control of behaviour. Recent theories propose that the role of serotonin can be understood in terms of an interaction between a motivational and a behavioural activation axis. Experimental support for these ideas, however, has been mixed. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the role of serotonin (5HT) in behavioural vigour as a function of incentive motivation. We employed dietary acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) to lower the 5HT precursor tryptophan during the performance of a speeded visual discrimination task. Feedback valence and feedback probability were manipulated independently and cued prior to target onset. On feedback trials, fast correct responses led to either reward or avoidance of punishment, while slow or incorrect responses led to reward omission or punishment. We show that behavioural responding is inhibited under high incentive motivation (i.e. high-feedback probability) at baseline 5HT levels and that lowering these leads to behavioural disinhibition, while leaving accuracy unaffected. Surprisingly, there were no differential effects of motivational valence, with 5HT depletion releasing behavioural inhibition under both appetitive and aversive motivation. Our findings extend current theories on the role of 5HT in behavioural inhibition by showing that reductions in serotonin lead to increased behavioural vigour only if there is a motivational drive to inhibit behaviour at baseline.

  10. Activated human neutrophils release hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte growth factor or scatter factor (HGF\\/SF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has potent angiogenic properties. We have previously demonstrated that neutrophils (PMN) are directly angiogenic by releasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We hypothesized that the acute inflammatory response can stimulate PMN to release HGF. AIMS: To examine the effects of inflammatory mediators on PMN HGF release and the effect of recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) on PMN adhesion receptor expression and PMN VEGF release. METHODS: In the first experiment, PMN were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Culture supernatants were assayed for HGF using ELISA. In the second experiment, PMN were lysed to measure total HGF release and HGF expression in the PMN was detected by Western immunoblotting. Finally, PMN were stimulated with rhHGF. PMN CD 11a, CD 11b, and CD 18 receptor expression and VEGF release was measured using flow cytometry and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: TNF-alpha, LPS and fMLP stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN HGF (755+\\/-216, 484+\\/-221 and 565+\\/-278 pg\\/ml, respectively) compared to controls (118+\\/-42 pg\\/ml). IL-8 had no effect. Total HGF release following cell lysis and Western blot suggests that HGF is released from intracellular stores. Recombinant human HGF did not alter PMN adhesion receptor expression and had no effect on PMN VEGF release. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that pro-inflammatory mediators can stimulate HGF release from a PMN intracellular store and that activated PMN in addition to secreting VEGF have further angiogenic potential by releasing HGF.

  11. A Glutamate Homeostat Controls the Presynaptic Inhibition of Neurotransmitter Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiling Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We have interrogated the synaptic dialog that enables the bi-directional, homeostatic control of presynaptic efficacy at the glutamatergic Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We find that homeostatic depression and potentiation use disparate genetic, induction, and expression mechanisms. Specifically, homeostatic potentiation is achieved through reduced CaMKII activity postsynaptically and increased abundance of active zone material presynaptically at one of the two neuronal subtypes innervating the NMJ, while homeostatic depression occurs without alterations in CaMKII activity and is expressed at both neuronal subtypes. Furthermore, homeostatic depression is only induced through excess presynaptic glutamate release and operates with disregard to the postsynaptic response. We propose that two independent homeostats modulate presynaptic efficacy at the Drosophila NMJ: one is an intercellular signaling system that potentiates synaptic strength following diminished postsynaptic excitability, while the other adaptively modulates presynaptic glutamate release through an autocrine mechanism without feedback from the postsynaptic compartment. : Homeostatic mechanisms stabilize synaptic strength, but the signaling systems remain enigmatic. Li et al. suggest the existence of a homeostat operating at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction that responds to excess glutamate through an autocrine mechanism to adaptively inhibit presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This system parallels forms of plasticity at central synapses. Keywords: homeostatic synaptic plasticity, glutamate homeostasis, synaptic depression, Drosophila neuromuscular junction

  12. Ursodeoxycholic acid inhibits TNFα-induced IL-8 release from monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Aoife M; Lajczak, Natalia K; Keyes, Jennifer A; Ward, Joseph B; Greene, Catherine M; Keely, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Monocytes are critical to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) as they infiltrate the mucosa and release cytokines that drive the inflammatory response. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a naturally occurring bile acid with anti-inflammatory actions, has been proposed as a potential new therapy for IBD. However, its effects on monocyte function are not yet known. Primary monocytes from healthy volunteers or cultured U937 monocytes were treated with either the proinflammatory cytokine, TNFα (5 ng/ml) or the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 μg/ml) for 24 h, in the absence or presence of UDCA (25-100 μM). IL-8 release into the supernatant was measured by ELISA. mRNA levels were quantified by qPCR and changes in cell signaling proteins were determined by Western blotting. Toxicity was assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. UDCA treatment significantly attenuated TNFα-, but not LPS-driven, release of IL-8 from both primary and cultured monocytes. UDCA inhibition of TNFα-driven responses was associated with reduced IL-8 mRNA expression. Both TNFα and LPS stimulated NFκB activation in monocytes, while IL-8 release in response to both cytokines was attenuated by an NFκB inhibitor, BMS-345541. Interestingly, UDCA inhibited TNFα-, but not LPS-stimulated, NFκB activation. Finally, TNFα, but not LPS, induced phosphorylation of TNF receptor associated factor (TRAF2), while UDCA cotreatment attenuated this response. We conclude that UDCA specifically inhibits TNFα-induced IL-8 release from monocytes by inhibiting TRAF2 activation. Since such actions would serve to dampen mucosal immune responses in vivo, our data support the therapeutic potential of UDCA for IBD. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmao Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium (Ce corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0×10−14 m2s for Ce3+ compared to 2.5×10−13 m2s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.

  14. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nano porous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, X.; Rathod, Sh.; Shah, P.; Brinker, C.J.; Jiang, X.; Jiang, Y.; Liu, N.; Xu, H.; Brinker, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cerium (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0x10-14 m 2 s for Ce 3+ compared to 2.5x10-13 m 2 s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.

  15. Inhibition of histamine and eicosanoid release from dispersed human lung cells in vitro by quinotolast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayama, Y; Hiroi, J; Lau, L C; Church, M K

    1995-12-01

    We have examined the effects of a new anti-allergic drug, quinotolast [sodium 5-(4-oxo-1-phenoxy-4H-quinolizine-3-carboxamido) yetrazolate monohydrate], in inhibiting the release of histamine and the generation of leukotriene (LT) C4 and prostaglandin (PG) D2 from dispersed human lung cells and compared this with those of its active metabolite in the rat, hydroxy quinotolast, and reference drugs, tranilast and sodium cromoglycate (SCG). Quinotolast in the concentration range of 1-100 micrograms/ml inhibited histamine and LTC4 release in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of quinotolast on histamine release from dispersed lung cells was largely independent of the preincubation period, no tachyphylaxis being observed. Hydroxy quinotolast and tranilast showed a weak inhibition of histamine release only when the drugs were added to the cells simultaneously with anti-IgE challenge. Quinotolast, 100 micrograms/ml, and SCG, 1 mM, significantly inhibited PGD2 and LTC4 release. Quinotolast inhibited PGD2 release by 100% and LTC4 release by 54%, whereas SCG inhibited PDG2 release by 33% and LTC4 release by 100%. No cross-tachyphylaxis between quinotolast and SCG was observed. The results demonstrated that quinotolast showed a significant inhibition of inflammatory mediators from human dispersed lung cells, suggesting that quinotolast is a good candidate for a clinical anti-allergic drug.

  16. Flavonoids inhibit histamine release and expression of proinflammatory cytokines in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo-Hyun; Lee, Soyoung; Son, Hee-Young; Park, Seung-Bin; Kim, Mi-Sun; Choi, Eun-Ju; Singh, Thoudam S K; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Lee, Maan-Gee; Kim, Jung-Eun; Hyun, Myung Chul; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kim, Yeo Hyang; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2008-10-01

    Mast cells participate in allergy and inflammation by secreting inflammatory mediators such as histamine and proinflammatory cytokines. Flavonoids are naturally occurring molecules with antioxidant, cytoprotective, and antiinflammatory actions. However, effect of flavonoids on the release of histamine and proinflammatory mediator, and their comparative mechanism of action in mast cells were not well defined. Here, we compared the effect of six flavonoids (astragalin, fisetin, kaempferol, myricetin, quercetin, and rutin) on the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation. Fisetin, kaempferol, myricetin, quercetin, and rutin inhibited IgE or phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-mediated histamine release in RBL-2H3 cells. These five flavonoids also inhibited elevation of intracellular calcium. Gene expressions and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 were assessed in PMACI-stimulated human mast cells (HMC-1). Fisetin, quercetin, and rutin decreased gene expression and production of all the proinflammatory cytokines after PMACI stimulation. Myricetin attenuated TNF-alpha and IL-6 but not IL-1beta and IL-8. Fisetin, myricetin, and rutin suppressed activation of NF-kappaB indicated by inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB, NF-kappaB/DNA binding, and NF-kappaB-dependent gene reporter assay. The pharmacological actions of these flavonoids suggest their potential activity for treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases through the down-regulation of mast cell activation.

  17. Influence of body condition and bovine somatotropin on estrous behavior, reproductive performance, and concentrations of serum somatotropin and plasma fatty acids in postpartum Brahman-influenced cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, R; Looper, M L; Rorie, R W; Lamb, M A; Reiter, S T; Hallford, D M; Kreider, D L; Rosenkrans, C F

    2007-05-01

    Ninety-nine multiparous Brahman-influenced (1/4 to 3/8 Brahman) cows were managed to achieve low (BCS = 4.3 +/- 0.1; n = 50) or moderate (BCS = 6.1 +/- 0.1; n = 49) body condition (BC) to determine the influence of bovine somatotropin (bST) on estrous characteristics, reproductive performance, and concentrations of serum GH and plasma NEFA. Beginning 32 d postpartum, cows within each BC were assigned randomly to treatment with or without bST. Non-bST-treated cows received no treatment, and treated cows were administered bST (Posilac, 500 mg s.c.) on d -35, -21, and -7 before initiation of the breeding season. On d -7, all cows received an intravaginal, controlled internal drug-releasing (CIDR) device. On d 0 (initiation of the 70-d breeding season), the CIDR were removed and cows received prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha). Blood samples were collected from the median caudal vein of the cows at each bST treatment and at d -28 and 0. Estrous behavior was monitored by radiotelemetry during the first 30 d of the breeding season. Growth hormone was increased (P conception rate tended (P = 0.07) to be greater for bST-low BC cows than non-bST-treated cows in low or moderate BC. On d 0, NEFA were greater (P conception rate during the first 30 d of breeding and pregnancy rates during the first 3 d of breeding in postpartum Brahman-influenced cows.

  18. Activation of protein kinase C inhibits synthesis and release of decidual prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, I.; Costello, A.; Ganong, B.; Bell, R.M.; Handwerger, S.

    1986-01-01

    Activation of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C by diacylglycerol and phorbol esters has been shown to mediate release of hormones in many systems. To determine whether protein kinase C activation is also involved in the regulation of prolactin release from human decidual, the authors have examined the effects of various acylglycerols and phorbol esters on the synthesis and release of prolactin from cultured human decidual cells. sn-1,2-Dioctanolyglycerol (diC 8 ), which is known to stimulate protein kinase C in other systems, inhibited prolactin release in a dose-dependent manner with maximal inhibition of 53.1% at 100 μM. Diolein (100 μM), which also stimulates protein kinase C activity in some systems, inhibited prolactin release by 21.3%. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and 4β-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, which activate protein kinase C in other systems, also inhibited the release of prolactin, which the protein kinase C inactivate 4α-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate was without effect. The inhibition of prolactin release was secondary to a decrease in prolactin synthesis. Although diC 8 and PMA inhibited the synthesis and release of prolactin, these agents had no effect on the synthesis or release of trichloroacetic acid-precipitable [ 35 S]methionine-labeled decidual proteins and did not cause the release of the cytosolic enzymes lactic dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase. DiC 8 and PMA stimulates the specific activity of protein kinase C in decidual tissue by 14.6 and 14.0-fold, respectively. The inhibition of the synthesis and release of prolactin by diC 8 and phorbol esters strongly implicates protein kinase C in the regulation of the production and release of prolactin from the decidua

  19. Chlorpromazine inhibits tumour necrosis factor synthesis and cytotoxicity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinetti, M; Galli, G; Demitri, M T; Fantuzzi, G; Minto, M; Ghezzi, P; Alzani, R; Cozzi, E; Fratelli, M

    1995-11-01

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ) has been previously shown to protect against endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] lethality and inhibit the release of tumour necrosis factor in vivo. We investigated at the cellular level whether this was due to direct inhibition of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) synthesis, using LPS-stimulated THP-1 human monocytic leukemia cells. We also studied the effect of CPZ on human TNF-alpha action by assessing TNF-alpha cytotoxicity on mouse fibrosarcoma L929 cells. CPZ (1-100 microM) inhibited TNF-alpha production in THP-1 cells in a dose dependent manner by a maximum of 80%. This effect was comparable to that of two well-known inhibitory drugs, dexamethasone and cyclicAMP. Inhibition was also evident at the mRNA level. On the other hand CPZ (10-25 microM) also inhibited TNF-alpha activity: in fact it reduced the cytotoxicity of TNF-alpha on L929 cells (EC50 was increased four times) and could provide protection even as a post-treatment. CPZ inhibited TNF-induced apoptosis in L929 cells, as detected by analysis of nuclear morphology. However, since we showed that apoptosis was very limited, and was not the main mode of cell death in our conditions, this could not explain the overall protection. Since CPZ did not interfere with either the oligomerization state of TNF-alpha or its receptor binding, our data suggest that it reduced cytotoxicity by inhibiting some steps in the TNF-alpha signalling pathways.

  20. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone release by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Yasumoto, T.; Aurbach, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, a toxin derived from a marine dinoflagellate, is a potent activator of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. To further test the hypothesis that inhibition of PTH secretion by calcium is mediated via a calcium channel we studied the effect of maitotoxin on dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Maitotoxin inhibited PTH release in a dose-dependent fashion, and inhibition was maximal at 1 ng/ml. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA blocked the inhibition of PTH by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin enhanced the effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and increased the rate of radiocalcium uptake in parathyroid cells. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that interacts with calcium channels in the parathyroid cell, did not affect the inhibition of PTH secretion by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin, by its action on calcium channels allows entry of extracellular calcium and inhibits PTH release. Our results suggest that calcium channels are involved in the release of PTH. Inhibition of PTH release by maitotoxin is not sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting that maitotoxin may act distal to the site interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or maitotoxin could interact with other ions or second messengers to inhibit PTH release

  1. DIDS prevents ischemic membrane degradation in cultured hippocampal neurons by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Pamenter

    prevented stimulus-evoked release of von Willebrand Factor from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We conclude that DIDS inhibits MMP exocytosis and through this mechanism preserves neuronal membrane integrity during pathological stress.

  2. Inhibition of microparticle release triggers endothelial cell apoptosis and detachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abid Hussein, Mohammed N.; Böing, Anita N.; Sturk, Augueste; Hau, Chi M.; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2007-01-01

    Endothelial cell cultures contain caspase 3-containing microparticles (EMP), which are reported to form during or after cell detachment. We hypothesize that also adherent endothelial cells release EMP, thus protecting these cells from caspase 3 accumulation, detachment and apoptosis. Human umbilical

  3. Characterization of unsaturated fatty acid sustained-release microspheres for long-term algal inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lixiao; Jie, Xiaoting; Wang, Peifang; Li, Shiyin; Hu, Shuzhen; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Acharya, Kumud

    2015-02-01

    The unsaturated fatty acid (linoleic acid) sustained-release microspheres were prepared with linoleic acid (LA) using alginate-chitosan microcapsule technology. These LA sustained-release microspheres had a high encapsulation efficiency (up to 62%) tested by high performance liquid chromatography with a photo diode array. The dry microspheres were characterized by a scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction measurement, dynamic thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. The results of characterization showed that the microspheres had good thermal stability (decomposition temperature of 236°C), stable and temperature independent release properties (release time of more than 40 d). Compared to direct dosing of LA, LA sustained-released microspheres could inhibit Microcystis aeruginosa growth to the non-growth state. The results of this study suggested that the LA sustained-release microspheres may be a potential candidate for algal inhibition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Saiboku-to, a Kampo herbal medicine, inhibits LTC4 release from eosinophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Hirai

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Saiboku-to (TJ-96, a traditional Kampo herbal formation, has been used in the treatment of bronchial asthma in Japan as an anti-allergy herbal medicine. We investigated the effect of TJ-96 on leukotriene (LTC4 release from eosinophils and basophils isolated from healthy volunteers. Pre-incubation of eosinophils with TJ-96 inhibited ionophore- or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP-induced LTC4 generation by eosinophils in a dose-dependent fashion. The TJ-96 was more potent in the release by ionophore (IC50 = 60 mg/mL than the release induced by FMLP (IC50 = 300 mg/mL. Maximal inhibition was observed when eosinophils were pretreated with TJ-96 for 5 min. Although TJ-96 at high concentrations inhibited IgE-mediated histamine release from human basophils, inhibition of IgE-mediated LTC4 release was not statistically significant. The potent inhibitory activity was found in the extract of Glycyrrhiza root, one of the herbal components of TJ-96, but the inhibitory effects were not due to either glycyrrhizin or liquiritin, the main elements of the Glycyrrhiza root. These results raise the possibility that the clinical efficacy of TJ-96 is derived, at least in part, from its potent inhibitory effect on LTC4 release from eosinophils.

  5. The effect of porcine somatotropin (pST) and gender on production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of porcine somatotropin (pST) and gender on production parameters and tissue yield of pigs slaughtered at 135 kg live weight. ... No significant pST effects were found for live weight, carcass weight, % bone, % fat or % lean meat, but a significant increase in percentage skin was found. Keywords: triterpenoid, stem ...

  6. A rapid surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor immunossay for screening of somatotropins in injection preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heutmekers, T.H.J.; Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Haasnoot, W.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2007-01-01

    The use of growth hormones (recombinant somatotropins (rSTs)) is approved in several countries, e.g. the USA, Brazil and Australia to enhance growth or lactating performances of livestock. Their use in the EU is banned, however, due to the widespread application, the illegal use within the EU cannot

  7. Multiplex flow cytometric immunoassay for serum biomarker profiling of recombinant bovine somatotropin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, N.G.E.; Ludwig, S.K.J.; Veer, van der G.; Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) is licensed for enhancing milk production in dairy cows in some countries, for instance the United States, but is banned in Europe. Serum biomarker profiling can be an adequate approach to discriminate between treated and untreated groups. In this study a

  8. Monitoring milk for antobodies against recombinant bovine somatotropin using a microsphere immunoassay-based biomarker approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludwig, S.K.J.; Smits, N.G.E.; Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) can be used to enhance milk production in dairy cattle. This is permitted in several countries but unauthorized in the European Union. Antibodies, which are produced endogenously in response to rbST administration, can be detected as a biomarker for indicating

  9. Protein biomarker-based screening for detection of recombinant bovine somatotropin abuse in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludwig, S.K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) is a 22 kDa proteohormone, which can be used to increase milk production in dairy cows. It has been marketed since 1994 and while its use in food production is approved in several countries, such as the US, it is banned in the EU since 2000. To enforce the

  10. In Vitro Inhibition of Enamel Demineralisation by Fluoride-releasing Restorative Materials and Dental Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    To determine the ability of 5 contemporary fluoride-releasing restoratives and 3 fluoride-releasing adhesives to inhibit enamel demineralisation surrounding restorations, and the associations between inhibition and the levels of fluoride released from these materials. Five fluoride-releasing restoratives (Fuji IX GP, Ketac N100, Dyract Extra, Beautifil II and Wave) and 3 fluoride-releasing adhesives (Stae, Prime & Bond NT and Fluoro Bond II) were investigated. Eight disks of each material were prepared. Fluoride release was measured daily using a fluoride-ion-selective electrode for 15 days. Twenty-four cavities for each group were restored with a restorative and an adhesive. Specimens were subjected to thermal stress and stored for 30 days in saline solution. After a 15-day pH-cycling regimen, two 150-μm-thick sections were derived from each specimen. Enamel lesion depth was measured at 0, 100, and 200 μm from each restoration's margin via polarised light microscopy. Of the restoratives investigated, Fuji IX GP released the most fluoride. The fluoride-releasing restoratives tested exhibited shallower enamel lesions than did the control group at all distances tested (p < 0.05). Fuji IX GP yielded significantly lower enamel lesion depth than did the other experimental materials. The depths of enamel lesions did not differ significantly when comparing restoratives applied with a fluoride-releasing adhesive with those applied with a non-fluoride-releasing adhesive. The fluoride-releasing materials tested reduced enamel demineralisation but to different extents, depending on their levels of fluoride release. Fluoride-releasing adhesives did not influence enamel lesion formation.

  11. Inhibition of synaptically evoked cortical acetylcholine release by adenosine: an in vivo microdialysis study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materi, L M; Rasmusson, D D; Semba, K

    2000-01-01

    The release of cortical acetylcholine from the intracortical axonal terminals of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons is closely associated with electroencephalographic activity. One factor which may act to reduce cortical acetylcholine release and promote sleep is adenosine. Using in vivo microdialysis, we examined the effect of adenosine and selective adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on cortical acetylcholine release evoked by electrical stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in urethane anesthetized rats. All drugs were administered locally within the cortex by reverse dialysis. None of the drugs tested altered basal release of acetylcholine in the cortex. Adenosine significantly reduced evoked cortical acetylcholine efflux in a concentration-dependent manner. This was mimicked by the adenosine A(1) receptor selective agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine and blocked by the selective A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). The A(2A) receptor agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosi ne hydrochloride (CGS 21680) did not alter evoked cortical acetylcholine release even in the presence of DPCPX. Administered alone, neither DPCPX nor the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine affected evoked cortical acetylcholine efflux. Simultaneous delivery of the adenosine uptake inhibitors dipyridamole and S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine significantly reduced evoked cortical acetylcholine release, and this effect was blocked by the simultaneous administration of caffeine. These data indicate that activation of the A(1) adenosine receptor inhibits acetylcholine release in the cortex in vivo while the A(2A) receptor does not influence acetylcholine efflux. Such inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release by adenosine may contribute to an increased propensity to sleep during prolonged wakefulness.

  12. Bacterial inhibiting surfaces caused by the effects of silver release and/or electrical field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Schroll, Casper

    2008-01-01

    In this study, silver-palladium surfaces and silver-bearing stainless steels were designed and investigated focusing on electrochemical principles to form inhibiting effects on planktonic and/or biofilm bacteria in water systems. Silver-resistant Escherichia coli and silver-sensitive E. coli were...... silver ions release can occur from their Surfaces. For silver-bearing stainless steels, the inhibiting effect can only be explained by high local silver ions release. and can be limited or deactivated dependent on the specific environment. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  13. Combination of roflumilast with a beta-2 adrenergic receptor agonist inhibits proinflammatory and profibrotic mediator release from human lung fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tannheimer Stacey L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small airway narrowing is an important pathology which impacts lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The accumulation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts contribute to inflammation, remodeling and fibrosis by production and release of mediators such as cytokines, profibrotic factors and extracellular matrix proteins. This study investigated the effects of the phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor roflumilast, combined with the long acting β2 adrenergic agonist indacaterol, both approved therapeutics for COPD, on fibroblast functions that contribute to inflammation and airway fibrosis. Methods The effects of roflumilast and indacaterol treatment were characterized on transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1-treated normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF. NHLF were evaluated for expression of the profibrotic mediators endothelin-1 (ET-1 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, expression of the myofibroblast marker alpha smooth muscle actin, and fibronectin (FN secretion. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α was used to induce secretion of chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10, chemokine C-C motif ligand 5 (CCL5 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF from NHLF and drug inhibition was assessed. Results Evaluation of roflumilast (1-10 μM showed no significant inhibition alone on TGFβ1-induced ET-1 and CTGF mRNA transcripts, ET-1 and FN protein production, alpha smooth muscle expression, or TNF-α-induced secretion of CXCL10, CCL5 and GM-CSF. A concentration-dependent inhibition of ET-1 and CTGF was shown with indacaterol treatment, and a submaximal concentration was chosen for combination studies. When indacaterol (0.1 nM was added to roflumilast, significant inhibition was seen on all inflammatory and fibrotic mediators evaluated, which was superior to the inhibition seen with either drug alone. Roflumilast plus indacaterol combination treatment resulted in significantly elevated phosphorylation

  14. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, 320, Taiwan (China); Lu, Cheng-Wei [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); Wang, Su-Jane, E-mail: med0003@mail.fju.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat

  15. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Su-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K + channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca 2+ ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] C ), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca v 2.2 (N-type) and Ca v 2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na + /Ca 2+ exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca 2+ entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. ► This action did

  16. Inhibition of Anaerobic Phosphate Release by Nitric Oxide in Activated Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Niel, E. W. J.; Appeldoorn, K. J.; Zehnder, A. J. B.; Kortstee, G. J. J.

    1998-01-01

    Activated sludge not containing significant numbers of denitrifying, polyphosphate [poly(P)]-accumulating bacteria was grown in a fill-and-draw system and exposed to alternating anaerobic and aerobic periods. During the aerobic period, poly(P) accumulated up to 100 mg of P · g of (dry) weight. When portions of the sludge were incubated anaerobically in the presence of acetate, 80 to 90% of the intracellular poly(P) was degraded and released as orthophosphate. Degradation of poly(P) was mainly catalyzed by the concerted action of polyphosphate:AMP phosphotransferase and adenylate kinase, resulting in ATP formation. In the presence of 0.3 mM nitric oxide (NO) in the liquid-phase release of phosphate, uptake of acetate, formation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate, utilization of glycogen, and formation of ATP were severely inhibited or completely abolished. In cell extracts of the sludge, adenylate kinase activity was completely inhibited by 0.15 mM NO. The nature of this inhibition was probably noncompetitive, similar to that with hog adenylate kinase. Activated sludge polyphosphate glucokinase was also completely inhibited by 0.15 mM NO. It is concluded that the inhibitory effect of NO on acetate-mediated phosphate release by the sludge used in this study is due to the inhibition of adenylate kinase in the phosphate-releasing organisms. The inhibitory effect of nitrate and nitrite on phosphate release is probably due to their conversion to NO. The lack of any inhibitory effect of NO on adenylate kinase of the poly(P)-accumulating Acinetobacter johnsonii 210A suggests that this type of organism is not involved in the enhanced biological phosphate removal by the sludges used. PMID:9687452

  17. Investigation of the effects of certain formulation factors on release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the effects of three formulation variables (PVP, stearic acid and Avicel PH101) on disintegration time and release properties of paracetamol tablets using a 23 factorial experimental design. Methodology: Three formulation variables; Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (factor A), Stearic acid (factor B) and Avicel PH 101 ...

  18. Inhibition of serotonin release by bombesin-like peptides in rat hypothalamus in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saporito, M.S.; Warwick, R.O. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the activity of bombesin (BN), neuromedin-C (NM-C) and neuromedin-B (NM-B) on serotonin (5-HT) release and reuptake in rat hypothalamus (HYP) in vitro. BN and NM-C but not NM-B decreased K + evoked 3 H-5-HT release from superfused HYP slices by 25%. Bacitracin, a nonspecific peptidase inhibitor, reversed the inhibitory effect of BN on K + evoked 3 H-5-HT release. Phosphoramidon (PAN, 10 μM) an endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor, abolished the inhibitory effect of BN, but not NM-C, on K + evoked 3 H-5-HT release. The peptidyl dipeptidase A inhibitor enalaprilat (ENP, 10 μM), enhanced both BN and NM-C inhibition of 3 H-5-HT release. Bestatin (BST, 10 μM) had no effect on BN or NM-C inhibitory activity on 3 H-5-HT release. Neither BN, NM-C nor NM-B affected reuptake of 3 H-5-HT into HYP synaptosomes alone or in combination with any of the peptidase inhibitors, nor did these peptides alter the ability of fluoxetine to inhibit 3 H-5-HT uptake

  19. Doc2b synchronizes secretion from chromaffin cells by stimulating fast and inhibiting sustained release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Pinheiro, Paulo César; de Wit, Heidi; Walter, Alexander M

    2013-01-01

    Synaptotagmin-1 and -7 constitute the main calcium sensors mediating SNARE-dependent exocytosis in mouse chromaffin cells, but the role of a closely related calcium-binding protein, Doc2b, remains enigmatic. We investigated its role in chromaffin cells using Doc2b knock-out mice and high temporal...... resolution measurements of exocytosis. We found that the calcium dependence of vesicle priming and release triggering remained unchanged, ruling out an obligatory role for Doc2b in those processes. However, in the absence of Doc2b, release was shifted from the readily releasable pool to the subsequent...... sustained component. Conversely, upon overexpression of Doc2b, the sustained component was largely inhibited whereas the readily releasable pool was augmented. Electron microscopy revealed an increase in the total number of vesicles upon Doc2b overexpression, ruling out vesicle depletion as the cause...

  20. BET Bromodomain Inhibition Releases the Mediator Complex from Select cis-Regulatory Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Anand S; Roe, Jae-Seok; Mok, Beverly Y L; Hohmann, Anja F; Shi, Junwei; Vakoc, Christopher R

    2016-04-19

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein BRD4 can physically interact with the Mediator complex, but the relevance of this association to the therapeutic effects of BET inhibitors in cancer is unclear. Here, we show that BET inhibition causes a rapid release of Mediator from a subset of cis-regulatory elements in the genome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. These sites of Mediator eviction were highly correlated with transcriptional suppression of neighboring genes, which are enriched for targets of the transcription factor MYB and for functions related to leukemogenesis. A shRNA screen of Mediator in AML cells identified the MED12, MED13, MED23, and MED24 subunits as performing a similar regulatory function to BRD4 in this context, including a shared role in sustaining a block in myeloid maturation. These findings suggest that the interaction between BRD4 and Mediator has functional importance for gene-specific transcriptional activation and for AML maintenance. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Expression and Regulation of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Type 2 beta in Developing and Mature Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuperman, Yael; Issler, Orna; Vaughan, Joan; Bilezikjian, Louise; Vale, Wylie; Chen, Alon

    Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 (CRFR2) is highly expressed in skeletal muscle (SM) tissue where it is suggested to inhibit interactions between insulin signaling pathway components affecting whole-body glucose homeostasis. However, little is known about factors regulating SM CRFR2

  2. Acute Stress Suppresses Synaptic Inhibition and Increases Anxiety via Endocannabinoid Release in the Basolateral Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Shi; Itoga, Christy A; Fisher, Marc O; Solomonow, Jonathan; Roltsch, Emily A; Gilpin, Nicholas W; Tasker, Jeffrey G

    2016-08-10

    Stress and glucocorticoids stimulate the rapid mobilization of endocannabinoids in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Cannabinoid receptors in the BLA contribute to anxiogenesis and fear-memory formation. We tested for rapid glucocorticoid-induced endocannabinoid regulation of synaptic inhibition in the rat BLA. Glucocorticoid application to amygdala slices elicited a rapid, nonreversible suppression of spontaneous, but not evoked, GABAergic synaptic currents in BLA principal neurons; the effect was also seen with a membrane-impermeant glucocorticoid, but not with intracellular glucocorticoid application, implicating a membrane-associated glucocorticoid receptor. The glucocorticoid suppression of GABA currents was not blocked by antagonists of nuclear corticosteroid receptors, or by inhibitors of gene transcription or protein synthesis, but was blocked by inhibiting postsynaptic G-protein activity, suggesting a postsynaptic nongenomic steroid signaling mechanism that stimulates the release of a retrograde messenger. The rapid glucocorticoid-induced suppression of inhibition was prevented by blocking CB1 receptors and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) synthesis, and it was mimicked and occluded by CB1 receptor agonists, indicating it was mediated by the retrograde release of the endocannabinoid 2-AG. The rapid glucocorticoid effect in BLA neurons in vitro was occluded by prior in vivo acute stress-induced, or prior in vitro glucocorticoid-induced, release of endocannabinoid. Acute stress also caused an increase in anxiety-like behavior that was attenuated by blocking CB1 receptor activation and inhibiting 2-AG synthesis in the BLA. Together, these findings suggest that acute stress causes a long-lasting suppression of synaptic inhibition in BLA neurons via a membrane glucocorticoid receptor-induced release of 2-AG at GABA synapses, which contributes to stress-induced anxiogenesis. We provide a cellular mechanism in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) for the rapid stress

  3. Sigma receptor ligand N,N'-di-(ortho-tolyl)guanidine inhibits release of acetylcholine in the guinea pig ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, B G; Keana, J F; Weber, E

    1991-11-26

    The inhibition of stimulated contractions of the guinea pig ileum longitudinal muscle/myenteric plexus preparation by sigma receptor ligands has been previously described. In this study, the stimulated release of [3H]acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve terminals in this same preparation was monitored in the presence and absence of sigma receptor ligands. N,N'-Di-(orthotolyl)guanidine (DTG) and other compounds selective for the sigma receptor inhibited stimulated [3H]acetylcholine release. These results suggest that their inhibition of stimulated contractions in this preparation was mediated by inhibition of acetylcholine release.

  4. Improvement of succinate production by release of end-product inhibition in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soon-Chun; Park, Joon-Song; Yun, Jiae; Park, Jin Hwan

    2017-03-01

    Succinate is a renewable-based platform chemical that may be used to produce a wide range of chemicals including 1,4-butanediol, tetrahydrofurane, and γ-butyrolactone. However, industrial fermentation of organic acids is often subject to end-product inhibition, which significantly retards cell growth and limits metabolic activities and final productivity. In this study, we report the development of metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum for high production of succinate by release of end-product inhibition coupled with an increase of key metabolic flux. It was found that the rates of glucose consumption and succinate production were significantly reduced by extracellular succinate in an engineered strain, S003. To understand the mechanism underlying the inhibition by succinate, comparative transcriptome analysis was performed. Among the downregulated genes, overexpression of the NCgl0275 gene was found to suppress the inhibition of glucose consumption and succinate production, resulting in a 37.7% increase in succinate production up to 55.4g/L in fed-batch fermentation. Further improvement was achieved by increasing the metabolic flux from PEP to OAA. The final engineered strain was able to produce 152.2g/L succinate, the highest production reported to date, with a yield of 1.1g/g glucose under anaerobic condition. These results suggest that the release of end-product inhibition coupled with an increase in key metabolic flux is a promising strategy for enhancing production of succinate. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Blockade of chloride channels by DIDS stimulates renin release and inhibits contraction of afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Skøtt, O

    1996-01-01

    or without ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] and DIDS were not additive. In the absence of chloride, basal renin release was suppressed and the stimulatory effect of DIDS was abolished. The DIDS-induced enhancement of renin release was not dependent on bicarbonate....... Norepinephrine (5 x 10(-7)-1 x 10(-6) M) and angiotensin II (1 x 10(-8)-10(-6) M) evoked reversible and dose-dependent contractions of microperfused rabbit afferent arterioles. DIDS (0.5 mM) did not affect the basal diameter of the arterioles but strongly inhibited the response to angiotensin II and attenuated...

  6. Antiviral Inhibition of Enveloped Virus Release by Tetherin/BST-2: Action and Counteraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J. D. Neil

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin (BST2/CD317 has been recently recognized as a potent interferon-induced antiviral molecule that inhibits the release of diverse mammalian enveloped virus particles from infected cells. By targeting an immutable structure common to all these viruses, the virion membrane, evasion of this antiviral mechanism has necessitated the development of specific countermeasures that directly inhibit tetherin activity. Here we review our current understanding of the molecular basis of tetherin’s mode of action, the viral countermeasures that antagonize it, and how virus/tetherin interactions may affect viral transmission and pathogenicity.

  7. Dopamine inhibits maitotoxin-stimulated pituitary 45Ca2+ efflux and prolactin release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Login, I.S.; Judd, A.M.; MacLeod, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors examined the hypothesis that dopaminergic inhibition of prolactin release is coupled to modulation of cellular calcium flux. Dispersed female rat pituitary cells were prelabeled in 45 Ca 2+ and perifused to determine simultaneously fractional calcium efflux and prolactin release, as stimulated by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator. The integrated response of each parameter to 5 ng/ml maitotoxin was obtained in individual perifusion columns in the absence or presence of various concentrations of dopamine. Maitotoxin-stimulated calcium efflux was suppressed by dopamine concentrations of 0.01 μM and greater and achieved a maximal effect at ∼0.1 μM, at which calcium efflux was reduced by 50%. Maitotoxin-stimulated prolactin release was inhibited by 0.03 μM dopamine and greater concentrations, and at a concentration of ∼10.0 μM dopamine the effect became maximal at ∼85% suppression. Haloperidol (0.1 μM) blocked the effects of 0.1 μM dopamine on both parameters. Simultaneous suppression of maitotoxin-stimulated calcium efflux and prolactin release by concentrations of dopamine within the nonomolar range suggests that dopamine receptor activation is negatively coupled to modulation of calcium flux in the physiological regulation of prolactin secretion

  8. [Shikimic acid inhibits the degranulation and histamine release in RBL-2H3 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianyong; Zheng, Qianqian; Liu, Wei; Yu, Lingling; Wang, Jinling; Li, Shigang

    2017-05-01

    Objective To study the effects of shikimic acid on the proliferation of rat RBL-2H3 cells and the degranulation of the cells induced by C48/80 and its mechanism. Methods MTT assay was performed to measure the proliferation of RBL-2H3 cells treated with 3, 10, 30 μg/mL shikimic acid. Toluidine blue staining was used to observe the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells. The release of β-hexosaminidase from RBL-2H3 cells treated with 0, 12.5, 25, 50, 80, 100 μg/mL C48/80 was determined by substrate assay. ELISA was used to detect the histamine content in the supernatant of each treated group. Results Shikimic acid at 3, 10, 300 μg/mL had no obvious inhibitory effect on the proliferation of RBL-2H3 cells. There was a dose-effect relationship between the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells and C48/80 concentration. Shikimic acid inhibited the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells compared with the positive control group, the β-hexosaminidase release rate and histamine release were significantly reduced in RBL-2H3 cells treated with shikimic acid and C48/80. Conclusion Shikimic acid can inhibit the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells and reduce histamine release.

  9. The controlled release of simvastatin from TiO{sub 2} nanotubes to promote osteoblast differentiation and inhibit osteoclast resorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Min, E-mail: minlai@jsnu.edu.cn [School of Life Science, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Jin, Ziyang; Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Huaying [School of Life Science, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Xu, Kui [Biomedical Engineering Center, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The TiO{sub 2} nanotube substrates filled with simvastatin were successfully coated using chitosan/gelatin multilayers. • The bio-functionalized substrates display controlled release of simvastatin in a sustained manner. • The bio-functionalized substrates have great potential for improving osteoblast differentiation. • The bio-functionalized substrates effectively inhibit osteoclast differentiation. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to fabricate a novel drug-releasing bioactive platform that has excellent potential for improving osteoblast differentiation and inhibiting osteoclast resorption. TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (TNTs) with an outer diameter of around 70 nm were prepared by an anodization method. TNTs were filled with simvastatin (SV) and then coated using chitosan/gelatin multilayers (TNT-SV-LBL). The successful fabrication of TNT-SV-LBL substrates was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurement, respectively. The in vitro release behavior of simvastatin from TNT-SV-LBL substrates showed a sustained release as compared to the uncoated group. Osteoblasts adhering to TNT-SV-LBL substrates attached well and displayed significantly higher (p < 0.01) cell viability compared with the other substrates. More importantly, osteoblasts grown on TNT-SV-LBL substrates displayed a statistically significant (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05) increase in protein production levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC) and mRNA expression of runt related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), ALP, collagen type I (Col I), osteopontin (OPN), OC and osteoprotegerin (OPG) compared to the other groups after 4, 7 and 14 days of culture, respectively. Additionally, multinuclear osteoclastic differentiation of RAW264.7 cells grown on TNT-SV-LBL substrates was inhibited as confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) analysis. These

  10. The analgesic agent tapentadol inhibits calcitonin gene-related peptide release from isolated rat brainstem via a serotonergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Maria Cristina; Navarra, Pierluigi; Tringali, Giuseppe

    2016-01-15

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that tapentadol inhibits GGRP release from the rat brainstem through a mechanism mediated by the inhibition of NA reuptake; as a second alternative hypothesis, we investigated whether tapentadol inhibits GGRP release via the inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Rat brainstems were explanted and incubated in short-term experiments. CGRP released in the incubation medium was taken as a marker of CGRP release from the central terminals of trigeminal neurons within the brainstem. CGRP levels were measured by radioimmunoassay under basal conditions or in the presence of tapentadol; NA, 5-HT, clonidine, yohimbine and ondansetron were used as pharmacological tools to investigate the action mechanism of tapentadol. The α2-antagonist yohimbine failed to counteract the effects of tapentadol. Moreover, neither NA nor the α2-agonist clonidine per se inhibited K(+)-stimulated CGRP release, thereby indicating that the effects of tapentadol are nor mediated through the block of NA reuptake. Further experiments showed that 5-HT and tramadol, which inhibits both NA and 5-HT reuptake, significantly reduced K(+)-stimulated CGRP release. Moreover, the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron was able to counteract the effects of tapentadol in this system. This study provided pharmacological evidence that tapentadol inhibits stimulated CGRP release from the rat brainstem in vitro through a mechanism involving an increase in 5-HT levels in the system and the subsequent activation of 5-HT3 receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of basophil histamine release by gangliosides. Further studies on the significance of cell membrane sialic acid in the histamine release process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C; Norn, S; Thastrup, Ole

    1987-01-01

    with the glucolipid mixture increased the sialic acid content of the cells, and this increase was attributed to an insertion of gangliosides into the cell membrane. The inhibition of histamine release was abolished by increasing the calcium concentration, which substantiates our previous findings that cell membrane......Histamine release from human basophils was inhibited by preincubation of the cells with a glucolipid mixture containing sialic acid-containing gangliosides. This was true for histamine release induced by anti-IgE, Concanavalin A and the calcium ionophore A23187, whereas the release induced by S....... aureus Wood 46 was not affected. It was demonstrated that the inhibitory capacity of the glucolipid mixture could be attributed to the content of gangliosides, since no inhibition was obtained with cerebrosides or with gangliosides from which sialic acid was removed. Preincubation of the cells...

  12. In vitro atrazine-exposure inhibits human natural killer cell lytic granule release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, Alexander M.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B.

    2007-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine is a known immunotoxicant and an inhibitor of human natural killer (NK) cell lytic function. The precise changes in NK cell lytic function following atrazine exposure have not been fully elucidated. The current study identifies the point at which atrazine exerts its affect on the stepwise process of human NK cell-mediated lyses of the K562 target cell line. Using intracellular staining of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, it was determined that a 24-h in vitro exposure to atrazine did not decrease the level of NK cell lytic proteins granzyme A, granzyme B or perforin. Thus, it was hypothesized that atrazine exposure was inhibiting the ability of the NK cells to bind to the target cell and subsequently inhibit the release of lytic protein from the NK cell. To test this hypothesis, flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were employed to analyze NK cell-target cell co-cultures following atrazine exposure. These assays demonstrated no significant decrease in the level of target cell binding. However, the levels of NK intracellular lytic protein retained and the amount of lytic protein released were assessed following a 4-h incubation with K562 target cells. The relative level of intracellular lytic protein was 25-50% higher, and the amount of lytic protein released was 55-65% less in atrazine-treated cells than vehicle-treated cells following incubation with the target cells. These results indicate that ATR exposure inhibits the ability of NK cells to lyse target cells by blocking lytic granule release without affecting the ability of the NK cell to form stable conjugates with target cells

  13. Uniformity of Peptide Release Is Maintained by Methylation of Release Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Pierson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Termination of protein synthesis on the ribosome is catalyzed by release factors (RFs, which share a conserved glycine-glycine-glutamine (GGQ motif. The glutamine residue is methylated in vivo, but a mechanistic understanding of its contribution to hydrolysis is lacking. Here, we show that the modification, apart from increasing the overall rate of termination on all dipeptides, substantially increases the rate of peptide release on a subset of amino acids. In the presence of unmethylated RFs, we measure rates of hydrolysis that are exceptionally slow on proline and glycine residues and approximately two orders of magnitude faster in the presence of the methylated factors. Structures of 70S ribosomes bound to methylated RF1 and RF2 reveal that the glutamine side-chain methylation packs against 23S rRNA nucleotide 2451, stabilizing the GGQ motif and placing the side-chain amide of the glutamine toward tRNA. These data provide a framework for understanding how release factor modifications impact termination.

  14. Hydrocortisone selectively inhibits IgE-dependent arachidonic acid release from rat peritoneal mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiman, A.S.; Crews, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    Purified rat mst cells were used to study the effects of antiinflammatory steroids on the release of [1-14C]-arachidonic acid ([1-14C]AA) and metabolites. Mast cell were incubated overnight with glucocorticoids, [1-14C]AA incorporated into cellular phospholipids and the release of [1-14C]AA, and metabolites determined using a variety of secretagogues. Release of [1-14C]AA and metabolites by concanavalin A, the antigen ovalbumin and anti-immunoglobulin E antibody was markedly reduced by glucocorticoid treatment. Neither the total incorporation of [1-14C]AA nor the distribution into phospholipids was altered by hydrocortisone pretreatment. Glucocorticoid pretreatment did not alter [1-14C]AA release stimulated by somatostatin, compound 48/80, or the calcium ionophore, A23187. These data indicate that antiinflammatory steroids selectively inhibit immunoglobulin dependent release of arachidonic acid from rat mast cells. These findings question the role of lipomodulin and macrocortin as general phospholipase inhibitors and suggest that they may be restricted to immunoglobulin stimuli

  15. Multiple protein biomarker assessment for recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST abuse in cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann K J Ludwig

    Full Text Available Biomarker profiling, as a rapid screening approach for detection of hormone abuse, requires well selected candidate biomarkers and a thorough in vivo biomarker evaluation as previously done for detection of growth hormone doping in athletes. The bovine equivalent of growth hormone, called recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST is (illegally administered to enhance milk production in dairy cows. In this study, first a generic sample pre-treatment and 4-plex flow cytometric immunoassay (FCIA were developed for simultaneous measurement of four candidate biomarkers selected from literature: insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1, its binding protein 2 (IGFBP2, osteocalcin and endogenously produced antibodies against rbST. Next, bovine serum samples from two extensive controlled rbST animal treatment studies were used for in vivo validation and biomarker evaluation. Finally, advanced statistic tools were tested for the assessment of biomarker combination quality aiming to correctly identify rbST-treated animals. The statistical prediction tool k-nearest neighbours using a combination of the biomarkers osteocalcin and endogenously produced antibodies against rbST proved to be very reliable and correctly predicted 95% of the treated samples starting from the second rbST injection until the end of the treatment period and even thereafter. With the same biomarker combination, only 12% of untreated animals appeared false-positive. This reliability meets the requirements of Commission Decision 2002/657/EC for screening methods in veterinary control. From the results of this multidisciplinary study, it is concluded that the osteocalcin - anti-rbST-antibodies combination represent fit-for-purpose biomarkers for screening of rbST abuse in dairy cattle and can be reliably measured in both the developed 4-plex FCIA as well as in a cost-effective 2-plex microsphere-based binding assay. This screening method can be incorporated in routine veterinary monitoring

  16. Acacetin inhibits glutamate release and prevents kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Yu Lin

    Full Text Available An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be a molecular mechanism associated with several neurological diseases that causes neuronal damage. Therefore, searching for compounds that reduce glutamate neurotoxicity is necessary. In this study, the possibility that the natural flavone acacetin derived from the traditional Chinese medicine Clerodendrum inerme (L. Gaertn is a neuroprotective agent was investigated. The effect of acacetin on endogenous glutamate release in rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes was also investigated. The results indicated that acacetin inhibited depolarization-evoked glutamate release and cytosolic free Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+]C in the hippocampal nerve terminals. However, acacetin did not alter synaptosomal membrane potential. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of acacetin on evoked glutamate release was prevented by the Cav2.2 (N-type and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channel blocker known as ω-conotoxin MVIIC. In a kainic acid (KA rat model, an animal model used for excitotoxic neurodegeneration experiments, acacetin (10 or 50 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally to the rats 30 min before the KA (15 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection, and subsequently induced the attenuation of KA-induced neuronal cell death and microglia activation in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. The present study demonstrates that the natural compound, acacetin, inhibits glutamate release from hippocampal synaptosomes by attenuating voltage-dependent Ca(2+ entry and effectively prevents KA-induced in vivo excitotoxicity. Collectively, these data suggest that acacetin has the therapeutic potential for treating neurological diseases associated with excitotoxicity.

  17. Platelet-Released Growth Factors Induce Differentiation of Primary Keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Andreas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Lammel, Justus; Lippross, Sebastian; Behrendt, Peter; Klüter, Tim; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Cremer, Jochen; Rademacher, Franziska; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates, for example, platelet-released growth factors, (PRGFs) or their clinically related formulations (e.g., Vivostat PRF?) came recently into the physicians' focus as they revealed promising effects in regenerative and reparative medicine such as the support of healing of chronic wounds. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we analyzed the influence of PRGF and Vivostat PRF on human keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and on epidermal differentiatio...

  18. The Perils of Inhibiting Deficient Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Zara; Speed, Victoria; Patel, Jignesh P; Patel, Raj K; Arya, Roopen

    2018-06-08

    We report a case of a previously undiagnosed factor X deficiency in an 83-year old man, who had no previous bleeding history despite multiple haemostatic challenges. He was anticoagulated with warfarin for atrial fibrillation (AF) without bleeding complications; however, major haemorrhage occurred soon after a switch to rivaroxaban. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. 20(S-Protopanaxatriol inhibits release of inflammatory mediators in immunoglobulin E-mediated mast cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Yong Kim

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: PPT reduces the release of inflammatory mediators via inhibiting multiple cellular signaling pathways comprising the Ca2+ influx, protein kinase C, and PLA2, which are propagated by Syk activation upon allergic stimulation of mast cells.

  20. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase supports Renin release during sodium restriction through inhibition of phosphodiesterase 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sällström, Johan; Jensen, Boye L; Skøtt, Ole

    2010-01-01

    NOS supports renin release by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-mediated inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) in juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. METHODS: The experiments were performed in conscious nNOS⁻(/)⁻ and wild types after 10 days on a low-sodium diet...... by measurements of inulin- and para-amino hippuric acid (PAH) clearances, respectively. RESULTS: The basal PRC was reduced in nNOS⁻(/)⁻ compared to the wild types. Administration of milrinone caused a more pronounced PRC increase in nNOS⁻(/)⁻, resulting in normalized renin levels, whereas PDE5 inhibition did...... not affect PRC in any genotype. The blood pressure was similar in both genotypes, and milrinone did not affect blood pressure compared to vehicle. GFR and RPF were similar at baseline and were reduced by milrinone. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides in vivo evidence supporting the view that NO...

  1. Memory consolidation in human sleep depends on inhibition of glucocorticoid release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plihal, W; Born, J

    1999-09-09

    Early sleep dominated by slow-wave sleep has been found to be particularly relevant for declarative memory formation via hippocampo-neocortical networks. Concurrently, early nocturnal sleep is characterized by an inhibition of glucocorticoid release from the adrenals. Here, we show in healthy humans that this inhibition serves to support declarative memory consolidation during sleep. Elevating plasma glucocorticoid concentration during early sleep by administration of cortisol impaired consolidation of paired associate words, but not of non-declarative memory of visuomotor skills. Since glucocorticoid concentration was enhanced only during retention sleep, but not during acquisition or retrieval, a specific effect on the consolidation process is indicated. Blocking mineralocorticoid receptors by canrenoate did not affect memory, suggesting inactivation of glucocorticoid receptors to be the essential prerequisite for memory consolidation during early sleep.

  2. Methylmercury inhibits prolactin release in a cell line of pituitary origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A.L. Maués

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals, such as methylmercury, are key environmental pollutants that easily reach human beings by bioaccumulation through the food chain. Several reports have demonstrated that endocrine organs, and especially the pituitary gland, are potential targets for mercury accumulation; however, the effects on the regulation of hormonal release are unclear. It has been suggested that serum prolactin could represent a biomarker of heavy metal exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of methylmercury on prolactin release and the role of the nitrergic system using prolactin secretory cells (the mammosomatotroph cell line, GH3B6. Exposure to methylmercury (0-100 μM was cytotoxic in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with an LC50 higher than described for cells of neuronal origin, suggesting GH3B6 cells have a relative resistance. Methylmercury (at exposures as low as 1 μM for 2 h also decreased prolactin release. Interestingly, inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by N-nitro-L-arginine completely prevented the decrease in prolactin release without acute neurotoxic effects of methylmercury. These data indicate that the decrease in prolactin production occurs via activation of the nitrergic system and is an early effect of methylmercury in cells of pituitary origin.

  3. Pharmacological or genetic orexin 1 receptor inhibition attenuates MK-801 induced glutamate release in mouse cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah eAluisio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The orexin/hypocretin neuropeptides are produced by a cluster of neurons within the lateral posterior hypothalamus and participate in neuronal regulation by activating their receptors (OX1 and OX2 receptors. The orexin system projects widely through the brain and functions as an interface between multiple regulatory systems including wakefulness, energy balance, stress, reward and emotion. Recent studies have demonstrated that orexins and glutamate interact at the synaptic level and that orexins facilitate glutamate actions. We tested the hypothesis that orexins modulate glutamate signaling via OX1 receptors by monitoring levels of glutamate in frontal cortex of freely moving mice using enzyme coated biosensors under inhibited OX1 receptor conditions. MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, was administered subcutaneously (0.178 mg/kg to indirectly disinhibit pyramidal neurons and therefore increase cortical glutamate release. In wild-type mice, pretreatment with the OX1 receptor antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg S.C. which had no effect by itself, significantly attenuated the cortical glutamate release elicited by MK-801. OX1 receptor knockout mice had a blunted glutamate release response to MK-801 and exhibited about half of the glutamate release observed in wild-type mice in agreement with the data obtained with transient blockade of OX1 receptors. These results indicate that pharmacological (transient or genetic (permanent inhibition of the OX1 receptor similarly interfere with glutamatergic function in the cortex. Selectively targeting the OX1 receptor with an antagonist may normalize hyperglutamatergic states and thus may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with hyperactive states.

  4. Growth hormone-releasing factor induces c-fos expression in cultured primary pituitary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Mitchell, R L; Vale, W

    1987-01-01

    GH-releasing factor (GRF) and somatostatin regulates the secretion and biosynthesis of GH as well as the proliferation of GH-producing cells. In order to further characterize the mitogenic effect of GRF, we studied the expression of the proto-oncogene c-fos in primary pituitary cells. Maximal...... induction of c-fos mRNA was observed 20-60 min after stimulation with 5 nM GRF, returning to basal levels after 2 h. Somatostatin-14 (5 nM) partially inhibited the GRF induced c-fos expression. Forskolin and phorbol 12, 13 dibutyrate induced c-fos gene in cultured primary pituitary cells with similar...

  5. Stress-evoked opioid release inhibits pain in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Ashley K; Drummond, Peter D

    2008-10-15

    To determine whether stress-evoked release of endogenous opioids might account for hypoalgesia in major depressive disorder (MDD), the mu-opioid antagonist naltrexone (50mg) or placebo was administered double-blind to 24 participants with MDD and to 31 non-depressed controls. Eighty minutes later participants completed a painful foot cold pressor test and, after a 5-min interval, began a 25-min arithmetic task interspersed with painful electric shocks. Ten minutes later participants completed a second cold pressor test. Negative affect was greater in participants with MDD than in non-depressed controls throughout the experiment, and increased significantly in both groups during mental arithmetic. Before the math task, naltrexone unmasked direct linear relationships between severity of depression, negative affect while resting quietly, and cold-induced pain in participants with MDD. In contrast, facilitatory effects of naltrexone on cold- and shock-induced pain were greatest in controls with the lowest depression scores. Naltrexone strengthened the relationship between negative affect and shock-induced pain during the math task, particularly in the depressed group, and heightened anxiety in both groups toward the end of the task. Thus, mu-opioid activity apparently masked a positive association between negative affect and pain in the most distressed participants. These findings suggest that psychological distress inhibits pain via stress-evoked release of opioid peptides in severe cases of MDD. In addition, tonic endogenous opioid neurotransmission could inhibit depressive symptoms and pain in people with low depression scores.

  6. Targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling inhibits prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shu; Shao, Longjiang; Yu, Wendong; Gavine, Paul; Ittmann, Michael

    2012-07-15

    Extensive correlative studies in human prostate cancer as well as studies in vitro and in mouse models indicate that fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling plays an important role in prostate cancer progression. In this study, we used a probe compound for an FGFR inhibitor, which potently inhibits FGFR-1-3 and significantly inhibits FGFR-4. The purpose of this study is to determine whether targeting FGFR signaling from all four FGFRs will have in vitro activities consistent with inhibition of tumor progression and will inhibit tumor progression in vivo. Effects of AZ8010 on FGFR signaling and invasion were analyzed using immortalized normal prostate epithelial (PNT1a) cells and PNT1a overexpressing FGFR-1 or FGFR-4. The effect of AZ8010 on invasion and proliferation in vitro was also evaluated in prostate cancer cell lines. Finally, the impact of AZ8010 on tumor progression in vivo was evaluated using a VCaP xenograft model. AZ8010 completely inhibits FGFR-1 and significantly inhibits FGFR-4 signaling at 100 nmol/L, which is an achievable in vivo concentration. This results in marked inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and invasion in PNT1a cells expressing FGFR-1 and FGFR-4 and all prostate cancer cell lines tested. Treatment in vivo completely inhibited VCaP tumor growth and significantly inhibited angiogenesis and proliferation and increased cell death in treated tumors. This was associated with marked inhibition of ERK phosphorylation in treated tumors. Targeting FGFR signaling is a promising new approach to treating aggressive prostate cancer.

  7. Fed levels of amino acids are required for the somatotropin-induced increase in muscle protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Fiona A; Suryawan, Agus; Orellana, Renán A; Nguyen, Hanh V; Jeyapalan, Asumthia S; Gazzaneo, Maria C; Davis, Teresa A

    2008-10-01

    Chronic somatotropin (pST) treatment in pigs increases muscle protein synthesis and circulating insulin, a known promoter of protein synthesis. Previously, we showed that the pST-mediated rise in insulin could not account for the pST-induced increase in muscle protein synthesis when amino acids were maintained at fasting levels. This study aimed to determine whether the pST-induced increase in insulin promotes skeletal muscle protein synthesis when amino acids are provided at fed levels and whether the response is associated with enhanced translation initiation factor activation. Growing pigs were treated with pST (0 or 180 microg x kg(-1) x day(-1)) for 7 days, and then pancreatic-glucose-amino acid clamps were performed. Amino acids were raised to fed levels in the presence of either fasted or fed insulin concentrations; glucose was maintained at fasting throughout. Muscle protein synthesis was increased by pST treatment and by amino acids (with or without insulin) (P<0.001). In pST-treated pigs, fed, but not fasting, amino acid concentrations further increased muscle protein synthesis rates irrespective of insulin level (P<0.02). Fed amino acids, with or without raised insulin concentrations, increased the phosphorylation of S6 kinase (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1), decreased inactive 4EBP1.eIF4E complex association, and increased active eIF4E.eIF4G complex formation (P<0.02). pST treatment did not alter translation initiation factor activation. We conclude that the pST-induced stimulation of muscle protein synthesis requires fed amino acid levels, but not fed insulin levels. However, under the current conditions, the response to amino acids is not mediated by the activation of translation initiation factors that regulate mRNA binding to the ribosomal complex.

  8. A Poly-ADP-Ribose Trigger Releases the Auto-Inhibition of a Chromatin Remodeling Oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hari R; Nardozza, Aurelio P; Möller, Ingvar R; Knobloch, Gunnar; Kistemaker, Hans A V; Hassler, Markus; Harrer, Nadine; Blessing, Charlotte; Eustermann, Sebastian; Kotthoff, Christiane; Huet, Sébastien; Mueller-Planitz, Felix; Filippov, Dmitri V; Timinszky, Gyula; Rand, Kasper D; Ladurner, Andreas G

    2017-12-07

    DNA damage triggers chromatin remodeling by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The oncogene and chromatin remodeler ALC1/CHD1L massively decompacts chromatin in vivo yet is inactive prior to DNA-damage-mediated PARP1 induction. We show that the interaction of the ALC1 macrodomain with the ATPase module mediates auto-inhibition. PARP1 activation suppresses this inhibitory interaction. Crucially, release from auto-inhibition requires a poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) binding macrodomain. We identify tri-ADP-ribose as a potent PAR-mimic and synthetic allosteric effector that abrogates ATPase-macrodomain interactions, promotes an ungated conformation, and activates the remodeler's ATPase. ALC1 fragments lacking the regulatory macrodomain relax chromatin in vivo without requiring PARP1 activation. Further, the ATPase restricts the macrodomain's interaction with PARP1 under non-DNA damage conditions. Somatic cancer mutants disrupt ALC1's auto-inhibition and activate chromatin remodeling. Our data show that the NAD + -metabolite and nucleic acid PAR triggers ALC1 to drive chromatin relaxation. Modular allostery in this oncogene tightly controls its robust, DNA-damage-dependent activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition by salmeterol and cilomilast of fluticasone-enhanced IP-10 release in airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P J; Aksoy, Mark O; Yang, Yi; Li, Xiu Xia; Ji, Rong; Kelsen, Steven G

    2008-02-01

    The CXC chemokines, IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8, play a role in obstructive lung disease by attracting Th1/Tc1 lymphocytes and neutrophils, respectively. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long acting beta 2-agonists (LABA) are widely used. However, their effect(s) on the release of IP-10 and IL-8 by airway epithelial cells are poorly understood. This study examined the effects of fluticasone, salmeterol, and agents which raise intracellular cAMP (cilomilast and db-cAMP) on the expression of IP-10 and IL-8 protein and mRNA. Studies were performed in cultured human airway epithelial cells during cytokine-stimulated IP-10 and IL-8 release. Cytokine treatment (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IFN-gamma) increased IP-10 and IL-8 protein and mRNA levels. Fluticasone (0.1 nM to 1 microM) increased IP-10 but reduced IL-8 protein release without changing IP-10 mRNA levels assessed by real time RT-PCR. The combination of salmeterol (1 micro M) and cilomilast (1-10 mu M) reduced IP-10 but had no effect on IL-8 protein. Salmeterol alone (1 micro M) and db-cAMP alone (1 mM) antagonised the effects of fluticasone on IP-10 but not IL-8 protein. In human airway epithelial cells, inhibition by salmeterol of fluticasone-enhanced IP-10 release may be an important therapeutic effect of the LABA/ICS combination not present when the two drugs are used separately.

  10. Inhibition of Rac1 reduces store overload-induced calcium release and protects against ventricular arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Lu, Xiangru; Gui, Le; Wu, Yan; Sims, Stephen M; Wang, Guoping; Feng, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Rac1 is a small GTPase and plays key roles in multiple cellular processes including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether Rac1 activation during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) contributes to arrhythmogenesis is not fully understood. We aimed to study the effects of Rac1 inhibition on store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) and ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Adult Rac1(f/f) and cardiac-specific Rac1 knockdown (Rac1(ckd) ) mice were subjected to myocardial I/R and their electrocardiograms (ECGs) were monitored for ventricular arrhythmia. Myocardial Rac1 activity was increased and ventricular arrhythmia was induced during I/R in Rac1(f/f) mice. Remarkably, I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia was significantly decreased in Rac1(ckd) compared to Rac1(f/f) mice. Furthermore, treatment with Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 decreased I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia. Ca(2+) imaging analysis showed that in response to a 6 mM external Ca(2+) concentration challenge, SOICR was induced with characteristic spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) waves in Rac1(f/f) cardiomyocytes. Notably, SOICR was diminished by pharmacological and genetic inhibition of Rac1 in adult cardiomyocytes. Moreover, I/R-induced ROS production and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) oxidation were significantly inhibited in the myocardium of Rac1(ckd) mice. We conclude that Rac1 activation induces ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Inhibition of Rac1 suppresses SOICR and protects against ventricular arrhythmia. Blockade of Rac1 activation may represent a new paradigm for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia in ischaemic heart disease. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  11. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahren, B.

    1987-01-01

    It is known that epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits iodide uptake in the thyroid follicular cells and lowers plasma levels of thyroid hormones upon infusion into sheep and ewes. In this study, the effects of EGF on basal and stimulated thyroid hormone secretion were investigated in the mouse. Mice were pretreated with 125 I and thyroxine; the subsequent release of 125 I is an estimation of thyroid hormone secretion. It was found that basal radioiodine secretion was not altered by intravenous injection of EGF (5 micrograms/animal). However, the radioiodine secretion stimulated by both TSH (120 microU/animal) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP; 5 micrograms/animal) were inhibited by EGF (5 micrograms/animal). At a lower dose level (0.5 microgram/animal), EGF had no influence on stimulated radioiodine secretion. In conclusion, EGF inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

  12. Platelet-Released Growth Factors Modulate the Secretion of Cytokines in Synoviocytes under Inflammatory Joint Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasuo, Biljana; Hock, Jennifer Vanessa Phi; Kweider, Nisreen; Fragoulis, Athanassios; Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Jahr, Holger; Pufe, Thomas; Lippross, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are marked by a complex interplay of various cell populations and is mediated by different signaling pathways. Traditionally, therapies have primarily focused on pain relief, reducing inflammation and the recovery of joint function. More recently, however, researchers have discussed the therapeutic efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The main objective of this work is to examine the influences of platelet-released growth factor (PRGF) on human synoviocytes under inflammatory conditions. Additionally, it is checked to which extend treatment with platelet concentrate influences the release of cytokines form synoviocytes. For this purpose, an in vitro RA model was created by stimulating the cells with the TNF-α. The release of cytokines was measured by ELISA. The cytokine gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. It has been observed that the stimulation concentration of 10 ng/ml TNF-α resulted in a significantly increased endogenous secretion and gene expression of IL-6 and TNF-α. The anti-inflammatory effect of PRGF could be confirmed through significant reduction of TNF-α and IL-1β. An induced inflammatory condition seems to cause PRGF to inhibit the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Further study is required to understand the exact effect mechanism of PRGF on synoviocytes. PMID:29348703

  13. Platelet-Released Growth Factors Modulate the Secretion of Cytokines in Synoviocytes under Inflammatory Joint Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mersedeh Tohidnezhad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA are marked by a complex interplay of various cell populations and is mediated by different signaling pathways. Traditionally, therapies have primarily focused on pain relief, reducing inflammation and the recovery of joint function. More recently, however, researchers have discussed the therapeutic efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP. The main objective of this work is to examine the influences of platelet-released growth factor (PRGF on human synoviocytes under inflammatory conditions. Additionally, it is checked to which extend treatment with platelet concentrate influences the release of cytokines form synoviocytes. For this purpose, an in vitro RA model was created by stimulating the cells with the TNF-α. The release of cytokines was measured by ELISA. The cytokine gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. It has been observed that the stimulation concentration of 10 ng/ml TNF-α resulted in a significantly increased endogenous secretion and gene expression of IL-6 and TNF-α. The anti-inflammatory effect of PRGF could be confirmed through significant reduction of TNF-α and IL-1β. An induced inflammatory condition seems to cause PRGF to inhibit the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Further study is required to understand the exact effect mechanism of PRGF on synoviocytes.

  14. Inhibition of factor-dependent transcription termination in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inhibition of factor-dependent transcription termination in Escherichia coli might relieve xenogene silencing by abrogating. H-NS-DNA interactions in vivo. DEEPTI CHANDRAPRAKASH and ASWIN SAI NARAIN SESHASAYEE. Chromatin immunoprecipitation. MG1655 hns::3xFLAG cells were grown in liquid LB me-.

  15. Evaluation of factors inhibiting effective performance of primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, the following are the factors that are inhibiting the productivity of the primary school teachers in Oyo state, Nigeria, viz: lack of motivation on the ... Headmasters or the local government education area officers in cash or kind and illegal deduction from primary school teacher's salary on the account of bank charges.

  16. Presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine release induced by adenosine at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Silvana; Veggetti, Mariela; Muchnik, Salomón; Losavio, Adriana

    2004-05-01

    1. At the mouse neuromuscular junction, adenosine (AD) and the A(1) agonist 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyl-adenosine (CCPA) induce presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine (ACh) release by activation of A(1) AD receptors through a mechanism that is still unknown. To evaluate whether the inhibition is mediated by modulation of the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) associated with tonic secretion (L- and N-type VDCCs), we measured the miniature end-plate potential (mepp) frequency in mouse diaphragm muscles. 2. Blockade of VDCCs by Cd(2+) prevented the effect of the CCPA. Nitrendipine (an L-type VDCC antagonist) but not omega-conotoxin GVIA (an N-type VDCC antagonist) blocked the action of CCPA, suggesting that the decrease in spontaneous mepp frequency by CCPA is associated with an action on L-type VDCCs only. 3. As A(1) receptors are coupled to a G(i/o) protein, we investigated whether the inhibition of PKA or the activation of PKC is involved in the presynaptic inhibition mechanism. Neither N-(2[p-bromocinnamylamino]-ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, a PKA inhibitor), nor 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine (H-7, a PKC antagonist), nor phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PHA, a PKC activator) modified CCPA-induced presynaptic inhibition, suggesting that these second messenger pathways are not involved. 4. The effect of CCPA was eliminated by the calmodulin antagonist N-(6-aminohexil)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W-7) and by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester epsilon6TDelta-BM, which suggests that the action of CCPA to modulate L-type VDCCs may involve Ca(2+)-calmodulin. 5. To investigate the action of CCPA on diverse degrees of nerve terminal depolarization, we studied its effect at different external K(+) concentrations. The effect of CCPA on ACh secretion evoked by 10 mm K(+) was prevented by the P/Q-type VDCC antagonist omega-agatoxin IVA. 6. CCPA failed to

  17. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD.

  18. Brefeldin A inhibits pestivirus release from infected cells, without affecting its assembly and infectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macovei, Alina; Zitzmann, Nicole; Lazar, Catalin; Dwek, Raymond A.; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2006-01-01

    The enveloped bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the Pestivirus genus within the Flaviviridae family. While considerable information has been gathered on virus entry into the host cell, genome structure and protein function, little is known about pestivirus morphogenesis and release from cells. Here, we analyzed the intracellular localization, N-glycan processing and secretion of BVDV using brefeldin A (BFA), which blocks protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and causes disruption of the Golgi complex with subsequent fusion of its cis and medial cisternae with the ER. BFA treatment of infected cells resulted in complete inhibition of BVDV secretion and increased co-localization of the envelope glycoproteins with the cis-Golgi marker GM 130. Processing of the N-linked glycans was affected by BFA, however, virus assembly was not perturbed and intracellular virions were fully infectious, suggesting that trafficking beyond the cis-Golgi is not a prerequisite for pestivirus infectivity

  19. Brefeldin A inhibits pestivirus release from infected cells, without affecting its assembly and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macovei, Alina; Zitzmann, Nicole; Lazar, Catalin; Dwek, Raymond A; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2006-08-04

    The enveloped bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the Pestivirus genus within the Flaviviridae family. While considerable information has been gathered on virus entry into the host cell, genome structure and protein function, little is known about pestivirus morphogenesis and release from cells. Here, we analyzed the intracellular localization, N-glycan processing and secretion of BVDV using brefeldin A (BFA), which blocks protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and causes disruption of the Golgi complex with subsequent fusion of its cis and medial cisternae with the ER. BFA treatment of infected cells resulted in complete inhibition of BVDV secretion and increased co-localization of the envelope glycoproteins with the cis-Golgi marker GM 130. Processing of the N-linked glycans was affected by BFA, however, virus assembly was not perturbed and intracellular virions were fully infectious, suggesting that trafficking beyond the cis-Golgi is not a prerequisite for pestivirus infectivity.

  20. Hypothalamic growth hormone releasing factor deficiency following cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.R.; Shalet, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of synthetic human pancreatic tumour GH releasing factor (hp GRF1-44) on GH release has been studied in 10 patients with radiation-induced GH deficiency and four normal subjects. All 10 patients showed subnormal GH responses to both an ITT (median peak GH 3.2 mU/1) and to arginine stimulation (median peak GH 2.9 mU/1), although the remainder of pituitary function was intact. Following an acute intravenous bolus (100 μg) of hp GRF1-44, there was no GH response in two patients and a subnormal but definite GH response in a further four. The remaining four patients showed a significant GH response (median peak GH level 29 mU/1; range 22-57 mU/1) to hp GRF1-44, similar in magnitude and timing to that seen in th four normals. This strongly suggests that in these four subjects, the discrepancy in GH responses to hp GRF1-44, ITT and to arginine was a result of radiation-induced hypothalamic damage leading to a deficiency of endogenous GRF. The availability of synthetic hp GRF capable of stimulating GH secretion means that the distinction between hypothalamic and pituitary causes of GH deficiency will be of considerable therapeutic importance in the future. (author)

  1. Inhibition of rat pituitary growth hormone (GH) release by subclinical levels of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camoratto, A.M.; White, L.M.; Lau, Y.S.; Moriarty, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Lead toxicity has been associated with short stature in children. Since growth hormone is a major regulator of growth, the effects of chronic exposure to subclinical lead levels on pituitary function were assessed. Timed pregnant rats were given 125 ppm lead (as lead nitrate) in their drinking water beginning on day 5 of gestation. After weaning, pups were continued on lead until sacrifice at 7 weeks of age. The average blood lead level at this time was 18.9 ug/dl (range 13.7-27.8). On the day of sacrifice the pituitary was removed, hemisected and incubated with vehicle or 40 nM hGRH (human growth hormone releasing hormone). Pituitaries from chronically lead-treated pups were 64% less responsive to GRH than controls. In contrast, no difference in responsiveness was observed in pituitaries from the dams. The specific binding of GRH was also examined. Control animals showed a dose-dependent displacement of 125I-GRH by unlabeled ligand (10-1000 nM). In the pituitaries of lead-treated pups binding of labeled ligand was markedly reduced by unlabeled GRH (less than 100 nM). Chronic exposure to lead had no effect on serum GH or prolactin levels or on pituitary content of GH. These data suggest that one mechanism by which lead can affect growth is by inhibition of GH release

  2. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists inhibit the release of proinflammatory cytokines from RSV-infected epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Ralf; Koenig, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The epithelial cells of the airways are the target cells for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and the site of the majority of the inflammation associated with the disease. Recently, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the role of PPARγ agonists (15d-PGJ 2 , ciglitazone and troglitazone) on the synthesis of RSV-induced cytokine release from RSV-infected human lung epithelial cells (A549). We observed that all PPARγ ligands inhibited dose-dependently the release of TNF-α, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-6 and the chemokines CXCL8 (IL-8) and CCL5 (RANTES) from RSV-infected A549 cells. Concomitantly, the PPARγ ligands diminished the cellular amount of mRNA encoding for IL-6, CXCL8 and CCL5 and the RSV-induced binding activity of the transcription factors NF-κB (p65/p50) and AP-1 (c-fos), respectively. Our data presented herein suggest a potential application of PPARγ ligands in the anti-inflammatory treatment of RSV infection

  3. The celiac ganglion modulates LH-induced inhibition of androstenedione release in late pregnant rat ovaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastrilla Ana M

    2006-12-01

    was found on day 21 of pregnancy resulting in the inhibition of androstenedione release from the ovarian compartment. In addition on day 15 of pregnancy, LH placed in the ovarian compartment led to an inhibition of the release of androstenedione, and this inhibitory effect was further reinforced by the joint action of noradrenaline in the celiac ganglion and LH in the ovary. The levels of catecholamines in the ovarian compartment showed differences among the experiments; of significance, the joint treatment of noradrenaline in the celiac ganglion and LH in the ovary resulted in a remarkable increase in the ovarian levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline when compared to the effect achieved by either one of the compounds added alone. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the noradrenergic stimulation of the celiac ganglion reinforces the LH-induced inhibition of androstenedione production by the ovary of late pregnant rats, and that this effect is associated with marked changes in the release of catecholamines in the ovary.

  4. Mechanisms of inhibition of zinc-finger transcription factors by selenium compounds ebselen and selenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larabee, Jason L; Hocker, James R; Hanas, Jay S

    2009-03-01

    The anti-inflammatory selenium compounds, ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3[2H]-one) and selenite, were found to alter the DNA binding mechanisms and structures of cysteine-rich zinc-finger transcription factors. As assayed by DNase I protection, DNA binding by TFIIIA (transcription factor IIIA, prototypical Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger protein), was inhibited by micromolar amounts of ebselen. In a gel shift assay, ebselen inhibited the Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger-containing DNA binding domain (DBD) of the NF-kappaB mediated transcription factor Sp1. Ebselen also inhibited DNA binding by the p50 subunit of the pro-inflammatory Cys-containing NF-kappaB transcription factor. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was utilized to elucidate mechanisms of chemical interaction between ebselen and a zinc-bound Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger polypeptide modeled after the third finger of Sp1 (Sp1-3). Exposing Sp1-3 to micromolar amounts of ebselen resulted in Zn(2+) release from this peptide and the formation of a disulfide bond by oxidation of zinc finger SH groups, the likely mechanism for DNA binding inhibition. Selenite was shown by ESI-MS to also eject zinc from Sp1-3 as well as induce disulfide bond formation through SH oxidation. The selenite-dependent inhibition/oxidation mechanism differed from that of ebselen by inducing the formation of a stable selenotrisulfide bond. Selenite-induced selenotrisulfide formation was dependent upon the structure of the Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger as alteration in the finger structure enhanced this reaction as well as selenite-dependent zinc release. Ebselen and selenite-dependent inhibition/oxidation of Cys-rich zinc finger proteins, with concomitant release of zinc and finger structural changes, points to mechanisms at the atomic and protein level for selenium-induced alterations in Cys-rich proteins, and possible amelioration of certain inflammatory, neurodegenerative, and oncogenic responses.

  5. Butyrate-Loaded Chitosan/Hyaluronan Nanoparticles: A Suitable Tool for Sustained Inhibition of ROS Release by Activated Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sacco, Pasquale; Decleva, Eva; Tentor, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    that butyrate inhibits neutrophil ROS release in a dose and time-dependent fashion. Given the short half-life of butyrate, chitosan/hyaluronan nanoparticles are next designed and developed as controlled release carriers able to provide cells with a long-lasting supply of this SCFA. Notably, while the inhibition...... of neutrophil ROS production by free butyrate declines over time, that of butyrate-loaded chitosan/hyaluronan nanoparticles (B-NPs) is sustained. Additional valuable features of these nanoparticles are inherent ROS scavenger activity, resistance to cell internalization, and mucoadhesiveness. B-NPs appear...

  6. Platelet-Released Growth Factors Induce Differentiation of Primary Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Lammel, Justus; Lippross, Sebastian; Behrendt, Peter; Klüter, Tim; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Cremer, Jochen; Rademacher, Franziska; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates, for example, platelet-released growth factors, (PRGFs) or their clinically related formulations (e.g., Vivostat PRF®) came recently into the physicians' focus as they revealed promising effects in regenerative and reparative medicine such as the support of healing of chronic wounds. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we analyzed the influence of PRGF and Vivostat PRF on human keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and on epidermal differentiation status of skin wounds in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the expression of early (keratin 1 and keratin 10) and late (transglutaminase-1 and involucrin) differentiation markers. PRGF treatment of primary human keratinocytes decreased keratin 1 and keratin 10 gene expression but induced involucrin and transglutaminase-1 gene expression in an epidermal growth factor receptor- (EGFR-) dependent manner. In concordance with these results, microscopic analyses revealed that PRGF-treated human keratinocytes displayed morphological features typical of keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation. In vivo treatment of artificial human wounds with Vivostat PRF revealed a significant induction of involucrin and transglutaminase-1 gene expression. Together, our results indicate that PRGF and Vivostat PRF induce terminal differentiation of primary human keratinocytes. This potential mechanism may contribute to the observed beneficial effects in the treatment of hard-to-heal wounds with autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates in vivo. PMID:28808357

  7. Platelet-Released Growth Factors Induce Differentiation of Primary Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates, for example, platelet-released growth factors, (PRGFs or their clinically related formulations (e.g., Vivostat PRF® came recently into the physicians’ focus as they revealed promising effects in regenerative and reparative medicine such as the support of healing of chronic wounds. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we analyzed the influence of PRGF and Vivostat PRF on human keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and on epidermal differentiation status of skin wounds in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the expression of early (keratin 1 and keratin 10 and late (transglutaminase-1 and involucrin differentiation markers. PRGF treatment of primary human keratinocytes decreased keratin 1 and keratin 10 gene expression but induced involucrin and transglutaminase-1 gene expression in an epidermal growth factor receptor- (EGFR- dependent manner. In concordance with these results, microscopic analyses revealed that PRGF-treated human keratinocytes displayed morphological features typical of keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation. In vivo treatment of artificial human wounds with Vivostat PRF revealed a significant induction of involucrin and transglutaminase-1 gene expression. Together, our results indicate that PRGF and Vivostat PRF induce terminal differentiation of primary human keratinocytes. This potential mechanism may contribute to the observed beneficial effects in the treatment of hard-to-heal wounds with autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates in vivo.

  8. Factors controlling alkalisalt deposition in recovery boiler- release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Kylloenen, H.; Kurkela, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1996-12-01

    As part of a cooperative effort to develop a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers, an experimental investigation of the release of sulphur during black liquor pyrolysis has been undertaken. Previous to these studies, the mechanisms of sulphur release and the reasons for the observed effects of process conditions on sulphur release were very poorly understood. On the basis of the experimental results, the main reactions leading to sulphur release have been elucidated with a fair degree of certainty. Logical explanations for the variations of sulphur release with temperature and with liquor solids content have been proposed. The influence of pressure has been investigated in order to gain insights into the effects of mass transfer on the sulphur-release rate. In the near future, the research will be aimed at generating the kinetic data necessary for modelling the release of sulphur in the recovery furnace. (author)

  9. Inhibition of presynaptic activity by zinc released from mossy fiber terminals during tetanic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Akira; Sakurada, Naomi; Fuke, Sayuri; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Nagano, Tetsuo; Oku, Naoto; Takeda, Atsushi

    2006-01-01

    Zinc exists in high densities in the giant boutons of hippocampal mossy fibers. On the basis of the evidence that zinc decreases extracellular glutamate concentration in the hippocampus, the presynaptic action of zinc released from mossy fibers during high-frequency (tetanic) stimulation was examined using hippocampal slices. The increase in zinc-specific fluorescent signals was observed in both extracellular and intracellular compartments in the mossy fiber terminals during the delivery of tetanic stimuli (100 Hz, 1 sec) to the dentate granule cell layer, suggesting that zinc released from mossy fibers is immediately retaken up by mossy fibers. When mossy fiber terminals were preferentially double-stained with zinc and calcium indicators and tetanic stimuli (100 Hz, 1 sec) were delivered to the dentate granule cell layer, the increase in calcium orange signal during the stimulation was enhanced in mossy fiber terminals by addition of CaEDTA, a membrane-impermeable zinc chelator, and was suppressed by addition of zinc. The decrease in FM4-64 signal (vesicular exocytosis) during tetanic stimulation (10 Hz, 180 sec), which induced mossy fiber long-term potentiation, was also enhanced in mossy fiber terminals by addition of CaEDTA and was suppressed by addition of zinc. The present study demonstrates that zinc released from mossy fibers may be a negative-feedback factor against presynaptic activity during tetanic stimulation.

  10. Inhibition of placenta growth factor with TB-403

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is clinical evidence that therapies targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway are effective in delaying cancer progression. However, tumors may be either intrinsically resistant or evolve resistance to such therapies. Hence, there is a need for new therapies...... targeting angiogenesis. AREAS COVERED: The data are obtained by searching in the PubMed database. The search terms used included antiangiogenic therapy, TB-403 (RO5323441), placenta growth factor (PlGF) and VEGFR-1 (Flt-1). We review preclinical data concerning the function and inhibition of Pl......GF and summarize data on expression of PlGF in cancer patients. Data from early-phase clinical trials of TB-403 (RO5323441), a monoclonal antibody inhibiting PlGF, are discussed. Future development strategies, therapeutic potentials and limitations of TB-403 are further evaluated. EXPERT OPINION: There are some...

  11. Increasing kynurenine brain levels reduces ethanol consumption in mice by inhibiting dopamine release in nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Gómez, Pablo; Pérez-Hernández, Mercedes; Gutiérrez-López, María Dolores; Vidal, Rebeca; Abuin-Martínez, Cristina; O'Shea, Esther; Colado, María Isabel

    2018-06-01

    Recent research suggests that ethanol (EtOH) consumption behaviour can be regulated by modifying the kynurenine (KYN) pathway, although the mechanisms involved have not yet been well elucidated. To further explore the implication of the kynurenine pathway in EtOH consumption we inhibited kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) activity with Ro 61-8048 (100 mg/kg, i.p.), which shifts the KYN metabolic pathway towards kynurenic acid (KYNA) production. KMO inhibition decreases voluntary binge EtOH consumption and EtOH preference in mice subjected to "drinking in the dark" (DID) and "two-bottle choice" paradigms, respectively. This effect seems to be a consequence of increased KYN concentration, since systemic KYN administration (100 mg/kg, i.p.) similarly deters binge EtOH consumption in the DID model. Despite KYN and KYNA being well-established ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), administration of AhR antagonists (TMF 5 mg/kg and CH-223191 20 mg/kg, i.p.) and of an agonist (TCDD 50 μg/kg, intragastric) demonstrates that signalling through this receptor is not involved in EtOH consumption behaviour. Ro 61-8048 did not alter plasma acetaldehyde concentration, but prevented EtOH-induced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell. These results point to a critical involvement of the reward circuitry in the reduction of EtOH consumption induced by KYN and KYNA increments. PNU-120596 (3 mg/kg, i.p.), a positive allosteric modulator of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, partially prevented the Ro 61-8048-induced decrease in EtOH consumption. Overall, our results highlight the usefulness of manipulating the KYN pathway as a pharmacological tool for modifying EtOH consumption and point to a possible modulator of alcohol drinking behaviour. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased production of peptide deformylase eliminates retention of formylmethionine in bovine somatotropin overproduced in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, W C; Bentle, K A; Schlittler, M R; Schwane, A C; O'Neil, J P; Bogosian, G

    1996-10-03

    In Escherichia coli and most other microorganisms, peptide synthesis is started at methionine start codons which are read only by N-formyl-methionine-tRNA. The formyl group is normally removed from the N-terminal Met residue of the peptide by peptide deformylase (PDF). However, it has been observed that overproduction of proteins in recombinant bacteria often yields protein products which are incompletely deformylated. Certain proteins could be poor substrates for PDF and exhibit incomplete deformylation, particularly when they are overproduced. Strains of E. coli which overproduce bovine somatotropin (BST) have a significant fraction of the BST with the formyl group retained. The PDF gene was isolated and positioned into a BST production vector in such a way that the BST and PDF genes were coexpressed. In strains containing this coexpression vector, the levels of PDF were increased and formylated BST was undetectable.

  13. Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL overexpression inhibits cytochrome c release, activation of multiple caspases, and virus release following coxsackievirus B3 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carthy, Christopher M.; Yanagawa, Bobby; Luo Honglin; Granville, David J.; Yang, Decheng; Cheung, Paul; Cheung, Caroline; Esfandiarei, Mitra; Rudin, Charles M.; Thompson, Craig B.; Hunt, David W.C.; McManus, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3, a cytopathic virus in the family Picornaviridae, induces degenerative changes in host cell morphology. Here we demonstrate cytochrome c release and caspases-2, -3, -6, -7, -8, and -9 processing. Enforced Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression markedly reduced release of cytochrome c, presentation of the mitochondrial epitope 7A6, and depressed caspase activation following infection. In comparison, cell death using TRAIL ligand caused caspase-8 processing prior to cytochrome c release and executioner caspases and cell death was only partially rescued by Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL overexpression. Disruption of the mitochondrial inner membrane potential following CVB3 infection was not inhibited by zVAD.fmk treatment. Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL overexpression or zVAD.fmk treatment delayed the loss of host cell viability and decreased progeny virus release following infection. Our data suggest that mitochondrial release of cytochrome c may be an important early event in caspase activation in CVB3 infection, and, as such, may contribute to the loss of host-cell viability and progeny virus release

  14. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilbride Seán M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2 and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1 are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  15. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilbride, Sean M

    2011-07-26

    Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1) are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington\\'s disease and Alzheimer\\'s disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  16. Distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in primate brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millan, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.; Hauger, R.L.; Catt, K.J.; Aguilera, G.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution and properties of receptors for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) were analyzed in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys. Binding of [ 125 I]tyrosine-labeled ovine CRF to frontal cortex and amygdala membrane-rich fractions was saturable, specific, and time- and temperature-dependent, reaching equilibrium in 30 min at 23 0 C. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated one class of high-affinity sites with a K/sub d/ of 1 nM and a concentration of 125 fmol/mg. As in the rat pituitary and brain, CRF receptors in monkey cerebral cortex and amygdala were coupled to adenylate cyclase. Autoradiographic analysis of specific CRF binding in brain sections revealed that the receptors were widely distributed in the cerebral cortex and limbic system. Receptor density was highest in the pars tuberalis of the pituitary and throughout the cerebral cortex, specifically in the prefrontal, frontal, orbital, cingulate, insular, and temporal areas, and in the cerebellar cortex. A low binding density was present in the superior colliculus, locus coeruleus, substantia gelatinosa, preoptic area, septal area, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. These data demonstrate that receptors for CRF are present within the primate brain at areas related to the central control of visceral function and behavior, suggesting that brain CRF may serve as a neurotransmitter in the coordination of endocrine and neural mechanisms involved in the response to stress

  17. Endogenous opioids inhibit oxytocin release during nicotine-stimulated secretion of vasopressin in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckl, J R; Johnson, M; Shakespear, C; Lightman, S L

    1988-05-01

    The effects of the opioid antagonist naloxone on the vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) responses to nicotine were studied in male non-smokers (21-30 years old). Either saline (n = 6) or naloxone (4 mg bolus + 6 mg/h, n = 6) was infused i.v. during the study. After 60 min infusion the subjects smoked one high-nicotine content cigarette. Naloxone infusion for 60 min did not alter basal plasma AVP or OT levels. Smoking led to a significant rise in plasma vasopressin in both saline and naloxone-infused subjects (P less than 0.05). There was no significant difference in the plasma AVP response to smoking between the two groups. Saline-infused subjects did not show any change in plasma OT in response to smoking. Naloxone infusion was associated with a significant rise in OT from 1.3 +/- 0.1 pmol/l to 4.3 +/- 2.4 pmol/l 5 min after smoking (P less than 0.05). We conclude that there is endogenous opioid-mediated inhibition of OT which prevents its release when AVP is secreted in response to nicotine in man.

  18. Hsp70-GlcNAc-binding activity is released by stress, proteasome inhibition, and protein misfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinez, Celine; Mir, Anne-Marie; Leroy, Yves; Cacan, Rene; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Lefebvre, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Numerous recent works strengthen the idea that the nuclear and cytosolic-specific O-GlcNAc glycosylation protects cells against injuries. We have first investigated O-GlcNAc level and Hsp70-GlcNAc-binding activity (HGBA) behaviour after exposure of HeLa and HepG 2 cells to a wide variety of stresses. O-GlcNAc and HGBA responses were different according to the stress and according to the cell. HGBA was released for almost all stresses, while O-GlcNAc level was modified either upwards or downwards, depending to the stress. Against all expectations, we demonstrated that energy charge did not significantly vary with stress whereas UDP-GlcNAc pools were more dramatically affected even if differences in UDP-GlcNAc contents were not correlated with O-GlcNAc variations suggesting that O-GlcNAc transferase is itself finely regulated during cell injury. Finally, HGBA could be triggered by proteasome inhibition and by L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (a proline analogue) incorporation demonstrating that protein misfolding is one of the key-activator of this Hsp70 property

  19. Acetylcholine-induced inhibition of presynaptic calcium signals and transmitter release in the frog neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Khaziev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh, released from axonal terminals of motor neurones in neuromuscular junctions regulates the efficacy of neurotransmission through activation of presynaptic nicotinic and muscarinic autoreceptors. Receptor-mediated presynaptic regulation could reflect either direct action on exocytotic machinery or modulation of Ca2+ entry and resulting intra-terminal Ca2+ dynamics. We have measured free intra-terminal cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i using Oregon-Green 488 microfluorimetry, in parallel with voltage-clamp recordings of spontaneous (mEPC and evoked (EPC postsynaptic currents in post-junctional skeletal muscle fibre. Activation of presynaptic muscarinic and nicotinic receptors with exogenous acetylcholine and its non-hydrolized analogue carbachol reduced amplitude of the intra-terminal [Ca2+]i transients and decreased quantal content (calculated by dividing the area under EPC curve by the area under mEPC curve. Pharmacological analysis revealed the role of muscarinic receptors of M2 subtype as well as d-tubocurarine-sensitive nicotinic receptor in presynaptic modulation of [Ca2+]i transients. Modulation of synaptic transmission efficacy by ACh receptors was completely eliminated by pharmacological inhibition of N-type Ca2+ channels. We conclude that ACh receptor-mediated reduction of Ca2+ entry into the nerve terminal through N-type Ca2+ channels represents one of possible mechanism of presynaptic modulation in frog neuromuscular junction.

  20. Development of a confirmatory method for detecting recombinant bovine somatotropin in plasma by immunomagnetic precipitation followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Christelle; Huet, Anne-Catherine; Suárez-Pantaleón, Célia; Brasseur, Amaury; Delahaut, Philippe; Gillard, Nathalie

    2017-11-01

    Recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST), a synthetic growth hormone, is used to stimulate growth and enhance milk production in dairy cows. Both its use and the sale of dairy products from treated animals are prohibited in the European Union, as well as in Australia, Canada, Japan, and New Zealand, but authorised in several countries (e.g. Brazil, USA). Screening methods involve detecting anti-rbST antibodies (biomarkers) in treated cows. Confirmatory methods are required to prove rbST abuse. The major challenges in determining rbST are its potentially low levels, its high similarity to native bST, and matrix interferences. To overcome these obstacles, we have developed a method involving immunomagnetic precipitation followed by UHPLC-MS/MS for rbST detection. Briefly, protein G magnetic beads pre-coated with an in-house produced monoclonal antibody were added to plasma. Incubation at room temperature allowed rbST present in the sample to bind to the magnetic beads. After that, magnetic beads were isolated by centrifugation and thoroughly washed (PBS, PBS + 0.2% Tween 20). Finally, rbST was released by alkalinisation and the samples were trypsin digested prior to UHPLC-MS/MS analysis in the MRM mode. Validation was done in accordance with European Commission Decision 2002/657/CE. Matrix-matched calibration with internal standards was used. The decision limit (CCα) reached with this approach was 0.11 µg l -1 .

  1. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyatake S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shouta Miyatake,1 Yuko Shimizu-Motohashi,2 Shin’ichi Takeda,1 Yoshitsugu Aoki1 1Department of Molecular Therapy, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Child Neurology, National Center Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. Keywords: calcium channels, ryanodine receptor 1, exon skipping, NF-κB, myokine, ROS

  2. The influence of "host release factor" on carbon release by zooxanthellae isolated from fed and starved Aiptasia pallida (Verrill).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, S K; Cook, C B

    2001-06-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) typically respond to extracts of host tissue with enhanced release of short-term photosynthetic products. We examined this "host release factor" (HRF) response using freshly isolated zooxanthellae of differing nutritional status. The nutritional status was manipulated by either feeding or starving the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida (Verrill). The release of fixed carbon from isolated zooxanthellae was measured using 14C in 30 min experiments. Zooxanthellae in filtered seawater alone released approximately 5% of photosynthate irrespective of host feeding history. When we used a 10-kDa ultrafiltrate of A. pallida host tissue as a source of HRF, approximately 14% of photosynthate was released to the medium. This increased to over 25% for zooxanthellae from anemones starved for 29 days or more. The cell-specific photosynthetic rate declined with starvation in these filtrate experiments, but the decline was offset by the increased percentage release. Indeed, the total amount of released photosynthate remained unchanged, or even increased, as zooxanthellae became more nutrient deficient. Similar trends were also observed when zooxanthellae from A. pallida were incubated in a 3-kDa ultrafiltrate of the coral Montastraea annularis, suggesting that HRF in the different filtrates operated in a similar manner. Our results support the suggestion that HRF diverts surplus carbon away from storage compounds to translocated compounds such as glycerol.

  3. Allosteric Inhibition of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Revealed by Ibudilast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Y.; Crichlow, G; Vermeire, J; Leng, L; Du, X; Hodsdon, M; Bucala, R; Cappello, M; Gross, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    AV411 (ibudilast; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine) is an antiinflammatory drug that was initially developed for the treatment of bronchial asthma but which also has been used for cerebrovascular and ocular indications. It is a nonselective inhibitor of various phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and has varied antiinflammatory activity. More recently, AV411 has been studied as a possible therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain and opioid withdrawal through its actions on glial cells. As described herein, the PDE inhibitor AV411 and its PDE-inhibition-compromised analog AV1013 inhibit the catalytic and chemotactic functions of the proinflammatory protein, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Enzymatic analysis indicates that these compounds are noncompetitive inhibitors of the p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) tautomerase activity of MIF and an allosteric binding site of AV411 and AV1013 is detected by NMR. The allosteric inhibition mechanism is further elucidated by X-ray crystallography based on the MIF/AV1013 binary and MIF/AV1013/HPP ternary complexes. In addition, our antibody experiments directed against MIF receptors indicate that CXCR2 is the major receptor for MIF-mediated chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  4. 77 FR 4227 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor Analog...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... Factor Analog-Diphtheria Toxoid Conjugate AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule... extends the slaughter interval for intact male swine injected with gonadotropin releasing factor analog...-322 for IMPROVEST (gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate) Sterile Solution...

  5. 76 FR 27888 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor-Diphtheria...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Factor-Diphtheria Toxoid Conjugate AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. [[Page... veterinary prescription use of gonadotropin releasing factor-diphtheria toxoid conjugate by subcutaneous... provides for the veterinary prescription use of IMPROVEST (gonadotropin releasing factor-diphtheria toxoid...

  6. Influence of environmental factors on mercury release in hydroelectric reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, K.; Therien, N.

    1991-04-01

    Due to increased mercury concentrations in fish in hydro-electric reservoirs after flooding, a study was carried out to evaluate the release and transformation of mercury due to vegetation and soil flooded as a result of reservoir creation. Samples of vegetation and soils were immersed in water and concentrations of total mercury, methylmercury and nutrients were followed. The effects of anoxia, pH and temperature on release and transformation were examined. An existing dynamic model of decomposition of flooded materials in reservoirs was modified to include mercury release and transformation, and was calibrated to the experimental data. Amounts of mercury released by the different substrates was of the same order of magnitude. Tree species contributed to the greatest amounts of methylmercury per unit biomass, but the biomass used for these was twigs and foliage. Soil released significant amounts of mercury, but methylation was very low. The model was able to fit well for all substrates except lichen. The model can be adapted to proposed reservoirs to predict nutrient and mecury release and transformation. 175 refs., 38 figs., 38 tabs.

  7. Inhibition of release of inflammatory mediators in primary and cultured cells by a Chinese herbal medicine formula for allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McPhee Sarah

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We demonstrated that a Chinese herbal formula, which we refer to as RCM-101, developed from a traditional Chinese medicine formula, reduced nasal and non-nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR. The present study in primary and cultured cells was undertaken to investigate the effects of RCM-101 on the production/release of inflammatory mediators known to be involved in SAR. Methods Compound 48/80-induced histamine release was studied in rat peritoneal mast cells. Production of leukotriene B4 induced by the calcium ionophore A23187 was studied in porcine neutrophils using an HPLC assay and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated prostaglandin E2 production was studied in murine macrophage (Raw 264.7 cells by immune-enzyme assay. Expression of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 was determined in Raw 264.7 cells, using western blotting techniques. Results RCM-101 (1–100 μg/mL produced concentration-dependent inhibition of compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated prostaglandin E2 release from Raw 264.7 cells. Over the range 1 – 10 μg/mL, it inhibited A23187-induced leukotriene B4 production in porcine neutrophils. In addition, RCM-101 (100 μg/mL inhibited the expression of COX-2 protein but did not affect that of COX-1. Conclusion The findings indicate that RCM-101 inhibits the release and/or synthesis of histamine, leukotriene B4 and prostaglandin E2 in cultured cells. These interactions of RCM-101 with multiple inflammatory mediators are likely to be related to its ability to reduce symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

  8. FACTORS AFFECTING THE RELEASE RATE OF A HIGHLY SOLUBLE DRUG FROM A PROGRAMMED RELEASE MEGALOPOROUS SYSTEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERVEEN, C; MENGER, NR; LERK, CF

    The present study reports on the successful incorporation of a highly soluble drug, procaine HCl, in a programmed-release megaloporous system. This solid two-phase system is composed of housing phase matrix granules (HMG), controlling liquid penetration into the system, and of restraining phase

  9. Inhibition of enterovirus 71 entry by transcription factor XBP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jheng, Jia-Rong; Lin, Chiou-Yan [Department of Biochemistry and Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Horng, Jim-Tong, E-mail: jimtong@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Biochemistry and Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lau, Kean Seng [Department of Biochemistry and Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IRE1 was activated but no XBP1 splicing was detected during enterovirus 71 infection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XBP1 was subject to translational shutoff by enterovirus 71-induced eIF4G cleavage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The uptake of UV-irradiated virus was decreased in XBP1-overexpressing cells. -- Abstract: Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) plays an important role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), or unfolded protein, stress response by activating its downstream transcription factor X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1). We demonstrated previously that enterovirus 71 (EV71) upregulated XBP1 mRNA levels but did not activate spliced XBP1 (XBP1s) mRNA or its downstream target genes, EDEM and chaperones. In this study, we investigated further this regulatory mechanism and found that IRE1 was phosphorylated and activated after EV71 infection, whereas its downstream XBP1s protein level decreased. We also found that XBP1s was not cleaved directly by 2A{sup pro}, but that cleavage of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G by the EV71 2A{sup pro} protein may contribute to the decrease in XBP1s expression. Knockdown of XBP1 increased viral protein expression, and the synthesis of EV71 viral protein and the production of EV71 viral particles were inhibited in XBP1-overexpressing RD cells. When incubated with replication-deficient and UV-irradiated EV71, XBP1-overexpressing RD cells exhibited reduced viral RNA levels, suggesting that the inhibition of XBP1s by viral infection may underlie viral entry, which is required for viral replication. Our findings are the first indication of the ability of XBP1 to inhibit viral entry, possibly via its transcriptional activity in regulating molecules in the endocytic machinery.

  10. Inhibition of enterovirus 71 entry by transcription factor XBP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jheng, Jia-Rong; Lin, Chiou-Yan; Horng, Jim-Tong; Lau, Kean Seng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► IRE1 was activated but no XBP1 splicing was detected during enterovirus 71 infection. ► XBP1 was subject to translational shutoff by enterovirus 71-induced eIF4G cleavage. ► The uptake of UV-irradiated virus was decreased in XBP1-overexpressing cells. -- Abstract: Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) plays an important role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), or unfolded protein, stress response by activating its downstream transcription factor X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1). We demonstrated previously that enterovirus 71 (EV71) upregulated XBP1 mRNA levels but did not activate spliced XBP1 (XBP1s) mRNA or its downstream target genes, EDEM and chaperones. In this study, we investigated further this regulatory mechanism and found that IRE1 was phosphorylated and activated after EV71 infection, whereas its downstream XBP1s protein level decreased. We also found that XBP1s was not cleaved directly by 2A pro , but that cleavage of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G by the EV71 2A pro protein may contribute to the decrease in XBP1s expression. Knockdown of XBP1 increased viral protein expression, and the synthesis of EV71 viral protein and the production of EV71 viral particles were inhibited in XBP1-overexpressing RD cells. When incubated with replication-deficient and UV-irradiated EV71, XBP1-overexpressing RD cells exhibited reduced viral RNA levels, suggesting that the inhibition of XBP1s by viral infection may underlie viral entry, which is required for viral replication. Our findings are the first indication of the ability of XBP1 to inhibit viral entry, possibly via its transcriptional activity in regulating molecules in the endocytic machinery.

  11. Student Research Projects Inhibiting Factors from the Students Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Nikrooz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Identifying the research barriers and assess the ability of students to use the university services and facilities is crucial to promote research activities. Present study was carried out to determine the inhibiting factors influencing the student's research projects from the view point of Yasuj University of Medical Sciences students in 2008. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study 96 students of Yasuj Medical University were selected by stratified random sampling. The data were collected by validate & reliable questionnaire, containing demographic information, inhibiting factors related to students (personal and organization. The data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: The mean scores against the personal barriers and the organizational barriers questions were 43.23±12.96 and 62.58±12.08 respectively. There was a significant difference between personal and organizational barriers (P<0.001 and personal barriers were more important. According to the results, the student's inadequate skills & knowledge of research methodology and lack of awareness of research topics were the most prevalent personal barriers. The most prevalent organizational barriers were unavailability of research consulters, inadequate research skills of consulter, insufficient facilities & equipment and lack of motivating staff & faculties. Other variables such as gender, subject of study and research experience are mentioned in the full text. Conclusion: This study showed that the personal barriers were more important than organizational barriers which interfere with the student's research projects. This can be corrected and controlled by teachers, faculty members, university officials and students, themselves.

  12. Factors controlling alkali salt deposition in recovery boilers. Release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P; Kurkela, M; Kylloenen, H; Tapola, E [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1997-10-01

    The research was part of an ongoing cooperative research effort aimed at developing a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers. During 1996 experimental investigations of sulphur release were continued. Experiments at elevated pressures and employing larger particle sizes were performed in order to gain information about mass transfer effects. The first experiments yielding data on the rates of the sulphur-release reactions were performed. This data will be used as the basis of a drop model for sulphur release being developed in cooperation with another research group. The other part of the work during 1996 explored the possibility of using chemical equilibrium calculations to predict the release of sodium, potassium and chlorine in the recovery furnace. The approach is essentially different from that employed in earlier studies in that the effects of fume formation are taken into account. So far, the predictions of the chemical equilibrium release model have, in no way, conflicted with field measurements. (orig.)

  13. Simultaneous initiation of degranulation and inhibition of leukotriene release by soman in human basophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, H.L.; Warner, J.; MacGlashan, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Previous studies noted that the serine esterase inhibitor, soman, could induce histamine release from human basophils. To investigate the mechanisms by which soman causes histamine release (a preformed mediator), we also examined its ability to induce leukotriene release (a newly synthesized mediator) from basophils. We found that no leukotriene release followed activation with soman, while histamine release was usually greater than 70%. In addition, soman and diisopropyl-fluorophosphate were found actively to suppress low level spontaneous leukotriene release as well as ongoing leukotriene release induced by anti-IgE antibody. Soman (0.3 mM) was able to stop leukotriene release as rapidly as the calcium chelator, EDTA. In a series of control experiments, it was noted that soman did not influence the metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4 or LTE4 (for which little metabolism occurred), eliminating the possibility that reduced LTC4 release could have resulted from its enhanced metabolism. Therefore, using one compound (soman), basophils could be simultaneously activated to degranulate while having the pathway leading to leukotriene release actively suppressed. These results provide further evidence that histamine and leukotriene release are independent pathways resulting from the activation of basophils.

  14. GHRELIN ACTIVATES HYPOPHYSIOTROPIC CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING FACTOR NEURONS INDEPENDENTLY OF THE ARCUATE NUCLEUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Agustina; Portiansky, Enrique; Sánchez-Jaramillo, Edith; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Perello, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has established that the hormone ghrelin engages the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal neuroendocrine axis via activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). The neuronal circuitry that mediates this effect of ghrelin is currently unknown. Here, we show that ghrelin-induced activation of PVN CRF neurons involved inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inputs, likely via ghrelin binding sites that were localized at GABAergic terminals within the PVN. While ghrelin activated PVN CRF neurons in the presence of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor antagonists or in arcuate nucleus (ARC)-ablated mice, it failed to do it so in mice with ghrelin receptor expression limited to ARC agouti gene related protein (AgRP)/NPY neurons. These data support the notion that ghrelin activates PVN CRF neurons via inhibition of local GABAergic tone, in an ARC-independent manner. Furthermore, these data suggest that the neuronal circuits mediating ghrelin’s orexigenic action vs. its role as a stress signal are anatomically dissociated. PMID:26874559

  15. Effects of long-term inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase on blood pressure and renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollerstam, A.; Skøtt, O.; Ek, J.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by neuronal NO-synthase (nNOS) in macula densa cells may be involved in the control of renin release. 7-Nitro indazole (7-NI) inhibits nNOS, and we investigated the effect of short- (4 days) and long-term (4 weeks) 7-NI treatment on blood pressure (BP), plasma renin...... LS rats (107 +/- 15 vs. 56 +/- 1 mGU mL(-1)). Stimulation of PRC in LS rats was further enhanced by 7-NI after 4 days of treatment, but not affected in rats treated for 4 weeks. This suggests that inhibition of nNOS stimulates renin release but that this stimulatory effect in the long run might...

  16. Thiazolidinediones inhibit airway smooth muscle release of the chemokine CXCL10: in vitro comparison with current asthma therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidel Petra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated mast cells are present within airway smooth muscle (ASM bundles in eosinophilic asthma. ASM production of the chemokine CXCL10 plays a role in their recruitment. Thus the effects of glucocorticoids (fluticasone, budesonide, long-acting β2-agonists (salmeterol, formoterol and thiazolidinediones (ciglitazone, rosiglitazone on CXCL10 production by ASM cells (ASMC from people with and without asthma were investigated in vitro. Methods Confluent serum-deprived cells were treated with the agents before and during cytokine stimulation for 0-24 h. CXCL10 protein/mRNA, IκB-α levels and p65 activity were measured using ELISA, RT PCR, immunoblotting and p65 activity assays respectively. Data were analysed using ANOVA followed by Fisher’s post-hoc test. Results Fluticasone and/or salmeterol at 1 and 100 nM inhibited CXCL10 release induced by IL-1β and TNF-α, but not IFNγ or all three cytokines (cytomix. The latter was also not affected by budesonide and formoterol. In asthmatic ASMC low salmeterol, but not formoterol, concentrations increased cytomix-induced CXCL10 release and at 0.01 nM enhanced NF-κB activity. Salmeterol 0.1nM together with fluticasone 0.1 and 10 nM still increased CXCL10 release. The thiazolidinediones ciglitazone and rosiglitazone (at 25 and 100 μM inhibited cytomix-induced CXCL10 release but these inhibitory effects were not prevented by the PPAR-g antagonist GW9662. Ciglitazone did not affect early NF-κB activity and CXCL10 mRNA production. Conclusions Thus the thiazolidinediones inhibited asthmatic ASMC CXCL10 release under conditions when common asthma therapies were ineffective or enhanced it. They may provide an alternative strategy to reduce mast cell-ASM interactions and restore normal airway physiology in asthma.

  17. Thiazolidinediones inhibit airway smooth muscle release of the chemokine CXCL10: in vitro comparison with current asthma therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Petra; Alkhouri, Hatem; Lalor, Daniel J; Burgess, Janette K; Armour, Carol L; Hughes, J Margaret

    2012-10-04

    Activated mast cells are present within airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles in eosinophilic asthma. ASM production of the chemokine CXCL10 plays a role in their recruitment. Thus the effects of glucocorticoids (fluticasone, budesonide), long-acting β2-agonists (salmeterol, formoterol) and thiazolidinediones (ciglitazone, rosiglitazone) on CXCL10 production by ASM cells (ASMC) from people with and without asthma were investigated in vitro. Confluent serum-deprived cells were treated with the agents before and during cytokine stimulation for 0-24 h. CXCL10 protein/mRNA, IκB-α levels and p65 activity were measured using ELISA, RT PCR, immunoblotting and p65 activity assays respectively. Data were analysed using ANOVA followed by Fisher's post-hoc test. Fluticasone and/or salmeterol at 1 and 100 nM inhibited CXCL10 release induced by IL-1β and TNF-α, but not IFNγ or all three cytokines (cytomix). The latter was also not affected by budesonide and formoterol. In asthmatic ASMC low salmeterol, but not formoterol, concentrations increased cytomix-induced CXCL10 release and at 0.01 nM enhanced NF-κB activity. Salmeterol 0.1 nM together with fluticasone 0.1 and 10 nM still increased CXCL10 release. The thiazolidinediones ciglitazone and rosiglitazone (at 25 and 100 μM) inhibited cytomix-induced CXCL10 release but these inhibitory effects were not prevented by the PPAR-g antagonist GW9662. Ciglitazone did not affect early NF-κB activity and CXCL10 mRNA production. Thus the thiazolidinediones inhibited asthmatic ASMC CXCL10 release under conditions when common asthma therapies were ineffective or enhanced it. They may provide an alternative strategy to reduce mast cell-ASM interactions and restore normal airway physiology in asthma.

  18. R+-methanandamide inhibits tracheal response to endogenously released acetylcholine via capsazepine-sensitive receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieri, Paola; Martinotti, Enrica; Testai, Lara; Adinolfi, Barbara; Calderone, Vincenzo; Breschi, Maria Cristina

    2003-01-10

    The effects of cannabinoid drugs on the cholinergic response evoked by electrical field stimulation (0.2 ms pulse width, 20 V amplitude, 10 Hz, 7.5 s train duration) in guinea-pig tracheal preparations were investigated. The stable analogue of the endocannabinoid anandamide, R(+)-methanandamide (10(-7)-10(-4) M), produced a dose-dependent inhibition (up to 27+/-5% of control) of electrical field stimulation-mediated atropine-sensitive response. This effect was not blocked by the selective cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3 carboxamide hydrochloride (SR 141716A; 10(-6) M), and was not reproduced with the cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist R(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-[(morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo [1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-(1-naphthalenyl)methanone mesylate) (WIN 55,212-2; 10(-8)-10(-5) M) or the cannabinoid CB(2) receptor selective agonist 1-propyl-2-methyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole (JWH-015; 10(-8)-10(-5) M); it was, on the contrary, antagonized by the vanilloid antagonist 2-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl-amino-thiocarbonyl]-7,8-dihydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-2 benzazepine (capsazepine; 10(-6) M). At the postjunctional level, neither R(+)-methanandamide nor WIN 55,212-2 nor JWH-015 did affect tracheal contractions induced by exogenous acetylcholine (10(-6) M). An inhibitory vanilloid receptor-mediated effect on the cholinergic response evoked by electrical stimulation was confirmed with the vanilloid agonist capsaicin, at doses (3-6 x 10(-8) M) which poorly influenced the basal smooth muscle tone of trachea. In conclusion, our data indicate that in guinea-pig trachea (a) neither CB(1) nor CB(2) cannabinoid receptor-mediated modulation of acetylcholine release occurs; (b) vanilloid VR1-like receptors appear involved in R(+)-methanandamide inhibitory activity on the cholinergic response to electrical field stimulation.

  19. p27{sup Kip1} inhibits tissue factor expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenstein, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.breitenstein@usz.ch [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZHIP), University of Zurich (Switzerland); Akhmedov, Alexander; Camici, Giovanni G.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Tanner, Felix C. [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZHIP), University of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •p27{sup Kip1}regulates the expression of tissue factor at the transcriptional level. •This inhibitory effect of p27{sup Kip1} is independently of its cell regulatory action. •The current study provides new insights into a pleiotrophic function of p27{sup Kip1}. -- Abstract: Background: The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) p27{sup Kip1} regulates cell proliferation and thus inhibits atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling. Expression of tissue factor (TF), the key initator of the coagulation cascade, is associated with atherosclerosis. Yet, it has not been studied whether p27{sup Kip1} influences the expression of TF. Methods and results: p27{sup Kip1} overexpression in human aortic endothelial cells was achieved by adenoviral transfection. Cells were rendered quiescent for 24 h in 0.5% fetal-calf serum. After stimulation with TNF-α (5 ng/ml), TF protein expression and activity was significantly reduced (n = 4; P < 0.001) in cells transfected with p27{sup Kip1}. In line with this, p27{sup Kip1} overexpression reduced cytokine-induced TF mRNA expression (n = 4; P < 0.01) and TF promotor activity (n = 4; P < 0.05). In contrast, activation of the MAP kinases p38, ERK and JNK was not affected by p27{sup Kip1} overexpression. Conclusion: This in vitro study suggests that p27{sup Kip1} inhibits TF expression at the transcriptional level. These data indicate an interaction between p27{sup Kip1} and TF in important pathological alterations such as atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  20. Physiologic and skeletal response to exogenous equine somatotropin (eST) in two-year-old quarter horses in race training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, T.R.J; Potter, G.D.; Morris, E.L.; Greene, L.W.; Simmons, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the physiologic and skeletal response to exogenous equine somatotropin (eST) in two-year-old horses in race training. Sixteen Quarter Horse geldings were paired by age (ave. age=26 months), and one horse from each pair was assigned at random to either the eST treatment group or the control. The experiment was conducted over 112 days during which the horses were broke to ride and trained on a dirt track in a regimen typical for racehorses in training. Radiographs were taken of the left third metacarpal on day 0,28, 42, 56, 70, 84 and 112. Jugular blood samples were collected every 14 days and analyzed for calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P), osteocalcin, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D (Vit D), parathyroid hormone (PTH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and growth hormone (GH). Daily injections of eST were well tolerated and resulted in no observed side effects. There was a trend (P= .14) for increased plasma GH concentrations in the treated horses as the trial progressed. Plasma IGF-I concentrations were increased (P .05). In this study, administration of eST was effective in elevating plasma IGF-I, which is stimulatory to osteoblasts, and serum osteocalcin, which is a product of osteoblastic activity

  1. Diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 (DGAT1 inhibition perturbs postprandial gut hormone release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua V Lin

    Full Text Available Diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 (DGAT1 is a potential therapeutic target for treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases. However, the degree of DGAT1 inhibition required for metabolic benefits is unclear. Here we show that partial DGAT1 deficiency in mice suppressed postprandial triglyceridemia, led to elevations in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY only following meals with very high lipid content, and did not protect from diet-induced obesity. Maximal DGAT1 inhibition led to enhanced GLP-1 and PYY secretion following meals with physiologically relevant lipid content. Finally, combination of DGAT1 inhibition with dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibition led to further enhancements in active GLP-1 in mice and dogs. The current study suggests that targeting DGAT1 to enhance postprandial gut hormone secretion requires maximal inhibition, and suggests combination with DPP-4i as a potential strategy to develop DGAT1 inhibitors for treatment of metabolic diseases.

  2. Effects of porcine somatotropin and dietary phosphorus on growth performance and bone properties of gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, T L; Nelssen, J L; Goodband, R D; Hansen, J A; Fitzner, G E; Friesen, K G; Laurin, J L

    1993-10-01

    One hundred eight gilts (initial weight = 58.5 kg) were used to determine the effects of porcine somatotropin (pST) and dietary P on growth performance and bone mechanical properties and mineralization during the finishing phase (58 to 105 kg) and a 35-d postfinishing phase. Gilts were injected daily with placebo (control) or 4 mg of pST and fed diets containing .4, .8, or 1.2% P in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement. From 58 to 105 kg, administration of pST increased (P properties and bone ash. A pST x P interaction was observed (P < .05) for rib bending moment and modulus of elasticity; maximum rib bending moment was attained by control gilts at .8% P and rib modulus of elasticity values remained constant across P levels, whereas rib bending moment and modulus of elasticity increased as dietary P increased from .4 to 1.2% in pST-treated gilts. Administration of pST decreased (P < .05) stress of the rib, femur, and metacarpals compared with control gilts. Increasing dietary P resulted in a linear (P < .10) increase in bending moment, stress, and ash content for rib, femur, and metacarpal bones. The remaining 54 gilts were individually fed 1.8 kg/d of a common diet for 35 d postfinishing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. A regulator of G Protein signaling, RGS3, inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-stimulated luteinizing hormone (LH secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musgrove Lois C

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Luteinizing hormone secreted by the anterior pituitary gland regulates gonadal function. Luteinizing hormone secretion is regulated both by alterations in gonadotrope responsiveness to hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone and by alterations in gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion. The mechanisms that determine gonadotrope responsiveness are unknown but may involve regulators of G protein signaling (RGSs. These proteins act by antagonizing or abbreviating interaction of Gα proteins with effectors such as phospholipase Cβ. Previously, we reported that gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated second messenger inositol trisphosphate production was inhibited when RGS3 and gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor cDNAs were co-transfected into the COS cell line. Here, we present evidence for RGS3 inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from cultured rat pituitary cells. Results A truncated version of RGS3 (RGS3T = RGS3 314–519 inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated inositol trisphosphate production more potently than did RSG3 in gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor-bearing COS cells. An RSG3/glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein bound more 35S-Gqα than any other member of the G protein family tested. Adenoviral-mediated RGS3 gene transfer in pituitary gonadotropes inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion in a dose-related fashion. Adeno-RGS3 also inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulated 3H-inositol phosphate accumulation, consistent with a molecular site of action at the Gqα protein. Conclusions RGS3 inhibits gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated second messenger production (inositol trisphosphate as well as luteinizing hormone secretion from rat pituitary gonadotropes apparently by binding and suppressing the transduction properties of Gqα protein function. A version of RGS3 that is amino

  4. Cold urticaria: inhibition of cold-induced histamine release by doxantrazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley-Phillips, C B; Eady, R A; Greaves, M W

    1978-10-01

    Thirteen patients with cold urticaria were studied to assess the effect of the systemic drug doxantrazole, which has actions resembling disodium cromoglycate, on cold evoked histamine release. The patients, all of whom developed an immediate local whealing response after cooling of the forearm, demonstrated release of histamine into venous blood draining that forearm. Following doxantrazole treatment, significant suppression of histamine release occurred. In some but not all patients this was accompanied by diminution of urtication in response to cooling. A double-blind study was carried out in 3 subjects, all of whom showed diminished cold-stimulated histamine release after doxantrazole. Two of these showed clinical improvement. Doxantrazole had no effect on erythema due to intradermal histamine, but did suppress the erythematous reaction to intradermal injection of compound 48/80. Our results suggest that doxantrazole or related anti-allergic agents might be useful in the treatment of cold urticaria.

  5. Sulindac metabolites inhibit epidermal growth factor receptor activation and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahnen Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is associated with a decreased mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC. NSAIDs induce apoptotic cell death in colon cancer cells in vitro and inhibit growth of neoplastic colonic mucosa in vivo however, the biochemical mechanisms required for these growth inhibitory effects are not well defined. We previously reported that metabolites of the NSAID sulindac downregulate extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 signaling and that this effect is both necessary and sufficient for the apoptotic effects of these drugs. The goal of this project was to specifically test the hypothesis that sulindac metabolites block activation and/or expression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor (EGFR. Methods HT29 human colon cancer cells were treated with EGF, alone, or in the presence of sulindac sulfide or sulindac sulfone. Cells lysates were assayed by immunoblotting for phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR, pY1068, total EGFR, phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERK1/2, total ERK1/2, activated caspase-3, and α-tubulin. Results EGF treatment rapidly induced phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 in HT29 colon cancer cells. Pretreatment with sulindac metabolites for 24 h blocked EGF-induced phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 and decreased total EGFR protein expression. Under basal conditions, downregulation of pEGFR and total EGFR was detected as early as 12 h following sulindac sulfide treatment and persisted through at least 48 h. Sulindac sulfone induced downregulation of pEGFR and total EGFR was detected as early as 1 h and 24 h, respectively, following drug treatment, and persisted through at least 72 h. EGFR downregulation by sulindac metabolites was observed in three different CRC cell lines, occurred prior to the observed downregulation of pERK1/2 and induction of apoptosis by these drugs, and was not dependent of caspase activation. Conclusion These results suggest that

  6. Hydrogen sulphide-releasing diclofenac derivatives inhibit breast cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and prevent osteolysis ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzias, J; Logan, J G; Mollat, P; Sparatore, A; Del Soldato, P; Ralston, S H; Idris, A I

    2012-03-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) and prostaglandins are both involved in inflammation, cancer and bone turnover, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and H(2)S donors exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour properties. H(2)S-releasing diclofenac (S-DCF) derivatives are a novel class of NSAIDs combining the properties of a H(2)S donor with those of a conventional NSAID. We studied the effects of the S-DCF derivatives ACS15 and ACS32 on osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation and activity in vitro, human and mouse breast cancer cells support for osteoclast formation and signalling in vitro, and osteolysis ex vivo. The S-diclofenac derivatives ACS15 and ACS32 inhibited the increase in osteoclast formation induced by human MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 and mouse 4T1 breast cancer cells without affecting breast cancer cell viability. Conditioned media from human MDA-MB-231 cells enhanced IκB phosphorylation and osteoclast formation and these effects were significantly inhibited following treatment by ACS15 and ACS32, whereas the parent compound diclofenac had no effects. ACS15 and ACS32 inhibited receptor activator of NFκB ligand-induced osteoclast formation and resorption, and caused caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in mature osteoclasts via a mechanism dependent on IKK/NFκB inhibition. In calvaria organ culture, human MDA-MB-231 cells caused osteolysis, and this effect was completely prevented following treatment with ACS15 and ACS32. S-diclofenac derivatives inhibit osteoclast formation and activity, suppress breast cancer cell support for osteoclastogenesis and prevent osteolysis. This suggests that H(2)S-releasing diclofenac derivatives exhibit anti-resorptive properties, which might be of clinical value in the treatment of osteolytic bone disease. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Loss of nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of purine neurotransmitter release in the colon in the absence of interstitial cells of Cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnin, Leonie; Lees, Andrea; Manzoor, Sheerien; Sasse, Kent C; Sanders, Kenton M; Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N

    2017-11-01

    Regulation of colonic motility depends on the integrity of enteric inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by nitric oxide (NO), purine neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides. Intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-IM) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive (PDGFRα + ) cells are involved in generating responses to NO and purine neurotransmitters, respectively. Previous studies have suggested a decreased nitrergic and increased purinergic neurotransmission in Kit W /Kit W-v ( W/W v ) mice that display lesions in ICC-IM along the gastrointestinal tract. However, contributions of NO to these phenotypes have not been evaluated. We used small-chamber superfusion assays and HPLC to measure the spontaneous and electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked release of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + )/ADP-ribose, uridine adenosine tetraphosphate (Up4A), adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), and metabolites from the tunica muscularis of human, monkey, and murine colons and circular muscle of monkey colon, and we tested drugs that modulate NO levels or blocked NO receptors. NO inhibited EFS-evoked release of purines in the colon via presynaptic neuromodulation. Colons from W/W v , Nos1 -/- , and Prkg1 -/- mice displayed augmented neural release of purines that was likely due to altered nitrergic neuromodulation. Colons from W/W v mice demonstrated decreased nitrergic and increased purinergic relaxations in response to nerve stimulation. W/W v mouse colons demonstrated reduced Nos1 expression and reduced NO release. Our results suggest that enhanced purinergic neurotransmission may compensate for the loss of nitrergic neurotransmission in muscles with partial loss of ICC. The interactions between nitrergic and purinergic neurotransmission in the colon provide novel insight into the role of neurotransmitters and effector cells in the neural regulation of gastrointestinal motility. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study investigating the role of nitric

  8. Antioxidants inhibit SAA formation and pro-inflammatory cytokine release in a human cell model of alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreafico, Adriano; Millucci, Lia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Geminiani, Michela; Braconi, Daniela; Amato, Loredana; Chellini, Federico; Frediani, Bruno; Moretti, Elena; Collodel, Giulia; Bernardini, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2013-09-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an ultra-rare autosomal recessive disease that currently lacks an appropriate therapy. Recently we provided experimental evidence that AKU is a secondary serum amyloid A (SAA)-based amyloidosis. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the use of antioxidants to inhibit SAA amyloid and pro-inflammatory cytokine release in AKU. We adopted a human chondrocytic cell AKU model to evaluate the anti-amyloid capacity of a set of antioxidants that had previously been shown to counteract ochronosis in a serum AKU model. Amyloid presence was evaluated by Congo red staining. Homogentisic acid-induced SAA production and pro-inflammatory cytokine release (overexpressed in AKU patients) were evaluated by ELISA and multiplex systems, respectively. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by means of a fluorescence-based assay. Our AKU model allowed us to prove the efficacy of ascorbic acid combined with N-acetylcysteine, taurine, phytic acid and lipoic acid in significantly inhibiting SAA production, pro-inflammatory cytokine release and membrane lipid peroxidation. All the tested antioxidant compounds were able to reduce the production of amyloid and may be the basis for establishing new therapies for AKU amyloidosis.

  9. Pharmacological hypothesis: Nitric oxide-induced inhibition of ADAM-17 activity as well as vesicle release can in turn prevent the production of soluble endothelin-converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Parkington, Helena C; Smith, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) are two highly potent vasoactive molecules with opposing effects on the vasculature. Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) catalyse the production of ET-1 and NO, respectively. It is well established that these molecules play a crucial role in the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases and have therefore become targets of therapy. Many studies have examined the mechanism(s) by which NO regulates ET-1 production. Expression and localization of ECE-1 is a key factor that determines the rate of ET-1 production. ECE-1 can either be membrane bound or be released from the cell surface to produce a soluble form. NO has been shown to reduce the expression of both membrane-bound and soluble ECE-1. Several studies have examined the mechanism(s) behind NO-mediated inhibition of ECE expression on the cell membrane. However, the precise mechanism(s) behind NO-mediated inhibition of soluble ECE production are unknown. We hypothesize that both exogenous and endogenous NO, inhibits the production of soluble ECE-1 by preventing its release via extracellular vesicles (e.g., exosomes), and/or by inhibiting the activity of A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease-17 (ADAM17). If this hypothesis is proven correct in future studies, these pathways represent targets for the therapeutic manipulation of soluble ECE-1 production. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Silymarin Ameliorates Diabetes-Induced Proangiogenic Response in Brain Endothelial Cells through a GSK-3β Inhibition-Induced Reduction of VEGF Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Alhusban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Additionally, it was found to induce a dysfunctional angiogenic response in the brain that was attributed to oxidative stress. Milk thistle seed extract (silymarin has potent antioxidant properties, though its potential use in ameliorating diabetes-induced aberrant brain angiogenesis is unknown. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β is a regulator of angiogenesis that is upregulated by diabetes. Its involvement in diabetes-induced angiogenesis is unknown. To evaluate the potential of silymarin to ameliorate diabetes-induced aberrant angiogenesis, human brain endothelial cells (HBEC-5i were treated with 50 μg/mL advanced glycation end (AGE products in the presence or absence of silymarin (50, 100 μM. The angiogenic potential of HBEC-5i was evaluated in terms of migration and in vitro tube formation capacities. The involvement of GSK-3β was also evaluated. AGE significantly increased the migration and tube formation rates of HBEC-5i by about onefold (p=0.0001. Silymarin reduced AGE-induced migration in a dose-dependent manner where 50 μM reduced migration by about 50%, whereas the 100 μM completely inhibited AGE-induced migration. Similarly, silymarin 50 μg/mL blunted AGE-induced tube formation (p=0.001. This effect was mediated through a GSK-3β-dependent inhibition of VEGF release. In conclusion, silymarin inhibits AGE-induced aberrant angiogenesis in a GSK-3β-mediated inhibition of VEGF release.

  11. Efficient inhibition of heavy metal release from mine tailings against acid rain exposure by triethylenetetramine intercalated montmorillonite (TETA-Mt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Beini; Wu, Pingxiao; Huang, Zhujian; Li, Yuanyuan; Yang, Shanshan; Dang, Zhi; Ruan, Bo; Kang, Chunxi

    2016-11-15

    The potential application of triethylenetetramine intercalated montmorillonite (TETA-Mt) in mine tailings treatment and AMD (acid mine drainage) remediation was investigated with batch experiments. The structural and morphological characteristics of TETA-Mt were analyzed with XRD, FTIR, DTG-TG and SEM. The inhibition efficiencies of TETA-Mt against heavy metal release from mine tailings when exposed to acid rain leaching was examined and compared with that of triethylenetetramine (TETA) and Mt. Results showed that the overall inhibition by TETA-Mt surpassed that by TETA or Mt for various heavy metal ions over an acid rain pH range of 3-5.6 and a temperature range of 25-40°C. When mine tailings were exposed to acid rain of pH 4.8 (the average rain pH of the mining site where the mine tailings were from), TETA-Mt achieved an inhibition efficiency of over 90% for Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) release, and 70% for Pb(2+) at 25°C. It was shown that TETA-Mt has a strong buffering capacity. Moreover, TETA-Mt was able to adsorb heavy metal ions and the adsorption process was fast, suggesting that coordination was mainly responsible. These results showed the potential of TETA-Mt in AMD mitigation, especially in acid rain affected mining area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolution of the mammary capillary network and carbonic anhydrase activity throughout lactation and during somatotropin treatment in goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Benedicte Olaf; Cvek, Katarina; Dahlborn, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    involved in the coordination of mammary blood flow (MBF) and metabolic activity. Milk vein blood velocity was determined as a measure of MBF, and fine needle mammary biopsies were obtained at different time points during lactation and by the end of a 14-d bovine somatotropin (BST) treatment initiated 3...... almost tripled in size, whereas number of capillaries surrounding each alveolus decreased by 1/3, and CA activity more than halved. BST treatment did not affect capillary traits but increased number of alveoli in mammary sections, and BST thus appeared to be targeted mostly towards the mammary epithelial...

  13. Factors affecting calculations of dose resulting from a tritium release into the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaduy, P.; Easterly, C.E.; Booth, R.S.; Jacobs, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium releases in the form of HT represent a lower hazard to man than releases as HTO. However, during movement in the environment, HT is converted into HTO. The effects of the conversion rate on calcultions of dose are described, and a general method is presented for determining the dose from tritium for various conversion rates and relative HTO/HT risk factors

  14. Supplementation with vitamins C and E inhibits the release of interleukin-6 from contracting human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Christian P; Hiscock, Natalie J; Penkowa, Milena

    2004-01-01

    (6 h). Leg blood flow was measured using Doppler ultrasonography. Plasma IL-6 concentration was measured in blood sampled from the femoral artery and vein. The net release of IL-6 was calculated using Fick's principle. Plasma vitamin C and E concentrations were elevated in Treatment compared...... in Control, but not in Treatment. In conclusion, our results show that supplementation with vitamins C and E attenuated the systemic IL-6 response to exercise primarily via inhibition of the IL-6 protein release from the contracting skeletal muscle per se....... (Treatment versus Control: 7.9 pg ml(-1), 95% confidence interval (CI) 6.0-10.7 pg ml(-1), versus 19.7 pg ml(-1), CI 13.8-29.4 pg ml(-1), at 3.5 h, P C-reactive protein and cortisol levels all increased after the exercise...

  15. Misoprostol inhibits gastric mucosal release of endogenous prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2 in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Eskerod, O; Bukhave, K

    1995-01-01

    Prostaglandin analogues of the E-series theoretically offer the ideal antiulcer drugs. Peptic ulcer healing with prostaglandin analogues is, however, no better than would be predicted from their ability to inhibit gastric acid secretion and they are less effective than histamine H2 receptor...... antagonists in preventing ulcer relapse. It could be that prostaglandin analogues inhibit gastric mucosal synthesis or release of endogenous eicosanoids, thereby abrogating their own effects. This study, therefore, examined how a single therapeutic dose (200 micrograms) of misoprostol, a synthetic analogue...... blind, cross over design. In each subject misoprostol or placebo was instilled in randomised order into the stomach, which was subsequently perfused with isotonic mannitol. Misoprostol significantly decreased basal as well as acid stimulated output of PGE2 and TXB2, without affecting output of LTB4...

  16. Adenosine (ADO) released during orthodromic stimulation of the frog sympathetic ganglion inhibits phosphatidylinositol turnover (PI) associated with synaptic transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curnish, R.; Bencherif, M.; Rubio, R.; Berne, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that 3 H-purine release was enhanced during synaptic activation of the prelabelled frog sympathetic ganglion. In addition, during orthodromic stimulation, there is an increased 3 H-inositol release (an index of PI) that occurs during the poststimulation period and not during the period of stimulation. They hypothesized that endogenous ADO inhibits PI turnover during orthodromic stimulation. To test this hypothesis (1) they performed experiments to directly measure ADO release in the extracellular fluid by placing the ganglion in a 5 μl drop of Ringer's and let it come to equilibrium with the interstitial fluid, (2) they destroyed endogenous ADO by suffusing adenosine deaminase (ADA) during the stimulation period. Their results show (1) orthodromic stimulation increases release of ADO into the bathing medium, (2) ADA induced an increase of PI during the stimulation period in contrast to an increase seen only during the poststimulation period when ADA was omitted. They conclude that there is dual control of PI during synaptic activity, a stimulatory effect (cause unknown) and a short lived inhibitory effect that is probably caused by adenosine

  17. Growth factor delivery: How surface interactions modulate release in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, William J.; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been extensively used to deliver growth factors to induce new bone formation. The pharmacokinetics of growth factor delivery has been a critical regulator of their clinical success. This review will focus on the surface interactions that control the non-covalent incorporation of growth factors into scaffolds and the mechanisms that control growth factor release from clinically relevant biomaterials. We will focus on the delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 from materials currently used in the clinical practice, but also suggest how general mechanisms that control growth factor incorporation and release delineated with this growth factor could extend to other systems. A better understanding of the changing mechanisms that control growth factor release during the different stages of preclinical development could instruct the development of future scaffolds for currently untreatable injuries and diseases. PMID:22433783

  18. The effects of corticotrophin-releasing factor and two antagonists on breathing movements in fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, L; Johnston, B M; Vale, W W; Gluckman, P D

    1990-01-01

    1. The respiratory effects of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and the CRF antagonists alpha-helical CRF 9-41 (alpha hCRF) and [DPhe 12, Nle 21-38] rCRF (12-41) (DPhe CRF) have been studied in unanaesthetized fetal lambs of 125-140 days gestation. 2. CRF when given as a 10 micrograms bolus followed by a 5 micrograms h-1 infusion into a lateral cerebral ventricle caused prolonged continuous fetal breathing movements which were stimulated in both amplitude and frequency but which did not persist during hypoxia. 3. Lower doses of CRF (20 ng bolus followed by 10 ng h-1) increased the amplitude but not the frequency of fetal breathing movements which did not become continuous. 4. At higher doses (20 micrograms bolus followed by 10-15 micrograms h-1) CRF induced cerebral convulsions which were also associated with fetal breathing movements of increased amplitude and frequency. 5. The CRF antagonists alpha hCRF and DPhe CRF both inhibited fetal breathing movements and induced a prolonged apnoea which was resistant to the stimulatory effects of 5-6% hypercapnia. 6. We conclude that CRF stimulates breathing movements in the fetal lamb. The finding that administration of the CRF antagonists alone cause apnoea suggests that CRF may have a tonic role in the regulation of fetal breathing movements. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2348387

  19. Mechanisms of inhibition of vasopressin release during moderate antiorthostatic posture change in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pump, B.; Gabrielsen, A.; Christensen, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the carotid baroreceptor stimulation caused by a posture change from upright seated with legs horizontal (Seat) to supine (Sup) participates in the suppression of arginine vasopressin (AVP) release. Ten healthy males underwent this posture change for 30 min without...... decreased from 0.9 +/- 0.2 to 0.5 +/- 0.1 pg/ml (P posture...

  20. Interleukin-6 infusion during human endotoxaemia inhibits in vitro release of the urokinase receptor from peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S R; Plomgaard, P; Fischer, C P

    2005-01-01

    Leucocyte expression of the urokinase receptor [urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)] is regulated by inflammatory mediators. This study investigated the in vivo effect of endotoxin, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on uPAR-release in vivo and in vitro in ...

  1. Controllable mineral coatings on scaffolds as carriers for growth factor release for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurez-Gonzalez, Darilis

    The work presented in this document, focused on the development and characterization of mineral coatings on scaffold materials to serve as templates for growth factor binding and release. Mineral coatings were formed using a biomimetic approach that consisted in the incubation of scaffolds in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF). To modulate the properties of the mineral coating, which we hypothesized would dictate growth factor release, we used carbonate (HCO3) concentration in mSBF of 4.2 mM, 25mM, and 100mM. Analysis of the mineral coatings formed using scanning electron microscopy indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral with different morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite. FTIR data confirmed the substitution of HCO3 in the mineral. As the extent of HCO3 substitution increased, the coating exhibited more rapid dissolution kinetics in an environment deficient in calcium and phosphate. The mineral coatings provided an effective mechanism for bioactive growth factor binding and release. Peptide versions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) were bound with efficiencies up to 90% to mineral-coated PCL scaffolds. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) also bound to mineral coated scaffolds with lower efficiency (20%) and released with faster release kinetics compared to peptides growth factor. Released rhVEGF induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation in vitro and enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in an intramuscular sheep model. In addition to the use the mineral coatings for single growth factor release, we expanded the concept and bound both an angiogenic (rhVEGF) and osteogenic (mBMP2) growth factor by a simple double dipping process. Sustained release of both growth factors was demonstrated for over 60 days. Released rhVEGF enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in sheep and its biological activity was

  2. Furan- and Thiophene-2-Carbonyl Amino Acid Derivatives Activate Hypoxia-Inducible Factor via Inhibition of Factor Inhibiting Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichi Kawaguchi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Induction of a series of anti-hypoxic proteins protects cells during exposure to hypoxic conditions. Hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α is a major transcription factor that orchestrates this protective effect. To activate HIF exogenously, without exposing cells to hypoxic conditions, many small-molecule inhibitors targeting prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein have been developed. In addition, suppression of factor inhibiting HIF-1 (FIH-1 has also been shown to have the potential to activate HIF-α. However, few small-molecule inhibitors of FIH-1 have been developed. In this study, we synthesized a series of furan- and thiophene-2-carbonyl amino acid derivatives having the potential to inhibit FIH-1. The inhibitory activities of these compounds were evaluated in SK-N-BE(2c cells by measuring HIF response element (HRE promoter activity. Several furan- and thiophene-2-carbonyl amino acid derivatives inhibited FIH-1 based on correlations among the docking score of the FIH-1 active site, the chemical structure of the compounds, and biological HIF-α/HRE transcriptional activity.

  3. Release of Growth Factors into Root Canal by Irrigations in Regenerative Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qian; Nguyen, Sean; Zhang, Hongming; Chebrolu, Hari Priya; Alzebdeh, Dalia; Badi, Mustafa A; Kim, Jong Ryul; Ling, Junqi; Yang, Maobin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the release of growth factors into root canal space after the irrigation procedure of regenerative endodontic procedure. Sixty standardized root segments were prepared from extracted single-root teeth. Nail varnish was applied to all surfaces except the root canal surface. Root segments were irrigated with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 17% EDTA, or deionized water. The profile of growth factors that were released after irrigation was studied by growth factor array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to validate the release of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) at 4 hours, 1 day, and 3 days after irrigation. The final concentrations were calculated on the basis of the root canal volume measured by cone-beam computed tomography. Dental pulp stem cell migration on growth factors released from root segments was measured by using Transwell assay. Total of 11 of 41 growth factors were detected by growth factors array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that TGF-β1 was released in all irrigation groups. Compared with the group with 17% EDTA (6.92 ± 4.49 ng/mL), the groups with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA and 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA had significantly higher release of TGF-β1 (69.04 ± 30.41 ng/mL and 59.26 ± 3.37 ng/mL, respectively), with a peak release at day 1. The release of bFGF was detected at a low level in all groups (0 ng/mL to 0.43 ± 0.22 ng/mL). Migration assay showed the growth factors released from root segments induced dental pulp stem cell migration. The root segment model in present study simulated clinical scenario and indicated that the current irrigation protocol released a significant amount of TGF-β1 but not bFGF. The growth factors released into root canal space induced dental pulp stem cell migration. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ciproxifan, a histamine H{sub 3} receptor antagonist and inverse agonist, presynaptically inhibits glutamate release in rat hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei City 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Ying [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei City 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, No. 510, Chung-Cheng Road, Hsin-Chuang District, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shu-Kuei [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei City 22060, Taiwan (China); Wang, Su-Jane, E-mail: med0003@mail.fju.edu.tw [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No. 510, Chung-Cheng Rd., Hsin-Chuang, New Taipei 24205, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Chinese Herbal Medicine, College of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China)

    2017-03-15

    Ciproxifan is an H{sub 3} receptor antagonist and inverse agonist with antipsychotic effects in several preclinical models; its effect on glutamate release has been investigated in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, ciproxifan reduced 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked Ca{sup 2+}-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration elevation but did not affect the membrane potential. The inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was prevented by the Gi/Go-protein inhibitor pertussis toxin and Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, but was not affected by the intracellular Ca{sup 2+}-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157. Furthermore, the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) inhibitor OBAA, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), PGE2 subtype 2 (EP{sub 2}) receptor antagonist PF04418948, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor FR180204 eliminated the inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on glutamate release. Ciproxifan reduced the 4-AP-evoked phosphorylation of ERK and synapsin I, a presynaptic target of ERK. The ciproxifan-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was prevented in synaptosomes from synapsin I-deficient mice. Moreover, ciproxifan reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that ciproxifan, acting through the blockade of Gi/Go protein-coupled H{sub 3} receptors present on hippocampal nerve terminals, reduces voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry by diminishing PLA{sub 2}/PGE{sub 2}/EP{sub 2} receptor pathway, which subsequently suppresses the ERK/synapsin I cascade to decrease the evoked glutamate release. - Highlights: • Ciproxifan presynaptically reduces glutamate release in the hippocampus in vitro. • Decrease in voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} influx is involved. • A role for the PLA{sub 2}/PGE{sub 2}/EP{sub 2} pathway in the action of

  5. Prejunctional inhibition of norepinephrine release caused by acetylcholine in the human saphenous vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rorie, D.K.; Rusch, N.J.; Shepherd, J.T.; Vanhoutte, P.M.; Tyce, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    We performed experiments to determine whether or not acetylcholine exerts a prejunctional inhibitory effect on adrenergic neurotransmission in the human blood vessel wall. Rings of human greater saphenous veins were prepared 2 to 15 hours after death and mounted for isometric tension recording in organ chambers filled with Krebs-Ringer solution. Acetylcholine depressed contractile responses to electric activation of the sympathetic nerve endings significantly more than those to exogenous norepinephrine; the relaxations caused by the cholinergic transmitter were antagonized by atropine. Helical strips were incubated with [/sub 3/H]norepinephrine and mounted for superfusion. Electric stimulation augmented the fractional release of labeled norepinephrine. Acetylcholine caused a depression of the evoked /sub 3/H release which was antagonized by atropine but not by hexamethonium. These experiments demonstrate that, as in animal cutaneous veins, there are prejunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors on the adrenergic nerve endings in the human saphenous vein. By contrast, the human vein also contains postjunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors

  6. Purines released from astrocytes inhibit excitatory synaptic transmission in the ventral horn of the spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Eva Maria Meier; Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie

    2014-01-01

    by different neuromodulators. These substances are usually thought of being released by dedicated neurons. However, in other networks from the central nervous system synaptic transmission is also modulated by transmitters released from astrocytes. The star-shaped glial cell responds to neurotransmitters....... Neurons responded to electrical stimulation by monosynaptic EPSCs (excitatory monosynaptic postsynaptic currents). We used mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein under the promoter of the glial fibrillary acidic protein to identify astrocytes. Chelating calcium with BAPTA in a single...... neighboring astrocyte increased the amplitude of synaptic currents. In contrast, when we selectively stimulated astrocytes by activating PAR-1 receptors with the peptide TFLLR, the amplitude of EPSCs evoked by a paired stimulation protocol was reduced. The paired-pulse ratio was increased, suggesting...

  7. Inhibition of K+ permeability diminishes alpha 2-adrenoceptor mediated effects on norepinephrine release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimanyi, I.; Folly, G.; Vizi, E.S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of two different potassium channel blockers, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and quinine, on the alpha 2-adrenoceptor mediated modulation of norepinephrine (NE) release was investigated. Pairs of mouse vasa deferentia were loaded with 3 H-norepinephrine ( 3 H-NE), superfused continuously, and stimulated electrically. 4-AP (5.3 x 10(-4) M), and quinine (10(-5) M) enhanced the stimulation-evoked release of tritium significantly. The electrically induced release of radioactivity was reduced by alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists (1-NE and xylazine) and enhanced by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine. Both effects were affected markedly by 4-AP or quinine: the depressant action of 1-NA and xylazine was partially antagonized and the facilitatory effect of yohimbine was completely abolished during the blockade of the potassium channels. It is suggested that the blockade of the potassium permeability counteracts negative feedback modulation; therefore, it seems likely that the stimulation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors leads to an enhanced potassium permeability and hyperpolarization of varicose axon terminals

  8. Basic fibroblast growth factor binds to subendothelial extracellular matrix and is released by heparitinase and heparin-like molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashkin, P.; Doctrow, S.; Klagsbrun, M.; Svahn, C.M.; Folkman, J.; Vlodavsky, I.

    1989-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) exhibits specific binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by cultured endothelial cells. Binding was saturable as a function both of time and of concentration of 125 I-bFGF. Scatchard analysis of FGF binding revealed the presence of about 1.5 x 10 12 binding sites/mm 2 ECM with an apparent k D of 610 nM. FGF binds to heparan sulfate (HS) in ECM as evidenced by (i) inhibition of binding in the presence of heparin or HS at 0.1-1 μg/mL, but not by chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, or hyaluronic acid at 10 μg/mL, (ii) lack of binding to ECM pretreated with heparitinase, but not with chondroitinase ABC, and (iii) rapid release of up to 90% of ECM-bound FGF by exposure to heparin, HS, or heparitinase, but not to chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, hyaluronic acid, or chondroitinase ABC. Oligosaccharides derived from depolymerized heparin, and as small as the tetrasaccharide, released the ECM-bound FGF, but there was little or no release of FGF by modified nonanticoagulant heparins such as totally desulfated heparin, N-desulfated heparin, and N-acetylated heparin. FGF released from ECM was biologically active, as indicated by its stimulation of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis in vascular endothelial cells and 3T3 fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained in studies on release of endogenous FGF-like mitogenic activity from Descement's membranes of bovine corneas. It is suggested that ECM storage and release of bFGF provide a novel mechanism for regulation of capillary blood vessel growth. Whereas ECM-bound FGF may be prevented from acting on endothelial cells, its displacement by heparin-like molecules and/or HS-degrading enzymes may elicit a neovascular response

  9. Influence of factors on release of antimicrobials from antimicrobial packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Mei; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Hu, Chang-Ying; Nerín, Cristina

    2018-05-03

    Antimicrobial packaging materials (films or coatings) (APMs) have aroused great interest among the scientists or the experts specialized in material science, food science, packaging engineering, biology and chemistry. APMs have been used to package the food, such as dairy products, poultry, meat (e.g., beef), salmon muscle, pastry dough, fresh pasta, bakery products, fruits, vegetables and beverages. Some materials have been already commercialized. The ability of APMs to extend the shelf-life of the food depends on the release rate of the antimicrobials (AMs) from the materials to the food. The optimum rate is defined as target release rate (TRR). To achieve TRR, the influencing factors of the release rate should be considered. Herein we reviewed for the first time these factors and their influence on the release. These factors mainly include the AMs, food (or food simulant), packaging materials, the interactions among them, the temperature and environmental relative humidity (RH).

  10. Scaffolds for Controlled Release of Cartilage Growth Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morille, Marie; Venier-Julienne, Marie-Claire; Montero-Menei, Claudia N

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, cell-based therapies using adult stem cells have attracted considerable interest in regenerative medicine. A tissue-engineered construct for cartilage repair should provide a support for the cell and allow sustained in situ delivery of bioactive factors capable of inducing cell differentiation into chondrocytes. Pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs), made of biodegradable and biocompatible poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA), are a unique system which combines these properties in an adaptable and simple microdevice. This device relies on nanoprecipitation of proteins encapsulated in polymeric microspheres with a solid in oil in water emulsion-solvent evaporation process, and their subsequent coating with extracellular matrix protein molecules. Here, we describe their preparation process, and some of their characterization methods for an application in cartilage tissue engineering.

  11. Enhancing human islet transplantation by localized release of trophic factors from PLG scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavaty, K A; Gibly, R F; Zhang, X; Rives, C B; Graham, J G; Lowe, W L; Luo, X; Shea, L D

    2014-07-01

    Islet transplantation represents a potential cure for type 1 diabetes, yet the clinical approach of intrahepatic delivery is limited by the microenvironment. Microporous scaffolds enable extrahepatic transplantation, and the microenvironment can be designed to enhance islet engraftment and function. We investigated localized trophic factor delivery in a xenogeneic human islet to mouse model of islet transplantation. Double emulsion microspheres containing exendin-4 (Ex4) or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were incorporated into a layered scaffold design consisting of porous outer layers for islet transplantation and a center layer for sustained factor release. Protein encapsulation and release were dependent on both the polymer concentration and the identity of the protein. Proteins retained bioactivity upon release from scaffolds in vitro. A minimal human islet mass transplanted on Ex4-releasing scaffolds demonstrated significant improvement and prolongation of graft function relative to blank scaffolds carrying no protein, and the release profile significantly impacted the duration over which the graft functioned. Ex4-releasing scaffolds enabled better glycemic control in animals subjected to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Scaffolds releasing IGF-1 lowered blood glucose levels, yet the reduction was insufficient to achieve euglycemia. Ex4-delivering scaffolds provide an extrahepatic transplantation site for modulating the islet microenvironment to enhance islet function posttransplant. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  12. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  13. Allosteric Inhibition of Factor XIIIa. Non-Saccharide Glycosaminoglycan Mimetics, but Not Glycosaminoglycans, Exhibit Promising Inhibition Profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami A Al-Horani

    Full Text Available Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa is a transglutaminase that catalyzes the last step in the coagulation process. Orthostery is the only approach that has been exploited to design FXIIIa inhibitors. Yet, allosteric inhibition of FXIIIa is a paradigm that may offer a key advantage of controlled inhibition over orthosteric inhibition. Such an approach is likely to lead to novel FXIIIa inhibitors that do not carry bleeding risks. We reasoned that targeting a collection of basic amino acid residues distant from FXIIIa's active site by using sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs or non-saccharide GAG mimetics (NSGMs would lead to the discovery of the first allosteric FXIIIa inhibitors. We tested a library of 22 variably sulfated GAGs and NSGMs against human FXIIIa to discover promising hits. Interestingly, although some GAGs bound to FXIIIa better than NSGMs, no GAG displayed any inhibition. An undecasulfated quercetin analog was found to inhibit FXIIIa with reasonable potency (efficacy of 98%. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies revealed an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. Fluorescence studies confirmed close correspondence between binding affinity and inhibition potency, as expected for an allosteric process. The inhibitor was reversible and at least 9-fold- and 26-fold selective over two GAG-binding proteins factor Xa (efficacy of 71% and thrombin, respectively, and at least 27-fold selective over a cysteine protease papain. The inhibitor also inhibited the FXIIIa-mediated polymerization of fibrin in vitro. Overall, our work presents the proof-of-principle that FXIIIa can be allosterically modulated by sulfated non-saccharide agents much smaller than GAGs, which should enable the design of selective and safe anticoagulants.

  14. Extracellular Adenosine Triphosphate Associated with Amphibian Erythrocytes: Inhibition of ATP Release by Anion Channel Blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Paddle and Burnstock (326), Williams and Forrester (463), Forrester and Williams (151) and Clemens and Forrester (82) provide evidence that hypoxia may...an ATp4 - receptor. Fed. Proc. 45:208, 1986. (abstr) 99. Dahlen , S.E. and Hedqvist, P. ATP, B,y-methylene ATP andN adenosine inhibit non-cholinergic...regulation of skeletal muscle blood low. Circ Res. 29:375-384, 1971. 117. Dodd, J., Jahr, C.E., Hamilton, P.N., Heath, M.J., Matthew , W.P., and Jessell, T.M

  15. Growth inhibition and chemosensitization of exogenous nitric oxide released from NONOates in glioma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyerbrock, Astrid; Baumer, Brunhilde; Papazoglou, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) from NO donors has cytotoxic, chemosensitizing, and radiosensitizing effects, and increases vascular permeability and blood flow in tumors. Yet little is known about whether these cytotoxic and chemosensitizing effects can be observed in glioma cells at doses that alter tumor physiological characteristics in vivo and whether these effects are tumor selective. The effect of NO released from proline NONOate, diethylamine NONOate, spermine NONOate, and sodium nitrite on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and chemosensitivity to carboplatin of cultured glioma cells was studied in C6, U87 glioma cells, human glioblastoma cells, and human astrocytes and fibroblasts. Although proline NONOate failed to induce cell death, the other NO donors induced growth arrest when present in high concentrations (10(-2) M) in all cell lines. Chemosensitization was observed after concomitant incubation with spermine NONOate and carboplatin in C6 and human glioblastoma cells. There is strong evidence that cell death occurs primarily by necrosis and to a lesser degree by apoptosis. The NO doses, which altered tumor physiology in vivo, were not cytotoxic, indicating that NO alters vascular permeability and cell viability in vivo by different mechanisms. The authors found that NO-generating agents at high concentrations are potent growth inhibitors and might also be useful as chemosensitizers in glioma cells. These data corroborate the theory that the use of NOgenerating agents may play a role in the multimodal treatment of malignant gliomas but that the NO release must be targeted more specifically to tumor cells to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  16. Immunochemical determination of cellular content of translation release factor RF4 in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Manuel Palacios Moreno, Juan; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1999-01-01

    The biosynthesis of proteins in prokaryotes is terminated when a stop codon is present in the A-site of the 70S ribosomal complex. Four different translation termination factors are known to participate in the termination process. Release factor RF1 and RF2 are responsible for the recognition of ...

  17. Controllable mineral coatings on PCL scaffolds as carriers for growth factor release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-González, Darilis; Barnhart, Kara; Migneco, Francesco; Flanagan, Colleen; Hollister, Scott J; Murphy, William L

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we have developed mineral coatings on polycaprolactone scaffolds to serve as templates for growth factor binding and release. Mineral coatings were formed using a biomimetic approach that consisted in the incubation of scaffolds in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF). To modulate the properties of the mineral coating, which we hypothesized would dictate growth factor release, we used carbonate (HCO(3)) concentration in mSBF of 4.2 mm, 25 mm, and 100 mm. Analysis of the mineral coatings formed using scanning electron microscopy indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral with different morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite, the major inorganic constituent of human bone tissue in coatings formed in all HCO(3) concentrations. Mineral coatings with increased HCO(3) substitution showed more rapid dissolution kinetics in an environment deficient in calcium and phosphate but showed re-precipitation in an environment with the aforementioned ions. The mineral coating provided an effective mechanism for growth factor binding and release. Peptide versions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) were bound with efficiencies up to 90% to mineral mineral-coated PCL scaffolds. We also demonstrated sustained release of all growth factors with release kinetics that were strongly dependent in the solubility of the mineral coating. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Enkephalin inhibition of angiotensin-stimulated release of oxytocin and vasopressin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, L. C.; Chee, O.; Rosella-Dampman, L. M.; Emmert, S.; Summy-Long, J. Y.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) pretreatment with 100 ng/5 microliter leucine(5)-enkephalin (LE) on the increase in plasma oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) caused by ICV injection of 10, 50, or 100 ng/5 microliter of angiotensin II (AII) is investigated experimentally in conscious adult male Sprague-Dawley rats; the effects of water-deprivation dehydration and lactation/suckling (in female rats) are also studied. An OT radioimmunoassay (RIA) with a sensitivity of 800 fg/ml (described in detail) and the VP RIA technique of Keil and Severs (1977) are employed. Administration of AII or dehydration for 48 or 72 h cause a significant increase in OT and VP without affecting the ratio, while lactation and suckling increase OT only. LE pretreatment inhibits significantly but does not suppress the AII-stimulated OT-VP response.

  19. A Poly-ADP-Ribose Trigger Releases the Auto-Inhibition of a Chromatin Remodeling Oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Hari R; Nardozza, Aurelio P; Möller, Ingvar R

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage triggers chromatin remodeling by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The oncogene and chromatin remodeler ALC1/CHD1L massively decompacts chromatin in vivo yet is inactive prior to DNA-damage-mediated PARP1 induction. We show that the interaction of the ALC1 macrodomain......-macrodomain interactions, promotes an ungated conformation, and activates the remodeler's ATPase. ALC1 fragments lacking the regulatory macrodomain relax chromatin in vivo without requiring PARP1 activation. Further, the ATPase restricts the macrodomain's interaction with PARP1 under non-DNA damage conditions. Somatic...... cancer mutants disrupt ALC1's auto-inhibition and activate chromatin remodeling. Our data show that the NAD+-metabolite and nucleic acid PAR triggers ALC1 to drive chromatin relaxation. Modular allostery in this oncogene tightly controls its robust, DNA-damage-dependent activation....

  20. Releasing dentate nucleus cells from Purkinje cell inhibition generates output from the cerebrocerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ishikawa

    Full Text Available The cerebellum generates its vast amount of output to the cerebral cortex through the dentate nucleus (DN that is essential for precise limb movements in primates. Nuclear cells in DN generate burst activity prior to limb movement, and inactivation of DN results in cerebellar ataxia. The question is how DN cells become active under intensive inhibitory drive from Purkinje cells (PCs. There are two excitatory inputs to DN, mossy fiber and climbing fiber collaterals, but neither of them appears to have sufficient strength for generation of burst activity in DN. Therefore, we can assume two possible mechanisms: post-inhibitory rebound excitation and disinhibition. If rebound excitation works, phasic excitation of PCs and a concomitant inhibition of DN cells should precede the excitation of DN cells. On the other hand, if disinhibition plays a primary role, phasic suppression of PCs and activation of DN cells should be observed at the same timing. To examine these two hypotheses, we compared the activity patterns of PCs in the cerebrocerebellum and DN cells during step-tracking wrist movements in three Japanese monkeys. As a result, we found that the majority of wrist-movement-related PCs were suppressed prior to movement onset and the majority of wrist-movement-related DN cells showed concurrent burst activity without prior suppression. In a minority of PCs and DN cells, movement-related increases and decreases in activity, respectively, developed later. These activity patterns suggest that the initial burst activity in DN cells is generated by reduced inhibition from PCs, i.e., by disinhibition. Our results indicate that suppression of PCs, which has been considered secondary to facilitation, plays the primary role in generating outputs from DN. Our findings provide a new perspective on the mechanisms used by PCs to influence limb motor control and on the plastic changes that underlie motor learning in the cerebrocerebellum.

  1. Expression of human soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR NJ TONUKARI

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... bio-technique in bacterial (Lin et al., 2007), yeast (Xu et al., 2003) ... biological activity, such as human somatotropin (hST) .... sion way with chloroplast transit peptide (Wang et al., .... chloroplast protein synthesis capacity by massive expression of a ... necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in vivo.

  2. mTOR inhibition in macrophages of asymptomatic HIV+ persons reverses the decrease in TLR4-mediated TNFα release through prolongation of MAPK pathway activation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Han, Xinbing; Llano, Juliana; Bole, Medhavi; Zhou, Xiuqin; Swan, Katharine; Anandaiah, Asha; Nelson, Benjamin; Patel, Naimish R.; Reinach, Peter S.; Koziel, Henry; Tachado, Souvenir D.

    2011-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mediated signaling is significantly impaired in macrophages from HIV+ persons predominantly due to altered MyD88-dependent pathway signaling caused in part by constitutive activation of PI3K. Here we assessed in these macrophages if the blunted increase in TLR4-mediated TNFα release induced by lipid A are associated with PI3K-induced upregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. mTOR inhibition with rapamycin enhanced TLR4-mediated TNFα release, but instead suppressed anti-inflammatory IL-10 release. Targeted gene silencing of mTOR in macrophages resulted in lipid A-induced TNFα and IL-10 release patterns similar to those induced by rapamycin. Rapamycin restored MyD88-IRAK interaction in a dose-dependent manner. Targeted gene silencing of MyD88 (shRNA) and mTOR (RNAi) inhibition resulted in TLR4-mediated p70s6K activation and enhanced TNFα release, whereas IL-10 release was inhibited in both silenced and non-silenced HIV+ macrophages. Furthermore, mTOR inhibition augmented lipid A-induced TNFα release through enhanced and prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 MAP kinases, which was associated with time-dependent MKP-1 destabilization. Taken together, impaired TLR4-mediated TNFα release in HIV+ macrophages is attributable in part to mTOR activation by constitutive PI3K expression in a MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. These changes result in MKP-1 stabilization, which shortens and blunts MAP kinase activation. mTOR inhibition may serve as a potential therapeutic target to upregulate macrophage innate immune host defense responsiveness in HIV+ persons. PMID:22025552

  3. Inhibition by local bupivacaine-releasing microspheres of acute postoperative pain from hairy skin incision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, Rachit; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Blaskovich, Phillip D; Pham, Lan N; Costa, Daniel S; Nichols, Gary A; Hildebrand, William P; Scarborough, Nelson L; Herman, Clifford J; Strichartz, Gary R

    2013-09-01

    Acute postoperative pain causes physiological deficits and slows recovery. Reduction of such pain by local anesthetics that are delivered for several days postoperatively is a desirable clinical objective, which is approached by a new formulation and applied in animal studies reported here. We subcutaneously injected a new formulation of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid polymer microspheres, which provides steady drug release for 96+ hours into rats at the dorsal region 2 hours before surgery. A single 1.2-cm-long skin incision was followed by blunt dissection of skin away from the underlying fascia, and closed by 2 sutures, followed by 14 days of testing. Microspheres containing 5, 10, 20, and 40 mg bupivacaine were injected locally 2 hours before surgery; bupivacaine-free microspheres were the vehicle control, and bupivacaine HCl solution (0.5%), the positive control. Mechanical sensitivity was determined by the frequency of local muscle contractions to repeated pokes with nylon monofilaments (von Frey hairs) exerting 4 and 15 g forces, testing, respectively, allodynia and hyperalgesia, and by pinprick. Injection of bupivacaine microspheres (40 mg drug) into intact skin reduced responses to 15 g von Frey hairs for 6 hours and to pinprick for 36 hours. Respective reductions from bupivacaine HCl lasted for 3 and 2 hours. Skin incision and dissection alone caused mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia for 14 days. Microspheres containing 20 or 40 mg bupivacaine suppressed postoperative hypersensitivity for up to 3 days, reduced integrated allodynia (area under curve of response versus time) over postoperative days 1 to 5 by 51% ± 20% (mean ± SE) and 78% ± 12%, and reduced integrated hyperalgesia by 55% ± 13% and 64% ± 11%, for the respective doses. Five and ten milligrams bupivacaine in microspheres and the 0.5% bupivacaine solution were ineffective in reducing postoperative hypersensitivity, as were 40 mg bupivacaine microspheres injected contralateral to the

  4. Sexual side effects of serotonergic antidepressants: mediated by inhibition of serotonin on central dopamine release?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y; Chan, Johnny S W; Olivier, Berend; Veening, Jan G; Millan, Mark J; Waldinger, Marcel D; Oosting, Ronald S

    2014-06-01

    Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction adversely affects the quality of life of antidepressant users and reduces compliance with treatment. Animal models provide an instructive approach for examining potential sexual side effects of novel drugs. This review discusses the stability and reproducibility of our standardized test procedure that assesses the acute, subchronic and chronic effects of psychoactive compounds in a 30 minute mating test. In addition, we present an overview of the effects of several different (putative) antidepressants on male rat sexual behavior, as tested in our standardized test procedure. By comparing the effects of these mechanistically distinct antidepressants (paroxetine, venlafaxine, bupropion, buspirone, DOV 216,303 and S32006), this review discusses the putative mechanism underlying sexual side effects of antidepressants and their normalization. This review shows that sexual behavior is mainly inhibited by antidepressants that increase serotonin neurotransmission via blockade of serotonin transporters, while those that mainly increase the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline are devoid of sexual side effects. Those sexual disturbances cannot be normalized by simultaneously increasing noradrenaline neurotransmission, but are normalized by increasing both noradrenaline and dopamine neurotransmission. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the sexual side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be mediated by their inhibitory effects on dopamine signaling in sex brain circuits. Clinical development of novel antidepressants should therefore focus on compounds that simultaneously increase both serotonin and dopamine signaling. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of coagulation factors by recombinant barley serpin BSZx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Søren Weis; Rasmussen, S.K.; Petersen, L..C.

    1996-01-01

    Barley serpin BSZx is a potent inhibitor of trypsin and chymotrypsin at overlapping reactive sites (Dahl, S.W., Rasmussen, S.K. and Hejgaard, J. (1996) J. Biol, Chem., in press), We have now investigated the interactions of BSZx with a range of serine proteinases from human plasma, pancreas......, urokinase and tissue type plasminogen activator, plasmin and pancreas kallikrein and elastase were not or only weakly affected, The inhibition pattern with mammalian proteinases reveal a specificity of BSZx similar to that of antithrombin III. Trypsin from Fusarium was not inhibited while interaction...... with subtilisin Carlsberg and Novo was rapid but most BSZx was cleaved as a substrate, Identification of a monoclonal antibody specific for native BSZx indicate that complex formation and loop cleavage result in similar conformational changes....

  6. The inhibition of cholera toxin-induced 5-HT release by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, granisetron, in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turvill, J L; Connor, P; Farthing, M J G

    2000-01-01

    The secretagogue 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is implicated in the pathophysiology of cholera. 5-HT released from enterochromaffin cells after cholera toxin exposure is thought to activate non-neuronally (5-HT2 dependent) and neuronally (5-HT3 dependent) mediated water and electrolyte secretion. CT-secretion can be reduced by preventing the release of 5-HT. Enterochromaffin cells possess numerous receptors that, under basal conditions, modulate 5-HT release. These include basolateral 5-HT3 receptors, the activation of which is known to enhance 5-HT release. Until now, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists (e.g. granisetron) have been thought to inhibit cholera toxin-induced fluid secretion by blockading 5-HT3 receptors on secretory enteric neurones. Instead we postulated that they act by inhibiting cholera toxin-induced enterochromaffin cell degranulation. Isolated intestinal segments in anaesthetized male Wistar rats, pre-treated with granisetron 75 μg kg−1, lidoocaine 6 mg kg−1 or saline, were instilled with a supramaximal dose of cholera toxin or saline. Net fluid movement was determined by small intestinal perfusion or gravimetry and small intestinal and luminal fluid 5-HT levels were determined by HPLC with fluorimetric detection. Intraluminal 5-HT release was proportional to the reduction in tissue 5-HT levels and to the onset of water and electrolyte secretion, suggesting that luminal 5-HT levels reflect enterochromaffin cell activity. Both lidocaine and granisetron inhibited fluid secretion. However, granisetron alone, and proportionately, reduced 5-HT release. The simultaneous inhibition of 5-HT release and fluid secretion by granisetron suggests that 5-HT release from enterochromaffin cells is potentiated by endogenous 5-HT3 receptors. The accentuated 5-HT release promotes cholera toxin-induced fluid secretion. PMID:10882387

  7. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in primary cortical neurons is inhibited by equine estrogens via down-regulation of caspase-3 and prevention of mitochondrial cytochrome c release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YueMei

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis plays a key role in cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases marked by a progressive loss of neurons as seen in Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact cause of apoptosis is not known, a number of factors such as free radicals, insufficient levels of nerve growth factors and excessive levels of glutamate have been implicated. We and others, have previously reported that in a stable HT22 neuronal cell line, glutamate induces apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation and up- and down-regulation of Bax (pro-apoptotic, and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic genes respectively. Furthermore, these changes were reversed/inhibited by estrogens. Several lines of evidence also indicate that a family of cysteine proteases (caspases appear to play a critical role in neuronal apoptosis. The purpose of the present study is to determine in primary cultures of cortical cells, if glutamate-induced neuronal apoptosis and its inhibition by estrogens involve changes in caspase-3 protease and whether this process is mediated by Fas receptor and/or mitochondrial signal transduction pathways involving release of cytochrome c. Results In primary cultures of rat cortical cells, glutamate induced apoptosis that was associated with enhanced DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, and up-regulation of pro-caspase-3. Exposure of cortical cells to glutamate resulted in a time-dependent cell death and an increase in caspase-3 protein levels. Although the increase in caspase-3 levels was evident after 3 h, cell death was only significantly increased after 6 h. Treatment of cells for 6 h with 1 to 20 mM glutamate resulted in a 35 to 45% cell death that was associated with a 45 to 65% increase in the expression of caspase-3 protein. Pretreatment with caspase-3-protease inhibitor z-DEVD or pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD significantly decreased glutamate-induced cell death of cortical cells. Exposure of cells to glutamate for 6 h in the presence or

  8. Protein kinase C and α 2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release from the rat tail artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, B.; Neuburger, J.; Illes, P.

    1991-01-01

    In isolated rat tail arteries preincubated with [3H]noradrenaline, electrical field stimulation evoked the overflow of tritium. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a protein kinase C (PKC) activating phorbol ester, time-dependently increased the overflow at 1 mumol/L but not at 0.1 mumol/L. In contrast, the overflow was not altered by phorbol 13-acetate (PA, 1 mumol/L), which does not influence the activity of PKC. Polymyxin B (70 mumol/L), an inhibitor of PKC, depressed the overflow when given alone and, in addition, attenuated the effect of PMA, 1 mumol/L. The selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist B-HT 933 depressed the overflow; PMA, 1 mumol/L, did not interfere with the effect of B-HT 933, 10 mumol/L. The results provide evidence for the participation of prejunctionally located PKC in the release of noradrenaline. However, PKC does not seem to be involved in the alpha 2-adrenoceptor-agonist-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release

  9. Influence of storage conditions on the release of growth factors in platelet-rich blood derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Düregger Katharina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thrombocytes can be concentrated in blood derivatives and used as autologous transplants e.g. for wound treatment due to the release of growth factors such as platelet derived growth factor (PDGF. Conditions for processing and storage of these platelet-rich blood derivatives influence the release of PDGF from the platelet-bound α-granules into the plasma. In this study Platelet rich plasma (PRP and Platelet concentrate (PC were produced with a fully automated centrifugation system. Storage of PRP and PC for 1 h up to 4 months at temperatures between −20°C and +37°C was applied with the aim of evaluating the influence on the amount of released PDGF. Storage at −20°C resulted in the highest release of PDGF in PRP and a time dependency was determined: prolonged storage up to 1 month in PRP and 10 days in PC increased the release of PDGF. Regardless of the storage conditions, the release of PDGF per platelet was higher in PC than in PRP.

  10. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues inhibit leiomyoma extracellular matrix despite presence of gonadal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Minnie; Britten, Joy; Cox, Jeris; Patel, Amrita; Catherino, William H

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of GnRH analogues (GnRH-a) leuprolide acetate (LA) and cetrorelix acetate on gonadal hormone-regulated expression of extracellular matrix in uterine leiomyoma three-dimensional (3D) cultures. Laboratory study. University research laboratory. Women undergoing hysterectomy for symptomatic leiomyomas. The 3D cell cultures, protein analysis, Western blot, immunohistochemistry. Expression of extracellular matrix proteins, collagen 1, fibronectin, and versican in leiomyoma cells 3D cultures exposed to E2, P, LA, cetrorelix acetate, and combinations for 24- and 72-hour time points. The 3D leiomyoma cultures exposed to E2 for 24 hours demonstrated an increased expression of collagen-1 and fibronectin, which was maintained for up to 72 hours, a time point at which versican was up-regulated significantly. Although P up-regulated collagen-1 protein (1.29 ± 0.04) within 24 hours of exposure, significant increase in all extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins was observed when the gonadal hormones were used concomitantly. Significant decrease in the amount of ECM proteins was observed on use of GnRH-a, LA and cetrorelix, with 24-hour exposure. Both the compounds also significantly decreased ECM protein concentration despite the presence of E2 or both gonadal hormones. This study demonstrates that GnRH-a directly affect the gonadal hormone-regulated collagen-1, fibronectin, and versican production in their presence. These findings suggest that localized therapy with GnRH-a may inhibit leiomyoma growth even in the presence of endogenous gonadal hormone exposure, thereby providing a mechanism to eliminate the hypoestrogenic side effects associated with GnRH-a therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Factors affecting release of ethanol vapour in active modified atmosphere packaging systems for horticultural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerawate Utto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The active modified atmosphere packaging (active MAP system , which provides interactive postharvest control , using ethanol vapour controlled release, is one of the current interests in the development of active packaging for horticultural products. A number of published research work have discussed the relationship between the effectiveness of ethanol vapour and its concentration in the package headspace, including its effect on postharvest decay and physiological controls. This is of importance because a controlled release system should release and maintain ethanol vapour at effective concentrations during the desired storage period. A balance among the mass transfer processes of ethanol vapour in the package results in ethanol vapour accumulation in the package headspace. Key factors affecting these processes include ethanol loading, packaging material, packaged product and storage environment (temperature and relative h umidity. This article reviews their influences and discusses future work required to better understand their influences on ethanol vapour release and accumulations in active MAP.

  12. Selective inhibition of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase enhances dopamine release from noradrenergic terminals in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoto, Paola; Flore, Giovanna; Saba, Pierluigi; Frau, Roberto; Gessa, Gian L

    2015-10-01

    Disulfiram has been claimed to be useful in cocaine addiction therapy, its efficacy being attributed to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibition. Our previous results indicate that disulfiram and the selective DBH inhibitor nepicastat increase extracellular dopamine (DA) in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and markedly potentiated cocaine-induced increase. Concomitantly, in rats with cocaine self-administration history, cocaine-seeking behavior induced by drug priming was prevented, probably through overstimulation of D1 receptors due to the DA increase. The present research was aimed at studying the neurochemical mechanisms originating the enhanced DA release. Noradrenergic system ablation was attained by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the neurotoxin anti-DBH-saporin (aDBH-sap). DA, noradrenaline (NA), and DOPAC were assessed by HPLC after ex vivo tissue extraction or in vivo microdialysis. Control and denervated rats were subjected to microdialysis in the mPFC and caudate nucleus to evaluate the effect of nepicastat-cocaine combination on extracellular DA levels and their regulation by α2-adrenoceptors. Fifteen days after neurotoxin or its vehicle administration, tissue and extracellular NA were reduced to less than 2% the control value, while extracellular DA was increased by approximately 100%. In control rats, nepicastat given alone and in combination with cocaine increased extracellular DA by about 250% and 1100%, respectively. In denervated rats, nepicastat slightly affected extracellular DA, while in combination with cocaine increased extracellular DA by 250%. No differences were found in the caudate nucleus. Clonidine almost totally reversed the extracellular DA elevation produced by nepicastat-cocaine combination, while it was ineffective in denervated rats. This research shows that the increase of extracellular DA produced by nepicastat alone or in combination with cocaine was prevented by noradrenergic denervation. The

  13. Canada continues use prohibition of gene recombination cattle somatotropin; Kanada wa idenshikumikaegyu seicho horumon no shiyo kinshi wo keizoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-05

    Canada continued use prohibition of gene recombination cattle somatotropin (BST) which stimulated milk increased production of this company in spite of request of Monsanto Co.. The cow that BST was administered is based on the report of veterinary surgeon that causes reproductive function and lowering in the life, dysbasia and increase in the mastitis on this. From the research report that BST causes thyroid gland cyst of the male rat in U.S.A., consumer organization and environment group petition FDA for the elimination of BST from the U.S.A. market. In the meantime, Monsanto Co. in the report which Canada adopted, chemical structure is different, and it reports that it uses BST of other company in which dosing method and dosing frequency differ and disregards the report of Cornell university in which the life of the cow administered more and more does not lower BST. (translated by NEDO)

  14. Presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine release mediated by P2Y receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, S; Veggetti, M; Muchnik, S; Losavio, A

    2006-09-29

    coupled to G(i/o) proteins. The protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist chelerythrine and the calmodulin antagonist N-(6-aminohexil)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W-7) occluded the effect of betagamma-imido ATP, while the protein kinase A (PKA) antagonist KT-5720 and the inhibitor of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII) KN-62 failed to do so. betagamma-Imido ATP did not affect 10, 15 and 20 mM K(+)-evoked release and application of reactive blue-2 before incubation in high K(+) induced a higher asynchronous secretion. Thus, our results show that at mammalian neuromuscular junctions, ATP induces presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous ACh release due to the modulation of Ca(2+) channels related to tonic secretion through the activation of P2Y receptors coupled to G(i/o) proteins. We also demonstrated that at increasing degrees of membrane depolarization evoked by K(+), endogenously released ATP induces presynaptic inhibition as a means of preventing excessive neurotransmitter secretion.

  15. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation

  16. Behavioral Inhibition as a Risk Factor for the Development of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.H.M. Muris (Peter); A.M.L. van Brakel (Anna); A. Arntz (Arnoud); E. Schouten (Erik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis longitudinal study examined the additive and interactive effects of behavioral inhibition and a wide range of other vulnerability factors in the development of anxiety problems in youths. A sample of 261 children, aged 5 to 8 years, 124 behaviorally inhibited and 137 control

  17. Receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of arachidonic acid release in 3T3 fibroblasts. Selective susceptibility to islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, T.; Ui, M.

    1985-01-01

    Thrombin exhibited diverse effects on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. It (a) decreased cAMP in the cell suspension, (b) inhibited adenylate cyclase in the Lubrol-permeabilized cell suspension in a GTP-dependent manner, increased releases of (c) arachidonic acid and (d) inositol from the cell monolayer prelabeled with these labeled compounds, (e) increased 45 Ca 2+ uptake into the cell monolayer, and (f) increased 86 Rb + uptake into the cell monolayer in a ouabain-sensitive manner. Most of the effects were reproduced by bradykinin, platelet-activating factor, and angiotensin II. The receptors for these agonists are thus likely to be linked to three separate effector systems: the adenylate cyclase inhibition, the phosphoinositide breakdown leading to Ca 2+ mobilization and phospholipase A2 activation, and the Na,K-ATPase activation. Among the effects of these agonists, (a), (b), (c), and (e) were abolished, but (d) and (f) were not, by prior treatment of the cells with islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates the Mr = 41,000 protein, the alpha-subunit of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (Ni), thereby abolishing receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The effects (a), (c), (d), and (e) of thrombin, but not (b), were mimicked by A23187, a calcium ionophore. The effects of A23187, in contrast to those of receptor agonists, were not affected by the treatment of cells with IAP. Thus, the IAP substrate, the alpha-subunit of Ni, or the protein alike, may play an additional role in signal transduction arising from the Ca 2+ -mobilizing receptors, probably mediating process(es) distal to phosphoinositide breakdown and proximal to Ca 2+ gating

  18. Growth hormone-releasing factor stimulates proliferation of somatotrophs in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Swanson, L W; Vale, W

    1986-01-01

    The mitogenic effect of the hypothalamic peptides growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and somatostatin on cultured growth hormone (GH)-producing cells (somatotrophs) was studied. Using autoradiographic detection of [3H]thymidine uptake and immunocytochemical identification of GH-producing cells...

  19. Localization and functional roles of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 in the cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gounko, Natalia V.; Gramsbergen, Albert; van der Want, Johannes J. L.

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) type 2 receptor has three splice variants alpha, beta, and gamma. In the rodent brain only CRF-R2 alpha is present. In the cerebellum, CRF-R2 alpha has two different isoforms: a full-length form (fl) and truncated (tr). Both forms CRF-R2 have a unique

  20. Inhibition of PAI-1 release from human endothelial cells by Angelica keiskei Koidzumi (Ashitaba chalcones is structure-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Ohkura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Angelica keiskei Koidzumi (Ashitaba is a traditional herbal medicine and it is also regarded in Japan as a health food that might have antithrombotic properties. Ashitaba exudate suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1, a risk factor for thrombotic diseases in mice. Xanthoangelol (XA and 4-hydroxyderricin (4-HD comprise > 95% of total chalcones from Ashitaba exudates that also contain trace amounts of other chalcone subtypes. The present study aimed to determine the effects of Ashitaba chalcones including xanthoangelols B (XB, D (XD, E (XE, F (XF and XA as well as 4-HD on PAI-1 levels in the medium of stimulated human EA.hy926 endothelial cells. Xanthoangelol (10 and #61549;M inhibited PAI-1 production at a rate of 77.1%, whereas the inhibition rates of XB, XD, XE and 4-HD were not significant. Xanthoangelol F was highly cytotoxic and thus its ability to inhibit PAI-1 production could not be evaluated. The side hydrocarbon chain of XA played an important role in the excretion of inhibitory activity. Small modifications of the hydrocarbon chain or small functional groups on the A ring measurably influenced the inhibitory activity of xanthoangelols. These findings warrant future research towards an understanding of the mechanism of antithrombotic action of Ashitaba as herbal medicine or antithrombotic health food. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(4.000: 355-357

  1. Nanodiamond-based injectable hydrogel for sustained growth factor release: Preparation, characterization and in vitro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacelli, Settimio; Acosta, Francisca; Chakravarti, Aparna R; Samanta, Saheli G; Whitlow, Jonathan; Modaresi, Saman; Ahmed, Rafeeq P H; Rajasingh, Johnson; Paul, Arghya

    2017-08-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) represent an emerging class of carbon nanomaterials that possess favorable physical and chemical properties to be used as multifunctional carriers for a variety of bioactive molecules. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of a new injectable ND-based nanocomposite hydrogel which facilitates a controlled release of therapeutic molecules for regenerative applications. In particular, we have formulated a thermosensitive hydrogel using gelatin, chitosan and NDs that provides a sustained release of exogenous human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for wound healing applications. Addition of NDs improved the mechanical properties of the injectable hydrogels without affecting its thermosensitive gelation properties. Biocompatibility of the generated hydrogel was verified by in vitro assessment of apoptotic gene expressions and anti-inflammatory interleukin productions. NDs were complexed with VEGF and the inclusion of this complex in the hydrogel network enabled the sustained release of the angiogenic growth factor. These results suggest for the first time that NDs can be used to formulate a biocompatible, thermosensitive and multifunctional hydrogel platform that can function both as a filling agent to modulate hydrogel properties, as well as a delivery platform for the controlled release of bioactive molecules and growth factors. One of the major drawbacks associated with the use of conventional hydrogels as carriers of growth factors is their inability to control the release kinetics of the loaded molecules. In fact, in most cases, a burst release is inevitable leading to diminished therapeutic effects and unsuccessful therapies. As a potential solution to this issue, we hereby propose a strategy of incorporating ND complexes within an injectable hydrogel matrix. The functional groups on the surface of the NDs can establish interactions with the model growth factor VEGF and promote a prolonged release from the polymer network

  2. What factors influence the decisions of mental health professionals to release service users from seclusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Haley; Baker, John; Berzins, Kathyrn

    2018-06-22

    Mental health policy stipulates seclusion should only be used as an intervention of last resort and for the minimum possible duration. Current evidence details which service users are more likely to be secluded, why they are secluded, and what influences the decision to seclude them. However, very little is known about the decision to release service users from seclusion. An integrative review was undertaken to explore the decision-making processes of mental health professionals which guide the ending of seclusion. The review used a systematic approach to gather and thematically analyse evidence within a framework approach. The twelve articles identified generated one overriding theme, maintaining safety. In addition, several subthemes emerged including the process of risk assessing which was dependent upon interaction and control, mediated by factors external to the service user such as the attitude and experience of staff and the acuity of the environment. Service users were expected to demonstrate compliance with the process ultimately ending in release and reflection. Little evidence exists regarding factors influencing mental health professionals in decisions to release service users from seclusion. There is no evidence-based risk assessment tool, and service users are not routinely involved in the decision to release them. Support from experienced professionals is vital to ensure timely release from seclusion. Greater insight into influences upon decisions to discontinue episodes may support initiatives aimed at reducing durations and use of seclusion. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Detroit regional transit study : a study of factors that enable and inhibit effective regional transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    An interdisciplinary team of six faculty members and six students at the University of Detroit Mercy (UDM) conducted a : comprehensive study of the factors enabling or inhibiting development of effective regional transit. Focusing on Metro Detroit an...

  4. Release kinetics of platelet-derived and plasma-derived growth factors from autologous plasma rich in growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mari Mar; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Orive, Gorka

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have evaluated the biological effects of platelet rich plasma reporting the final outcomes on cell and tissues. However, few studies have dealt with the kinetics of growth factor delivery by plasma rich in growth factors. Venous blood was obtained from three healthy volunteers and processed with PRGF-Endoret technology to prepare autologous plasma rich in growth factors. The gel-like fibrin scaffolds were then incubated in triplicate, in a cell culture medium to monitor the release of PDGF-AB, VEGF, HGF and IGF-I during 8 days of incubation. A leukocyte-platelet rich plasma was prepared employing the same technology and the concentrations of growth factors and interleukin-1β were determined after 24h of incubation. After each period, the medium was collected, fibrin clot was destroyed and the supernatants were stored at -80°C until analysis. The growth factor delivery is diffusion controlled with a rapid initial release by 30% of the bioactive content after 1h of incubation and a steady state release when almost 70% of the growth factor content has been delivered. Autologous fibrin matrix retained almost 30% of the amount of the growth factors after 8 days of incubation. The addition of leukocytes to the formula of platelet rich plasma did not increase the concentration of the growth factors, while it drastically increased the presence of pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Further studies employing an in vitro inflammatory model would be interesting to study the difference in growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines between leukocyte-free and leukocyte-rich platelet rich plasma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Rosiglitazone Suppresses In Vitro Seizures in Hippocampal Slice by Inhibiting Presynaptic Glutamate Release in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bing Wong

    Full Text Available Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a nuclear hormone receptor whose agonist, rosiglitazone has a neuroprotective effect to hippocampal neurons in pilocarpine-induced seizures. Hippocampal slice preparations treated in Mg2+ free medium can induce ictal and interictal-like epileptiform discharges, which is regarded as an in vitro model of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. We applied rosiglitazone in hippocampal slices treated in Mg2+ free medium. The effects of rosiglitazone on hippocampal CA1-Schaffer collateral synaptic transmission were tested. We also examined the neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone toward NMDA excitotoxicity on cultured hippocampal slices. Application of 10 μM rosiglitazone significantly suppressed amplitude and frequency of epileptiform discharges in CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not block the effect of rosiglitazone on suppressing discharge frequency, but reverse the effect on suppressing discharge amplitude. Application of rosiglitazone suppressed synaptic transmission in the CA1-Schaffer collateral pathway. By miniature excitatory-potential synaptic current (mEPSC analysis, rosiglitazone significantly suppressed presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This phenomenon can be reversed by pretreating PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Also, rosiglitazone protected cultured hippocampal slices from NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. The protective effect of 10 μM rosiglitazone was partially antagonized by concomitant high dose GW9662 treatment, indicating that this effect is partially mediated by PPARγ receptors. In conclusion, rosiglitazone suppressed NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform discharges by inhibition of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Rosiglitazone protected hippocampal slice from NMDA excitotoxicity partially by PPARγ activation. We suggest that rosiglitazone could be a potential agent to treat patients with TLE.

  6. Immunochemical determination of cellular content of translation release factor RF4 in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Manuel Palacios Moreno, Juan; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1999-01-01

    of the stop codons, and RF3 is known to accelerate the overall termination process. Release factor RF4 is a protein involved in the release of the mRNA and tRNA from the ribosomal complex. Furthermore, RF4 is involved in the proofreading in the elongation step of protein biosynthesis. The cellular contents...... of RF1, RF2, and RF3 were determined earlier. Here we report the cellular content of RF4 in Escherichia coli to be approximately 16,500 molecules per cell. The cells were grown in a rich medium and harvested in the beginning of the exponential growth phase. The quantifications were performed by using...

  7. Mast Cell Proteases 6 and 7 Stimulate Angiogenesis by Inducing Endothelial Cells to Release Angiogenic Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devandir Antonio de Souza Junior

    Full Text Available Mast cell proteases are thought to be involved with tumor progression and neo-vascularization. However, their exact role is still unclear. The present study was undertaken to further elucidate the function of specific subtypes of recombinant mouse mast cell proteases (rmMCP-6 and 7 in neo-vascularization. SVEC4-10 cells were cultured on Geltrex® with either rmMCP-6 or 7 and tube formation was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the capacity of these proteases to induce the release of angiogenic factors and pro and anti-angiogenic proteins was analyzed. Both rmMCP-6 and 7 were able to stimulate tube formation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that incubation with the proteases induced SVEC4-10 cells to invade the gel matrix. However, the expression and activity of metalloproteases were not altered by incubation with the mast cell proteases. Furthermore, rmMCP-6 and rmMCP-7 were able to induce the differential release of angiogenic factors from the SVEC4-10 cells. rmMCP-7 was more efficient in stimulating tube formation and release of angiogenic factors than rmMCP-6. These results suggest that the subtypes of proteases released by mast cells may influence endothelial cells during in vivo neo-vascularization.

  8. Conversion factors for estimating release rate of gaseous radioactivity by an aerial survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1988-02-01

    Conversion factors necessary for estimating release rate of gaseous radioactivity by an aerial survey are presented. The conversion factors were determined based on calculation assuming a Gaussian plume model as a function of atmospheric stability, down-wind distance and flight height. First, the conversion factors for plumes emitting mono-energy gamma rays were calculated, then, conversion factors were constructed through convolution for the radionuclides essential in an accident of a nuclear reactor, and for mixtures of these radionuclides considering elapsed time after shutdown. These conversion factors are shown in figures, and also polynomial expressions of the conversion factors as a function of height have been decided with the least-squares method. A user can easily obtain proper conversion factors from data shown here. (author)

  9. Potent and long-acting corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor 2 selective peptide competitive antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivier, J; Gulyas, J; Kirby, D; Low, W; Perrin, M H; Kunitake, K; DiGruccio, M; Vaughan, J; Reubi, J C; Waser, B; Koerber, S C; Martinez, V; Wang, L; Taché, Y; Vale, W

    2002-10-10

    We present evidence that members of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) family assume distinct structures when interacting with the CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors. Predictive methods, physicochemical measurements, and structure-activity relationship studies have suggested that CRF, its family members, and competitive antagonists such as astressin [cyclo(30-33)[DPhe(12),Nle(21),Glu(30),Lys(33),Nle(38)]hCRF((12-41))] assume an alpha-helical conformation when interacting with their receptors. We had shown that alpha-helical CRF((9-41)) and sauvagine showed some selectivity for CRF receptors other than that responsible for ACTH secretion(1) and later for CRF2.(2) More recently, we suggested the possibility of a helix-turn-helix motif around a turn encompassing residues 30-33(3) that would confer high affinity for both CRF(1) and CRF(2)(2,4) in agonists and antagonists of all members of the CRF family.(3) On the other hand, the substitutions that conferred ca. 100-fold CRF(2) selectivity to the antagonist antisauvagine-30 [[DPhe(11),His(12)]sauvagine((11-40))] did not confer such property to the corresponding N-terminally extended agonists. We find here that a Glu(32)-Lys(35) side chain to side chain covalent lactam constraint in hCRF and the corresponding Glu(31)-Lys(34) side chain to side chain covalent lactam constraint in sauvagine yield potent ligands that are selective for CRF(2). Additionally, we introduced deletions and substitutions known to increase duration of action to yield antagonists such as cyclo(31-34)[DPhe(11),His(12),C(alpha)MeLeu(13,39),Nle(17),Glu(31),Lys(34)]Ac-sauvagine((8-40)) (astressin(2)-B) with CRF(2) selectivities greater than 100-fold. CRF receptor autoradiography was performed in rat tissue known to express CRF(2) and CRF(1) in order to confirm that astressin(2)-B could indeed bind to established CRF(2) but not CRF(1) receptor-expressing tissues. Extended duration of action of astressin(2)-B vs that of antisauvagine-30 is demonstrated in

  10. Avoidance of Counseling: Psychological Factors that Inhibit Seeking Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, David L.; Wester, Stephen R.; Larson, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    How do counselors reach out to individuals who are reluctant to seek counseling services? To answer this question, the authors examined the research on the psychological help-seeking barriers from counseling, clinical and social psychology, as well as social work and psychiatry. Specific avoidance factors that have been identified in the mental…

  11. The role of factor inhibiting HIF (FIH-1 in inhibiting HIF-1 transcriptional activity in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enfeng Wang

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM accounts for about 38% of primary brain tumors in the United States. GBM is characterized by extensive angiogenesis induced by vascular growth factors and cytokines. The transcription of these growth factors and cytokines is regulated by the Hypoxia-Inducible-Factor-1(HIF-1, which is a key regulator mediating the cellular response to hypoxia. It is known that Factor Inhibiting HIF-1, or FIH-1, is also involved in the cellular response to hypoxia and has the capability to physically interact with HIF-1 and block its transcriptional activity under normoxic conditions. Delineation of the regulatory role of FIH-1 will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism responsible for tumor growth and progression and may lead to the design of new therapies targeting cellular pathways in response to hypoxia. Previous studies have shown that the chromosomal region of 10q24 containing the FIH-1 gene is often deleted in GBM, suggesting a role for the FIH-1 in GBM tumorigenesis and progression. In the current study, we found that FIH-1 is able to inhibit HIF-mediated transcription of GLUT1 and VEGF-A, even under hypoxic conditions in human glioblastoma cells. FIH-1 has been found to be more potent in inhibiting HIF function than PTEN. This observation points to the possibility that deletion of 10q23-24 and loss or decreased expression of FIH-1 gene may lead to a constitutive activation of HIF-1 activity, an alteration of HIF-1 targets such as GLUT-1 and VEGF-A, and may contribute to the survival of cancer cells in hypoxia and the development of hypervascularization observed in GBM. Therefore FIH-1 can be potential therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM patients with poor prognosis.

  12. Membrane-bound transcription factors: regulated release by RIP or RUP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, T; Rape, M; Jentsch, S

    2001-06-01

    Regulated nuclear transport of transcription factors from cytoplasmic pools is a major route by which eukaryotes control gene expression. Exquisite examples are transcription factors that are kept in a dormant state in the cytosol by membrane anchors; such proteins are released from membranes by proteolytic cleavage, which enables these transcription factors to enter the nucleus. Cleavage can be mediated either by regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) catalysed by specific membrane-bound proteases or by regulated ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent processing (RUP). In both cases processing can be controlled by cues that originate at or in the vicinity of the membrane.

  13. A role for corticotropin-releasing factor signaling in the lateral habenula and its modulation by early-life stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authement, Michael E; Langlois, Ludovic D; Shepard, Ryan D; Browne, Caroline A; Lucki, Irwin; Kassis, Haifa; Nugent, Fereshteh S

    2018-03-06

    Centrally released corticotropin-releasing factor or hormone (extrahypothalamic CRF or CRH) in the brain is involved in the behavioral and emotional responses to stress. The lateral habenula (LHb) is an epithalamic brain region involved in value-based decision-making and stress evasion. Through its inhibition of dopamine-mediated reward circuitry, the increased activity of the LHb is associated with addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and behavioral disorders. We found that extrahypothalamic CRF neurotransmission increased neuronal excitability in the LHb. Through its receptor CRFR1 and subsequently protein kinase A (PKA), CRF application increased the intrinsic excitability of LHb neurons by affecting changes in small-conductance SK-type and large-conductance BK-type K + channels. CRF also reduced inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid-containing (GABAergic) synaptic transmission onto LHb neurons through endocannabinoid-mediated retrograde signaling. Maternal deprivation is a severe early-life stress that alters CRF neural circuitry and is likewise associated with abnormal mental health later in life. LHb neurons from pups deprived of maternal care exhibited increased intrinsic excitability, reduced GABAergic transmission, decreased abundance of SK2 channel protein, and increased activity of PKA, without any substantial changes in Crh or Crhr1 expression. Furthermore, maternal deprivation blunted the response of LHb neurons to subsequent, acute CRF exposure. Activating SK channels or inhibiting postsynaptic PKA activity prevented the effects of both CRF and maternal deprivation on LHb intrinsic excitability, thus identifying potential pharmacological targets to reverse central CRF circuit dysregulation in patients with associated disorders. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  14. Cannabinoid signalling inhibits sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release and regulates excitation–contraction coupling in mammalian skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Tamás; Bodnár, Dóra; Tóth, Adrienn; Vincze, János; Fodor, János; Reischl, Barbara; Kovács, Adrienn; Ruzsnavszky, Olga; Dienes, Beatrix; Szentesi, Péter; Friedrich, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Key points Marijuana was found to cause muscle weakness, although the exact regulatory role of its receptors (CB1 cannabinoid receptor; CB1R) in the excitation–contraction coupling (ECC) of mammalian skeletal muscle remains unknown.We found that CB1R activation or its knockout did not affect muscle force directly, whereas its activation decreased the Ca2+‐sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and made the muscle fibres more prone to fatigue.We demonstrate that CB1Rs are not connected to the inositol 1,4,5‐trisphosphate pathway either in myotubes or in adult muscle fibres.By contrast, CB1Rs constitutively inhibit sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase during ECC in a Gi/o protein‐mediated way in adult skeletal muscle fibres but not in myotubes.These results help with our understanding of the physiological effects and pathological consequences of CB1R activation in skeletal muscle and may be useful in the development of new cannabinoid drugs. Abstract Marijuana was found to cause muscle weakness, although it is unknown whether it affects the muscles directly or modulates only the motor control of the central nervous system. Although the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R), which are responsible for the psychoactive effects of the drug in the brain, have recently been demonstrated in skeletal muscle, it is unclear how CB1R‐mediated signalling affects the contraction and Ca²⁺ homeostasis of mammalian skeletal muscle. In the present study, we demonstrate that in vitro CB1R activation increased muscle fatigability and decreased the Ca2+‐sensitivity of the contractile apparatus, whereas it did not alter the amplitude of single twitch contractions. In myotubes, CB1R agonists neither evoked, nor influenced inositol 1,4,5‐trisphosphate (IP3)‐mediated Ca2+ transients, nor did they alter excitation–contraction coupling. By contrast, in isolated muscle fibres of wild‐type mice, although CB1R agonists did not evoke IP3

  15. Cannabinoid signalling inhibits sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release and regulates excitation-contraction coupling in mammalian skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Tamás; Bodnár, Dóra; Tóth, Adrienn; Vincze, János; Fodor, János; Reischl, Barbara; Kovács, Adrienn; Ruzsnavszky, Olga; Dienes, Beatrix; Szentesi, Péter; Friedrich, Oliver; Csernoch, László

    2016-12-15

    Marijuana was found to cause muscle weakness, although the exact regulatory role of its receptors (CB1 cannabinoid receptor; CB1R) in the excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) of mammalian skeletal muscle remains unknown. We found that CB1R activation or its knockout did not affect muscle force directly, whereas its activation decreased the Ca 2+ -sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and made the muscle fibres more prone to fatigue. We demonstrate that CB1Rs are not connected to the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway either in myotubes or in adult muscle fibres. By contrast, CB1Rs constitutively inhibit sarcoplasmic Ca 2+ release and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ ATPase during ECC in a G i/o protein-mediated way in adult skeletal muscle fibres but not in myotubes. These results help with our understanding of the physiological effects and pathological consequences of CB1R activation in skeletal muscle and may be useful in the development of new cannabinoid drugs. Marijuana was found to cause muscle weakness, although it is unknown whether it affects the muscles directly or modulates only the motor control of the central nervous system. Although the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R), which are responsible for the psychoactive effects of the drug in the brain, have recently been demonstrated in skeletal muscle, it is unclear how CB1R-mediated signalling affects the contraction and Ca²⁺ homeostasis of mammalian skeletal muscle. In the present study, we demonstrate that in vitro CB1R activation increased muscle fatigability and decreased the Ca 2+ -sensitivity of the contractile apparatus, whereas it did not alter the amplitude of single twitch contractions. In myotubes, CB1R agonists neither evoked, nor influenced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP 3 )-mediated Ca 2+ transients, nor did they alter excitation-contraction coupling. By contrast, in isolated muscle fibres of wild-type mice, although CB1R agonists did not evoke IP 3 -mediated Ca 2

  16. Lycopene depresses glutamate release through inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry and protein kinase C in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Hung, Chi-Feng; Jean, Wei-Horng; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2018-05-01

    Lycopene is a natural dietary carotenoid that was reported to exhibit a neuroprotective profile. Considering that excitotoxicity and cell death induced by glutamate are involved in many brain disorders, the effect of lycopene on glutamate release in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals and the possible mechanism involved in such effect was investigated. We observed here that lycopene inhibited 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked glutamate release and intrasynaptosomal Ca 2+ concentration elevation. The inhibitory effect of lycopene on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was markedly reduced in the presence of the Ca v 2.2 (N-type) and Ca v 2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, but was insensitive to the intracellular Ca 2+ -release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157. Furthermore, in the presence of the protein kinase C inhibitors GF109203X and Go6976, the action of lycopene on evoked glutamate release was prevented. These results are the first to suggest that lycopene inhibits glutamate release from rat cortical synaptosomes by suppressing presynaptic Ca 2+ entry and protein kinase C activity.

  17. Antifouling coating with controllable and sustained silver release for long-term inhibition of infection and encrustation in urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Neoh, Koon Gee; Kang, En-Tang; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Chiong, Edmund

    2015-04-01

    Urinary tract infections constitute a large proportion of nosocomial infections, and the urinary catheter is the most important predisposing factor. Encrustation induced by urease-producing uropathogens like Proteus mirabilis causes further complications. In the present work, a strategy for controllable and sustained release of silver over several weeks has been developed for combating bacterial infection and encrustation in urinary devices. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were first immobilized on polydopamine (PDA) pre-treated silicone catheter surface and this was followed by another PDA coating. The number of AgNP-PDA bilayers could be manipulated to control the amount of silver loaded and its subsequent release. Poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate-co-acrylamide) was then grafted to provide an antifouling outer layer, and to ensure free diffusion of Ag from the surface. The micron-scale combination of an antifouling coating with AgNP-PDA bilayers reduced colonization of the urinary catheter by uropathogens by approximately two orders of magnitude. With one and two AgNP-PDA bilayers, the coated catheter could resist encrustation for 12 and 45 days, respectively, compared with approximately 6 days with the Dover™ silver-coated catheter. Such anti-infective and anti-encrustation catheters can potentially have a large impact on reducing patient morbidity and healthcare expenditure. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Serrulatane Diterpenoid from Eremophila neglecta Exhibits Bacterial Biofilm Dispersion and Inhibits Release of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines from Activated Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, Htwe H; Christo, Susan N; Ndi, Chi P; Jasieniak, Marek; Rickard, Heather; Hayball, John D; Griesser, Hans J; Semple, Susan J

    2015-12-24

    The purpose of this study was to assess the biofilm-removing efficacy and inflammatory activity of a serrulatane diterpenoid, 8-hydroxyserrulat-14-en-19-oic acid (1), isolated from the Australian medicinal plant Eremophila neglecta. Biofilm breakup activity of compound 1 on established Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms was compared to the antiseptic chlorhexidine and antibiotic levofloxacin. In a time-course study, 1 was deposited onto polypropylene mesh to mimic a wound dressing and tested for biofilm removal. The ex-vivo cytotoxicity and effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release were studied in mouse primary bone-marrow-derived macrophage (BMDM) cells. Compound 1 was effective in dispersing 12 h pre-established biofilms with a 7 log10 reduction of viable bacterial cell counts, but was less active against 24 h biofilms (approximately 2 log10 reduction). Compound-loaded mesh showed dosage-dependent biofilm-removing capability. In addition, compound 1 displayed a significant inhibitory effect on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion from BMDM cells, but interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) secretion was not significant. The compound was not cytotoxic to BMDM cells at concentrations effective in removing biofilm and lowering cytokine release. These findings highlight the potential of this serrulatane diterpenoid to be further developed for applications in wound management.

  19. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    kinase 4 (MPK4) exists in nuclear complexes with the WRKY33 transcription factor. This complex depends on the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Challenge with Pseudomonas syringae or flagellin leads to the activation of MPK4 and phosphorylation of MKS1. Subsequently, complexes with MKS1 and WRKY33 are released from...... MPK4, and WRKY33 targets the promoter of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 (PAD3) encoding an enzyme required for the synthesis of antimicrobial camalexin. Hence, wrky33 mutants are impaired in the accumulation of PAD3 mRNA and camalexin production upon infection. That WRKY33 is an effector of MPK4 is further...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  20. Studies on the Biological Effects of Ozone: 10. Release of Factors from Ozonated Human Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Valacchi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3, promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 and interleukin-8(IL-8 are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limbischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT.

  1. O-GlcNAc inhibits interaction between Sp1 and Elf-1 transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Kihong; Chang, Hyo-Ihl

    2009-01-01

    The novel protein modification, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc), plays an important role in various aspects of cell regulation. Although most of nuclear transcription regulatory factors are modified by O-GlcNAc, O-GlcNAc effects on transcription remain largely undefined yet. In this study, we show that O-GlcNAc inhibits a physical interaction between Sp1 and Elf-1 transcription factors, and negatively regulates transcription of placenta and embryonic expression oncofetal protein gene (Pem). These findings suggest that O-GlcNAc inhibits Sp1-mediated gene transcription possibly by interrupting Sp1 interaction with its cooperative factor.

  2. 14-3-3theta protects against neurotoxicity in a cellular Parkinson's disease model through inhibition of the apoptotic factor Bax.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny R Slone

    Full Text Available Disruption of 14-3-3 function by alpha-synuclein has been implicated in Parkinson's disease. As 14-3-3s are important regulators of cell death pathways, disruption of 14-3-3s could result in the release of pro-apoptotic factors, such as Bax. We have previously shown that overexpression of 14-3-3θ reduces cell loss in response to rotenone and MPP(+ in dopaminergic cell culture and reduces cell loss in transgenic C. elegans that overexpress alpha-synuclein. In this study, we investigate the mechanism for 14-3-3θ's neuroprotection against rotenone toxicity. While 14-3-3s can inhibit many pro-apoptotic factors, we demonstrate that inhibition of one factor in particular, Bax, is important to 14-3-3s' protection against rotenone toxicity in dopaminergic cells. We found that 14-3-3θ overexpression reduced Bax activation and downstream signaling events, including cytochrome C release and caspase 3 activation. Pharmacological inhibition or shRNA knockdown of Bax provided protection against rotenone, comparable to 14-3-3θ's neuroprotective effects. A 14-3-3θ mutant incapable of binding Bax failed to protect against rotenone. These data suggest that 14-3-3θ's neuroprotective effects against rotenone are at least partially mediated by Bax inhibition and point to a potential therapeutic role of 14-3-3s in Parkinson's disease.

  3. Inhibition of insulin release by cyproheptadine: Effects on 3',5'-cyclic-AMP-content and /sup 45/Ca-accumulation of incubated mouse islets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joost, H G; Beckmann, J; Lenzen, S; Hasselblatt, A [Goettingen Univ. (F.R. Germany)

    1976-01-01

    Cyproheptadine (1, 10 and 100 ..mu..m) significantly reduced insulin release from isolated mouse islets in response to glucose. In contrast, 1 mM cyproheptadine induced a large release of insulin into the incubation medium probably due to islet cell damage, since the islets had lost a considerable amount of their protein content. 3',5'-cyclic-AMP-levels of the islets were not significantly affected by 10 ..mu..M cyproheptadine in the presence as well as in the absence of theophylline (10 mM). As the inhibitory effect of cyproheptadine on insulin release was correlated with reduced accumulation of calcium-45, the agent may inhibit insulin release by interfering with the calcium handling of the ..beta..-cell.

  4. Release Profile and Inhibition Test of The Nanoparticles A. Paniculata Extract as Inhibitor of α-Glucosidase in The Process of Carbohydrates Breakdown Into Glucose Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imansari, Farisa; Sahlan, Muhammad; Arbianti, Rita

    2017-07-01

    Andrographis paniculata (A.paniculata) contain the main active substances Andrographolide which helps lower glucose levels in diabetics by inhibiting the enzyme α-glucosidase. The ability of the extract A.paniculata in lowering glucose levels will increase with the technique encapsulation with a coating of composition Chitosan-STPP as a drug delivery to the target organ. This study aimed to get an overview of A.paniculata release profile of nanoparticles in a synthetic fluid media with various concentrations of coating and inhibition testing nasty shard extract in inhibiting the enzyme α-glucosidase. This research resulted in nanoparticles by coating efficiency and loading capacity of chitosan greatest variation of 2% and 1% STPP 60% and 46.29%. chitosan greatest variation of 2% and 1% STPP 60% and 46.29%. The ability of A.paniculata extracts as α-glucosidase enzyme inhibitors has been demonstrated in this study, the percent inhibition of 33.17%.

  5. B16-BL6 melanoma cells release inhibitory factor(s) of active pump activity in isolated lymph vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, K; Mizuno, R; Ohhashi, T

    2001-12-01

    We investigated whether supernatant cultured with melanoma cell lines B16-BL6 and K1735 or the Lewis lung carcinoma cell line (LLC) can regulate lymphatic pump activity with bioassay preparations isolated from murine iliac lymph vessels. B16-BL6 and LLC supernatants caused significant dilation of lymph microvessels with cessation of pump activity. B16-BL6 supernatant produced dose-related cessation of lymphatic pump activity. There was no significant tachyphylaxis in the supernatant-mediated inhibitory response of lymphatic pump activity. Pretreatment with 3 x 10(-5) M N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 10(-7) M or 10(-6) M glibenclamide and 5 x 10(-4) M 5-hydroxydecanoic acid caused significant reduction of supernatant-mediated inhibitory responses. Simultaneous treatment with 10(-3) M L-arginine and 3 x 10(-5) M L-NAME significantly lessened L-NAME-induced inhibition of the supernatant-mediated response, suggesting that endogenous nitric oxide (NO) plays important roles in supernatant-mediated inhibitory responses. Chemical treatment dialyzed substances of B16-BL6 cells may release nonpeptide substance(s) of <1,000 MW, resulting in significant cessation of lymphatic pump activity via production and release of endogenous NO and activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

  6. Effects of treatment of periparturient dairy cows with recombinant bovine somatotropin on health and productive and reproductive parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P R B; Soares, H F; Braz, W D; Bombardelli, G D; Clapper, J A; Keisler, D H; Chebel, R C

    2017-04-01

    The objectives of the current experiment were to evaluate the effects of treating periparturient dairy cows with recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) on incidence of postpartum diseases and performance. Holstein (HO) and Jersey (JS) cows from 2 herds were enrolled in the experiment at 253 ± 3 d of gestation and assigned to the control (n = 432) and rbST125 (n = 437) treatments. Cows in the rbST125 treatment received 125 mg of rbST, weekly, from -21 to 21 d relative to calving. Blood sampled weekly, from -21 to 21 d relative to calving, from a subsample of cows was used to determine the concentrations of growth hormone (GH, HO = 106) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1, HO = 147 and JS = 49). Cows were scored for body condition (BCS) at enrollment and at 1 ± 3, 30 ± 3, and 60 ± 3 d in milk (DIM). Cows were milked thrice daily and energy-corrected milk (ECM) yield was recorded for the first 30 DIM. Treatment of cows with rbST resulted in greater concentrations of GH during the prepartum (log 10 back-transformed concentrations of GH: HO-control = 7.83 and HO-rbST125 = 10.36 ng/mL) and postpartum (log 10 back-transformed concentrations of GH: HO-control = 10.45 and HO-rbST125 = 18.47 ng/mL) periods. Similarly, IGF-1 concentrations were higher during the prepartum (HO-control = 115.1 ± 4.9, HO-rbST125 = 137.7 ± 4.7, JS-control = 120.2 ± 8.3, JS-rbST125 = 167.1 ± 8.1 ng/mL) and postpartum (HO-control = 61.3 ± 4.0, HO-rbST125 = 75.2 ± 3.8, JS-control = 35.5 ± 6.9, JS-rbST125 = 54.6 ± 6.9 ng/mL) periods for rbST-treated cows. During the prepartum period, BCS was not affected by treatment, but during the postpartum period, BCS was reduced for rbST-treated cows (HO-control = 3.00 ± 0.03, HO-rbST125 = 2.90 ± 0.03, JS-control = 2.64 ± 0.02, JS-rbST125 = 2.61 ± 0.02). Cows from the rbST125 treatment tended to have lower incidence of retained fetal membranes (HO-control = 14.3, HO-rbST125 = 6.1, JS-control = 1.5, JS-rbST125 = 1.2%) and had reduced incidence

  7. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Release and Suppression of Caspases by Gamma-Tocotrienol Prevent Apoptosis and Delay Aging in Stress-Induced Premature Senescence of Skin Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Makpol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined the molecular mechanism of γ-tocotrienol (GTT in preventing cellular aging by focusing on its anti-apoptotic effect in stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs. Results obtained showed that SIPS exhibited senescent-phenotypic characteristic, increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal and promoted G0/G1 cell cycle arrest accompanied by shortening of telomere length with decreased telomerase activity. Both SIPS and senescent HDFs shared similar apoptotic changes such as increased Annexin V-FITC positive cells, increased cytochrome c release and increased activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 (P<0.05. GTT treatment resulted in a significant reduction of Annexin V-FITC positive cells, inhibited cytochrome c release and decreased activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 (P<0.05. Gene expression analysis showed that GTT treatment down regulated BAX mRNA, up-regulated BCL2A1 mRNA and decreased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 protein expression (P<0.05 in SIPS. These findings suggested that GTT inhibits apoptosis by modulating the upstream apoptosis cascade, causing the inhibition of cytochrome c release from the mitochondria with concomitant suppression of caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. In conclusion, GTT delays cellular senescence of human diploid fibroblasts through the inhibition of intrinsic mitochondria-mediated pathway which involved the regulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes and proteins.

  8. Bacterial self-defense antibiotics release from organic-inorganic hybrid multilayer films for long-term anti-adhesion and biofilm inhibition properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingwen; Li, Xi; Jin, Yingying; Sun, Lin; Ding, Xiaoxu; Liang, Lin; Wang, Lei; Nan, Kaihui; Ji, Jian; Chen, Hao; Wang, Bailiang

    2017-12-14

    Implant-associated bacterial infections pose serious medical and financial issues due to the colonization and proliferation of pathogens on the surface of the implant. The as-prepared traditional antibacterial surfaces can neither resist bacterial adhesion nor inhibit the development of biofilm over the long term. Herein, novel (montmorillonite/poly-l-lysine-gentamicin sulfate) 8 ((MMT/PLL-GS) 8 ) organic-inorganic hybrid multilayer films were developed to combine enzymatic degradation PLL for on-demand self-defense antibiotics release. Small molecule GS was loaded into the multilayer films during self-assembly and the multilayer films showed pH-dependent and linear growth behavior. The chymotrypsin- (CMS) and bacterial infections-responsive film degradation led to the peeling of the films and GS release. Enzyme-responsive GS release exhibited CMS concentration dependence as measured by the size of the inhibition zone and SEM images. Notably, the obtained antibacterial films showed highly efficient bactericidal activity which killed more than 99.9% of S. aureus in 12 h. Even after 3 d of incubation in S. aureus, E. coli or S. epidermidis solutions, the multilayer films exhibited inhibition zones of more than 1.5 mm in size. Both in vitro and in vivo antibacterial tests indicated good cell compatibility, and anti-inflammatory, and long-term bacterial anti-adhesion and biofilm inhibition properties.

  9. Kaempferol alleviates LPS-induced neuroinflammation and BBB dysfunction in mice via inhibiting HMGB1 release and down-regulating TLR4/MyD88 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao; Yang, Ying-Lin; Yang, Huan; Wang, Yue-Hua; Du, Guan-Hua

    2018-03-01

    Kaempferol is a natural flavonoid with many biological activities including anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation. Nevertheless, its anti-neuroinflammation role and the relevant mechanism remain unclear. The present study was to investigate effects of kaempferol against LPS-induced neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier dysfunction as well as the mechanism in mice. BALB/c mice were treated with LPS 5mg/kg to induce inflammation after pre-treatment with kaempferol 25, 50, or 100mg/kg for 7days. The results showed that kaempferol reduced the production of various pro-inflammatory factors and inflammatory proteins including IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, COX-2 and iNOS in brain tissues. In addition, kaempferol also protected BBB integrity and increased BBB related proteins including occludin-1, claudin-1 and CX43 in brain of LPS-induced mice. Furthermore, kaempferol significantly reduced HMGB1 level and suppressed TLR4/MyD88 inflammatory pathway in both transcription level and translation level. These results collectively suggested that kaempferol might be a promising neuroprotective agent for alleviating inflammatory responses and BBB dysfunction by inhibiting HMGB1 release and down-regulating TLR4/MyD88 inflammatory pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Devil declines and catastrophic cascades: is mesopredator release of feral cats inhibiting recovery of the eastern quoll?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancourt, Bronwyn A; Hawkins, Clare E; Cameron, Elissa Z; Jones, Menna E; Nicol, Stewart C

    2015-01-01

    The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) is a medium-sized Australian marsupial carnivore that has recently undergone a rapid and severe population decline over the 10 years to 2009, with no sign of recovery. This decline has been linked to a period of unfavourable weather, but subsequent improved weather conditions have not been matched by quoll recovery. A recent study suggested another mechanism: that declines in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) populations, due to the spread of the fatal Devil Facial Tumour Disease, have released feral cats (Felis catus) from competitive suppression, with eastern quoll declines linked to a subsequent increase in cat sightings. Yet current evidence of intraguild suppression among devils, cats and quolls is scant and equivocal. We therefore assessed the influences of top-down effects on abundance and activity patterns among devils, feral cats and eastern quolls. Between 2011 and 2013, we monitored four carnivore populations using longitudinal trapping and camera surveys, and performed camera surveys at 12 additional sites throughout the eastern quoll's range. We did not find evidence of a negative relationship between devil and cat abundance, nor of higher cat abundance in areas where devil populations had declined the longest. Cats did not appear to avoid devils spatially; however, there was evidence of temporal separation of cat and devil activity, with reduced separation and increasing nocturnal activity observed in areas where devils had declined the longest. Cats and quolls used the same areas, and there was no evidence that cat and quoll abundances were negatively related. Temporal overlap in observed cat and quoll activity was higher in summer than in winter, but this seasonal difference was unrelated to devil declines. We suggest that cats did not cause the recent quoll decline, but that predation of juvenile quolls by cats could be inhibiting low density quoll populations from recovering their former abundance

  11. Outrage Factors in Government Press Releases of Food Risk and Their Influence on News Media Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Youngkee; Lim, Jeongsub; Shim, Minsun; You, Myoungsoon

    2015-08-01

    An appropriate level of risk perception should be a critical issue in modern "risk society." There have been many studies on the influences on risk perception. This study investigates whether risk communication scholar Dr. Peter Sandman's outrage factors intensify journalistic attention to health risks from food consumption. A content analysis of a health institution's press releases was conducted to examine 15 outrage factors of food risks conveyed in the governmental risk communication. In addition, the news stories covering the food risks informed by the press releases were calculated to evaluate the relation between outrage factors of a risk and the number of news stories covering the risk. Results showed that controllability was the most salient outrage factor, followed by trust, voluntariness, familiarity, and human origin; the greater the outrage score of a risk, the more news stories of the risk. For individual outrage factors, a risk with an implication of catastrophic potential was associated with an increase of news stories. Food providers' distrustful behaviors also influenced journalistic attention to the food risks. The implication of the findings to health message designers is discussed.

  12. The travel advice as an inhibiting factor of tourist movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylonopoulos Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is significantly affected by unpredictable and uncertain factors such as the occurrence of a terrorist attack, an epidemic outbreak or a natural disaster, etc. The impact of these phenomena on the tourist movement of the country or the place where the event occurred is aggravated by the way it is presented by the media both locally and internationally. The adverse climate gets worse by the issuance of travel advice that usually accompanies such phenomena and has the effect of limiting or even halting tourist flows. In order to identify and study the different types of travel advice that have been issued during international tourism crisis incidents, an internet search was carried out using keywords. Moreover, a study on the travel advice issued by major tourists' origin states, as the USA, Australia, Canada, Germany, the United Kingdom, etc. was carried out. Incidents (terrorist attacks, epidemics, natural disasters which had a great impact on tourism were then selected. In addition, the issuance of travel advice, their different issuing authorities, the classification level and the impact on the tourism of the country or the place in question were examined. An analysis of the reaction and the instructions of major international organizations (World Health Organization, World Tourism Organization concerning the management of such crises, directly or indirectly affecting tourism, were also analyzed. The study of the relevant websites, the international literature and the recorded incidents shows that the issuing of travel advice has negative effects on many sectors of tourism activity and is a bottleneck for tourism development. In fact, in many cases, travel advice is used by countries to exert pressure on other countries in order to achieve a desired result. Due to the enormous economic and social effects when issuing travel advice, the states proper management is necessary in order to minimize the negative consequences and avoid

  13. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy Increases Growth Factor Release from Equine Platelet-Rich Plasma In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn A. Seabaugh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionExtracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT and platelet-rich plasma (PRP are common treatments for soft tissue injuries in horses. Shockwave triggers cell specific responses to promote healing. Growth factors released from PRP also promote healing. It has been hypothesized that greater growth factor release would amplify the healing process. The combination of ESWT and PRP could promote healing in injured tendons and ligaments in the horse. The objective of this study was to determine if application of shockwaves to PRP samples increases the concentration of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and platelet-derived growth factor ββ (PDGF-ββ released from the platelets in vitro.Materials and methodsPRP was produced from blood drawn from six horses. The PRP from each horse was exposed to the following treatments: (1 positive control (freeze-thaw cycle, (2 untreated negative control, or shockwaves with either (3 a “standard probe” (ESWT-S with a 2 cm focal width and medium energy density or (4 a “power probe” (ESWT-P with a 1 cm focal width and high energy density. After each treatment, the samples were centrifuged, and the supernatant was harvested. The supernatant was then used for growth factor quantification via commercially available ELISA kits for TGF-β1 and PDGF-ββ.ResultsConcentrations of TGF-β1 and PDGF-ββ in PRP that underwent a freeze-thaw cycle were significantly increased compared with all other treatments. Both ESWT-S and ESWT-P resulted in significantly increased TGF-β1 concentrations, 46 and 33%, respectively, when compared with the negative control. Both ESWT-S and ESWT-P resulted in significantly increased PDGF-ββ concentrations, 219 and 190%, respectively, when compared with the negative control.DiscussionThese data indicate that the application of ESWT to PRP increases the expression of growth factors in vitro. This suggests that the combination therapy of local PRP injection followed by ESWT

  14. Protein S-glutathionylation lowers superoxide/hydrogen peroxide release from skeletal muscle mitochondria through modification of complex I and inhibition of pyruvate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Gill

    Full Text Available Protein S-glutathionylation is a reversible redox modification that regulates mitochondrial metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS production in liver and cardiac tissue. However, whether or not it controls ROS release from skeletal muscle mitochondria has not been explored. In the present study, we examined if chemically-induced protein S-glutathionylation could alter superoxide (O2●-/hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 release from isolated muscle mitochondria. Disulfiram, a powerful chemical S-glutathionylation catalyst, was used to S-glutathionylate mitochondrial proteins and ascertain if it can alter ROS production. It was found that O2●-/H2O2 release rates from permeabilized muscle mitochondria decreased with increasing doses of disulfiram (100-500 μM. This effect was highest in mitochondria oxidizing succinate or palmitoyl-carnitine, where a ~80-90% decrease in the rate of ROS release was observed. Similar effects were detected in intact mitochondria respiring under state 4 conditions. Incubation of disulfiram-treated mitochondria with DTT (2 mM restored ROS release confirming that these effects were associated with protein S-glutathionylation. Disulfiram treatment also inhibited phosphorylating and proton leak-dependent respiration. Radiolabelled substrate uptake experiments demonstrated that disulfiram inhibited pyruvate import but had no effect on carnitine uptake. Immunoblot analysis of complex I revealed that it contained several protein S-glutathionylation targets including NDUSF1, a subunit required for NADH oxidation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that O2●-/H2O2 release from muscle mitochondria can be altered by protein S-glutathionylation. We attribute these changes to the protein S-glutathionylation complex I and inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier.

  15. Calcium Occupancy of N-terminal Sites within Calmodulin Induces Inhibition of the Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2007-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates calcium release from intracellular stores in skeletal muscle through its association with the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) calcium release channel, where CaM association enhances channel opening at resting calcium levels and its closing at micromolar calcium levels associated with muscle contraction. A high-affinity CaM-binding sequence (RyRp) has been identified in RyR1, which corresponds to a 30-residue sequence (i.e., K3614 – N3643) located within the central portion of the primary sequence. However, it is currently unclear whether the identified CaM-binding sequence a) senses calcium over the physiological range of calcium-concentrations associated with RyR1 regulation or b) plays a structural role unrelated to the calcium-dependent modulation of RyR1 function. Therefore, we have measured the calcium-dependent activation of the individual domains of CaM in association with RyRp and their relationship to the CaM-dependent regulation of RyR1. These measurements utilize an engineered CaM, permitting the site-specific incorporation of N-(1-pyrene) maleimide at either T34C (PyN-CaM) or T110C (PyC-CaM) in the N- and C-domains, respectively. Consistent with prior measurements, we observe a high-affinity association between both apo- and calcium-activated CaM and RyRp. Upon association with RyRp, fluorescence changes in PyN-CaM or PyC-CaM permit the measurement of the calcium-activation of these individual domains. Fluorescence changes upon calcium-activation of PyC-CaM in association with RyRp are indicative of high-affinity calcium-dependent activation of the C-terminal domain of CaM bound to RyRp at resting calcium levels and the activation of the N-terminal domain at levels of calcium associated cellular activation. In comparison, occupancy of calcium-binding sites in the N-domain of CaM mirrors the calcium-dependence of RyR1 inhibition observed at activating calcium levels, where [Ca]1/2 = 4.3 0.4 μM, suggesting a direct regulation of Ry

  16. Inhibition of host protein synthesis by Sindbis virus: correlation with viral RNA replication and release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Miguel A; García-Moreno, Manuel; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Infection of mammalian cells by Sindbis virus (SINV) profoundly blocks cellular mRNA translation. Experimental evidence points to viral non-structural proteins (nsPs), in particular nsP2, as the mediator of this inhibition. However, individual expression of nsP1, nsP2, nsP3 or nsP1-4 does not block cellular protein synthesis in BHK cells. Trans-complementation of a defective SINV replicon lacking most of the coding region for nsPs by the co-expression of nsP1-4 propitiates viral RNA replication at low levels, and inhibition of cellular translation is not observed. Exit of nuclear proteins including T-cell intracellular antigen and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein is clearly detected in SINV-infected cells, but not upon the expression of nsPs, even when the defective replicon was complemented. Analysis of a SINV variant with a point mutation in nsP2, exhibiting defects in the shut-off of host protein synthesis, indicates that both viral RNA replication and the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm are greatly inhibited. Furthermore, nucleoside analogues that inhibit cellular and viral RNA synthesis impede the blockade of host mRNA translation, in addition to the release of nuclear proteins. Prevention of the shut-off of host mRNA translation by nucleoside analogues is not due to the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, as this prevention is also observed in PKR(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not phosphorylate eIF2α after SINV infection. Collectively, our observations are consistent with the concept that for the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis to occur, viral RNA replication must take place at control levels, leading to the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Inhibitory effect of ramosetron on corticotropin releasing factor- and soybean oil-induced delays in gastric emptying in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takuya; Keto, Yoshihiro; Yamano, Mayumi; Yokoyama, Toshihide; Sengoku, Takanori; Seki, Nobuo

    2012-09-01

    Symptoms of functional dyspepsia (FD) are highly prevalent in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, the effects of therapeutic agents for IBS on the pathophysiology of FD are unclear. In this study, therefore, we examined the effects of ramosetron, a serotonin 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, on corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)- and soybean oil-induced delays in gastric emptying of rats, in comparison with anti-diarrheal agent and spasmolytics. The involvement of 5-HT and the 5-HT(3) receptor in delayed gastric emptying was also evaluated. Corticotropin releasing factor was administered intravenously to rats 10min before oral administration of 0.05% phenol red solution, and the amount remaining in the stomach was measured after 30min. Soybean oil was administered orally with glass beads, and the number of residual beads in the stomach was counted 1h later. Both CRF and soybean oil inhibited gastric emptying dose-dependently. Ramosetron and itopride, a gastro-prokinetic agent, significantly reduced both CRF- and soybean oil-induced delays in gastric emptying, while an anti-diarrheal agent and spasmolytics aggravated them. Pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine for 2days to reduced the synthesis of endogenous 5-HT diminished the effects of both CRF and soybean oil on gastric emptying. A 5-HT(3) receptor agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide suppressed gastric emptying of both phenol red and glass beads, and those effects were reversed by ramosetron. These results suggest that CRF and soybean oil suppress gastric emptying in rats by activating 5-HT(3) receptors, and that by antagonizing these receptors, ramosetron may ameliorate symptoms of FD in clinical settings. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Alteration effect of the PGFsub(2α) inhibition on the 3H-norepinephrine release caused by α2 receptor blocking, sodium loading and 4-aminopyridine addition in isolated pulmonary arteries of rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyevacs, Zs.; Toeroek, T.; Hadhazy, P.; Magyar, K.; Feher, L.; Vizi, E.Sz.

    1983-01-01

    The tritium labelled norepinephrine release was measured in isolated pulmonary artery of rabbit. If the 3 H-norepinephrine release was induced by nerves stimulated with electric current, the PGFsub(2α) inhibited the release by 62%. In the presence of Yohimbin the inhibitory effect of FGFsub(2α) was increased to 78.8%. If the Na + pump activity was reduced by potassium-free medium the PGFsub(2α) inhibition remained at 62%. In the presence of 4-aminopyridine the potassium channel was blocked and the PGFsub(2α) inhibition decreased to 32.1%. The endogen prostaglandin may serve as a modulator of the neurotransmitter release. (L.G.)

  19. Endothelial stress induces the release of vitamin D-binding protein, a novel growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Marc-Andre; Desormeaux, Anik; Labelle, Andree; Soulez, Mathilde; Soulez, Gilles; Langelier, Yves; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V.; Hebert, Marie-Josee

    2005-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) under stress release paracrine mediators that facilitate accumulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSCM) at sites of vascular injury. We found that medium conditioned by serum-starved EC increase proliferation and migration of VSCM in vitro. Fractionation of the conditioned medium followed by mass spectral analysis identified one bioactive component as vitamin D-binding protein (DBP). DBP induced both proliferation and migration of VSMC in vitro in association with increased phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. PD 98059, a biochemical inhibitor of ERK 1/2, abrogated these proliferative and migratory responses in VSMC. DBP is an important carrier for the vitamin-D sterols, 25-hydroxyvitamin-D, and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D. Both sterols inhibited the activity of DBP on VSMC, suggesting that vitamin D binding sites are important for initiating the activities of DBP on VSMC. Release of DBP at sites of endothelial injury represents a novel pathway favoring accumulation of VSMC at sites of vascular injury

  20. Analysis of factors that inhibiting implementation of Information Security Management System (ISMS) based on ISO 27001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatiara, R.; Fajar, A. N.; Siregar, B.; Gunawan, W.

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine multi factors that inhibiting the implementation of the ISMS based on ISO 2700. It is also to propose a follow-up recommendation on the factors that inhibit the implementation of the ISMS. Data collection is derived from questionnaires to 182 respondents from users in data center operation (DCO) at bca, Indonesian telecommunication international (telin), and data centre division at Indonesian Ministry of Health. We analysing data collection with multiple linear regression analysis and paired t-test. The results are multiple factors which inhibiting the implementation of the ISMS from the three organizations which has implement and operate the ISMS, ISMS documentation management, and continual improvement. From this research, we concluded that the processes of implementation in ISMS is the necessity of the role of all parties in succeeding the implementation of the ISMS continuously.

  1. The protective effect of platelet released growth factors and bone augmentation (Bio-Oss®) on ethanol impaired osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Bayer, Andreas; Cremer, Tillman; Hock, Jennifer Vanessa Phi; Lethaus, Bernd; Kweider, Nisreen; Wruck, Christoph Jan; Drescher, Wolf; Jahr, Holger; Lippross, Sebastian; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh

    2017-11-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption is a known limiting factor for bone healing. One promising strategy to improve bone augmentation techniques with Bio-Oss ® in oral and maxillofacial surgery might be the supportive application of platelet-concentrated biomaterials as platelet-released growth factor (PRGF). To address this matter, we performed an in vitro study investigating the protective effects of PRGF and Bio-Oss ® in ethanol (EtOH) treated osteoblasts. The SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cell line, with and without EtOH pretreatment was used. The cell viability, proliferation and alkali phosphatase activity (ALP) after application of 0%, 5% and 10% PRGF and Bio-Oss ® were assessed. The application of PRGF and Bio-Oss ® in EtOH impaired osteoblasts showed a significant beneficial influence increasing the viability of the osteoblasts in cell culture. The synergistic effect of Bio-Oss ® and 5% PRGF on the proliferation of osteoblasts was also demonstrated. Bio-Oss ® only in combination with PRGF increases the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in EtOH pretreated cells. These results indicate that the simultaneous application of PRGF and Bio-Oss ® inhibits EtOH induced bone healing impairment. Furthermore, in the cells, PRGF induced a protective mechanism which might promote bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrically induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor release from Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Beier; Huang, Jinghui; Lu, Lei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing; Li, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Regulating the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in Schwann cells (SCs) is critical for their application in traumatic nerve injury, neurodegenerative disorders, and demyelination disease in both central and peripheral nervous systems. The present study investigated the possibility of using electrical stimulation (ES) to activate SCs to release BDNF. We found that short-term ES was capable of promoting BDNF production from SCs, and the maximal BDNF release was achieved by ES at 6 V (3 Hz, 30 min). We further examined the involvement of intracellular calcium ions ([Ca2+]i) in the ES-induced BDNF production in SCs by pharmacological studies. We found that the ES-induced BDNF release required calcium influx through T-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) and calcium mobilization from internal calcium stores, including inositol triphosphate-sensitive stores and caffeine/ryanodine-sensitive stores. In addition, calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMK IV), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) were found to play important roles in the ES-induced BDNF release from SCs. In conclusion, ES is capable of activating SCs to secrete BDNF, which requires the involvement of calcium influx through T-type VGCC and calcium mobilization from internal calcium stores. In addition, activation of CaMK IV, MAPK, and CREB were also involved in the ES-induced BDNF release. The findings indicate that ES can improve the neurotrophic ability in SCs and raise the possibility of developing electrically stimulated SCs as a source of cell therapy for nerve injury in both peripheral and central nervous systems. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Release of Immunosuppressive Factor(s) in Young Males Following Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Ye; Nie, Jinlei; Tong, Tom K.; Baker, Julien S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that a suppressive protein, acting as an immune suppressor, is generated in animals and humans under particular stresses. However, studies related to immunosuppressive factors in response to the stress resulting from acute exercise are limited. This study compares the effects of pre- and post-exercise human serum on concanavalin A stimulated lymphocyte proliferation of mice. In the present study, blood samples in eight male undergraduates (age 21 ± 0.7 years) were taken befo...

  4. The release of immunosuppressive factor(s) in young males following exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Nie, Jinlei; Tong, Tom K; Baker, Julien S

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that a suppressive protein, acting as an immune suppressor, is generated in animals and humans under particular stresses. However, studies related to immunosuppressive factors in response to the stress resulting from acute exercise are limited. This study compares the effects of pre- and post-exercise human serum on concanavalin A stimulated lymphocyte proliferation of mice. In the present study, blood samples in eight male undergraduates (age 21 ± 0.7 years) were taken before and immediately after ten sets of exercise consisting of 15 free and 30 10-kg loaded squat jumps in each set. The suppression of lymphocyte proliferation was analysed with high pressure liquid chromatography. It was noted from the result of gel chromatography columns that the post-exercise values of the suppression of lymphocyte proliferation, in comparison to corresponding pre-exercise values, were generally greater with significant differences observed in 7.5th-9th min post-exercise eluates (P exercise may lead to generation of immunosuppressive factor(s) in young males.

  5. The Release of Immunosuppressive Factor(s in Young Males Following Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien S. Baker

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that a suppressive protein, acting as an immune suppressor, is generated in animals and humans under particular stresses. However, studies related to immunosuppressive factors in response to the stress resulting from acute exercise are limited. This study compares the effects of pre- and post-exercise human serum on concanavalin A stimulated lymphocyte proliferation of mice. In the present study, blood samples in eight male undergraduates (age 21 ± 0.7 years were taken before and immediately after ten sets of exercise consisting of 15 free and 30 10-kg loaded squat jumps in each set. The suppression of lymphocyte proliferation was analysed with high pressure liquid chromatography. It was noted from the result of gel chromatography columns that the post-exercise values of the suppression of lymphocyte proliferation, in comparison to corresponding pre-exercise values, were generally greater with significant differences observed in 7.5th–9th min post-exercise eluates (P < 0.05. Such findings suggest that intense eccentric type exercise may lead to generation of immunosuppressive factor(s in young males.

  6. Cannabinoids inhibit angiogenic capacities of endothelial cells via release of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 from lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, Robert; Fischer, Sascha; Haustein, Maria; Manda, Katrin; Hinz, Burkhard

    2014-09-15

    Cannabinoids inhibit tumor neovascularization as part of their tumorregressive action. However, the underlying mechanism is still under debate. In the present study the impact of cannabinoids on potential tumor-to-endothelial cell communication conferring anti-angiogenesis was studied. Cellular behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) associated with angiogenesis was evaluated by Boyden chamber, two-dimensional tube formation and fibrin bead assay, with the latter assessing three-dimensional sprout formation. Viability was quantified by the WST-1 test. Conditioned media (CM) from A549 lung cancer cells treated with cannabidiol, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, R(+)-methanandamide or the CB2 agonist JWH-133 elicited decreased migration as well as tube and sprout formation of HUVEC as compared to CM of vehicle-treated cancer cells. Inhibition of sprout formation was further confirmed for cannabinoid-treated A549 cells co-cultured with HUVEC. Using antagonists to cannabinoid-activated receptors the antimigratory action was shown to be mediated via cannabinoid receptors or transient receptor potential vanilloid 1. SiRNA approaches revealed a cannabinoid-induced expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) as well as its upstream trigger, the intercellular adhesion molecule-1, to be causally linked to the observed decrease of HUVEC migration. Comparable anti-angiogenic effects were not detected following direct exposure of HUVEC to cannabinoids, but occurred after addition of recombinant TIMP-1 to HUVEC. Finally, antimigratory effects were confirmed for CM of two other cannabinoid-treated lung cancer cell lines (H460 and H358). Collectively, our data suggest a pivotal role of the anti-angiogenic factor TIMP-1 in intercellular tumor-endothelial cell communication resulting in anti-angiogenic features of endothelial cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence for a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from the brain during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Brassard, Patrice; Adser, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has an important role in regulating maintenance, growth and survival of neurons. However, the main source of circulating BDNF in response to exercise is unknown. To identify whether the brain is a source of BDNF during exercise, eight volunteers rowed for 4...... h while simultaneous blood samples were obtained from the radial artery and the internal jugular vein. To further identify putative cerebral region(s) responsible for BDNF release, mouse brains were dissected and analysed for BDNF mRNA expression following treadmill exercise. In humans, a BDNF...... release from the brain was observed at rest (P BDNF, while that contribution decreased following 1 h of recovery. In mice, exercise induced a three...

  8. Atmospheric dilution factors for radioactive releases from Inshas research reactor, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Aal, M.M.; Aly, A.I.M.; Tawfik, F.S.

    1994-01-01

    In the frame of assessing the suitability of Inshas site for constructing a new research reactor 20 MW, the meteorological condition are analyzed to determine the most affected population sectors. The atmospheric stability classes are estimated by a developed computer program in which the meteorological data for one year are used as input data. The results indicate that stability class F (moderately stable) is predominant one. The dilution factor is calculated using the computer code XOQDOQ for meteorological evaluation of routine effluent releases at nuclear power stations, which implements regulatory Guide 1.111 for both normal and desert conditions and for ground and elevated releases. The concentration isopleths are plotted and the most affected sector is the southern one with higher values for desert condition than the corresponding normal condition at same distance from the source. 4 fig., 3 tab

  9. EDRF [endothelium-derived relaxing factor]-release and Ca++-channel blockage by Magnolol, an antiplatelet agent isolated from Chinese herb Magnolia officinalis, in rat thoracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Cheming; Yu, Sheumeei; Chen, Chienchih; Huang, Yulin; Huang, Turfu

    1990-01-01

    Magnolol is an antiplatelet agent isolated from Chinese herb Magnolia officinalis. It inhibited norepinephrine-induced phasic and tonic contractions in rat thoracic aorta. At the plateau of the NE-induced tonic contraction, addition of magnolol caused two phases (fast and slow) of relaxation. These two relaxations were concentration-dependent, and were not inhibited by indomethacin. The fast relaxation was completely antagonized by hemoglobin and methylene blue, and disappeared in de-endothelialized aorta while the slow relaxation was not affected by the above treatments. Magnolol also inhibited high potassium-induced, calcium-dependent contraction of rat aorta in a concentration-dependent manner. 45 Ca ++ influx induced by high potassium or NE was markedly inhibited by magnolol. Cyclic GMP, but not PGI 2 , was increased by magnolol in intact, but not in de-endothelialized aorta. It is concluded that magnolol relaxed vascular smooth muscle by releasing endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) and by inhibiting calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels

  10. A prospective study of prognostic factors for duration of sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalsgaard Jesper

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic carpal tunnel release with a single portal technique has been shown to reduce sick leave compared to open carpal tunnel release, claiming to be a less invasive procedure and reducing scar tenderness leading to a more rapid return to work, and the purpose of this study was to identify prognostic factors for prolonged sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release in a group of employed Danish patients. Methods The design was a prospective study including 75 employed patients with carpal tunnel syndrome operated with ECTR at two hospitals. The mean age was 46 years (SD 10.1, the male/female ratio was 0.42, and the mean preoperative duration of symptoms 10 months (range 6-12. Only 21 (28% were unable to work preoperatively and mean sick leave was 4 weeks (range 1-4. At base-line and at the 3-month follow-up, a self-administered questionnaire was collected concerning physical, psychological, and social circumstances in relation to the hand problem. Data from a nerve conduction examination were collected at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Significant prognostic factors were identified through multiple logistic regression analysis. Results After the operation, the mean functional score was reduced from 2.3 to 1.4 (SD 0.8 and the mean symptom score from 2.9 to 1.5 (SD 0.7. The mean sick leave from work after the operation was 19.8 days (SD 14.3. Eighteen patients (24% had more than 21 days of sick leave. Two patients (3% were still unable to work after 3 months. Significant prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis for more than 21 days of postoperative sick leave were preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem and a preoperative distal motor latency. Conclusion Preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem, and a preoperative distal nerve conduction motor latency were prognostic factors for postoperative work absence of more than 21 days. Other factors may be important

  11. MiR-34a inhibits colon cancer proliferation and metastasis by inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Wang, Yulin; Lu, Shuming; Zhang, Zhuqing; Meng, Hua; Liang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Song, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The microRNA (miRNA), miR‑34a is significant in colon cancer progression. In the present study, the role of miR‑34a in colon cancer cell proliferation and metastasis was investigated. It was found that the expression of miR‑34a in colon cancer tissues and cell lines was lower when compared with that of normal tissues and cells. Further research demonstrated that miR‑34a inhibited cell proliferation, induced G1 phase arrest, and suppressed metastasis and epithelial mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells. Bioinformatic prediction indicated that platelet‑derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) was a potential target gene of miR‑34a and a luciferase assay identified that PDGFRA was a novel direct target gene of miR‑34a. In addition, assays of western blot analyses and quantitative reverse‑transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that miR‑34a decreased PDGFRA mRNA expression and protein levels in colon cancer cells. Assessment of cellular function indicated that miR‑34a inhibited colon cancer progression via PDGFRA. These findings demonstrate that miR‑34a may act as a negative regulator in colon cancer by targeting PDGFRA.

  12. Radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical effects of recombinant canine somatotropin in an unstable ostectomy gap model of bone healing in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millis, D.L.; Wilkens, B.E.; Daniel, G.B.; Hubner, K.; Mathews, A.; Buonomo, F.C.; Patell, K.R.; Weigel, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of recombinant canine somatotropin (STH) on radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing using an unstable ostectomy gap model. Study Design: After an ostectomy of the midshaft radius, bone healing was evaluated over an 8-week period in control dogs (n = 4) and dogs receiving recombinant canine STH (n = 4). Animals Or Sample Population: Eight sexually intact female Beagle dogs, 4 to 5 years old. Methods: Bone healing was evaluated by qualitative and quantitative evaluation of serial radiographs every 2 weeks. Terminal dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and three-point bending biomechanical testing were also performed. Results: Dogs receiving STH had more advanced radiographic healing of ostectomy sites. Bone area, bone mineral content, and bone density were two to five times greater at the ostectomy sites of treated dogs. Ultimate load at failure and stiffness were three and five times greater in dogs receiving STH. Conclusions: Using the ostectomy gap model, recombinant canine STH enhanced the radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing in dogs. Clinical Relevance: Dogs at risk for delayed healing of fractures may benefit from treatment with recombinant canine STH

  13. The interrelationship of porcine somatotropin administration and dietary phosphorus on growth performance and bone properties in developing gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, T L; Nelssen, J L; Goodband, R D; Hansen, J A; Friesen, K G; Richert, B T

    1993-10-01

    Seventy-two gilts (initial weight = 57.9 kg) were used to determine the interrelationship of porcine somatotropin (pST) administration and dietary P on growth performance of finishing gilts (58 to 106 kg) and the effect on bone mechanical properties and mineralization for a 35-d postfinishing phase after withdrawal of pST administration. Gilts were injected daily with placebo (control) or 4 mg of pST and fed .4, .6, or .8% P in the finishing phase. Administration of pST increased ADG and G/F (P .18) on ADG, G/F, or ADFI for the overall finishing phase. When each block weight averaged 106 kg, half the gilts were slaughtered and the first rib, femur, and third and fourth metacarpals were collected. Stress, modulus of elasticity, and ash content of rib, femur, and metacarpals were reduced (P .22). The remaining 36 gilts were individually fed 1.8 kg/d of a common diet to assure a P intake of 22.8 g/d for the 35-d postfinishing phase. Gilts that received higher levels of dietary P during the finishing phase had increased (linear, P .4% P (10.3 g/d P) to maximize growth performance. However, a diet with .4% P (12.44 and 10.66 g/d P, control and pST-treated, respectively) was adequate for growth performance during the overall finishing phase (56 to 106 kg).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  14. Effect of trehalose coating on basic fibroblast growth factor release from tailor-made bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungjin; Lee, Jongil; Igawa, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Shigeki; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Chung, Ung-il; Sasaki, Nobuo

    2011-12-01

    Artificial bone implants are often incorporated with osteoinductive factors to facilitate early bone regeneration. Calcium phosphate, the main component in artificial bone implants, strongly binds these factors, and in a few cases, the incorporated proteins are not released from the implant under conditions of physiological pH, thereby leading to reduction in their osteoinductivity. In this study, we coated tailor-made bone implants with trehalose to facilitate the release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). In an in vitro study, mouse osteoblastic cells were separately cultured for 48 hr in a medium with a untreated implant (T-), trehalose-coated implant (T+), bFGF-incorporated implant (FT-), and bFGF-incorporated implant with trehalose coating (FT+). In the FT+ group, cell viability was significantly higher than that in the other groups (Pbone implant without affecting the crystallinity or the mechanical strength of the artificial bone implant. These results suggest that coating artificial bone implants with trehalose could limit the binding of bFGF to calcium phosphate.

  15. Rab3A Inhibition of Ca2+ -Dependent Dopamine Release From PC12 Cells Involves Interaction With Synaptotagmin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhipan; Tang, Xia; Chen, Jia; Tang, Xiaochao; Wang, Xianchun

    2017-11-01

    Rab3 and synaptotagmin have been suggested to play important roles in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and, however, the molecular mechanism has not been completely clear. Here, we studied the effects of Rab3A and synaptotagmin I (Syt I) on dopamine release using PC12 cells as a model system. Rab3A was demonstrated to have effects on both Ca 2+ -independent and Ca 2+ -dependent dopamine releases from the PC12 cells. Application of Rab3A (up to 2500 nM) gradually decreased the amount of Ca 2+ -dependently released dopamine, indicating that Rab3A is a negative modulator that was further supported by the increase in dopamine release caused by Rab3A knockdown. Syt I knockdown weakened the Ca 2+ -dependent dopamine release, suggesting that Syt I plays a positive regulatory role in the cellular process. Treatment of the Syt I-knocked down PC12 cells with Rab3A further decreased Ca 2+ -dependent dopamine release and, however, the decrease magnitude was significantly reduced compared with that before Syt I knockdown, thus for the first time demonstrating that the inhibitory effect of Rab3A on Ca 2+ -dependent dopamine release involves the interaction with Syt I. This work has shed new light on the molecular mechanism for Rab3 and synaptotamin regulation of neurotransmitter release. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3696-3705, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Devil declines and catastrophic cascades: is mesopredator release of feral cats inhibiting recovery of the eastern quoll?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn A Fancourt

    Full Text Available The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus is a medium-sized Australian marsupial carnivore that has recently undergone a rapid and severe population decline over the 10 years to 2009, with no sign of recovery. This decline has been linked to a period of unfavourable weather, but subsequent improved weather conditions have not been matched by quoll recovery. A recent study suggested another mechanism: that declines in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii populations, due to the spread of the fatal Devil Facial Tumour Disease, have released feral cats (Felis catus from competitive suppression, with eastern quoll declines linked to a subsequent increase in cat sightings. Yet current evidence of intraguild suppression among devils, cats and quolls is scant and equivocal. We therefore assessed the influences of top-down effects on abundance and activity patterns among devils, feral cats and eastern quolls. Between 2011 and 2013, we monitored four carnivore populations using longitudinal trapping and camera surveys, and performed camera surveys at 12 additional sites throughout the eastern quoll's range. We did not find evidence of a negative relationship between devil and cat abundance, nor of higher cat abundance in areas where devil populations had declined the longest. Cats did not appear to avoid devils spatially; however, there was evidence of temporal separation of cat and devil activity, with reduced separation and increasing nocturnal activity observed in areas where devils had declined the longest. Cats and quolls used the same areas, and there was no evidence that cat and quoll abundances were negatively related. Temporal overlap in observed cat and quoll activity was higher in summer than in winter, but this seasonal difference was unrelated to devil declines. We suggest that cats did not cause the recent quoll decline, but that predation of juvenile quolls by cats could be inhibiting low density quoll populations from recovering their

  17. Adenohypophysial changes in mice transgenic for human growth hormone-releasing factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefaneanu, L; Kovacs, K; Horvath, E

    1989-01-01

    The effect of protracted GH-releasing factor (GRF) stimulation on adenohypophysial morphology was investigated in six mice transgenic for human GRF (hGRF). All animals had significantly higher plasma levels of GH and GRF and greater body weights than controls. Eight-month-old mice were killed...... of their ultrastructural features, contained secretory granules heavily labeled for GH by immunogold technique; PRL labeling varied from cell to cell, with the predominance of a weak immunostaining and was colocalized with GH in secretory granules. These results indicate that chronic exposure to GRF excess leads...

  18. Water-Soluble Coenzyme Q10 Inhibits Nuclear Translocation of Apoptosis Inducing Factor and Cell Death Caused by Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haining Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the study were to explore the mechanism of rotenone-induced cell damage and to examine the protective effects of water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 on the toxic effects of rotenone. Murine hippocampal HT22 cells were cultured with mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone. Water-soluble CoQ10 was added to the culture media 3 h prior to the rotenone incubation. Cell viability was determined by alamar blue, reactive oxygen species (ROS production by dihydroethidine (DHE and mitochondrial membrane potential by tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM. Cytochrome c, caspase-9 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF were measured using Western blotting after 24 h rotenone incubation. Rotenone caused more than 50% of cell death, increased ROS production, AIF nuclear translocation and reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, but failed to cause mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation. Pretreatment with water-soluble CoQ10 enhanced cell viability, decreased ROS production, maintained mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented AIF nuclear translocation. The results suggest that rotenone activates a mitochondria-initiated, caspase-independent cell death pathway. Water-soluble CoQ10 reduces ROS accumulation, prevents the fall of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibits AIF translocation and subsequent cell death.

  19. Injectable Biodegradable Polyurethane Scaffolds with Release of Platelet-derived Growth Factor for Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeman, Andrea E.; Li, Bing; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of triisocyanate composition on the biological and mechanical properties of biodegradable, injectable polyurethane scaffolds for bone and soft tissue engineering. Methods Scaffolds were synthesized using reactive liquid molding techniques, and were characterized in vivo in a rat subcutaneous model. Porosity, dynamic mechanical properties, degradation rate, and release of growth factors were also measured. Results Polyurethane scaffolds were elastomers with tunable damping properties and degradation rates, and they supported cellular infiltration and generation of new tissue. The scaffolds showed a two-stage release profile of platelet-derived growth factor, characterized by a 75% burst release within the first 24 h and slower release thereafter. Conclusions Biodegradable polyurethanes synthesized from triisocyanates exhibited tunable and superior mechanical properties compared to materials synthesized from lysine diisocyanates. Due to their injectability, biocompatibility, tunable degradation, and potential for release of growth factors, these materials are potentially promising therapies for tissue engineering. PMID:18516665

  20. Orexin–Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Heteromers in the Ventral Tegmental Area as Targets for Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Quiroz, César; Moreno-Delgado, David; Sierakowiak, Adam; McDowell, Kimberly; Moreno, Estefanía; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Aguinaga, David; Howell, Lesley A.; Hausch, Felix; Cortés, Antonio; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I.

    2015-01-01

    Release of the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and orexin-A in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in stress-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. We provide evidence for pharmacologically significant interactions between CRF and orexin-A that depend on oligomerization of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) and orexin OX1 receptors (OX1R). CRF1R–OX1R heteromers are the conduits of a negative crosstalk between orexin-A and CRF as demonstrated in transfected cells and rat VTA, in which they significantly modulate dendritic dopamine release. The cocaine target σ1 receptor (σ1R) also associates with the CRF1R–OX1R heteromer. Cocaine binding to the σ1R–CRF1R–OX1R complex promotes a long-term disruption of the orexin-A–CRF negative crosstalk. Through this mechanism, cocaine sensitizes VTA cells to the excitatory effects of both CRF and orexin-A, thus providing a mechanism by which stress induces cocaine seeking. PMID:25926444

  1. Orexin-corticotropin-releasing factor receptor heteromers in the ventral tegmental area as targets for cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Quiroz, César; Moreno-Delgado, David; Sierakowiak, Adam; McDowell, Kimberly; Moreno, Estefanía; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Aguinaga, David; Howell, Lesley A; Hausch, Felix; Cortés, Antonio; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; Ferré, Sergi; McCormick, Peter J

    2015-04-29

    Release of the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and orexin-A in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in stress-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. We provide evidence for pharmacologically significant interactions between CRF and orexin-A that depend on oligomerization of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) and orexin OX1 receptors (OX1R). CRF1R-OX1R heteromers are the conduits of a negative crosstalk between orexin-A and CRF as demonstrated in transfected cells and rat VTA, in which they significantly modulate dendritic dopamine release. The cocaine target σ1 receptor (σ1R) also associates with the CRF1R-OX1R heteromer. Cocaine binding to the σ1R-CRF1R-OX1R complex promotes a long-term disruption of the orexin-A-CRF negative crosstalk. Through this mechanism, cocaine sensitizes VTA cells to the excitatory effects of both CRF and orexin-A, thus providing a mechanism by which stress induces cocaine seeking. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356639-15$15.00/0.

  2. Platelet-derived growth factor inhibits platelet activation in heparinized whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selheim, F; Holmsen, H; Vassbotn, F S

    1999-08-15

    We previously have demonstrated that human platelets have functionally active platelet-derived growth factor alpha-receptors. Studies with gel-filtered platelets showed that an autocrine inhibition pathway is transduced through this tyrosine kinase receptor during platelet activation. The physiological significance of this inhibitory effect of platelet-derived growth factor on gel-filtered platelets activation is, however, not known. In the present study, we investigated whether platelet-derived growth factor inhibits platelet activation under more physiological conditions in heparinized whole blood, which represents a more physiological condition than gel-filtered platelets. Using flow cytometric assays, we demonstrate here that platelet-derived growth factor inhibits thrombin-, thrombin receptor agonist peptide SFLLRN-, and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and shedding of platelet-derived microparticles from the platelet plasma membrane during platelet aggregation in stirred heparinized whole blood. The inhibitory effect of platelet-derived growth factor was dose dependent. However, under nonaggregating conditions (no stirring), we could not demonstrate any significant effect of platelet-derived growth factor on thrombin- and thrombin receptor agonist peptide-induced platelet surface expression of P-selectin. Our results demonstrate that platelet-derived growth factor appears to be a true antithrombotic agent only under aggregating conditions in heparinized whole blood.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits differentiation of myogenic cells in human urethral rhabdosphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Mayuka; Sumino, Yasuhiro; Sato, Fuminori; Kiyono, Tohru; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Mimata, Hiromitsu

    2017-06-01

    To examine the inhibitory effects of tumor necrosis factor-α on myogenic differentiation of human urethral rhabdosphincter cells. A rhabdosphincter sample was obtained from a patient who underwent total cystectomy. To expand the lifespan of the primary cultured cells, rhabdosphincter myogenic cells were immortalized with mutated cyclin-dependent kinase 4, cyclin D1 and telomerase. The differential potential of the cells was investigated. The transfected human rhabdosphincter cells were induced for myogenic differentiation with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-α and/or the tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist etanercept at different concentrations, and activation of signaling pathways was monitored. Human rhabdosphincter cells were selectively cultured for at least 40 passages. Molecular analysis confirmed the expression of myosin heavy chain, which is a specific marker of differentiated muscle cells, significantly increased after differentiation induction. Although tumor necrosis factor-α treatment reduced the myosin heavy chain expression in a concentration-dependent manner, etanercept inhibited this suppression. Tumor necrosis factor-α suppressed phosphorylation of protein kinase B and p38, whereas etanercept pretreatment promoted phosphorylation and myosin heavy chain expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Tumor necrosis factorinhibits differentiation of urethral rhabdosphincter cells in part through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathways. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α might be a useful strategy to treat stress urinary incontinence. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  4. Catabolic factors and osteoarthritis-conditioned medium inhibit chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldens, Genoveva T H; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N; Vitters, Elly L; Schreurs, B Willem; Piek, Ester; van den Berg, Wim B; van der Kraan, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage has a very limited intrinsic repair capacity leading to progressive joint damage. Therapies involving tissue engineering depend on chondrogenic differentiation of progenitor cells. This chondrogenic differentiation will have to survive in a diseased joint. We postulate that catabolic factors in this environment inhibit chondrogenesis of progenitor cells. We investigated the effect of a catabolic environment on chondrogenesis in pellet cultures of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We exposed chondrogenically differentiated hMSC pellets, to interleukin (IL)-1α, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or conditioned medium derived from osteoarthritic synovium (CM-OAS). IL-1α and TNF-α in CM-OAS were blocked with IL-1Ra or Enbrel, respectively. Chondrogenesis was determined by chondrogenic markers collagen type II, aggrecan, and the hypertrophy marker collagen type X on mRNA. Proteoglycan deposition was analyzed by safranin o staining on histology. IL-1α and TNF-α dose-dependently inhibited chondrogenesis when added at onset or during progression of differentiation, IL-1α being more potent than TNF-α. CM-OAS inhibited chondrogenesis on mRNA and protein level but varied in extent between patients. Inhibition of IL-1α partially overcame the inhibitory effect of the CM-OAS on chondrogenesis whereas the TNF-α contribution was negligible. We show that hMSC chondrogenesis is blocked by either IL-1α or TNF-α alone, but that there are additional factors present in CM-OAS that contribute to inhibition of chondrogenesis, demonstrating that catabolic factors present in OA joints inhibit chondrogenesis, thereby impairing successful tissue engineering.

  5. Evidence that morphine and opioid peptides do not share a common pathway with adenosine in inhibiting acetylcholine release from isolated intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizi, E S; Somogyi, G T; Magyar, K

    1981-12-01

    1 The release of acetylcholine from guinea-pig ileal isolated longitudinal muscle strip with intact Auerbach's plexus was measured by bioassay and by a radioisotope technique. 2 Normorphine (5 x 10(-7)M) and D-Met2, Pro5-enkephalinamide (D-Met, Pro-EA) reduced the release of acetylcholine. Theophylline, an adenosine antagonist, failed to prevent the inhibitory effect of normorphine or D-Met, Pro-EA. 3 Theophylline (1.7 x 10(-4)M) by itself enhanced the twitch responses to field stimulation (0.1 Hz) but did not prevent the inhibitory effect of normorphine and D-Met, Pro-EA. 4 From the results it can be concluded that morphine and opioid peptides do not share a common pathway with adenosine in inhibiting acetylcholine release from axon terminals of Auerbach's plexus.

  6. Olfactory bulb short axon cell release of GABA and dopamine produces a temporally biphasic inhibition-excitation response in external tufted cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaolin; Plachez, Celine; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam; Shipley, Michael T

    2013-02-13

    Evidence for coexpression of two or more classic neurotransmitters in neurons has increased, but less is known about cotransmission. Ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons corelease dopamine (DA), the excitatory transmitter glutamate, and the inhibitory transmitter GABA onto target cells in the striatum. Olfactory bulb (OB) short axon cells (SACs) form interglomerular connections and coexpress markers for DA and GABA. Using an optogenetic approach, we provide evidence that mouse OB SACs release both GABA and DA onto external tufted cells (ETCs) in other glomeruli. Optical activation of channelrhodopsin specifically expressed in DAergic SACs produced a GABA(A) receptor-mediated monosynaptic inhibitory response, followed by DA-D(1)-like receptor-mediated excitatory response in ETCs. The GABA(A) receptor-mediated hyperpolarization activates I(h) current in ETCs; synaptically released DA increases I(h), which enhances postinhibitory rebound spiking. Thus, the opposing actions of synaptically released GABA and DA are functionally integrated by I(h) to generate an inhibition-to-excitation "switch" in ETCs. Consistent with the established role of I(h) in ETC burst firing, we show that endogenous DA release increases ETC spontaneous bursting frequency. ETCs transmit sensory signals to mitral/tufted output neurons and drive intraglomerular inhibition to shape glomerulus output to downstream olfactory networks. GABA and DA cotransmission from SACs to ETCs may play a key role in regulating output coding across the glomerular array.

  7. Allosuppressor T lymphocytes abolish migration inhibition factor production in autoimmune thyroid disease: evidence from radiosensitivity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topliss, D.J.; Okita, N.; Lewis, M.; Row, V.V.; Volpe, R.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of normal T lymphocytes to abolish the production of migration inhibition factor by antigen-sensitized T lymphocytes of Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in response to thyroid antigen has been studied by a modified migration inhibition factor test using isolated T lymphocytes alone. The production of migration inhibition factor was consistently abolished when normal T lymphocytes were mixed with GD or HT T lymphocytes in various ratios (1:9, 2:8, 5:5) as reported previously (Okita et al., 1980b). However, prior in-vitro irradiation (1000 rad) of the normal T lymphocytes resulted in loss of their ability to abolish migration inhibition factor production by the antigen-sensitized T lymphocytes of GD and HT. The effect is consistent with the radiosensitivity of suppressor T lymphocytes and indicates that the effect of normal T lymphocytes on GD and HT T lymphocytes is one of allosuppression. The results support the view that there is a defect in suppressor T cell function in GD and HT. (author)

  8. Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Localization of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor: Mechanistic Implications for Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Woon Yu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor, but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders.

  9. Suckling induced insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) release in mother rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lékó, András H; Cservenák, Melinda; Dobolyi, Árpád

    2017-12-01

    Lactation involves significant neuroendocrine changes. The elevated prolactin (PRL) release from the pituitary, induced markedly by suckling, is the most relevant example. Suckling also causes a significant and rapid elevation in growth hormone (GH) levels. GH is necessary for milk synthesis as milk yield is stopped completely in the absence of PRL and GH, while the absence of PRL alone causes only a 50% reduction. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) plays an important role in the GH axis. GH exerts its effects through IGF-1 in the periphery, for example in the mammary gland. In addition, IGF-1 is responsible for the long-loop feedback control of GH secretion. IGF-1 secretion has not been established yet in mothers. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of suckling on serum IGF-1 level in rat mothers and correlated it with serum PRL levels. We examined a potential mechanism of the regulation of IGF-1 level during suckling by administering IGF-1 into the lateral ventricle of rat mothers continuously for 12days, or acutely, right before the start of suckling. We described that suckling affected IGF-1 release based on one-way repeated measures ANOVA (F=10.8 and pIGF-1 level 30min after the start of suckling (pIGF-1 release. The prolonged central IGF-1 administration diminished the suckling-induced IGF-1 surge (F=9.19 and pIGF-1 release either by elevating PRL or GH. Long-loop feedback via IGF-1 in the GH axis can diminish this action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of 5-Fluorouracil-Polycaprolactone Sustained-Release Film in Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implantation Inhibits Postoperative Bleb Scarring in Rabbit Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiu-Zeng; Pan, Wei-Hua; Yu, Xin-Ping; Song, Zong-Ming; Ren, Zeng-Jin; Sun, Min; Li, Cong-Hui; Nan, Kai-Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu)-polycaprolactone sustained-release film in Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation inhibits postoperative bleb scarring in rabbit eyes. Eighteen New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups (A, B and C; n = 6 per group). Group A received combined 5-Fu-polycaprolactone sustained-release film application and Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation, group B received local infiltration of 5-Fu and Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation, and group C received Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. Postoperative observations were made of the anterior segment, intraocular pressure, central anterior chamber depth, blebs, drainage tube, and accompanying ciliary body detachment. The pathology of the blebs and surrounding tissues were observed at month 3 postoperatively. We revealed that the 5-Fu-polycaprolactone sustained-release film maintained a release concentration range of 13.7 ± 0.12 to 37.41 ± 0.47 μg/ml over three months in vitro. Postoperatively, diffuse blebs with ridges were found in all eyes in group A, two blebs were observed in group B, and no bleb formation was present in group C. The postoperative central anterior chamber depth in group A was significantly less than that of the other two groups. The postoperative intraocular pressure of group A stabilized at 6.33-8.67 mmHg, whereas that of group C gradually remained at 7.55-10.02 mmHg. The histopathology showed that the fibrous tissue thickness of the blebs in group A was significantly thinner than that of the other groups. We conclude that the 5-Fu-polycaprolactone sustained-release film had a sustained drug release effect, which promoted the inhibition of bleb scarring after Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation.

  11. Biomaterial-based drug delivery systems for the controlled release of neurotrophic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohtaram, Nima Khadem; Montgomery, Amy; Willerth, Stephanie M

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights recent work on the use of biomaterial-based drug delivery systems to control the release of neurotrophic factors as a potential strategy for the treatment of neurological disorders. Examples of neurotrophic factors include the nerve growth factor, the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3. In particular, this review focuses on two methods of drug delivery: affinity-based and reservoir-based systems. We review the advantages and challenges associated with both types of drug delivery system and how these systems can be applied to neurological diseases and disorders. While a limited number of affinity-based delivery systems have been developed for the delivery of neurotrophic factors, we also examine the broad spectrum of reservoir-based delivery systems, including microspheres, electrospun nanofibers, hydrogels and combinations of these systems. Finally, conclusions are drawn about the current state of such drug delivery systems as applied to neural tissue engineering along with some thoughts on the future direction of the field. (topical review)

  12. Vinpocetine inhibits glutamate release induced by the convulsive agent 4-aminopyridine more potently than several antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitges, M; Sanchez-Tafolla, B M; Chiu, L M; Aldana, B I; Guarneros, A

    2011-10-01

    4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) is a convulsing agent that in vivo preferentially releases Glu, the most important excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter in the brain. Here the ionic dependence of 4-AP-induced Glu release and the effects of several of the most common antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and of the new potential AED, vinpocetine on 4-AP-induced Glu release were characterized in hippocampus isolated nerve endings pre-loaded with labelled Glu ([3H]Glu). 4-AP-induced [3H]Glu release was composed by a tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive and external Ca2+ dependent fraction and a TTX insensitive fraction that was sensitive to the excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor, TBOA. The AEDs: carbamazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine at the highest dose tested only reduced [3H]Glu release to 4-AP between 50-60%, and topiramate was ineffective. Vinpocetine at a much lower concentration than the above AEDs, abolished [3H]Glu release to 4-AP. We conclude that the decrease in [3H]Glu release linked to the direct blockade of presynaptic Na+ channels, may importantly contribute to the anticonvulsant actions of all the drugs tested here (except topiramate); and that the significantly greater vinpocetine effect in magnitude and potency on [3H]Glu release when excitability is exacerbated like during seizures, may involve the increase additionally exerted by vinpocetine in some K+ channels permeability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide-releasing naproxen suppresses colon cancer cell growth and inhibits NF-κB signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodela R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ravinder Kodela,1 Niharika Nath,2 Mitali Chattopadhyay,1 Diandra E Nesbitt,1 Carlos A Velázquez-Martínez,3 Khosrow Kashfi11Department of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City University of New York Medical School, 2Department of Life Sciences, New York Institute of Technology, New York, NY, USA; 3Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of death due to cancer and the third most common cancer in men and women in the USA. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB is known to be activated in CRC and is strongly implicated in its development and progression. Therefore, activated NF-κB constitutes a bona fide target for drug development in this type of malignancy. Many epidemiological and interventional studies have established nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs as a viable chemopreventive strategy against CRC. Our previous studies have shown that several novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing NSAIDs are promising anticancer agents and are safer derivatives of NSAIDs. In this study, we examined the growth inhibitory effect of a novel H2S-releasing naproxen (HS-NAP, which has a repertoire as a cardiovascular-safe NSAID, for its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle phase transitions, and apoptosis using HT-29 human colon cancer cells. We also investigated its effect as a chemopreventive agent in a xenograft mouse model. HS-NAP suppressed the growth of HT-29 cells by induction of G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis and downregulated NF-κB. Tumor xenografts in mice were significantly reduced in volume. The decrease in tumor mass was associated with a reduction of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and decreases in NF-κB levels in vivo. Therefore, HS-NAP demonstrates strong anticancer potential in CRC. Keywords: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cell cycle, apoptosis, xenograft, NF

  14. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat, represses hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha expression through translational inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren M Hutt

    Full Text Available Hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α is a master regulator of tumor angiogenesis being one of the major targets for cancer therapy. Previous studies have shown that Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi block tumor angiogenesis through the inhibition of HIF-1α expression. As such, Vorinostat (Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid/SAHA and Romidepsin, two HDACis, were recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Although HDACis have been shown to affect HIF-1α expression by modulating its interactions with the Hsp70/Hsp90 chaperone axis or its acetylation status, the molecular mechanisms by which HDACis inhibit HIF-1α expression need to be further characterized. Here, we report that the FDA-approved HDACi Vorinostat/SAHA inhibits HIF-1α expression in liver cancer-derived cell lines, by a new mechanism independent of p53, prolyl-hydroxylases, autophagy and proteasome degradation. We found that SAHA or silencing of HDAC9 mechanism of action is due to inhibition of HIF-1α translation, which in turn, is mediated by the eukaryotic translation initiation factor--eIF3G. We also highlighted that HIF-1α translation is dramatically inhibited when SAHA is combined with eIF3H silencing. Taken together, we show that HDAC activity regulates HIF-1α translation, with HDACis such as SAHA representing a potential novel approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. Influence of hirudin and cobra venom factor on the release of 14C-serotonin and 51chromium from human platelets induced by thrombin, collagen, aggregate gammaglobulin and HLA antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemeyer, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    The present work investigates the influence of hirudin and cobra venom factor on thrombin, collagen, aggregate gammaglobulin and HLA-antibody-induced release of 14 C-serotonin and 51 chromium from human platelets. Besides the platelet-specific release reaction ( 14 C-serotonin) the extent of platelet lysis was determined by measurement of the loss of 51 chromium from the platelets. The results showed the thrombin, collagen and aggregate-gammaglobulin-induced platelet alteration to be a non-complement-dependent reaction of the platelets with release of 14 C-serotonin. Following long-term incubation small quantities of 51 chromium are also released. As this release of 51 chromium cannot be inhibited using cobra venom factor and does not occur in washed platelets either, it is most probably a non-complement-dependent reaction. The HLA-antibody-induced, specific platelet alteration is both complement-dependent and complement-independent. Differentiation is possible by inhibition of the complement-dependent lysis. On the other hand thrombin is of no relevance to the collagen, aggregate gammaglobulin, and HLA-antibody-induced platelet alteration as the interactions of these substances with platelets are not inhibited by hirudin. The above results are confirmed by investigation of the 51 chromium uptake capacity of washed platelets treated previously with thrombin, collagen and HLA antibody. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Peptide YY, neuropeptide Y and corticotrophin-releasing factor modulate gastrointestinal motility and food intake during acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Sarah C; Cox, Helen M

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral neuropeptide Y (NPY) provides protection against the endocrine, feeding and gastrointestinal (GI) responses to stress; however, it is not yet established how it interacts with corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) to mediate these effects. Peptide YY (PYY) also has significant roles in GI motility and food intake but little is known about its role in stress responses. Upper GI transit, fecal pellet output (FPO) and feeding responses, and the role of CRF1 receptors, during restraint or a novel environment stress, were ascertained in PYY-/-, NPY-/- and wild type (WT) mice, with CRF and the CRF1 antagonist, antalarmin, injected intraperitoneally. Upper GI transit and FPO were significantly increased in PYY-/- mice during restraint stress. Exogenous CRF increased defecation during placement in a novel environment in WT mice through CRF1 , while CRF1 blockade reduced defecation in WT and NPY-/- mice but had no effect in PYY-/- mice. In addition, CRF1 blockade had no effect on upper GI transit in WT mice, or on food intake in PYY-/- or NPY-/- mice, but it significantly increased food intake in WT mice. Endogenous NPY appears to inhibit the colonic motor response induced by CRF1 activation, unlike PYY, while both peptides are required for CRF1 modulation of feeding behavior during stress. Overall, these results provide new insights into the mechanism by which PYY and NPY affect stress responses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Determination of the radionuclide release factor for an evaporator process using nondestructive assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    The 242-A Evaporator is the primary waste evaporator for the Hanford Site radioactive liquid waste stored in underground double-shell tanks. Low pressure evaporation is used to remove water from the waste, thus reducing the amount of tank space required for storage. The process produces a concentrated slurry, a process condensate, and an offgas. The offgas exhausts through two stages of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters before being discharged to the atmosphere 40 CFR 61 Subpart H requires assessment of the unfiltered exhaust to determine if continuous compliant sampling is required. Because potential (unfiltered) emissions are not measured, methods have been developed to estimate these emissions. One of the methods accepted by the Environmental Protection Agency is the measurement of the accumulation of radionuclides on the HEPA filters. Nondestructive assay (NDA) was selected for determining the accumulation on the HEPA filters. NDA was performed on the HEPA filters before and after a campaign in 1997. NDA results indicate that 2.1 E+4 becquerels of cesium-137 were accumulated on the primary HEPA 1700 filter during the campaign. The feed material processed in the campaign contained a total of 1.4 E+l6 Bq of cesium-137. The release factor for the evaporator process is 1.5 E-12. Based on this release factor, continuous compliant sampling is not required

  18. In Situ Loading of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Within Porous Silica Nanoparticles for a Prolonged Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postovit Lynne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, a protein, plays a key role in wound healing and blood vessel regeneration. However, bFGF is easily degraded in biologic systems. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs with well-tailored porous structure have been used for hosting guest molecules for drug delivery. Here, we report an in situ route to load bFGF in MSNs for a prolonged release. The average diameter (d of bFGF-loaded MSNs is 57 ± 8 nm produced by a water-in-oil microemulsion method. The in vitro releasing profile of bFGF from MSNs in phosphate buffer saline has been monitored for 20 days through a colorimetric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The loading efficiency of bFGF in MSNs is estimated at 72.5 ± 3%. In addition, the cytotoxicity test indicates that the MSNs are not toxic, even at a concentration of 50 μg/mL. It is expected that the in situ loading method makes the MSNs a new delivery system to deliver protein drugs, e.g. growth factors, to help blood vessel regeneration and potentiate greater angiogenesis.

  19. Improvement in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) by the inhibition of polyphenolics released during wounding of cotyledonary node explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Reena; Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Singh, Aditya K; Niranjan, Abhishek; Singh, Rani; Sanyal, Indraneel; Lehri, Alok; Pande, Veena; Amla, D V

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) has been performed using cotyledonary node explants (CNs), which release phenolics upon excision that are detrimental to the viability of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and result in low transformation frequency. Twelve low molecular weight phenolic compounds and salicylic acid were identified in the exudates released upon excision during the preparation of cotyledonary nodes by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Zone inhibition assays performed with the explant exudates released at periodic intervals after excision showed the inhibition of A. tumefaciens. Agroinoculation of freshly excised cotyledonary nodes of chickpea showed 98-99 % inhibition of colony forming units (cfu). Osmium tetraoxide fixation of excised tissues showed enhanced accumulation of phenolics in the sub-epidermal regions causing enzymatic browning, affecting the viability and performance of A. tumefaciens for T-DNA delivery. The periodic analysis of exudates released from excised CNs showed enhanced levels of gallic acid (0.2945 ± 0.014 μg/g), chlorogenic acid (0.0978 ± 0.0046 μg/g), and quercetin (0.0971 ± 0.0046 μg/g) fresh weight, which were detrimental to A. tumefaciens. Quantitative assays and the elution profile showed the maximum leaching of phenolics, flavonoids, and salicylic acid immediately after the excision of explants and continued till 4 to 8 h post-excision. Pre-treatment of excised explants with inhibitors of polyphenol oxidase like L-cysteine, DTT, and sodium thiosulfate before co-cultivation showed the recovery of A. tumefaciens cfu, decreased the accumulation of phenolics, and improved transformation frequency. Our results show the hypersensitive response of excision stress for the expression of defense response-related genes and synthesis of metabolites in grain legume chickpea against pathogen infestation including Agrobacterium.

  20. Pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein mediates the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor inhibition of melatonin release in photoreceptive chick pineal cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, B.L.; Takahashi, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The avian pineal gland is a photoreceptive organ that has been shown to contain postjunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors that inhibit melatonin synthesis and/or release upon receptor activation. Physiological response and [32P]ADP ribosylation experiments were performed to investigate whether pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) were involved in the transduction of the alpha 2-adrenergic signal. For physiological response studies, the effects of pertussis toxin on melatonin release in dissociated cell cultures exposed to norepinephrine were assessed. Pertussis toxin blocked alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin-induced blockade appeared to be noncompetitive. One and 10 ng/ml doses of pertussis toxin partially blocked and a 100 ng/ml dose completely blocked norepinephrine-induced inhibition. Pertussis toxin-catalyzed [32P]ADP ribosylation of G-proteins in chick pineal cell membranes was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Membranes were prepared from cells that had been pretreated with 0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. In the absence of pertussis toxin pretreatment, two major proteins of 40K and 41K mol wt (Mr) were labeled by [32P]NAD. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of pineal cells abolished [32P] radiolabeling of the 40K Mr G-protein in a dose-dependent manner. The norepinephrine-induced inhibition of both cAMP efflux and melatonin release, as assessed by RIA of medium samples collected before membrane preparation, was also blocked in a dose-dependent manner by pertussis toxin. Collectively, these results suggest that a pertussis toxin-sensitive 40K Mr G-protein labeled by [32P]NAD may be functionally associated with alpha 2-adrenergic signal transduction in chick pineal cells

  1. Alveolar macrophage release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in chronic alcoholics without liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, K; Casey, R; Nelson, S; Olariu, R; Shellito, J E

    1998-05-01

    Alcohol is an immunosuppressive drug, and chronic abuse has been associated with increased susceptibility to a variety of infections, including bacterial pneumonia and tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophages are the resident phagocytes of the lung and play a central role in lung host defenses against infection ranging from direct antibacterial activity to the release of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). TNFalpha, in particular, plays a key role in the development of the early inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on alveolar macrophage release of TNFalpha in vitro. We prospectively studied lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated release of TNFalpha from alveolar macrophages obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in 22 alcoholic (18 smokers, 4 nonsmokers) and 7 nondrinking healthy volunteers (3 smokers, 4 nonsmokers). The total number of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and their differential distribution were not significantly different in alcoholics versus controls (43 +/- 8 x 10(6) and 39 +/- 13 x 10(6), respectively). However, the total number of cells recovered from BALF was significantly higher in smokers (51 +/- 8 x 10(6)) than in nonsmokers (19 +/- 5 x 10(6)). Spontaneous (basal) release of TNFalpha by alveolar macrophages was the same in alcoholics and controls. In contrast, LPS-stimulated release of TNFalpha was significantly suppressed in alcoholics compared with that of controls (1343 +/- 271 vs. 3806 +/- 926 U TNF/ml/10(6) cells, respectively, p < 0.015). When controlled for smoking, LPS-stimulated TNFalpha production was suppressed in alcoholic nonsmokers (563 +/- 413 U TNF/ml/10(6)) compared with control nonsmokers (5113 +/- 1264 U TNF/ml/10(6)). LPS-stimulated TNFalpha production was also less in control smokers (2063 +/- 386 U TNF/ml/10(6) cells) than in control nonsmokers (5113 +/- 1264 U TNF/ml/10(6) cells). There was no difference

  2. Canine tracheal epithelial cells are more sensitive than rat tracheal epithelial cells to transforming growth factor beta induced growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbs, A.F.; Hahn, F.F.; Kelly, G.; Thomassen, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) markedly inhibited growth of canine tracheal epithelial (CTE) cells. Reduced responsiveness to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition accompanied neoplastic progression of these cells from primary to transformed to neoplastic. This was similar to the relationship between neoplastic progression and increased resistance to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition seen for rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells. The canine cells were more sensitive than rat cells to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition at all stages in the neoplastic process. (author)

  3. Cognitive Improvement of Attention and Inhibition in the Late Afternoon in Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Treated With Osmotic-Release Oral System Methylphenidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama, Hichem; Fery, Patrick; Verheulpen, Denis; Vanzeveren, Nathalie; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    Long-acting medications have been developed and approved for use in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These compounds are intended to optimize and maintain symptoms control throughout the day. We tested prolonged effects of osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate on both attention and inhibition, in the late afternoon. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 36 boys (7-12 years) with ADHD and 40 typically developing children. The ADHD children received an individualized dose of placebo or osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate. They were tested about 8 hours after taking with 2 continuous performance tests (continuous performance test-X [CPT-X] and continuous performance test-AX [CPT-AX]) and a counting Stroop. A positive effect of osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate was present in CPT-AX with faster and less variable reaction times under osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate than under placebo, and no difference with typically developing children. In the counting Stroop, we found a decreased interference with osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate but no difference between children with ADHD under placebo and typically developing children. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. In Vitro Inhibition of Histamine Release Behavior of Cetirizine Intercalated into Zn/Al- and Mg/Al-Layered Double Hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nazrul Hakim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The intercalation of cetirizine into two types of layered double hydroxides, Zn/Al and Mg/Al, has been investigated by the ion exchange method to form CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites, respectively. The basal spacing of the nanocomposites were expanded to 31.9 Å for CTZAN and 31.2 Å for CTMAN, suggesting that cetirizine anion was intercalated into Layered double hydroxides (LDHs and arranged in a tilted bilayer fashion. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR study supported the formation of both the nanocomposites, and the intercalated cetirizine is thermally more stable than its counterpart in free state. The loading of cetirizine in the nanocomposite was estimated to be about 57.2% for CTZAN and 60.7% CTMAN. The cetirizine release from the nanocomposites show sustained release manner and the release rate of cetirizine from CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites at pH 7.4 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8, presumably due to the different release mechanism. The inhibition of histamine release from RBL2H3 cells by the free cetirizine is higher than the intercalated cetirizine both in CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites. The viability in human Chang liver cells at 1000 μg/mL for CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites are 74.5 and 91.9%, respectively.

  5. MiR-125a TNF receptor-associated factor 6 to inhibit osteoclastogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Li-Juan; Liao, Lan; Yang, Li; Li, Yu; Jiang, Tie-Jian

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. In the present study, we found that miR-125a was dramatically down-regulated during macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclastogenesis of circulating CD14+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Overexpression of miR-125a in CD14+ PBMCs inhibited osteoclastogenesis, while inhibition of miR-125a promoted osteoclastogenesis. TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), a transduction factor for RANKL/RANK/NFATc1 signal, was confirmed to be a target of miR-125a. EMSA and ChIP assays confirmed that NFATc1 bound to the promoter of the miR-125a. Overexpression of NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transcription, and block of NFATc1 expression attenuated RANKL-regulated miR-125a transcription. Here, we reported that miR-125a played a biological function in osteoclastogenesis through a novel TRAF6/ NFATc1/miR-125a regulatory feedback loop. It suggests that regulation of miR-125a expression may be a potential strategy for ameliorating metabolic disease. - Highlights: • MiR-125a was significantly down-regulated in osteoclastogenesis of CD14+ PBMCs. • MiR-125a inhibited osteoclast differentiation by targeting TRAF6. • NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transciption by binding to the promoter of miR-125a. • TRAF6/NFATc1 and miR-125a form a regulatory feedback loop in osteoclastogenesis

  6. Active spice-derived components can inhibit inflammatory responses of adipose tissue in obesity by suppressing inflammatory actions of macrophages and release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 from adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hae-Mi; Kang, Ji-Hye; Kawada, Teruo; Yoo, Hoon; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Yu, Rina

    2007-02-13

    Inflammation plays a key role in obesity-related pathologies such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, and several types of cancer. Obesity-induced inflammation entails the enhancement of the recruitment of macrophages into adipose tissue and the release of various proinflammatory proteins from fat tissue. Therefore, the modulation of inflammatory responses in obesity may be useful for preventing or ameliorating obesity-related pathologies. Some spice-derived components, which are naturally occurring phytochemicals, elicit antiobesity and antiinflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated whether active spice-derived components can be applied to the suppression of obesity-induced inflammatory responses. Mesenteric adipose tissue was isolated from obese mice fed a high-fat diet and cultured to prepare an adipose tissue-conditioned medium. Raw 264.7 macrophages were treated with the adipose tissue-conditioned medium with or without active spice-derived components (i.e., diallyl disulfide, allyl isothiocyanate, piperine, zingerone and curcumin). Chemotaxis assay was performed to measure the degree of macrophage migration. Macrophage activation was estimated by measuring tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), nitric oxide, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) concentrations. The active spice-derived components markedly suppressed the migration of macrophages induced by the mesenteric adipose tissue-conditioned medium in a dose-dependent manner. Among the active spice-derived components studied, allyl isothiocyanate, zingerone, and curcumin significantly inhibited the cellular production of proinflammatory mediators such as TNF-alpha and nitric oxide, and significantly inhibited the release of MCP-1 from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our findings suggest that the spice-derived components can suppress obesity-induced inflammatory responses by suppressing adipose tissue macrophage accumulation or activation and inhibiting MCP-1 release from adipocytes

  7. In vitro differentiation of human monocytes to macrophages: change of PDE profile and its relationship to suppression of tumour necrosis factorrelease by PDE inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantner, Florian; Kupferschmidt, Rochus; Schudt, Christian; Wendel, Albrecht; Hatzelmann, Armin

    1997-01-01

    During in vitro culture in 10% human AB serum, human peripheral blood monocytes acquire a macrophage-like phenotype. The underlying differentiation was characterized by increased activities of the macrophage marker enzymes unspecific esterase (NaF-insensitive form) and acid phosphatase, as well as by a down-regulation in surface CD14 expression. In parallel, a dramatic change in the phosphodiesterase (PDE) profile became evident within a few days that strongly resembled that previously described for human alveolar macrophages. Whereas PDE1 and PDE3 activities were augmented, PDE4 activity, which represented the major cyclic AMP-hydrolysing activity of peripheral blood monocytes, rapidly declined. Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages responded to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with the release of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). In line with the change in CD14 expression, the EC50 value of LPS for induction of TNF release increased from approximately 0.1 ng ml−1 in peripheral blood monocytes to about 2 ng ml−1 in macrophages. Both populations of cells were equally susceptible towards inhibition of TNF release by cyclic AMP elevating agents such as dibutyryl cyclic AMP, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or forskolin, which all led to a complete abrogation of TNF production in a concentration-dependent manner and which were more efficient than the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. In monocytes, PDE4 selective inhibitors (rolipram, RP73401) suppressed TNF formation by 80%, whereas motapizone, a PDE3 selective compound, exerted a comparatively weak effect (10–15% inhibition). Combined use of PDE3 plus PDE4 inhibitors resulted in an additive effect and fully abrogated LPS-induced TNF release as did the mixed PDE3/4 inhibitor tolafentrine. In monocyte-derived macrophages, neither PDE3- nor PDE4-selective drugs markedly affected TNF generation when used alone (<15% inhibition), whereas in combination, they led to a maximal inhibition of TNF formation by about 40–50

  8. Direct projection from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to hypophysiotrophic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus demonstrated...

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry......Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry...

  9. Inhibition of filiform corrosion on organic-coated AA2024-T3 by smart-release cation and anion-exchange pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, G.; McMurray, H.N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Filiform corrosion (FFC) inhibition by various smart-release pigments was evaluated by SKP. ► Rare earth cation-containing pigments were ineffective at halting FFC propagation. ► Metal oxo-anions and organic copper-specific agents were exchanged into hydrotalcite. ► Effective inhibition of FFC was demonstrated by anions which stopped copper re-plating. - Abstract: In-coating cation and anion exchange pigments are studied with respect to their ability to inhibit chloride-induced filiform corrosion (FFC) on organic-coated AA2024-T3 aluminium alloy substrates. In-situ scanning Kelvin probe potentiometry is used to quantify both underfilm potentials associated with populations of propagating corrosion filaments and the kinetics of coating disbondment. Smart-release bentonite pigments containing exchangeable cerium (III) and yttrium (III) cations are shown to be largely ineffective in reducing rates of FFC propagation. The reasons for this are discussed in terms of the chemistry of the electrolyte-filled corrosion filament head. In contrast, anion-exchange hydrotalcite (HT) based pigments are highly effective inhibitors of FFC. A comparison of the extent of FFC observed for various inorganic exchangeable anions is made with as-received HT comprising carbonate anions. Of the anions evaluated, exchangeable chromate unsurprisingly provides the highest FFC inhibition efficiency. It is also demonstrated that exchanging the native carbonate ions for certain organic species which act as complexing agents for copper ions, gives rise to an equivalent level of FFC inhibition. The implication of these findings with respect to the mechanism of FFC on copper containing aluminium alloys is considered.

  10. Potent inhibition of tumoral hypoxia-inducible factor 1α by albendazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourgholami, Mohammad H; Cai, Zhao Y; Badar, Samina; Wangoo, Kiran; Poruchynsky, Marianne S; Morris, David L

    2010-01-01

    Emerging reports suggest resistance, increased tumor invasiveness and metastasis arising from treatment with drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It is believed that increased tumoral hypoxia plays a prominent role in the development of these phenomena. Inhibition of tumoral hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) is thus becoming an increasingly attractive therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer. We hypothesized that the anti-VEGF effect of albendazole (ABZ) could be mediated through inhibition of tumoral HIF-1α. In vitro, the effects of ABZ on HIF-1α levels in human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3) were investigated using hypoxic chamber or desferrioxamine (DFO) induced-hypoxia. In vivo, the effects of ABZ (150 mg/kg, i.p., single dose) on the tumor levels of HIF-1α and VEGF protein and mRNA were investigated by western blotting, RT-PCR and real time-PCR. In vitro, ABZ inhibited cellular HIF-1α protein accumulation resulting from placement of cells under hypoxic chamber or exposure to DFO. In vivo, tumors excised from vehicle treated mice showed high levels of both HIF-1α and VEGF. Whereas, tumoral HIF-1α and VEGF protein levels were highly suppressed in ABZ treated mice. Tumoral VEGFmRNA (but not HIF-1αmRNA) was also found to be highly suppressed by ABZ. These results demonstrate for the first time the effects of an acute dose of ABZ in profoundly suppressing both HIF-1α and VEGF within the tumor. This dual inhibition may provide additional value in inhibiting angiogenesis and be at least partially effective in inhibiting tumoral HIF-1α surge, tumor invasiveness and metastasis

  11. Slow and sustained nitric oxide releasing compounds inhibit multipotent vascular stem cell proliferation and differentiation without causing cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Brandon M.; Leix, Kyle Alexander [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Ji, Yajing [Department of Biomedical Science and Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot [Department of Biology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Ash, David E. [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Mohanty, Dillip K., E-mail: Mohan1dk@cmich.edu [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) proliferate and differentiate. • Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of MVSCs. • Nitric oxide inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs). • Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) neither de-differentiate nor proliferate. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cerebral and myocardial infarction. It is believed that neointimal growth common in the later stages of atherosclerosis is a result of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) de-differentiation in response to endothelial injury. However, the claims of the SMC de-differentiation theory have not been substantiated by monitoring the fate of mature SMCs in response to such injuries. A recent study suggests that atherosclerosis is a consequence of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) differentiation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known mediator against atherosclerosis, in part because of its inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation. Using three different NO-donors, we have investigated the effects of NO on MVSC proliferation. Results indicate that NO inhibits MVSC proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. A slow and sustained delivery of NO proved to inhibit proliferation without causing cell death. On the other hand, larger, single-burst NO concentrations, inhibits proliferation, with concurrent significant cell death. Furthermore, our results indicate that endogenously produced NO inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) and subsequently to SMC as well.

  12. Slow and sustained nitric oxide releasing compounds inhibit multipotent vascular stem cell proliferation and differentiation without causing cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Brandon M.; Leix, Kyle Alexander; Ji, Yajing; Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot; Ash, David E.; Mohanty, Dillip K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) proliferate and differentiate. • Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of MVSCs. • Nitric oxide inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs). • Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) neither de-differentiate nor proliferate. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cerebral and myocardial infarction. It is believed that neointimal growth common in the later stages of atherosclerosis is a result of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) de-differentiation in response to endothelial injury. However, the claims of the SMC de-differentiation theory have not been substantiated by monitoring the fate of mature SMCs in response to such injuries. A recent study suggests that atherosclerosis is a consequence of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) differentiation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known mediator against atherosclerosis, in part because of its inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation. Using three different NO-donors, we have investigated the effects of NO on MVSC proliferation. Results indicate that NO inhibits MVSC proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. A slow and sustained delivery of NO proved to inhibit proliferation without causing cell death. On the other hand, larger, single-burst NO concentrations, inhibits proliferation, with concurrent significant cell death. Furthermore, our results indicate that endogenously produced NO inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) and subsequently to SMC as well

  13. Sexual Inhibition is a Vulnerability Factor for Orgasm Problems in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Inês M; Laan, Ellen T M; Nobre, Pedro J

    2018-03-01

    The differential role of psychological traits in the etiology and maintenance of female orgasm difficulties is yet to be consistently established. To investigate the contribution of different psychological trait features (personality, sexual inhibition and excitation, and sexual beliefs) to predict female orgasm and to assess the degree to which these dispositional factors moderate the association between sexual activity and orgasm occurrence in a large community sample of Portuguese women. 1,002 women (18-72 years, mean age = 26.27, SD = 8.74) completed questionnaires assessing personality traits (NEO-Five Factor Inventory), sexual inhibition and sexual excitation (Sexual Inhibition/Sexual Excitation Scales-Short Form [SIS/SES]), sexual beliefs (Sexual Dysfunctional Beliefs Questionnaire), sexual behavior (frequency of sexual activities and frequency of orgasm occurrence), and social desirability (Socially Desirable Response Set). Hierarchical multiple regression and moderation analyses were conducted while controlling for the effect of covariates such as social desirability, sociodemographic and medical characteristics, and relationship factors. The main outcome measurement was orgasm frequency as predicted and moderated by personality, SIS/SES dimensions, and sexual beliefs. Results of the hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated a significant predictive role for sexual inhibition (associated with fear of performance failure [SIS1] and related to the threat of performance consequences) and body image beliefs in female orgasm occurrence. The significant predictive effect of extraversion and of sexual excitation on orgasm frequency ceased to be significant with the insertion of all trait predictors in the final model. Furthermore, SIS1 significantly moderated the relation between sexual activity and orgasm occurrence. Attention should be given to individual factors impairing orgasmic response in women, particularly sexual inhibition processes. The

  14. Piracetam ameliorated oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced injury in rat cortical neurons via inhibition of oxidative stress, excitatory amino acids release and P53/Bax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi; Hu, Min; Zha, Yun-hong; Li, Zi-cheng; Zhao, Bo; Yu, Ling-ling; Yu, Min; Qian, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that piracetam inhibited the decrease in amino acid content induced by chronic hypoperfusion, ameliorated the dysfunction of learning and memory in a hypoperfusion rat model, down-regulated P53, and BAX protein, facilitated the synaptic plasticity, and may be helpful in the treatment of vascular dementia. To explore the precise mechanism, the present study further evaluated effects of piracetam on Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal damage in rat primary cortical cells. The addition of piracetam to the cultured cells 12 h before OGD for 4 h significantly reduced neuronal damage as determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and lactate dehydrogenase release experiments. Piracetam also lowered the levels of malondialdehyde, nitrogen monoxidum, and xanthine oxidase which was increased in the OGD cells, and enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, which were decreased in the OGD cells. We also demonstrated that piracetam could decrease glutamate and aspartate release when cortical cells were subjected to OGD. Furthermore, Western blot study demonstrated that piracetam attenuated the increased expression of P53 and BAX protein in OGD cells. These observations demonstrated that piracetam reduced OGD-induced neuronal damage by inhibiting the oxidative stress and decreasing excitatory amino acids release and lowering P53/Bax protein expression in OGD cells.

  15. Inhibition of clone formation as an assay for T cell-mediated cytotoxicity: short-term kinetics and comparison with 51Cr release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lees, R.K.; MacDonald, H.R.; Sinclair, N.R.; University of Western Ontario London

    1977-01-01

    The short-term kinetics of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was investigated using a cloning inhibition assay. Murine cytotoxic thymus-derived lymphocytes generated in vitro in mixed leukocyte cultures were incubated for various periods of time at 37degC with allogeneic mastocytoma target cells. The mixtures were then plated in soft agar, and mastocytoma clone formation was assessed after 5-7 days incubation. Using this technique, it was demonstrated that events leading to the loss of cloning ability could be detected after 1-3 min incubation at 37degC, and after 20-30 min, 95% of the clone forming cells had been inactivated. When these results were compared directly with those obtained using the conventional 51 Cr-release assay, it was found that the events leading to loss of cloning ability occurred more rapidly than indicated by the isotope assay. However, a modification of the 51 Cr-release assay involving EDTA addition gave comparable result to the cloning inhibition assay. These results raise the possibility that the events leading to 51 Cr-release of tumor target cells may be related in time to those leading to the loss of cloning ability

  16. The M358R variant of α{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor inhibits coagulation factor VIIa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, William P., E-mail: sheffiel@mcmaster.ca [Canadian Blood Services, Centre for Innovation, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Bhakta, Varsha [Canadian Blood Services, Centre for Innovation, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-02-12

    The naturally occurring M358R mutation of the plasma serpin α{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor (API) changes both its cleavable reactive centre bond to Arg–Ser and the efficacy with which it inhibits different proteases, reducing the rate of inhibition of neutrophil elastase, and enhancing that of thrombin, factor XIa, and kallikrein, by several orders of magnitude. Although another plasma serpin with an Arg–Ser reactive centre, antithrombin (AT), has been shown to inhibit factor VIIa (FVIIa), no published data are available with respect to FVIIa inhibition by API M358R. Recombinant bacterially-expressed API M358R and plasma-derived AT were therefore compared using gel-based and kinetic assays of FVIIa integrity and activity. Under pseudo-first order conditions of excess serpin over protease, both AT and API M358R formed denaturation-resistant inhibitory complexes with FVIIa in reactions accelerated by TF; AT, but not API M358R, also required heparin for maximal activity. The second order rate constant for heparin-independent API M358R-mediated FVIIa inhibition was determined to be 7.8 ± 0.8 × 10{sup 2} M{sup −1}sec{sup −1}. We conclude that API M358R inhibits FVIIa by forming inhibitory complexes of the serpin type more rapidly than AT in the absence of heparin. The likely 20-fold excess of API M358R over AT in patient plasma during inflammation raises the possibility that it could contribute to the hemorrhagic tendencies manifested by rare individuals expressing this mutant serpin. - Highlights: • The inhibitory specificity of the serpin alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is sharply altered in the M358R variant. • API M358R forms denaturation-resistant complexes with coagulation factor VIIa at a rate accelerated by tissue factor but unaffected by heparin. • Complex formation was shown by gel-based assays and quantified kinetically by inhibition of FVIIa-dependent amidolysis.

  17. The M358R variant of α_1-proteinase inhibitor inhibits coagulation factor VIIa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, William P.; Bhakta, Varsha

    2016-01-01

    The naturally occurring M358R mutation of the plasma serpin α_1-proteinase inhibitor (API) changes both its cleavable reactive centre bond to Arg–Ser and the efficacy with which it inhibits different proteases, reducing the rate of inhibition of neutrophil elastase, and enhancing that of thrombin, factor XIa, and kallikrein, by several orders of magnitude. Although another plasma serpin with an Arg–Ser reactive centre, antithrombin (AT), has been shown to inhibit factor VIIa (FVIIa), no published data are available with respect to FVIIa inhibition by API M358R. Recombinant bacterially-expressed API M358R and plasma-derived AT were therefore compared using gel-based and kinetic assays of FVIIa integrity and activity. Under pseudo-first order conditions of excess serpin over protease, both AT and API M358R formed denaturation-resistant inhibitory complexes with FVIIa in reactions accelerated by TF; AT, but not API M358R, also required heparin for maximal activity. The second order rate constant for heparin-independent API M358R-mediated FVIIa inhibition was determined to be 7.8 ± 0.8 × 10"2 M"−"1sec"−"1. We conclude that API M358R inhibits FVIIa by forming inhibitory complexes of the serpin type more rapidly than AT in the absence of heparin. The likely 20-fold excess of API M358R over AT in patient plasma during inflammation raises the possibility that it could contribute to the hemorrhagic tendencies manifested by rare individuals expressing this mutant serpin. - Highlights: • The inhibitory specificity of the serpin alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is sharply altered in the M358R variant. • API M358R forms denaturation-resistant complexes with coagulation factor VIIa at a rate accelerated by tissue factor but unaffected by heparin. • Complex formation was shown by gel-based assays and quantified kinetically by inhibition of FVIIa-dependent amidolysis.

  18. Ginsenoside Rb1 Attenuates Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Apoptosis in SH-SY5Y Cells via Protection of Mitochondria and Inhibition of AIF and Cytochrome c Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Ge

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of mitochondria in the protective effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on cellular apoptosis caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation, in this study, MTT assay, TUNEL staining, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and western blotting were used to examine the cellular viability, apoptosis, ROS level, mitochondrial membrane potential, and the distribution of apoptosis inducing factor, cytochrome c, Bax and Bcl-2 in nucleus, mitochondria and cytoplasm. We found that pretreatment with GRb1 improved the cellular viability damaged by OGD. Moreover, GRb1 inhibited apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells induced by OGD. Further studies showed that the elevation of cellular reactive oxygen species levels and the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential caused by OGD were both counteracted by GRb1. Additionally, GRb1 not only suppressed the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor into nucleus and cytochrome c into cytoplasm, but also inhibited the increase of Bax within mitochondria and alleviated the decrease of mitochondrial Bcl-2. Our study indicates that the protection of GRb1 on OGD-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells is associated with its protection on mitochondrial function and inhibition of release of AIF and cytochrome c.

  19. Role of pigment epithelium-derived factor in the involution of hemangioma: Autocrine growth inhibition of hemangioma-derived endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Jin [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Science, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jang-Hyuk; Heo, Jong-Ik [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Hui [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Hye Sook [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Tae Hyun, E-mail: psthchoi@snu.ac.kr [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Seoul National University Children’s Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pediatric Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Seoul National University Children’s Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chung-Hyun, E-mail: iamhyun@snu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Science, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Ischemic/Hypoxic Disease Institute, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-14

    Highlights: • PEDF was expressed and induced during the involuting phase of IH. • PEDF inhibited the cell growth of the involuting HemECs in an autocrine manner. • PEDF suppression restored the impaired cell growth of the involuting HemECs. - Abstract: Hemangioma is a benign tumor derived from abnormal blood vessel growth. Unlike other vascular tumor counterparts, a hemangioma is known to proliferate during its early stage but it is followed by a stage of involution where regression of the tumor occurs. The critical onset leading to the involution of hemangioma is currently not well understood. This study focused on the molecular identities of the involution of hemangioma. We demonstrated that a soluble factor released from the involuting phase of hemangioma-derived endothelial cells (HemECs) and identified pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) as an anti-angiogenic factor that was associated with the growth inhibition of the involuting HemECs. The growth inhibition of the involuting HemECs was reversed by suppression of PEDF in the involuting HemECs. Furthermore, we found that PEDF was more up-regulated in the involuting phase of hemangioma tissues than in the proliferating or the involuted. Taken together, we propose that PEDF accelerates the involution of hemangioma by growth inhibition of HemECs in an autocrine manner. The regulatory mechanism of PEDF expression could be a potential therapeutic target to treat hemangiomas.

  20. Curcumin longa extract-loaded nanoemulsion improves the survival of endotoxemic mice by inhibiting nitric oxide-dependent HMGB1 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Min Young; Hwang, Jung Seok; Lee, Su Bi; Ham, Sun Ah; Hur, Jinwoo; Kim, Jun Tae; Seo, Han Geuk

    2017-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a well-known damage-related alarmin that participates in cellular inflammatory responses. However, the mechanisms leading to HMGB1 release in inflammatory conditions and the therapeutic agents that could prevent it remain poorly understood. This study attempted to examine whether the Curcumin longa herb, which is known to have anti-inflammatory property, can modulate cellular inflammatory responses by regulating HMGB1 release. The murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or a C. longa extract-loaded nanoemulsion (CLEN). The levels of released HMGB1, nitric oxide (NO) production, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression, and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases were analyzed in RAW264.7 macrophages. The effects of CLEN on survival of endotoxemic model mice, circulating HMGB1 levels, and tissue iNOS expression were also evaluated. We have shown that a nanoemulsion loaded with an extract from the C. longa rhizome regulates cellular inflammatory responses and LPS-induced systemic inflammation by suppressing the release of HMGB1 by macrophages. First, treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages with the nanoemulsion significantly attenuated their LPS-induced release of HMGB1: this effect was mediated by inhibiting c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, which in turn suppressed the NO production and iNOS expression of the cells. The nanoemulsion did not affect LPS-induced p38 or extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Second, intraperitoneal administration of the nanoemulsion improved the survival rate of LPS-injected endotoxemic mice. This associated with marked reductions in circulating HMGB1 levels and tissue iNOS expression. The present study shows for the first time the mechanism by which C. longa ameliorates sepsis, namely, by suppressing NO signaling and thereby inhibiting the release of the proinflammatory cytokine HMGB1. These observations suggest that identification of

  1. Curcumin longa extract-loaded nanoemulsion improves the survival of endotoxemic mice by inhibiting nitric oxide-dependent HMGB1 release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Young Ahn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 is a well-known damage-related alarmin that participates in cellular inflammatory responses. However, the mechanisms leading to HMGB1 release in inflammatory conditions and the therapeutic agents that could prevent it remain poorly understood. This study attempted to examine whether the Curcumin longa herb, which is known to have anti-inflammatory property, can modulate cellular inflammatory responses by regulating HMGB1 release. Methods The murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and/or a C. longa extract-loaded nanoemulsion (CLEN. The levels of released HMGB1, nitric oxide (NO production, inducible NO synthase (iNOS expression, and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases were analyzed in RAW264.7 macrophages. The effects of CLEN on survival of endotoxemic model mice, circulating HMGB1 levels, and tissue iNOS expression were also evaluated. Results We have shown that a nanoemulsion loaded with an extract from the C. longa rhizome regulates cellular inflammatory responses and LPS-induced systemic inflammation by suppressing the release of HMGB1 by macrophages. First, treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages with the nanoemulsion significantly attenuated their LPS-induced release of HMGB1: this effect was mediated by inhibiting c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, which in turn suppressed the NO production and iNOS expression of the cells. The nanoemulsion did not affect LPS-induced p38 or extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Second, intraperitoneal administration of the nanoemulsion improved the survival rate of LPS-injected endotoxemic mice. This associated with marked reductions in circulating HMGB1 levels and tissue iNOS expression. Discussion The present study shows for the first time the mechanism by which C. longa ameliorates sepsis, namely, by suppressing NO signaling and thereby inhibiting the release of the proinflammatory cytokine HMGB1

  2. Histamine H3 receptor activation selectively inhibits dopamine D1 receptor-dependent [3H]GABA release from depolarization-stimulated slices of rat substantia nigra pars reticulata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aceves, J.; Young, J.M.; Arias-Montano, J.A.; Floran, B.; Garcia, M.

    1997-01-01

    The release of [ 3 H]GABA from slices of rat substantia nigra pars reticulata induced by increasing extracellular K + from 6 to 15 mM in the presence of 10 μM sulpiride was inhibited by 73±3% by 1 μM SCH 23390, consistent with a large component of release dependent upon D 1 receptor activation. The histamine H 3 receptor-selective agonist immepip (1 μM) and the non-selective agonist histamine (100 μM) inhibited [ 3 H]GABA release by 78±2 and 80±2%, respectively. The inhibition by both agonists was reversed by the H 3 receptor antagonist thioperamide (1 μM). However, in the presence of 1 μM SCH 23390 depolarization-induced release of [ 3 H]GABA was not significantly decreased by 1 μM immepip. In rats depleted of dopamine by pretreatment with reserpine, immepip no longer inhibited control release of [ 3 H]GABA, but in the presence of 1 μM SKF 38393, which produced a 7±1-fold stimulation of release, immepip reduced the release to a level not statistically different from that in the presence of immepip alone. Immepip (1 μM) also inhibited the depolarization-induced release of [ 3 H]dopamine from substantia nigra pars reticulata slices, by 38±3%.The evidence is consistent with the proposition that activation of histamine H 3 receptors leads to the selective inhibition of the component of depolarization-induced [ 3 H]GABA release in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices which is dependent upon D 1 receptor activation. This appears to be largely an action at the terminals of the striatonigral GABA projection neurons, which may be enhanced by a partial inhibition of dendritic [ 3 H]dopamine release. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyuan Bai

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB. However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy.

  4. Substance P enhances tissue factor release from granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via the p22phox/β-arrestin 2/Rho A signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces procoagulant activity of macrophages. Tissue factor (TF) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein and substance P (SP) is a pro-inflammatory neuropeptide involved in the formation of membrane blebs. This study investigated the role of SP in TF release by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. SP significantly decreased TF levels in whole-cell lysates of GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. TF was detected in the culture supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after stimulation of macrophages by SP. Aprepitant (an SP/neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist) reduced TF release from macrophages stimulated with SP. Pretreatment of macrophages with a radical scavenger(pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) also limited the decrease of TF in whole-cell lysates after stimulation with SP. A protein kinase C inhibitor (rottlerin) partially blocked this macrophage response to SP, while it was significantly inhibited by a ROCK inhibitor (Y-27632) or a dynamin inhibitor (dinasore). An Akt inhibitor (perifosine) also partially blocked this response. Furthermore, siRNA targeting p22phox, β-arrestin 2, or Rho A, blunted the release of TF from macrophages stimulated with SP. In other experiments, visceral adipocytes derived from cryopreserved preadipocytes were found to produce SP. In conclusion, SP enhances the release of TF from macrophages via the p22phox/β-arrestin 2/Rho A signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antagonism of corticotrophin-releasing factor receptors in the fourth ventricle modifies responses to mild but not restraint stress

    OpenAIRE

    Miragaya, Joanna R.; Harris, Ruth B. S.

    2008-01-01

    Repeated restraint stress (RRS; 3 h of restraint on 3 consecutive days) in rodents produces temporary hypophagia, but a long-term downregulation of body weight. The mild stress (MS) of an intraperitoneal injection of saline and housing in a novel room for 2 h also inhibits food intake and weight gain, but the effects are smaller than for RRS. Previous exposure to RRS exaggerates hypophagia, glucocorticoid release, and anxiety-type behavior caused by MS. Here we tested the involvement of brain...

  6. Factors facilitating and inhibiting value stream mapping processes at hospital units in three Nordic countries - a Nordic multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Jørgen; Birgisdóttir, Birna Dröfn; Dudas, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present observations that may indicate facilitating and inhibiting factors for the VSM process.......The aim of this paper is to present observations that may indicate facilitating and inhibiting factors for the VSM process....

  7. Applications of human factors engineering to LNG release prevention and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikiar, R.; Rankin, W.L.; Rideout, T.B.

    1982-06-01

    The results of an investigation of human factors engineering and human reliability applications to LNG release prevention and control are reported. The report includes a discussion of possible human error contributions to previous LNG accidents and incidents, and a discussion of generic HF considerations for peakshaving plants. More specific recommendations for improving HF practices at peakshaving plants are offered based on visits to six facilities. The HF aspects of the recently promulgated DOT regulations are reviewed, and recommendations are made concerning how these regulations can be implemented utilizing standard HF practices. Finally, the integration of HF considerations into overall system safety is illustrated by a presentation of human error probabilities applicable to LNG operations and by an expanded fault tree analysis which explicitly recognizes man-machine interfaces.

  8. Application of insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin release test in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dong; Ma Yongxiu; Duan Wenruo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin release test (IRT) in understanding the extent of damage to ability of reducing blood sugar in different types of diabetes mellitus (DM) and in selection of treatment plan and adjustment of using drugs. OGTT, IRT and determination of IGF-I level of 67 normal subjects and 217 DM patients were performed. The result was analyzed comparatively. The level of IGF-I was negatively correlated with the level of fasting blood sugar, and positively correlated with the level of fasting insulin. Our conclusions are: There are two ways of reducing blood sugar: one is by insulin, and the other is by IGF-I. IRT can reflect the former better, and IGF-I the latter. The combination of these two is of significant value in diagnosis and treatment of DM

  9. Corticotropin-releasing factor peptide antagonists: design, characterization and potential clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivier, Jean E; Rivier, Catherine L

    2014-04-01

    Elusive for more than half a century, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) was finally isolated and characterized in 1981 from ovine hypothalami and shortly thereafter, from rat brains. Thirty years later, much has been learned about the function and localization of CRF and related family members (Urocortins 1, 2 and 3) and their 2 receptors, CRF receptor type 1 (CRFR1) and CRF receptor type 2 (CRFR2). Here, we report the stepwise development of peptide CRF agonists and antagonists, which led to the CRFR1 agonist Stressin1; the long-acting antagonists Astressin2-B which is specific for CRFR2; and Astressin B, which binds to both CRFR1 and CRFR2.This analog has potential for the treatment of CRF-dependent diseases in the periphery, such as irritable bowel syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) Neurocircuitry and Neuropharmacology in Alcohol Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Allyson L; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2018-01-28

    Alcohol use is pervasive in the United States. In the transition from nonhazardous drinking to hazardous drinking and alcohol use disorder, neuroadaptations occur within brain reward and brain stress systems. One brain signaling system that has received much attention in animal models of excessive alcohol drinking and alcohol dependence is corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). The CRF system is composed of CRF, the urocortins, CRF-binding protein, and two receptors - CRF type 1 and CRF type 2. This review summarizes how acute, binge, and chronic alcohol dysregulates CRF signaling in hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic brain regions and how this dysregulation may contribute to changes in alcohol reinforcement, excessive alcohol consumption, symptoms of negative affect during withdrawal, and alcohol relapse. In addition, it summarizes clinical work examining CRF type 1 receptor antagonists in humans and discusses why the brain CRF system is still relevant in alcohol research.

  11. SERINC as a Restriction Factor to Inhibit Viral Infectivity and the Interaction with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracia Viviana Gonzalez-Enriquez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The serine incorporator 5 (SERINC5 is a recently discovered restriction factor that inhibits viral infectivity by preventing fusion. Retroviruses have developed strategies to counteract the action of SERINC5, such as the expression of proteins like negative regulatory factor (Nef, S2, and glycosylated Gag (glycoGag. These accessory proteins downregulate SERINC5 from the plasma membrane for subsequent degradation in the lysosomes. The observed variability in the action of SERINC5 suggests the participation of other elements like the envelope glycoprotein (Env that modulates susceptibility of the virus towards SERINC5. The exact mechanism by which SERINC5 inhibits viral fusion has not yet been determined, although it has been proposed that it increases the sensitivity of the Env by exposing regions which are recognized by neutralizing antibodies. More studies are needed to understand the role of SERINC5 and to assess its utility as a therapeutic strategy.

  12. Expression and hypophysiotropic actions of corticotropin-releasing factor in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorse, Graham C; Denver, Robert J

    2004-07-01

    Members of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family of peptides play pivotal roles in the regulation of neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to physical and emotional stress. In amphibian tadpoles, CRF-like peptides stimulate both thyroid and interrenal (adrenal) hormone secretion, and can thereby modulate the rate of metamorphosis. To better understand the regulation of expression and actions of CRF in amphibians we developed a homologous radioimmunoassay (RIA) for Xenopus laevis CRF (xCRF). We validated this RIA and tissue extraction procedure for the measurement of brain CRF content in tadpoles and juveniles. We show that the CRF-binding protein, which is highly expressed in X. laevis brain, is largely removed by acid extraction and does not interfere in the RIA. We analyzed CRF peptide content in five microdissected brain regions in prometamorphic tadpoles and juveniles. CRF was detected throughout the brain, consistent with its role as both a hypophysiotropin and a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator. CRF content was highest in the region of the preoptic area (POa) and increased in all brain regions after metamorphosis. Exposure to 4h of handling/shaking stress resulted in increased CRF peptide content in the POa in juvenile frogs. Injections of xCRF into prometamorphic tadpoles increased whole body corticosterone and thyroxine content, thus supporting findings in other anuran species that this peptide functions as both a corticotropin- and a thyrotropin (TSH)-releasing factor. Furthermore, treatment of cultured tadpole pituitaries with xCRF (100nM for 24h) resulted in increased medium content, but decreased pituitary content of TSHbeta-immunoreactivity. Our results support the view that CRF functions as a stress neuropeptide in X. laevis as in other vertebrates. Furthermore, we provide evidence for a dual hypophysiotropic action of CRF on the thyroid and interrenal axes in X. laevis as has been shown previously in other amphibian species.

  13. Experiment calculated ascertainment of factors affecting the energy release in IGR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurpesheva, A.M.; Zhotabayev, Zh.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: At present energy supply resources problem is important. Nuclear reactors can, of course, solve this problem, but at the same time there is another issue, concerning safety exploitation of nuclear reactors. That is why, for the last seven years, such experiments as 'Investigation of the processes, conducting severe accidents with core melting' are being carried out at our IGR (impulse graphite reactor) reactor. Leaving out other difficulties of such experiments, it is necessary to notice, that such experiments require more accurate IGR core energy release calculations. The final aim of the present research is verification and correction of the existing method or creation of new method of IGR core energy release calculation. IGR reactor is unique and there is no the same reactor in the world. Therefore, application of the other research reactor methods here is quite useful. This work is based on evaluation of factors affecting core energy release (physical weight of experimental device, different configuration of reactor core, i.e. location of absorbers, initial temperature of core, etc), as well as interference of absorbers group. As it is known, energy release is a value of integral reactor power. During experiments with rays, Reactor power depends on currents of ion production chambers (IPC), located round the core. It is worth to notice that each ion production chamber (IPC) in the same start-up has its own ratio coefficient between IPC current and reactor present power. This task is complicated due to 'IPC current - reactor power' ratio coefficients, that change continuously, probably, because of new loading of experimental facility and different position of control rods. That is why, in order to try about reactor power, before every start-up, we have to re-determine the 'IPC current - reactor power' ratio coefficients for each ion production chamber (IPC). Therefore, the present work will investigate the behavior of ratio coefficient within the

  14. Stress, sex, and addiction: potential roles of corticotropin-releasing factor, oxytocin, and arginine-vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisagno, Verónica; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2014-09-01

    Stress sensitivity and sex are predictive factors for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. Life stresses are not only risk factors for the development of addiction but also are triggers for relapse to drug use. Therefore, it is imperative to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between stress and drug abuse, as an understanding of this may help in the development of novel and more effective therapeutic approaches to block the clinical manifestations of drug addiction. The development and clinical course of addiction-related disorders do appear to involve neuroadaptations within neurocircuitries that modulate stress responses and are influenced by several neuropeptides. These include corticotropin-releasing factor, the prototypic member of this class, as well as oxytocin and arginine-vasopressin that play important roles in affiliative behaviors. Interestingly, these peptides function to balance emotional behavior, with sexual dimorphism in the oxytocin/arginine-vasopressin systems, a fact that might play an important role in the differential responses of women and men to stressful stimuli and the specific sex-based prevalence of certain addictive disorders. Thus, this review aims to summarize (i) the contribution of sex differences to the function of dopamine systems, and (ii) the behavioral, neurochemical, and anatomical changes in brain stress systems.

  15. Administration of caffeine inhibited adenosine receptor agonist-induced decreases in motor performance, thermoregulation, and brain neurotransmitter release in exercising rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinyan; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of an adenosine receptor agonist on caffeine-induced changes in thermoregulation, neurotransmitter release in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, and endurance exercise performance in rats. One hour before the start of exercise, rats were intraperitoneally injected with either saline alone (SAL), 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine and saline (CAF), a non-selective adenosine receptor agonist (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine [NECA]: 0.5 mg kg(-1)) and saline (NECA), or the combination of caffeine and NECA (CAF+NECA). Rats ran until fatigue on the treadmill with a 5% grade at a speed of 18 m min(-1) at 23 °C. Compared to the SAL group, the run time to fatigue (RTTF) was significantly increased by 52% following caffeine administration and significantly decreased by 65% following NECA injection (SAL: 91 ± 14.1 min; CAF: 137 ± 25.8 min; NECA: 31 ± 13.7 min; CAF+NECA: 85 ± 11.8 min; pcaffeine injection inhibited the NECA-induced decreases in the RTTF, Tcore, heat production, heat loss, and extracellular DA release. Neither caffeine nor NECA affected extracellular noradrenaline or serotonin release. These results support the findings of previous studies showing improved endurance performance and overrides in body limitations after caffeine administration, and imply that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may be associated with the adenosine receptor blockade-induced increases in brain DA release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Limonene inhibits methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity via regulation of 5-HT neuronal function and dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jaesuk

    2014-05-15

    Methamphetamine is a psychomotor stimulant that produces hyperlocomotion in rodents. Limonene (a cyclic terpene from citrus essential oils) has been reported to induce sedative effects. In this study, we demonstrated that limonene administration significantly inhibited serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)-induced head twitch response in mice. In rats, pretreatment with limonene decreased hyperlocomotion induced by methamphetamine injection. In addition, limonene reversed the increase in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens of rats given methamphetamine. These results suggest that limonene may inhibit stimulant-induced behavioral changes via regulating dopamine levels and 5-HT receptor function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Low-Concentration Tributyltin Decreases GluR2 Expression via Nuclear Respiratory Factor-1 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Keishi; Aoki, Kaori; Takishita, Tomoko; Miyara, Masatsugu; Sakamoto, Shuichiro; Sanoh, Seigo; Kimura, Tomoki; Kanda, Yasunari; Ohta, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro

    2017-08-11

    Tributyltin (TBT), which has been widely used as an antifouling agent in paints, is a common environmental pollutant. Although the toxicity of high-dose TBT has been extensively reported, the effects of low concentrations of TBT are relatively less well studied. We have previously reported that low-concentration TBT decreases α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptor subunit 2 ( GluR2 ) expression in cortical neurons and enhances neuronal vulnerability to glutamate. However, the mechanism of this TBT-induced GluR2 decrease remains unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of TBT on the activity of transcription factors that control GluR2 expression. Exposure of primary cortical neurons to 20 nM TBT for 3 h to 9 days resulted in a decrease in GluR2 mRNA expression. Moreover, TBT inhibited the DNA binding activity of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), a transcription factor that positively regulates the GluR2 . This result indicates that TBT inhibits the activity of NRF-1 and subsequently decreases GluR2 expression. In addition, 20 nM TBT decreased the expression of genes such as cytochrome c, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) 4, and COX 6c, which are downstream of NRF-1. Our results suggest that NRF-1 inhibition is an important molecular action of the neurotoxicity induced by low-concentration TBT.

  18. Low-Concentration Tributyltin Decreases GluR2 Expression via Nuclear Respiratory Factor-1 Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Keishi; Aoki, Kaori; Takishita, Tomoko; Miyara, Masatsugu; Sakamoto, Shuichiro; Sanoh, Seigo; Kimura, Tomoki; Kanda, Yasunari; Ohta, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro

    2017-01-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), which has been widely used as an antifouling agent in paints, is a common environmental pollutant. Although the toxicity of high-dose TBT has been extensively reported, the effects of low concentrations of TBT are relatively less well studied. We have previously reported that low-concentration TBT decreases α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptor subunit 2 (GluR2) expression in cortical neurons and enhances neuronal vulnerability to glutamate. However, the mechanism of this TBT-induced GluR2 decrease remains unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of TBT on the activity of transcription factors that control GluR2 expression. Exposure of primary cortical neurons to 20 nM TBT for 3 h to 9 days resulted in a decrease in GluR2 mRNA expression. Moreover, TBT inhibited the DNA binding activity of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), a transcription factor that positively regulates the GluR2. This result indicates that TBT inhibits the activity of NRF-1 and subsequently decreases GluR2 expression. In addition, 20 nM TBT decreased the expression of genes such as cytochrome c, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) 4, and COX 6c, which are downstream of NRF-1. Our results suggest that NRF-1 inhibition is an important molecular action of the neurotoxicity induced by low-concentration TBT. PMID:28800112

  19. The distressed (Type D) personality factor of social inhibition, but not negative affectivity, enhances eyeblink conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M T; Handy, J D; Blankenship, M R; Servatius, R J

    2018-06-01

    Recent work has focused on a learning diathesis model in which specific personality factors such as behavioral inhibition (BI) may influence associative learning and in turn increase risk for the development of anxiety disorders. We have found in a series of studies that individuals self-reporting high levels of BI exhibit enhanced acquisition of conditioned eyeblinks. In the study reported here, hypotheses were extended to include distressed (Type D) personality which has been found to be related to BI. Type D personality is measured with the DS-14 scale which includes two subscales measuring negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI). We hypothesized that SI, which is similar to BI, would result in enhanced acquisition while the effect of NA is unclear. Eighty nine participants completed personality inventories including the Adult Measure of Behavioral Inhibition (AMBI) and DS-14. All participants received 60 acquisition trials with a 500 ms, 1000 Hz, tone CS and a co-terminating 50 ms, 5 psi corneal airpuff US. Participants received either 100% CS-US paired trials or a schedule of partial reinforcement where 50% US alone trials were intermixed into CS-US training. Acquisition of CRs did not differ between the two training protocols. Whereas BI was significantly related to Type D, SI, and NA, only BI and SI individuals exhibited enhanced acquisition of conditioned eyeblinks as compared to non-inhibited individuals. Personality factors now including social inhibition can be used to identify individuals who express enhanced associative learning which lends further support to a learning diathesis model of anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chondroitin Sulfate Inhibits Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 Release From 3T3-L1 Adipocytes: A New Treatment Opportunity for Obesity-Related Inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas V Stabler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 overproduction from inflamed adipose tissue is a major contributor to obesity-related metabolic syndromes. 3T3-L1 embryonic fibroblasts were cultured and differentiated into adipocytes using an established protocol. Adipocytes were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS to induce inflammation and thus MCP-1 release. At the same time, varying concentrations of chondroitin sulfate (CS were added in a physiologically relevant range (10-200 µg/mL to determine its impact on MCP-1 release. Chondroitin sulfate, a natural glycosaminoglycan of connective tissue including the cartilage extracellular matrix, was chosen on the basis of our previous studies demonstrating its anti-inflammatory effect on macrophages. Because the main action of MCP-1 is to induce monocyte migration, cultured THP-1 monocytes were used to test whether CS at the highest physiologically relevant concentration could inhibit cell migration induced by human recombinant MCP-1. Chondroitin sulfate (100-200 µg/mL inhibited MCP-1 release from inflamed adipocytes in a dose-dependent manner ( P  < .01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −5.89 to −3.858 at 100 µg/mL and P  < .001, 95% CI: −6.028 to −3.996 at 200 µg/mL but had no effect on MCP-1–driven chemotaxis of THP-1 monocytes. In summary, CS could be expected to reduce macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue by reduction in adipocyte expression and release of MCP-1 and as such might reduce adipose tissue inflammation in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli such as LPS, now increasingly recognized to be relevant in vivo.

  1. Factors influencing immediate post-release survival of spectacled eiders following surgical implantation of transmitters with percutaneous antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexson, Matthew G.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Spriggs, Maria; Myers, Gwen E.

    2014-01-01

    Surgically implanted transmitters are a common method for tracking animal movements. Immediately following surgical implantation, animals pass through a critical recovery phase when behaviors may deviate from normal and the likelihood of individual survival may be reduced. Therefore, data collected during this period may be censored to minimize bias introduced by surgery-related behaviors or mortality. However, immediate post-release mortalities negate a sampling effort and reduce the amount of data potentially collected after the censoring period. Wildlife biologists should employ methods to support an animal’s survival through this period, but factors contributing to immediate post-release survival have not been formally assessed. We evaluated factors that potentially influenced the immediate post-release survival of 56 spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri) marked with coelomically implanted satellite transmitters with percutaneous antennae in northern Alaska in 2010 and 2011. We modeled survival through the first 14 days following release and assessed the relative importance and effect of 15 covariates hypothesized to influence survival during this immediate post-release period. Estimated daily survival rate increased over the duration of the immediate post-release period; the probability of mortality was greatest within the first 5 days following release. Our top-ranking model included the effect of 2 blood analytes, pH and hematocrit, measured prior to surgical implantation of a transmitter. We found a positive response to pH; eiders exhibiting acidemia (low pH) prior to surgery were less likely to survive the immediate post-release period. We found a curvilinear response to hematocrit; eiders exhibiting extremely low or high pre-surgery hematocrit were also less likely to survive the immediate post-release period. In the interest of maximizing the survival of marked birds following release, hematological data obtained prior to surgical implantation of

  2. Dual growth factor delivery from biofunctionalized allografts: Sequential VEGF and BMP-2 release to stimulate allograft remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Farzana; McDermott, Casey; Lieberman, Jay; Sanjay, Archana; Khan, Yusuf

    2017-05-01

    Autografts have been shown to stimulate osteogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and angiogenesis, and subsequent rapid graft incorporation. Large structural allografts, however, suffer from limited new bone formation and remodeling, both of which are directly associated with clinical failure due to non-unions, late graft fractures, and infections, making it a priority to improve large structural allograft healing. We have previously shown the osteogenic ability of a polymer-coated allograft that delivers bone morphogenetic protein-2 both in vitro and in vivo through both burst release and sustained release kinetics. In this study, we have demonstrated largely sequential delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor from the same coated allograft. Release data showed that loading both growth factors onto a polymeric coating with two different techniques resulted in short-term (95% release within 2 weeks) and long-term (95% release within 5 weeks) delivery kinetics. We have also demonstrated how released VEGF, traditionally associated with angiogenesis, can also provide a stimulus for allograft remodeling via resorption. Bone marrow derived mononuclear cells were co-cultured with VEGF released from the coated allograft and showed a statistically significant (p exposed to VEGF released from the allografts over controls (p < 0.05). These results indicate that by using different loading protocols temporal control can be achieved when delivering multiple growth factors from a polymer-coated allograft. Further, released VEGF can also stimulate osteoclastogenesis that may enhance allograft incorporation, and thus mitigate long-term clinical complications. © 2017 Orthopedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1086-1095, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effect of bovine somatotropin (500 mg) administered at ten-day intervals on ovulatory responses, expression of estrus, and fertility in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, F; Narciso, C; Oliveira, R; Cerri, R L A; Correa-Calderón, A; Chebel, R C; Santos, J E P

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of administering 500 mg of recombinant bovine somatotropin (bST) every 10 d on ovulatory responses, estrous behavior, and fertility of lactating Holstein cows. Lactating dairy cows were assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: a control with no administration of bST (73 primiparous and 120 multiparous cows) or 6 consecutive administrations of 500 mg of bST (83 primiparous and 123 multiparous cows) given subcutaneously at 10-d intervals starting 61+/-3 d postpartum (study d 0), concurrent with the initiation of the timed artificial insemination (AI). Blood samples were collected thrice weekly from 61+/-3 to 124+/-3 d in milk (DIM), and plasma samples were analyzed for concentrations of estradiol, glucose, insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, and progesterone. The estrous cycle of cows was presynchronized with 2 injections of PGF(2alpha) at 37+/-3 and 51+/-3 DIM, and the Ovsynch timed AI protocol was initiated at 61+/-3 DIM. Ovaries were scanned to determine ovulatory responses during the Ovsynch protocol. Pregnancy was diagnosed at 33 and 66 d after AI. Body condition was scored on study d 0, 10, 42, and 76. Sixty-four cows were fitted with a pressure mounting sensor with radiotelemetric transmitters to monitor estrous behavior. Treatment of lactating dairy cows with 500 mg of bST at 10-d intervals increased yields of milk and milk components in the first 2 mo after treatment. Body condition of bST-treated cows remained unaltered, whereas control cows gained BCS. Treatment with bST increased concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 chronically, but concentrations of insulin and glucose increased only transiently in the first 7 d after the first injection of bST. Concentrations of progesterone during and after the Ovsynch protocol remained unaltered after treatment with bST; likewise, ovulatory responses during the Ovsynch protocol were mostly unaltered by treatment. Concentration of estradiol tended to be

  4. Quantitative PET Imaging of Tissue Factor Expression Using 18F-labled Active Site Inhibited Factor VII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten H; Erlandsson, Maria; Jeppesen, Troels E

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is up regulated in many solid tumors and its expression is linked to tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis and prognosis. A non-invasive assessment of tumor TF expression status is therefore of obvious clinical relevance. Factor VII (FVII) is the natural ligand to TF. Here we...... report the development of a new PET tracer for specific imaging of TF using an (18)F-labeled derivative of FVII. METHODS: Active site inhibited factor VIIa (FVIIai) was obtained by inactivation with phenylalanine-phenylalanine-arginine-chloromethyl ketone. FVIIai was radiolabeled with N-succinimidyl 4......-[(18)F]-fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) and purified. The corresponding product, [(18)F]FVIIai, was injected into nude mice with subcutaneous human pancreatic xenograft tumors (BxPC-3) and investigated using small animal PET/CT imaging 1, 2 and 4 hours after injection. Ex vivo biodistribution was performed...

  5. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H Le

    Full Text Available Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1. Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr and chronic (2hr CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of 18F-labeled active site inhibited factor VII (ASIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlandsson, Maria; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen; Jeppesen, Troels Elmer

    2015-01-01

    Activated factor VII blocked in the active site with Phe-Phe-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (active site inhibited factor VII (ASIS)) is a 50-kDa protein that binds with high affinity to its receptor, tissue factor (TF). TF is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an important role in, for example......, thrombosis, metastasis, tumor growth, and tumor angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to develop an 18F-labeled ASIS derivative to assess TF expression in tumors. Active site inhibited factor VII was labeled using N-succinimidyl-4-[18F]fluorobenzoate, and the [18F]ASIS was purified on a PD-10 desalting...... column. The radiochemical yield was 25 ± 6%, the radiochemical purity was >97%, and the pseudospecific radioactivity was 35 ± 9 GBq/µmol. The binding efficacy was evaluated in pull-down experiments, which monitored the binding of unlabeled ASIS and [18F]ASIS to TF and to a specific anti-factor VII...

  7. Facilitating and inhibiting factors related to treatment adherence in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Bazarganipour

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adherence issues in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS patients have not been examined thoroughly. Patients report prolonged periods of treatment and side effects of the drug as the most common reason for withdrawal from treatment. To improve the effective management of PCOS patients, it is fundamental to understand facilitating and inhibiting factors to treatment adherence. Objective: To explore facilitating/inhibiting factors related to treatment adherence among PCOS patients. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative study with a purposive sample of women with confirmed diagnosis of PCOS. The data were collected via 20 in-depth semi-structured interviews with women aged between 21-34 yr. A qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Five themes were identified which described different types of facilitating/ inhibiting factors to treatment adherence. Inhibiting factors included financial issues, patient-related, disease-related, and health care provider-related factors; while social factors were found to be both facilitating and inhibiting. Conclusion: The findings suggest that successful adherence to PCOS treatment is highly dependent on patients recognizing and adapting to financial, social, and health care related inhibiting factors. It is also crucial for clinicians and policy makers to recognize these key inhibiting factors in order to improve treatment outcomes.

  8. Process factors facilitating and inhibiting medical ethics teaching in small groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentwich, Miriam Ethel; Bokek-Cohen, Ya'arit

    2017-11-01

    To examine process factors that either facilitate or inhibit learning medical ethics during case-based learning. A qualitative research approach using microanalysis of transcribed videotaped discussions of three consecutive small-group learning (SGL) sessions on medical ethics teaching (MET) for three groups, each with 10 students. This research effort revealed 12 themes of learning strategies, divided into 6 coping and 6 evasive strategies. Cognitive-based strategies were found to relate to Kamin's model of critical thinking in medical education, thereby supporting our distinction between the themes of coping and evasive strategies. The findings also showed that cognitive efforts as well as emotional strategies are involved in discussions of ethical dilemmas. Based on Kamin's model and the constructivist learning theory, an examination of the different themes within the two learning strategies-coping and evasive-revealed that these strategies may be understood as corresponding to process factors either facilitating or inhibiting MET in SGL, respectively. Our classification offers a more nuanced observation, specifically geared to pinpointing the desired and less desired process factors in the learning involved in MET in the SGL environment. Two key advantages of this observation are: (1) it brings to the forefront process factors that may inhibit and not merely facilitate MET in SGL and (2) it acknowledges the existence of emotional and not just cognitive process factors. Further enhancement of MET in SGL may thus be achieved based on these observations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Involvement of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and Receptors in Immune Cells in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahanand Chatoo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder defined by ROME IV criteria as pain in the lower abdominal region, which is associated with altered bowel habit or defecation. The underlying mechanism of IBS is not completely understood. IBS seems to be a product of interactions between various factors with genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and stress playing a key role in the pathogenesis of this disease. The crosstalk between the immune system and stress in IBS mechanism is increasingly recognized. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, a major mediator in the stress response, is involved in altered function in GI, including inflammatory processes, colonic transit time, contractile activity, defecation pattern, pain threshold, mucosal secretory function, and barrier functions. This mini review focuses on the recently establish local GI-CRF system, its involvement in modulating the immune response in IBS, and summarizes current IBS animal models and mapping of CRF, CRFR1, and CRFR2 expression in colon tissues. CRF and receptors might be a key molecule involving the immune and movement function via brain–gut axis in IBS.

  10. Carprofen inhibits the release of matrix metalloproteinases 1, 3, and 13 in the secretome of an explant model of articular cartilage stimulated with interleukin 1β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Adam; Smith, Julia R; Allaway, David; Harris, Pat; Liddell, Susan; Mobasheri, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Arthritic diseases are characterized by the degradation of collagenous and noncollagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) components in articular cartilage. The increased expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is partly responsible for cartilage degradation. This study used proteomics to identify inflammatory proteins and catabolic enzymes released in a serum-free explant model of articular cartilage stimulated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β). Western blotting was used to quantify the release of selected proteins in the presence or absence of the cyclooxygenase-2 specific nonsteroidal pro-inflammatory drug carprofen. Cartilage explant cultures were established by using metacarpophalangeal joints from horses euthanized for purposes other than research. Samples were treated as follows: no treatment (control), IL-1β (10 ng/ml), carprofen (100 μg/ml), and carprofen (100 μg/ml) + IL-1β (10 ng/ml). Explants were incubated (37°C, 5% CO2) over twelve day time courses. High-throughput nano liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry uncovered candidate proteins for quantitative western blot analysis. Proteoglycan loss was assessed by using the dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay, which measures the release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Mass spectrometry identified MMP-1, -3, -13, and the ECM constituents thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) and fibronectin-1 (FN1). IL-1β stimulation increased the release of all three MMPs. IL-1β also stimulated the fragmentation of FN1 and increased chondrocyte cell death (as assessed by β-actin release). Addition of carprofen significantly decreased MMP release and the appearance of a 60 kDa fragment of FN1 without causing any detectable cytotoxicity to chondrocytes. DMMB assays suggested that carprofen initially inhibited IL-1β-induced GAG release, but this effect was transient. Overall, during the two time courses, GAG release was 58.67% ± 10.91% (SD) for IL-1

  11. Chronic Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Exposure Alters Corticotropin Releasing Factor Expression and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Female Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costine, Beth A; Oberlander, Joseph G; Davis, Matthew C; Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Leaton, Robert N; Henderson, Leslie P

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the past several decades, the therapeutic use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been overshadowed by illicit use of these drugs by elite athletes and a growing number of adolescents to enhance performance and body image. As with adults, AAS use by adolescents is associated with a range of behavioral effects, including increased anxiety and altered responses to stress. It has been suggested that adolescents, especially adolescent females, may be particularly susceptible to the effects of these steroids, but few experiments in animal models have been performed to test this assertion. Here we show that chronic exposure of adolescent female mice to a mixture of three commonly abused AAS (testosterone cypionate, nandrolone decanoate and methandrostenolone; 7.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) significantly enhanced anxiety-like behavior as assessed by the acoustic startle response (ASR), but did not augment the fear-potentiated startle response (FPS) or alter sensorimotor gating as assessed by prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI). AAS treatment also significantly increased the levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and somal-associated CRF immunoreactivity in the central amygdala (CeA), as well as neuropil-associated immunoreactivity in the dorsal aspect of the anterolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBnST). AAS treatment did not alter CRF receptor 1 or 2 mRNA in either the CeA or the dBnST; CRF immunoreactivity in the ventral BNST, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) or the median eminence (ME); or peripheral levels of corticosterone. These results suggest that chronic AAS treatment of adolescent female mice may enhance generalized anxiety, but not sensorimotor gating or learned fear, via a mechanism that involves increased CRF-mediated signaling from CeA neurons projecting to the dBnST. PMID:20537804

  12. Pycnogenol Attenuates the Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Expression of Perilipin 2 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Microglia in Part via Inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Fan

    Full Text Available Over activation of microglia results in the production of proinflammatory agents that have been implicated in various brain diseases. Pycnogenol is a patented extract from French maritime pine bark (Pinus pinaster Aiton with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potency. The present study investigated whether pycnogenol may be associated with the production of proinflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 (mouse-derived microglia. It was found that pycnogenol treatment was dose-dependently associated with significantly less release of nitricoxide (NO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, and lower levels of intercellular adhesion molecule1 (ICAM-1 and perilipin 2 (PLIN2. Furthermore, this effect was replicated in primary brain microglia. Levels of inducible NO synthase mRNA and protein were attenuated, whereas there was no change in the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Further evidence indicated that pycnogenol treatment led to the suppression of NF-κB activation through inhibition of p65 translocation into the nucleus and inhibited DNA binding of AP-1, suggesting that these proinflammatory factors are associated with NF-κB and AP-1. We conclude that pycnogenol exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of the NF-κB and AP-1pathway, and may be useful as a therapeutic agent in the prevention of diseases caused by over activation of microglia.

  13. Involvement of serotonergic pathways in mediating the neuronal activity and genetic transcription of neuroendocrine corticotropin-releasing factor in the brain of systemically endotoxin-challenged rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laflamme, N.; Feuvrier, E.; Richard, D.; Rivest, S. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, CHUL Research Center and Department of Anatomy and Physiology, Laval University, 2705 boul. Laurier, Ste-Foy Quebec (Canada)

    1999-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of serotonin depletion on the neuronal activity and transcription of corticotropin-releasing factor in the rat brain during the acute-phase response. Conscious male rats received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection with the immune activator lipopolysaccaride (25 {mu}g/100 g body wt) after being treated for three consecutive days with para-chlorophenylalanine (30 mg/100 g/day). This irreversible inhibitor of tryptophane-5-hydroxylase decreased hypothalamic serotonin levels by 96%. One, 3 and 6 h after a single i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide or vehicle solution, rats were killed and their brains cut in 30-{mu}m coronal sections. Messenger RNAs encoding c-fos, nerve-growth factor inducible-B gene, corticotropin-releasing factor and the heteronuclear RNA encoding corticotropin-releasing factor primary transcript were assayed by in situ hybridization using {sup 35}S-labeled riboprobes, whereas Fos-immunoreactive nuclei were labeled by immunocytochemistry. Lipopolysaccharide induced a wide neuronal activation indicated by the expression of both immediate-early gene transcripts and Fos protein in numerous structures of the brain. The signal for both immediate-early gene transcripts was low to moderate 1 h after lipopolysaccharide administration, maximal at 3 h and decline at 6 h post-injection, whereas at that time, Fos-immunoreactive nuclei were still detected in most of the c-fos messenger RNA-positive structures. Interestingly, the strong and widespread induction of both immediate-early gene transcripts was almost totally inhibited by para-chlorophenylalanine treatment; in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus for example, c-fos messenger RNA signal and the number of Fos-immunoreactive positive cells were reduced by 80 and 48%, respectively, in serotonin-depleted rats treated with the bacterial endotoxin. This blunted neuronal response was also associated with an attenuated stimulation of neuroendocrine corticotropin-releasing

  14. The Arabidopsis transcription factor ABIG1 relays ABA signaled growth inhibition and drought induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tie; Longhurst, Adam D; Talavera-Rauh, Franklin; Hokin, Samuel A; Barton, M Kathryn

    2016-10-04

    Drought inhibits plant growth and can also induce premature senescence. Here we identify a transcription factor, ABA INSENSITIVE GROWTH 1 (ABIG1) required for abscisic acid (ABA) mediated growth inhibition, but not for stomatal closure. ABIG1 mRNA levels are increased both in response to drought and in response to ABA treatment. When treated with ABA, abig1 mutants remain greener and produce more leaves than comparable wild-type plants. When challenged with drought, abig1 mutants have fewer yellow, senesced leaves than wild-type. Induction of ABIG1 transcription mimics ABA treatment and regulates a set of genes implicated in stress responses. We propose a model in which drought acts through ABA to increase ABIG1 transcription which in turn restricts new shoot growth and promotes leaf senescence. The results have implications for plant breeding: the existence of a mutant that is both ABA resistant and drought resistant points to new strategies for isolating drought resistant genetic varieties.

  15. Cycle Inhibiting Factors (Cifs: Cyclomodulins That Usurp the Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation Pathway of Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Oswald

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are “cyclomodulins” that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions.

  16. Insulin like growth factor-1/insulin bypasses Pref-1/FA1-mediated inhibition of adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Nøhr, Jane; Jensen, Charlotte Harken

    2003-01-01

    that forced expression of the soluble form, FA1, or full-length Pref-1 did not inhibit adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells when differentiation was induced by standard treatment with methylisobutylxanthine, dexamethasone, and high concentrations of insulin. However, forced expression of either form...... of Pref-1/FA1 in 3T3-L1 or 3T3-F442A cells inhibited adipocyte differentiation when insulin or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was omitted from the differentiation mixture. We demonstrate that the level of the mature form of the IGF-1 receptor is reduced and that IGF-1-dependent activation of p42/p44...... mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) is compromised in preadipocytes with forced expression of Pref-1. This is accompanied by suppression of clonal expansion and terminal differentiation. Accordingly, supplementation with insulin or IGF-1 rescued p42/p44 MAPK activation, clonal expansion...

  17. Overexpression of ERβ is sufficient to inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1 transactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Choa; Lee, YoungJoo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We examined the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition. • DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels in PC3 cells. • DPN did not show additional effect in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. • Our study shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression. - Abstract: Estrogen receptor (ER) β is predicted to play an important role in the prevention of breast cancer development and progression. We have previously shown that ERβ suppresses hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1-mediated transcription through aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) degradation via ubiquitination processes. In this study, we attempted to examine the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition in ERβ positive PC3 cells and ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. ERβ specific agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) stimulated estrogen response element (ERE)-luciferase activity in a similar fashion to estradiol in PC3 cells. We observed that DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels leading to an attenuation of hypoxia-induced hypoxia response element (HRE)-driven luciferase reporter gene activation in PC3 cells. Treatment of DPN reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and co-treatment with ERβ specific antagonist PHTPP abrogated the effect in PC3 cells. We then examined the effect of DPN in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. HIF-1 transcriptional activity repression by ERβ was not further reduced by DPN, as examined by HRE-driven luciferase assays. Expression of ERβ significantly decreased VEGF secretion and ARNT expression under hypoxic conditions. However, DPN did not additionally affect this suppression in MCF-7 cells transfected with ERβ. This result shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression

  18. Overexpression of ERβ is sufficient to inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1 transactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Choa; Lee, YoungJoo, E-mail: yjlee@sejong.ac.kr

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We examined the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition. • DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels in PC3 cells. • DPN did not show additional effect in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. • Our study shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression. - Abstract: Estrogen receptor (ER) β is predicted to play an important role in the prevention of breast cancer development and progression. We have previously shown that ERβ suppresses hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1-mediated transcription through aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) degradation via ubiquitination processes. In this study, we attempted to examine the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition in ERβ positive PC3 cells and ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. ERβ specific agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) stimulated estrogen response element (ERE)-luciferase activity in a similar fashion to estradiol in PC3 cells. We observed that DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels leading to an attenuation of hypoxia-induced hypoxia response element (HRE)-driven luciferase reporter gene activation in PC3 cells. Treatment of DPN reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and co-treatment with ERβ specific antagonist PHTPP abrogated the effect in PC3 cells. We then examined the effect of DPN in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. HIF-1 transcriptional activity repression by ERβ was not further reduced by DPN, as examined by HRE-driven luciferase assays. Expression of ERβ significantly decreased VEGF secretion and ARNT expression under hypoxic conditions. However, DPN did not additionally affect this suppression in MCF-7 cells transfected with ERβ. This result shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression.

  19. Activation of MAPK/ERK signaling by Burkholderia pseudomallei cycle inhibiting factor (Cif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Ying Ng

    Full Text Available Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs are virulence proteins secreted by the type III secretion system of some Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria including Burkholderia pseudomallei. Cif is known to function to deamidate Nedd8, leading to inhibition of Cullin E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL and consequently induction of cell cycle arrest. Here we show that Cif can function as a potent activator of MAPK/ERK signaling without significant activation of other signaling pathways downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. Importantly, we found that the ability of Cif to activate ERK is dependent on its deamidase activity, but independent of Cullin E3 ligase inhibition. This suggests that apart from Nedd8, other cellular targets of Cif-dependent deamidation exist. We provide evidence that the mechanism involved in Cif-mediated ERK activation is dependent on recruitment of the Grb2-SOS1 complex to the plasma membrane. Further investigation revealed that Cif appears to modify the phosphorylation status of SOS1 in a region containing the CDC25-H and proline-rich domains. It is known that prolonged Cullin E3 ligase inhibition leads to cellular apoptosis. Therefore, we hypothesize that ERK activation is an important mechanism to counter the pro-apoptotic effects of Cif. Indeed, we show that Cif dependent ERK activation promotes phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein Bim, thereby potentially conferring a pro-survival signal. In summary, we identified a novel deamidation-dependent mechanism of action of the B. pseudomallei virulence factor Cif/CHBP to activate MAPK/ERK signaling. Our study demonstrates that bacterial proteins such as Cif can serve as useful molecular tools to uncover novel aspects of mammalian signaling pathways.

  20. Role of platelet-released growth factors in detoxification of reactive oxygen species in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Wruck, Christoph-Jan; Slowik, Alexander; Kweider, Nisreen; Beckmann, Rainer; Bayer, Andreas; Houben, Astrid; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove; Varoga, Deike; Sönmez, Tolga-Taha; Stoffel, Marcus; Jahr, Holger; Lippross, Sebastian; Pufe, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Oxidative stress can impair fracture healing. To protect against oxidative damage, a system of detoxifying and antioxidative enzymes works to reduce the cellular stress. The transcription of these enzymes is regulated by antioxidant response element (ARE). The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like2 (Nrf2) plays a major role in transcriptional activation of ARE-driven genes. Recently it has been shown that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) prevents oxidative damage via activation of the Nrf2 pathway in vitro. Platelet-released growth factor (PRGF) is a mixture of autologous proteins and growth factors, prepared from a determined volume of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). It has already used to enhance fracture healing in vitro. The aim of the present study was to elucidate if platelets can lead to upregulation of VEGF and if platelets can regulate the activity of Nrf2-ARE system in primary human osteoblast (hOB) and in osteoblast-like cell line (SAOS-2). Platelets and PRGF were obtained from healthy human donors. HOB and SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cell line were used. The ARE activity was analysed using a dual luciferase reporter assay system. We used Western blot to detect the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the amount of cytosolic antioxidant Thioredoxin Reductase-1 (TXNRD-1), Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1). Gene expression analysis was performed by real-time RT PCR. ELISA was used for the quantification of growth factors. The activity of ARE was increased in the presence of PRGF up to 50%. Western blotting demonstrated enhanced nuclear accumulation of Nrf2. This was followed by an increase in the protein expression of the aforementioned downstream targets of Nrf2. Real-time RT PCR data showed an upregulation in the gene expression of the VEGF after PRGF treatment. This was confirmed by ELISA, where the treatment with PRGF induced the protein level of VEGF in both cells. These results provide a new insight into PRGF's mode of

  1. Diclofenac inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-induced nuclear factor-κB activation causing synergistic hepatocyte apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Lisa; Herpers, Bram; Benedetti, Giulia; Matadin, Quraisha; Puigvert, Jordi C; de Bont, Hans; Dragovic, Sanja; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M; Danen, Erik; de Graauw, Marjo; van de Water, Bob

    2011-06-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important clinical problem. It involves crosstalk between drug toxicity and the immune system, but the exact mechanism at the cellular hepatocyte level is not well understood. Here we studied the mechanism of crosstalk in hepatocyte apoptosis caused by diclofenac and the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). HepG2 cells were treated with diclofenac followed by TNF-α challenge and subsequent evaluation of necrosis and apoptosis. Diclofenac caused a mild apoptosis of HepG2 cells, which was strongly potentiated by TNF-α. A focused apoptosis machinery short interference RNA (siRNA) library screen identified that this TNF-α-mediated enhancement involved activation of caspase-3 through a caspase-8/Bid/APAF1 pathway. Diclofenac itself induced sustained activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and inhibition of JNK decreased both diclofenac and diclofenac/TNF-α-induced apoptosis. Live cell imaging of GFPp65/RelA showed that diclofenac dampened the TNF-α-mediated nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) translocation oscillation in association with reduced NF-κB transcriptional activity. This was associated with inhibition by diclofenac of the TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of the inhibitor of NF-κB alpha (IκBα). Finally, inhibition of IκB kinase β (IKKβ) with BMS-345541 as well as stable lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-based knockdown of p65/RelA sensitized hepatocytes towards diclofenac/TNF-α-induced cytotoxicity. Together, our data suggest a model whereby diclofenac-mediated stress signaling suppresses TNF-α-induced survival signaling routes and sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptors Modulate Oxytocin Release in the Dorsolateral Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis (BNST in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Martinon

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT plays an important role in the regulation of social and anxiety-like behavior. Our previous studies have shown that OT neurons send projections from the hypothalamus to the dorsolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTdl, a forebrain region critically involved in the modulation of anxiety-like behavior. Importantly, these OT terminals in the BNSTdl express presynaptic corticotropin releasing factor (CRF receptor type 2 (CRFR2. This suggests that CRFR2 might be involved in the modulation of OT release. To test this hypothesis, we measured OT content in microdialysates collected from the BNSTdl of freely-moving male Sprague-Dawley rats following the administration of a selective CRFR2 agonist (Urocortin 3 or antagonist (Astressin 2B, As2B. To determine if type 1 CRF receptors (CRFR1 are also involved, we used selective CRFR1 antagonist (NBI35965 as well as CRF, a putative ligand of both CRFR1 and CRFR2. All compounds were delivered directly into the BNSTdl via reverse dialysis. OT content in the microdialysates was measured with highly sensitive and selective radioimmunoassay. Blocking CRFR2 with As2B caused an increase in OT content in BNSTdl microdialysates, whereas CRFR2 activation by Urocortin 3 did not have an effect. The As2B-induced increase in OT release was blocked by application of the CRFR1 antagonist demonstrating that the effect was dependent on CRFR1 transmission. Interestingly, CRF alone caused a delayed increase in OT content in BNSTdl microdialysates, which was dependent on CRF2 but not CRF1 receptors. Our results suggest that members of the CRF peptide family modulate OT release in the BNSTdl via a fine-tuned mechanism that involves both CRFR1 and CRFR2. Further exploration of mechanisms by which endogenous OT system is modulated by CRF peptide family is needed to better understand the role of these neuropeptides in the regulation of anxiety and the stress response.

  3. Base residue release from 3H-thymine labeled DNA in irradiated E. coli under conditions of enzyme inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, R.C.; Zimbrick, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    E. coli C and E. coli K12 cells were incorporated with ( 3 H-C-6)-thymine, irradiated with 60 Co-gamma rays, and then variously treated with EDTA and lysed with sodium lauryl sulfate. The 3 H-material released from DNA was then measured by Sephadex G-10 gel filtration. Because the focus of this work was the examination of the radiolytic lesions within the DNA, an attempt was made to exclude enzymatic contributions to in vivo product yields from these cells which were irradiated in the presence and absence of O 2

  4. Different Effects of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Glioblastoma Stem Cells by Direct Cell Interaction or Via Released Soluble Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bajetto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM, the most common primary brain tumor in adults, is an aggressive, fast-growing and highly vascularized tumor, characterized by extensive invasiveness and local recurrence. In GBM and other malignancies, cancer stem cells (CSCs are believed to drive invasive tumor growth and recurrence, being responsible for radio- and chemo-therapy resistance. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent progenitors that exhibit tropism for tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. Initial studies proposed that MSCs might exert inhibitory effects on tumor development, although, to date, contrasting evidence has been provided. Different studies reported either MSC anti-tumor activity or their support to tumor growth. Here, we examined the effects of umbilical cord (UC-MSCs on in vitro GBM-derived CSC growth, by direct cell-to-cell interaction or indirect modulation, via the release of soluble factors. We demonstrate that UC-MSCs and CSCs exhibit reciprocal tropism when co-cultured as 3D spheroids and their direct cell interaction reduces the proliferation of both cell types. Contrasting effects were obtained by UC-MSC released factors: CSCs, cultured in the presence of conditioned medium (CM collected from UC-MSCs, increased proliferation rate through transient ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation/activation. Analysis of the profile of the cytokines released by UC-MSCs in the CM revealed a strong production of molecules involved in inflammation, angiogenesis, cell migration and proliferation, such as IL-8, GRO, ENA-78 and IL-6. Since CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2, a receptor shared by several of these ligands, is expressed in GBM CSCs, we evaluated its involvement in CSC proliferation induced by UC-MSC-CM. Using the CXCR2 antagonist SB225002, we observed a partial but statistically significant inhibition of CSC proliferation and migration induced by the UC-MSC-released cytokines. Conversely, CXCR2 blockade did not

  5. Different Effects of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Glioblastoma Stem Cells by Direct Cell Interaction or Via Released Soluble Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajetto, Adriana; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Corsaro, Alessandro; Barbieri, Federica; Daga, Antonio; Bosio, Alessia; Gatti, Monica; Pisaturo, Valerio; Sirito, Rodolfo; Florio, Tullio

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most common primary brain tumor in adults, is an aggressive, fast-growing and highly vascularized tumor, characterized by extensive invasiveness and local recurrence. In GBM and other malignancies, cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to drive invasive tumor growth and recurrence, being responsible for radio- and chemo-therapy resistance. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitors that exhibit tropism for tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. Initial studies proposed that MSCs might exert inhibitory effects on tumor development, although, to date, contrasting evidence has been provided. Different studies reported either MSC anti-tumor activity or their support to tumor growth. Here, we examined the effects of umbilical cord (UC)-MSCs on in vitro GBM-derived CSC growth, by direct cell-to-cell interaction or indirect modulation, via the release of soluble factors. We demonstrate that UC-MSCs and CSCs exhibit reciprocal tropism when co-cultured as 3D spheroids and their direct cell interaction reduces the proliferation of both cell types. Contrasting effects were obtained by UC-MSC released factors: CSCs, cultured in the presence of conditioned medium (CM) collected from UC-MSCs, increased proliferation rate through transient ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation/activation. Analysis of the profile of the cytokines released by UC-MSCs in the CM revealed a strong production of molecules involved in inflammation, angiogenesis, cell migration and proliferation, such as IL-8, GRO, ENA-78 and IL-6. Since CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2), a receptor shared by several of these ligands, is expressed in GBM CSCs, we evaluated its involvement in CSC proliferation induced by UC-MSC-CM. Using the CXCR2 antagonist SB225002, we observed a partial but statistically significant inhibition of CSC proliferation and migration induced by the UC-MSC-released cytokines. Conversely, CXCR2 blockade did not reduce the

  6. Elevated CSF Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Concentrations in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, J. Douglas; Licinio, Julio; Darnell, Adam; Krystal, John H.; Owens, Michael J.; Southwick, Steven M.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Charney, Dennis S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and somatostatin both play important roles in mediating responses to acute and chronic stress. The purpose of this study was to measure CSF concentrations of CRF and somatostatin in patients with chronic combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comparison subjects. Method Lumbar punctures for collection of CSF were performed in Vietnam combat veterans with PTSD (N=11) and comparison subjects (N=17). CSF concentrations of CRF and somatostatin were compared between the two groups. Results CSF concentrations of CRF were higher in the PTSD patients than in the comparison subjects (mean=29.0 pg/ml, SD=7.8, versus mean=21.9 pg/ml, SD=6.0). This group difference remained significant after covariance for age. CSF somatostatin concentrations in PTSD patients were higher than those of the comparison subjects (mean=19.9 pg/ml, SD=5.4, versus mean=13.7 pg/ml, SD=8.0). However, covarying for age reduced the level of significance. Conclusions Higher CSF CRF concentrations in patients with PTSD may reflect alterations in stress-related neurotransmitter systems. The higher CSF CRF concentrations may play a role in disturbances of arousal in patients with PTSD. PMID:9137116

  7. Radioautographic study of binding and internalization of corticotropin-releasing factor by rat anterior pituitary corticotrophs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroux, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1984-01-01

    In order to identify the anterior pituitary cell type(s) containing corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors and to study the internalization processes of this peptide by the target cells, radioautography was performed on rat anterior pituitaries removed at specific intervals (2-60 min) after intracarotid injection of [ 125 I]iodo-CRF into intact and adrenalectomized female rats. In intact animals, all corticotrophs were labeled, whereas in the adrenalectomized animals about 80% of the hypertrophied corticotrophs (adrenalectomy cells) were. In control animals injected with both iodinated CRF and an excess of unlabeled peptide, no specific reaction could be detected. The time-course study in intact animals showed that 2 min after injection most silver grains were found over or within 160 nm of the plasma membrane. At the 5-min time intervals, grains were observed both over the plasma membrane and within the cytoplasm, associated with lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus. Fifteen minutes after injection, grains were mostly found over lysosomes and the Golgi apparatus, whereas at the longest time intervals (30 and 60 min) almost no labeling could be detected. The results obtained in this study indicate that in the anterior pituitary CRF receptors are restricted to corticotrophs (as identified by electron microscopy) and that, after binding to the plasma membrane, CRF is rapidly internalized to Golgi elements and lysosomes

  8. Stress and addiction: contribution of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF system in neuroplasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina L Haass-Koffler

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF has been shown to induce various behavioral changes related to adaptation to stress. Dysregulation of the CRF system at any point can lead to a variety of psychiatric disorders, including substance use disorders (SUDs. CRF has been associated with stress-induced drug reinforcement. Extensive literature has identified CRF to play an important role in the molecular mechanisms that lead to an increase in susceptibility that precipitates relapse to SUDs. The CRF system has a heterogeneous role in SUDs. It enhances the acute effects of drugs of abuse and is also responsible for the potentiation of drug-induced neuroplasticity evoked during the withdrawal period. We present in this review the brain regions and circuitries where CRF is expressed and may participate in stress-induced drug abuse. Finally, we attempt to evaluate the role of modulating the CRF system as a possible therapeutic strategy for treating the dysregulation of emotional behaviors that result from the acute positive reinforcement of substances of abuse as well as the negative reinforcement produced by withdrawal.

  9. Corticotropin-releasing factor: effect on cerebral blood flow in physiologic and ischaemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Michele, Manuela; Touzani, Omar; Foster, Alan C; Fieschi, Cesare; Sette, Giuliano; McCulloch, James

    2005-09-01

    The expression of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors in cerebral arteries and arterioles suggests that CRF may modulate cerebral blood flow (CBF). In the present study, the effects of CRF, CRF-like peptides and the CRF broad spectrum antagonist DPhe-CRF on CBF have been investigated under normal physiologic conditions and in the margins of focal ischaemic insult. The experiments were carried out in anaesthetised and ventilated rats. Changes in CBF after subarachnoid microapplication of CRF and related peptides were assessed with a laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) probe. In the ischaemic animals, agents were injected approximately 60 minutes after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Microapplication of CRF and related peptides in normal rats into the subarachnoid space produced sustained concentration-dependent increases in CBF. This effect was attenuated by co-application with DPhe-CRF, which did not alter CBF itself. A second microapplication of CRF 30 min after the first failed to produce increases in CBF in normal animals. Microapplication of CRF in the subarachnoid space overlying the ischaemic cortex effected minor increases in CBF whereas D-Phe-CRF had no significant effect on CBF. Activation of the CRF peptidergic system increases CBF in the rat. Repeated activation of CRF receptors results in tachyphylaxis of the vasodilator response. CRF vasodilator response is still present after MCAo in the ischaemic penumbra, suggesting that the CRF peptidergic system may modulate CBF in ischaemic stroke.

  10. Numerical Studies on Heat Release Rate in Room Fire on Liquid Fuel under Different Ventilation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat release rate (HRR of the design fire is the most important parameter in assessing building fire hazards. However, HRR in room fire was only studied by computational fluid dynamics (CFD in most of the projects determining fire safety provisions by performance-based design. In contrast to ten years ago, officers in the Far East are now having better knowledge of CFD. Two common questions are raised on CFD-predicted results on describing free boundaries; and on computing grid size. In this work, predicting HRR by the CFD model was justified with experimental room pool fire data reported earlier. The software fire dynamics simulator (FDS version 5 was selected as the CFD simulation tool. Prescribed input heating rate based on the experimental results was used with the liquid fuel model in FDS. Five different free boundary conditions were investigated to predict HRR. Grid sensitivity study was carried out using one stretched mesh and multiple uniform meshes with different grid sizes. As it is difficult to have the entire set of CFD predicted results agreed with experiments, macroscopic flow parameters on the mass flow rate through door opening predicted by CFD were also justified by another four conditions with different ventilation factors.

  11. Sex differences in stress responses: a critical role for corticotropin-releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangasser, Debra A; Wiersielis, Kimberly R

    2018-03-01

    Rates of post-traumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, and major depression are higher in women than in men. Another shared feature of these disorders is that dysregulation of the stress neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), is thought to contribute to their pathophysiology. Therefore, sex differences in responses to CRF could contribute to this sex bias in disease prevalence. Here, we review emerging data from non-human animal models that reveal extensive sex differences in CRF functions ranging from its presynaptic regulation to its postsynaptic efficacy. Specifically, detailed are sex differences in the regulation of CRF-containing neurons and the amount of CRF that they produce. We also describe sex differences in CRF receptor expression, distribution, trafficking, and signaling. Finally, we highlight sex differences in the processes that mitigate the effects of CRF. In most cases, the identified sex differences can lead to increased stress sensitivity in females. Thus, the relevance of these differences for the increased risk of depression and anxiety disorders in women compared to men is also discussed.

  12. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel)

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  13. Design and Synthesis of Benzimidazoles As Novel Corticotropin-Releasing Factor 1 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Michiyo; Kori, Masakuni; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Yano, Takahiko; Sako, Yuu; Tanaka, Maiko; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Gyorkos, Albert C; Corrette, Christopher P; Cho, Suk Young; Pratt, Scott A; Aso, Kazuyoshi

    2016-03-24

    Benzazole derivatives with a flexible aryl group bonded through a one-atom linker as a new scaffold for a corticotropin-releasing factor 1 (CRF1) receptor antagonist were designed, synthesized, and evaluated. We expected that structural diversity could be expanded beyond that of reported CRF1 receptor antagonists. In a structure-activity relationship study, 4-chloro-N(2)-(4-chloro-2-methoxy-6-methylphenyl)-1-methyl-N(7),N(7)-dipropyl-1H-benzimidazole-2,7-diamine 29g had the most potent binding activity against a human CRF1 receptor and the antagonistic activity (IC50 = 9.5 and 88 nM, respectively) without concerns regarding cytotoxicity at 30 μM. Potent CRF1 receptor-binding activity in brain in an ex vivo test and suppression of stress-induced activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis were also observed at 138 μmol/kg of compound 29g after oral administration in mice. Thus, the newly designed benzimidazole 29g showed in vivo CRF1 receptor antagonistic activity and good brain penetration, indicating that it is a promising lead for CRF1 receptor antagonist drug discovery research.

  14. Bioresponsive release of insulin-like growth factor-I from its PEGylated conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Alexandra C; Gutmann, Marcus; Mueller, Thomas D; Lühmann, Tessa; Meinel, Lorenz

    2018-06-10

    PEGylation of protein ligands, the attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers to a therapeutic protein, increases therapeutics' half-life but frequently comes at the cost of reduced bioactivity. We are now presenting a bioinspired strategy leading out of this dilemma. To this end, we selected a position within insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) for decoration with a PEG 30kDa -modified protease-sensitive peptide linker (PSL) using a combination of enzymatic and chemical bioorthogonal coupling strategies. The PSL sequence responded to matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) to provide a targeted release in diseased tissue. The IGF-PSL-PEG conjugate had different binding protein affinity, cell proliferation, and endocytosis patterns as compared to the wild type. Exposure of the conjugate to elevated levels of activated MMPs, as present in inflamed tissues, fully reestablished the wild type properties through effective PSL cleavage. In conclusion, this bioinspired approach provided a blueprint for PEGylated therapeutics combining the pharmacokinetic advantages of PEGylation, while locally restoring the full suite of biological potential of therapeutics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The cauliflower Orange gene enhances petiole elongation by suppressing expression of eukaryotic release factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangjun; Sun, Tian-Hu; Wang, Ning; Ling, Hong-Qing; Lu, Shan; Li, Li

    2011-04-01

    The cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) Orange (Or) gene affects plant growth and development in addition to conferring β-carotene accumulation. This study was undertaken to investigate the molecular basis for the effects of the Or gene mutation in on plant growth. The OR protein was found to interact with cauliflower and Arabidopsis eukaryotic release factor 1-2 (eRF1-2), a member of the eRF1 family, by yeast two-hybrid analysis and by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. Concomitantly, the Or mutant showed reduced expression of the BoeRF1 family genes. Transgenic cauliflower plants with suppressed expression of BoeRF1-2 and BoeRF1-3 were generated by RNA interference. Like the Or mutant, the BoeRF1 RNAi lines showed increased elongation of the leaf petiole. This long-petiole phenotype was largely caused by enhanced cell elongation, which resulted from increased cell length and elevated expression of genes involved in cell-wall loosening. These findings demonstrate that the cauliflower Or gene controls petiole elongation by suppressing the expression of eRF1 genes, and provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of leaf petiole regulation. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition via RGFP966 Releases the Brakes on Sensory Cortical Plasticity and the Specificity of Memory Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieszczad, Kasia M; Bechay, Kiro; Rusche, James R; Jacques, Vincent; Kudugunti, Shashi; Miao, Wenyan; Weinberger, Norman M; McGaugh, James L; Wood, Marcelo A

    2015-09-23

    Research over the past decade indicates a novel role for epigenetic mechanisms in memory formation. Of particular interest is chromatin modification by histone deacetylases (HDACs), which, in general, negatively regulate transcription. HDAC deletion or inhibition facilitates transcription during memory consolidation and enhances long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. A key open question remains: How does blocking HDAC activity lead to memory enhancements? To address this question, we tested whether a normal function of HDACs is to gate information processing during memory formation. We used a class I HDAC inhibitor, RGFP966 (C21H19FN4O), to test the role of HDAC inhibition for information processing in an auditory memory model of learning-induced cortical plasticity. HDAC inhibition may act beyond memory enhancement per se to instead regulate information in ways that lead to encoding more vivid sensory details into memory. Indeed, we found that RGFP966 controls memory induction for acoustic details of sound-to-reward learning. Rats treated with RGFP966 while learning to associate sound with reward had stronger memory and additional information encoded into memory for highly specific features of sounds associated with reward. Moreover, behavioral effects occurred with unusually specific plasticity in primary auditory cortex (A1). Class I HDAC inhibition appears to engage A1 plasticity that enables additional acoustic features to become encoded in memory. Thus, epigenetic mechanisms act to regulate sensory cortical plasticity, which offers an information processing mechanism for gating what and how much is encoded to produce exceptionally persistent and vivid memories. Significance statement: Here we provide evidence of an epigenetic mechanism for information processing. The study reveals that a class I HDAC inhibitor (Malvaez et al., 2013; Rumbaugh et al., 2015; RGFP966, chemical formula C21H19FN4O) alters the formation of auditory memory by

  17. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition via RGFP966 Releases the Brakes on Sensory Cortical Plasticity and the Specificity of Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechay, Kiro; Rusche, James R.; Jacques, Vincent; Kudugunti, Shashi; Miao, Wenyan; Weinberger, Norman M.; McGaugh, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Research over the past decade indicates a novel role for epigenetic mechanisms in memory formation. Of particular interest is chromatin modification by histone deacetylases (HDACs), which, in general, negatively regulate transcription. HDAC deletion or inhibition facilitates transcription during memory consolidation and enhances long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. A key open question remains: How does blocking HDAC activity lead to memory enhancements? To address this question, we tested whether a normal function of HDACs is to gate information processing during memory formation. We used a class I HDAC inhibitor, RGFP966 (C21H19FN4O), to test the role of HDAC inhibition for information processing in an auditory memory model of learning-induced cortical plasticity. HDAC inhibition may act beyond memory enhancement per se to instead regulate information in ways that lead to encoding more vivid sensory details into memory. Indeed, we found that RGFP966 controls memory induction for acoustic details of sound-to-reward learning. Rats treated with RGFP966 while learning to associate sound with reward had stronger memory and additional information encoded into memory for highly specific features of sounds associated with reward. Moreover, behavioral effects occurred with unusually specific plasticity in primary auditory cortex (A1). Class I HDAC inhibition appears to engage A1 plasticity that enables additional acoustic features to become encoded in memory. Thus, epigenetic mechanisms act to regulate sensory cortical plasticity, which offers an information processing mechanism for gating what and how much is encoded to produce exceptionally persistent and vivid memories. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here we provide evidence of an epigenetic mechanism for information processing. The study reveals that a class I HDAC inhibitor (Malvaez et al., 2013; Rumbaugh et al., 2015; RGFP966, chemical formula C21H19FN4O) alters the formation of auditory memory by

  18. Influential factors in individual differences in reading comprehension: cognitive inhibition and working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Wilfrido Guevara Toledo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To read involves understanding of what it is read; automation of the processes involved in reading, lead us to believe that it is a simple process. Thepeople, to read uses encoding and decoding processes: recognizing and decoding words graphemes allowing lexical access; and comprehension processes: syntactic and semantic analysis, to give meaning to the text they read. Any disturbance in these processes compromise text comprehension and learning, including expert readers. Reading is the gateway to knowledge, science and good living.The analysis of reading comprehension should be analyzed from neuroscience. A review of the neurophysiological factors: cognitive inhibition and working memory, that influenced individual differences in reading comprehension in expert readers, was performed. Starting from a bibliographical review, the theoretical proposals of Megan Boudewyn and Debra Long, researchers from the Universities of California – Davis and Wisconsin – Madison, were considered. It was concluded that cognitive inhibition and working memory are influential factors for individual differences in reading comprehension in expert readers. The PROLEC - SE (reader process evaluation, the reading amplitude (PAL test, the Stroop effect and experimental tests of sentences with prime words, associated and non - associated can help to investigate these factors.

  19. Chemical Inhibition of Kynureninase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Virulence Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Stephen H; Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T; Musah, Rabi Ann; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2016-04-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes multiple quorum sensing (QS) pathways to coordinate an arsenal of virulence factors. We previously identified several cysteine-based compounds inspired by natural products from the plant Petiveria alliacea which are capable of antagonizing multiple QS circuits as well as reducing P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. To understand the global effects of such compounds on virulence factor production and elucidate their mechanism of action, RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis was performed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, the most potent inhibitor from the prior study. Exposure to this inhibitor down-regulated expression of several QS-regulated virulence operons (e.g., phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion systems). Interestingly, many genes that were differentially regulated pertain to the related metabolic pathways that yield precursors of pyochelin, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, phenazines, and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Activation of the MexT-regulon was also indicated, including the multidrug efflux pump encoded by mexEF-oprN, which has previously been shown to inhibit QS and pathogenicity. Deeper investigation of the metabolites involved in these systems revealed that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide has structural similarity to kynurenine, a precursor of anthranilate, which is critical for P. aeruginosa virulence. By supplementing exogenous anthranilate, the QS-inhibitory effect was reversed. Finally, it was shown that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide competitively inhibits P. aeruginosa kynureninase (KynU) activity in vitro and reduces PQS production in vivo. The kynurenine pathway has been implicated in P. aeruginosa QS and virulence factor expression; however, this is the first study to show that targeted inhibition of KynU affects P. aeruginosa gene expression and QS, suggesting a potential antivirulence strategy.

  20. Hydrological and Mineralogical Factors Influencing Paradoxical Groundwater Arsenic Release in the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, A.; Bostick, B. C.

    2017-12-01

    In South and Southeast Asia, the widespread contamination of groundwater arsenic (As) via microbial reduction of As-bearing iron (Fe) minerals in the subsurface results in toxic levels of arsenic above the World Health Organization (WHO) drinking water standard of 10 ug/L. High groundwater arsenic levels are generally found in gray Holocene aquifers whereas orange-sanded Pleistocene aquifers are typically a safer, lower As alternative. In the Red River Delta of Vietnam and elsewhere, Pleistocene aquifers can also have elevated arsenic levels, often due to increased groundwater pumping from the growing Hanoi area drawing high As water from Holocene aquifers, or from reduction induced by advected groundwater and organic carbon from the Red River. To determine which factors threaten the Pleistocene aquifers, we critically examine the hydrological and geochemical factors that could influence arsenic levels in the area. Exploiting an asymmetry in the region just south of Hanoi, yearlong spatiotemporal measurements of dissolved arsenic levels reveals a paradox between a Pleistocene aquifer site in Yen My (west bank) with higher As concentrations than a Holocene site in Van Duc (east bank). We monitor the influence of local and regional hydrology via water table measurements, stable water isotopes and conservative anion concentrations linked to the release of aqueous As. Preliminary x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data point to As(V)/arsenic sulfide minerals in Yen My versus As(III) minerals in Van Duc. Coupled to hydrology, downcore Fe Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and As X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) stratigraphy and spatiotemporal dissolved organic carbon data serve to narrow down the possible sources of carbon and reductive processes that affect As speciation and transport. Overall, understanding sources that endanger the Pleistocene aquifers may elucidate important As cycling mechanisms at play that threatens water quality for

  1. Platelet-derived-growth-factor-induced signalling in human platelets: phosphoinositide-3-kinase-dependent inhibition of platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selheim, F; Fukami, M H; Holmsen, H; Vassbotn, F S

    2000-09-01

    Human platelets release platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from alpha-granules during platelet activation. We have previously shown that platelets have PDGF alpha-receptors, a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that takes part in negative feedback regulation during platelet activation. Here we have described a study of PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of platelet substrates and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI-3K) activity in collagen-stimulated platelets. By immunoblotting with phosphotyrosine antibodies of collagen-activated platelets we found that PDGF increased the phosphorylation of several platelet substrates, e.g. pp140, pp120 and pp85. PDGF inhibited collagen-induced platelet activation in the presence of inhibitors of autocrine stimulation, thus blocking the pure collagen-induced signal transduction. PDGF enhanced the collagen-induced formation of PtdIns(3,4)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) as measured by HPLC. Wortmannin and LY294002, two unrelated inhibitors of PI-3K, were used to investigate the role of PI-3K in PDGF-induced platelet signalling. Incubation of platelets with wortmannin and LY294002 blocked the formation of three phosphorylated inositides as well as the inhibitory effect of PDGF on collagen-induced platelet activation. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of PDGF on platelet activation is PI-3K dependent. This is the first demonstration of a negative regulatory function of 3-phosphorylated inositides in platelets.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits insulin's stimulating effect on glucose uptake and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask-Madsen, Christian; Domínguez, Helena; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mechanisms could be involved in the pathogenesis of both insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Therefore, we aimed at examining whether the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and insulin....../or TNF-alpha were coinfused. During infusion of insulin alone for 20 minutes, forearm glucose uptake increased by 220+/-44%. This increase was completely inhibited during coinfusion of TNF-alpha (started 10 min before insulin) with a more pronounced inhibition of glucose extraction than of blood flow....... Furthermore, TNF-alpha inhibited the ACh forearm blood flow response (Palpha...

  3. Exploring the utility of organo-polyoxometalate hybrids to inhibit SOX transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Kamesh; Micoine, Kevin; Lacôte, Emmanuel; Thorimbert, Serge; Cheung, Edwin; Hasenknopf, Bernold; Jauch, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    SOX transcription factors constitute an attractive target class for intervention with small molecules as they play a prominent role in the field of regenerative biomedicine and cancer biology. However, rationally engineering specific inhibitors that interfere with transcription factor DNA interfaces continues to be a monumental challenge in the field of transcription factor chemical biology. Polyoxometalates (POMs) are inorganic compounds that were previously shown to target the high-mobility group (HMG) of SOX proteins at nanomolar concentrations. In continuation of this work, we carried out an assessment of the selectivity of a panel of newly synthesized organo-polyoxometalate hybrids in targeting different transcription factor families to enable the usage of polyoxometalates as specific SOX transcription factor drugs. The residual DNA-binding activities of 15 different transcription factors were measured after treatment with a panel of diverse polyoxometalates. Polyoxometalates belonging to the Dawson structural class were found to be more potent inhibitors than the Keggin class. Further, organically modified Dawson polyoxometalates were found to be the most potent in inhibiting transcription factor DNA binding activity. The size of the polyoxometalates and its derivitization were found to be the key determinants of their potency. Polyoxometalates are highly potent, nanomolar range inhibitors of the DNA binding activity of the Sox-HMG family. However, binding assays involving a limited subset of structurally diverse polyoxometalates revealed a low selectivity profile against different transcription factor families. Further progress in achieving selectivity and deciphering structure-activity relationship of POMs require the identification of POM binding sites on transcription factors using elaborate approaches like X-ray crystallography and multidimensional NMR. In summary, our report reaffirms that transcription factors are challenging molecular architectures

  4. Pore geometry of ceramic device: The key factor of drug release kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Release kinetics of tigecycline, a potential antibiotic in treatment of osteomyelitis, from calcium hydroxyapatite (CHA, as one of the most important ceramic materials in bone tissue engineering, was investigated in this study. Tigecycline, in solid state, was mixed with CHA powder and the obtained mixture was compressed into tablets using two different pressures. These tablets were immersed in a phosphate-buffered saline solution and tigecycline release was measured by a UV-VIS spectrophotometer. The total release time was 5 or 28 days, depending on the pressure applied during compression. It was shown that there is a close relationship between pore sizes and drug release rate. The drug release kinetics was interpreted on the base of pore sizes and pore size distribution. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172026

  5. Olive oil compounds inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamy, Sylvie; Ouanouki, Amira; Béliveau, Richard; Desrosiers, Richard R.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) triggers crucial signaling processes that regulate tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, represents an attractive target for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. Several epidemiological studies have confirmed that abundant consumption of foods from plant origin is associated with reduced risk of developing cancers. In the Mediterranean basin, the consumption of extra virgin olive oil is an important constituent of the diet. Compared to other vegetable oils, the presence of several phenolic antioxidants in olive oil is believed to prevent the occurrence of a variety of pathological processes, such as cancer. While the strong antioxidant potential of these molecules is well characterized, their antiangiogenic activities remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (HT), taxifolin (Tax), oleuropein (OL) and oleic acid (OA), five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil, can affect in vitro angiogenesis. We found that HT, Tax and OA were the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors through their inhibitory effect on specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2 (Tyr951, Tyr1059, Tyr1175 and Tyr1214) leading to the inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) signaling. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 by these olive oil compounds significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC proliferation and migration as well as their morphogenic differentiation into capillary-like tubular structures in Matrigel. Our study demonstrates that HT, Tax and OA are novel and potent inhibitors of the VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. These findings emphasize the chemopreventive properties of olive oil and highlight the importance of nutrition in cancer prevention. - Highlights: • We investigated five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil on angiogenesis. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid are the best angiogenesis inhibitors. • Olive oil compounds affect endothelial cell functions essential for

  6. Olive oil compounds inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, Sylvie, E-mail: lamy.sylvie@uqam.ca; Ouanouki, Amira; Béliveau, Richard; Desrosiers, Richard R.

    2014-03-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) triggers crucial signaling processes that regulate tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, represents an attractive target for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. Several epidemiological studies have confirmed that abundant consumption of foods from plant origin is associated with reduced risk of developing cancers. In the Mediterranean basin, the consumption of extra virgin olive oil is an important constituent of the diet. Compared to other vegetable oils, the presence of several phenolic antioxidants in olive oil is believed to prevent the occurrence of a variety of pathological processes, such as cancer. While the strong antioxidant potential of these molecules is well characterized, their antiangiogenic activities remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (HT), taxifolin (Tax), oleuropein (OL) and oleic acid (OA), five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil, can affect in vitro angiogenesis. We found that HT, Tax and OA were the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors through their inhibitory effect on specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2 (Tyr951, Tyr1059, Tyr1175 and Tyr1214) leading to the inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) signaling. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 by these olive oil compounds significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC proliferation and migration as well as their morphogenic differentiation into capillary-like tubular structures in Matrigel. Our study demonstrates that HT, Tax and OA are novel and potent inhibitors of the VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. These findings emphasize the chemopreventive properties of olive oil and highlight the importance of nutrition in cancer prevention. - Highlights: • We investigated five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil on angiogenesis. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid are the best angiogenesis inhibitors. • Olive oil compounds affect endothelial cell functions essential for

  7. Unconjugated Bilirubin Inhibits Proteolytic Cleavage of von Willebrand Factor by ADAMTS13 Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rui-Nan; Yang, Shangbin; Wu, Haifeng M.; Zheng, X. Long

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Bilirubin is a yellow breakdown product of heme catabolism. Increased serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin are conditions commonly seen in premature neonates and adults with acute hemolysis including thrombotic microangiopathy. Previous studies have shown that unconjugated bilirubin lowers plasma ADAMTS13 activity, but the mechanism is not fully understood. Objectives The study is to determine whether unconjugated bilirubin directly inhibits the cleavage of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and its analogs by ADAMTS13. Methods Fluorogenic, SELDI-TOF mass spectrometric assay, and Western blotting analyses were employed to address this question. Results Unconjugated bilirubin inhibits the cleavage of F485-rVWF73-H, D633-rVWF73-H, and GST-rVWF71-11K by ADAMTS13 in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of ~13 μM, ~70 μM, and ~17 μM, respectively. Unconjugated bilirubin also dose-dependently inhibits the cleavage of multimeric VWF by ADAMTS13 under denaturing conditions. The inhibitory activity of bilirubin on the cleavage of D633-rVWF73-H and multimeric VWF, but not F485-rVWF73-H, was eliminated after incubation with bilirubin oxidase that converts bilirubin to biliverdin. Furthermore, plasma ADAMTS13 activity in patients with hyperbilirubinemia is lower prior to than after treatment with bilirubin oxidase. Conclusions unconjugated bilirubin directly inhibits ADAMTS13’s ability to cleave both peptidyl and native VWF substrates in addition to its interference with certain fluorogenic assays. Our findings may help proper interpretation of ADAMTS13 results under pathological conditions. Whether elevated serum unconjugated bilirubin has an adverse effect in vivo remains to be determined in our future study. PMID:25782102

  8. Synthesis and characterization of (18)F-labeled active site inhibited factor VII (ASIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Maria; Nielsen, Carsten H; Jeppesen, Troels E; Kristensen, Jesper B; Petersen, Lars C; Madsen, Jacob; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-05-15

    Activated factor VII blocked in the active site with Phe-Phe-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (active site inhibited factor VII (ASIS)) is a 50-kDa protein that binds with high affinity to its receptor, tissue factor (TF). TF is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an important role in, for example, thrombosis, metastasis, tumor growth, and tumor angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to develop an (18)F-labeled ASIS derivative to assess TF expression in tumors. Active site inhibited factor VII was labeled using N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate, and the [(18)F]ASIS was purified on a PD-10 desalting column. The radiochemical yield was 25 ± 6%, the radiochemical purity was >97%, and the pseudospecific radioactivity was 35 ± 9 GBq/µmol. The binding efficacy was evaluated in pull-down experiments, which monitored the binding of unlabeled ASIS and [(18)F]ASIS to TF and to a specific anti-factor VII antibody (F1A2-mAb). No significant difference in binding efficacy between [(18)F]ASIS and ASIS could be detected. Furthermore, [(18)F]ASIS was relatively stable in vitro and in vivo in mice. In conclusion, [(18)F]ASIS has for the first time been successfully synthesized as a possible positron emission tomography tracer to image TF expression levels. In vivo positron emission tomography studies to evaluate the full potential of [(18)F]ASIS are in progress. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Free amino acids exhibit anthozoan "host factor" activity: they induce the release of photosynthate from symbiotic dinoflagellates in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, R D; Hoegh-Guldberg, O; McFall-Ngai, M J; Bil, K Y; Muscatine, L

    1995-08-01

    Reef-building corals and other tropical anthozoans harbor endosymbiotic dinoflagellates. It is now recognized that the dinoflagellates are fundamental to the biology of their hosts, and their carbon and nitrogen metabolisms are linked in important ways. Unlike free living species, growth of symbiotic dinoflagellates is unbalanced and a substantial fraction of the carbon fixed daily by symbiont photosynthesis is released and used by the host for respiration and growth. Release of fixed carbon as low molecular weight compounds by freshly isolated symbiotic dinoflagellates is evoked by a factor (i.e., a chemical agent) present in a homogenate of host tissue. We have identified this "host factor" in the Hawaiian coral Pocillopora damicornis as a set of free amino acids. Synthetic amino acid mixtures, based on the measured free amino acid pools of P. damicornis tissues, not only elicit the selective release of 14C-labeled photosynthetic products from isolated symbiotic dinoflagellates but also enhance total 14CO2 fixation.

  10. Dominant dwarfism in transgenic rats by targeting human growth hormone (GH) expression to hypothalamic GH-releasing factor neurons.

    OpenAIRE

    Flavell, D M; Wells, T; Wells, S E; Carmignac, D F; Thomas, G B; Robinson, I C

    1996-01-01

    Expression of human growth hormone (hGH) was targeted to growth hormone-releasing (GRF) neurons in the hypothalamus of transgenic rats. This induced dominant dwarfism by local feedback inhibition of GRF. One line, bearing a single copy of a GRF-hGH transgene, has been characterized in detail, and has been termed Tgr (for Transgenic growth-retarded). hGH was detected by immunocytochemistry in the brain, restricted to the median eminence of the hypothalamus. Low levels were also detected in the...

  11. Inhibition of growth of experimental prostate cancer with sustained delivery systems (microcapsules and microgranules) of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist SB-75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, E; Bokser, L; Comaru-Schally, A M; Groot, K; Schally, A V

    1991-02-01

    Inhibitory effects of the sustained delivery systems (microcapsules and microgranules) of a potent antagonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone N-Ac-[3-(2-naphthyl)-D-alanine1, 4-chloro-D-phenylalanine2, 3-(3-pyridyl)-D-alanine3, D-citrulline6, D-alanine10]LH-RH (SB-75) on the growth of experimental prostate cancers were investigated. In the first experiment, three doses of a microcapsule preparation releasing 23.8, 47.6, and 71.4 micrograms of antagonist SB-75 per day were compared with microcapsules of agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH liberating 25 micrograms/day in rats bearing Dunning R3327H transplantable prostate carcinoma. During 8 weeks of treatment, tumor growth was decreased by [D-Trp6]LH-RH and all three doses of SB-75 as compared to untreated controls. The highest dose of SB-75 (71.4 micrograms/day) caused a greater inhibition of prostate cancer growth than [D-Trp6]LH-RH as based on measurement of tumor volume and percentage change in tumor volume. Doses of 23.8 and 47.6 micrograms of SB-75 per day induced a partial and submaximal decrease, respectively, in tumor weight and volume. Tumor doubling time was the longest (50 days) with the high dose of SB-75 vs. 15 days for controls. The body weights were unchanged. The weights of testes, seminal vesicles, and ventral prostate were greatly reduced in all three groups that received SB-75, and testosterone levels were decreased to nondetectable values in the case of the two higher doses of SB-75. LH levels were also diminished. Similar results were obtained in the second experiment, in which the animals were treated for a period of 8 weeks with microgranules of SB-75. Therapy with microgranules of SB-75 significantly decreased tumor growth as measured by the final tumor volume, the percentage change from the initial tumor volume, and the reduction in tumor weight. The results indicate that antagonist SB-75, released from sustained delivery systems, can produce a state of chemical castration and effectively

  12. PLC-dependent intracellular Ca2+ release was associated with C6-ceramide-induced inhibition of Na+ current in rat granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Fei, Xiao-Wei; Fang, Yan-Jia; Shi, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Qiu; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2008-09-01

    In this report, the effects of C(6)-ceramide on the voltage-gated inward Na(+) currents (I(Na)), two types of main K(+) current [outward rectifier delayed K(+) current (I(K)) and outward transient K(+) current (I(A))], and cell death in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells were investigated. At concentrations of 0.01-100 microM, ceramide produced a dose-dependent and reversible inhibition of I(Na) without alteration of the steady-state activation and inactivation properties. Treatment with C(2)-ceramide caused a similar inhibitory effect on I(Na). However, dihydro-C(6)-ceramide failed to modulate I(Na). The effect of C(6)-ceramide on I(Na) was abolished by intracellular infusion of the Ca(2+)-chelating agent, 1,2-bis (2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N, N, N9, N9-tetraacetic acid, but was mimicked by application of caffeine. Blocking the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum with ryanodine receptor blocker induced a gradual increase in I(Na) amplitude and eliminated the effect of ceramide on I(Na). In contrast, the blocker of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive Ca(2+) receptor did not affect the action of C(6)-ceramide. Intracellular application of GTPgammaS also induced a gradual decrease in I(Na) amplitude, while GDPbetaS eliminated the effect of C(6)-ceramide on I(Na). Furthermore, the C(6)-ceramide effect on I(Na) was abolished after application of the phospholipase C (PLC) blockers and was greatly reduced by the calmodulin inhibitors. Fluorescence staining showed that C(6)-ceramide decreased cell viability and blocking I(Na) by tetrodotoxin did not mimic the effect of C(6)-ceramide, and inhibiting intracellular Ca(2+) release by dantrolene could not decrease the C(6)-ceramide-induced cell death. We therefore suggest that increased PLC-dependent Ca(2+) release through the ryanodine-sensitive Ca(2+) receptor may be responsible for the C(6)-ceramide-induced inhibition of I(Na), which does not seem to be associated with C(6)-ceramide-induced granule

  13. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  14. Nutmeg oil alleviates chronic inflammatory pain through inhibition of COX-2 expression and substance P release in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Kevin Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic pain, or sometimes referred to as persistent pain, reduces the life quality of patients who are suffering from chronic diseases such as inflammatory diseases, cancer and diabetes. Hence, herbal medicines draw many attentions and have been shown effective in the treatment or relief of pain. Methods and Results: Here in this study, we used the CFA-injected rats as a sustainable pain model to test the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of nutmeg oil, a spice flavor additive to beverages and baked goods produced from the seed of Myristica fragrans tree. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that nutmeg oil could potentially alleviate the CFA-injection induced joint swelling, mechanical allodynia and heat hyperanalgesia of rats through inhibition of COX-2 expression and blood substance P level, which made it possible for nutmeg oil to be a potential chronic pain reliever.

  15. Ecto-ATPase inhibition: ATP and adenosine release under physiological and ischemic in vivo conditions in the rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melani, Alessia; Corti, Francesca; Stephan, Holger; Müller, Christa E; Donati, Chiara; Bruni, Paola; Vannucchi, Maria Giuliana; Pedata, Felicita

    2012-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS) ATP and adenosine act as transmitters and neuromodulators on their own receptors but it is still unknown which part of extracellular adenosine derives per se from cells and which part is formed from the hydrolysis of released ATP. In this study extracellular concentrations of adenosine and ATP from the rat striatum were estimated by the microdialysis technique under in vivo physiological conditions and after focal ischemia induced by medial cerebral artery occlusion. Under physiological conditions, adenosine and ATP concentrations were in the range of 130 nmol/L and 40 nmol/L, respectively. In the presence of the novel ecto-ATPase inhibitor, PV4 (100 nmol/L), the extracellular concentration of ATP increased 12-fold to ~360 nmol/L but the adenosine concentration was not altered. This demonstrates that, under physiological conditions, adenosine is not a product of extracellular ATP. In the first 4h after ischemia, adenosine increased to ~690 nmol/L and ATP to ~50 nmol/L. In the presence of PV4 the extracellular concentration of ATP was in the range of 450 nmol/L and a significant decrease in extracellular adenosine (to ~270 nmol/L) was measured. The contribution of extracellular ATP to extracellular adenosine was maximal in the first 20 min after ischemia onset. Furthermore we demonstrated, by immunoelectron microscopy, the presence of the concentrative nucleoside transporter CNT2 on plasma and vesicle membranes isolated from the rat striatum. These results are in favor that adenosine is transported in vesicles and is released in an excitation-secretion manner under in vivo physiological conditions. Early after ischemia, extracellular ATP is hydrolyzed by ecto-nucleotidases which significantly contribute to the increase in extracellular adenosine. To establish the contribution of extracellular ATP to adenosine might constitute the basis for devising a correct putative purinergic strategy aimed at protection from ischemic damage

  16. JS-K, a glutathione/glutathione S-transferase-activated nitric oxide releasing prodrug inhibits androgen receptor and WNT-signaling in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschak, Martin; Spindler, Klaus-Dieter; Schrader, Andres J; Hessenauer, Andrea; Streicher, Wolfgang; Schrader, Mark; Cronauer, Marcus V

    2012-03-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its oxidative reaction products have been repeatedly shown to block steroid receptor function via nitrosation of zinc finger structures in the DNA-binding domain (DBD). In consequence NO-donors could be of special interest for the treatment of deregulated androgen receptor(AR)-signaling in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Prostate cancer (PCa) cells were treated with JS-K, a diazeniumdiolate derivate capable of generating large amounts of intracellular NO following activation by glutathione S-transferase. Generation of NO was determined indirectly by the detection of nitrate in tissue culture medium or by immunodetection of nitrotyrosine in the cytoplasm. Effects of JS-K on intracellular AR-levels were determined by western blotting. AR-dimerization was analyzed by mammalian two hybrid assay, nuclear translocation of the AR was visualized in PCa cells transfected with a green fluorescent AR-Eos fusion protein using fluorescence microscopy. Modulation of AR- and WNT-signalling by JS-K was investigated using reporter gene assays. Tumor cell proliferation following JS-K treatment was measured by MTT-Assay. The NO-releasing compound JS-K was shown to inhibit AR-mediated reporter gene activity in 22Rv1 CRPC cells. Inhibition of AR signaling was neither due to an inhibition of nuclear import nor to a reduction in AR-dimerization. In contrast to previously tested NO-donors, JS-K was able to reduce the intracellular concentration of functional AR. This could be attributed to the generation of extremely high intracellular levels of the free radical NO as demonstrated indirectly by high levels of nitrotyrosine in JS-K treated cells. Moreover, JS-K diminished WNT-signaling in AR-positive 22Rv1 cells. In line with these observations, castration resistant 22Rv1 cells were found to be more susceptible to the growth inhibitory effects of JS-K than the androgen dependent LNCaP which do not exhibit an active WNT-signaling pathway. Our results

  17. Nitric oxide-releasing agents enhance cytokine-induced tumor necrosis factor synthesis in human mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eigler, A; Sinha, B; Endres, S

    1993-01-01

    In septic shock tumor necrosis factor (TNF) leads to increased nitric oxide (NO) production by induction of NO synthase. An inverse regulatory effect, the influence of NO on cytokine synthesis, has rarely been investigated. The present study assessed the influence of NO-releasing agents on TNF

  18. Ghrelin Attenuated Lipotoxicity via Autophagy Induction and Nuclear Factor-κB Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Mao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. Autophagy is associated with NAFLD. Ghrelin is a gut hormone with various functions including energy metabolism and inflammation inhibition. We investigated the therapeutic effect of ghrelin on NAFLD and its association with autophagy. Methods: C57bl/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks to induce a model of chronic NAFLD, with ghrelin (10 µg/kg administrated subcutaneously twice weekly from weeks 6 to 8. LO2 cells were pretreated with ghrelin (10-8 M before stimulation with free fatty acid (palmitic and oleic acids; 1 mM. Lipid droplets were identified by hematoxylin and eosin and Red O staining and quantified by triglyceride test kits. LC3I/II, an important biomarker protein of autophagy was detected by western blotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-a and interleukin (IL-6 were detected by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. Nuclear factor (NF-κB p65 was detected by western blotting and immunofluorescence. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR were detected by western blotting. Results: Ghrelin reduced the triglyceride content in high fat diet (HFD group in vivo and free fatty acid (FFA group in vitro. TNF-a and IL-6 were significantly reduced in the ghrelin-treated mice compared with the control group. Autophagy induction was accompanied with intracellular lipid reduction in ghrelin-treated mice. Ghrelin upregulated autophagy via AMPK/mTOR restoration and inhibited translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus. Conclusions: The results indicate that ghrelin attenuates lipotoxicity by autophagy stimulation and NF-κB inhibition.

  19. Memory extinction entails the inhibition of the transcription factor NF-kappaB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Merlo

    Full Text Available In contextual memories, an association between a positive or negative reinforcement and the contextual cues where the reinforcement occurs is formed. The re-exposure to the context without reinforcement can lead to memory extinction or reconsolidation, depending on the number of events or duration of a single event of context re-exposure. Extinction involves the temporary waning of the previously acquired conditioned response. The molecular processes underlying extinction and the mechanisms which determine if memory will reconsolidate or extinguish after retrieval are not well characterized, particularly the role of transcription factors and gene expression. Here we studied the participation of a transcription factor, NF-kappaB, in memory extinction. In the crab context-signal memory, the activation of NF-kappaB plays a critical role in consolidation and reconsolidation, memory processes that are well characterized in this model. The administration of a NF-kappaB inhibitor, sulfasalazine prior to extinction session impeded spontaneous recovery. Moreover, reinstatement experiments showed that the original memory was not affected and that NF-kappaB inhibition by sulfasalazine impaired spontaneous recovery strengthening the ongoing memory extinction process. Interestingly, in animals with fully consolidated memory, a brief re-exposure to the training context induced neuronal NF-kappaB activation and reconsolidation, while prolonged re-exposure induced NF-kappaB inhibition and memory extinction. These data constitutes a novel insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the switch between memory reconsolidation and extinction. Moreover, we propose the inhibition of NF-kappaB as the engaged mechanism underlying extinction, supporting a novel approach for the pharmacological enhancement of this memory process. The accurate description of the molecular mechanisms that support memory extinction is potentially useful for developing new strategies

  20. Effects of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase inhibition on radiation response in canine osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Fernanda B; Morrison, Jodi A; Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2016-05-31

    Radiation therapy is a palliative treatment modality for canine osteosarcoma, with transient improvement in analgesia observed in many cases. However there is room for improvement in outcome for these patients. It is possible that the addition of sensitizing agents may increase tumor response to radiation therapy and prolong quality of life. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression has been documented in canine osteosarcoma and higher EGFR levels have been correlated to a worse prognosis. However, effects of EGFR inhibition on radiation responsiveness in canine osteosarcoma have not been previously characterized. This study examined the effects of the small molecule EGFR inhibitor erlotinib on canine osteosarcoma radiation responses, target and downstream protein expression in vitro. Additionally, to assess the potential impact of treatment on tumor angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in conditioned media were measured. Erlotinib as a single agent reduced clonogenic survival in two canine osteosarcoma cell lines and enhanced the impact of radiation in one out of three cell lines investigated. In cell viability assays, erlotinib enhanced radiation effects and demonstrated single agent effects. Erlotinib did not alter total levels of EGFR, nor inhibit downstream protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) activation. On the contrary, erlotinib treatment increased phosphorylated Akt in these osteosarcoma cell lines. VEGF levels in conditioned media increased after erlotinib treatment as a single agent and in combination with radiation in two out of three cell lines investigated. However, VEGF levels decreased with erlotinib treatment in the third cell line. Erlotinib treatment promoted modest enhancement of radiation effects in canine osteosarcoma cells, and possessed activity as a single agent in some cell lines, indicating a potential role for EGFR inhibition in the treatment of a subset of osteosarcoma patients. The relative radioresistance of

  1. AZD5363 inhibits inflammatory synergy between interleukin-17 and insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong eChen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, one third of population is affected by obesity and almost 29 million people are suffering from type 2 diabetes. Obese people have elevated serum levels of insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 and interleukin-17 (IL-17. Insulin and IGF1 are known to enhance IL-17-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which may contribute to the chronic inflammatory status observed in obese people. We have previously demonstrated that insulin/IGF1 signaling pathway crosstalks with IL-17-activated nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB pathway through inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β activity. However, it is unclear whether GSK3α also plays a role and whether this crosstalk can be manipulated by AZD5363, a novel pan-Akt inhibitor that has been shown to increase GSK3 activity through reducing phosphorylation of GSK3α and GSK3β. In this study, we investigated IL-17-induced expression of C-X-C motif ligand 1 (Cxcl1, C-C motif ligand 20 (Ccl20 and interleukin-6 (Il-6 in wild-type, GSK3α-/-, and GSK3β-/- mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells as well as in mouse prostate tissues by real-time quantitative PCR. We examined the proteins involved in the signaling pathways by Western blot analysis. We found that insulin and IGF1 enhanced IL-17- induced expression of Cxcl1, Ccl20 and Il-6, which was associated with increased phosphorylation of GSK3α and GSK3β in the presence of insulin and IGF1. AZD5363 inhibited the synergy between IL-17 and insulin/IGF1 through reducing phosphorylation of GSK3α and GSK3β by inhibiting Akt function. These findings imply that the cooperative crosstalk of IL-17 and insulin/IGF1 in initiating inflammatory responses may be alleviated by AZD5363.

  2. Presence of corticotrophin-releasing factor and/or tyrosine hydroxylase in cells of a neural brain-testicular pathway that are labelled by a transganglionic tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P; Rivier, C; Lee, S

    2008-02-01

    Our laboratory has shown that male testosterone levels are not solely controlled by the release of hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone and pituitary luteinising hormone, but are also regulated by a multisynaptic pathway connecting the brain and the testis that interferes with the testosterone response to gonadotrophins. This pathway, which is independent of the pituitary gland, is activated by an i.c.v. injection of either the stress-related peptide corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) or of beta-adrenoceptor agonists, both of which alter androgen release and decrease levels of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor and the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein within Leydig cells. Our original studies used the retrograde transganglionic tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) to map progression of the virus from the testes to upper brain levels. The present study aimed to extend this work by identifying the regions where CRF and catecholamine neurones represented components of the stress-activated, brain-testicular pathway that prevents testosterone increases. To this end, anaesthetised adult male rats received an intra-testicular injection of PRV. Using immunofluorescence, we identified co-labelling of PRV and either CRF or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the enzyme responsible for biogenic amine synthesis. Co-labelling of PRV and CRF was found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the central amygdala. Co-labelling of PRV and TH was found in the PVN, substantia nigra, A7/Kölliker-Fuse area, area of A5, locus coeruleus, nucleus of solitary tract, area of C3, area of C2 and the area of C1/A1. These results indicate that most cell groups of the ventral noradrenergic pathway have neurones that are a part of the brain-testicular pathway. This suggests that the stress hormones CRF and catecholamines may act as neurotransmitters that signal the pathway to inhibit increases in plasma testosterone levels.

  3. FACTORS WHICH INHIBIT PROFESSORIAL CREATIVITY. PSYCHO PEDAGOGICAL ANALYSIS / FACTORES QUE INHIBEN LA CREATIVIDAD PROFESORAL. ANÁLISIS PSICOPEDAGÓGICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odiel Estrada Molina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Several researches exposed some factors that inhibit creative thinking, but generally without psychological or pedagogical argument. In this paper is shown from a psycho pedagogical perspective some factors that hinder the development of creativity, and its final execution to students. It presents four types of inhibitory factors of creativity as: a Disorders in the affective process of teachers; b The burnout syndrome, c The modeling, and d the application ineffective communication styles. It refers to the disturbances in the processes of psychological phenomena; outlines the main theories of emotion, burnout, and modeling, and its negative impact on creativity, finally makes a pedagogical reflection on the different communication styles and their relationship with creativity.RESUMENDiversas investigaciones exponen algunos factores que inhiben el pensamiento creativo, pero generalmente sin una previa argumentación psicológica o pedagógica, es por ello que en este trabajo se presenta desde una perspectiva psicopedagógica cuatro factores que impiden el desarrollo de la creatividad, así como su ejecución final ante los alumnos. Los factores que se exponen en este trabajo son a los trastornos en el proceso afectivo del profesor; b el síndrome de desgaste profesional; c la imitación o el modelado; y d la aplicación inefectiva de los estilos de comunicación. En el desarrollo del artículo se alude a los trastornos en los procesos de los fenómenos psicológicos; se exponen las principales teorías sobre las emociones, el burnout y el modelado, y sus consecuencias negativas en la creatividad, por último se realiza una reflexión pedagógica sobre los diferentes estilos de comunicación y su relación con la creatividad.

  4. Low-molecular-weight organoiodine and organobromine compounds released by polar macroalgae--the influence of abiotic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laturnus, F; Giese, B; Wiencke, C; Adams, F C

    2000-01-01

    The influence of temperature, light, salinity and nutrient availability on the release of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons was investigated in the Antarctic red macroalgal species Gymnogongrus antarcticus Skottsberg. Compared to standard culture condition, an increase in the release rates of iodocompounds was generally found for the exposure of the alga to altered environmental conditions. Macroalgae exhibited higher release rates after adaptation for two months to the changed factors, than after short-term exposure. Monitoring the release rates during a 24 h incubation period (8.25 h light, 15.75 h darkness) showed that changes between light and dark periods had no influence on the release of volatile halocarbons. Compounds like bromoform and 1-iodobutane exhibited constant release rates during the 24 h period. The formation mechanisms and biological role of volatile organohalogens are discussed. Although marine macroalgae are not considered to be the major source of biogenically-produced volatile organohalogens, they contribute significantly to the bromine and iodine cycles in the environment. Under possible environmental changes like global warming and uncontrolled entrophication of the oceans their significance may be increase.

  5. Inhibition of Ribosome Recruitment Induces Stress Granule Formation Independently of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2α Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazroui, Rachid; Sukarieh, Rami; Bordeleau, Marie-Eve; Kaufman, Randal J.; Northcote, Peter; Tanaka, Junichi; Gallouzi, Imed

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic aggregates known as stress granules (SGs) arise as a consequence of cellular stress and contain stalled translation preinitiation complexes. These foci are thought to serve as sites of mRNA storage or triage during the cell stress response. SG formation has been shown to require induction of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)2α phosphorylation. Herein, we investigate the potential role of other initiation factors in this process and demonstrate that interfering with eIF4A activity, an RNA helicase required for the ribosome recruitment phase of translation initiation, induces SG formation and that this event is not dependent on eIF2α phosphorylation. We also show that inhibition of eIF4A activity does not impair the ability of eIF2α to be phosphorylated under stress conditions. Furthermore, we observed SG assembly upon inhibition of cap-dependent translation after poliovirus infection. We propose that SG modeling can occur via both eIF2α phosphorylation-dependent and -independent pathways that target translation initiation. PMID:16870703

  6. Inhibition of ribosome recruitment induces stress granule formation independently of eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazroui, Rachid; Sukarieh, Rami; Bordeleau, Marie-Eve; Kaufman, Randal J; Northcote, Peter; Tanaka, Junichi; Gallouzi, Imed; Pelletier, Jerry

    2006-10-01

    Cytoplasmic aggregates known as stress granules (SGs) arise as a consequence of cellular stress and contain stalled translation preinitiation complexes. These foci are thought to serve as sites of mRNA storage or triage during the cell stress response. SG formation has been shown to require induction of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)2alpha phosphorylation. Herein, we investigate the potential role of other initiation factors in this process and demonstrate that interfering with eIF4A activity, an RNA helicase required for the ribosome recruitment phase of translation initiation, induces SG formation and that this event is not dependent on eIF2alpha phosphorylation. We also show that inhibition of eIF4A activity does not impair the ability of eIF2alpha to be phosphorylated under stress conditions. Furthermore, we observed SG assembly upon inhibition of cap-dependent translation after poliovirus infection. We propose that SG modeling can occur via both eIF2alpha phosphorylation-dependent and -independent pathways that target translation initiation.

  7. Inhibition of the mitogenic response to platelet-derived growth factor by terbinafine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Denny, I.H.; Glinka, K.G.; Nemecek, G.M.; Stuetz, A.

    1987-01-01

    Terbinafine (T;(E)-N-(6,6-dimethyl-2-hepten-4-ynyl)-N-methyl-1-naphthalenemethanamine), an antimycotic which inhibits fungal squalene epoxidase activity, was examined for its effects on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated mitogenesis. The inclusion of 1.5-5μM T in fibroblast incubation media was associated with increased [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in the presence and absence of PDGF. However, T at concentrations above 6μM reduced DNA synthesis in control and PDGF-exposed cultures to nearly undetectable levels. Under a phase-contrast microscope, fibroblasts appeared morphologically normal at T concentrations as high as 25 μM. Neither the uptake of [ 3 H]thymidine nor the specific binding of 125 I-PDGF to fibroblast receptors was significantly affected by 10 μM T. Furthermore, concentrations of T which antagonized the mitogenic response to PDGF also interfered with fibroblast growth factor-induced mitogenesis. Together, these data suggest that T has the ability to inhibit the in vitro action of PDGF via a post-receptor mechanism

  8. Inhibition of the mitogenic response to platelet-derived growth factor by terbinafine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. Denny, I.H.; Glinka, K.G.; Nemecek, G.M. (Sandoz Research Institute, East Hanover, NJ (USA)); Stuetz, A. (Sandoz Forschungsinstitut, Vienna (Austria))

    1987-05-01

    Terbinafine (T;(E)-N-(6,6-dimethyl-2-hepten-4-ynyl)-N-methyl-1-naphthalenemethanamine), an antimycotic which inhibits fungal squalene epoxidase activity, was examined for its effects on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated mitogenesis. The inclusion of 1.5-5{mu}M T in fibroblast incubation media was associated with increased ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into DNA in the presence and absence of PDGF. However, T at concentrations above 6{mu}M reduced DNA synthesis in control and PDGF-exposed cultures to nearly undetectable levels. Under a phase-contrast microscope, fibroblasts appeared morphologically normal at T concentrations as high as 25 {mu}M. Neither the uptake of ({sup 3}H)thymidine nor the specific binding of {sup 125}I-PDGF to fibroblast receptors was significantly affected by 10 {mu}M T. Furthermore, concentrations of T which antagonized the mitogenic response to PDGF also interfered with fibroblast growth factor-induced mitogenesis. Together, these data suggest that T has the ability to inhibit the in vitro action of PDGF via a post-receptor mechanism.

  9. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-dependent lung adenocarcinoma with a human monoclonal antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Yin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 have been identified in multiple types of human cancer and in congenital birth defects. In human lung cancer, fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9, a high-affinity ligand for FGFR3, is overexpressed in 10% of primary resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC specimens. Furthermore, in a mouse model where FGF9 can be induced in lung epithelial cells, epithelial proliferation and ensuing tumorigenesis is dependent on FGFR3. To develop new customized therapies for cancers that are dependent on FGFR3 activation, we have used this mouse model to evaluate a human monoclonal antibody (D11 with specificity for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of FGFR3, that recognizes both human and mouse forms of the receptor. Here, we show that D11 effectively inhibits signaling through FGFR3 in vitro, inhibits the growth of FGFR3-dependent FGF9-induced lung adenocarcinoma in mice, and reduces tumor-associated morbidity. Given the potency of FGF9 in this mouse model and the absolute requirement for signaling through FGFR3, this study validates the D11 antibody as a potentially useful and effective reagent for treating human cancers or other pathologies that are dependent on activation of FGFR3.

  10. Human interleukin for DA cells or leukemia inhibitory factor is released by Vero cells in human embryo coculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaxanthos-Roche, A; Taupin, J L; Mayer, G; Daniel, J Y; Moreau, J F

    1994-09-01

    In the light of the newly discovered implications of human interleukin for DA cells and leukemia inhibitory factor in embryology, we searched for the presence of this soluble cytokine in the supernatant of Vero cell coculture systems. Using a bioassay as well as a specific ELISA, we demonstrated that Vero cells are able to release large quantities of human interleukin for DA cells and leukemia inhibitory factor in the embryo-growing medium of such cocultures.

  11. Plutonium in the environment: key factors related to impact assessment in case of an accidental atmospheric release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guetat, P. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Moulin, V.; Reiller, P. [CEA Saclay, 91 (FR)] (and others)

    2009-07-01

    This paper deals with plutonium and key factors related to impact assessment. It is based on recent work performed by CEA which summarize the main features of plutonium behaviour from sources inside installations to the environment and man, and to report current knowledge on the different parameters used in models for environmental and radiological impact assessment. These key factors are illustrated through a case study based on an accidental atmospheric release of Pu in a nuclear facility. (orig.)

  12. Effect of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor antagonist on psychologically suppressed masculine sexual behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Yoshiji; Nagase, Keiko; Oyama, Nobuyuki; Akino, Hironobu; Yokoyama, Osamu

    2011-03-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) coordinates various responses of the body to stress, and CRF receptors are important targets of treatment for stress-related disorders. To investigate the effect of a nonselective CRF receptor antagonist, astressin, on suppression of masculine sexual behavior by psychological stress in rats. First, we investigated the influence of psychological stress, induced 2 hours per day for three consecutive days, on sexual behavior. Then, rats were divided into 4 groups: a control group, an astressin administration group (A), a psychological stress loading group (PS), and a psychological stress loading and astressin administration group (PS + A). The rats were exposed to sham or psychological stress for three consecutive days. After the last stress loading, the rats were injected with vehicle or astressin, and their sexual behavior was observed. We also measured serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). The effects of astressin on sexual behavior and serum levels of ACTH in rats affected by psychological stress were determined. Sexual behavior was reduced after psychological stress loading. The PS rats had significantly longer mount, intromission, and ejaculation latencies and lower ejaculation frequency than did the control, A, and PS + A rats. The intromission latency and ejaculation frequency in the PS + A rats did not achieve the level observed in the controls. There was no significant difference in these parameters between the control and A rats. Serum ACTH levels were significantly lower in PS + A rats than in PS rats. Psychologically suppressed masculine sexual behavior could be partially recovered with astressin administration in rats. These data provide a rationale for the further study of CRF receptor antagonists as novel agents for treating psychological sexual disorders. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. Common and divergent structural features of a series of corticotropin releasing factor-related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Christy Rani R; Perrin, Marilyn H; Cantle, Jeffrey P; Vale, Wylie W; Rivier, Jean E; Riek, Roland

    2007-12-26

    Members of the corticoliberin family include the corticotropin releasing factors (CRFs), sauvagine, the urotensins, and urocortin 1 (Ucn1), which bind to both the CRF receptors CRF-R1 and CRF-R2, and the urocortins 2 (Ucn2) and 3 (Ucn3), which are selective agonists of CRF-R2. Structure activity relationship studies led to several potent and long-acting analogues with selective binding to either one of the receptors. NMR structures of six ligands of this family (the antagonists astressin B and astressin2-B, the agonists stressin1, and the natural ligands human Ucn1, Ucn2, and Ucn3) were determined in DMSO. These six peptides show differences in binding affinities, receptor-selectivity, and NMR structure. Overall, their backbones are alpha-helical, with a small kink or a turn around residues 25-27, resulting in a helix-loop-helix motif. The C-terminal helices are of amphipathic nature, whereas the N-terminal helices vary in their amphipathicity. The C-terminal helices thereby assume a conformation very similar to that of astressin bound to the ECD1 of CRF-R2 recently reported by our group.1 On the basis of an analysis of the observed 3D structures and relative potencies of [Ala]-substituted analogues, it is proposed that both helices could play a crucial role in receptor binding and selectivity. In conclusion, the C-terminal helices may interact along their hydrophobic faces with the ECD1, whereas the entire N-terminal helical surface may be involved in receptor activation. On the basis of the common and divergent features observed in the 3D structures of these ligands, multiple binding models are proposed that may explain their plurality of actions.

  14. Protamine sulfate down-regulates thrombin generation by inhibiting factor V activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Ainle, Fionnuala

    2009-08-20

    Protamine sulfate is a positively charged polypeptide widely used to reverse heparin-induced anticoagulation. Paradoxically, prospective randomized trials have shown that protamine administration for heparin neutralization is associated with increased bleeding, particularly after cardiothoracic surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The molecular mechanism(s) through which protamine mediates this anticoagulant effect has not been defined. In vivo administration of pharmacologic doses of protamine to BALB\\/c mice significantly reduced plasma thrombin generation and prolonged tail-bleeding time (from 120 to 199 seconds). Similarly, in pooled normal human plasma, protamine caused significant dose-dependent prolongations of both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. Protamine also markedly attenuated tissue factor-initiated thrombin generation in human plasma, causing a significant decrease in endogenous thrombin potential (41% +\\/- 7%). As expected, low-dose protamine effectively reversed the anticoagulant activity of unfractionated heparin in plasma. However, elevated protamine concentrations were associated with progressive dose-dependent reduction in thrombin generation. To assess the mechanism by which protamine mediates down-regulation of thrombin generation, the effect of protamine on factor V activation was assessed. Protamine was found to significantly reduce the rate of factor V activation by both thrombin and factor Xa. Protamine mediates its anticoagulant activity in plasma by down-regulation of thrombin generation via a novel mechanism, specifically inhibition of factor V activation.

  15. Growth Factor Inhibiting PKC Sensor in E-coli Environment Using Classification Technique and ANN Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. BASAK

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinease C plays an important role in angiogenesis and apoptosis in cancer. During the phase of angiogenesis the growth factor is up regulated where as during apoptosis the growth factor is down regulated. For down regulation of growth factor the pH environment of intra-cellular fluid has a specific range in the alkaline medium. Protein kinease C along with E-coli through interaction of Selenometabolite is able to maintain that alkaline environment for the apoptosis of the cancer cell with inhibition of the growth factor related to antioxidant/oxidant ratio. The present paper through implementation of Artificial Neural Network and Decision Tree has focused on metastasis linked with Capacitance Relaxation phenomena and down regulation of growth factor (VGEF. In this paper a distributed neural network has been applied to a data mining problem for classification of cancer stages inorder to have proper diagnosis of patient with PKC sensor. The Network was trained off line using 270 patterns each of 6 inputs. Using the weight obtained during training, fresh patterns were tested for accuracy in diagnosis linked with the stages of cancer.

  16. Aeroallergen analyses and their clinical relevance. I. Immunochemical quantification of allergens by RAST-inhibition, Mab-ELISA, basophil histamine release, and counter current immuno electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, C R; Abrahamsen, L; Stahl Skov, P

    1991-01-01

    The aim was to compare IgE and IgG4 RAST-inhibition assay (RI), monoclonal antibody ELISA (Mab-ELISA), counter current immuno electrophoresis (CCIE) and histamine release from basophil leukocytes (HR) for allergen quantification with special reference to aeroallergen detection. As components......-U/ml) than IgE-RI (2*10(3) SQ-U/ml). The ranges of allergen detection limits for the Mab-ELISA were equal for cat and Derm. pter. (10-10(2) SQ-U/ml). The range of allergen detection limits for CCIE, assaying dog were 10(4)-10(5) SQ-U/ml. The ranges of allergen detection limits for HR were equal for cat...

  17. Effect of centrifugation time on growth factor and MMP release of an experimental platelet-rich fibrin-type product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Gülnihal; Gürkan, Ali; Atmaca, Harika; Dönmez, Ayhan; Atilla, Gül

    2016-07-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) has a controlled release of growth factors due to the fibrin matrix structure. Different centrifugation protocols were suggested for PRF preparation. Since the derivation method of PRF can alter its contents, in the present study it is aimed to investigate the cell contents and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AB), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and-8 release from experimental PRF-type membranes obtained with different centrifugation times at 400 gravity. Three blood samples were collected from 20 healthy non-smoker volunteers. One tube was used for whole blood analyses. The other two tubes were centrifuged at 400 g for 10 minutes (group A) or 12 minutes (group B). Each experimental PRF-type membrane was placed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM)and at 1, 24 and 72 hours, TGF-β1, PDGF-AB, VEGF, MMP-1 and -8 release amounts were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The blood cell count of membranes was determined by subtracting plasma supernatant and red blood cell (RBC) mixture from the whole blood cell counts. At 72 hours, the VEGF level of group B was statistically higher than that of group A (p = 0.040). The centrifugation time was not found to influence the release of other growth factors, enzymes and cell counts. Within the limits of the present study, it might be suggested that centrifugation time at a constant gravity has a significant effect on the VEGF levels released from experimental PRF-type membrane. It can be concluded that due to the importance of VEGF in the tissue healing process, membranes obtained at 12-minute centrifugation time may show a superior potential in wound healing.

  18. Optimal Zn-Modified Ca–Si-Based Ceramic Nanocoating with Zn Ion Release for Osteoblast Promotion and Osteoclast Inhibition in Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangming Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the slow release of Zn ion (Zn2+ from nanocoatings and compared the in vitro response of osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 and proosteoclasts (RAW 264.7 cultured on Ca2ZnSi2O7 nanocoated with different Zn/Ca molar ratios on a Ti-6Al-4V (i.e., Ti substrate to optimize cell behaviors and molecule levels. Significant morphology differences were observed among samples. By comparing with pure Ti and CaSiO3 nanocoating, the morphology of Ca2ZnSi2O7 ceramic nanocoatings was rough and contained small nanoparticles or aggregations. Slow Zn2+ release from nanocoatings was observed and Zn2+ concentration was regulated by varying the Zn/Ca ratios. The cell-response results showed Ca2ZnSi2O7 nanocoating at different Zn/Ca molar ratios for osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Compared to other nanocoatings and Ti, sample Zn/Ca (0.3 showed the highest cell viability and upregulated expression of the osteogenic differentiation genes ALP, COL-1, and OCN. Additionally, sample Zn/Ca (0.3 showed the greatest inhibition of RAW 264.7 cell growth and decreased the mRNA levels of osteoclast-related genes OAR, TRAP, and HYA1. Therefore, the optimal Zn-Ca ratio of 0.3 in Ca2ZnSi2O7 ceramic nanocoating on Ti had a dual osteoblast-promoting and osteoclast-inhibiting effect to dynamically balance osteoblasts/osteoclasts. These optimal Zn-Ca ratios are valuable for Ca2ZnSi2O7 ceramic nanocoating on Ti-coated implants for potential applications in bone tissue regeneration.

  19. Factors influencing release of phosphorus from sediments in a high productive polymictic lake system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solim, S U; Wanganeo, A

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) release rates from bottom sediments are high (20.6 mg/m(2)/day) in Dal Lake (India), a polymictic hyper-eutrophic lake. These gross release rates occur over a period of 72 days during summer only. Likewise, a net internal load of 11.3 tons was obtained from mass balance estimates. Significant proportion i.e. approximately 80% of 287.3 tons/yr of nitrate nitrogen (NO(3)-N) load is either eliminated by denitrification or gets entrapped for a short period in high macrophyte biomass of 3.2 kg/m(2) f.w., which eventually get decomposed and nitrogen (N) is released back. These processes result in low lake water NO(3)-N concentrations which potentially influence sediment phosphorus (P) release. Especially, nitrate nitrogen (NO(3)-N) 500 microg/L in the lake waters were associated with high P concentrations. Phosphorus was also observed to increase significantly in relation to temperature and pH, and it seems likely that release of phosphorus and ammonical nitrogen (NH(4)-N) depend on decomposition of rich reserves of organic matter (893 tons d.w. in superficial 10-cm bottom sediment layer). Lake P concentrations were significantly predicted by a multivariate regression model developed for the lake. This study describes significance of various lake water variables in relation to P-release from bottom sediments.

  20. Growth inhibition of tumor cells in vitro by using monoclonal antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory; Ge, Bixia

    2010-07-01

    As the continuation of a previous study, synthetic peptides corresponding to the extracellular domains of human gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor were used to generate additional monoclonal antibodies which were further characterized biochemically and immunologically. Among those identified to recognize GnRH receptor, monoclonal antibodies designated as GHR-103, GHR-106 and GHR-114 were found to exhibit high affinity (Kd L37), when cancer cells were incubated with GnRH or GHR-106. The widespread expressions of GnRH receptor in almost all of the studied human cancer cell lines were also demonstrated by RT-PCR and Western blot assay, as well as indirect immunofluorescence assay with either of these monoclonal antibodies as the primary antibody. In view of the longer half life of antibodies as compared to that of GnRH or its analogs, anti-GnRH receptor monoclonal antibodies in humanized forms could function as GnRH analogs and serve as an ideal candidate of anti-cancer drugs for therapeutic treatments of various cancers in humans as well as for fertility regulations.

  1. The membrane fraction of homogenized rat kidney contains an enzyme that releases epidermal growth factor from the kidney membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1991-01-01

    shows that the membrane fraction of homogenized rat kidney contains an enzyme that releases immuno and receptor reactive EGF from the kidney membranes when incubated at 37 degrees C. Gel filtration shows that the EGF reactivity released from the membranes is similar to the EGF reactivity in rat urine......High levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) are excreted in the urine and high levels of mRNA for the EGF-precursor have been demonstrated in the kidney. The EGF-precursor is a membrane bound peptide in the kidney, but little is known about the renal processing of the precursor. The present study...

  2. Some commonly used brominated flame retardants cause Ca2+-ATPase inhibition, beta-amyloid peptide release and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawaz Al-Mousa

    Full Text Available Brominated flame retardants (BFRs are chemicals commonly used to reduce the flammability of consumer products and are considered pollutants since they have become widely dispersed throughout the environment and have also been shown to bio-accumulate within animals and man. This study investigated the cytotoxicity of some of the most commonly used groups of BFRs on SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The results showed that of the BFRs tested, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD, tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA and decabromodiphenyl ether (DBPE, all are cytotoxic at low micromolar concentrations (LC(50 being 2.7 ± 0.7 µM, 15 ± 4 µM and 28 ± 7 µM, respectively. They induced cell death, at least in part, by apoptosis through activation of caspases. They also increased intracellular [Ca(2+] levels and reactive-oxygen-species within these neuronal cells. Furthermore, these BFRs also caused rapid depolarization of the mitochondria and cytochrome c release in these neuronal cells. Elevated intracellular [Ca(2+] levels appear to occur through a mechanism involving microsomal Ca(2+-ATPase inhibition and this maybe responsible for Ca(2+-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, µM levels of these BFRs caused β-amyloid peptide (Aβ-42 processing and release from these cells with a few hours of exposure. These results therefore shows that these pollutants are both neurotoxic and amyloidogenic in-vitro.

  3. Inhibition of Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia Progression to Carcinoma by Nitric Oxide-Releasing Aspirin in p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ Mice

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    Chinthalapally V. Rao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide-releasing aspirin (NO-aspirin represents a novel class of promising chemopreventive agents. Unlike conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NO-aspirin seems to be free of adverse effects while retaining the beneficial activities of its parent compound. The effect of NO-aspirin on pancreatic carcinogenesis was investigated by assessing the development of precursor pancreatic lesions and adenocarcinomas in KrasG12D/+ transgenic mice that recapitulate human pancreatic cancer progression. Six-week-old male p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ transgenic mice (20 per group were fed diets containing 0, 1000, or 2000 ppm NO-aspirin. The development of pancreatic tumors was monitored by positron emission tomography imaging. All mice were killed at the age of 41 weeks and assessed for pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC and for molecular changes in the tumors. Our results reveal that NO-aspirin at 1000 and 2000 ppm significantly suppressed pancreatic tumor weights, PDAC incidence, and carcinoma in situ (PanIN-3 lesions. The degree of inhibition of PanIN-3 and carcinoma was more pronounced with NO-aspirin at 1000 ppm (58.8% and 48%, respectively than with 2000 ppm (47% and 20%, respectively. NO-aspirin at 1000 ppm significantly inhibited the spread of carcinoma in the pancreas (∼97%; P < .0001. Decreased expression of cyclooxygenase (COX; with ∼42% inhibition of total COX activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, Bcl-2, cyclin D1, and β-catenin was observed, with induction of p21, p38, and p53 in the pancreas of NO-aspirin-treated mice. These results suggest that low-dose NO-aspirin possesses inhibitory activity against pancreatic carcinogenesis by modulating multiple molecular targets.

  4. Inhibition of Release of Vasoactive and Inflammatory Mediators in Airway and Vascular Tissues and Macrophages by a Chinese Herbal Medicine Formula for Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Binh Lenon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal therapies are being used increasingly for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible pharmacological actions and cellular targets of a Chinese herbal formula (RCM-101, which was previously shown to be effective in reducing seasonal allergic rhinitis symptoms in a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Rat and guinea pig isolated tissues (trachea and aorta were used to study the effects of RCM-101 on responses to various mediators. Production of leukotriene B4 in porcine neutrophils and of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide (NO in Raw 264.7 cells were also measured. In rat and guinea pig tracheal preparations, RCM-101 inhibited contractile responses to compound 48/80 but not those to histamine (guinea pig preparations or serotonin (rat preparations. Contractile responses of guinea pig tracheal preparations to carbachol and leukotriene C4, and relaxant responses to substance P and prostaglandin E2 were not affected by RCM-101. In rat aortic preparations, precontracted with phenylephrine, endothelium-dependent relaxant responses to acetylcholine and endothelium-independent relaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside were not affected by RCM-101. However, RCM-101 inhibited relaxations to l-arginine in endothelium-denuded rat aortic preparations, which had been pre-incubated with lipopolysaccharide. RCM-101 did not affect leukotriene B4 formation in isolated porcine neutrophils, induced by the calcium ionophore A23187; however, it inhibited prostaglandin E2 and NO production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages (Raw 264.7 cells.The findings indicate that RCM-101 may have multiple inhibitory actions on the release and/or synthesis of inflammatory mediators involved in allergic rhinitis.

  5. Antagonism of CD11b with neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF inhibits vascular lesions in diabetic retinopathy.

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    Alexander A Veenstra

    Full Text Available Leukocytes and proteins that govern leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells play a causal role in retinal abnormalities characteristic of the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, including diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries. Leukocyte integrin αmβ2 (CD11b/CD18, MAC1, a protein mediating adhesion, has been shown to mediate damage to endothelial cells by activated leukocytes in vitro. We hypothesized that Neutrophil Inhibitory Factor (NIF, a selective antagonist of integrin αmβ2, would inhibit the diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries by inhibiting the excessive interaction between leukocytes and retinal endothelial cells in diabetes. Wild type animals and transgenic animals expressing NIF were made diabetic with streptozotocin and assessed for diabetes-induced retinal vascular abnormalities and leukocyte activation. To assess if the leukocyte blocking therapy compromised the immune system, animals were challenged with bacteria. Retinal superoxide production, leukostasis and leukocyte superoxide production were increased in wild type mice diabetic for 10 weeks, as was the ability of leukocytes isolated from diabetic animals to kill retinal endothelial cells in vitro. Retinal capillary degeneration was significantly increased in wild type mice diabetic 40 weeks. In contrast, mice expressing NIF did not develop any of these abnormalities, with the exception that non-diabetic and diabetic mice expressing NIF generated greater amounts of superoxide than did similar mice not expressing NIF. Importantly, NIF did not significantly impair the ability of mice to clear an opportunistic bacterial challenge, suggesting that NIF did not compromise immune surveillance. We conclude that antagonism of CD11b (integrin αmβ2 by NIF is sufficient to inhibit early stages of diabetic retinopathy, while not compromising the basic immune response.

  6. Antagonism of CD11b with neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF) inhibits vascular lesions in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Alexander A; Tang, Jie; Kern, Timothy S

    2013-01-01

    Leukocytes and proteins that govern leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells play a causal role in retinal abnormalities characteristic of the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, including diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries. Leukocyte integrin αmβ2 (CD11b/CD18, MAC1), a protein mediating adhesion, has been shown to mediate damage to endothelial cells by activated leukocytes in vitro. We hypothesized that Neutrophil Inhibitory Factor (NIF), a selective antagonist of integrin αmβ2, would inhibit the diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries by inhibiting the excessive interaction between leukocytes and retinal endothelial cells in diabetes. Wild type animals and transgenic animals expressing NIF were made diabetic with streptozotocin and assessed for diabetes-induced retinal vascular abnormalities and leukocyte activation. To assess if the leukocyte blocking therapy compromised the immune system, animals were challenged with bacteria. Retinal superoxide production, leukostasis and leukocyte superoxide production were increased in wild type mice diabetic for 10 weeks, as was the ability of leukocytes isolated from diabetic animals to kill retinal endothelial cells in vitro. Retinal capillary degeneration was significantly increased in wild type mice diabetic 40 weeks. In contrast, mice expressing NIF did not develop any of these abnormalities, with the exception that non-diabetic and diabetic mice expressing NIF generated greater amounts of superoxide than did similar mice not expressing NIF. Importantly, NIF did not significantly impair the ability of mice to clear an opportunistic bacterial challenge, suggesting that NIF did not compromise immune surveillance. We conclude that antagonism of CD11b (integrin αmβ2) by NIF is sufficient to inhibit early stages of diabetic retinopathy, while not compromising the basic immune response.

  7. HIV-1 Vpu Blocks Recycling and Biosynthetic Transport of the Intrinsic Immunity Factor CD317/Tetherin To Overcome the Virion Release Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sarah; Fritz, Joëlle V.; Bitzegeio, Julia; Fackler, Oliver T.; Keppler, Oliver T.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intrinsic immunity factor CD317 (BST-2/HM1.24/tetherin) imposes a barrier to HIV-1 release at the cell surface that can be overcome by the viral protein Vpu. Expression of Vpu results in a reduction of CD317 surface levels; however, the mechanism of this Vpu activity and its contribution to the virological antagonism are incompletely understood. Here, we characterized the influence of Vpu on major CD317 trafficking pathways using quantitative antibody-based endocytosis and recycling assays as well as a microinjection/microscopy-based kinetic de novo expression approach. We report that HIV-1 Vpu inhibited both the anterograde transport of newly synthesized CD317 and the recycling of CD317 to the cell surface, while the kinetics of CD317 endocytosis remained unaffected. Vpu trapped trafficking CD317 molecules at the trans-Golgi network, where the two molecules colocalized. The subversion of both CD317 transport pathways was dependent on the highly conserved diserine S52/S56 motif of Vpu; however, it did not require recruitment of the diserine motif interactor and substrate adaptor of the SCF-E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, β-TrCP. Treatment of cells with the malaria drug primaquine resulted in a CD317 trafficking defect that mirrored that induced by Vpu. Importantly, primaquine could functionally replace Vpu as a CD317 antagonist and rescue HIV-1 particle release. PMID:21610122

  8. SHP-1, a novel peptide isolated from seahorse inhibits collagen release through the suppression of collagenases 1 and 3, nitric oxide products regulated by NF-kappaB/p38 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, BoMi; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been taken to identify natural peptides as potential bioactive substances. In this study, novel peptide (SHP-1) derived from seahorse (Hippocampus, Syngnathidae) hydrolysate was explored for its inhibitory effects on collagen release in arthritis with the investigation of its underlying mechanism of action. The efficacy of SHP-1 was determined on cartilage protective effects such as inhibition of collagen and GAG release. SHP-1 was able to suppress not only the expression of collagenases 1 and 3, but also the production of NO via down-regulation of iNOS. However, it presented an irrelevant effect on the level of GAG release in chondrocytic and osteoblastic cells. Inhibition of collagen release by SHP-1 is associated with restraining the phosphorylation of NF-kappaB and p38 kinase cascade. Therefore, it could be suggested that SHP-1 has a potential to be used in arthritis treatment.

  9. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-B signaling reduces growth in medulloblastoma in vivo

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    Deckard Lindsey A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant pediatric brain tumor that requires surgery, whole brain and spine irradiation, and intense chemotherapy for treatment. A more sophisticated understanding of the pathophysiology of medulloblastoma is needed to successfully reduce the intensity of treatment and improve outcomes. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB is a signaling pathway that controls transcriptional activation of genes important for tight regulation of many cellular processes and is aberrantly expressed in many types of cancer. Methods To test the importance of NFκB to medulloblastoma cell growth, the effects of multiple drugs that inhibit NFκB, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfasalazine, curcumin and bortezomib, were studied in medulloblastoma cell lines compared to a malignant glioma cell line and normal neurons. Expression of endogenous NFκB was investigated in cultured cells, xenograft flank tumors, and primary human tumor samples. A dominant negative construct for the endogenous inhibitor of NFκB, IκB, was prepared from medulloblastoma cell lines and flank tumors were established to allow specific pathway inhibition. Results We report high constitutive activity of the canonical NFκB pathway, as seen by Western analysis of the NFκB subunit p65, in medulloblastoma tumors compared to normal brain. The p65 subunit of NFκB is extremely highly expressed in xenograft tumors from human medulloblastoma cell lines; though, conversely, the same cells in culture have minimal expression without specific stimulation. We demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of NFκB in cell lines halts proliferation and leads to apoptosis. We show by immunohistochemical stain that phosphorylated p65 is found in the majority of primary tumor cells examined. Finally, expression of a dominant negative form of the endogenous inhibitor of NFκB, dnIκB, resulted in poor xenograft tumor growth, with average tumor volumes

  10. Adipose stem cells can secrete angiogenic factors that inhibit hyaline cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher Sd; Burnsed, Olivia A; Raghuram, Vineeth; Kalisvaart, Jonathan; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2012-08-24

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) secrete many trophic factors that can stimulate tissue repair, including angiogenic factors, but little is known about how ASCs and their secreted factors influence cartilage regeneration. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects ASC-secreted factors have in repairing chondral defects. ASCs isolated from male Sprague Dawley rats were cultured in monolayer or alginate microbeads supplemented with growth (GM) or chondrogenic medium (CM). Subsequent co-culture, conditioned media, and in vivo cartilage defect studies were performed. ASC monolayers and microbeads cultured in CM had decreased FGF-2 gene expression and VEGF-A secretion compared to ASCs cultured in GM. Chondrocytes co-cultured with GM-cultured ASCs for 7 days had decreased mRNAs for col2, comp, and runx2. Chondrocytes treated for 12 or 24 hours with conditioned medium from GM-cultured ASCs had reduced sox9, acan, and col2 mRNAs; reduced proliferation and proteoglycan synthesis; and increased apoptosis. ASC-conditioned medium also increased endothelial cell tube lengthening whereas conditioned medium from CM-cultured ASCs had no effect. Treating ASCs with CM reduced or abolished these deleterious effects while adding a neutralizing antibody for VEGF-A eliminated ASC-conditioned medium induced chondrocyte apoptosis and restored proteoglycan synthesis. FGF-2 also mitigated the deleterious effects VEGF-A had on chondrocyte apoptosis and phenotype. When GM-grown ASC pellets were implanted in 1 mm non-critical hyaline cartilage defects in vivo, cartilage regeneration was inhibited as evaluated by radiographic and equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via microCT imaging. Histology revealed that defects with GM-cultured ASCs had no tissue ingrowth from the edges of the defect whereas empty defects and defects with CM-grown ASCs had similar amounts of neocartilage formation. ASCs must be treated to reduce the secretion of VEGF-A and other factors that

  11. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor interacts with HBx and inhibits its apoptotic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shimeng; Lin Ruxian; Zhou Zhe; Wen Siyuan; Lin Li; Chen Suhong; Shan Yajun; Cong Yuwen; Wang Shengqi

    2006-01-01

    HBx, a transcriptional transactivating protein of hepatitis B virus (HBV), is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the precise molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. We used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify that HBx interacts with MIF directly. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is implicated in the regulation of inflammation, cell growth, and even tumor formation. The interaction between HBx and MIF was verified with co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, and cellular colocalization. The expression of MIF was up-regulated in HBV particle producing cell 2.2.15 compared with HepG2 cell. Both HBx and MIF cause HepG2 cell G /G 1 phase arrest, proliferation inhibition, and apoptosis. However, MIF can counteract the apoptotic effect of HBx. These results may provide evidence to explain the link between HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma

  12. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor signaling prevents muscle fiber growth during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugg, Kristoffer B; Korn, Michael A; Sarver, Dylan C; Markworth, James F; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptors alpha and beta (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) mark fibroadipogenic progenitor cells/fibroblasts and pericytes in skeletal muscle, respectively. While the role that these cells play in muscle growth and development has been evaluated, it was not known whether the PDGF receptors activate signaling pathways that control transcriptional and functional changes during skeletal muscle hypertrophy. To evaluate this, we inhibited PDGFR signaling in mice subjected to a synergist ablation muscle growth procedure, and performed analyses 3 and 10 days after induction of hypertrophy. The results from this study indicate that PDGF signaling is required for fiber hypertrophy, extracellular matrix production, and angiogenesis that occur during muscle growth. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Knockdown of the placental growth factor gene inhibits laser induced choroidal neovascularization in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourinia, Ramin; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Akrami, Hassan; Rezaei Kanavi, Mozhgan; Samiei, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of placental growth factor (PlGF) gene knockdown in a murine model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization. Choroidal neovascularization was induced in the left eyes of 11 mice by infrared laser. Small interfering RNA (siRNA, 20 picomoles/10 μl) corresponding to PlGF mRNA was administered intravitreally by Hamilton syringe in all subjects. One month later, fluorescein angiography and histolologic examination were performed. No leakage was apparent in the 11 eyes treated with siRNA cognate to PlGF. The results of histological evaluation were consistent with angiographic findings showing absence of choroidal neovascularization. Knockdown of the PlGF gene can inhibit the growth of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization in mice.

  14. Knockdown of the Placental Growth Factor Gene Inhibits Laser Induced Choroidal Neovascularization in a Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Nourinia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of placental growth factor (PlGF gene knockdown in a murine model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization. Methods: Choroidal neovascularization was induced in the left eyes of 11 mice by infrared laser. Small interfering RNA (siRNA, 20 picomoles/10 μl corresponding to PlGF mRNA was administered intravitreally by Hamilton syringe in all subjects. One month later, fluorescein angiography and histolologic examination were performed. Results: No leakage was apparent in the 11 eyes treated with siRNA cognate to PlGF. The results of histological evaluation were consistent with angiographic findings showing absence of choroidal neovascularization. Conclusion: Knockdown of the PlGF gene can inhibit the growth of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization in mice.

  15. Mactosylceramide Prevents Glial Cell Overgrowth by Inhibiting Insulin and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdøe-Kristensen, Stine; Lund, Viktor K; Wandall, Hans H

    2017-01-01

    , in which the mannosyltransferase Egghead controls conversion of glucosylceramide (GlcCer) to mactosylceramide (MacCer). Lack of elongated GSL in egghead (egh) mutants causes overgrowth of subperineurial glia (SPG), largely due to aberrant activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). However, to what...... of the Drosophila Insulin Receptor (InR) and the FGFR homolog Heartless (Htl) in wild type SPG, and is suppressed by inhibiting Htl and InR activity in egh. Knockdown of GlcCer synthase in the SPG fails to suppress glial overgrowth in egh nerves, and slightly promotes overgrowth in wild type, suggesting that RTK...... hyperactivation is caused by absence of MacCer and not by GlcCer accumulation. We conclude that an early product in GSL biosynthesis, MacCer, prevents inappropriate activation of Insulin and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors in Drosophila glia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  16. Flavonoid glycosides from Hosta longipes, their inhibition on NO production, and nerve growth factor inductive effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Sub; Lee, Kang Ro; Kwon, Oh Wook; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2014-01-01

    An extended phytochemical investigation of the leaves of Hosta longipes identified the new flavonoid glycoside, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)- [6 ' -O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranoside]-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and five known flavonoid derivatives. The structures of two compounds were revealed by extensive NMR methods ( 1 H and 13 C NMR, 1 H- 1 H COSY, HMQC and HMBC) and chemical hydrolysis. NMR data of one of them are published for the first time. Bioactivities of six compounds revealed that five strongly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) with IC 50 values of 11.56-15.97 μm in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells without cell toxicity. Two compounds showed moderate induction of secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) in C6 glioma cells (124.70 ± 7.71% and 117.02 ± 3.60%, respectively). (author)

  17. Inhibition of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT suppresses accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V Zetterqvist

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: Diabetic patients have a much more widespread and aggressive form of atherosclerosis and therefore, higher risk for myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease and stroke, but the molecular mechanisms leading to accelerated damage are still unclear. Recently, we showed that hyperglycemia activates the transcription factor NFAT in the arterial wall, inducing the expression of the pro-atherosclerotic protein osteopontin. Here we investigate whether NFAT activation may be a link between diabetes and atherogenesis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes in apolipoprotein E(-/- mice resulted in 2.2 fold increased aortic atherosclerosis and enhanced pro-inflammatory burden, as evidenced by elevated blood monocytes, endothelial activation- and inflammatory markers in aorta, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in plasma. In vivo treatment with the NFAT blocker A-285222 for 4 weeks completely inhibited the diabetes-induced aggravation of atherosclerosis, having no effect in non-diabetic mice. STZ-treated mice exhibited hyperglycemia and higher plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, but these were unaffected by A-285222. NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity was examined in aorta, spleen, thymus, brain, heart, liver and kidney, but only augmented in the aorta of diabetic mice. A-285222 completely blocked this diabetes-driven NFAT activation, but had no impact on the other organs or on splenocyte proliferation or cytokine secretion, ruling out systemic immunosuppression as the mechanism behind reduced atherosclerosis. Instead, NFAT inhibition effectively reduced IL-6, osteopontin, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, CD68 and tissue factor expression in the arterial wall and lowered plasma IL-6 in diabetic mice. CONCLUSIONS: Targeting NFAT signaling may be a novel and attractive approach for the treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications.

  18. Inhibition of peripubertal sheep mammary gland development by cysteamine through reducing progesterone and growth factor production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Feng, Yanni; Zhang, Hongfu; Kou, Xin; Li, Lan; Liu, Xinqi; Zhang, Pengfei; Cui, Liantao; Chu, Meiqiang; Shen, Wei; Min, Lingjiang

    2017-02-01

    Cysteamine has been used for treating cystinosis for many years, and furthermore it has also been used as a therapeutic agent for different diseases including Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease (PD), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, malaria, cancer, and others. Although cysteamine has many potential applications, its use may also be problematic. The effects of low doses of cysteamine on the reproductive system, especially the mammary glands are currently unknown. In the current investigation, low dose (10 mg/kg BW/day) of cysteamine did not affect sheep body weight gain or organ index of the liver, spleen, or heart; it did, however, increase the levels of blood lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets. Most interestingly, it inhibited mammary gland development after 2 or 5 months of treatment by reducing the organ index and the number of mammary gland ducts. Plasma growth hormone and estradiol remained unchanged; however, plasma progesterone levels and the protein level of HSD3β1 in sheep ovaries were decreased by cysteamine. In addition to steroid hormones, growth factors produced in the mammary glands also play crucial roles in mammary gland development. Results showed that protein levels of HGF, GHR, and IGF1R were decreased after 5 months of cysteamine treatment. These findings together suggest that progesterone and local growth factors in mammary glands might be involved in cysteamine initiated inhibition of pubertal ovine mammary gland development. Furthermore, it may lead to a reduction in fertility. Therefore, cysteamine should be used with great caution until its actions have been further investigated and its limitations overcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of trigonelline inhibition of the Nrf2 transcription factor in vitro on Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wenjuan; Guan, Dongfang; Ma, Rongji; Yang, Rentan; Xing, Guoqiang; Shi, Hongjuan; Tang, Guangyao; Li, Jiajie; Lv, Hailong; Jiang, Yufeng

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of trigonelline (TRG) on Echinococcus granulosus, and to explore the inhibition impact of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway on E. granulosus protoscoleces. Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces were incubated with various concentrations of TRG, and then Nrf2 protein expression and its localization in protoscoleces were detected by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in protoscoleces was measured using ROS detection kit. Caspase-3 activity was measured using a caspase-3 activity assay kit, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO)-1 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 activities in protoscoleces were measured by ELISA. The effect of TRG on protoscoleces viability was investigated using 0.1% eosin staining, and ultrastructural alterations in protoscoleces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Immunolocalization experiment clearly showed that Nrf2 protein was predominantly present in cells of protoscoleces. TRG treatment reduced NQO-1 and HO-1 activities in protoscoleces, but could increase ROS level at early time. Protoscoleces could not survive when treated with 250 μM TRG for 12 days. SEM results showed that TRG-treated protoscoleces presented damage in the protoscoleces region, including hook deformation, lesions, and digitiform protuberance. Nrf2 protein expression was significantly decreased and caspase-3 activity was clearly increased in protoscoleces treated with TRG for 24 and 48 h, respectively, when compared with that in controls (P granulosus protoscoleces. Nrf2 protein was mainly expressed in the cells and TRG could efficiently inhibit the Nrf2 signaling pathway in E. granulosus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For

  20. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor with AZD4547 mitigates juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tran; New, Jacob; Jones, Joel W; Usman, Shireen; Yalamanchali, Sreeya; Tawfik, Ossama; Hoover, Larry; Bruegger, Dan E; Thomas, Sufi Mary

    2017-10-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a benign tumor that presents in adolescent males. Although surgical excision is the mainstay of treatment, recurrences complicate treatment. There is a need to develop less invasive approaches for management. JNA tumors are composed of fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells. We identified fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in JNA-derived fibroblasts. FGFR influences fibroblast proliferation and VEGF is necessary for angiogenesis. We hypothesized that targeting FGFR would mitigate JNA fibroblast proliferation, invasion, and migration, and that targeting the VEGF receptor would attenuate endothelial tubule formation. After informed consent, fibroblasts from JNA explants of 3 patients were isolated. Fibroblasts were treated with FGFR inhibitor AZD4547, 0 to 25 μg/mL for 72 hours and proliferation was quantified using CyQuant assay. Migration and invasion of JNA were assessed using 24-hour transwell assays with subsequent fixation and quantification. Mitigation of FGFR and downstream signaling was evaluated by immunoblotting. Tubule formation was assessed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with vehicle control (dimethylsulfoxide [DMSO]) or semaxanib (SU5416) as well as in serum-free media (SFM) or JNA conditioned media (CM). Tubule length was compared between treatment groups. Compared to control, AZD4547 inhibited JNA fibroblast proliferation, migration, and invasion through inhibition of FGFR and downstream signaling, specifically phosphorylation of - p44/42 mitogen activated protein kinase (p44/42 MAPK). JNA fibroblast CM significantly increased HUVEC tubule formation (p = 0.0039). AZD4547 effectively mitigates FGFR signaling and decreases JNA fibroblast proliferation, migration, and invasion. SU5416 attenuated JNA fibroblast-induced tubule formation. AZD4547 may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of JNA. © 2017 ARS

  1. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of transcription factors by leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akiko; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-05-21

    NUP98 is a nucleoporin that plays complex roles in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Rearrangements of the NUP98 gene in human leukemia result in the expression of numerous fusion oncoproteins whose effect on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NUP98-HOXA9, a prototypic NUP98 fusion, inhibited the nuclear export of two known CRM1 substrates: mutated cytoplasmic nucleophosmin and HIV-1 Rev. In vitro binding assays revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 binds CRM1 through the FG repeat motif in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner similar to but stronger than the interaction between CRM1 and its export substrates. Two NUP98 fusions, NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10, whose fusion partners are structurally and functionally unrelated, interacted with endogenous CRM1 in myeloid cells as shown by co-immunoprecipitation. These leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins interacted with CRM1, Ran, and the nucleoporin NUP214 in a manner fundamentally different from that of wild-type NUP98. NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10 formed characteristic aggregates within the nuclei of a myeloid cell line and primary human CD34+ cells and caused aberrant localization of CRM1 to these aggregates. These NUP98 fusions caused nuclear accumulation of two transcription factors, NFAT and NFkappaB, that are regulated by CRM1-mediated export. The nuclear entrapment of NFAT and NFkappaB correlated with enhanced transcription from promoters responsive to these transcription factors. Taken together, the results suggest a new mechanism by which NUP98 fusions dysregulate transcription and cause leukemia, namely, inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export with aberrant nuclear retention of transcriptional regulators.

  2. E-cadherin homophilic ligation inhibits cell growth and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling independently of other cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrais, Michaël; Chen, Xiao; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2007-01-01

    growth inhibitory signals. To address this question, we have selectively formed E-cadherin homophilic bonds at the cell surface of isolated epithelial cells by using functionally active recombinant E-cadherin protein attached to microspheres. We find that E-cadherin ligation alone reduces the frequency...... of cells entering the S phase, demonstrating that E-cadherin ligation directly transduces growth inhibitory signals. E-cadherin binding to beta-catenin is required for cell growth inhibition, but beta-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity is not involved in growth inhibition resulting from...... homophilic binding. Neither E-cadherin binding to p120-catenin nor beta-catenin binding to alpha-catenin, and thereby the actin cytoskeleton, is required for growth inhibition. E-cadherin ligation also inhibits epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-mediated growth signaling by a beta...

  3. Spironolactone inhibits production of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, and has potential in the treatment of arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, K; Hansen, P R; Rieneck, K

    2003-01-01

    and interleukin 6 (70-90% inhibition). Release of these cytokines was also suppressed when testing whole blood from RA patients receiving 50 mg spironolactone twice daily, indicating that pharmaceutical use of the drug may suppress the release of inflammatory cytokines. Spironolactone therapy was generally well...

  4. Hemistepsin A ameliorates acute inflammation in macrophages via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB and activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Kwang; Lee, Ji Eun; Jung, Eun Hye; Jung, Ji Yun; Jung, Dae Hwa; Ku, Sae Kwang; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan

    2018-01-01

    Hemistepsin A (HsA) is a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Hemistepta lyrata (Bunge) Bunge. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of HsA and sought to determine its mechanisms of action in macrophages. HsA pretreatment inhibited nitric oxide production, and reduced the expression of iNOS and COX-2 in Toll-like receptor ligand-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Additionally, HsA decreased the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Kupffer cells as well as in RAW 264.7 cells. HsA inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα/β and degradation of IκBα, resulting in decreased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and its transcriptional activity. Moreover, HsA phosphorylated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), increased expression levels of antioxidant genes, and attenuated LPS-stimulated H 2 O 2 production. Phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase was required for HsA-mediated Nrf2 phosphorylation. In a D-galactosamine/LPS-induced liver injury model, HsA ameliorated D-galactosamine/LPS-induced hepatocyte degeneration and inflammatory cells infiltration. Moreover, immunohistochemical analyses using nitrotyrosine, 4-hydroxynonenal, and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase antibodies revealed that HsA protected the liver from oxidative stress. Furthermore, HsA reduced the numbers of proinflammatory cytokine-positive cells in hepatic tissues. Thus, these results suggest HsA may be a promising natural product to manage inflammation-mediated tissue injuries through inhibition of NF-κB and activation of Nrf2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sicilian pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) nut inhibits expression and release of inflammatory mediators and reverts the increase of paracellular permeability in IL-1β-exposed human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, C; Perrone, A; Attanzio, A; Tesoriere, L; Livrea, M A

    2015-08-01

    Dietary approaches to control inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) may include proanthocyanidin-rich foods. Our previous research showed that a hydrophilic extract from Sicilian pistachio nut (HPE) contains substantial amounts of proanthocyanidins and possesses anti-inflammatory activities. We studied the effects of HPE and of its polymeric proanthocyanidin fraction (PPF) in a cell model that simulated some conditions of IBD, consisting of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated Caco-2 cells. HPE was prepared by Pistacia vera L. nuts, and PPF was isolated from HPE by adsorbance chromatography. Proanthocyanidins were quantified as anthocyanidins after acidic hydrolysis. Differentiated Caco-2 cells were pre-incubated with HPE or PPF and then were exposed to IL-1β. Cell viability and parameters associated with nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation were assayed. Adsorption of polymeric proanthocyanidins to the cell membrane was investigated by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements. HPE decreased prostaglandin (PG)E2 production, IL-6 and IL-8 release, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression. HPE also inhibited the increase in paracellular permeability and reduced NF-κB activation. Polymeric proanthocyanidins, tested at a concentration comparable with their content in HPE, produced effects comparable to HPE. Finally, cell exposure to PPF increases TEER of the epithelial monolayers. Our results provide evidence that pistachio nut components inhibit inflammatory response of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and indicate polymeric proanthocyanidins as the major bioactive nut components. The protection implies inhibition of NF-κB activation and occurs in parallel with the adsorption of polymeric proanthocyanidins to cell membrane. Our findings suggest that intake of small amounts of pistachio nut can exert beneficial effects to gastrointestinal pathophysiology.

  6. Neurobiology of stress adaptation in the mouse: Roles of corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Körösi, Anikó

    2006-01-01

    The body's ability to adapt to stressors is essential for survival. Failure of stress adaptation may lead to the development of stress-related disorders. The traditionally known adaptation system in vertebrates, is the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA-) axis, in which corticotropin-releasing

  7. Down-regulation of connective tissue growth factor by inhibition of transforming growth factor beta blocks the tumor-stroma cross-talk and tumor progression in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocca, Antonio; Fransvea, Emilia; Dituri, Francesco; Lupo, Luigi; Antonaci, Salvatore; Giannelli, Gianluigi

    2010-02-01

    Tumor-stroma interactions in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are of key importance to tumor progression. In this study, we show that HCC invasive cells produce high levels of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and generate tumors with a high stromal component in a xenograft model. A transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) receptor inhibitor, LY2109761, inhibited the synthesis and release of CTGF, as well as reducing the stromal component of the tumors. In addition, the TGF-beta-dependent down-regulation of CTGF diminished tumor growth, intravasation, and metastatic dissemination of HCC cells by inhibiting cancer-associated fibroblast proliferation. By contrast, noninvasive HCC cells were found to produce low levels of CTGF. Upon TGF-beta1 stimulation, noninvasive HCC cells form tumors with a high stromal content and CTGF expression, which is inhibited by treatment with LY2109761. In addition, the acquired intravasation and metastatic spread of noninvasive HCC cells after TGF-beta1 stimulation was blocked by LY2109761. LY2109761 interrupts the cross-talk between cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts, leading to a significant reduction of HCC growth and dissemination. Interestingly, patients with high CTGF expression had poor prognosis, suggesting that treatment aimed at reducing TGF-beta-dependent CTGF expression may offer clinical benefits. Taken together, our preclinical results indicate that LY2109761 targets the cross-talk between HCC and the stroma and provide a rationale for future clinical trials.

  8. Specific inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 alpha activation and of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production by flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Yuki; Egawa, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Yoko; Kunimoto, Setsuko; Hirai, Yasuaki; Ida, Yoshiteru; Nose, Kiyoshi

    2003-10-01

    Screening using a reporter under the control of the hypoxia-response element (HRE) identified several flavonoids and homoisoflavonoids that inhibit the activation of HRE under hypoxic conditions. Among various compounds, isorhamnetin, luteolin, quercetin, and methyl ophiopogonanone B (MOB) were effective at 3 to 9 microg/ml in inhibiting the reporter activity. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA during hypoxia was also inhibited by MOB in HepG2 cells, but the effective doses were 10 to 20 microg/ml. MOB caused destabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha, as revealed by Western blotting, that was dependent on proteasome activity and the tumor suppressor, p53. The tubular formation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells was also inhibited by MOB. MOB is expected to act as an inhibitor of angiogenesis.

  9. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor counter-regulates dexamethasone-induced annexin 1 expression and influences the release of eicosanoids in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Wang, Yu; Li, Jia-Hui; Zhu, Shi-Hui; Tang, Hong-Tai; Xia, Zhao-Fan

    2013-10-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine and glucocorticoid (GC) counter-regulator, has emerged as an important modulator of inflammatory responses. However, the molecular mechanisms of MIF counter-regulation of GC still remain incomplete. In the present study, we investigated whether MIF mediated the counter-regulation of the anti-inflammatory effect of GC by affecting annexin 1 in RAW 264.7 macrophages. We found that stimulation of RAW 264.7 macrophages with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in down-regulation of annexin 1, while GC dexamethasone (Dex) or Dex plus LPS led to significant up-regulation of annexin 1 expression. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of intracellular MIF increased annexin 1 expression with or without incubation of Dex, whereas Dex-induced annexin 1 expression was counter-regulated by the exogenous application of recombinant MIF. Moreover, recombinant MIF counter-regulated, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) activation and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4 ) release by Dex in RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with LPS. Endogenous depletion of MIF enhanced the effects of Dex, reflected by further decease of cPLA2α expression and lower PGE2 and LTB4 release in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Based on these data, we suggest that MIF counter-regulates Dex-induced annexin 1 expression, further influencing the activation of cPLA2α and the release of eicosanoids. These findings will add new insights into the mechanisms of MIF counter-regulation of GC. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A photo-crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel growth factor release vehicle for wound healing applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bourke, Sharon L.; Al-Khalili, Mohammad; Briggs, Tonye; Michniak, Bozena B.; Kohn, Joachim; Poole-Warren, Laura A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a hydrogel vehicle for sustained release of growth factors for wound healing applications. Hydrogels were fabricated using ultraviolet photo-crosslinking of acrylamide-functionalized nondegradable poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). Protein permeability was initially assessed using trypsin inhibitor (TI), a 21 000 MW model protein drug. TI permeability was altered by changing the solids content of the gel and by adding hydrophilic PVA fillers. As...

  11. Effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin during the periparturient period on innate and adaptive immune responses, systemic inflammation, and metabolism of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P R B; Machado, K S; Da Silva, D N Lobão; Moraes, J G N; Keisler, D H; Chebel, R C

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this experiment was to determine effects of treating peripartum dairy cows with body condition score ≥3.75 with recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) on immune, inflammatory, and metabolic responses. Holstein cows (253±1d of gestation) were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 treatments: untreated control (n=53), rbST87.5 (n=56; 87.5mg of rbST), and rbST125 (n=57; 125mg of rbST). Cows in the rbST87.5 and rbST125 treatments received rbST weekly from -21 to 28d relative to calving. Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor 1, haptoglobin, tumor necrosis factor α, nonesterified fatty acids, β-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, and cortisol concentrations were determined weekly from -21 to 21d relative to calving. Blood sampled weekly from -14 to 21d relative to calving was used for hemogram and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) expression of adhesion molecules, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst. Cows were vaccinated with ovalbumin at -21, -7, and 7d relative to calving, and blood was collected weekly from -21 to 21d relative to calving to determine IgG anti-ovalbumin concentrations. A subsample of cows had liver biopsied -21, -7, and 7d relative to calving to determine total lipids, triglycerides, and glycogen content. Growth hormone concentrations prepartum (control=11.0±1.2, rbST87.5=14.1±1.2, rbST125=15.1±1.3ng/mL) and postpartum (control=14.4±1.1, rbST87.5=17.8±1.2, rbST125=21.8±1.1ng/mL) were highest for rbST125 cows. Cows treated with rbST had higher insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations than control cows (control=110.5±4.5, rbST87.5=126.2±4.5, rbST125=127.2±4.5ng/mL) only prepartum. Intensity of L-selectin expression was higher for rbST125 than for control and rbST87.5 cows [control=3,590±270, rbST87.5=3,279±271, rbST125=4,371±279 geometric mean fluorescence intensity (GMFI)] in the prepartum period. The PMNL intensities of phagocytosis (control=3,131±130, rbST87.5=3,391±133, rbST125=3,673±137 GMFI) and oxidative burst (control=9,588±746

  12. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor types 1 and 2 are differentially expressed in pre- and post-synaptic elements in the post-natal developing rat cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinny, JD; Kalicharan, D; Blaauw, EH; Ijkema-Paassen, J; Shi, F; Gramsbergen, A; van der Want, JJL

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-like proteins act via two G-protein-coupled receptors (CRF-R1 and CRF-R2) playing important neuromodulatory roles in stress responses and synaptic plasticity. The cerebellar expression of corticotropin-releasing factor-like ligands has been well documented, but

  13. Cardiac regeneration by pharmacologically active microcarriers releasing growth factors and/or transporting adipose-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monia Savi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that cardiac regeneration through local delivery of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs, activation of resident cardiac stem cells via growth factors (GFs [hepatocyte growth factor (HGF and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1:GFs] or both, are improved by pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs interacting with cells/molecules conveyed on their surface. Rats with one-month old myocardial infarction were treated with ASCs, ASCs+PAMs, GF-releasing PAMs, ASCs+GF-releasing PAMs or vehicle. Two weeks later, hemodynamic function and inducibility of ventricular arrhythmias (VAs were assessed. Eventually, the hearts were subjected to anatomical and immunohistochemical analyses. A significant ASCs engraftment and the largest improvement in cardiac mechanics occurred in ASC+GF-releasing PAM rats which by contrast were more vulnerable to VAs. Thus, PAMs may improve cell/GF-based cardiac regeneration although caution should be paid on the electrophysiological impact of their physical interaction with the myocardium.

  14. Effects of Antiseptic Solutions Commonly Used in Dentistry on Bone Viability, Bone Morphology, and Release of Growth Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kosaku; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Kobayashi, Eizaburo; Schaller, Benoit; Miron, Richard J

    2016-02-01

    Antiseptic solutions are commonly used in dentistry for a number of sterilization procedures, including harvesting of bone chips, irrigation of extraction sockets, and sterilization of osteonecrotic bone. Despite its widespread use, little information is available regarding the effects of various antiseptic solutions on bone cell viability, morphology, and the release of growth factors. The antiseptic solutions included 1) 0.5% povidone iodine (PI), 2) 0.2% chlorhexidine diguluconate (CHX), 3) 1% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and 4) 0.25% sodium hypochlorite (HYP). Bone samples collected from porcine mandibular cortical bone were rinsed in the antiseptic solutions for 10 minutes and assessed for cell viability using an MTS assay and protein release of transforming growth factor (TGF-β1), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin (IL)-1β, and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 15 minutes and 4 hours after rinsing. After antiseptic rinsing, changes to the surface protein content showed marked alterations, with an abundant protein layer remaining on CHX-rinsed bone samples. The amount of surface protein content gradually decreased in the following order: CHX, H2O2, PI, and HYP. A similar trend was also observed for the relative cell viability from within bone samples after rinsing, with up to 6 times more viable cells found in the CHX-rinsed bone samples than in the HYP- and PI-rinsed samples. An analysis of the growth factors found that both HYP and PI had significantly lower VEGF and TGF-β1 protein release from bone samples at 15 minutes and 4 hours after rinsing compared with CHX and H2O2. A similar trend was observed for RANKL and IL-1β protein release, although no change was observed for BMP2. The results from the present study have demonstrated that antiseptic solutions present with very different effects on bone samples after 10 minutes of

  15. Investigation of some factors affecting on release of radon-222 from phosphogypsum waste associated with phosphate ore processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, M A; El Afifi, E M; Nayl, A A

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is oriented to investigate the influence of some physicochemical factors such as radium distribution, grain size, moisture content and chemical constituents on releases of radon-222 from the accumulated phosphogypsum (PG) waste. The emanation fraction, activity concentration in the pore and the surface exhalation rate of radon-222 in the bulk PG waste are 34.5 ± 0.3%, 238.6 ± 7.8 kBq m(-3) and 213 ± 6.9 mBq m(-2) s(-1), respectively. These values were varied and enhanced slightly in the fine grain sizes (F1 factor of 1.05 folds compared to the bulk residue. It was also found that release of radon from residue PG waste was controlled positively by radium (Ra-226), calcium (CaSO4) and strontium (SrO). About 67% of radon release attributed to the grain size below 0.5 mm, while 33% due to the large grain size above 0.5 mm. The emanation fraction of Rn-222 is increased with moisture content and the maximum emanation is ∼43% of moisture of 3-8%. It reduced slowly with the continuous increase in moisture till 20%. Due to PG waste in situ can be enhancing the background to the surround workers and/or public. Therefore, the environmental negative impacts due to release of Rn-222 can be minimized by legislation to restrict its civil uses, or increasing its moisture to ∼10%, or by the particle size separation of the fine fraction containing the high levels of Ra-226 followed by a suitable chemical treatment or disposal; whereas the low release amount can be diluted and used in cement industry, roads or dam construction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Culicoides antigen extract stimulates equine blood mononuclear (BMN) cell proliferation and the release of eosinophil adherence-inducing factor(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckelvie, J; Foster, A P; Hamblin, A S; Cunningham, F M

    2001-04-01

    Intradermal injection of a Culicoides antigen extract (CAgX) induces T lymphocyte and eosinophil accumulation in the skin of horses with sweet itch. Blood mononuclear (BMN) cells from normal ponies proliferate when stimulated by mitogen (phytohaemagglutinin, PHA) or antigen (tetanus toxoid, TT) and, as shown here, release soluble factor(s) that induce eosinophil adherence. CAgX also caused concentration dependent proliferation of BMN cells from sweet itch and normal ponies [stimulation index: 29 (13) and 17 (7) for BMN cells from sweet itch and normal ponies, respectively during the active phase of disease; 4 microg protein ml(-1)CAgX; 168 h]. A heat labile factor(s) which caused eosinophil adherence was also released [sweet itch ponies: 6.0 (1.6) per cent adherence versus 1.3 (0.4) per cent; normal ponies: 6.6 (0.5) per cent adherence versus 0.9 (0.1) per cent for supernatants from CAgX (4 microg protein ml(-1); 48 hours) stimulated versus unstimulated BMN cells, respectively]. These results suggest that soluble proteins released from T lymphocytes could affect eosinophil function in the lesional skin of sweet itch horses. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  17. Prolonged inhibition of luteinizing hormone and testosterone levels in male rats with the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist SB-75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokser, L; Bajusz, S; Groot, K; Schally, A V

    1990-09-01

    Inhibitory effects of the potent antagonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone N-Ac-[3-(2-naphthyl)-D-alanine1,4-chloro-D-phenylalanine2,3- (3-pyridyl)-D- alanine3,D-citrulline6,D-alanine10]luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (SB-75) free of edematogenic effects were investigated in male rats. In a study to determine the effect on luteinizing hormone levels in castrated male rats, SB-75 was injected s.c. in doses of 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, and 10 micrograms. Blood samples were taken at different intervals for 48 hr. All doses of SB-75 significantly decreased luteinizing hormone levels for greater than 6 hr (P less than 0.01); this inhibition lasted for greater than 24 hr (P less than 0.01) with a dose of 5.0 micrograms and greater than 48 hr with 10 micrograms (P less than 0.05). Serum testosterone levels were also measured in intact male rats injected with SB-75 in doses of 25, 50, and 100 micrograms. All doses produced a dramatic fall in testosterone to castration levels 6 hr after injection (P less than 0.01); this inhibition of serum testosterone was maintained for greater than 72 hr, but only the 100-micrograms dose could keep testosterone in the castration range for greater than 24 hr (P less than 0.01). In another study using a specific RIA, we obtained the pharmacokinetic release pattern of SB-75 from two sustained delivery formulations of SB-75 pamoate microgranules and examined their effect on serum testosterone. After a single i.m. injection of 20 mg of one batch of microgranules, a large peak corresponding to SB-75 at 45.8 ng/ml was observed, corresponding to the "burst" effect. Levels of the analog decreased to 19.6 ng/ml on day 2, gradually reached a concentration of 4.7 ng/ml on day 7, and kept declining thereafter. Testosterone levels were reduced on day 1 (P less than 0.01) and were maintained at low values for greater than 7 days (P less than 0.05). In rats injected with 10 mg of SB-75 pamoate microgranules of the second batch, SB-75 serum

  18. Emerging role of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in therapy for advanced malignancy: focus on NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Corey J.

    2004-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy regimens have emerged as the standard approach in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Meta-analyses have demonstrated a 2-month increase in median survival after platinum-based therapy vs. best supportive care, and an absolute 10% improvement in the 1-year survival rate. Just as importantly, cytotoxic therapy has produced benefits in symptom control and quality of life. Newer agents, including the taxanes, vinorelbine, gemcitabine, and irinotecan, have expanded our therapeutic options in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Despite their contributions, we have reached a therapeutic plateau, with response rates seldom exceeding 30-40% in cooperative group studies and 1-year survival rates stable between 30% and 40%. It is doubtful that substituting one agent for another in various combinations will lead to any further improvement in these rates. The thrust of current research has focused on targeted therapy, and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition is one of the most promising clinical strategies. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors currently under investigation include the small molecules gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839) and erlotinib (Tarceva, OSI-774), as well as monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab (IMC-225, Erbitux). Agents that have only begun to undergo clinical evaluation include CI-1033, an irreversible pan-erbB tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and PKI166 and GW572016, both examples of dual kinase inhibitors (inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor and Her2). Preclinical models have demonstrated synergy for all these agents in combination with either chemotherapy or radiotherapy, leading to great enthusiasm regarding their ultimate contribution to lung cancer therapy. However, serious clinical challenges persist. These include the identification of the optimal dose(s); the proper integration of these agents into popular, established cytotoxic regimens; and the selection of the optimal setting(s) in which

  19. Transforming growth factor β1 inhibition protects from noise-induced hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eMurillo-Cuesta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Excessive exposure to noise damages the principal cochlear structures leading to hearing impairment. Inflammatory and immune responses are central mechanisms in cochlear defensive response to noise but, if unregulated, they contribute to inner ear damage and hearing loss. Transforming growth factor ß (TGF-ß is a key regulator of both responses and high levels of this factor have been associated with cochlear injury in hearing loss animal models. To evaluate the potential of targeting TGF-ß as a therapeutic strategy for preventing or ameliorating noise-induced hearing loss, we studied the auditory function, cochlear morphology, gene expression and oxidative stress markers in mice exposed to noise and treated with TGF-ß1 peptidic inhibitors P17 and P144, just before or immediately after noise insult. Our results indicate that systemic administration of both peptides significantly improved both the evolution of hearing thresholds and the degenerative changes induced by noise-exposure in lateral wall structures. Moreover, treatments ameliorated the inflammatory state and redox balance. These therapeutic effects were dose-dependent and more effective if the TGF-ß1 inhibitors were administered prior to inducing the injury. In conclusion, inhibition of TGF-ß1 actions with antagonistic peptides represents a new, promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention and repair of noise-induced cochlear damage.

  20. Modifying chemotherapy response by targeted inhibition of eukaryotic initiation factor 4A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cencic, R; Robert, F; Galicia-Vázquez, G; Malina, A; Ravindar, K; Somaiah, R; Pierre, P; Tanaka, J; Deslongchamps, P; Pelletier, J

    2013-01-01

    Translation is regulated predominantly at the initiation phase by several signal transduction pathways that are often usurped in human cancers, including the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis. mTOR exerts unique administration over translation by regulating assembly of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F, a heterotrimeric complex responsible for recruiting 40S ribosomes (and associated factors) to mRNA 5′ cap structures. Hence, there is much interest in targeted therapies that block eIF4F activity to assess the consequences on tumor cell growth and chemotherapy response. We report here that hippuristanol (Hipp), a translation initiation inhibitor that selectively inhibits the eIF4F RNA helicase subunit, eIF4A, resensitizes Eμ-Myc lymphomas to DNA damaging agents, including those that overexpress eIF4E—a modifier of rapamycin responsiveness. As Mcl-1 levels are significantly affected by Hipp, combining its use with the Bcl-2 family inhibitor, ABT-737, leads to a potent synergistic response in triggering cell death in mouse and human lymphoma and leukemia cells. Suppression of eIF4AI using RNA interference also synergized with ABT-737 in murine lymphomas, highlighting eIF4AI as a therapeutic target for modulating tumor cell response to chemotherapy

  1. The Factor Inhibiting HIF Asparaginyl Hydroxylase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism and Accelerates Metabolic Adaptation to Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jingwei; Cowburn, Andrew S; Palazon, Asis; Madhu, Basetti; Tyrakis, Petros A; Macías, David; Bargiela, David M; Pietsch, Sandra; Gralla, Michael; Evans, Colin E; Kittipassorn, Thaksaon; Chey, Yu C J; Branco, Cristina M; Rundqvist, Helene; Peet, Daniel J; Johnson, Randall S

    2018-04-03

    Animals require an immediate response to oxygen availability to allow rapid shifts between oxidative and glycolytic metabolism. These metabolic shifts are highly regulated by the HIF transcription factor. The factor inhibiting HIF (FIH) is an asparaginyl hydroxylase that controls HIF transcriptional activity in an oxygen-dependent manner. We show here that FIH loss increases oxidative metabolism, while also increasing glycolytic capacity, and that this gives rise to an increase in oxygen consumption. We further show that the loss of FIH acts to accelerate the cellular metabolic response to hypoxia. Skeletal muscle expresses 50-fold higher levels of FIH than other tissues: we analyzed skeletal muscle FIH mutants and found a decreased metabolic efficiency, correlated with an increased oxidative rate and an increased rate of hypoxic response. We find that FIH, through its regulation of oxidation, acts in concert with the PHD/vHL pathway to accelerate HIF-mediated metabolic responses to hypoxia. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pentoxifylline inhibits the fibrogenic activity of pleural effusions and transforming growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Entzian

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiopathology of organ fibrosis is far from being completely understood, and the efficacy of the available therapeutic strategies is disappointing. We chose pleural disease for further studies and addressed the questions of which cytokines are relevant in pleural fibrosis and which drugs might interrupt its development. We screened pleural effusions for mediators thought to interfere with fibrogenesis (transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β, tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα, soluble TNF-receptor p55 (sTNF-R and correlated the results with patient clinical outcome in terms of extent of pleural thickenings. We found pleural thickenings correlated with TGF-β (p<0.005 whereas no correlations could be observed with TNFα and sTNF-R. Further, we were interested in finding out how TGF-β effects on fibroblast growth could be modulated. We found that pentoxifylline is able to inhibit both fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis independently of the stimulus. We conclude that, judging from in vitro studies, pentoxifylline might offer a new approach in the therapy of pleural as well as pulmonary fibrosis.

  3. Kinetic Investigations of the Role of Factor Inhibiting Hypoxia-inducible Factor (FIH) as an Oxygen Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Hardy, Adam P; Howe, Emily A; Loik, Nikita D; Kramer, Holger B; McCullagh, James S O; Schofield, Christopher J; Flashman, Emily

    2015-08-07

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases regulate hypoxia sensing in animals. In humans, they comprise three prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3 or EGLN1-3) and factor inhibiting HIF (FIH). FIH is an asparaginyl hydroxylase catalyzing post-translational modification of HIF-α, resulting in reduction of HIF-mediated transcription. Like the PHDs, FIH is proposed to have a hypoxia-sensing role in cells, enabling responses to changes in cellular O2 availability. PHD2, the most important human PHD isoform, is proposed to be biochemically/kinetically suited as a hypoxia sensor due to its relatively high sensitivity to changes in O2 concentration and slow reaction with O2. To ascertain whether these parameters are conserved among the HIF hydroxylases, we compared the reactions of FIH and PHD2 with O2. Consistent with previous reports, we found lower Km(app)(O2) values for FIH than for PHD2 with all HIF-derived substrates. Under pre-steady-state conditions, the O2-initiated FIH reaction is significantly faster than that of PHD2. We then investigated the kinetics with respect to O2 of the FIH reaction with ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) substrates. FIH has lower Km(app)(O2) values for the tested ARDs than HIF-α substrates, and pre-steady-state O2-initiated reactions were faster with ARDs than with HIF-α substrates. The results correlate with cellular studies showing that FIH is active at lower O2 concentrations than the PHDs and suggest that competition between HIF-α and ARDs for FIH is likely to be biologically relevant, particularly in hypoxic conditions. The overall results are consistent with the proposal that the kinetic properties of individual oxygenases reflect their biological capacity to act as hypoxia sensors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Quantitative PET Imaging of Tissue Factor Expression Using 18F-Labeled Active Site-Inhibited Factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Carsten H; Erlandsson, Maria; Jeppesen, Troels E; Jensen, Mette M; Kristensen, Lotte K; Madsen, Jacob; Petersen, Lars C; Kjaer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is upregulated in many solid tumors, and its expression is linked to tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, and prognosis. A noninvasive assessment of tumor TF expression status is therefore of obvious clinical relevance. Factor VII is the natural ligand to TF. Here we report the development of a new PET tracer for specific imaging of TF using an (18)F-labeled derivative of factor VII. Active site-inhibited factor VIIa (FVIIai) was obtained by inactivation with phenylalanine-phenylalanine-arginine-chloromethyl ketone. FVIIai was radiolabeled with N-succinimidyl 4-(18)F-fluorobenzoate and purified. The corresponding product, (18)F-FVIIai, was injected into nude mice with subcutaneous human pancreatic xenograft tumors (BxPC-3) and investigated using small-animal PET/CT imaging 1, 2, and 4 h after injection. Ex vivo biodistribution was performed after the last imaging session, and tumor tissue was preserved for molecular analysis. A blocking experiment was performed in a second set of mice. The expression pattern of TF in the tumors was visualized by immunohistochemistry and the amount of TF in tumor homogenates was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and correlated with the uptake of (18)F-FVIIai in the tumors measured in vivo by PET imaging. The PET images showed high uptake of (18)F-FVIIai in the tumor regions, with a mean uptake of 2.5 ± 0.3 percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) (mean ± SEM) 4 h after injection of 7.3-9.3 MBq of (18)F-FVIIai and with an average maximum uptake in the tumors of 7.1 ± 0.7 %ID/g at 4 h. In comparison, the muscle uptake was 0.2 ± 0.01 %ID/g at 4 h. At 4 h, the tumors had the highest uptake of any organ. Blocking with FVIIai significantly reduced the uptake of (18)F-FVIIai from 2.9 ± 0.1 to 1.4 ± 0.1 %ID/g (P < 0.001). The uptake of (18)F-FVIIai measured in vivo by PET imaging correlated (r = 0.72, P < 0.02) with TF protein level measured ex vivo. (18)F-FVIIai is a promising PET tracer for

  5. The Antimicrobial Peptide Human Beta-Defensin-3 Is Induced by Platelet-Released Growth Factors in Primary Keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Bayer; Justus Lammel; Mersedeh Tohidnezhad; Sebastian Lippross; Peter Behrendt; Tim Klüter; Thomas Pufe; Jochen Cremer; Holger Jahr; Franziska Rademacher; Regine Gläser; Jürgen Harder

    2017-01-01

    Platelet-released growth factors (PRGF) and its related clinically used formulations (e.g., Vivostat Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF?)) contain a variety of chemokines, cytokines, and growth factors and are therefore used to support healing of chronic, hard-to-heal, or infected wounds. Human beta-defensin-3 (hBD-3) is an antimicrobial peptide inducibly expressed in human keratinocytes especially upon wounding. The potent antimicrobial activity of hBD-3 together with its wound closure-promoting acti...

  6. Enhanced phosphoserine insertion during Escherichia coli protein synthesis via partial UAG codon reassignment and release factor 1 deletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Ilka U.; Rovner, Alexis J.; Aerni, Hans R.; Rogulina, Svetlana; Cheng, Laura; Olds, William; Fischer, Jonathan T.; Söll, Dieter; Isaacs, Farren J.; Rinehart, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    Genetically encoded phosphoserine incorporation programmed by the UAG codon was achieved by addition of engineered elongation factor and an archaeal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase to the normal Escherichia coli translation machinery (Park (2011) Science 333, 1151). However, protein yield suffers from expression of the orthogonal phosphoserine translation system and competition with release factor 1 (RF-1). In a strain lacking RF-1, phosphoserine phosphatase, and where 7 UAG codons residing in essential genes were converted to UAA, phosphoserine incorporation into GFP and WNK4 was significantly elevated, but with an accompanying loss in cellular fitness and viability. PMID:22982858

  7. Spontaneous release from mossy fiber terminals inhibits Ni2+-sensitive T-type Ca2+ channels of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the rat organotypic hippocampal slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Christopher A; Xu, Shenghong; Williams, David A

    2008-01-01

    Mossy fibers (axons arising from dentate granule cells) form large synaptic contacts exclusively onto the proximal apical dendrites of CA3 pyramidal neurons. They can generate large synaptic currents that occur in close proximity to the soma. These properties mean that active conductance in the proximal apical dendrite could have a disproportionate influence on CA3 pyramidal neuron excitability. Ni(2+)-sensitive T-type Ca(2+) channels are important modulators of dendritic excitability. Here, we use an optical approach to determine the contribution of Ni(2+) (100 microM)-sensitive Ca(2+) channels to action potential (AP) elicited Ca(2+) flux in the soma, proximal apical and distal apical dendrites. At resting membrane potentials Ni(2+)-sensitive Ca(2+) channels do not contribute to the Ca(2+) signal in the proximal apical dendrite, but do contribute in the other cell regions. Spontaneous release from mossy fiber terminals acting on 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX)-sensitive postsynaptic channels underlies a tonic inhibition of Ni(2+)-sensitive channels. Chelating Zn(2+) with CaEDTA blocks CNQX-sensitive changes in Ca(2+) flux implicating a mechanistic role of this ion in T-type Ca(2+) channel block. To test if this inhibition influenced excitability, progressively larger depolarizing pulses were delivered to CA3 pyramidal neurons. CNQX significantly reduced the size of the depolarizing step required to generate APs and increased the absolute number of APs per depolarizing step. This change in AP firing was completely reversed by the addition of Ni(2+). This mechanism may reduce the impact of T-type Ca(2+) channels in a region where large synaptic events are common.

  8. Targeting Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Growth and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Ramadevi; Lopez-Valdez, Rebecca; Arumugam, Arunkumar; Nandy, Sushmita; Boopalan, Thiyagarajan; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers. Increasing incidence and mortality indicates that there is still much lacking in detection and management of the disease. This is partly due to a lack of specific symptoms during early stages of the disease. Several growth factor receptors have been associated with pancreatic cancer. Here, we have investigated if an RNA interference approach targeted to IGF-IR could be effective and efficient against pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis. For that, we evaluated the effects of IGF-1R inhibition using small interfering RNA (siRNAs) on tumor growth and metastasis in HPAC and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell lines. We found that silencing IGF-1R inhibits pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis by blocking key signaling pathways such AKT/PI3K, MAPK, JAK/STAT and EMT. Silencing IGF-1R resulted in an anti-proliferative effect in PANC-1 and HPAC pancreatic cancer cell lines. Matrigel invasion, transwell migration and wound healing assays also revealed a role for IGF-1R in metastatic properties of pancreatic cancer. These results were further confirmed using Western blotting analysis of key intermediates involved in proliferation, epithelial mesenchymal transition, migration, and invasion. In addition, soft agar assays showed that silencing IGF-1R also blocks the colony forming capabilities of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Western blots, as well as, flow cytometric analysis revealed the induction of apoptosis in IGF-1R silenced cells. Interestingly, silencing IGF-1R also suppressed the expression of insulin receptor β. All these effects together significantly control pancreatic cancer cell growth and metastasis. To conclude, our results demonstrate the significance of IGF-1R in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24809702

  9. Inhibition of repopulation is not a determining factor for the radiosensitizing effects of rapamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkaria, J.N.; Carlson, B.L.; Mladek, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key downstream effector of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and we have previously shown that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin significantly enhances the efficacy of prolonged fractionated radiation in U87 glioma cells grown as xenografts or spheroids. To test whether inhibition of repopulation between radiation fractions contributes to the sensitizing effects of rapamycin, the efficacy of our previous protracted radiation schedule was compared with an accelerated regimen in U87 spheroids. Regrowth of individual spheroids was tracked over time following treatment with either accelerated or protracted radiation in the presence or absence of rapamycin. As in our previous studies, treatment with 10 nM rapamycin significantly increased the time required for U87 spheroids to regrow to 10 times their original volume (22 ± 2 days [mean ± 95% CI]) compared to control (7 ± 1 days). Regrowth after protracted radiation (2 Gy every 3 days x 4; 9 ± 2 days)did not significantly differ from control treatment, while accelerated radiation (2 Gy every 4 hours x 4) modestly delayed spheroid regrowth (12 ± 2 days). Specific to our model, the relatively small difference in regrowth time between the two radiation fractionation schedules suggests that repopulation is not a major detrimental factor in the protracted radiation schedule. Interestingly, the combination of rapamycin with either protracted or accelerated RT significantly enhanced the efficacy of the radiation with regrowth times of 31 ± 4 days and 29 ± 4 days, respectively. Consistent with this in vitro data, preliminary results from an animal study suggest that treatment with a rapamycin analog and daily radiation is as effective as protracted radiation/ rapamycin schedules. Thus, any effects of rapamycin on repopulation in our model systems do not contribute significantly to the sensitizing effects of rapamycin

  10. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor 1 and topoisomerase with acriflavine sensitizes perihilar cholangiocarcinomas to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijer, Ruud; Broekgaarden, Mans; Krekorian, Massis; Alles, Lindy K; van Wijk, Albert C; Mackaaij, Claire; Verheij, Joanne; van der Wal, Allard C; van Gulik, Thomas M; Storm, Gert; Heger, Michal

    2016-01-19

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) induces tumor cell death by oxidative stress and hypoxia but also survival signaling through activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Since perihilar cholangiocarcinomas are relatively recalcitrant to PDT, the aims were to (1) determine the expression levels of HIF-1-associated proteins in human perihilar cholangiocarcinomas, (2) investigate the role of HIF-1 in PDT-treated human perihilar cholangiocarcinoma cells, and (3) determine whether HIF-1 inhibition reduces survival signaling and enhances PDT efficacy. Increased expression of VEGF, CD105, CD31/Ki-67, and GLUT-1 was confirmed in human perihilar cholangiocarcinomas. PDT with liposome-delivered zinc phthalocyanine caused HIF-1α stabilization in SK-ChA-1 cells and increased transcription of HIF-1α downstream genes. Acriflavine was taken up by SK-ChA-1 cells and translocated to the nucleus under hypoxic conditions. Importantly, pretreatment of SK-ChA-1 cells with acriflavine enhanced PDT efficacy via inhibition of HIF-1 and topoisomerases I and II. The expression of VEGF, CD105, CD31/Ki-67, and GLUT-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry in human perihilar cholangiocarcinomas. In addition, the response of human perihilar cholangiocarcinoma (SK-ChA-1) cells to PDT with liposome-delivered zinc phthalocyanine was investigated under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Acriflavine, a HIF-1α/HIF-1β dimerization inhibitor and a potential dual topoisomerase I/II inhibitor, was evaluated for its adjuvant effect on PDT efficacy. HIF-1, which is activated in human hilar cholangiocarcinomas, contributes to tumor cell survival following PDT in vitro. Combining PDT with acriflavine pretreatment improves PDT efficacy in cultured cells and therefore warrants further preclinical validation for therapy-recalcitrant perihilar cholangiocarcinomas.

  11. Limonene inhibits streptococcal biofilm formation by targeting surface-associated virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramenium, Ganapathy Ashwinkumar; Vijayakumar, Karuppiah; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2015-08-01

    The present study explores the efficacy of limonene, a cyclic terpene found in the rind of citrus fruits, for antibiofilm potential against species of the genus Streptococcus, which have been deeply studied worldwide owing to their multiple pathogenic efficacy. Limonene showed a concentration-dependent reduction in the biofilm formation of Streptococcus pyogenes (SF370), with minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) of 400 μg ml - 1. Limonene was found to possess about 75-95 % antibiofilm activity against all the pathogens tested, viz. Streptococcus pyogenes (SF370 and 5 clinical isolates), Streptococcus mutans (UA159) and Streptococcus mitis (ATCC 6249) at 400 μg ml - 1 concentration. Microscopic analysis of biofilm architecture revealed a quantitative breach in biofilm formation. Results of a surface-coating assay suggested that the possible mode of action of limonene could be by inhibiting bacterial adhesion to surfaces, thereby preventing the biofilm formation cascade. Susceptibility of limonene-treated Streptococcus pyogenes to healthy human blood goes in unison with gene expression studies in which the mga gene was found to be downregulated. Anti-cariogenic efficacy of limonene against Streptococcus mutans was confirmed, with inhibition of acid production and downregulation of the vicR gene. Downregulation of the covR, mga and vicR genes, which play a critical role in regulating surface-associated proteins in Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus mutans, respectively, is yet further evidence to show that limonene targets surface-associated proteins. The results of physiological assays and gene expression studies clearly show that the surface-associated antagonistic mechanism of limonene also reduces surface-mediated virulence factors.

  12. Isolation and amino acid sequence of corticotropin-releasing factor from pig hypothalami.

    OpenAIRE

    Patthy, M; Horvath, J; Mason-Garcia, M; Szoke, B; Schlesinger, D H; Schally, A V

    1985-01-01

    A polypeptide was isolated from acid extracts of porcine hypothalami on the basis of its high ability to stimulate the release of corticotropin from superfused rat pituitary cells. After an initial separation by gel filtration on Sephadex G-25, further purification was carried out by reversed-phase HPLC. The isolated material was homogeneous chromatographically and by N-terminal sequencing. Based on automated gas-phase sequencing of the intact and CNBr-cleaved peptide and on carboxypeptidase ...

  13. Factors affecting the efficiency of the sterile insect release method for tsetse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    Data are reviewed on the levels of sterility, survival and competitiveness of Glossina males after irradiation with various gamma-ray doses delivered in air or nitrogen. A simple population model helps in the choice of the optimum dose. Field studies of mating competitiveness require a measure of the ratio of sterile to fertile males and of sterile to fertile matings, and both ratio estimates will be subject to sampling error. Data on multiple mating of female Glossina are reviewed. There is some degree of precedence for sperm from the first mating but sterile sperm are fully competitive for fertilization and, following the early death of an embryo, the timing of the next ovulation is only advanced to a slight extent. Thus in an isolated population the occurrence or non-occurrence of female polygamy would be of almost no consequence. Where mated females were immigrating into the release area female polygamy would be advantageous. The low recovery potential of tsetse populations is the main reason for thinking them suitable for control by the introduction of sterility. In trying to measure this recovery potential it is important to distinguish it from natural seasonal increase. If natural population fluctuations are studied to detect density dependent effects it is important not to confuse cause with effect. Non-isolation of the 'target' population is almost certainly the most serious obstacle to practical application of the sterile insect release method, and a steady 'rolling forward' of the release area may be a possible solution. (author)